Page 1

September 2017

Inside This Month... utilizing DNA technology on your ranch appreciating the old west one cattle drive at a time September 2017 California Cattleman 1


Baldy Builders

Pedretti Ranches Registered Herefords Since 1946

Bulls For Sale at the ranch private treaty

Pedretti Ranches Gino Pedretti ����������������������������������������������������209/756-1609 Mark St� Pierre �������������������������������������������������209/233-1406 Gino Pedretti Jr� �����������������������������������������������209/756-2088 Gino Pedretti III������������������������������������������������209/756-1612 Nick Brinlee ������������������������������������������������������209/233-1403 Justin Sandlin ��������������������������������������������������209/233-1404 E-mail���������������������������������������GBL1domino@sbcglobal�net

1975 E ROOSEVELT RD • EL NIDO, CA 95317 2 California Cattleman September 2017


e v i L s u n Joi nline! or O HAYTHORN RANCH • OGALLALA, NEBRASKA

SHASTA LIVESTOCK • COTTONWOOD, CALIFORNIA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: OCTOBER 17

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy. bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

September 2017 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

WE HEAR YOU

by CCA Second Vice President Mike Williams

One of the most enjoyable duties of serving as an officer for the California Cattlemen’s Association has been the opportunity to travel and meet ranchers and cattlemen from all over the state. It has been a very rewarding experience. I have learned a great deal about ranching and even more about ranchers. I am continually amazed with the caliber of people in this industry. I have found the men and women who ranch and raise cattle are some of the smartest and most capable on the planet. They need to be. Ranching presents unique challenges that require a persistent adherence to values and traditions, while at the same time demanding the flexibility to adapt to ever changing environmental, economic and social circumstances. The knowledge, skills and experience of the ranchers who make up CCA is the strength of the association. The more ranchers who participate and add their perspective to the issues we face as cattlemen, the more effective we are as an organization. Unfortunately, there are some ranchers who feel – as I once did – that organizations such as CCA only serve the interest of a few prominent people. They believe their input is neither desired nor valued. I can assure you that is not the case in this organization. Great efforts are made by the officers and the staff to encourage the participation of ranchers across the state and provide opportunities for their ideas, viewpoints and concerns to be heard. It has been my experience, since becoming involved in the California Cattlemen’s Association, that if your viewpoint is not being heard, it is because you are not

showing up and expressing it. It is important that you get involved and communicate your ideas and concerns. If you are unable to attend the state association meetings, be active in your local ones. Communicate your views with those from your local association who do attend the state meetings. Of course, showing up and presenting your opinion does not guarantee that others will agree with you. In any room full of strong-minded, smart and opinionated producers there are bound to be a variety of thoughts and ideas. Good debate is a sign of a healthy organization. Members must feel free to express their point of view, and be willing to respect others when they do the same. When you have expressed an opinion, but find a majority of others do not support it, consider these three steps. First, re-examine your position. It is important to listen to and reflect on opposing viewpoints. There may be things you have not considered. Second, change the way you are presenting your argument. This not only includes what you say, but how and when you say it. Third, respect other people’s point of view. Assume those you disagree with are smart and honorable, they just see things differently than you. In any industry as large and varied as this one there will be different perspectives. The process of converging the various, and sometimes conflicting perspectives into good, sound and clear policy for the organization to pursue can be challenging at times, but good, honest debate makes better policy, and as we pursue better policy we build a better industry.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Bakersfield, CA and additional mailing offices. Publication # 8-3600 National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman September 2017


ON THE COVER

This month’s cover photo was taken by Katie Eason, Adin, and features north state cowboys Joe Tipton, Sierraville and Clint Tipton, Loma Rica, pushing pairs through the rugged terrain of the Ash Valley on the DeForest Ranch. If you have a photograph you think might make a good cover shot, reach out to the CCA office by calling (916) 444-0845 or enter it into the annual CCA & CCW Photo Contest for a chance to win $500!

SEPTEMBER 2017 Volume 100, Issue 8 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN At CCA, your voice matters

4

BUNKHOUSE CCA working for the small producer

8

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 10 CCA litigates over critical habitat designation

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS SEPT. 8

NAPA-SOLANO CATTLEMEN’S MEETING Emigh Ranch, Dixon

HERD HEALTH CHECK 14 What buyers are looking for

SEPT. 12

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER Using DNA to improve herd quality

28

MENDOCINO-LAKE CATTLEMEN’S DINNER Broiler Steak House, Redwood Valley

SEPT. 20

FUTURE FOCUS Young producers show ambition over summer break

44

TRANSPORATION AND ELD WORKSHIP Nugget Casino and Resort, Sparks, Nev.

SEPT. 22

CCA CATTLE-PAC TEAM SORTING, BUFFET & AUCTION Harris Ranch, Coalinga

SEPT. 23

CHIMES 82 CattleWomen gearing up for convention

BQA WORKSHOP Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center Browns Valley

SEPT. 23

RANGELAND TRUST TALK 86 Planning now to keep ranch down the road

SACRAMENTO FARM-TO-FORK FESTIVAL Downtown Sacramento

OCT. 7

SONOMA-MARIN CATTLEMEN’S DINNER Respini Ranch, Sebastopol

SPECIAL FEATURES

NOV. 29-DEC. 1 101ST CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev.

FROM COAST TO COAST 50 NCBA CEO sends warning COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR 78 Improving your animal handling skills

In depth: How to make DNA testing work for you Carrying on tradition on the Dot 7 Ranch What does the Japanese Tariff mean to you? CCA in the 1980s Sharing tradition on Main Street USA

READER SERVICES

Buyers’ Guide Obituaries, Wedding Bells & New Arrivals Advertisers Index

20 32 36 52 64

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

90 96 98

September 2017 California Cattleman 5


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6 California Cattleman September 2017

American AgCredit | CoBank | Farm Credit West


N

EW

SA

LE

D

AT

SONOMA MOUNTAIN HEREFORDS 11th Annual Bull Sale

September 9, 2017 • 1 p.m. • Kenwood, CA

6057

5113 B

5115 J

5136

6038

6066 J

Featuring 50-plus long yearling and 2-year-old Horned & Polled Hereford bulls! To request a catalog, contact: Jim, Marcia and Jamie Mickelson (707) 481-3440 JMMick@sonic.net Herdsman: Bobby and Heidi Mickelson (707) 396-7364 5174 Sonoma Mountain Rd. Santa Rosa, CA 95404 sonomamountainherefords.com

September 2017 California Cattleman 7

E!


BUNKHOUSE

Why Join?

CCA battling on your behalf by CCA Director of Finance Lisa Brendlen pickups and trailers commonly Last month I was invited by the used in agriculture from the Basic San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Inspection of Terminals (BIT) Association to come down and work program administered by the a booth at the Mid-State Fair and California Highway Patrol. The BIT help recruit new CCA members. We program requires the payment of an staff are excited when we receive annual fee, 90-day self-inspections an invitation like this; it gives us the of vehicles and a thorough onsite opportunity to get out of the office inspection by BIT program personnel and to speak to ranchers that we at least once every six years, including otherwise would not be able to. review of all maintenance and 90-day During my visit in Paso Robles, I inspection records. spoke to one gentleman in particular In addition to the daily work who asked me “I’m a small producer, that goes on at the Capitol, CCA is why should I join CCA?” My response was the standard answer that currently the plaintiff in numerous lawsuits to protect our members’ I give when asked that question and also what I feel is the most important rights as ranchers and property owners, including: reasons to be a member: Two fulltime lobbyists, a contract lobbyist CCA v. California Fish and Game and a full staff working tirelessly on Commission your behalf on both legislative and This lawsuit was filed against regulatory issues. the California Fish and Game Hundreds of bills are introduced Commission in an effort to overturn every legislative session. It is our the illegal 2014 listing of the gray legislative staff ’s job to analyze all of the bills introduced each year, evaluate wolf as endangered species under the California Endangered Species Act the impact they might have on the (CESA). cattle industry or the agricultural industry as a whole, and then work to CCA v. California Department of Fish kill bills that might harm the industry and move any favorable bills forward. and Wildlife This lawsuit was filed against This year, just such a harmful California Department of Fish bill, SB 726, was introduced with and Wildlife for failure to conduct the intent to reinstate a 40 percent legally-mandated five-year status California Estate Tax (or Death evaluations for 233 species listed Tax) for every dollar beyond the as endangered or threatened under current $5.5 million exemption CESA. Status evaluations could found in federal law. Farmers and ranchers would have been particularly result in information supporting the downlisting or delisting of these vulnerable to the estate tax because species. the price of land, cattle, farm equipment, barns, etc. can very easily CCA v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service exceed the exemption. CCA worked CCA brought this case to force swiftly to successfully defeat this the US Fish and Wildlife Service to legislation, and CCA continues to work on the elimination of the federal consider the economic impacts of critical habitat designations to small estate tax in Washington, D.C. business owners such as ranchers, as Another success that CCA required by the Regulatory Flexibility had this year was sponsoring Act, and to provide relief for ranchers and passing legislation to exempt 8 California Cattleman September 2017

LISA BRENDLEN whose bottom line will be impacted by critical habitat designations for three amphibian species in California. If you would like more information or have any questions regarding any of the current legislative, regulatory or legal issues CCA is currently engaged in, please do call the office. As staff, we are here to answer any questions you may have, listen to any concerns you have and get busy working on issues that are impacting you directly. Additionally, CCA continues to strive to keep you apprised to what is going on in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. ,weekly with Legislative Bulletin and monthly with Hot Irons and the California Cattleman magazine. As a grass-roots organization, the more members we have the louder our voice, and the more resources we have to work with the better able we are to ensure your livelihood and that the ranching way of life is preserved. With a small staff, we rely heavily on our current members to spread the word about the value of being a member of the California Cattlemen’s Association. You all are our very best resource, and we hope that you see the value every day of your membership and hope that you are willing to tell your neighbors and friends about what CCA is doing every day in Sacramento.


