Page 1

Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage PA I D Denver, CO Permit No. 3280

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS 1111 Eighth Street San Francisco CA 94107-2247

San Francisco Oakland

Get CCA news and event info delivered by email each month! Subscribe at www.cca.edu/subscribe Opt out of the paper version of Glance and receive a PDF instead by emailing publications@cca.edu and including “Glance” in the subject line.

CCA is on Facebook! Show your support by adding our official page to your profile and joining the alumni group if you’re an alum!

A publication for the CCA community Spring 2009 Vol. 17, No. 2


TABLE OF CONTENTS

02 Radical Jewelry Ethical metalsmithing at CCA 06 Soil to Studio Rediscovering the Oakland campus with Sasha Duerr

10 Mike Mignola

On Hellboy, and getting back to the drawing board

12 Jennifer Hung

A day in the life at T: The New York Times Style Magazine

14 School News 18 Awards and Accolades 20 Bookshelf 24 Spotlight 26 Advancement News

Gifts and grants, David Sedaris, scholarships

30 2008 Honor Roll of Donors 35 CCA Wattis Institute 36 Faculty Notes 42 Alumni Notes 48 In Memoriam

Photo credits All artworks are reproduced with the kind permission of the artists and/or their representatives, copyright the artists. All images appear courtesy the artists unless noted otherwise: Covers: Alexandra Styc; p. 1: Robert Adler Photography; pp. 2–5: Richard Matzinger; pp. 6, 8 (left and top), and 9: Sasha Duerr; p. 8 (bottom right): Deepa Natarajan; pp. 10–11: courtesy Mike Mignola and Dark Horse Comics Inc.; pp. 12–13: courtesy The New York Times Style Magazine; p. 14 (left): Steven Heller; p. 14 (right): Erica Meade and Kathryn Hautanen; p. 15: Stephen Beal; p. 16 (top left): Pablo Iragorri; p. 16 (bottom left): courtesy Marx & Zavattero, San Francisco; p. 18 (left): Darlene Bouchard; p. 19 (left): courtesy Mark Wolfe Contemporary Art, San Francisco; pp. 24–25: Nikki Ritcher Photography; pp. 28–29: Keanan Evers; p. 34 (right): courtesy the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City; p. 35 (center): courtesy Store, London, and Motive Gallery, Amsterdam; p. 35 (bottom): courtesy Jan Mot, Brussels; p. 37: Karl Petzke; p. 39: Killer Banshee Studios; p. 41 (right grouping, clockwise from top right): Monica Hernandez, Robert Adler Photography, Robert Adler Photography, Karl Petzke, Robert Adler Photography, Robert Adler Photography; p. 43: courtesy Nike; p. 44: courtesy Magnolia Pictures; p. 45 (right grouping): Anke Burger; p. 46: Bruce Damonte; p. 47: Michael Suh; p. 48: Stone and Steccati

Ralph Borge

Harry X. Ford

Painting 1952 Painting/Drawing faculty 1952–1988 Point Reyes Station, California December 30, 2008

CCA President 1959–1984 Las Vegas, Nevada December 29, 2008

Ralph Borge graduated from CCA in 1952 and went on to teach here for 38 years while maintaining his own highly successful art career. He became quite an elder statesman of the Painting and Drawing programs and a mentor to generations of artists, several of whom also became respected professors at CCA. He retired in 1988 and was accorded the rank of professor emeritus. At the time he humorously described his life at the college as “beginning and ending in Room C2 of the Carriage House!” As an artist Mr. Borge pursued his own style, variously described as “social realism,” “magic realism,” and “meticulous realism,” at a time when abstraction was the trend. He was represented at the breakthrough figurative show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1962, where he was praised by Time magazine for possessing “a fascination with texture and a gift for drama.” He participated in many major exhibitions throughout the United States and received many awards, including a Guggenheim fellowship. We remain eternally grateful to Mr. Borge for his many contributions to the college.

Harry X. Ford served as president of the college for 25 years, from 1959 until 1984, leading the school forward in numerous ways and laying a considerable foundation for the amazing growth and accomplishments of recent decades. The Oakland campus changed dramatically during Mr. Ford’s tenure. He led the charge to construct a number of new buildings. Founder’s Hall, Martinez Hall, Treadwell Ceramic Arts Center, Irwin Student Center, and the Shaklee Building were all completed during his presidency. In an interview published in the centennial issue of Glance, Mr. Ford said that his most pivotal efforts as president centered on taking the college in an international direction. Working with Professor of Graphic Design Wolfgang Lederer, he laid the groundwork for the establishment of international exchange programs. With trustee emeritus Leo Helzel he was also involved in the World Print Council, whose sponsorship of international exhibitions carried the college’s name to audiences worldwide. Yet another highlight of his tenure was the establishment of a sister-college relationship with Osaka University of Arts. The links between our institutions are sustained with much appreciation to this day.

Glance is published twice a year by the CCA Communications Department 1111 Eighth Street San Francisco CA 94107-2247 415.703.9542 glance@cca.edu

Glance

Change of address? Please notify the CCA Advancement Office 5212 Broadway Oakland CA 94618-1426 510.594.3779 bjones@cca.edu

Lindsey Westbrook

Opt out of the paper version of Glance and receive a PDF instead by emailing publications@cca.edu and including “Glance” in the subject line.

Assistant Director of Publications

Spring 2009 Volume 17, No. 2

Editor

Director of Publications Erin Lampe

Meghan Ryan

Printed by America Web Inc., Denver By using recycled paper (30 percent postconsumer waste) for this magazine, CCA saved 35 trees, 13,207 gallons of water, 26,000,000 BTUs, 2,185 pounds of solid waste, and 4,029 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions. Canadian Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40065056 Canadian Return Address: DP Global Mail, 4960-2 Walker Road, Windsor, ON, N9A6J3

Contributors Susan Avila Stacen Berg Chris Bliss Camille Gerstel Barbara Jones Kim Lessard Lindsey Lyons Jim Norrena Sarah Owens Brenda Tucker Lindsey Westbrook

Donations in his memory may be sent to Attn. Camille Gerstel, Advancement Office California College of the Arts 5212 Broadway Oakland CA 94618-1426

Design

Please make checks payable to CCA and note that the gift is for the Ralph Borge Scholarship Fund. For more information, call 510.594.3787 or email cgerstel@cca.edu.

Faculty Advisor

CCA Sputnik, a student design team

Bob Aufuldish

Designers Jennifer Hennesy Alexandra Styc


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

ear friends, My first year as CCA’s president has been engaging and exhilarating. I have had the opportunity to visit with alumni and generous supporters, work closely with members of the board, and meet with peers from art schools around the country and the world (including the presidents of several prestigious Chinese art academies). I have also made it a priority to meet often with CCA students, faculty, and staff. I can sense in our college community tremendous energy and enthusiasm for working together to provide our students with the best possible educational experience. Three large projects have occupied us this year: the search for a provost, national accreditation visits, and the development of the 2010−15 strategic plan. I’m pleased to report we have made significant progress on all fronts. On page 14 you can read about Provost Mark Breitenberg, who joined us in February. The WASC (Western Association of Schools and Colleges) and NASAD (National Association of Schools of Art and Design) accreditation teams have completed their campus visits. These peer reviews are important for ensuring the continued high quality of the education we offer, and the positive feedback has been wonderful. And we have had a tremendous rate of participation—more than 600 CCA alumni, students, faculty, parents, trustees, and staff—in the

strategic planning process. We are looking forward to rolling out the new strategic plan this fall. This issue of Glance also features F. Noel Perry (see page 17), the new chair of CCA’s Board of Trustees. Noel is an ardent supporter of the college, especially programs that expand CCA’s role in the larger community. Many, many thanks to outgoing chair Ann Hatch, who helped guide this college through numerous significant events: the centennial celebration, the search for a new president, the expansion of the San Francisco campus, the addition of new programs, and the wildly successful Centennial Campaign. There are still challenges ahead, but CCA remains a place of promise and transformation, and one of the premier choices for young people who believe that creative work can positively and powerfully affect our communities locally, nationally, and internationally. Thank you for your continued interest and support. Sincerely,

Stephen Beal President


ADICAL JEWELRY

Ethical Metalsmithing at CCA

By Lindsey Westbrook

2.

1.

2

3.


“Garbage in, garbage out,” or so they say. But CCA’s students this

past fall turned out some impressive exceptions to the rule. San Francisco was the third city to host the Radical Jewelry Makeover, coordinated by Ethical Metalsmiths in conjunction with multiple Bay Area art schools, galleries, and metalsmithing groups. First came a Bay Area–wide call for donations of unwanted jewelry. “We filled a table with it,” says Curtis Arima, a faculty member in the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program, “not just gold and silver but lots of junk jewelry, earrings without mates, et cetera. The students had a great time picking through everything and selecting parts for their projects.” Every student currently enrolled in a Jewelry / Metal Arts course spent 10 intense days remaking the jewelry into new creations—either collaging existing elements together, or completely melting them down and re-forming them. Their finished pieces were exhibited and sold at Velvet da Vinci, a highly regarded jewelry and metal sculpture gallery in San Francisco. Donors received a discount in proportion to their contributions. Donated items that hadn’t been appropriated were sent on to the next stop on the project’s tour.

4.

SWITCHING UP THE SCRIPT

1. Meghan Williams 2. Chloe Kim 3. Manon Bogerd-Wada 4. Meghan Williams

The Radical Jewelry Makeover was a great way to start the semester, as one student put it, by “switching up the script.” CCA’s program usually emphasizes a balance between concept and craft; weeks might be spent articulating what a new piece will communicate before any physical work begins. The Makeover’s 10-day time frame demanded a dramatic shift in both aesthetics and modus operandi. Many reported feeling a sense of collaboration with unknown jewelers of the past, and with the pieces’ anonymous former owners. Sophomore Jean Saung observes, “I wanted people to recognize some of the parts taken from the old jewelry, and to appreciate the recombination of their past and history to create new meanings. I made a necklace from pieces of an old watch by prying apart the metal wrist links and re-forming them into cubes, which I slipped onto a neck wire. Sometimes

certain parts that used to belong to completely different pieces actually seemed like they were meant to be together. I was also surprised to find myself gravitating toward the costume jewelry and the nonprecious materials. I liked the idea of making something that was not very valuable into something someone would want to keep.” Senior student Victoria Montgomery agrees, “Metalsmiths, just like any other artists, sometimes get stuck in their own ways of creating. That week was a way of breaking free from the rut. It felt like a week dedicated to play. The studio came alive with a constant buzz of artists sharing materials and ideas. “Some of the donated items were over-the-top costume jewelry. They were visually daunting, but once I started simplifying, that’s when my pieces started to take form. For example, the donation box contained endless costume earrings from the 1980s, most missing a mate. I started collecting all the clip-on mechanisms and studs and treated them as links in a large chain. I liked the surprise of something so forgettable as the back of an earring suddenly taking the stage.” MINING THE DRAWERS

Ethical Metalsmiths views this project as a way to get young jewelers thinking early about their materials—first and foremost mined metals such as gold and silver, but also the stuff at the back of people’s drawers that would otherwise become landfill. The organization is working on several aspects of mining reform, including the establishment of standards for certified recycled metal, which can be advertised to consumers who want to buy responsibly. The remains of Malakoff Diggins up in California’s gold country are a vivid reminder of how destructive mining is. According to Ethical Metalsmiths, to mine the gold for one new ring creates a staggering 20 tons of waste rock. Mining is a core industry in many countries, and the arsenic, lead, and other chemicals required to process ore cause serious health problems and pollute the land and the water supply. Not to mention the terrible child labor practices and other human rights violations that

3


RADICAL JEWELRY

6.

5.

8.

4

9.

7.

10.


11.

12.

often plague mining economies. In the United States, hard-rock mining produces more toxic waste than any other industry, and 80 percent of all mined gold is used to produce jewelry. Senior student Russell Larman found great inspiration not only in the project, but also in the organization behind it. “It’s important to remember that the history of our new pieces did not begin with the people who made the donations,” he says. “They were only temporary custodians in a larger life cycle. Objects have an inherent history that often becomes separated from them when they are packaged as consumer products. As consumers of gold, silver, platinum, and gemstones, we have a responsibility to make sure we’re not supporting unethical labor conditions in the communities that make these materials available to us.”

13.

SUSTAINABILIT Y IN METALSMITHING

5. Dean Schneider 6. Seiwon Chung 7. Wonhee Lee 8. Jae Hyun Kim 9. Alexis Myre 10. Erin Kang 11. Anna Adair 12. Deb Lozier 13. Corey Lico Wolffs

Surprisingly, even though gold and silver seem expensive, many jewelers do not recycle their metals. The Radical Jewelry Makeover was an occasion for open dialogue about issues of sourcing, and for Arima to demonstrate to the students how easy it is to melt down gold and silver and reuse them. MFA student Anna Adair remarks, “The project’s focus on sustainability and our ethics as practicing jewelers was, for me, the most important component. It’s not something we can afford to ignore, on either a commercial or a conceptual level. A couple of years ago I wasn’t thinking about my studio practice in these terms, aside from basic recycling and proper disposal of chemicals. Scrutinizing my studio habits was an eye-opener.” Saung echoes, “I had thought about sustainability and reuse for some of my smaller crafts and hobbies, but I never really had the motivation or courage to incorporate the concept into my studio work. My jewelry metal was always just processed metal I could easily buy. Now I am changing that, and I think it was my experience with this project that gave me the courage.”

5


OIL TO STUDIO Rediscovering the Oakland Campus with Sasha Duerr By Lindsey Westbrook

6


Fast food generally isn’t healthy. But it is easy, quick, and cheap. You could say the same about the synthetic chemical dyes that are used to color our clothes. And just as the “slow food” movement first took hold in the Bay Area—where the population is more socially sensitive, health conscious, and willing to experiment—the Bay Area is also fertile ground for the “slow textiles” movement, which promotes sustainable, whole-systems thinking in the realms of textiles and fashion. Sasha Duerr has emerged as a key player in this. She is a lecturer in CCA’s Textiles Program, and a widely known textile artist and designer whose work has been exhibited across the country. She is passionately dedicated to education, specifically the promotion of ecoliteracy—an understanding of the natural world that is grounded in direct experience, an enhanced sense of place. If there’s anything Duerr has plenty of, it’s a sense of place. For her wedding last summer she hand-dyed all of her bridesmaids’ dresses using fennel that she gathered around her neighborhood in the Mission District. She also has gained a new appreciation recently for CCA’s Oakland campus. Despite all the hundreds of days she spent there while earning her MFA in 2001–3, she says she never really saw it until she began working on the Fiber and Dye Walk map, now available at the campus and at www.cca.edu/textiles/sustainability. “I’ve gotten to know that fig tree, for instance, and how it’s been coming back just in the last couple of weeks. I care for this campus now in a way that I didn’t before. There are some crazy plants, like the monkey puzzle tree. We’re pretty sure that many of the specimens here today were intentionally planted in this configuration back in the 1920s by the school’s founder, Frederick Meyer.” The Fiber and Dye Walk map project involved combing the campus with CCA facilities staff and staff from the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley, identifying plants that produce fibers and dyes. The map details the plants’ names, their uses and properties, and the colors and textures that their leaves, fruit, and bark can produce. Did you know that aloe, that standard ingredient in skin lotion, is also a dye producer? “Ivy and juniper are dye producers, too, and all over

the campus. The tannin in native oak can be used as a dye, but it’s also a binder, which means it helps other dyes bind to natural fibers. We even have a maple tree of the type that can be tapped to make maple syrup!” DIGGING IN THE DIRT

The Fiber and Dye Walk map was just one part of Duerr’s fall 2008 Textiles course, titled Soil to Studio. Another major component was the creation of a new plot dedicated to fiber and dye plants at the Botanical Garden in Berkeley. It gave the students experience specifically with nontoxic species that can be safely grown at home, around pets and children. For many it was their first exposure to gardening, and a powerful encounter with the raw materials that eventually become their studio materials. The Botanical Garden has long-standing relationships with Mills College, San Francisco State University, the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and other Bay Area educational institutions, but those courses are all of the “introduction to botany” or “landscape design” sort. To tie in textiles and fashion is an exciting and important next step, and a natural one for the Botanical Garden to take with CCA. Emma Fowler, a Ceramics student, says it wasn’t at all a stretch for her to enroll in the Soil to Studio course. “I transferred here from Baltimore specifically because I wanted to learn about sustainability and the things this environment has to offer. There’s not a lot of discussion about sustainability in ceramics. I’m experimenting with using natural clay and fibers in my work, and staining and dyeing porcelain with natural dyes.” One natural dye producer that our grandmothers’ generation used all the time was onion skins. Onion skins were once essential for Easter egg dyeing, but of course these days it’s all about the little synthetic chemical tablets. “All it takes is one or two generations for our culture literally to forget,” observes Duerr. “I love rediscovering and experimenting with ‘lost’ recipes. Recovering knowledge can be a creative process. I’ve been going to a lot of old bookstores and library sales, finding books from the 1800s called, say, Plants and Wildflowers Every Child Should Know. We’ve become so disconnected from our environment—even places we’re in every day—which makes it really hard to care for it.” 7


SOIL TO STUDIO

8


THE SLOW TEXTILES REVOLUTION

“Food is leading the way in the sustainability revolution,” Duerr continues. “Clothing and architecture are coming next. They occupy a different time frame. Food is immediate; you’re actually putting it in your body.” We don’t consume clothing quite so literally, but the production of textiles uses the same resources that are required to make food: land, water, air, soil. Questions of biodiversity and whole-systems thinking apply equally to both. Both use (literally) tons of toxic fertilizers and chemicals. And also like food, Duerr points out, clothing is not just a basic need, but a mode of personal and cultural expression. “We have to raise awareness of how rich our world is, of how many possibilities there are. You go to the store and there are only three or four different kinds of apples to choose from. With fiber and dye plants it’s the same way. There is so much more out there for us to explore! “I like to pose the question of how we move forward from organic to actually regenerative. How can we use things that are by-products or waste products? What systems are already in place that we can tap into, become participants in? You can glean onion skins at the grocery store, for instance. They don’t cost anything, don’t weigh anything, and would get thrown away otherwise. Similarly, we’re working with the gardeners on CCA’s Oakland campus to collect their clippings to dye fabrics in Textiles courses. And I’ve started an educational nonprofit, the Permacouture Institute, to further spread the word.” Lydia West, a Textiles student, is excited about the possibilities and processes she’s explored in Soil to Studio, even if they are, by definition, slow. “I really wanted some exposure to making my own dyes in an ecofriendly way,” she says. “We do a lot of our own dyeing as part of the program, but not much with natural dyes, I think largely because it’s harder to make them last and you don’t get such a large range of colors. And obviously it takes a lot longer, so it’s harder to fit into a semester. Sasha is the only one teaching this. It involves a lot of experimentation, and it’s fascinating.”