SHASTA

LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD

Cottonwood, California Mark your calendar for these upcoming events... ANNIVERSARY FEEDER SALE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

FEATURING 2,500 HEAD OF QUALITY COWS AND CALVES

ANNUAL

SHASTA BULL SALE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7

Sa

! y a d i r F le Every

For Information, Please Call Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793 or visit our website at www.shastalivestock.com September 2017 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

CCA Sues USFWS Over Critical Habitat Designation for Amphibians On July 31, CCA sued the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) for violating the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) when the agency designated 1.8 million acres of land in California as critical habitat for the Yosemite toad, the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog and the Northern distinct population segment of the Mountain yellowlegged frog. CCA is represented by the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF), and is joined in the suit by the California Farm Bureau Federation (CFBF) and the California Wool Growers Association (CWGA). The RFA requires federal agencies to consider the impacts of regulations upon small businesses, small organizations and local governments and to consider alternatives that may lessen economic burdens on those small entities. According to Reed Hopper, the PLF senior attorney representing CCA in the case, “the RFA is meant to balance regulatory goals with the needs of a healthy economy. But agencies like the Fish and Wildlife Service have been concocting spurious excuses for not complying and refusing to undertake the required economic-impact studies.” The USFWS refuses to conduct RFA analyses when it designates critical habitat for threatened or endangered species, claiming that it is exempt from the RFA because designations of critical habitat only regulate other federal agencies, such as the US Forest Service, and not small business entities. The Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy, which provides federal agencies guidance on how to comply with the RFA, takes issue with USFWS’ position, stating that “critical habitat designations have direct effects on small businesses which should be reflected in regulatory flexibility analyses.” Additionally, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which also designated critical habitat, does comply with RFA requirements, suggesting that USFWS is not, in fact, exempt from the law. 10 California Cattleman September 2017

Indeed, the potential economic impacts of designating 1.8 million acres of critical habitat for the three amphibian species could be significant. In opposing the designation of critical habitat in 2014, CCA, CFBF and CWGA relayed the concerns of one grazing permittee whose allotment is entirely within the amphibians’ critical habitat unit and who feared that U.S. Forest Service management of her allotment could force her to sell her entire 320-head herd. Other permittees feared that smaller reductions in their herds necessitated by critical habitat designation would likewise render their ranching operations economically unviable. But the potential damage of critical habitat designation is not limited to federal permittees—the economic consequences of such regulation ripple out to local businesses and governments that rely on agricultural production. CCA is suing the USFWS to ensure that the agency complies with the RFA, and to provide economic relief for the ranchers whose family businesses are likely to be impacted by critical habitat designated for the three amphibian species. CCA hopes that this case could also lead to relief for ranchers and landowners throughout the country impacted by other designations of critical habitat by the USFWS.


PerForMance-TeSTeD, anGuS BuLLS SeLL SaT., SePTeMBer 9 • cLM, GaLT, ca areLLano Bravo

Spring Yearlings

&

Diablo Valley Angus

Saturday, September 9

CAttLEMEN’S LIvEStoCK MARKEt Galt, California, 12:30 p.m.

Bravo Ten X 6420

vaLLey FallDIaBLo Yearlings

DIaBLo raMPaGe 1146

aar Ten X 7008 Sa x n Bar emulation eXT

Quaker Hill rampage 0a36 x In Focus

CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +7 +1.9 +50 +99 +22 +.62 +.55 +50.11 +120.43

CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +13 +1.3 +62 +111 +23 +.72 +.64 +59.64 +141.08

Bravo conSenSuS 6402

connealy consensus 7229 x Leachman right Time CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +4 +2.5 +50 +85 +23 +.50 +.31 +55.92 +94.18

DIaBLo Ten X 1124

aar Ten X 7008 Sa x Summitcrest complete CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +3 +2.7 +76 +144 +26 +.61 +.82 +72.11 +180.63

Also Selling

Registered Angus Fall Pairs & Registered Fall Yearling Heifers

Sale Books

www.parnelldickinson.com sales@parnelldickinson.com

Bravo Ten X 6431

aar Ten X 7008 Sa x eXar upshot 0562B

CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +7 +1.9 +51 +92 +22 +.54 +.43 +52.23 +110.77

CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +5 +2.6 +70 +142 +19 +.93 +.66 +53.02 +186.41

SALE MANAGED BY

John Dickinson 916-806-1919 Jake Parnell 916-662-1298

DIaBLo 10X 1122

aar Ten X 7008 Sa x n Bar emulation eXT

Adhemar Arellano: 916-996-9855

10365 Gilliam Drive, Elk Grove, CA 95757

Diablo Valley Angus Byron, California

Dennis Lopez: 209-814-2440

THD ©

September 2017 California Cattleman 11


CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Zone 2 - Peach

Zone 1 - Yellow

1

Zone 3 - Light Blue Shasta-Trinity Plumas-Sierra Tehama Butte Glenn-Colusa Yuba-Sutter Tahoe (Placer-Nevada) Yolo

3

2

Humboldt-Del Norte Mendocino-Lake Sonoma-Marin Napa-Solano

Siskiyou Modoc Lassen Fall River-Big Valley

Zone 4 - Pink

San Mateo-San Francisco Santa Cruz Santa Clara Contra Costa-Alameda

Zone 5 - Green

Zone 6 - Purple

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Calaveras

Merced-Mariposa Madera Fresno-Kings

San Joaquin-Stanislaus

Tuolumne

Zone 7 - Tan

5 4

Zone 8 - Turquoise Santa Barbara Tulare Kern Inyo-Mono-Alpine High Desert

Monterey San Benito San Luis Obispo

Zone 9 - Orange Southern California San Diego-Imperial Ventura

6 7

CCA committee leadership POLICY COMMITTEES AG & FOOD POLICY Chair: Jack Lavers Vice Chair: Ramsay Wood

CATTLE HEALTH & WELL BEING Chair: Tom Talbot, DVM Vice Chair: A.E. “Bud” Sloan, DVM

8

CATTLE MARKETING Chair: Col. Jake Parnell Vice Chair: Holly Foster

FEDERAL LANDS Chair: Mike Byrne Vice Chair: Buck Parks

9

PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Chair: Adam Cline Vice Chair: Clayton Koopmann

2017 CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Dave Daley

Zone Director 5 Gib Gianandrea

First Vice President Mark Lacey

Zone Director 6 Bob Erickson

Second Vice President Mike Williams

Zone Director 7 Anthony Stornetta

mbw61@aol.com • (805) 823-4245

anthony.stornetta@sbcfire.com • (805) 391-0044

Second Vice President Pat Kirby

Zone Director 8 John Hammon

pat.kirby@algilbert.com • (209) 604-3719

hamdawg66@gmail.com • (559) 623-1538

Second Vice President Mike Miller

Zone Director 9 Bud Sloan

western-beef@juno.com • (408) 929-8425

Asloan5119@aol.com • (805) 340-0693

Treasurer Rob von der Lieth

Feeder Council Member Paul Cameron

ddaley@csuchico.edu • (530) 521-3826 mjlacey1@me.com • (760) 784-1309

rvdlieth@aol.com • (916) 769-1153

Feeder Council Chairman Mike Smith

msmith@harrisranch.com • (559) 301-0076

Feeder Council Vice Chair Trevor Freitas

trevor@mendescalfranch.com • (559) 805-5431

Zone Director 1 Ramsey Wood

ramseywood83@gmail.com • (530) 680-8985

cgianandre@aol.com • (209) 256-3782 bobericksonequipment@yahoo.com • (209) 652-3536

Feeder Council Member Jesse Larios

lariosjess1@gmail.com •(760) 455-3888

At Large Appointee Myron Openshaw

openshaw4@gmail.com •(530) 521-0099

At Large Appointee Mark Nelson

kmarknelson@gmail.com •(916) 849-5558

At Large Appointee Rob Frost

Zone Director 3 Wally Roney

At Large Appointee Darrel Sweet

Zone Director 4 Mike Bettencourt

At Large Appointee Jerry Hemsted

bjr@billieweb.com •(530) 519-3608 mbteamroper@aol.com • (209) 499-0794

pcmesquitecattle@sbcglobal.net •(760) 427-6906

Zone Director 2 Hugo Klopper

hugoklopper@frontier.com • (707) 498-7810

CCA affiliate leadership

rbmaf@juno.com •(805) 377-2231 dsweet@cattlemen.net • (209) 601-4074 Jhemsted@att.net • (530) 949-6294

12 California Cattleman September 2017

ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL Chair: Heston Nunes

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION President: Cheryl Lafranchi Vice President: Rita McPhee Secretary: Celeste Settrini

YOUNG CATTLEMEN’S COMMITTEE Chair: Rebecca Swanson Vice Chair: Steven Pozzi Secretary: Rebecca Barnett Publicity Chair: Melissa Hardy

For more information about CCA’s Executive Board or committees, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Arellano Bravo/Diablo Valley Angus Production Sale, 12 p.m.

THD ©

WEDnESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

CLM RepResentatives

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

Jake Parnell .............................. 916-662-1298 George Gookin .......................209-482-1648

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

Mark Fischer ............................209-768-6522

Thomas Angus Ranch Bull Sale, 12 p.m.

Rex Whittle.............................. 209-996-6994

WEDnESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

Kris Gudel ................................. 916-208-7258

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

Joe Gates ..................................707-694-3063 Abel Jimenez ........................... 209-401-2515

TUESDAY, ocToBER 3

Jason Dailey .............................916-439-7761

Lorenzen Ranches Bull Sale, 12 p.m.

saLe eveRy wednesday

FRiDAY, novEMBER 3

Butcher Cows .......................................8:30 a.m.

CLM Annual Fall Pair & Bred Cow Sale & Social, 2 p.m.

Pairs/Bred Cows .............................. 11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle ........................................... 12 p.m.

SATURDAY, novEMBER 4

auCtion MaRket

49th Annual Central California ‘World of Bulls’ Sale, 12 p.m.

Address ...12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office...........................................209-745-1515 Fax ............................................... 209-745-1582 Website/Market Report .....www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast .........www.lmaauctions.com

Central California 49th annual

westeRn video MaRket

Call to Consign to tHEsE WVM salEs:

Oct. 26 from Cottonwood/Nov. 26 from Reno

THD ©

W rld ofbulls

saturday, november 4

Galt, California

September 2017 California Cattleman 13


HERD HEALTH CHECK

considerations buyers make when evaluating feeder calves from Biozyme, Inc. Health. Source. Genetics. Size. Condition. All of these are factors that cattle buyers should take into account when buying their next load of calves to background on grass or put into a feedlot. A healthy calf is going to eat and grow more efficiently so health is of the utmost importance. Be sure to know about the overall health and nutrition program of the operation where the calves originated. “It helps if you can ascertain that the calves have been weaned and that the last preventative vaccine was given at least 30 days before you plan to take possession. This will aid in fewer sick calves and get them off to a better start,” said Gary Fike, Director of Commercial Marketing for the Red Angus Association of America. He encourages the backgrounder to implant the calves to help with gains, but regardless if they are implanted or grow naturally, a good nutrition program is vital. “A higher dose implant on cattle consuming low quality forage or a low energy ration results in a poorer return on investment,” he said. Information is powerful, and that is where the source and genetics of the calves you are going to buy play an important role in their future outcome. Fike strongly encourages those looking for calves to consider buying those that are already identified in a breed-specific program like AngusSource®, the Red Angus Feeder Calf Certification Program (FCCP) or Allied Access. Knowing a little bit about the calves’ genetics and source can help predict their outcome through the feedlot.

14 California Cattleman September 2017

“The FCCP tag program is a 99-cent investment that typically returns more than $20 per calf,” Fike said of the program that documents 50-percent Red Angus genetics, ranch of origin and group age. And if buying calves enrolled in a program isn’t feasible, keeping them uniform in type is still vital. Keep them the same size, weight and color to maximize efficiencies. “If you really want to succeed it is best to start with similar genetics,” Fike said. “It helps from the standpoint of having uniformity throughout the remainder of their lives and will result in fewer ‘sorts’ down the road; either when sold again or placed in a feedlot.” Two more important factors that cattle buyers should consider are size and condition. Fleshy, over-conditioned calves generally convert more poorly, and generally are less efficient in their gains later on. Calves that are thin and “green” are those mostly sought after to get the biggest kick in terms of compensatory gains later on. They will be more expensive on a per pound basis than fleshy calves, but will also gain more rapidly and be more efficient. Another consideration for buying stockers is location. Transportation costs for calves bought in a different geographic region will cut into your profit. Finally, once you have your stockers purchased, DNA TESTED!don’t forget their nutritional needs. Lighter weight calves will ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


38th Annual Bull Sale SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2017

SELLING 75 ANGUS BULLS AT THE RANCH NEAR CALISTOGA 2017 offering includes these bulls and more of the same kind and quality!

OAK RIDGE ALL STAR 1445

OAK RIDGE WILLIE 226 SIRE: Baldridge Willie Y34

SIRE: Five Star 7043 All Star 9003 MGS: S A V Pioneer 7301

MGS: Mytty In Focus

BW

72

BW

74

WW

790

WW

804

YW

1241

YW

1345

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

-2.1

57

101

26

1.03

0.48

-.006

63.04

59.46

50.78

136.20

1.9

72

124

17

.84

.44

.009

61.57

92.53

41.04

160.33

OAK RIDGE BLACK PEARL 206

OAK RIDGE TOUR OF DUTY 496 SIRE: R B Tour Of Duty 177

SIRE: SydGen Black Pearl 2006 MGS: S A V 8180 Traveler 004

MGS: G A R Predestined

BW

70

BW

76

WW

743

WW

741

YW

1263

YW

1307

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

1.3

49

87

27

.75

.31

.026

48.34

44.50

38.04

122.52

1.5

62

106

25

.59

.67

-.015

61.34

62.52

40.62

130.56

Also selling sons of:

CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE PA FORTITUDE SYDGEN BLACK PEARL

PVF INSIGHT 0129 OAK RIDGE ATLAS 083 V A R RANGER 3008 FIVE STAR ALL STAR 9003

For Sale Book, Contact:

THE LA FRANCHI FAMILY

Cheryl and Frank: (707) 292-1013 13250 Hwy. 128 • Calistoga, CA 94515

September 2017 California Cattleman 15


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 thrive on higher quality forages, where heavier calves can perform on slightly lower quality grasses. Either way, it is vital to provide a proper mineral and protein supplementation program to ensure the calves get the right balance of protein and minerals to convert the forages to energy. This is where the Gain Smart™ Stocker Program plays an important role in giving your calves the

Apply to be a CCA Convention Intern! Are you a California Young Cattlemen’s Committee member with an interest in attending the 101st California Cattlemen’s Association and California CattleWomen, Inc. Annual Convention? California beef community’s favorite event will take place in Sparks, Nev. at the Nugget Casino Resort Nov. 29- Dec. 1. CCA is seeking interns with a desire to serve and assist CCA members and staff. The convention intern team assists CCA staff members behind the scenes at the convention with event set up, registration, event monitoring and more! You can take minutes in the CCA committee meetings that interest you most or help the cattlemen and cattlewomen from across the state get settled and squared away with their convention registration, in addition to building relationships and making connections with industry professionals and a large group of your like-minded peers who are passionate about the beef cattle community. If you are a hard worker with a high standard for customer service and a can-do attitude, please send YCC advisor, Malorie Bankhead, a cover letter outlining your desire to serve on the CCA convention intern team and what makes you an ideal candidate. Please email your letter no later than Oct. 13 to malorie@ calcattlemen.org.

jumpstart they need for eating and staying healthy. It includes products to increase appetite and a line of vitamin and mineral supplements with the Amaferm® advantage that will encourage intake, increase digestibility and absorption. “The return on investment in feeding the Gain Smart Program lies within the Amaferm advantage,” Twig Marston, BioZyme® Beef Business Development & Field Support, said. Research has shown that during an

84-day growing period, Amaferm has increased feed efficiency by 6 percent. As with any program, Marston reminds feeders and stockers to consult with their veterinarian and nutritionist to make sure their calves are on the best protocol to grow and add value. A Gain Smart supplement in their diets will help build immunity, keeping calves healthy and growing. For more information about the Gain Smart Stocker Program, visit www.gainsmart.com.

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

16 California Cattleman September 2017

WILD Doug Winnett 800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

License 0208825


Join Us For Our

22 nd Annual bull sale

Thursday September

14

Colusa Fairgrounds

Colusa, California SEllInG 160 AnGuS lonG-yEARlInGS AnD yEARlInGS Bulls sell with a 110% satisfaction guarantee, plus a complete performance, fertility, health and ultrasound evaluation. They are Anaplas vaccinated and tested PI negative for BVD.

Offering includes a Large Selection of Heifer Bulls FEATuRED A.I. SIRES • Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Baldridge Atlas A266 • EF Commando 1366 • VAR Generation 2100 • Connealy Black Granite • Basin Advance 3134 • A A R Ten X 7008 SA • J M B Traction 292 • RB Tour of Duty 177 • Connealy In Focus 4925 • Baldridge Waylon W34 • Baldridge Titan A139 • Deer Valley All In • KCF Bennett Absolute • Connealy Regulator • CTS Remedy 1T01 • Boyd Signature 1014 • Connealy Capitalist 028

‘D106’ 7/8/16 • Sire: V A R Generation 2100 Dam’s Sire: A A R Ten X 7008 S A CED +12

BW -.8

10%

WW +65

10%

10%

YW +120

MILK +23

10%

55%

916-803-3113

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

CED +6 50%

BW +.6

WW +64

35%

15%

YW +102

MILK +16

25%

95%

MARB +.57

RE +.76

$W +64.42

$F +90.49

$G +39.06

$B +146.70

MARB +.77

RE +.50

$W +64.57

$F +61.65

$G +38.78

$B +122.83

40%

10%

10%

4%

30%

15%

20%

45%

10%

25%

30%

35%

‘618’ 8/22/16 • Sire: K C F Bennett Absolute Dam’s Sire: S A V net Worth 4200

Sale Manager Matt Macfarlane

‘D108’ 7/8/16 • Sire: EF Commando 1366 Dam’s Sire: Connealy Black Granite

CED +3

BW +2.4

75%

WW +61

75%

20%

YW +107

MILK +26

20%

30%

‘6714’ 7/21/16 • Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 Dam’s Sire: A A R Ten X 7008 S A CED +19

BW -2.6

1%

WW +56

2%

30%

YW +106

MILK +25

20%

35%

MARB +.69

RE +.90

$W +64.96

$F +79.13

$G +38.26

$B +158.38

MARB +.76

RE +.95

$W +60.42

$F +68.97

$G +52.26

$B +143.11

30%

4%

10%

10%

30%

10%

20%

3%

15%

20%

4%

15%

Auctioneer

Rick Machado, 805-501-3210

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CONTACT THE TEAM AT TLAY TODAY TO REQUEST A SALE CATALOG! 18 California Cattleman September 2017


Turlock Livestock Auction Yard

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MAX OLVERA................................ 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA ................................ 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES............................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI .............................. 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .................................... 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ..................................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA......................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ................. 209 262-4019 TIM SISIL ...................................... 209 631-6054

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE:

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10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 September 2017 www.turlocklivestock.com California Cattleman 19


BEEF CATTLE SELECTION a comprehensive look at how genetic marker data can assist you by Alison Van Eenenaam, Ph.D., University of California, Davis Genetic markers can be used for several purposes in selection decisions. These include parentage determination, avoidance of genetic conditions, markerassisted selection for specific traits, or as a way to develop genomic-enhanced EPDs (GE-EPDs). The value of testing is dependent upon which animals in the breeding herd are being tested and for what purpose (e.g. selection, sale, culling, flushing). There are a number of different companies offering DNA tests, and testing is being done to answer a number of different questions. I have sometimes heard producers say they “DNAed” their cattle, but that is little bit like saying I vaccinated my cattle – the important question is “for what?” DNA is present in every cell and so DNA can be extracted from a number of different tissues including blood, semen, hair follicles and an ear notch. Before going ahead to perform DNA testing there are a number of questions you need to ask as detailed below. Step 1: What do you want to test? There are several different types of DNA tests, including parentage tests that can determine a particular animal’s sire, single trait tests that evaluate simple traits like coat color or inherited defects/diseases and SNP chip tests which can be used for genomic selection of complex traits such as weaning weight and calving ease. Some testing platforms can simultaneously provide parentage, single trait and information to enable the calculation of GE-EPDs which can improve selection accuracy. The value of DNA testing to an individual operation depends on a number of factors. These include the breed(s) and number of animals that will be tested, and sometimes the availability of health records, pedigrees and EPDs. The ultimate goals for testing results are also important to consider. DNA testing can be used for a variety of purposes such as aiding in selection and breeding choices, sorting into management groups, pedigree verification, and marketing based solely on the test result. The successful use of DNA tests for these purposes requires a basic understanding of how they work and how the results should be applied. Parentage and paternity tests Parentage tests work with a variety of sample types, including blood, hair and tissue. They require that the breeder/producer identify at least one potential parent that has DNA on file or that can have a sample included with the offspring’s sample. The quickest and best results 20 California Cattleman September 2017

are available if DNA is available from both the dam and all potential sires. This is best accomplished by taking a DNA sample from all potential sires BEFORE they are turned out with the cows. Parentage tests generate DNA profiles for the offspring and the presumed parent(s) using multiple genetic markers. Parental status is determined based on exclusions (Figure 1). Parentage tests are required by many breed registries and are useful for ensuring accurate pedigrees which increases the accuracy of genetic evaluations. Paternity results are also useful for evaluating the performance and prolificacy of new bulls in multiple-bull breeding pastures. FIGURE 1.

Example of sire exclusion using 2 genetic markers, A and B. The offspring beingof the gene (allele) at each marker locus from each parent. In this case, the offspring had to receive an “A” allele tested received one form of the gene (allele) at each marker locus from each parent. In this from one parent and an “a” allele from the other parent and a “B” allele from each parent. Since the known dam has two “A” alleles and no “a” alleles, the offspring’s “A” had to come from the dam. This means that Sire 2 had to case, the offspring had to receive an “A” allele from one parent and an “a” allele from the other contribute the “a” since Sire 1 only has “A”s. The same is true for the “B” allele since Sire 1 only has “b” alleles and parent and a “B” allele from each parent. Since the known dam has two “A” alleles and no “a” the offspring has no “b” allele. Sire 1 is excluded at 2 loci in this example, meaning that Sire 2 is the most likely sire for this offspring based on these two genetic markers.