The fall 2008 Soil to Studio course also included local foraging and visits to urban gardens; meetings with pioneers in ecological and regenerative design; hands-on practice with dyeing and felting; upcycling T-shirts with Alabama Chanin; field trips to the Innovative Fashion Council and Ocelot Clothing Company in San Francisco; and a final exhibition at the Botanical Garden in Berkeley that featured student work from all aspects of the course. Many thanks to Deepa Natarajan and Jeff Vadney of the Botanical Garden and Roland Pitschel, CCA’s Oakland facilities supervisor, for their help in identifying plants on the Oakland campus for the Fiber and Dye Walk map. Thanks also to Sputnik graphic designer Jamie Lee for her beautiful work on the map. Many thanks to Christine Manoux, the Botanical Garden’s education program coordinator, for her help in the creation of the new fiber and dye plot there.

9


ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT: MIKE MIGNOLA

TM

SARG in KETTEN MIKE MIGNOLA

Mike Mignola, Illustration 1982 Born in 1960 in Berkeley Lives and works in Los Angeles Current occupation: comic book artist and writer Website: www.hellboy.com Influences at CCA: Vincent Perez, Gary Ruddell 10


Mike Mignola’s iconic red comic-book demon, Hellboy, has been translated into dozens of languages, distributed all over the globe, and turned into two Hollywood feature films starring Ron Perlman (Beauty and the Beast) and directed by Guillermo del Toro. Mignola always knew he wanted to be a comic artist. He began working for DC and Marvel immediately after he graduated from CCA in 1982 with his Illustration degree. In 1994, when the first Hellboy stories were published by Dark Horse Comics, he dove full-time into his own projects and hasn’t looked back since. ON THE APPEAL OF HELLBOY . . .

I think there’s a certain absurdity to Hellboy’s character. He looks like a monster, and (maybe) he’s the beast of the apocalypse, but he’s the most regular, working-stiff kind of guy. Certain aspects of him are based on my father—mostly his physicality. My father is tough and leathery, a cabinetmaker, worked with his hands all his life. I’m not any of those things! So Hellboy ends up having a lot of my personality, but he’s much tougher than me. ON A T YPICAL DAY . . .

I work out of my house, from the time I get up until dinnertime, seven days a week. I’m running a franchise here! I write Hellboy, a couple of different spin-off books, and I’m beginning a series of Victorian occult detective stories that are Hellboy related. I’m trying to narrow it down. I need to stop making up new characters and get back to drawing. My typical day involves less time at the drawing table than I would like. My goal is to get back to what I was doing for the first 15 or 20 years of my career, which was sitting and drawing. That was boring after 15 or 20 years, but now of course I’m wishing I was that bored again. ON THE LURE OF HOLLY WOOD . . .

When you make up something called Hellboy, you don’t do it thinking, “Hey, this could be a movie!” When the film became a reality, it was definitely a side project for me, but it was great. It was a lot of work. We

shot the movies in Eastern Europe, a place I never would have gone on my own. I got to fly first class. I love the director, Guillermo del Toro, and we had a really good time working together. It was a little like going to summer camp—or maybe some kind of military training camp. Doing a lot of press around the movie, the most common question from non-comic journalists has been, “Now that you’ve worked in Hollywood, would you want to direct a movie?” Everybody working in comics is supposed to be itching to get into Hollywood. “Now you’ve got the chance! Now you get to play in the big leagues!” I’ve spent enough time sitting next to a director, I can see how impossibly difficult that job is, plus I’m in no way qualified to do it. Because I own Hellboy and control it, and my publisher lets me do whatever I want, nobody can offer me a better job than the job I already have. I never feel like, “This thing I’m doing now is a stepping-stone to this other thing.” I’m doing exactly what I always wanted to do. I make up stories about monsters and I draw them. ON THE TRANSL ATIONS . . .

Hellboy is all over the place, in China, Japan, France, Russia, the Czech Republic, Italy, Spain, Germany (they have to take the swastikas out, but I understand it’s very popular there), South America, Mexico . . . ON HIS MEMORIES OF CCA . . .

CCA was a long time ago for me, but I do recall my years there as a gigantic growth period. I went into CCA knowing exactly what I wanted to do with my career. But I wanted to get exposure to other things besides illustration. If I could do it over again, actually, I would be a general fine arts major and spend even more time painting and drawing. The Illustration Program at that time was very small, but I did have a teacher, Vincent Perez, who really understood comics and what I was trying to do. Vince introduced me to another CCA student, Steve Purcell, who became a good friend. He had a strip in the CCA school newspaper, Sam & Max: Freelance Police, which became an animated TV show and a computer game. He’s working at Pixar now. The guy is just a genius. 11


ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT: JENNIFER HUNG

Jennifer Hung (Graphic Design 2001) started her new job at T: The New York Times Style Magazine in October 2007 with a massive, looming deadline before she’d even sat down at her desk: just six weeks to populate the magazine’s new website with more than a dozen brand-new films. Not only did the site launch go off without a hitch, but four of those first films were nominated for Webby awards (two won) and two others were nominated for Emmys. The pace hasn’t let up since. The job requires extensive, in-depth knowledge not only of film and motion graphics, but also of directing, producing, curating, and publishing, not to mention the wide worlds of arts and entertainment. Here she talks a little about what her days are like, how her CCA experience led to her exciting new position, and the culture of glamour. ON HER UNIQUE JOB TITLE . . .

1.

Jennifer Hung, Graphic Design 2001 Born in 1975 in Hawaii Lives and works in New York Current occupation: visual editor, T: The New York Times Style Magazine Website: www.nytimes.com/tmagazine Influences at CCA: Jim Kenney, Barry Katz, Barney Haynes, Mark Bartlett 12

I’m the visual editor, which means that instead of assigning stories to writers, I assign films to directors. The New York Times Style Magazine needed somebody to lead their multimedia department, specifically producing and commissioning films for the website, and they didn’t already have someone who could play that role. So they created this job I’m in now. The application process was pretty arduous! For my first interview I had to pitch three film ideas to the magazine’s senior photo editor, with only one week to prepare. I ended up pitching five ideas in the form of a multimedia presentation that covered travel, fashion, style, and food. During that first interview the senior editor introduced me to the creative director and the editor and asked me to present my ideas again, which was both exciting and intimidating.

2.

1. In the New York Times lobby 2. New York Times Style Magazine covers featuring Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise 3. Norbert Schoerner, Soar 4. T exclusive films 5. Javier Bardem, Screen Test


ON MAKING 15 MOVIES IN SIX WEEKS . . .

ON HER CCA EXPERIENCE . . .

The website is intended to complement the concept and philosophy of the magazine but have a life of its own, with films and videos that are influenced by the magazine’s established taste, but brand new and very exclusive to the website. When I got the job I immediately had to produce 15 movies in six weeks! So I reached out to all these artists and directors and designers that I knew, and also some that I didn’t know personally but knew their work, and helped them develop pitches.

I loved CCA. I visited and interviewed at schools on both coasts, and I chose CCA because of the faculty and the curriculum. They have some of the best graphic designers in San Francisco teaching there, and the web was taking off in a big way then, so I got to tailor my own program to include graphic design, motion graphics, film, and video. Everything I learned at school, and all my work experience since, has perfectly translated into the production and editorial work I’m doing now. At CCA the studio program is really well balanced with humanities, and I got such a great, wide exposure to academia that I never would have had at another art school. Barry Katz’s humanities courses introduced me to so many influential theorists and writers and philosophers. Jim Kenney was a major and important influence. He brought so much experience to the classroom and helped me tremendously in forming my path— identifying and pursuing my passion. The projects he assigned were amazing and fun and interesting. I remember one where I made a film, a combination of digital footage and Super-8 footage, with the premise that it was site-specific. I spent a good part of that semester filming at a horse racetrack. I got to know the staff, and they allowed me behind the scenes. That course, and my senior design courses in motion graphics and film, cemented my career direction.

ON PUSHING THE MULTIMEDIA ENVELOPE . . . 3.

4.

The single most exciting thing for me about this job is when we come up with a really original, interesting concept for a movie and it gets people animated and talking. In 2008, during the Sundance Film Festival, I commissioned the indie director Brody Baker to do a series of 12 film shorts called T Takes. It stars some up-and-coming actors, and some others who are better known, like Josh Hartnett, Michael Pitt, and Lukas Haas. It’s very experimental. Instead of sitting down for standard interviews, the actors act out an improvised scene—not related to a movie, and not an excerpt from anything. We filmed all the segments in this cool roadside motel in Utah, and it was snowing. We tried to create interesting, weird, subtle interactions among the characters. ON WORKING AT THE NEW YORK TIMES . . .

Another of our film series is Screen Test, interviews with celebrity actors. We’ve done more than 20 of them now, with Tom Cruise, George Clooney, Javier Bardem, Penelope Cruz. . . . I wouldn’t say I’m fascinated by celebrity or star culture per se, but it’s certainly interesting and exciting! I worked in television for five years before this, at VH1 and Showtime, and my experiences there were more centered on art directing and brand management. 5.

13


SCHOOL NEWS

Staff Appointments

Mark Breitenberg, Provost

Shannon Foshe

Mark Breitenberg, our new provost, comes to CCA from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, where he had been since 1998, most recently as dean of Humanities and Design Sciences. He has an outstanding record of academic leadership and is a proponent of strong humanities and sciences programs in arts education. He played a pivotal role in completing our WASC and NASAD accreditation processes over the last few months, and he is providing critical assistance in finalizing our new five-year strategic plan. Prior to joining Art Center, Breitenberg held teaching positions at Otis College of Art and Design and Swarthmore College. He also worked in the film industry as an independent writer and producer. He holds a PhD in literature and critical theory from the University of California, San Diego, and he completed his undergraduate studies at William and Mary.

Director of Institutional Giving

Sherie Gilmore-Cleveland Assistant Director of Admissions / Coordinator of Diversity Enrollment and Retention

Peter Hendricks Director of International Student Affairs and Programs

Suzanne Raffeld Director of Access and Wellness Services

Kayoko Wakamatsu Dean of Student Educational Support

Read more at www.cca.edu/about/press/2008/breitenberg_provost

The new MBA in Design Strategy program, the first of its kind in the country, is off to a phenomenal start. A highlight of the inaugural fall 2008 semester was the Teach Us Something in Seven Minutes (TUS7M) project, presented to the public on the evening of November 15. It was part of Linda Yaven’s Live Exchange course, which examined the power of communication to generate meaning and sustain collaboration. To a nearly full Timken Lecture Hall, 14 pairs of students engaged the audience to the fullest, leaving them, according to one report, “exhilarated!” Henry Liu and Jennifer Pechacek literally got everyone moving with their explanation of follower versus leader in salsa dancing. Rowan Edwards and Nicole Trautsch broke the ice for their presentation on conquering one’s fear of public speaking by stripping to reveal funny T-shirts custom-printed with advice. Erica Meade and Kathryn Hautanen, reacting against PowerPoint and other ubiquitous-but-not-actually-essential technologies, used a six-foot-tall piece of cloth and a spear-size needle to teach everyone how to sew on a button. To learn more, visit the course blog at www.triplepundit.com/cca

14


CCA President Stephen Beal visited China in October 2008 as part of a small delegation of art school presidents invited to participate in an international symposium on arts education. Other attending presidents came from the Rhode Island School of Design, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the San Francisco Art Institute, and elsewhere. They participated in celebrations marking the 90th anniversary of the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing and the 70th anniversary of the LuXun Academy of Fine Arts in Shenyang. Beal also visited Shanghai University and Fudan University, and he attended the opening of LuXun’s new campus in Dalian. He reported back on the elaborateness of the festivities, the impressive size of the Chinese art schools, and the overwhelmingly positive reception he and the other presidents enjoyed. The trip, he says, was an important first step for productive future collaborations, and it enhanced everyone’s joint commitment to forge stronger partnerships and exchanges where possible. Read a day-by-day account of Beal’s trip at www.cca.edu/about/press/2008/stephen_beal_china

15


SCHOOL NEWS

Art Basel Miami Beach is one of the most important art fairs in the country, and CCA always has a presence there. Every December, more than 250 leading galleries from around the world descend for a week on Miami, presenting work by the artists they represent, frequently with those artists actually in attendance. Complementing this is an exciting program of special exhibitions, parties, and crossover events featuring music, film, architecture, and design. Jens Hoffmann, director of the CCA Wattis Institute, was back as the ringleader of Miami Basel’s Art Perform series. Seasoned collectors and curious passersby gathered around his beachside stage to watch the diverse cast of characters/artists. The highlight was Yoshua Okon’s Art Wrestling, in which “aesthetes” did battle for “spectacular prizes”: “Transform your muscle power into acquisitions power!” Hoffmann was described in Art Newspaper’s special fair edition as a “wiry supercurator” and by Art Basel Miami Beach magazine as a “veritable rock star.” For the Surface magazine closing party, Yves Béhar (Industrial Design chair) created an amphibious, floating pool installation for Plunge, a rooftop club at South Beach’s luxury Gansevoort South hotel. John McCracken’s (Painting 1962) sculptural contribution to the fair was highlighted by Ken Johnson in the December 5 New York Times. Libby Black’s (MFA 2001) Work Out installation, presented as part of PULSE Miami with her gallery, Marx & Zavattero, created quite a buzz. It included an Hermès punching bag, a Chanel lifting belt, Gucci boxing gloves, a Louis Vuitton gym bag, and a dozen other faux high-end workout items.

Patrick Dintino (MFA 2001), Kota Ezawa (Media Arts faculty), David Huffman (Painting/Drawing faculty, MFA 1998), Jordan Kantor (Painting/Drawing faculty), Don Porcella (Painting/Drawing 2001), and Michele Pred (Interdisciplinary Fine Arts 1990) were among the many other CCA faculty and alumni who showed work at Art Basel Miami Beach.

Jim Allison, Media Arts Learn, Create, Live Megan Gilman, Graphic Design Versus Reality Check J. P. Kelly, Individualized Major 7 Semesters in 90 Seconds Grant Kolton, Animation Ubiquitous Uniquitous

1. Justin Yasgoor, Furniture Release Watch all five at www.cca.edu/students/raw

2. 1. Jens Hoffmann, left, arm wrestles the artist Christian Jankowski, right, while emcee Tom Colucci looks on 2. Libby Black, Work Out, 2008 3. J. P. Kelly, 7 Semesters in 90 Seconds, 2008

16

CCA’s fall 2008 R.A.W. (Real Artists at Work) student video competition generated numerous excellent entries and five winners. The challenge: Create a short interpretive film, no longer than two minutes, that captures the CCA experience from a student’s perspective. The talented $500 winners were

3.


F. Noel Perry takes the helm as chair of CCA’s Board of Trustees on May 1. He is the founder and managing director of Baccharis Capital Inc., a private venture capital firm in Menlo Park. He is a founding director and former vice-chair of Conservation International; the founder of Next 10, a nonpartisan organization working at the intersection of the economy and the environment to educate and empower Californians; chair of the California Leadership Council of the New America Foundation; and a trustee of the Woodside Community Foundation. Perry is the founder of 100 Families Oakland, a neighborhood socialchange art project that runs programs in partnership with CCA’s Center for Art and Public Life. He also developed the California Initiative at CCA, a three-year program aimed at confronting the major challenges facing Californians over the next 20 years. Through academic courses, investigative studios, and public programs, students and faculty across disciplines have been examining, researching, and developing strategies for such issues as global warming, sustainability, government, and education. Perry has served on CCA’s board since September 2005. He is also an artist. What excites you about this job? The CCA community is wonderful! The focus is on the students—young creative people who arrive with ambition and promise. I want to help make their educational experience the best it can be. I am very excited to be working with President Beal. He’s visionary and pragmatic, with a real sense of public purpose. I think he’s the perfect leader for CCA and will build on the school’s many successes. The trustees are passionate and committed advocates for the college. I am inspired by the leadership of five former chairs who are still sitting at the table. What are your top priorities as chair? First and foremost, I will be working with the management team to make sure CCA weathers the country’s financial meltdown. We must stay focused on maintaining and enhancing the student experience while being mindful of our fiscal responsibilities.

Second, I will help in developing and implementing the new strategic plan. I have been so impressed with the process thus far, especially because it has involved so many stakeholders. They say the more inclusive the process, the more successful the plan will be. Third, I will focus on fundraising, particularly for scholarships but also for programs and facilities. Fourth, I will continue to support the college’s role in the larger community. I first became involved with CCA through 100 Families Oakland. I believe that by keeping a vital connection to the community, CCA can make a difference in the world. What would you tell a prospective donor about CCA? CCA is one of the most exciting colleges in America, and it is on the rise. We have a solid management team and tremendous faculty who are training the creative leaders of tomorrow—problem solvers who will make important and lasting contributions to society. CCA students are thinking beyond themselves. How would you describe CCA 10 years from now? I hope to see expanded state-of-the art facilities, more student housing, stronger programs, and a more diverse community. I would like to see more connections to Silicon Valley, in terms of both fundraising and tapping into its entrepreneurial spirit. CCA will continue to gain national recognition for its academic excellence.

17


AWARDS & ACCOLADES

Walter Kitundu

Rob Epstein

Hanh Nguyen

Furniture faculty member Walter Kitundu was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2008. Known as “genius grants,” MacArthur Fellowships include $500,000 in unrestricted, nostrings-attached support over five years. The recipients work across a broad spectrum of endeavors, including science, medicine, the humanities, and the visual and performing arts. They are selected for their exceptional creativity and potential to make important future contributions in their respective fields. Kitundu is the Wornick Distinguished Visiting Professor of Wood Arts at CCA for the 2008–9 academic year. His furniture studio courses are focusing on works that utilize natural phenomena such as wind and ocean tides. Kitundu is also an instrument builder, photographer, and music composer. One of his most recent projects is a series of hand-built record players powered by natural forces, which he calls phonoharps.

Two-time Academy Award winner and Media Arts cochair Rob Epstein was presented with the Pioneer Award in December 2008 by the International Documentary Association for his groundbreaking work in film. In November, Epstein’s Oscar-winning The Times of Harvey Milk was presented at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and a review in the New Yorker commented on its “aching beauty.” The film was the inspiration for Gus Van Sant’s Milk, starring Sean Penn. Epstein’s current projects include production on the feature film Howl, starring James Franco, and the television special Free Love: The Sexual Revolution of 1969, which will air on the History Channel this summer.

Current student Hanh Nguyen has had her documentary film The Bush Man accepted to three film festivals (and counting!): the Zero Film Festival in Los Angeles, the San Francisco Independent Film Festival, and the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival in Missoula, Montana. This is a wonderful accomplishment, especially for an undergraduate, and we are all extremely proud! Nguyen’s film is about the man at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco who hides behind tree branches and pops out to scare passersby. She made it as part of the Media Arts course Fundamentals of Directing.

Visit www.kqed.org/spark to watch an eight-minute segment on Kitundu and his work

18


Yee Jan Bao

Stephanie Sandstrom

Kevin Wada & Owen Smith

Painting/Drawing faculty member Yee Jan Bao recently received a $25,000 individual support grant from the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation in honor of his status as a mature artist—one who has spent 20 years or more in painting, sculpture, or printmaking—who has dedicated his life to his work. Bao was one of only 12 artists selected from a pool of 482 international applicants. He has previously received prestigious artist grants from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Current Fashion Design student Stephanie Sandstrom was a runner-up in the 2008 “Chuck It or Keep It” student competition at the Fashioning the Future global summit in London. Her entry was One Night Stands, recycled (and recyclable) polypropylene shoes for those occasions when women want shoes for one-time use but hate to buy a pair and then donate them, or throw them away. One Night Stands are made domestically (reducing the carbon footprint associated with shipping) and come with a prepaid mailer for sending them back to be made into a new pair. The competition garnered international attention in Vogue magazine and was judged by members of the fashion industry elite, including representatives from the London Times and the popular British Clothes Show.

The art and design journal Creative Quarterly has honored Illustration student Kevin Wada and Illustration faculty member Owen Smith with silver medals in the student and professional categories, respectively. Both were featured in the magazine’s March 2009 issue. Wada’s winning piece originated in one of his studio courses, where the assignment was to create a movie poster. Smith’s winning entry was one of eight large-scale kiosk posters inspired by Dashiell Hammett’s famous novel The Maltese Falcon, which were installed along Market Street in summer 2008 for the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Art on Market Street program. Smith has had his work featured on 17 New Yorker covers, and also in the pages of Sports Illustrated, Time, Rolling Stone, and numerous other national magazines.

Yee Jan Bao, War, 2008

19


BOOKSHELF

Library of Dust by David Maisel Chronicle Books, 2008 Hardcover, 108 pages, $80

These somber and beautiful photographs by David Maisel (MFA 2006) depict canisters containing the cremated remains of the unclaimed dead at an Oregon psychiatric hospital. The metal canisters date as far back as the 19th century. They have undergone chemical reactions over the years, and brilliant white, green, and blue blooms of corrosion cover their surfaces. The dramatically oversize book is designed by Bob Aufuldish (Graphic Design faculty).

Manufractured: The Conspicuous Transformation of Everyday Objects by Steven Skov Holt and Mara Holt Skov Chronicle Books, 2008 Hardcover, 144 pages, $35

This catalog by Steven Skov Holt and Mara Holt Skov (both Industrial Design faculty) accompanies an exhibition they curated in fall 2008 at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon. The featured artists, craftspeople, and designers engage in “conspicuous transformation,” creating works that combine manufactured products (such as athletic shoes, paper plates, and plastic army soldiers) with traditional craft techniques (such as weaving, crochet, collage, and assemblage).

20

Remembering Yankee Stadium: An Oral and Narrative History of “The House That Ruth Built” designed by Think Studio (John Clifford and Herb Thornby) Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2008 Hardcover, 240 pages, $45

This oversize book, released to coincide with the closure of New York’s venerable Yankee Stadium, is designed by John Clifford (Graphic Design 1997) and Herb Thornby (Graphic Design 1998), principals of Think Studio. Its decade-by-decade account, ranging from 1923 to 2008, includes hundreds of historical photographs and vivid, first-person reminiscences by entertainers and politicians, broadcasters and sportswriters, players and fans. The author, Harvey Frommer, is a leading authority on baseball history.

I Name Me Name by Opal Palmer Adisa Peepal Tree Press, 2008 Hardcover, 222 pages, $19.95

Opal Palmer Adisa (Community Arts and Writing faculty) uses the voices of iconic figures past and present to explore a wide range of subjects: the senility of a beloved grandmother, for instance, or Michael Jackson’s racial transformations. The mode continually shifts, from dramatic monologue to prose poem to prophetic rant, to convey an African Jamaican American woman’s radical consciousness of gender, race, and geography; the spiritual and the sensual; the social, the political, and the historical.


Half-Life of a Dream: Contemporary Chinese Art from the Logan Collection designed by Bob Aufuldish San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and UC Press, 2008 Hardcover, 144 pages, $35

This SFMOMA exhibition catalog surveying China’s art and cultural scene, post–Tiananmen Square, is designed by Bob Aufuldish (Graphic Design faculty). It features the artists Ai Weiwei, Fang Lijun, Li Songsong, Liu Xiaodong, Zhang Huan, and others, whose work conveys a sense of the shadows and masks that have haunted China’s collective psyche during its rapid, and sometimes troubled, modernization.

The Art of Participation: 1950 to Now designed by Volume Inc. (Eric Heiman and Adam Brodsley) San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Thames & Hudson, 2008 Hardcover, 212 pages, $39.95

Eric Heiman (Graphic Design faculty, Graphic Design 1996) and Adam Brodsley of Volume Inc. are the designers of this SFMOMA exhibition catalog, which overviews the rich and varied history of participatory art from early happenings and performances to current practices that demand audience interaction. As Web 2.0—browsing, sharing, collecting, and producing—permeates our world, this timely project looks at the ways in which both artists and viewers have approached “open” works of art.

500 Chairs by Craig Nutt Lark, 2008 Paperback, 408 pages, $24.95

Of the 290 artists and designers featured here (hailing from the United States, Canada, the UK, Australia, Japan, and Europe), 16 have strong connections with CCA, including Christine Lee (First Year faculty), current students Jeff Michael Weathers, Benjamin Harth, and Jonny Doan, and numerous alumni and former visiting faculty. The lavishly illustrated book covers its subject from all angles: the traditional to the contemporary, the functional to the artistic, the bizarre to the purposely mundane. The chairs are selected by studio furniture artist Craig Nutt, who also offers a brief but thoughtful essay on human seating.

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: International Terminal, San Francisco International Airport by Anne-Catrin Schultz Axel Menges Editions, 2008 Hardcover, 60 pages, $49

Anne-Catrin Schultz (Architecture faculty) takes a close-up look at the San Francisco airport’s new international terminal. It is a striking symbol of the city’s status as the West Coast’s gateway to the Pacific Rim and a model for other urban airports with limited developable land. Its position above several lanes of traffic requires a 380-foot span between the central columns, making the building a bridge both literally and metaphorically. Its roof trusses evoke the rolling Bay Area hills and the shapes of birds in flight.

21


BOOKSHELF

22

The Procession of Mollusks

Barf Manifesto

by Eric Olson Astrophil Press, 2009 Paperback, 240 pages, $15

by Dodie Bellamy Ugly Duckling Presse, 2008 Paperback, 32 pages, $7

Twin Peaks meets The Living Planet (with a dash of Groundhog Day) in this debut novel by Eric Olson (Writing and Literature faculty). In Newport Bay, a once-quiet little sea town famous for its annual March of the Mollusks festival, there has been a series of murders where the victims reappear and cause trouble. A reporter with a dark and peculiar past must work with his ex-wife and a highly intelligent boy to solve the mystery. Nothing is stable: Man becomes mollusk, hand becomes camera, life becomes strange.

Dodie Bellamy (Writing faculty) makes a compelling case for the virtues of the personal, messy, digressive, and awkward in experimental writing. In a diptych of academic “talks” that mirror back on themselves, her discussion ranges from her mother’s death to the “snooty pockets” of the MLA to the embarrassment of clogging someone else’s toilet. “Sophistication is conformist, deadening,” she says. “Let’s get rid of it.”

Action Kylie

The Snow Prince

by Kevin Killian ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni, 2008 Paperback, 128 pages, $15

by Jon Dodge Cold Tree Press, 2008 Hardcover, 112 pages, $18.95

The poet and critic Wayne Koestenbaum calls this latest effort from Kevin Killian (Writing faculty) “a book I will turn to when I want to remember that literature can regenerate authenticity as well as renege it. Killian plays with multiple rhetorics and codes, all in the pursuit of his own school of Action Poetry, in which I wish quickly to enroll.” Killian is also an authority on the American poet Jack Spicer, and he coedited the 508-page My Vocabulary Did This to Me: The Collected Poetry of Jack Spicer, recently published by Wesleyan University Press.

Jon Dodge (Painting 1969) sets this Christmas tale of family, misadventure, and moral courage in rural New Hampshire in 1906. A young brother and sister, their pony, and their new sleigh stray from warmth and comfort to encounter many challenges as well as a strange cast of characters and events that leave them forever changed.


CCA Publications

(visit www.cca.edu for ordering info)

Architecture for a Hybrid Landscape: Proposals for the California Delta by Katherine Rinne and students CCA, 2009 Hardcover, 112 pages, $25

Capp Street Project: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz by Beatriz Santiago Muñoz, Julieta González, and Claire Fitzsimmons CCA, 2008 Paperback, 54 pages, $12

The 11 students in Katherine Rinne’s (Architecture faculty) recent studio course were asked to design a hypothetical new research and interpretive center in the California Delta, a complex and fragile region that faces an uncertain future. They visited the Delta numerous times and came to love its landscape and small towns. This full-color book showcases their innovative designs, essays, artworks, and photographs. It is designed by Leah Hickey and Tim Gruneisen of Sputnik, CCA’s award-winning undergraduate graphic design studio.

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz was the fall 2008 Capp Street Project artist in residence at the CCA Wattis Institute. Working with local anarchists and radical leftists, she explored how anarchism has evolved to encompass a variety of strategies, from tree-dwelling protests to veganism to open-source computing. The final results of her project included a new film, titled Flowers of Antimony, and this full-color catalog, the first-ever monograph on her work. The book is designed by Jon Sueda (Graphic Design faculty).

Eleven Eleven Vol. 5

The Wizard of Oz

by CCA’s 2008 MFA in Writing students CCA, 2008 Paperback, 214 pages, $10

by Jens Hoffmann and Rebecca Loncraine CCA, 2008 Hardcover, 76 pages, $25

This annual journal of literature and art provides a forum for risk, experimentation, and lively exchange among writers and artists. This is the largest issue yet, with writings by 42 students in the MFA Program in Writing; images by Kirsten Stolle; and Open End Kiss, a project by MFA students emphasizing Social Practice. It is edited by Hugh Behm-Steinberg (Writing faculty) and students David Aloi, Diane Berry, Autumn Heath, Michael Pakes, and Laura Quezadaz. Volume 6, the first electronic-only issue, is also available now at www.elevenelevenjournal.com.

The CCA Wattis Institute’s fall 2008 exhibition was inspired by The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum’s classic children’s novel. This full-color catalog includes insightful essays by Wattis Director Jens Hoffmann and Baum biographer Rebecca Loncraine, plus a text on each of the 22 artists in the show, who included Robert Bechtle, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Carsten Höller, Glenn Ligon, Steve McQueen, Rivane Neuenschwander, and Cerith Wyn Evans. The catalog is designed by Jon Sueda (Graphic Design faculty).

23


SPOTLIGHT

Kay Kimpton Walker, left, and Karen Justis, right, at the opening of The Wizard of Oz at the Wattis Institute, September 2008 Above Wornick scholar Willem Evett-Miller, left, and his parents at the reception for the 10th annual Ronald and Anita Wornick Award, October 2008 Below Anita and Ronald Wornick, left, and Donald Fortescue, center, with past award recipients at the reception for the 10th annual Ronald and Anita Wornick Award, October 2008 24

Above Walter Kitundu, recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and CCA’s Wornick Distinguished Visiting Professor of Wood Arts, at the reception for the 10th annual Ronald and Anita Wornick Award, October 2008 Below Tracy Herrick, left, Jessica Coccia, center, and Maie Herrick, right, at the Scholarship Dinner, October 2008; Jessica received the Alan Herrick Memorial Scholarship and the William R. Hearst Foundation Endowed Scholarship


Elizabeth McMillan, left, and Breanne Bumanlag, right, at the Scholarship Dinner, October 2008; Breanne received the Carmen M. Christensen Endowed Scholarship

Above, left to right Jens Hoffmann, Patty Fitzpatrick, Stephen Beal, Nancy Forster, Mary Zlot, and Diane Frankel at the opening of The Wizard of Oz at the Wattis Institute, September 2008

Ana Mason, left, and Susan Shawl, right, at the Scholarship Dinner, October 2008; Ana received the Louis Shawl Graphic Design Endowed Scholarship

Below, left to right Dorothy Saxe, Thomas and Johanna Baruch, Dare Michos, Themis Michos, Lauren Ford, and Diane Frankel at the opening of The Wizard of Oz at the Wattis Institute, September 2008

25


GIFTS & GRANTS

CCA extends warm thanks to all donors who made gifts in 2008. Last year, the community came together to complete the Centennial Campaign, raising $27.5 million for facilities, endowment, and new programs. (A full report appeared in the last issue of Glance.) Throughout the campaign, CCA continued fundraising for the Annual Fund, which supports core operations. In the following pages you will find our Honor Roll thanking donors to Annual Fund programs in 2008. We offer special appreciation to the following lead donors.

Annual Fund Gifts Annual Fund gifts are those CCA may use to meet any of its priority needs. In 2008, $328,000 was given for this purpose by trustees, alumni, parents, faculty, staff, and friends. Mildred Patterson remembered CCA with an estate gift of $13,000. Miranda Leonard renewed her gift of $10,000, and Marion Stroud-Swingle renewed support with a gift of $10,900. The following trustees gave to the Annual Fund in 2008: Simon Blattner, Tim Brown, Tecoah Bruce (BFA 1974), Diane Christensen, Susan Cummins, Nancy Forster, Ann Hatch, Mrs. Charles Hine, George Jewett (BArch 1996), Raoul Kennedy, Byron Kuth, Anthony Meier, Lorna Meyer, Timothy Mott, Steven Oliver, F. Noel Perry, Mark Petersen, Shepard Pollack, George Saxe, Barclay Simpson, Alan Stein, Judith Timken, Kay Kimpton Walker, Dr. Calvin Wheeler, Carlie Wilmans, Ronald Wornick, and Mary Zlot.

Student Scholarships Gump’s organized an event raising $50,000 for the Gump’s Endowed Scholarship. The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation awarded $50,000 to endow a new scholarship. Patrick Coyne (BFA 1983) and his mother, Jean, renewed their gift of $20,000 to the Richard and Jean Coyne Family Foundation Illustration Scholarship. Dean of Design Michael Vanderbyl (BFA 1968) gave $14,600 to the Michael Vanderbyl Design Scholarship. Byron Meyer gave $10,000 to the Byron Meyer Scholarship in Graduate Fine Arts. Drue and Arthur Gensler added $10,000 to the Gensler Family Foundation Scholarship. Fong and Chan Architects added $10,000 to their undergraduate

26

scholarship. Ann Morhauser (BFA 1979) gave $10,000 to the Annieglass Scholarship.