Single gene tests Single gene and genetic defect tests also work with a variety of sample types and usually test for single, known, genetic variants. The results are used to make appropriate breeding decisions to reduce or eliminate genetic disorders/diseases in herds and to optimize beneficial traits. SNP chip tests SNP assays work on multiple sample types and are used to analyze thousands, or tens or hundreds of thousands, of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs are single base pair changes in the DNA. Large numbers of SNPs can be rapidly evaluated using SNP chips. Genomic testing is available through breed associations who have partnered with two companies that provide genotyping services; Zoetis and Neogen/GeneSeek. There are several types of tests which differ mainly by the number of genetic markers that are included in the test. There are the so called high-density chips which have somewhere between 50,000-150,000 SNP markers on a single assay. There are also some lower-density chips that are less expensive and can be used for “imputation” up to the high density chip (e.g. Zoetis® i50K and GeneSeekLD). Many SNP panels often include established parentage markers as well as some single trait or genetic defect tests mutation tests for common genetic abnormalities. This can decrease the cost of these tests quite dramatically when they are ordered as an add-on test, rather than a standalone test. Genomic testing The incorporation of DNA information into genetic evaluations has been a stepwise evolution since the first genetic tests for cattle were released in the early 2000s. The goal of including genomic information in genetic evaluation is to increase the accuracy of the prediction of genetic merit for potential breeding animals. Theoretically, the accuracy of selection can be substantially increased, especially for young seedstock. Initially, results were presented independently of beef breed genetic evaluations (i.e. EPDs). This was not an ideal situation as it resulted in two pieces of information about the same trait, and if the results differed it was unclear which result was “correct.” For breeders to make the best use of genomic data, it needs to be combined with traditional sources of information (i.e. phenotypes and pedigrees) into traditional genetic evaluations. For this to happen there needs to be

a way to determine how predictive the genetic test is for traits of interest in the breed. This has required that breed associations make an effort to invest in developing large phenotyped and genotyped “training” populations to enable the development of genomic prediction equations. Basically, this estimates the effect of each genetic marker on the trait of interest, so that when a new animal is genotyped the effect of each marker it inherited can be summed to get a genomic genetic merit estimate. Bigger training populations allow for the development of more accurate tests. Many breeds now have tens of thousands of genotyped animals in their databases. The majority of genetic evaluations of beef cattle are carried out by breed associations. These associations use a variety of genetic evaluation providers and methods to calculate their Expected Progeny Differences (EPD), and as a result there are different EPDs reported for different breeds. This means that it is sometimes challenging to compare data from different evaluations. Within a breed EPDs can be directly compared; however, this is not true when comparing across different evaluations as an EPD from one evaluation is not directly comparable to an EPD from another evaluation. Historically this has been resolved by using “across-breed” EPD adjustment factors that are developed by the Meat Animal Research Center (MARC), available at http://beefimprovement.org. All 12 breed associations (Chianina, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Maine-Anjou, Red Angus, Simmental, Shorthorn, Canadian Simmental, Canadian Gelbvieh, Canadian Limousin, Canadian Angus and Canadian Shorthorn) have been collaborating under the umbrella of International Genetics Solutions (IGS) to leverage a multibreed database that enables the calculation of EPDs on a common base. This allows commercial producers to directly compare the genetic merit of animals in this genetic evaluation system regardless of breed composition. The cumulative IGS database includes approximately 16 million total animal records, 100,000 genotypes, and over 340,000 new animals are added annually. One feature of this IGS collaboration is that many of the participating breed associations require or strongly encourage inventory-based recording. Historically, many beef breed genetic evaluations were based on progeny weaned and/or registered and did not require data to be recorded from females that failed to reproduce or whose progeny were not registered. By contrast, inventory-based ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 September 2017 California Cattleman 21


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 reporting requires collection of annual reproductive records on every inventoried female within a herd. According to the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF), the objective of inventory-based or whole herd recording (WHR) is “to accumulate reproductive and certain performance data on all animals in a breed. It does not, however, seek to control which animals will be registered. That remains a decision of individual breeders. With WHR, performance records (or disposal codes) are required on all calves produced by each breeder, but whether any or all of those calves receive registration papers is the breeder’s decision.” This enables the collection of phenotypes relevant for the development of EPDs for important traits such as heifer pregnancy and stayability. The main advantage of including genomic information in EPDs is that it improves accuracy. Accuracy (ACC) is the reliability that can be placed on the EPD; ACC ranges from .00 to 1.0. An accuracy close to 1.0 indicates higher reliability. This increase in accuracy is dependent upon how much of the genetic variation is explained by the genomic information. In other words, the usefulness of the test is proportional to how well it predicts the true genetic merit of an animal. Genomic testing is most useful for improving the accuracy of EPDs on young animals where there is little other information upon which to base genetic merit estimates. Breed association EPDs are typically associated with Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) accuracies. It takes a lot of progeny records to increase the BIF ACC. Reranking is uncommon among bulls with high accuracy EPDs as there is less possible change associated with well-proven bulls. Production sale catalogs and breed associations often provide breed average EPDs against which to compare a specific bull’s numbers. It is important to consider that, although this is useful information, most commercial herds select bulls that are not the breed average. However, since 87.5 percent of a calf crop is determined by the previous three sire generations, it is possible to obtain a general sense of a commercial herd’s standing for additive genetic merit by evaluating the EPDs of the herd sires used in the recent past. There are several tests that are being marketed for use on unregistered commercial cattle that are not directly part of a breed association genetic evaluation program. There are two products exclusively distributed by Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI) and marketed by Zoetis® which are designed for animals that are at least 75 percent Black Angus. These include GeneMax Advantage ($39) and GeneMax Focus ($17). The first test involves tens of thousands of markers and is marketed as a heifer selection and mating test that ranks heifers for net return using three economic indices (Cow Advantage: Predicts differences in profitability from heifer development, pregnancy and calving, to the sales of weaned progeny; Feeder Advantage: Predicts differences in net return of feeder calf progeny due to growth, feed efficiency and CAB carcass merit; Total Advantage: Predicts differences in profitability from genetic merit across all economically- relevant traits captured in Cow 22 California Cattleman September 2017

and Feeder Advantage index scores). It also identifies genetic outliers for cow cost, docility, marbling and tenderness, and allows for paternity assignment if the sires have been 50K or i50K tested by Zoetis®. GeneMax Focus utilizes fewer genetic markers and is marketed to provide genomic predictions for feedlot gain and marbling, in addition to sire assignment. These two tests are only intended for use on unregistered, commercial high-percentage Angus cattle. As such, GeneMax predictions do not contribute to Angus breed association GE-EPDs. There are also two Angus-specific heifer selection tests available from Igenity; Angus Silver ($25) which includes calving ease maternal, heifer pregnancy, docility, milk, average daily gain and marbling) and Igenity Angus Gold ($40) which additionally includes birth weight, mature weight, residual average daily gain, weaning weight, tenderness, ribeye area, back fat thickness and carcass weight. These two tests can be directly ordered through Igenity. Additionally, there are two breed-specific c heifer replacement tests for Red Angus and Gelbvieh that can be ordered through the breed association. The Red Angus Herd Navigator ($25) test provides results on all traits for which RAAA calculates EPDs and Red Angus’ HerdBuilder and GridMaster Indices and parent verification if the potential sires have been tested with the RA50K test. Due to the DNA test being breed specific, the Herd Navigator should only be used on females that are at least 75 percent Red Angus. The Gelbvieh Maternal Edge Female Profile ($26) is a low-density panel to be used by producers as a sorting tool for Gelbvieh influenced commercial females. It includes calving ease, maternal calving ease, weaning weight, yield grade, marbling and carcass weight. Tests being marketed for crossbred cattle PredicGEN PredicGEN ($19.50) is a test marketed by Zoetis® as “a heifer selection tool for straight-bred or crossbred British/Continental animals that are less than 75 percent Black Angus.” Data is reported back on a normally distributed 0 to 100 scale, with a mean of 50 based on Zoetis’® database of 20,000 animals. It provides predictions of genetic merit for key carcass traits – marbling score, USDA yield grade and tenderness, as well as an index that predicts carcass grid value. The economic importance of these traits for heifer selection will depend upon the individual marketing strategy and value of carcass traits to overall ranch returns. Igenity Gold and Silver The Igenity Gold and Silver tests, which include approximately 1000 markers associated with 13 traits of interest and some randomly spaced markers, are being marketed by Neogen® as “DNA profiles for crossbred and purebred cattle.” A single prediction equation is used for each trait to give the score or molecular breeding value, irrespective of the breed makeup of the animal being tested. The silver test evaluates six traits (calving ease maternal, stayability, ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


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“DRIVEN BY PERFORMANCE SINCE 1943” September 2017 California Cattleman 23


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

Step 2: Which company do you want to use for

residual feed intake, average daily gain, tenderness, marbling) and the gold test includes an additional seven traits (birth weight, calving ease direct, heifer pregnancy, docility, milk, ribeye area and back fat thickness). A selection index score is provided for each animal based on the six traits that are in both tests. According to the Neogen brochure, the development of these tests involved large populations with phenotypic data and/or EPDs comprising tens of thousands of animals that represent various biological types. The six main datasets used to form the training data set for this test were from six breed associations: Angus, Hereford, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Red Angus and Simmental. Data is reported back on a 1 to 10 scale. These tests were developed with input from researchers at Iowa State University. Unpublished data (Saatchi and Garrick, personal communication) suggests that this reduced SNP panel (~2,300 markers) gives purebred genetic merit estimates of ~ 80-90 percent of the accuracy of the 50K SNP chip for the six breeds in the training data set. This number dropped to a correlation between the test result and the true breeding value (r) of ~ 0.3 when estimating the genetic merit of commercial crossbred animals. The correlation is likely to be even lower in animals comprised of breeds that were not in the original training set. The lower the correlation (r), the more possible change there is in the ranking based upon that test. This is analogous to low accuracy “interim” EPDs which are given to young bulls with very little available information where the possible change in the EPD value is high. EPDs with low accuracy are still the single best tool for selecting on the trait of interest; however, they are associated with wide margins of possible change. To explain this concept, consider two bulls that have low accuracy EPDs of 0 and +3, but the possible change at that accuracy is ±4. This means that it is likely that the second bull is better than the other by 3 units, but it is possible the first bull’s EPD will improve by up to 4 units with more data, and likewise the second bull’s EPD could decrease 4 units reversing their ranking. It is therefore possible that the rank of these two low accuracy bulls could flip with more information. Low accuracy estimates are associated with increased possibilities for changes and reranking. Unfortunately there are not yet any independent, peerreviewed papers in the scientific literature documenting the field performance of any of these tests for commercial cattle.

testing? Several companies offer various combinations of mutation tests, and many offer both mutation tests and parentage testing in cattle along with a variety of other species. For a list of companies and currently-available tests, please visit the following webpage at UC Davis: http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/AnimalBiotech/ Biotechnology/Companies. In order to have genomic information included in breed association genetic evaluations the DNA sample typically has to be submitted through the breed association. The cost for tests that are used in genetic evaluation is $75-90 for the high-density chips, and $45-50 for the lowdensity imputation chips. Breed associations obtain either molecular breeding values or genotypes from the service provider and work to include that genomic information to provide GE-EPDs that have improved accuracy due to the inclusion of the genomic information in the EPD calculations. Neogen’s GeneSeek (http://www.neogen.com/ Genomics/Beef.html) and Zoetis (http://www.zoetis. com/ products-services/animal-genetics.aspx) are currently the companies that are partnering with US beef breed associations to provide the genotypes needed to develop GE-EPDs.