Sponsored Studios and Academic Programs Mrs. Frances Bowes renewed support with a gift of $39,300 for a second sponsored studio. Intel gave $30,000 for a graduate design studio. Build Inc. gave $25,000 for an architecture studio. STUDIOS Architecture gave $12,220 to support a publication. CCA students are participating with Santa Clara University students in the Solar Decathlon, in which 20 teams compete to design and build the best solar-powered house. CCA received $25,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy and $10,000 from Pacific Gas and Electric Company for this project.

Public Programs The Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation renewed its lead support for the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts with a grant of $150,000. Fourteen members of the Curator’s Forum gave a total of $70,000 for Wattis Institute exhibitions. Robin Wright and Ian Reeves gave $15,000 to sponsor Paul McCarthy’s Low Life Slow Life: Part 2. Etant donnés and Outset Contemporary Art Fund each gave $10,000. Grants for the Arts / San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund awarded $64,000 for San Francisco campus public programs. The Center for Art and Public Life received renewed funding of $150,000 from the Nathan Cummings Foundation. The National Endowment for the Arts awarded $40,000 and the San Francisco Foundation pledged $30,000 to the Center. CCA thanks all of its generous supporters in 2008!


An Evening with David Sedaris October 29 to Benefit Scholarships

Creating CCA’s Future: The Founders Legacy Society

David Sedaris, best-selling author and NPR commentator, will appear at a special benefit reading for CCA on October 29 at the Veterans’ Memorial Auditorium at Marin Center. The evening will include a reading from new and unpublished materials, a book signing, and, for leadership donors to the event, a special cocktail reception with the author. Sedaris’s sardonic wit and incisive social critiques have made him one of America’s preeminent humor writers. He is the author of Barrel Fever and Holidays on Ice as well as the best-selling collections of personal essays When You Are Engulfed in Flames, Naked, Me Talk Pretty One Day, and Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim. His original radio pieces can be heard on National Public Radio’s This American Life. “We are thrilled to have David come to the Bay Area to help us raise funds for student scholarships,” said CCA President Stephen Beal. “I have known him for many years, and he is not only one of the funniest and smartest writers working today, but also a former art school student. With this event we hope to raise $100,000 in much-needed financial aid to support talented young artists, architects, designers, and writers who are earning their degrees at CCA.” David Sedaris is graciously waiving his speaking fee to ensure that the maximum amount generated from ticket sales, leadership gifts, and sponsorships will go directly to students in need.

By including CCA in their estate plans, Founders Legacy Society donors become dedicated supporters and partners in helping CCA educate future artists, architects, designers, and writers. The Founders Legacy Society serves two objectives: to honor those who make deferred gifts that secure the ongoing artistic vitality and financial security of the college, and to encourage others to remember CCA in their financial plans. These planned gifts are of the utmost importance to the college, forming the foundation of its endowed support. Members receive many special benefits, but perhaps most important is the knowledge that their personal legacy will enrich the lives of students and sustain our community for generations to come.

General-admission tickets to the reading and book signing are $35 and are available through the Marin Center box office (415.499.6800) or at Ticketmaster.com. The book signing is sponsored by Book Passage. Trustee Kay Kimpton Walker will chair a special pre-reading cocktail party for donors of $250 or more. Attendance is limited; for tickets please contact CCA’s Advancement Office at 510.594.3604 or jmckay@cca.edu. Event sponsorships are available for donations of $5,000 and $10,000. Please call 510.594.3604 or email jmckay@cca.edu for more info.

Privileges of membership include • invitations to collegewide events, private receptions, and exhibition previews • permanent listing on donor walls at both CCA campuses (at your discretion) • a 20 percent discount on Extended Education course tuition • exhibition catalogs from the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts

Bequests are just one type of planned gift (a gift that will be distributed sometime in the future) that you can make to the college. CCA is pleased to include in the Founders Legacy Society all those who have named the college as a beneficiary of their will, charitable remainder trust, lead trust, annuity, life insurance policy, or the remainder of a retirement fund. Our Advancement Office is happy to provide information on the different kinds of planned gifts and their various tax advantages. Please let us know of your estate gift, or find out more about planned giving, by contacting Camille Gerstel, individual giving director, at 510.594.3787 or cgerstel@cca.edu. We respect all requests for anonymity, and all inquiries are kept strictly confidential.

27


SCHOLARSHIPS

The Gift of Education: Scholarships at CCA Each year more than 500 alumni, friends, faculty, and staff make gifts to student scholarships at CCA. Every gift, large and small, helps promising students earn their degrees and pursue their dreams of working in art, design, architecture, and writing. This year we face a critical challenge. Many CCA students have hardships at home that may put their education in jeopardy. Due to the economic downturn, requests for financial aid are growing at the same time that CCA is experiencing a significant loss in endowed scholarship revenue. The college is committed to its students and wants to ensure that each talented individual with the drive to succeed is able to complete their education, regardless of their ability to pay. That is why we ask you to make a gift to CCA scholarships today. It is one of the best investments you could make in this uncertain market, as it will pay the highest of dividends: the opportunity for young people to fulfill their boundless potential. To make a tax-deductible donation, please contact Barbara Jones in the Advancement Office at 510.594.3779 or bjones@cca.edu, and she will be happy to help you. We are pleased to introduce you to a few of the students who received scholarship support this year.

28

Clive Hacker, Graphic Design

Vanessa Flores, Writing and Literature

CCA Alumni and Friends Design Scholarship

Walter J. Menrath Scholarship

“I had heard a lot about CCA’s great reputation, and my brother Trevor had also attended. I came to visit and knew this was the right atmosphere for me.” Clive loves the feeling of community at CCA, and the experience of working with so many teachers who are also working artists. “Nathan Lynch, one of my first teachers here, was very inspirational and introduced me to new ideas. Mark Fox helped me realize the necessary work ethic.” Clive hopes to work as a graphic designer and someday start his own company. To donors he says, “Getting a scholarship made it possible for me to attend CCA. Thank you so much. Not everyone has the opportunity to attend an art school like this. You make it possible for talented individuals to make something of themselves.”

Vanessa came to CCA specifically for its writing program and the interdisciplinary setting it provides for her work. “I love CCA because of the wonderful connections I am able to have with the faculty and because the school is so small and intimate. I love the personal environment in the classroom. I feel like my opinion matters.” Scholarship support lifted financial worries from Vanessa’s shoulders and gave her the freedom to concentrate on her studies. After graduation, she plans to attend graduate school.


Merav Tzur, Individualized Major

Justin Olerud, Painting

Annie Frykholm, Ceramics

Albertina “Nina” Zanzi Endowed Scholarship

Vivian Bolton Scholarship

Arthur E. Nelson Memorial Scholarship

Merav, who grew up in Israel, dreamed of a CCA education, but with her family unable to help financially, she thought it would be impossible. “My portfolio was well received, and I was encouraged to apply for financial aid. The interview was almost like a fantasy.” With graduation approaching, Merav is grateful for the time she’s spent at CCA. “All the studio teachers were absolutely exceptional. Every moment was worth it.” CCA introduced her to new ideas and challenged her to expand the scope of her performance-based installation work. She has been accepted to the graduate art programs at UC Berkeley, UCLA, and Columbia.

Justin has been immensely inspired by CCA’s location. “The setting is gorgeous, and perfect for my art. I’ve met so many different creative people who have impacted me, and helped me formulate ways of viewing the world. I was inspired by each painting teacher’s different outlook on things. They have such varied aesthetics, and yet they’re all about hard work. They want you to paint as much as possible, and they provide a great support system.” Scholarships helped Justin afford CCA. “I took out fewer loans and was able to support myself. I think everyone should have a college education, but not everyone can afford it without help. It’s not just the money, although that’s very much appreciated. A scholarship is special, and helps a student feel important.”

“I chose CCA for its reputation in both ceramics and photography.” Annie’s ceramic work is heavily influenced by textiles and “the small traditional craft objects that are fading away.” Annie enjoys the close community at CCA and being in a studio environment where she can share ideas with other students. She has been inspired by CCA’s emphasis on balancing theory with craft, and she sees her future work moving toward the realms of theory and writing. Scholarships have made it all possible. “My parents aren’t able to help. I take out loans and work two jobs to cover expenses, and it’s still a struggle. Without scholarships I just wouldn’t be here. Your gifts are hugely appreciated, and I can’t say thank you enough. I’m grateful that people are willing to make the investment to help artists achieve something and change the future.”

29


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

New gifts and pledges from the following donors were recorded between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Alumni are identified by actual or expected year of graduation, when the date is known.

Michael Vanderbyl (1968), Vanderbyl Design Ms. Carlie Wilmans Ronald and Anita Wornick Robin Wright and Ian Reeves Dr. Janice H. Zakin and   Mr. Jonathan N. Zakin Mary and Harold Zlot

INDIVIDUAL DONORS $5,000–$9,999 $10,000+

Kimberly and Simon Blattner Mrs. Frances F. Bowes Tim Brown Tecoah Bruce (1974, 1979) and   Thomas Bruce C. Diane Christensen and Mr. Jean Pierret Richard and Jean Coyne Family Foundation Nancy and Pat Forster Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gensler Marion E. Greene Ann Hatch and Paul Discoe Brenda Jewett and   George F. Jewett III (1996) Martha and Raoul Kennedy Ms. Kay Kimpton and Mr. Sandy Walker Byron D. Kuth and Elizabeth Ranieri Miranda Leonard Tony and Celeste Meier Byron R. Meyer Lorna Meyer and Dennis Calas Ms. Ann Morhauser (1979) Nancy and Steven Oliver Outset Contemporary Art Fund Mildred N. Patterson* 2001 Trust F. Noel Perry Shepard Pollack and Paulette Long Rotasa Foundation Dorothy and George Saxe Barclay and Sharon Simpson Mr. and Mrs. Alan L. Stein Ms. Marion Stroud-Swingle Judy and Bill Timken The Toby Fund 30

Johanna and Tom Baruch Susan and Bill Beech Gretchen and John Berggruen Alexandra Bowes and Stephen Williamson Dr. Thomas and Janice Boyce Ms. Frish Brandt (1979) and   Mr. Jeffrey Fraenkel Warren and Chris Hellman Mrs. Charles H. Hine Carol and Richard Hyman Ellen Klutznick Mrs. Sarajane Miller-Wheeler and   Dr. Calvin B. Wheeler Sally and Robert Nicholson   (parents of Bobby Nicholson) Mary and Andy Pilara Edna Reichmuth* (1939) Trust Mr. Bob Rennie and Mr. Carey Fouks Mr. Paul Sack and Ms. Shirley R. Davis C. Ross Sappenfield and Laura Brugger Lisa Schiff Estate of Lundy Siegriest (1949) Dr. and Mrs. Norman C. Stone Laura and Joe Sweeney Mrs. Roselyne C. Swig Ms. Jennifer N. Wilmans Mr. Vincent R. Worms $1,000–$4,999

Ms. Ursula K. Auerbach (1977) Mr. Robert Bechtle (1954) and   Ms. Whitney Chadwick Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Bohn Jr. Amanda A. Bryan (1984)

John and Florence Bryan Lorne and Rochelle Buchman Penny and Peter Chen Gladys M. Eaton Ms. Lisa W. Esherick Richard and Lorrie Greene Tracy and Maie Herrick Wan Jou Family Foundation Ms. Susan Landor Keegin Ms. Elizabeth Jason Kibbey Jean Krakower and Arthur Krakower (2001) Ms. Roxanne Kupfer Gyöngy Laky and Thomas Layton Brian Douglas Lee and Wendy Szeto Lee Mr. Fred M. Levin and Ms. Nancy Livingston Carole and James Looke Frederick Loomis (2004) George H. Mead III (1976, 1978),   The H. T. Mead Foundation James and Janice Meeder Dr. Thomas L. Nelson and   Dr. Wylda H. Nelson Mr. Peter Read Andrea Schwartz and Steve Dolan Büldan Seka Nancy and Steve Selvin Kenneth W. and Cherie Swenson Tito & Sandra Tiberti Foundation Ying and Chinying Wang Mr. Peter B. Wiley and Ms. Valerie M. Barth Mrs. Alfred S. Wilsey Anonymous $500–$999

Mr. David Alvarado Jacob Belsky (1965) Sally and Philip Chapman Paul and Susan Clarkson Mrs. Lucy Congdon Hanson (1995) Don Crewell Ms. Ludell Deutscher Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Dilday II (1974) Mr. Leroy Dutro (1941)

Mrs. Dianne D. Felton James M. Fowler (1969) and   Sui Hen Fung Fowler Norval L. Gill (1937) Ms. Mikae Hara (1986) Ms. Tania Holland (1993) Diana and Robert Laufer Mr. and Mrs. Peter Loewy Ms. Jamie L. Millican (1981) Richard Plishker and   Bettyann Plishker (1978) Mr. John M. Sanger Bruce and Dianne Spaulding Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Vartain Randy L. Wilson Anonymous (2)

Gregory and Elaine Miller Jack Mills (1964) Ms. Dorothy R. Mondavi Mr. Alan W. Myers Mr. Martin E. Myers (1974) Mrs. Miyako F. Overturf (1961) Rosalie Ross and William Sennett Elaine and Ray Sundberg James Terman (1982) and Carolyn Terman Robert Tong (1953) and Helen Tong Ms. Christina Turner (2003, 2005) Mr. Caio Villela Ms. Sara Webber and Mr. Leif E. Brown Laurellee Westaway Suzanne Westaway Bobbi and Herb Wiltsek Anonymous (2)

$250–$499

Richard and Judith Allen Joseph Arena (1956) and Tonni Arena Mr. Lawrence S. Azerrad (1995) and   Ms. Julie Muncy Christine Bliss and David Nitz Mrs. Myra Block Kaiser Phyllis Peres Brown (1956, 1982) Nina Chiappa (1976) Mr. and Mrs. Allan D. Crane (1978) Betty W. Denebeim (1980) Ms. Cyndi Devereaux (1992) Mr. and Mrs. Andre Dilan Lori and Peter J. Feibelman Margaret Mary Geis (1981) Maud Hallin Ms. Melinda Hogan (1971) Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Howard (1958, 1959) Ms. Dorothy Knecht Mr. David G. Kolonay (1990) and   Ms. Melissa A. O’Connor Jacqueline P. Little (1992) Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Low Howard and Seisel Maibach Mrs. Margaret J. Menrath Christina Meyer (1994)

$50–$249

William Adamo (1948) and   Mrs. Elizabeth Adamo Clarellen Adams Erik Adigard (1987) Dr. Edward A. Aiken (1972) Ms. Jane D. Hegedus Alvarez (1976) Ms. Judith D. Andresen (1960) Jane L. Archer (1995) and Timothy Williams Ms. Ellen M. Arnaud (2004) Mr. David H. Asari (1989) and   Ms. Luz Marina Ruiz Robert Avery (1962) and Amanda Avery Myles and Jackie Babcock Mrs. Terri Bailard (1973) Ms. Suzanne E. Barnecut (2007) Ms. Dominique R. Bayart and   Mr. Jonathan Hayden Irwin and Ann Bear Mr. Robert Becker Mary B. Bender (1984) and Charley C. Hoyt Marcia and Craig Benham Ms. Caitlin D. Berfield Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Bergquist Donald A. Berk (1975) and Nina Berk (1974)


Ms. Linda Berlinger Becky and David Bigelow Mr. and Mrs. Byron Blodgett Mr. Alan J. Bloom (1975) Rosalind D. Bonerz Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bousian (1942) Jack and Julie Bracken Geoffrey A. Bradley (1982) Maureen Bragdon (1973) and   Richard Bragdon Mr. Bertram G. Brauer Mr. Robert D. Brodsky (1974) and   Ms. Maria C. Davila (1973) Patrisha R. Brown (1970) and   Michael Brown Kenneth L. Bryant (1976) Claudia L. Bubeck (1979) Dr. and Mrs. Michael D. Butcher Judith A. Carter (1967) and Bruno J. Brania Mr. James Caselli Mr. and Mrs. William M. Chambers (1964) Ms. Lori Chan Luna (1973) and   Mr. Robert Luna Alice and Rigoberto Chavarin Ms. Nicole Chen Ms. Tiffany Chin (2002) Mr. John M. Christensen (1950) Blanche C. Clark (1949) Mr. Robert Clark, Little Eagles Family Trust Rosemary Clark (1967) Ms. Ann D. Clemenza and   Mr. Andrew Clemenza Ms. Jane S. Conn (1968) Celia E. Coolidge (1990) Beau and Alan Daniels Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Deal Mr. Levon DerBedrossian Armen and Nelly Der Kiureghian Ms. Pamela M. Dernham (1998) and   Mr. Gregory Linden Ms. Nancy A. Derr (1957) Ms. Gail A. DeSpain (1986) Ms. Marva Devereaux (1961)