24 California Cattleman September 2017

Step 3: How much do genetic tests cost? The costs for various DNA tests in cattle vary based on the type of test(s) being performed, the company and the number of animals being tested. Costs can range from $13-20 for parentage testing, $20-$30 per animal for a single mutation test for a disease or trait, up to $75-90 for the high-density SNP chips for genomic-enhanced EPDs. If multiple tests can be performed on a single DNA sample or a large volume of samples is tested then the cost per test is reduced. Additional costs can include the cost of DNA cards, sample collection, sample storage and shipping and sample processing, again depending on sample type, test and application. Step 4: What kind of sample do you need to submit? Most of the DNA testing that has been described here can be performed on a variety of samples. These include tail hairs, blood (in tubes or on blood spot cards), semen or tissue. Hair samples and blood spot cards are the easiest to submit as they generally do not require refrigeration or any special packaging. The hairs themselves do not contain DNA; it is located in the hair root bulb. Submitted hair samples must contain root bulbs in order to be processed for DNA.Always be sure to follow collection procedures


closely and properly label all samples. It is important to note that different preferred sample types may be requested for specific tests, so be sure to carefully review the instructions provided by the testing company.

Step 6: What do you do with the results? Parentage and mutation test results often need to be reported to specific breed associations for registration purposes. This is also true for SNP results for breeds that use them for genetic evaluation. Results of disease, trait and coat color mutation tests can be used to manage breeding decisions and mate selection to avoid producing undesirable combinations of genotypes (e.g. double recessive “aa”) and phenotypes in the offspring.

particular interest may be “Replacement Heifer Selection” http://articles. extension.org/pages/73404/commercialreplacement-heifer-selection. The application of genomics to improve the accuracy of EPDs is a rapidly developing field. There are ongoing improvements in genotyping and sequencing technologies, statistical methods to increase the correlation between genomic predictions and true genetic merit, and the computing systems to handle the large datasets associated with animal breeding. One thing still remains true in the genomic age and that is the need to collect accurate records. It is essential to ensure performance data, pedigree and DNA information are recorded and reported accurately. Genomic predictions will only be as reliable as the data upon which they are based. Although it might seem like the genomics era could signal the end of performance recording, the opposite is true. Now more than ever it is important that producers accurately report data, and ensure that animals which are genotyped are correctly identified so that their information can contribute towards improving the accuracy of the genomic predictions of the future.

Looking ahead There are a number of breed associations working on developing a suite of new traits for genetic evaluations. There are also several large USDA-funded grants that are working to develop training populations for hard-tomeasure traits including feed efficiency, susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease complex and fertility. These large projects require thousands of genotyped animals with observations on these novel traits. It is anticipated that their results will allow for more traits to be added to the list of GE- EPDs in the future. The interested reader is referred to http://www.eBEEF.org, a website that collates beef cattle genetics information. There are fact sheets located there from which the material in this article was drawn. Specifically see: http://articles.extension.org/pages/73798/ how-to-get-started-with-dna-testing and http://articles. extension.org/pages/73461/recent-developments-ingenetic-evaluations- and-genomic-testing. Another of

Conclusion DNA technologies are evolving rapidly and it is likely that in the future DNA information will play an increasingly important role in beef cattle breeding and management. Even if you are not currently testing it may be prudent to collect DNA samples (e.g. tail hair) on important animals in your herd (e.g. herd bulls) and store them for potential future uses. Many times when performing parentage determinations using DNA information, producers realize they are missing DNA samples from potential sires which typically sired the calves 12-18 months earlier. It is also likely there will be future uses for DNA technology that have not been thought of yet – like smart phone technology this is a rapidly moving field and it may be wise to have some archived DNA samples on hand to make use of new innovations in the future.

Step 5: How do you ship the sample? Many sample types can be shipped at room temperature. Tissue samples may need to be frozen upon collection and shipped in a cooler with an ice pack. Never store samples in direct sunlight or expose them to heat. Heat denatures DNA and will result in a poor sample and potentially inconclusive test results.

September 2017 California Cattleman 25


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FALL BULL SALE OCTOBER 3, 2017

Cattlemen’s Livestock Market • Galt, CA

100 18-MONTH BULLS • 15 FALL YEARLING BULLS RED ANGUS & BLACK SIMANGUS

Range Ready Bulls raised on the desert and summered on mountain meadows

26 California Cattleman September 2017


YEARLING RED ANGUS Exclusively ET Born Bulls or by Lorenzen Donor Cows LORENZEN GUN SHIP 6935

LORENZEN SHOW TIME D213

Brown Redemption X HXC Conquest

Brown Oracle X Six Mile Upper Deck

Dam had 4 ET calves in our spring 2017 sale that averaged over $10,000 per lot HB

EPD

174

GM

54

CED

13

BW

-4.9

WW

67

YW

115

HPG

CEM

11

7

ST

15

The first Oracle calves to sell anywhere! 4 full brothers to Show Time in offering

MARB

0.76

LONG YEARLING RED SIMANGUS

HB

EPD

134

GM

53

CED

6

BW

-1.6

WW

76

YW

118

HPG

11

ST

13

MARB

0.81

REA

0.61

Combining the best of The Red Angus with the best of Simmental

Featuring 10 Full brothers by the $100,000 LSF TBJ Takeback X Hooks Mika- Possibly the most prolific Donor cow of the Simmental Breed

API

EPD

164

TI

75

CED

18

BW

-4.2

WW

50

YW

73

MCE

LORENZEN HALFBACK D101

LORENZEN REGULATOR D204

LSF Takeback X Hooks Mika

LSF Takeback X Hooks Mika

STAY

10.25 15.75

MARB

0.6

REA

0.79

API

EPD

164

TI

75

CED

18

BW

-4.2

WW

50

YW

73

MCE

STAY

10.25 15.75

MARB

0.6

REA

0.79

18 MONTH OLD RED ANGUS Developed on High Desert of Central Oregon LORENZEN READY TO GO 6997

LORENZEN OPEN RANGE 6930 Brown Deep & Wide X Beckton Lancer A664

Bieber Fusion X LSF JBOB Expectation

Maternal brother to our 2014 $24,000 high seller Lorenzen Just Right 6920

HB

EPD

101

GM

51

CED

6

BW

-1.4

WW

67

YW

107

HPG

ST

13

4

MARB

0.81

Maternal Packed pedigree with loads of Marbling

REA

0.05

HB

EPD

133

GM

51

CED

4

BW

-0.6

WW

70

YW

113

HPG

12

CEM

2

ST

14

MARB

0.45

18 MONTH OLD BLACK SIMANGUS Born and Raised on the High Desert All SimAngus bulls will have Residual Feed Intake Data

LORENZEN PROWLER D627

LORENZEN OPEN RANGE 682D

GDAR Gameday X BR Midland

HRI Shear Force X Lucky Charm

1/8 Simmental 7/8 AnguS Calving Ease Deluxe with big time Marbling

½ Simmental ½ AnguS Top 25% in breed in 10 traits API

EPD

147

TI

80

CED

14

BW

0.3

WW

67

YW

99

MWW

59.6

STAY

11.8

MARB

0.55

REA

0.76

API

EPD

135

TI

69

CED

17

BW

-3

WW

46

YW

86

MWW

0.25

STAY

10.6

MARB

0.67

REA

0.49

LORENZEN RANCHES • 22575 SKYVIEW LANE • BEND, OREGON 97702 L A R R Y L O R E N Z E N 5 4 1 . 9 6 9 . 8 0 3 4 | S A M L O R E N Z E N 5 4 1 . 2 1 5 . 2 6 8 7 | W W W. L O R E N Z E N R A N C H E S . C O M September 2017 California Cattleman 27 DISH Network 231 DIRECTV 345


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER OUTSMARTING SCIENCE:

MANAGING LETHAL RECESSIVE ALLELES WHILE OPTIMIZING GENETIC GAIN IN BEEF CATTLE by Lindsay Upperman and Alison L. Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., University of California, Davis Female reproductive efficiency is an important factor We hypothesized that the second strategy of mate that contributes to beef production and overall profitability. allocation to avoid carrier matings at the same essential It plays a crucial role in a female’s longevity within the herd. gene loci, rather than indiscriminate selection against carrier Even though fertilization rates in beef cattle are around animals as a class, would result in a better rate of genetic 90 percent, average calving rate tends to be 55 percent, gain while avoiding losses associated with affected calves suggesting a 35 percent embryonic or fetal loss. It is likely (i.e. pregnancy loss), thus proving to be the more profitable that some portion of this loss is due to homozygous strategy. recessive loss of function (LOF) alleles at essential genes. To test this hypothesis, we used a dataset of 250 cattle In these cases, selection could be employed to avoid (169 females and 89 males). The simulation criteria included heterozygous carrier matings. Management of such matings mating 125 females to produce offspring with the highest for one essential gene locus is relatively easy. However, resulting progeny index ($M) values, not allowing any one when 10, 20 or even 50 essential gene loci need to be sire to be used more than 50 times and not allowing for considered, management can become very complicated. more than 25 percent inbreeding. Three scenarios were Ongoing sequencing projects are likely to identify an analyzed: 7 loci with LOF alleles at high frequencies (High increasing number of recessive LOF alleles at essential 7), 50 loci with LOF alleles with random high and low genes that result in embryonic mortality when inherited in frequencies (Random 50), and 76 loci with LOF alleles at the homozygous condition. This will make it increasingly low frequencies (Low 76) (Table 1). complicated for breeders to consider all of the potential After the scenarios were run through MateSel, the carrier sire by carrier dam matings at multiple loci when occurrence of a lethal “aa” genotype (i.e. embryonic making breeding decisions. Software programs offer mortality) was assigned a cost of $200, essentially the cost an approach by which breeders can choose appropriate of a dead calf (Engelken, 2011). Profit per mating ($P) was matings for multiple selection criteria. Mating selection can calculated as: $M – (LethalG X $200). be used to optimize the rate of genetic progress towards Within each simulation, the strategy of selection against an economic index while also avoiding same-locus carrier homozygous recessive genotypes (aa) in the progeny matings that result in homozygous affected offspring. allowed for greater genetic gain within the progeny index Mate selection software is likely to become increasingly ($M) when compared to the strategy of selection against important to manage both inbreeding and recessive genetic carrier parents (Aa), confirming our hypothesis. In other conditions, especially as assisted reproductive techniques words, matching genetically superior carrier individuals, offer further opportunities to increase the intensity of provided they had LOF alleles at different essential loci, selection for genetically superior seedstock. maximized genetic gain. A software program called MateSel has been developed With either a low number of essential loci (High 7) or to analyze the outcome of multiple potential mating low LOF allele frequencies (Low 76), the optimal mating strategies within a given population. This program decisions did not greatly decrease the rate of genetic gain optimizes mate selection to increase genetic progress ($M), nor the profit per mating as it was relatively easy to towards a given economic selection index while minimizing select mating that avoided matings of carriers at the same inbreeding for a set of matings based on information essential gene loci. However, in the case of Random 50 regarding the genetic merit of selection candidates, their with 50 loci and varied LOF allele frequencies balancing genetic relatedness and recessive LOF allele carrier status. In our research, three simulations were tested using ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 30 MateSel. Each simulation had a different number of hypothetical essential gene loci with various TABLE 1. Allele frequencies for the three simulations with different numbers of loci. frequencies of LOF alleles and NUMBER OF MEAN STANDARD MINIMUM MAXIMUM employed two mating strategies: LOCI FREQUENCY DEVIATION FREQUENCY FREQUENCY (1) selection against carrier animals as a class (i.e. avoid use of any carrier), 7 0.0847 0.0151 0.0527 0.1001 and 50 0.0488 0.0307 0.0044 0.1436 (2) selection against the occurrence of homozygous affected calves (i.e. 76 0.0112 0.0125 0.0004 0.0695 avoid carrier matings). 28 California Cattleman September 2017


Spring Bred Heifers & Cows

A Sample of the Quality of Spring Females Selling Sat., Sept. 30, Examined Safe to A.I.

Com lete & Total Dis ersal d

d

Spring Calving Unit Sat., September 3 0

Safe to SAV Resource 1441

Safe to Connealy Black Granite

ma abigale’s pride 4097 Born 2/28/2014

MA Back to Basics 202 x S A V Bismarck 5682

CED BW WW YW +8 +1.1 +38 +71

Milk Marb RE $W +21 +.27 +.37 +30.79

$B +69.56

ma lass 6002 Born 1/4/2016

Deer Valley All In x S A V Birthstone 8258

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $W $B +13 -.3 +70 +116 +24 I+.60 I+.68 +66.56 +140.58

at the ranCh, vale, or@1 p.m. mDt Sires of Bred Heifers & Cows Selling: • Connealy Confidence 0100 • WK Bobcat • EF Complement 8088 • SAV Birthstone 8258 • KCF Bennett Expert Z138 • Deer Valley All In • And More

Sires of 2017 Heifer Calves Selling: • PA Fortitude 2500 • McKellar Now Look • Leachman LA Certainty G066A • Connealy Stingray 9618

Safe to Connealy Black Granite

Safe to Connealy Black Granite

ma everelda pride 6055 Born 1/27/2016

ma lass 6075 Born 2/3/2016

Deer Valley All In x Werner Westward 357

Deer Valley All In x EF Complement 8088

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $W $B +12 -.4 +61 +105 +24 I+.55 I+.48 +57.77 +123.28

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $W $B +8 +1.6 +64 +111 +27 I+.48 I+.47 +59.38 +123.81

Service Sells by These Sires & More: • SAV Resource 1441 • Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Connealy Black Granite

Safe to Connealy Black Granite

Sale Book Requests maag angus ranCh Home: 541-473-2108 Deanne’s Cell: 541-881-7989 Bob’s Cell: 541-881-7639

Safe to Connealy Black Granite

ma queen 6047 Born 1/22/2016

Deer Valley All In x B C Matrix 4132 CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $W $B +13 -.8 +60 +103 +25 I+.51 I+.36 +61.59 +106.98

ma queen mother 6044 Born 1/21/2016 Deer Valley All In X S A V Brilliance 8077

CED BW WW YW +11 -.1 +52 +94

Milk Marb RE $W $B +22 I+.62 I+.57 +46.05 +117.51

www.maagangus.com

Sale Manager Safe to Quaker Hill Rampage

Safe to Quaker Hill Rampage

Matt Macfarlane Marketing

916-803-3113

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

ma galeen 2075 Born 2/6/2012

MA Pendleton 9176 x T D L Nine Irons Preemptor CED BW WW YW +7 -.1 +39 +69

Milk Marb RE $W +26 +.50 +.15 +40.59

$B +87.82

ma lassie pride 2034 Born 1/18/2011

Sitz Madison 10477 x Bluegrass Bushwacker 513 CED BW WW YW +2 +2.2 +42 +77

Milk Marb RE $W +22 +.17 +.39 +34.96

$B +84.84

thd ©

September 2017 California Cattleman 29


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 28 mate selection to avoid affected (aa) calves (i.e. embryonic mortalities) while optimizing genetic gain was more complicated, in this case a computer software program like MateSel would likely be required to optimally assign mate decisions to maximize profit. The results of our research show that avoiding carrier matings at the same essential gene locus is the more profitable mating strategy than avoiding carrier matings as a class. More genetic progress can be made in the first scenario while still avoiding the occurrence of homozygous affected (aa) calves (i.e. embryonic mortalities). As a result, females that become pregnant will be more likely to stay pregnant, having increased longevity within the herd. As bovine genome sequencing projects identify more essential genes and LOF alleles, breed associations will need to develop policies on the management of lethal recessive conditions. In the long run, there may be some benefit in having breed association policies that put some selection emphasis against the occurrence of LOF alleles. This would need to be balanced against the short-term costs associated with forgoing the beneficial genetics associated with carrier animals.

30 California Cattleman September 2017

Get social with CCA!

Š Katie Eason Photography

Snap an action shot or a scenic photo on the ranch with your cell phone or digital camera and email it to Malorie Bankhead in the CCA office at malorie@calcattlemen.org to see it featured on CCA’s Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!


WEDNESDAY 1:00 PM

SEPT. 20

GONSALVES RANCH BULL DEVELOPMENT CENTER, MODESTO, CA

ANGUS

DMND OAK GRIPTION 817-16 Sired by JMB Traction 29Z

ANGUS

GONSALVES WEIGHUP 611B Sired by Plattemere Weighup K360

THE MOST POWERFUL SET OF ANGUS & SIMANGUS BULLS TO SELL!

50 18-Month & Yearling Angus Bulls 50 18-Month & Yearling SimAngus™ Bulls 40 Fall Open Commercial Females 10 Elite Registered Spring Bred Angus & Simmental Females

ANGUS

DMND OAK ATTRACTION 233-16 Sired by JMB Traction 29Z

GRS BOUNTY D629 SIM-ANGUS

ANGUS

GONSALVES PROPHET 617C Sired by GAR Prophet

Sired by Hook’s Bounty 6B

SIM-ANGUS

GRS FRONTIER D611 Sired by CCR Frontier

Steve & Jean Obad 209-383-4373 or Cell 209-777-1551 1232 W Tahoe St, Merced, CA 95348 Sale Management: Steve & Jean Obad 209-383-4373 or Cell 209-777-1551 1232 W Tahoe St, Merced, CA 95348 Joey & Kristy 209-765-1142 • Mike & Stacy 209-531-4893 Joe &• Mike Debbie 209-523-5826 Joey & Kristy 209-765-1142 & Stacy 209-531-4893 Maze209-523-5826 Blvd., Modesto, CA 95358 Joe7243 & Debbie Joey & Kristy 209-765-1142 •Greg Mike & Stacy&209-531-4893 Mauchley Sons 435-830-7233 Joe & Debbie 209-523-5826 7243 Maze Blvd., Modesto, CA 95358 Full sale offering at www.ebersale.com!

Sale Management: Office 507-532-6694 Val Cell 612-805-7405 Roger Andy Flood 530-534-7211 Steve Obad&209-383-4373 or Cell 209-777-1551 Kelly Cell 406-599-2395 636 Flag Creek Rd, Oroville, CA 95965 www.ebersale.com Office 507-532-6694 Roger & Andy Flood Val Cell 612-805-7405 530-534-7211 Roger & Andy Flood 530-534-7211 Kelly Cell 406-599-2395 636 Flag Creek Rd, Oroville, CA 95965 www.ebersale.com

September 2017 California Cattleman Sale Management: EBERSPACHER ENT. INC. • Office 507-532-6694 • Val 612-805-7405 • Kelly 406-599-2395 • www.ebersale.com

31


DOT 7 RANCH The Legacy of a Little More Love by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead

T

he Dot 7 Ranch, a cow-calf operation located in the Eastern foothills of the Central San Joaquin Valley was built by Jay and Betty Robinson and is currently owned by their children, Jayne Robinson and Betsy Behlen, Clovis. Like any family ranch, many generations have put blood, sweat and tears into the Dot 7. Betsy along with her husband Steve and their children, Brooke Helsel and Brett Behlen care for a small herd of Angus cattle on the ranch today, while Jayne and Betsy lease the other portion to another local rancher. Helsel’s great aunt and uncle, Fred and Lois Hazelton, homesteaded the ranch in the early 1900s, but as they were getting out of the business they offered to sell the ranch to her grandparents, the aforementioned Robinsons. From there, Jayne and Betsy inherited the ranch, eventually making Brett and Brooke the fourth generation to be involved on the Dot Seven. Today, arguably, the ranch’s most unique feature is that women mostly operate it! When Brett is able to come home from his horse training job in Bakersfield, he helps with branding, shipping and other large do-tos, but the everyday tasks are managed by Betsy who leans on her daughter Brooke for support. Though ranching roots run deep on the Dot 7 spanning many generations, Helsel’s passion for the cattle industry grew from the relationship she had with her grandfather. In fact, he instilled a love for cattle and the land in everyone he met, she says. For Helsel, there is no question in her mind that her grandfather has had the largest impact on her life within agriculture and beyond. “He knew cattle, he knew the land he raised them on, and he proved daily to his family how fulfilling life can be in the beef industry,” Helsel said. Helsel recalls all of the early morning gathers on the ranch with her family when her grandfather was alive. For some unknown reason, she jokes, he trusted Helsel with the leaders of the herd as a young kid. “It was a job I took very seriously,” Helsel said. “A famous saying of his as we’d ride out in the morning was 32 California Cattleman September 2017