Ms. Margaret Dhaemers (1955, 1960) Ms. Melinda A. diSessa Mark and Barbara Dorn Mr. Arvi Dorsey (1965) Sheryl S. Drinkwater (1995) and Justin Lee Mr. Thomas Dufurrena and   Ms. Hilda S. West Mark M. Dutka (1992) Gerald and Jane Dwyer Brian Dyck (1971) and Iwalani Dyck Ms. Margaret A. Ebberts Max and Pamela Edwards Mr. James P. Ellis Jr. (1998) Mr. Lonnie J. Ellis (1985) Mrs. Noel E. Ellman Shirley J. Emerson (1982) Eric Espinosa (1983) and Felicia Espinosa Mr. Jorge A. Euan (1968) Avery Falkner Ms. Barbara Federle (1995) Ms. Leila Fiery Hamar (1986) and   Mr. G. D. Hamar Jr. Ms. Pamela Fingado (1981) Mary Jane and Charles Fisher Chloe Fonda (1969) and James Fonda Bernard Frankel and Barbara Cohn Ms. Michele M. Froehlich Ms. Vinquetta C. Frye (2007) Ms. Kathleen M. Gadway (1983) and   Mr. Marcell Hall Ms. Elise Gardella (1997) John and Cindy Gayle Ms. Christina M. Gearin (2000) and   Mr. Andrew Mayo Ms. Margaret Ghodsi Samuel Ginsburg (1995) Ms. Marie A. Glynn (1991) and   Mr. Steve King Richard A. Goodman (1974) Mr. Douglas R. Gordon (1964) Ms. Lorrie Gray and Mr. Seth Chazin Thomas Greek (2002) and Lesley Greek Mr. Douglas B. Green

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Greenwold Mr. Christopher Grubbs Ms. Mary C. Gustafson Miller Mr. Peter W. Hacker Ms. Claudia Herrera Hall (1976) Mrs. Joan H. Hall (1965) Ms. Judith Hamill (1974) and   Mr. Corwith Hamill Mr. William A. Hamilton (1968, 1975) Ms. Mary E. Harden (1999) Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Harding (1957) Valerie C. Harris (1974) Ms. Jacquelyn A. Harrison (1972) Ms. Andrea Hattersley Susan and Gregory Hawthorne Margaret and Ralph Heineman J. R. Heinzkill Mr. and Mrs. William C. Herman Jr. Carol and James Hinton Ms. Cynthia Hobson Eleonore F. Hockabout (1981) Laurie M. Hoey (1987) Ms. Phyllis V. Holmes (2000) Ms. Lena H. Hong (2005) Joslyn and Gregory Houston Michael and Virginia Howden Yan-Tom and Hsing-Li Hu Ms. Chong-I Huang (1998) Ms. Bronwyn Hughes (2006) J. A. Scott (1975) and Sandy Hughes Marilyn T. Hulbert (1976) Carolina Humphreys (2002) and   David Humphreys Mr. and Mrs. Mark Hurty Mr. and Mrs. Robert Israel Mr. Johnny Iwan and Ms. Chandra Likke Ms. Karen A. Jacobs Bradley (1988) and   Mr. Mark S. Bradley Mr. Jim Jennings Walter F. Jenny Jr. (1974) Ms. Ea Jensen (1978) Mr. Mark Jensen Shirley A. Jowise (1982)

Marsha Jurgenson (1972) and   Neal Jurgenson Elizabeth Shari Kadar (1989) Maureen and Mark Kane Mr. Martin Kaufman and Ms. Michelle Bayba Ms. Madeleine S. Keesing (1972) Genevieve Keller (1980) and Gordon Keller Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Kelly Ms. Susan W. Kendrick (1985) Mr. and Mrs. John W. Kenney Mr. Christopher W. Kent Mr. Randy Kessler Ms. Rochelle L. Kessler (1974) Ms. Diane Ketelle Mr. and Mrs. Young Kim Ms. Sharon K. King (1971, 1972) and   Mr. Randall D. Aeschliman Ms. Vesta Ann Kirby Christopher and Christina Kitze John and Susan Kluthe Mr. Norman Kondy Mrs. Katherine Koelsch Kriken and   Mr. John L. Kriken Laureen M. Landau (1961, 1962) Mr. Ronald J. Larman,   Sebastopol Cleaners & Alterations Mr. and Mrs. Donn Laughlin (1959) Gregory D. Lee (1967) Ms. Julie P. Lee Mr. and Mrs. David Lees Paul and Arlene Leiber Mr. and Mrs. David C. Lemon (1979) Kuo Wei Li and Pen Chuan Huang Susan M. Lilly (1988, 1991) Ms. Nora Lindahl James R. Little (1966) Ms. Ashley Lomery Roderick B. Mac Connell (1961) Robert K. Madge (1950) Jane F. Malmgren (1939) William G. Malpas (1972) Dr. Janice Marcin (1984) Ms. Tamia Marg (1977)

Ms. Diane C. Martini Greg L. Marvin (1979) and Monica Marvin Nancy R. Marzi (1954) Mr. and Mrs. Jad I. Massis Mr. Ben Mates and   Ms. Sivana Contreras Liz Maxwell Ms. Katherine S. McCabe Mr. Jeffrey R. McCaslin (1972) Ms. Erin McCluskey (2003) James Mc Connell (1959) and   Lonnie Mc Connell Timothy B. McDonald (19794) Ms. Margreta G. McKeown Jean W. McLaughlin (1988) and   Tom H. Spleth James McLemore (1966) and Ida McLemore John McNeil Jr. (1982) Mary W. Mead (1978),   The H. T. Mead Foundation Mr. Mike M. Mead Matt A. Meis (1986) and Barbara Meis Mrs. Lynne Merchant (1968) Cecily A. Merrill (1966, 1967) and   Frank M. Friedlaender Ms. Irma S. Miller Mr. John E. Miner (1974) Barbara L. Minneman (1967) Janet M. Monaghan (1973) and   Brian J. McKeever Robert and Leslie Monaghan Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Mooney Mr. and Mrs. Dennis E. Moran (1961) Mr. Hiroki A. Morinoue (1973) Richard Murray (1949) Ms. Ellen B. Nachtrieb Ms. Mona J. Nakashima Linda Nelson (1973) and Robert Nelson Mr. Loan H. Ngo and Ms. Minh H. Huynh Nancy Noloboff (1967) and Jerry Noloboff Rik Olson (1967) Ms. Jennifer L. Ormerod (1999) Ms. Judith E. Oroshnik (1983) 31


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Charles Overton (1965) and   Nancy Overton (1965) Jeffrey T. Padilla (1983) Sushil C. Pal (1978) Ms. Georgia Panagiotopoulos Relman (1984)   and Mr. David Relman Leroy W. Parker (1966, 1968) Mr. and Mrs. Gary L. Parks (1987) Wendy J. Paull-David (1972) Charmaine M. Pearson TTEE (1991) Marshall H. Peck III (1979) and Beth Dunbar Ms. Elaine Porter and Ms. Anne E. Ritzma Rosalie Price (1961) and John Price Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Purdie Mr. Ronald R. Ramirez and   Mrs. Lola Quan-Ramirez George and Eloisa Ramos Mr. Michael R. Reardon and   Ms. Jill Lawrence Mr. and Mrs. Jack Reineck Harry Reom (1950) and Carol Reom Mrs. Helene Y-J Rice (1997) Ruth M. Rippon (1949, 1951) Barbara and Frederick Riser Rachel M. Riser (1995) Mr. Donald P. Roberts (1953) Ms. Marianne Rose MA Ms. Elizabeth R. Ross (1972) Ms. Stephanie A. Ross (1971) and   Mr. Hugh E. Jenkins Mr. Mark Rowland and   Ms. Rosemary Aguayo Mr. Nick Rudelich and Ms. Susan Clark Ms. Ana Cecilia Sagrera (2002) Ms. Mara E. Saltz (1975) Earl W. Saunders (1953) Mrs. Miriam Scheffe (1970) Mr. Timothy J. Schmitt Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Scholz Ms. Daphne Schrampf (1984) Mr. and Mrs. Terry L. Scott Daniel and Martha Seeger Bryce and Chris Seidl 32

Sally L. Seymour Dan Shafer (2005) and Alicia Shafer Adrienne A. Sharp (1975) Stephen J. Shawl Ms. Lois O. Sheesley (1958) and   Ms. Carol A. Jones Ms. Debra T. Shimamoto (1981) and   Mr. Michael J. Korver Ms. Ethel W. Shipp (1950, 1951) Mr. Alexander Silbergleit and   Ms. Evgenia Makarova Robert Simms (1962) Mr. William Slater and Ms. Monica Hayes Dr. Kathleen O. Slobin (1980) Mrs. T. Rachel Slonicki Ms. Lynn S. Sondag (1997) and   Mr. Rinko Ghosh Ms. Kara Spellman (1999) Ms. Carla M. Spindt Mary T. Spivey (1952) Mr. Henry C. Stevens III (1975) Ms. Mary I. Stevens (2001) Frances and Robert Stine Ms. Allison Brook Stone (2003) Stephanie Summersgill (2005) and   Chris Summersgill Ms. Asako Takusagawa (1942) Philip S. K. Tang (1977) Eve Steccati-Tanovitz (1969) and   Ron Tanovitz (1969) Lisa G. Tasner (1983) Martin and Elizabeth Terplan Ms. Gabrielle Thormann (1988) Mr. Philip A. Tice (1970) Ms. Joyce I. Tobe (1990) Joel and Patricia Tomei Louis Torres (1974) and   Mrs. Julie Torres (1974) Constance A. Treadwell Mr. Paul Trolander and Ms. Zeynep Tenger Ms. Denise J. Trudeau Ms. Susan S. Tsuchiya (1988) Ms. Susan Tully

Benjamin Turner’s Family Ms. Micki Turner CC Ulatowski Travis T. Van Brasch (1994) and   Eleanor M. Fong (1984) Mr. and Mrs. Frank Van Steenhuyse Mr. and Mrs. David A. Ventura (1977) Lauree Villarreal (1973) and Gerald Villarreal Jan C. Walker (1974) Elsa Waller (1968) and Julian Waller Robert Wallis (1997) and   Benjie Wallis (1996) Jane Howard Walsh (1938) Ms. Alyssa Warnock (2001) Frederick Wasser (1960) and Linda Wasser Fayette Block Watkis (1978) Mr. and Mrs. Martin M. Wefald John L. Weiss Mrs. Julie A. Weiss Mr. John L. Werbelow (1972) Michele Wessling (2001) and   Anthony Wessling Mr. Benjamin F. Wheeler (1986) Ms. Dorothy L. Wilbanks (1961) Sharon Wilcox (1965) Ms. Janis L. Wild Ms. Andrea Wilder (1974) Derek E. Wilson (1992) Heidi and Vernon Wilson Mr. Jeffrey B. Wilson (1974) Mrs. Lana Legallet Wilson (1966) Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wiser Ms. Christina Wolfe Dr. Ruth Worthington Ms. Helene K. Wright Jenny Wunderly (1991) Carmen and Duff Wyllie Mr. and Mrs. Eugengnan Yeh Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Young Zendarski Studio Ms. Anne M. Zielenski-Fleming (1973) Christina and Philip Zimbardo Anonymous (10)

ORGANIZATIONAL DONORS $10,000+

Build Inc. The Clorox Company Foundation The Nathan Cummings Foundation East Bay Community Foundation Etant donnés, The French-American Fund   for Contemporary Art Fong & Chan Architects The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Grants for the Arts /   San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund Gump’s Intel Corporation LEF Foundation MF Foundation / Tim Mott National Endowment for the Arts Nimoy Foundation Osterweis Capital Management Pacific Gas and Electric Company RMW architecture & interiors / Architectural Foundation of San Francisco The San Francisco Foundation Skirball Foundation The W.L.S. Spencer Foundation STUDIOS architecture U.S. Department of Energy The Andy Warhol Foundation   for the Visual Arts Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation Anonymous $5,000–$9,999

The Office of Charles Bloszies Christie’s The Ken and Judith Joy Family Foundation $1,000–$4,999

American Institute of Architects,   San Francisco Chapter Capital Group Companies

Cultural Services, French Consulate General   in San Francisco Fennie+Mehl Architects Field Paoli Architects Ideate Inc. InterZinc Jensen Architects McCall Design Group The Mechanics Bank The Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation Romak Iron Works $500–$999

ARCH Drafting Supplies David Baker + Partners, Architects BKBC Architects Inc. BraytonHughes Design Studios Cass Calder Smith Heller Manus Architects HKIT Architects Mark Horton / Architecture International Housewares Association Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects Levy Design Partners Inc. Marc L’Italien, EHDD Architecture NicholsBooth Architects Ratcliff SRG Partnership $250–$499

Avenue A | Razorfish BAMO Inc. Dahlin Group Architecture Planning Inc. ELS Architecture and Urban Design


GIFTS IN KIND

FOUNDERS LEGACY SOCIET Y

Mr. David Abel Ms. Sandra J. Adams Mr. William Alschuler Mrs. Faye Behrens Mr. Michael L. Cohen Consulate General of Chile Mr. Max Fallon Mr. Martin Gellen Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr.,   US Bank Foundation Ideate Inc. Mr. Jordan Kantor and Ms. Elizabeth Mangini Ms. Lucy Karanfilian Ms. Sandra Lawrie Dr. Florence R. Oaks Ms. Marjanne Pearson Mr. Sean Rubin Mr. Phil Schlein Ms. Jeanie R. Skvaril Ms. Barbara Smoak Unisource Worldwide Elsa Waller (1968) and Julian Waller Mr. Dominic Willsdon

Mia S. Alexander (1979) Cal Anderson (1946) Carol A. Austin (1978) Kimberly and Simon Blattner Audrey Brown (1976) Claudia L. Bubeck (1979) Shirley Y. Christensen (1953) Mrs. Mary L. Correia (1967) Gladys M. Eaton Mrs. Phoebe Fisher-Wolters Koko Fujita (1970) and Thomas E. Flowers Kenneth A. Goss,   in memory of Armando Rocha (1980) Marian D. Keeler (1990) Mr. Jim Kidder Laureen M. Landau (1961, 1962) Mr. Robert P. Levenson (1974) and   Ms. Diane M. Kinnane Michael Lopez* (1963) and Jeannette Lopez Richard M. Lowenthal, M.D. Dr. Thomas L. Nelson and   Dr. Wylda H. Nelson Gerald M. Ober (1956) Diane Oles (1984) Nancy and Steven Oliver Estate of Mildred N. Patterson Shepard Pollack and Paulette Long Estate of Edna M. Reichmuth (1939) Dorothy and George B. Saxe Estate of Lundy Siegriest (1949) Margi Sullivan (1973) and Bill Van Dyk Estate of Robert Baxter Todd Kern Toy (1985) Sheila L. Wells Anonymous (5)

GIFTS IN MEMORY RIchard Chapman Thomas Corcoran Judy Cortese Enrico Donati Clayton Gordon John Clemence McCullock Steve Reoutt

Ben & A. Jess Shenson Jack Thornton

GIFTS IN HONOR Lorna Meyer Linda Northington Ross Sappenfield Susan Shawl

Donor Sally and Philip Chapman Sally and Philip Chapman Sally and Philip Chapman Sally and Philip Chapman Eve Steccati-Tanovitz (1969) and   Ron Tanovitz (1969) Sally and Philip Chapman Mr. David H. Asari (1989) and   Ms. Luz Marina Ruiz Ms. Dominique R Bayart and   Mr. Jonathan Hayden Jack and Julie Bracken The De Goff Family Mr. Jeffrey R. McCaslin (1972) Mr. Brian T. McCrea Ms. Rose M. O’Leary Elaine and Ray Sundberg Michele Wessling (2001) and   Anthony Wessling Ms. Janis L. Wild Carmen and Duff Wyllie Mr. Fred M. Levin and Ms. Nancy Livingston Sally and Philip Chapman

Donor Dr. and Mrs. Michael D. Butcher Ms. Lisa Beaty Capital Group Companies Stephen J. Shawl

* deceased

33


CAFEPRESS STORE

Have you visited CCA’s store at CafePress? Why the heck not?

1.

2.

Our virtual bookstore sells a lot more than books. Buy a T-shirt for your brother, thong underwear for the girlfriend, a tote bag for mom, a mug for your boss. Sure, you can choose from a wide array of standard logo merchandise, but check out the Designers’ Collection, featuring ingenious creations by students in CCA’s award-winning Sputnik undergraduate design studio. The collection grows—and gets more interesting—every semester. CafePress merchandise is printed on demand and shipped directly to your door in just a few days. Proceeds from CCA’s virtual store benefit CCA scholarships and give our student designers’ egos a boost! Order today! www.cafepress.com/cca_store

3.

4. 34

1. Tim Gruneisen 2. Leah Hickey 3. Sarah Pulver 4. Fumi Nakamura

1.


WATTIS INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS

The Exhibition Formerly Known as Passengers through August 29, 2009 Since its launch in September 2007, this constantly transforming exhibition series has challenged the constraints of conventional museum and gallery programming. By the end of its run in August, 24 emerging international artists will have presented a staggering range of paintings, sculptures, photographs, installations, and performances, many of them brand-new commissions. For all of the artists it will have been their first solo exhibition in an American public art institution. A new presentation opens to the public on the first Tuesday of every month, with a short artist talk at 7 p.m. followed by a reception.

Abraham Cruzvillegas May 5–30 The Mexican artist Abraham Cruzvillegas is best known for his sculptures transforming everyday objects, such as found wood scraps and weathered buoys, into elegant compositions. He updates Marcel Duchamp’s readymade technique with references to the specific geographies and socioeconomics of the locales where his materials are sourced.

Claire Fontaine June 2–July 3 The French artist Claire Fontaine is motivated by the history of radical protest—particularly the Paris student uprisings of May 1968—and the artworks associated with that era. Her work is not so much about nostalgia, however, as a reflection on the power of art and the relative political impotence of our contemporary culture.

Mario Garcia Torres July 7–August 1 Mario Garcia Torres, born in Mexico and now based in Los Angeles, investigates specific incidents and personalities from the history of Conceptual art. Through video, slide installations, and photography, he introduces fresh perspectives on Conceptualism’s forgotten narratives. His works are simultaneously critical, playful, and nostalgic.

Ongoing Exhibitions Paul McCarthy’s Low Life Slow Life: Part 2 through May 30, 2009

Aurélien Froment August 4–29

Tino Sehgal ongoing

The French artist Aurélien Froment presents the final solo show in the Passengers series. It will include new works conceived during his residency in San Francisco (organized in collaboration with the Kadist Art Foundation) as well as existing pieces. Known for his highly conceptual practice, Froment has worked variously with film, performance, sculpture, and print to investigate territories of time, documentation, fiction, and history.

Americana: 50 States, 50 Months, 50 Exhibitions through May 31, 2012

Passengers 2.12: Aurélien Froment is kindly supported by Etant donnés: The French-American Fund for Contemporary Art, a program of FACE. Support for Paul McCarthy’s Low Life Slow Life: Part 2 is provided by Robin Wright and Ian Reeves. Additional support provided by Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

2.

and coming soon. . . Moby Dick September 22– December 12, 2009 The Magnificent Seven September 2009– July 2012 3.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy and Bill Timken. Generous support provided by the Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation, Grants for the Arts / San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund, Ann Hatch and Paul Discoe, and the CCA Curator’s Forum.

1. Abraham Cruzvillegas, Autoconstrucción: London Suite, United Kingdom, 2007 2. Claire Fontaine, Change, 2004–8 3. Aurélien Froment, En abrégé, 2008 4. Mario Garcia Torres, What Happens in Halifax Stays in Halifax (In 36 Slides), 2004–6

4. 35


FACULTY NOTES

Bob Aufuldish

Claudia Bernardi

David Gissen

Awards: CCA undergraduate catalog and Architecture Lecture Series poster selected for Print Regional Design Annual, 2008; CCA Architecture Lecture Series poster and David Maisel’s book Library of Dust selected for STEP 100, 2008; SWA 50x50 brochure selected for Mohawk Show 9, 2008. Group shows: 365: AIGA Annual Design Exhibition, AIGA National Design Center, New York, Dec. 2008– Feb. 2009; 50 Books / 50 Covers, AIGA National Design Center, New York, Sept.–Nov. 2008.

Group show: Homage and Remembrance: The Past Is Present, Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, California, Nov.–Dec. 2008. Residency: Center for Civic and Global Engagement, Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Virginia, 2008–10. Presentation: Consejo Gráfico Latino Printmaking conference, Austin, Nov. 2008.

Lectures: “The Experimental Practice of Architectural History,” UC Berkeley Department of Architecture, Oct. 2008; “The Architectural Production of Nature,” Stanford/Berkeley City Group, Oct. 2008. Moderator: “Anxious Climate: Francois Roche, Philippe Rahm, Cristina Díaz Moreno, and Efrén García Grinda,” ACADIA conference, Minneapolis, Nov. 2008.

David Cole

James Gobel

Commissions: ongoing re-creation of numerous historical architectural features of campus buildings for Stanford University.

Solo show: Happy Hour, Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles, Oct.– Nov. 2008.

Yves Béhar (with fuseproject) Projects: designed both the physical product and the user interface for the Canal+ Le Cube, an STB (set-top box) that allows for vertical/hortizontal orientation as well as additional information (weather, time, alarm). Other 2008 projects included a piece in the Paperlove Auction for Luminaire, the new Jawbone bluetooth headset, HBF C Collection, OLPC XOXO, Y Water, and a new website and blog at www.fuseproject.com. Awards: five IDSA awards as well as awards from ID magazine, iF, Index, CES, and Spark, 2008. fuseproject has a permanent place in the new Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco and created the Swarovski Voyage chandelier for the new Museum of Arts and Design in New York.

Alisa Golden Lauren Elder Project: “greened” landscape design for the playground at Sequoia Elementary School, Oakland, opened Sept. 2008.

Richard Elliott Group shows: Adorned Cloth: Contemporary Surface Design in Fiber Art, Mills Building, San Francisco, Dec. 2008–Mar. 2009; (Un)wearable, Cabrillo College Gallery, Aptos, California, Sept.–Oct. 2008; Surface Design, Mendocino Art Center, July– Aug. 2008; Meadowfound Revisited, Green Horse Gallery, Manitou Springs, Colorado, June 2008.

Linda Geary Group shows: Interference, HP Garcia Gallery, New York, Mar. 2008; Introductions, Pulliam Deffenbaugh Gallery, Portland, Oregon, Feb.– Mar. 2008.

36

Group show: Books Under Fire, Mills College Special Collections and Archive, Oakland, Aug.–Oct. 2008.

Arthur Gonzalez Group shows: Eccentric Imagery, Blue Line Gallery, Roseville, California, Nov. 2008–Jan. 2009; ARAC@AAM, Anderson Ranch at the Aspen Art Museum, Colorado, Oct.–Dec. 2008; Confrontational Ceramics: The Artist as Social Critic, Westchester Arts Council, White Plains, New York, Oct.– Dec. 2008; Resurrection: The Dead Space Show, Lobot Gallery, Oakland, Oct. 2008; The Grand Ceramics Theatre, Museo Internazionale delle Arti Applicate Oggi, Torino, Italy, June–July 2008. Lectures and demonstrations: Richmond Art Center, California, Nov. 2008; The Fire House, Oakland, Oct. 2008; Indiana University, Bloomington, Oct. 2008.

Linda Geary Painting/Drawing www.pulliamdeffenbaugh.com This summer Linda Geary will once again lead the New York Studio Program course, an exciting opportunity for CCA students to spend three weeks living and working in the thriving DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) district. Last summer, Geary enhanced the students’ experience with visits to important art collections and the studios of several acclaimed New York artists, including Jules de Balincourt (Ceramics and Painting 1998), Polly Apfelbaum, Jonathan Lasker, James Siena, and Jim Hodges.


Lynda Grose

Glen Helfand

Presentations and panels: “Greening Our Urban Future,” Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Nov. 2008; Eco Fashion panel moderator, Commonwealth Club, San Francisco, Sept. 2008; “Moving Beyond Organic: Light,” Ecollection at MAGIC trade show, Las Vegas, Aug. 2008; “Moving Beyond Organic: Light,” World Shoe Association, Las Vegas, July 2008; “Fashion That Helps Us Flourish,” Changing the Change Conference, Torino, Italy, July 2008; “Econnovation in Bay Area Green Design,” Design Guild SF Gallery, San Francisco, June 2008; “Sustainable Cotton: A Design Perspective,” AIGA Y13 conference, San Diego, Mar. 2008. Publication: “IPM Cotton Comes to Market as Cleaner Cotton,” Pesticide News, no. 80, 2008.

Curated: Capital Jewelers, Dust Gallery, Las Vegas, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Eric Heiman

(with Volume Inc.) Commissions: contributed to the design of all the main-floor exhibits at the new California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, 2008; cover of Metropolis magazine, Sept. 2008. Awards: two silver Spark Design Awards and one bronze, 2008. Work featured: Coupe International Design and Image Awards Annual, no. 19, 2008; “Creativity and Commerce: Print’s 2008 International Business Graphics Prize,” Print, Oct. 2008; “Green Architecture’s Grand Experiment,” Metropolis, Sept. 2008.

Taraneh Hemami Solo show: Evocations, Rose Issa, London, Oct.–Nov. 2008. Group show: Residency Projects Part 4, Kala Art Institute, Berkeley, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Todd Hido Solo shows: Between the Two, Yours Gallery, Warsaw, Poland, Nov. 2008– Jan. 2009; A Road Divided, Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco, Oct.– Dec. 2008. Group show: Paris Photo 2008 (with Rose Gallery), Nov. 2008.

Desirée Holman Solo show: The Magic Window, Machine Project, Los Angeles, Oct.– Nov. 2008. Group shows: I-Legitimo, Museum of Image and Sound and Paço das Artes, São Paulo, Oct. 2008– Jan. 2009; Running Time: 24:00:00, LACE / Paul Gleason Theater, Los Angeles, Oct. 2008; Cover = Reencenacão + Repeticão, Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo, Aug.– Dec. 2008; Mineral Park, Park Gallery, Falkirk, Scotland, Aug.–Sept. 2008.

Steven Skov Holt and Mara Holt Skov Curated: Manuf®actured: The Conspicuous Transformation of Everyday Objects, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, Oregon, Aug. 2008–Jan. 2009. Publication: “Please Don’t Be Seated,” ARTnews (annual design issue), Dec. 2008.

Lecture: “From ReadyMade to AlreadyMade: Some Assembly Required,” University of Oregon and the Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, Sept. 2008. Featured: “On the Couch” column, San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 2008.

Duncan House Group shows: Bay Area Glass Sculpture, Sculpturesite Gallery, San Francisco, Nov. 2008–Jan. 2009; Design MMoCA, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Wisconsin, Apr. 2008; The Art of Glass, Falkirk Cultural Center, San Rafael, California, Jan.–Mar. 2008.

James Gobel Painting/Drawing www.marxzav.com Painter James Gobel has been unusually busy lately with curatorial projects. Closest to home was his coordination of CCA’s participation in Designo 2, a juried drawing show that brought together works by six students each from CCA, the Maryland Institute College of Art, and the Kansas City Art Institute, and traveled to all three schools. Gobel also recently guest curated the group shows Blot Out the Sun at Sam Lee Gallery in Los Angeles and Illusion Helps at Orange Alley Project in San Francisco, both featuring CCA students and alumni.

David Huffman Solo show: Dig It!, Patricia Sweetow Gallery, San Francisco, Nov.– Dec. 2008. Publication: suite of six etchings, Paulson Press, 2008.

Jordan Kantor Group shows: California Biennial 2008, Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, Oct. 2008–Mar. 2009; This Is Not a Void, Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo, Oct. 2008–Jan. 2009; Don’t Come In, Be Merciful, Johnen + Schöttle, Cologne, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Jim Kenney Award: Adobe Leader of Higher Education, 2008.

37


FACULTY NOTES

Tirza True Latimer

Maria Makela

Presentations: “Tee Corinne: Lavender Muse” (inauguration of the Lesbian and Gay Archives, Special Collections), University of Oregon, Eugene, Dec. 2008; “Borderline Performance,” American Society for Theatre Research conference, Boston, Nov. 2008; “Artistic Production and the Feminist Theory of Art: New Debates,” Southeastern College Art Conference, New Orleans, Sept. 2008; “Questioning Legitimacy: Feminism, Activism, and Institutional Politics,” Centro Cultural Montehermoso, Vitoria, Spain, June 2008. Publications: “Border Art” in The Impact of Globalization on the United States, vol. 1, Praeger Perspectives, 2008; review of Taraneh Hemami’s show Theory of Survival in Fuse, fall 2008.

Presentations: “Kurt Schwitters: Cloth Culture: On Ersatz and Merz,” German Studies Association Conference, Saint Paul, Oct. 2008; “Schein und Sein: Identity in Fritz Lang’s Metropolis,” Meanings of Modernity in Central Europe symposium, New York Public Library, Nov. 2007.

Joseph Lease Reading: Watershed Festival, Berkeley, Nov. 2008.

Tom McKeag Projects: creation of the “How Would Nature Do That?” graduate seminar in bio-inspired design at UC Berkeley. It is the first course of its kind there and is open to students in design, engineering, biology, and business. In summer 2008 McKeag taught the nation’s first outdoor education camp devoted to the subject of biomimicry at the Madden Outdoor Education Center, Newburgh, New York, and was an invited speaker at the Biomimicry Institute’s annual international educators’ summit at Yellow Bay, Montana.

Elizabeth Leger Group show: Making Their Mark, Nightingale Gallery, Eastern Oregon University, La Grande, Oct. 2008.

Nathan Lynch Group shows: Resurrection: The Dead Space Show, Lobot Gallery, Oakland, Oct. 2008; Hopeless and Otherwise, Southern Exposure, San Francisco, May–July 2008. Lecture: California State University, Fullerton, Nov. 2008.

38

Jeremy Mende (with MendeDesign) Awards: Communication Arts Design Annual, 2008; Coupe magazine International Design Awards, 2008; Print magazine Regional Design Annual, 2008; How magazine Design Annual, 2008; AIGA 365 Design Annual, 2008; Graphis Poster Annual, 2008; ID magazine Design Awards issue, 2008; STEP 100 Design Annual (judge’s choice award), 2008; Type Directors Club Design Annual Award of Typographic Excellence, 2008. Group shows: AIGA 50 Books / 50 Covers,

traveling to New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, 2008; Ideas That Matter, Art Directors Club, New York, Oct. 2008; Bookbuilders West Show (judge’s choice award), Oakland Convention Center, Jan. 2008. Lectures: “Designism 3.0,” Art Directors Club, New York, Oct. 2008; “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Process,” 3x3, CCA, San Francisco, Feb. 2008. Featured: “The Search of a Conceptually Committed Designer for the Authentic Gesture,” STEP magazine, June 2008; “Social Engagement in Graphic Design,” Web Designing Magazine, Japan, Dec. 2007. MendeDesign is a featured studio in AIGA/SF studio tours.

Ranu Mukherjee Solo show: VividWild, Fort Gallery, Oakland, Dec. 2008.

Francesca Pastine Solo show: Iraqi Casualty Series, University of Arkansas Fine Art Gallery, Fayetteville, Oct. 2008. Group shows: Big, Big Bangs / Small, Small Bucks, Dean Jensen Gallery, Milwaukee, Dec. 2008–Jan. 2009; 14th Annual Art Walk New York, Nov. 2008; Art of Democracy: War and Empire, Meridian Gallery, San Francisco, Sept.– Nov. 2008.

Maria Porges Solo show: After the Age of Reason, di Rosa Preserve, Napa, California, Nov. 2008–Feb. 2009.

Martin Venezky Graphic Design www.appetiteengineers.com Diaspora is a two-deck boxed set of playing cards designed by Martin Venezky with text by Michael Cunningham (Pulitzer Prize– winning author of The Hours). This is the first newly commissioned project for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s Architecture+Design Forum. The cards are produced in a numbered and signed edition of 300. They are available at the SFMOMA museum store.


Alfonso Alvarez Media Arts www.independentexposure.com/filmmaker/184/ The Illuminated Corridor, a nomadic extravaganza of public art, live music, and film, is coming to Oakland’s Middle Harbor Shoreline Park on May 9. Alfonso Alvarez (Media Arts faculty, Film/Video 1990) and Steve Dye (Film/Video 1990) will once again be participating. They collaborated on a contribution to the massive New York Illuminated Corridor on May 31 of last year. Other CCA alumni participants in the New York event included Katherin McInnis (MFA 2002), Hank Willis Thomas (MFA 2003, MA Visual and Critical Studies 2004), and Eliot Daughtry (MFA 2008).

Michele Pred Group shows: Aqua Art Miami and Art Miami, Dec. 2008; Change America, Robert Berman Gallery, Los Angeles, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Katherine Rinne Presentation: “Water Systems of Early Modern Rome,” Fondazione Centro Studi Leon Battista Alberti, Mantova, Italy, Oct. 2008.

Eugene Rodriguez Group shows: Death and Memory in Contemporary Art, Landmark Arts Gallery, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Oct.–Nov. 2008; Contemporary American Realism, Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana, Sept.–Nov. 2008; Think Tank, Eagle Art Gallery, Murray State University, Kentucky, Sept.–Nov. 2008; The Sonic Self, Chelsea Art Museum, New York, July–Aug. 2008 (traveling to Saint Petersburg, Russia, and Chennai, India); Mass Consumption, Mesa Contemporary Arts, Arizona, June– Aug. 2008; Reforming U.S.: Immigration Through Art, Crown Center Gallery, Loyola University, Chicago, June–July 2008; Experiencing the War in Iraq, Pawtucket Armory, Rhode Island, Mar. 2008. Screenings: Narrative Shorts International Film + Video Festival, California State University, Chico, Nov. 2008; International Small Film Festival, Berkeley Art Center, Sept. 2008. Curated: Bridges, Borders, and the Spaces in Between, LGBT Community Center, New York, Apr.–May 2008. Award: Distinguished Educator Award,

De Anza College, Cupertino, California, winter 2008. Lectures: “Death and Words in Images: The Case of the Early Modern Hispanic World,” EMIT Conference, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Oct. 2008; “Painting Empire: Darks, Lights, Cameras, Action!” Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Oct. 2008.

Marianne Rogoff Reading: Copperfield’s Books, Napa, California, Oct. 2008.

Zack Rogow Readings: five East Coast venues (including a master’s tea at Yale University’s Branford College and the Cornelia Street Cafe in New York) in five days, Oct. 2008.

Judith Serin Publications: “Season Tickets: Game 28” and “Season Tickets: Game 37” (with photographs by CCA faculty emerita Betsy Davids) in the blink, summer 2008.

Elizabeth Sher Solo show: Crossed Words: Narrative Explorations in Image and Text, Tarrant County College, Fort Worth, Sept.–Oct. 2008. Group show: Banned and Recovered: Artists Respond to Censorship, African American Museum and Library, Oakland, Sept.–Dec. 2008.

Allison Smith

Cocurated: Who’s the Fairest of Them All? Women Artists Considering Social Justice in the Everyday, Hang Art Annex, San Francisco, Nov. 2008. Group show: Eclections, A Muse Gallery, San Francisco, July–Aug. 2008.