‘Get up here, and let’s talk about this.’” She says her horse never could walk out as fast as his could, but by the time she’d catch up to him, he’d reach out to hold her hand and then immediately make some sort of joke. Everyone would laugh, but then it was down to business. She shares a time when her grandfather knew her love of calves and acted on it. When they would have the unfortunate situation of a cow losing her calf, Robinson would purchase a graft calf from a local dairy. One time in particular, Helsel went along with him to pick up the new graft calf. When they returned to the ranch, he knew just how eager she was to have a few moments to play with the calf. So, he ended up finding other “chores” to do for nearly an hour just so she had plenty of time to sit in the trailer and love on the new graft calf. She says he had a way of creating special moments like that on purpose. Calving season is a favorite time on the ranch for Betsy and Brooke. Seeing the bond between a cow and her calf is so humbling to them. “That sweet, gentle hum the cow gives her newborn calf makes those challenging moments on the ranch so worth it,” Betsy said. She says the cows on the ranch help her feel better connected to her late father. “My dad devoted his life to this ranch and our family,” Betsy said. “If you knew Jay Robinson you would know how easy it is for us to want to keep raising cattle with the .7 on the left hip. He made an indelible impression on us all


and we honor him with the cattle we raise.” In fact, the pair are presently caring for their first Fall calf of the year who made his debut a bit early from a first calf heifer who is doing well learning how to be a good mother, but is looking to Betsy and Brooke for a little assistance. He’s a fighter, and the mother-daughter duo isn’t giving up on him any time soon. Betsy and Brooke consider being a part of the beef community nothing short of an honor. It’s humbling to be around a group of people who share the same passions as they have, they said. Over the years, the Dot 7 has hosted multiple college classes which have taken tours of the ranch. In recent years, Helsel has made an effort to increase transparency in what she and her mom do on the ranch using social media and has done some live videos on various social media platforms so the public can see an unedited version of ranch life. Helsel has taken up an extreme passion in advocating for the industry and has met some incredible people along the trail, she says. As active members of the Fresno-Kings Counties CattleWomen, Helsel and her mom have participated in many consumer outreach events. Each year the group sets up an information board at a couple different farm days where children visit different stations to learn about agriculture. The group serves chili for the Rodeo Blood Drive each year where they engage with the public about raising beef. Helsel also worked with the California Beef Council last year where she joined a tour organized for local dieticians to help answer questions from a cow-calf sector perspective. She even traveled to Washington, D.C. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

“If you knew Jay Robinson you would know how easy it is for us to want to keep raising cattle with the .7 on the left hip. He made an indelible impression on us all and we honor him with the cattle we raise.” — Betsy Behlen

September 2017 California Cattleman 33


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33 last year to represent cattle producers in a discussion about antibiotic resistance and the role producers play in that arena. She has also completed the Top of the Class Program with National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, an advanced extension of the Masters of Beef Advocacy program. Currently, Helsel serves as the vice president of Fresno Kings Counties CattleWomen and serves on the board of the Fresno-Kings Counties Cattlemen’s Association. Over the last couple of years, she has really taken a liking to documenting the happenings on her family’s ranch. Through her blog, Meet Your Beef, she’s had the opportunity to talk with people from all walks of life. Writing is therapeutic for her and when writing about cattle is included, it became a dream come true for Helsel. As an advocacy extension, her blog has morphed into a small boutique business she calls The Beef Boutique, where she creates and sells products that promote agriculture and more specifically, beef. Cattle and land health are really important to Betsy and Brooke and they feel the two go hand-in-hand. Although their herd is now smaller than it once was, maintaining the genetics that Helsel’s grandfather so carefully spent years building is also at the top of their list. With a focus on the land, the cattle and genetics, ultimately they feel they can improve their efficiency by creating more pounds of beef per acre while also improving the land. The drought makes up one of the most significant ranching issues Betsy and Brooke have been a part of recently. Throughout the most recent drought, they had to decrease their herd numbers about 20 percent while also supplementing with much more alfalfa hay. It was a trying time, no doubt, but thankfully they were able to manage through that season. Another issue Helsel sees affecting her family’s ranch specifically is housing development. In recent years developers have been building housing tracks that are slowly making their way in the direction of the ranch, and Betsy and Brooke remain cautious. The pair love what they do and love working with each other and other family members to ensure the success of the ranch. Though Helsel says she hasn’t received any official industry awards, her mom claims that she’s her top hand on the Dot 7, and Helsel says that’s the only award she needs. “I think the future of ranching in California hinges on the ability of the beef community to come together and effectively communicate with the public what it is that we do,” Helsel said. “Our ranch is located in a valley that produces more food than anywhere else in the world and yet the public doesn’t understand the full scope of what is produced in their backyard.” For the longevity of the beef industry, Helsel says it is imperative for ranchers to focus on communicating to those in urban areas how vital the beef industry is for the California economy. Helsel considers the opportunity she has to carry on the legacy of the Dot 7 an honor. “I hope there will come a day when my brother 34 California Cattleman September 2017

and I are successfully running a ranching business off the same land that that the generations before us worked so hard to create.” To Helsel, a legacy is the only thing left when you are gone. Her grandparents left their legacy, her mom is working on hers now, and it is her ultimate goal in life to follow in their footsteps, always going a bit above and beyond for the greater good of the beef community. To learn more about the Dot 7 Ranch and read about more historic California ranches, pick up a copy of Since 1917: A Century of Family Legacies in the California Cattlemen’s Association.


th

26 Annual

Bull Sale THESE TOP BULLS AND OTHERS OF THIS CALIBER SELL! DPL REVIVED • #18779157

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • MGS: Connealy Consensus 7229 DOB: 2/24/16

CED

BW

+11

WW

+.4

+92

YW

MILK

+161

SC

+27

+.58

Sire: KM Broken Bow 002L • MGS: DPL Upward L70 DOB: 1/29/16

$W

$W

+98.36

+89.37

$F

$F

+131.37

+98.64

$G

$G

+40.80

+41.71

$B

$B

+177.94

+186.80

RE

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

+1.21

+18

-2.1

+75

+128

+32

+.57

+.78

+.79

MARB

+1.09

CASINO BOMBER N33 • #18658677

DPL ALL IN T105 • #118834783

Sire: Deer Valley All In • MGS: S S Objective T510 0T26 DOB: 8/26/16

CASINO BLACK ROCK N138 • #18824870 Sire: Connealy Black Granite • MGS: Casino Franklin G66 DOB: 8/18/16

$W

$W

+77.56

+76.76

$F

$F

+67.19

+70.54

$G

$G

+39.36

+36.03

$B

$B

+134.55

+144.37

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

+13

-.1

+66

+112

+30

+.26

+.76

+.35

+9

+.6

+66

+109

+26

+.91

+.46

+.73

DPL DEVELOPER T18 • #18660645

Sire: KM Broken Bow 002 • MGS: DPL Daybreak K82 DOB: 2/27/16

CASINO SENSATIONAL N02 • #18658666 Sire: Sitz Sensation 693A • MGS: EXAR Upshot 0562B DOB: 1/2/16

$W

$W

+76.46

+68.53

$F

$F

+82.02

$74.39

$G

$G

+41.13

+42.73

$B

$B

+150.46

+155.91

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

+7

+.6

+73

+124

+27

+.12

+.73

+.61

+10

0

+60

+106

+31

+.79

+.80

+.39

CALL TO BE ADDED TO OUR MAILING LIST: (209) 632-6015

David & Jeanene Dal Porto

5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561 • (925) 634-0933

David & Carol Medeiros

September 2017 Cattleman 35 2800 Half Rd •California Denair, CA 95316 • (209) 632-6015


THE JAPANESE TARIFF THE INS AND OUTS OF HOW IT IMPACTS YOUR BEEF BUSINESS

U

by USMEF President Phillip Seng

.S. beef exports to Japan have been very successful in 2017, especially in the highervalue chilled category. But even with chilled U.S. exports expanding at such a rapid pace—through May, chilled volume was up 45 percent from a year ago to 58,000 metric tons (mt), valued at $414 million (up 42 percent)—the Japanese market still has a strong need for frozen imported beef. The first quarter of Japan’s fiscal year (April-June) saw substantial year-over-year growth in its frozen beef imports, triggering Japan’s frozen beef safeguard. This happens when imports exceed the year-ago level by more than 17 percent, and by the slimmest of margins— just 113 mt—this threshold was crossed. Now Japan’s already-lofty 38.5 percent duty on imports of frozen beef increases to 50 percent for the remaining eight months of the fiscal year, through March 31, 2018. The higher rate applies only to imports from countries that do not have a trade agreement with Japan. Among major suppliers, this includes the U.S., Canada and New Zealand. Australian beef will not be affected by the triggering of the safeguard, due to the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement (JAEPA), which took effect in 2015 and includes a separate annual safeguard that is based solely on imports from Australia. The current JAEPA duty rate of 27.2 percent will remain in effect until the end of the current fiscal year, when it is due for another decrease. Inquota imports from Mexico—which also has a trade agreement with Japan—will remain at 30.8 percent.

Background on the frozen beef safeguard Japan’s safeguard dates back to the WTO Uruguay Round in 1994, and has not been triggered since 1996 (a separate safeguard for chilled beef imports was last triggered in 2003). On more than one occasion, Japan’s safeguards for frozen and chilled beef have created anxiety for Japanese importers and U.S. exporters alike, 36 California Cattleman September 2017

causing port clearances to slow and creating logistical bottlenecks near the end of a quarter. Because of the trade disruptions and associated damage to long-standing business relationships when safeguards are triggered, the United States has sought to eliminate them—or at least reduce their impact— through free trade agreements. For example, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which was strongly supported by the U.S. beef industry, would have reduced the likelihood of the beef safeguard being triggered and softened the impact through lower duty rate increases. TPP also would have set the duty rates on beef imports from any participating country at the same level, with the rate for all TPP suppliers dropping to 9 percent over 15 years. One of the frustrations with Japan’s beef safeguards is that the Japanese beef industry has gone through fundamental changes since the mid-1990s and is no longer nearly as vulnerable to lower-priced imports as it was at the time the safeguard provision was negotiated. What is the potential impact of the snapback duty? The safeguards aren’t needed to bolster Japan’s cattle

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 38


r u o r o in us f

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Complimentary BBQ Lunch! 11:30 AM TO 1 PM

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Shop our comprehensive selection of animal health and handling equipment featuring products and services by these industry-leading manufacturers and more...

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(209) 847-8977 www.conlinsupply.com

September 2017 California Cattleman 37


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 36 producers, so they essentially just add costs to imported beef and place U.S. beef at an even greater disadvantage compared with Australian product. Japanese consumers are essentially stuck with a large tax increase on a product they clearly want and enjoy. But, especially in the short run, this added cost will be shared among U.S. exporters, Japanese importers and their downstream customers. Some Japanese end users may shift to Australian beef to capitalize on the huge duty advantage, but Australia can’t supply the volume of short plate necessary to offset the upward pressure on prices. One segment of the Japanese foodservice industry hit especially hard by the triggering of the safeguard is gyudon beef bowl restaurants. These establishments rely heavily on U.S. short plate as the primary ingredient for their tremendously popular and budget-priced lunch dishes, and they endured a major setback when U.S. beef was absent from the market due to BSE. This sector has recently enjoyed robust growth due to greater availability of U.S. beef and strong consumer demand, but it now faces tough decisions about whether to increase menu prices and how to procure enough beef to maintain sales.

is not currently at risk of triggering. But this could change later in the year, if there is a shift toward chilled imports. What can be done to resolve this issue? The Japanese government’s decision to trigger the safeguard raises the question of what can be done to reduce the chances of this happening again in the future. As noted above, TPP would have addressed this issue. But with the fate of TPP now in doubt, it is a strategic priority of the beef industry that the U.S. and Japanese governments find ways to modify the current safeguard mechanism so that it is less disruptive to the U.S. industry and our Japanese customers.