Group show: Democracy in America: The National Campaign (reviewed in the Village Voice), Creative Time / Convergence Center at Park Avenue Armory, New York, Sept. 2008. Presentations: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Nov. 2008; “Crockery: Allison Smith in Conversation with Dr. ‘Fuzzy’ Randolph,” Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, Sept. 2008.

Nancy Selvin

Owen Smith

KC Rosenberg

Group shows: Complexities of Clay, Bell Family Gallery, Los Angeles, Sept.– Dec. 2008; Table of Elements, Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, Pittsburgh, Mar. 2008. Work featured: “California Clay,” Ceramic Review, Nov.–Dec. 2008; Handbuilding, Lark Books, 2008.

Award: Creative Quarterly 14 silver medal in the professional illustration category (featured in the Mar. 2009 issue), 2008.

39


FACULTY NOTES

Jon Sueda

Joseph Tanke

Work featured: “Public Libraries: Personal Libraries Made Public, Public Libraries Made Personal,” IDEA magazine, Dec. 2008; Pick of the Month column, IdN, vol. 15, no. 4, 2008; Showcase column, Grafik, Aug. 2008; Bastardised, Bunch / Magma Books, 2008. Award: Print Regional Design Annual for the Wattis Institute identity/stationery system, 2008. In addition to his ongoing work designing all of the Wattis Institute catalogs, in 2008 Sueda designed the catalog for Luna Luna in the Sky, Will You Make Me Laugh or Cry? at Arena 1, Santa Monica.

Publication: “The Specter of Manet: A Contribution to the Archaeology of Painting,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, vol. 66, no. 4, 2008. Presentations: “Aesthetics and Utopian Possibility: Herbert Marcuse and the Arts,” San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, Oct. 2008; “The Hellenic Strategies of Modern Art,” University of California, Santa Cruz, June 2008.

Larry Sultan Group show: Darkside, Fotomuseum Winterthur, Switzerland, Sept.– Nov. 2008. Lecture: Amherst College, Massachusetts, Nov. 2008.

Michael Swaine Solo shows: Door to Door Darning at Fabrications, Prick Your Finger, and Jessie Chorley + Buddug, London, Oct. 2008; How to Organize a Public Library, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Aug. 2008; The Reverse Ark: The Flotsam and the Jetsam (with futurefarmers), Pasadena City College Art Gallery, Mar. 2008. Group show: The Knitting and Stitching Show, Alexandra Palace, London, Oct. 2008. Commission: The Reverse Ark: The Flotsam and the Jetsam (with futurefarmers), Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, California, 2008.

40

Pamina Traylor Group show: Bay Area Glass Sculpture, Sculpturesite Gallery, San Francisco, Nov. 2008–Jan. 2009.

Franklin Williams Group show: At Home, Lincart, San Francisco, Sept.–Oct. 2008.

John Zurier Group show: 7th Gwangju Biennale, China, Sept.–Nov. 2008.

Raffi Minasian Industrial Design and MBA in Design Strategy www.raffim.com Among Raffi Minasian’s latest projects is the concept design for Ibrido, the first hybrid Ferrari, published in a 2008 issue of Forza magazine and showcased at the 2008 Detroit Auto Show. Formula 1 Racing has announced that in 2009, for the first time, F1 cars are going hybrid. Ferrari hopes that the green technological and design advances made in their F1 cars will translate directly to their road cars, with energy efficiency and performance goals working hand in hand. Minasian is himself a two-time Ferrari owner. He and a former student, Christopher Keller, worked within an extremely tight time frame to create this design, which has a distinct Ferrari “face,” a dynamic expression, and a tight, aggressive package for the bodywork, deliberately countering the recent trend for Ferraris to become larger, wider, and more like touring cars as the company’s clientele has aged.


EXTENDED EDUCATION

Jim Kenney Graphic Design www.interstitch.com www.realideasstudio.org In January 2009 Jim Kenney served for the third year in a row as a director and mentor of the Real Ideas Studio, a global creative nonprofit. In 2007 and 2008 the Real Ideas Studio took place at the Cannes Film Festival; this year it was at the Slamdance Film Festival (concurrent with Sundance) in Park City, Utah. Participating students worked on four-person teams, each of which made a short documentary over the course of the festival. CCA alum Juan Leguizamon (Graphic Design 2008) was a motion graphics designer on the team that won the distinguished documentary award. The screening of his team’s film was more packed than any other, according to the Slamdance directors, and Kenney reports that during the end credits, applause surged when Leguizamon’s name scrolled past.

Extended Education courses are a wonderful opportunity to explore something creative and new—from traditional painting and crafts to digital media and sustainable design. These day, evening, and weekend classes range from oneday workshops to comprehensive 30-hour courses. They are scheduled throughout the year, in both San Francisco and Oakland, to accommodate even the busiest schedule. Architecture Art History Book Arts Ceramics Computer Applications Drawing Fashion Design Furniture Graphic Design Illustration

Interior Design Jewelry / Metal Arts Media Arts Painting Photography Printmaking Professional Development Sculpture Textiles Writing

CCA also offers several popular summer programs for middle school and high school students on both its San Francisco and Oakland campuses. Visit www.cca.edu/summer or call 510.594.3710 for more information.

41


ALUMNI NOTES

1956

1966

1972

Billy Al Bengston

Mira White

James Erickson

Speaker: “Artistic Production: Los Angeles: An Alternate Art-World Model?” Art Basel Conversations, Miami, Florida, Dec. 2008.

Group show: Civic Arts Education 45th Anniversary, Bedford Gallery, Walnut Creek, California, Dec. 2008.

Solo show: Fruit Forward and M. Good & Juicy Art, Louis Pohl Gallery, Honolulu, Nov.–Dec. 2008.

1969

1974

Manuel Neri

Lee Birch

Charlie Milgrim

Solo show: The Figure in Relief, San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, Nov. 2008–Jan. 2009.

Solo show: Marquetry and Newar Woodcarvers, Indigo Gallery, Kathmandu, Nepal, Oct. 2008.

Group show: Politique Poetique, Gallery Theatre, Skyline College, San Bruno, California, Oct. 2008.

1961

Roger Kast

Judith Mortensen

Garry Knox Bennett

Solo show: Drawings in Black and White, St. John’s University Arts Center, Collegeville, Minnesota, Sept.–Nov. 2008.

Solo show: Vision/Revision: Pastels and Mixed-Media Collage, Rockridge Library Gallery, Oakland, Nov. 2008.

Solo show: Paintings, Rubin Building Glass Hallway, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, Sept.–Nov. 2008. Group show: Thoreau Reconsidered, Concord Art Association, Massachusetts, Oct.–Dec. 2008. Commission: South Burlington City Center Gateway Public Art Project (with landscape architect Terry Boyle, TJ Boyle & Associates), Vermont, 2008.

1976

1986

Solo shows: Call Me Chairmaker, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, Massachusetts, Oct. 2008–Feb. 2009; One of Each: 1973–2008, Gallery NAGA, Boston, Oct.–Nov. 2008; Call Me Chairmaker, Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, June–Sept. 2008.

1965 Craig Clemens Group shows: The Big Picture Show, Turn of the Century Fine Arts, Berkeley, Oct. 2008; Remembered Light: Glass Fragments from World War II, Arthur Ross Gallery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Mar.–June 2008; Remembered Light: Glass Fragments from World War II, Washington State History Museum, Tacoma, Jan.–Mar. 2008; Pink Week, Cricket Engine Gallery, Oakland, Nov. 2007.

Harry Weisburd Publication: “Thoughts on Erotic Art,” NY Arts, Aug.–Sept. 2008.

42

Arizona, Feb. 2008; Rhythym and Resonance, 455 Market Street, San Francisco, Jan.–Mar. 2008.

1983 Dan Gottsegen

1970 Pat Torley Gentenaar and Peter Gentenaar Publication: Compiled Pure Paper, Holland Paper Biennial, 2008. The Gentenaars have coorganized the Holland Paper Biennial since its inauguration in 1996 and collaborate on the accompanying books.

Judith Linhares Solo show: Gouaches, New York Public Library, Apr.–Aug. 2008. Group shows: Art and Illusion: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Blue Line Gallery, Roseville, California, Feb.–May 2008; It’s Gouache and Gouache Only, Meislin Gallery, New York, Feb.–Mar. 2008. Award: $7,500 Academy Award in Art, American Academy of Arts and Letters, 2008.

Nevin Mercede Solo show: 20 Degrees North, 50 Degrees East, Winds Café, Yellow Springs, Ohio, Oct. 2008.

1977 Susan Goldsmith Solo show: Seeing Through the Trees, 255 California Street, San Francisco, Nov. 2008–Jan. 2009.

1981 Susan Martin Solo show: In My Parents’ Garden, Traywick Contemporary, Berkeley, Oct.–Dec. 2008.

1982 Jennifer Bain Solo shows: Passages, Gallery One, Nashville, Nov. 2008; Linked Narratives, g2 Gallery, Scottsdale,

Amy McClure Commission: sculpture for the Center for the Tebtunis Papyri, Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, 2008.

Sono Osato Group shows: Beauty’s Burden, Educational Alliance Gallery, New York, Sept.–Oct. 2008; 33 Washington: A Retrospective, Rabbit Hole Studios, Brooklyn, Sept. 2008. Award: PollockKrasner Foundation Award, 2008.

1987 Nina Lyons Solo show: Enclosed Passage: Contemporary Figurative Sculpture, Los Medanos College Art Gallery, Pittsburg, California, Nov.–Dec. 2008.

Marilyn Donahue-Schiller MFA 1999 www.marilyndonahue.com www.cca.edu/alumni/profiles/mdonahue-schiller Marilyn Donahue-Schiller’s latest undertaking is the Sustainable Education Project, which since 2005 has been helping London-based organizations go green. Whether she’s working with teachers and students to develop school eco-clubs or writing action plans for sustainability, she reflects, “There’s something artistic about the work. It’s a very organic process to problem-solve with communities.” Here, she and her project coorganizers (she is at the far left) distribute reusable shopping bags in her London neighborhood. They have given away 7,000 bags thus far.


Tory Cross Industrial Design 2002 www.cca.edu/alumni/profiles/tcross After graduation, Tory Cross and five of his CCA classmates formed the design collective Lift, whose work won many awards and was featured in numerous industry publications. Those efforts, plus the work he was doing at his day job at the North Face, led to his current position as an advanced products designer at Nike Innovation Group, where he develops everything from messenger bags to baseball bats.

1988

Claudia Middendorf

Cynthia Guild Stoetzer

Solo show: Discard < > Discover, Farm, Wellfleet, Massachusetts, Oct. 2008. Curated: In Others’ Words, Student Union Art Gallery, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Nov.– Dec. 2008.

Award: Idaho Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, 2008.

1989 Suzanne Onodera Residencies: Millay Colony for the Arts, New York, Oct. 2008; Acadia National Park, Maine, Sept. 2008. Publication: essay on the artist Florence Yoo in Cheers to Muses: Contemporary Works by Asian American Women, AAWAA, 2007.

1990 Misty Gamble Group show: Confrontational Ceramics, Westchester Arts Council, White Plains, New York, Oct.–Dec. 2008. Speaker: Current Perspectives Lecture Series, Kansas City Art Institute, Oct. 2008. New position: special instructor, Kansas City Art Institute, fall 2008.

Cynthia Hron Solo show: Home Turf, Siena Heights University, Adrian, Michigan, Nov.– Dec. 2008. Group shows: Espace Vert, Flatfile Galleries, Chicago, Oct.– Dec. 2008; Contemporary Works, Min Museum, BoSung, Korea, Apr.–May 2008. Award: Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowship for drawing and works on paper, 2008.

1992 China Blue Solo show: Aqua Alta, OPEN X1 International Exhibition of Sculptures and Installations, San Servolo Island, Venice, Aug.–Sept. 2008. CD release: Under Voices / Les Voix de la Tour Eiffel, 2008.

Tim Perks Architecture 1991 www.cca.edu/alumni/profiles/tperks Tim Perks is a senior environmental designer for Nike’s Asia Pacific region: China, Korea, Japan, India, Australia, and beyond. Nike opens multiple stores a month in China alone, he reports, and of these his proudest efforts are the unique flagship stores. The one pictured here opened in Beijing in August 2008, and Perks was the lead designer. “It requires a lot of late-night conference calls and a lot of time on airplanes,” he says. “I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve been to China this year.”

Jianwei Fong Solo show: New Works, Stir Art Gallery, Shanghai, Nov. 2008.

Blake Herman Group show: Art from the Heart: Benefit for the East Meets West Foundation, Piedmont Community Church, Oakland, Oct. 2008.

Jeffrey Plotkin Illustrated: New Allegory (by James Owens), Xlibris, 2008; Group Rules! The Social Skills and Ground Rules for Children’s Groups (by Sherry Henig), Brenner Publishing, 2008.

Robert Shepherd Group show: Urban Re:Interventions, Center for Architecture+Design Gallery, San Francisco, Aug.–Oct. 2008.

43


ALUMNI NOTES

1993

Stella Lai

Shawn Lovell

Solo show: Fat Children Ruined My Life, F2 Gallery, Beijing, Sept.–Oct. 2008.

Award: Niche Award in the furniture category for Tree Bed, 2008.

1998 Lee Mingwei

Sergio de la Torre

Solo shows: Uncommon Senses, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, New Zealand, Dec. 2008– Mar. 2009; Quartet Project, Albion Gallery, London, Sept.–Oct. 2008.

Group show: New Blood, VertexList, Brooklyn, Sept.–Oct. 2008.

1996

Herb Thornby (with Think Studio) Featured: Communication Arts Design Annual, Nov. 2008.

Geoffrey Chadsey Solo show: You, and Other Unknowing Subjects, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, Nov.–Dec. 2008. Publication: edition of prints, Hui Press, 2008.

Anthony Pearson Solo show: Anthony Pearson, Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis, Sept.–Oct. 2008. Group shows: Truthiness: Photography as Sculpture, California Museum of Photography, Riverside, July–Oct. 2008; The Possible Document, Herald Street, London, Mar.–Apr. 2008.

Laurie Reid Group show: Mysteries, Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco, Sept.– Oct. 2008.

1997 John Clifford (with Think Studio) Featured: Communication Arts Design Annual, Nov. 2008.

44

1999 Rafi Baeza Award: gold award for the design and creation of the Reunion Booklet for the biennial AIGA Xposed show, 2008. Performance: Elvis, Royal Caribbean Cruises, June 2008.

Patrick Nelson Barnes Work featured: edited the independent feature film The Lost Coast, which won Best U.S. Narrative Feature at NewFest, New York, June 2008. The film premiered in competition at South by Southwest in March 2008 and was accepted into the Queer Lion Competition, Venice.

Rajkamal Kahlon Group show: EAF08: Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition, Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, New York, Sept. 2008–Mar. 2009.

Wayne Wang Film 1973 The celebrated writer/director/producer Wayne Wang (The Joy Luck Club) is leaving Hollywood blockbusters behind for a while to focus again on smaller, independent films about being Chinese in America. His two newest movies premiered in very different ways: one in theaters, and one on YouTube. “A Thousand Years of Good Prayers is classical and is being distributed classically,” Wang says. “It’s about an older generation. The Princess of Nebraska is shot in a very contemporary way . . . guerrilla style, and we used a lot of cell phone stuff.”

2000

Don Porcella

Jason Engelund

Solo show: Swimming Hole (reviewed in Art Business and San Francisco Art Magazine), Project Space at Mark Wolfe Contemporary Art, San Francisco, Sept.–Oct. 2008. Group shows: Art Miami (with Stefan Stux Gallery), Miami, Florida, Dec. 2008; Group Show, Cain Schulte Gallery, Berlin, Nov. 2008–Feb. 2009; 12th Annual Art for AIDS, Herbst International Exhibition Hall, San Francisco, Oct. 2008; Bridge Art Fair (with Cain Schulte Gallery), Berlin, Oct. 2008. Curated: Funhouse, Park Life Gallery, San Francisco, Oct.–Dec. 2008. Work acquired: Evolutionary Baggage, West Collection, Pennsylvania, 2008.

Group show: Winter White, Modernbook Gallery, Palo Alto, Dec. 2008–Jan. 2009.

Kathleen Walsh Work featured: “Being Kathleen Walsh: A Day in the Mind of a California Designer,” ID magazine, Sept.–Oct. 2008.

2001 Lily Cox-Richard Group show: Fall Solos 2008, Arlington Arts Center, Virginia, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Patrick Dintino Group shows: Red Dot Art Fair (with Andrea Schwartz Gallery), Miami, Florida, Dec. 2008; The Future of Abstraction, Chelsea Art Museum, New York, Nov. 2008.

2002

Arthur Krakower

Candacy Taylor

Solo show: Wild and Lovely: Monotypes and Oil Paintings, RS Gallery, Palo Alto, Oct.–Dec. 2008.

Award: Story Fund grant from the California Council for the Humanities for her new project documenting some of the longest continuously operating ethnic beauty shops in San Francisco, 2008.

Amy Lam Group show: APAture Runway II (Kearny Street Workshop’s second annual fashion show of emerging Asian Pacific American designers), Gray Area Gallery, San Francisco, Aug. 2008.

Pepe Mar Group show: Troglodytes See Better in the Dark, David Castillo Annex, Miami, Florida, Dec. 2008–Jan. 2009.

Rebecca Goodman Solo show: Somnial Lucidity, Everett Gee Jackson Gallery, San Diego State University, Nov. 2008.

Natalie Tyler Group show: Falling Away, Lana Santorelli Gallery, New York, Sept.–Oct. 2008.


Tomie dePaola MFA 1969 www.tomie.com Tomie dePaola, creator of numerous children’s books, including the Caldecott Award– winning Strega Nona series, celebrates his 75th birthday this year with a major retrospective at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts, from July 3 through November 1. The exhibition will include pieces from Strega Nona, Bill and Pete to the Rescue, and Big Anthony and the Magic Ring as well as examples of his non–picture book art.

2003 Erin McCluskey New position: public education manager, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York, Oct. 2008.

Florian Roeper Group show: Western Interiors Design + Home Show, Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, Oct. 2008.

Hank Willis Thomas Lectures: “B®ANDED: The Commodification of African American Male Identity,” Hammer Lectures, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, Oct. 2008; PhotoAlliance and Aperture West Collaborative Lecture Series, San Francisco Art Institute, Oct. 2008. Group show: Double Exposure: African Americans Before and Behind the Camera, Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, June– Sept. 2008.

2004 John Chiara Solo shows: Land’s End: Starr King (reviewed in Artweek, 7x7, and ArtBusiness.com), Eleanor Harwood Gallery, San Francisco, Aug.– Sept. 2008; Land’s End (reviewed in the New Yorker, the Village Voice, New York Magazine, BlackBook, Daily Candy, and Design Arts Daily Telegraph), Von Lintel Gallery, New York, Jan.– Mar. 2008. Group shows: Summer Gallery Group Show, Von Lintel Gallery, New York, July 2008; Innovation in Tradition, War Memorial Opera House,

San Francisco, Apr.–May 2008. Work featured: ArtForum, Nov. 2008.

Erik Adigard and Patricia McShane Graphic Design 1987

Bayeté Ross Smith Solo shows: Pomp and Circumstance: First Time to Be Adults (reviewed in the San Francisco Examiner and the San Francisco Bay Guardian), Patricia Sweetow Gallery, San Francisco, Sept.–Oct. 2008; Residency Projects Part I, Kala Art Institute, Berkeley, June–July 2008. Group shows: Off Color, Rush Arts Gallery, New York, Sept.–Nov. 2008; Double Exposure: African Americans Before and Behind the Camera, Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, June–Sept. 2008. Award: Along the Way (with Cause Collective), Sundance Film Festival official selection, 2008. Residency: McColl Center for Visual Art, Charlotte, North Carolina, 2008.

www.airxy.org www.madxs.com Erik Adigard and Patricia McShane (as the firm M-A-D, in collaboration with Chris Salter) presented AirXY at the 2008 Venice Architecture Biennale. Their multimedia installation combined real-time animation, sensors, haze, light, and sound to merge the human with the technological. Floor projections and a large, freestanding screen engaged visitors passing through the massive exhibition hall, enticing them with hypnotic imagery and architectural spaces that alternately materialized and dissolved.

2005 Carl Auge Group show: Thought of You as My Mountaintop: SFMOMA Staff Art Show, Space Gallery, San Francisco, Oct. 2008.

Jonathan Lyons Publications: “The Good Life” in Phoebe, vol. 36, no. 1, 2008; “Dashiell” in Gargoyle, no. 83, 2008; “the gravity of the moment” in Rampike, Dec. 2008.

45


ALUMNI NOTES

2006

Leslie Shows

Lacey Jane Roberts

Seth Armstrong

Group shows: Tournesol Award 5th Year Anniversary Exhibition, Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, California, Nov.–Dec. 2008; Residency Projects Part IV, Kala Art Institute, Berkeley, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Group shows: Capital Jewelers, Naomi Arin Contemporary Art, Las Vegas, Oct.–Nov. 2008; Mystery Ball, Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, California, Oct. 2008; Making Room for Wonder, SOMArts Cultural Center, San Francisco, June 2008.

Solo show: Where So Ever You May Go, Rowan Morrison, Oakland, Aug.– Oct. 2008.

David Maisel Solo shows: Library of Dust, Blue Sky Gallery, Portland, Oregon, Oct. 2008; Library of Dust, Portland Art Museum, Oregon, Sept.–Dec. 2008; Library of Dust, Haines Gallery, San Francisco, Sept.–Oct. 2008. Group shows: First Doubt: Optical Confusion in Modern Photography, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, Oct. 2008–Jan. 2009; Prix Pictet Award in Photography (show of short-listed artists in the inaugural Prix Pictet, the world’s first graphic award in sustainability), Palais de Tokyo, Paris, Oct.–Nov. 2008. Publications: Cascade Effect, Nazraeli Press, 2008; Library of Dust, Chronicle Books, 2008. Work featured: “What Remains,” British Journal of Photography, Nov. 2008; “David Maisel’s Library of Dust” (cover and feature article), X-tra Contemporary Art Quarterly, fall 2008.

Weston Teruya Residency: Oliver Ranch Studio (inaugural resident artist), Alexander Valley, California, June–July 2008.

Jamie Treacy Group show: At Play, Community Art Gallery, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, Sept.–Nov. 2008.

2007 Renée Gertler Group show: Blot Out the Sun: Work from North of Los Angeles, Sam Lee Gallery, Los Angeles, Dec. 2008– Jan. 2009.

Marnia Johnston Cocurated: Multispecies Salon II, PLAySPACE, CCA, San Francisco, Nov.–Dec. 2008.

Nikolai Moderbacher Performance: Niko’s Kids, Lower Eastside Girls Club, New York, Oct. 2008.

Zachary Royer Scholz Solo show: Open Space, Chandra Cerrito Contemporary, Oakland, Dec. 2008–Jan. 2009.

46

Dania Myers Projects: worked as an art director on the domestic and international one-sheets for Saw IV, international character banners for Sweeney Todd, and the international Joker character banner and domestic/international in-theater standee for The Dark Knight, 2007–8.

2008 Luke Butler Group show: Capital Jewelers, Naomi Arin Contemporary Art, Las Vegas, Oct.–Nov. 2008.

Rachelle Cohen Curated: Regarding Neighbors: A Portrait of Place, 18 Reasons, San Francisco, Aug. 2008. Group shows: Blot Out the Sun: Work from North of Los Angeles, Sam Lee Gallery, Los Angeles, Dec. 2008–Jan. 2009; Creative Cartographies, BAC Gallery, Brooklyn, Sept. 2008–Jan. 2009.

Eliot Daughtry (with Killer Banshee Studios) Solo shows: Unleashed Power, RADAR, San Francisco, Dec. 2008; Unleashed Power and Mobility, Le Petit Versailles, New York, June 2008; JenRO, Rawhide, San Francisco, Dec. 2007; Greetings from Robot City II, Femina Potens, San Francisco, Aug.–Sept. 2007. Group shows: Illuminated Corridor, Kahn’s Alley, Oakland Day of Art, Oct. 2008; Illuminated Corridor, Gansevoort Plaza, New York, May 2008; Double Vision, ATA, San

Casper Mork-Ulnes Architecture 1997 www.mork-ulnesdesign.com Casper Mork-Ulnes and his wife, Lexie, recently completed one of the biggest undertakings of their architecture and design careers: a three-year top-to-bottom transformation of their San Francisco Victorian home, originally built in 1896. Previously a hippie boarding house complete with communal shower and murals of mandalas and naked goddesses, it retains some of its old “aura,” including wainscoting and windows salvaged from other old Victorians, but the warren of dark rooms has opened up into a masterpiece of spacious, modern Norwegian design.


Francisco, Oct. 2007; Prelinger on Prelinger, Illuminated Corridor, San Francisco, Oct. 2007. Curated: T-10 Video Festival, 21 Grand, Oakland, Jan. 2008. View an enhanced version of Daughtry’s CCA MFA thesis project at www.uncannyvalley.net.

Christina Empedocles Commission: Flock mural installation, William J. Rutter Center, UCSF Mission Bay campus, San Francisco, 2008.

Naoko Okabe Group show: Winter Salon 2008, Micaëla Gallery, San Francisco, Nov. 2008–Jan. 2009.

Greg Schultz Awards: For his Peapod home ultrasound system, Schultz was a speaker and spotlighted designer at the Industrial Designers Society of America’s Bay Area’s Best Gala, Oct. 2008; received a bronze IDEA award from BusinessWeek magazine and the Industrial Designers Society of America, 2008; was featured in Innovation magazine’s Yearbook of Design Excellence, fall 2008; and was a finalist in ID magazine’s student design review, 2008. Schultz exhibited his Viridis lounge chair (a CCA student project) at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York in May 2008, and the chair won a furniture production contract with Bevara Design House in conjunction with Walmart.com.

Dennis Oppenheim Painting 1965 www.dennis-oppenheim.com Dennis Oppenheim, a pioneer of land art, performance art, and video in the 1960s and 1970s, was one of 19 international artists commissioned to create monumental sculptures for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. His two pieces will remain permanently installed. The 35-foot-tall Raining Halos, shown here, includes 60 stainless-steel rings and evokes both the Olympic rings and the aurora borealis. As the rings spin, a fine water mist cools spectators underneath. Engagement, his other commission, is 30 feet tall with pitched-roof houses perched atop conjoined rings.

Drop Us a Line Tell us about your creative and scholarly work from the last six to 12 months: exhibitions, publications, screenings, performances, lectures, promotions, and awards. Please include all relevant dates (including months!), titles, venue names, and locations as well as your name and year of graduation. Send us images of your artworks as well (preferably JPGs, 300 dpi and at least 6 inches across). Include the title and date for each artwork. Individual email messages greater than 2 MB will not be received. Email your news and JPGs to alumninotes@cca.edu or facultynotes@cca.edu. You can also mail your info, including exhibition announcements, to Alumni Notes / Faculty Notes CCA Communications Department 1111 Eighth Street San Francisco CA 94107-2247 Notes are featured on a space-available basis. We cannot return slides and photographs, so please do not send your original copies! You can reach Jessica Russell and Lindsey Lyons in the Alumni Relations Office at 415.703.9595. Sign up at www.cca.edu/subscribe to get alumni news and event info delivered by email each month!

47


IN MEMORIAM

Alumni Mary Avary

Gordon King

Painting 1965 Menlo Park, California May 4, 2008

Industrial Design 1956 Sacramento, California September 21, 2008

David Chikalla

Virginia (Ginny) Kleker

Illustration 1959 Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin September 18, 2008

MFA 2005 Oakland, California October 8, 2008

Craig Clemens

Edwin Lee

Painting 1965 Oakland, California December 26, 2008

Graphic Design 1954 Ossining, New York October 18, 2008

Joaquin DeLeon

Lisa Robinson

Interior Architecture 1988 Houston, Texas June 2008

Interdisciplinary Fine Arts 1969 Sarasota, Florida November 21, 2008

Carolyne Harader-Blaisdell

Coosje van Bruggen

Art Education 1963 Towson, Maryland November 16, 2008

Honorary Doctorate 1996 Los Angeles, California January 10, 2009

Iona Hepper

Charles (Chuck) Wilson

1935 Stockton, California September 25, 2008

Industrial Design 1959 Santa Clara, California June 2008 Ralph Borge, left, and Harry X. Ford, right, hold a drawing of Ford made by Borge on the occasion of Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retirement as CCA president in 1984

48


TABLE OF CONTENTS

02 Radical Jewelry Ethical metalsmithing at CCA 06 Soil to Studio Rediscovering the Oakland campus with Sasha Duerr

10 Mike Mignola

On Hellboy, and getting back to the drawing board

12 Jennifer Hung

A day in the life at T: The New York Times Style Magazine

14 School News 18 Awards and Accolades 20 Bookshelf 24 Spotlight 26 Advancement News

Gifts and grants, David Sedaris, scholarships

30 2008 Honor Roll of Donors 35 CCA Wattis Institute 36 Faculty Notes 42 Alumni Notes 48 In Memoriam

Photo credits All artworks are reproduced with the kind permission of the artists and/or their representatives, copyright the artists. All images appear courtesy the artists unless noted otherwise: Covers: Alexandra Styc; p. 1: Robert Adler Photography; pp. 2–5: Richard Matzinger; pp. 6, 8 (left and top), and 9: Sasha Duerr; p. 8 (bottom right): Deepa Natarajan; pp. 10–11: courtesy Mike Mignola and Dark Horse Comics Inc.; pp. 12–13: courtesy The New York Times Style Magazine; p. 14 (left): Steven Heller; p. 14 (right): Erica Meade and Kathryn Hautanen; p. 15: Stephen Beal; p. 16 (top left): Pablo Iragorri; p. 16 (bottom left): courtesy Marx & Zavattero, San Francisco; p. 18 (left): Darlene Bouchard; p. 19 (left): courtesy Mark Wolfe Contemporary Art, San Francisco; pp. 24–25: Nikki Ritcher Photography; pp. 28–29: Keanan Evers; p. 34 (right): courtesy the artist and kurimanzutto, Mexico City; p. 35 (center): courtesy Store, London, and Motive Gallery, Amsterdam; p. 35 (bottom): courtesy Jan Mot, Brussels; p. 37: Karl Petzke; p. 39: Killer Banshee Studios; p. 41 (right grouping, clockwise from top right): Monica Hernandez, Robert Adler Photography, Robert Adler Photography, Karl Petzke, Robert Adler Photography, Robert Adler Photography; p. 43: courtesy Nike; p. 44: courtesy Magnolia Pictures; p. 45 (right grouping): Anke Burger; p. 46: Bruce Damonte; p. 47: Michael Suh; p. 48: Stone and Steccati

Ralph Borge

Harry X. Ford

Painting 1952 Painting/Drawing faculty 1952–1988 Point Reyes Station, California December 30, 2008

CCA President 1959–1984 Las Vegas, Nevada December 29, 2008

Ralph Borge graduated from CCA in 1952 and went on to teach here for 38 years while maintaining his own highly successful art career. He became quite an elder statesman of the Painting and Drawing programs and a mentor to generations of artists, several of whom also became respected professors at CCA. He retired in 1988 and was accorded the rank of professor emeritus. At the time he humorously described his life at the college as “beginning and ending in Room C2 of the Carriage House!” As an artist Mr. Borge pursued his own style, variously described as “social realism,” “magic realism,” and “meticulous realism,” at a time when abstraction was the trend. He was represented at the breakthrough figurative show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1962, where he was praised by Time magazine for possessing “a fascination with texture and a gift for drama.” He participated in many major exhibitions throughout the United States and received many awards, including a Guggenheim fellowship. We remain eternally grateful to Mr. Borge for his many contributions to the college.

Harry X. Ford served as president of the college for 25 years, from 1959 until 1984, leading the school forward in numerous ways and laying a considerable foundation for the amazing growth and accomplishments of recent decades. The Oakland campus changed dramatically during Mr. Ford’s tenure. He led the charge to construct a number of new buildings. Founder’s Hall, Martinez Hall, Treadwell Ceramic Arts Center, Irwin Student Center, and the Shaklee Building were all completed during his presidency. In an interview published in the centennial issue of Glance, Mr. Ford said that his most pivotal efforts as president centered on taking the college in an international direction. Working with Professor of Graphic Design Wolfgang Lederer, he laid the groundwork for the establishment of international exchange programs. With trustee emeritus Leo Helzel he was also involved in the World Print Council, whose sponsorship of international exhibitions carried the college’s name to audiences worldwide. Yet another highlight of his tenure was the establishment of a sister-college relationship with Osaka University of Arts. The links between our institutions are sustained with much appreciation to this day.

Glance is published twice a year by the CCA Communications Department 1111 Eighth Street San Francisco CA 94107-2247 415.703.9542 glance@cca.edu

Glance

Change of address? Please notify the CCA Advancement Office 5212 Broadway Oakland CA 94618-1426 510.594.3779 bjones@cca.edu

Lindsey Westbrook

Opt out of the paper version of Glance and receive a PDF instead by emailing publications@cca.edu and including “Glance” in the subject line.

Assistant Director of Publications

Spring 2009 Volume 17, No. 2

Editor

Director of Publications Erin Lampe

Meghan Ryan

Printed by America Web Inc., Denver By using recycled paper (30 percent postconsumer waste) for this magazine, CCA saved 35 trees, 13,207 gallons of water, 26,000,000 BTUs, 2,185 pounds of solid waste, and 4,029 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions. Canadian Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40065056 Canadian Return Address: DP Global Mail, 4960-2 Walker Road, Windsor, ON, N9A6J3

Contributors Susan Avila Stacen Berg Chris Bliss Camille Gerstel Barbara Jones Kim Lessard Lindsey Lyons Jim Norrena Sarah Owens Brenda Tucker Lindsey Westbrook

Donations in his memory may be sent to Attn. Camille Gerstel, Advancement Office California College of the Arts 5212 Broadway Oakland CA 94618-1426

Design

Please make checks payable to CCA and note that the gift is for the Ralph Borge Scholarship Fund. For more information, call 510.594.3787 or email cgerstel@cca.edu.

Faculty Advisor

CCA Sputnik, a student design team

Bob Aufuldish

Designers Jennifer Hennesy Alexandra Styc


Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage PA I D Denver, CO Permit No. 3280

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS 1111 Eighth Street San Francisco CA 94107-2247

San Francisco Oakland

Get CCA news and event info delivered by email each month! Subscribe at www.cca.edu/subscribe Opt out of the paper version of Glance and receive a PDF instead by emailing publications@cca.edu and including “Glance” in the subject line.

CCA is on Facebook! Show your support by adding our official page to your profile and joining the alumni group if you’re an alum!

A publication for the CCA community Spring 2009 Vol. 17, No. 2

Glance Spring 2009  

Glance Spring 2009

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you