Additional facts on U.S. beef exports to Japan: ·

Japan is the largest export market for U.S. beef, with exports through May totaling 123,291 mt (up 28 percent year-over-year) valued at $731.4 million (up 32 percent).

·

Of the chilled and frozen U.S. beef exported to Japan through May of this year, 56 percent was chilled and 44 percent was frozen. On a value basis, 71 percent was chilled and 29 percent was frozen.

·

The U.S. is now the largest supplier of chilled beef to Japan, with imports through June totaling 64,365 mt, up 47 percent from last year. With imports from Australia dropping 5 percent (to 55,715 mt), U.S. market share is now 51 percent.

·

The U.S. is the second-largest (to Australia) supplier of frozen beef to Japan, with imports through June totaling 51,332 mt (up 20 percent) and U.S. market share at 34 percent. Imports from Australia totaled 81,611 mt during the same period, up 15 percent.

Can Japanese buyers shift to chilled beef?

Some can, and likely will. But chilled beef does not work for every customer due to the higher product and shipping costs, which could offset the lower duty. And if the higher frozen duty rate causes a shift toward chilled imports, this increases the possibility that the chilled beef safeguard could be triggered later in the fiscal year. The chilled safeguard operates on pre-BSE 2002/03 import levels and

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38 California Cattleman September 2017


SEPTEMBER 12, 2017

F AR MER ’ S L IVE STO C K M A R KET O A K D A L E , CA T O V IEW

T HE

C ATALOG

AN D

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H

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GL Genoa 028X Sensation 16061

A powerful, athletic bull with a light bw!

H

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+9.0 +0.3 +53 +82 +33 +0.48 +0.30 +$22 +$34

CS Sensation Domino S533 A low bw, high carcass trait bull!

d

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A lengthy spread bull with a great profile!

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Genoa 10Y Hometown 16060 An ideal made bull with great data! H

CS Future Sensation S5331

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EPD *Trait is measured in the Top 20% or better of the breed.

Carl and Susan Schohr PO Box 391 • Gridley, CA 95948 Carl 530-570-2275 ricencows@schohr.com www.SchohrHerefords.com

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September 2017 California Cattleman 39


NCBA Summer Meeting drives policy for producers More than 700 cattle industry leaders are gathered at the Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting in Denver July 13 through July 15 to help create direction for industry programs. The event included sessions of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Cattlemen’s Beef Board, American National CattleWomen and National Cattlemen’s Foundation. Among the purposes of the yearly conference was to create a framework for checkoff and policy efforts on behalf of U.S. cattle producers for the 2018 fiscal year, which for NCBA and the Cattlemen’s Beef Board begins Oct. 1. Keynote speaker at the opening general session, sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim, was Eric Baumgartner, executive vice president of VML, a global marketing ad agency. Baumgartner provided insight into the advent of technologies that are changing how consumers purchase almost everything they buy, from hamburgers to vacations. Also at the Summer Business Meeting, results from the 2016 National Beef Quality Audit were unveiled. Every five years since 1991 the NBQA has delivered a set of guideposts and measurements for cattle producers and others to help determine quality conformance of the U.S. beef supply. “While cattlemen and women continue to improve their operations and the beef they produce, there has been tremendous volatility in our industry over the past couple of years,” said Craig Uden, a beef producer from Nebraska and NCBA president. “To maximize their success cattle producers need to understand not only the impact of their own operations but everything in the world that affects how they do business today.” Joint Committees and Subcommittees met on Thursday and Friday to develop proposals for 2018 checkoff-funded research, education and promotion programs. Also on Friday NCBA policy committees met to determine priorities and discuss strategies for 2018. The NCBA Board held its board meeting on July 15 and the meeting of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board took place on Friday, July 14. “Cattlemen and women from across the country are taking time out of their busy lives to help make decisions that will have an impact on the direction our industry takes,” said Uden. “Meetings like this are a testament to the unselfish dedication these individuals have for the future of the beef cattle industry.” 40 California Cattleman September 2017


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B ULL AND F EMALE S ALE S EPTEMBER 2 3 , 2 0 1 7 • F E MA LE S

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Fall Female & Bull Sale OCTOBER

19

Thomas Angus Ranch Thomas Patricia 3873

11 A.M.

Selling 250 Bull & 150 Females

Thomas Idoldee 45495

17737903

CED +8 BW +1.2 WW +75 YW +135 Milk +34

Baker City, Oregon

18167169

MRB +.63 RE +.79 $W +85.70 $F +108.27 $B +187.41

CED +1 BW +4.1 WW +71 YW +122 Milk +18

MRB +1.10 RE +.87 $W +58.14 $F +98.37 $B +201.97

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam: Thomas Patricia 1604 MGS: Connealy Thunder

Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 • Dam: Thomas Idoldee 81074 MGS: Mytty In Focus

Sells with a bull calf at side by KCF Bennett Absolute.

Due 9/30/2017 Thoms Navigator 5771.

Thomas Ester 5037

Thomas Lucy 4667

18164115

CED +15 BW -.1 WW +58 YW +98 Milk +20

MRB +.32 RE +.92 $W +58.28 $F +67.96 $B +140.86

18040175

CED MRB +7 +.77 BW RE +1.7 +.72 WW $W +67 +67.29 YW $F +118 +81.17 Milk $B +28 +160.25

Sire: Plattemere Weigh Up K360 • Dam: Thomas Ester 1405 MGS: SAV Bismarck 5682

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam: Thomas Lucy 21158 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

Sells with a heifer calf at side by SAV Resource 1441.

Due 10/23/17 to Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36.

42 California Cattleman September 2017


Thomas Aviator 6790

Thomas Rampage 6855

18705671

CED +11 BW +1.1 WW +69 YW +128 Milk +32

Thomas Sunrise 6825

CED +5 BW +2.5 WW +67 YW +121 Milk +25

MRB +.58 RE +.89 $W +76.46 $F +100.81 $B +166.40

Sire: Musgrave Aviator • Dam: Thomas Miss Lucy 81194 MGS: Woodhill Foresight

MRB +.64 RE +1.04 $W +62.69 $F +87.95 $B +160.58

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Dam: Thomas Lucy 4961 MGS: Fintry of Graham 47539

Thomas Journey 6775

18704107

CED +3 BW +4.2 WW +93 YW +153 Milk +32

18696245

MRB +.78 RE +.91 $W +88.31 $F +117.99 $B +181.09

Sire: GAR Sunrise • Dam: Thomas Lucy Rose 4853 MGS: AAR Ten X 7008 SA

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Bryce Schumann, Cooperative Solutions Manager • Cell (785) 424-0360 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

18705492

CED +15 BW -.3 WW +70 YW +132 Milk +32

MRB +.65 RE +1.03 $W +78.69 $F +114.04 $B +181.41

Sire: WR Journey-1X74 • Dam: Thomas Eisa Erica 3714 MGS: AAR Ten X 7008 SA

Sale Managers: www.cotton-associates.com 517-546-6374

The Brand That Covers the Nation

September 2017 California Cattleman 43


FUTURE FOCUS SUMMER OF GROWTH

YCC MEMBERS MAKING THE MOST OF TIME OFF by YCC Publicity Chair Melissa Hardy While many California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) members are dusting off their backpacks and textbooks gearing up for anther school year, some of them are reflecting on how they continued their education over the summer and widened their experience in the cattle industry through internships and jobs. The opportunity for students to apply classroom information to field applications and work alongside those who have a lifetime of experience in their fields of interest is essential to their future careers, and of course the future of the cattle industry. YCC is excited to share the experiences of four of its members who spent their summer “vacation” expanding their skills, connections and knowledge.

Test management position is that hard work and a job done correctly always pay off in the end. Attention to detail is closely related as well. She advises, “The final results of whatever you are working on reflects the amount of time and preparation that goes into it, and it is essential to remember the big picture when you are working on a project.” Mason would like to go into the animal pharmaceutical industry when she graduates with her Bachelor of Science degree in animal science. Having extensive hands-on experience with treating and working animals alongside veterinarians, as well as making contacts with the many companies that contribute to the Cal Poly Bull Test is very beneficial.

tasks included checking the Federal Resister for bills, attending hearings, working with the NCBA policy team to find information and even visiting congressmen and senators. He was quickly engaged with the Public Lands Council and NCBA staff helping to create positive policy as he went to political action committee events and greatly enjoyed watching the lobbying team work on behalf of our country’s cattlemen. Pozzi was also part of an agriculture intern network which set up lunch and learns, socials and presentations for the 150 different agriculture interns in D.C. for the summer. This opportunity to build strong connections with people from across the country gave him a great picture of how well the agriculture industry is represented in D.C. He wants to encourage more college students from California to venture to Washington, D.C., and learn more about the legislative processes which greatly affects our industry.

Steven Pozzi California State University, Fresno Rebecca Mason To think a ranch boy from the California Polytechnic State northern coastline of California University, San Luis Obispo Rebecca Mason is the 2017 Cal Poly would end up having one of the best summers of his life in Washington, Bull Test Manager. Cal Poly Bull Test D.C., would have seemed like a strange consists of about 150 yearling bulls idea to Steven Pozzi, a junior studying from various consigners. The bulls are ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 46 agriculture business on a “Range Ready” program, which means that certain vaccination protocol at California State University, Fresno, are strictly followed. The bulls on test live in pens on the hillside of Cal Poly’s about three months before he applied Escuela ranch, which conditions and for the National prepares them to go to work at their Cattlemen’s Beef future homes. The top 50-60 percent Association of the bulls that make the cut will be (NCBA) Public sold in the sale on Oct. 1. Policy Internship Mason’s responsibilities include position. However, checking the bulls every morning he soon realized and night, doctoring sick and injured it was a blessing. animals and corresponding with the Steven was offered consigners to keep them updated on the internship and their animals. “This job comes with a tremendous rapidly started planning his summer, amount of responsibility,” Mason says, “I am responsible for all of the animals; which seemed daunting traveling however, I love working with the animals and making contacts with all of from one side of the country to the other. the consigners.” YCC’s Steven Pozzi with NCBA’s Vice President of His internship The most important lesson she has Government Affairs Colin Wodall. began in June and his learned from taking on Cal Poly Bull 44 California Cattleman September 2017


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A SAV Resource son with true depth, heel, and power!

A maternal brother to Uproar and Torque! Flush brothers sell!

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Herd bull alert! This guy has every tool to be a big time prospect!

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A powerfully constructed Resource son and flush brother to 5325!

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Circle Power Grid D63 • 7/25/16 • Reg 3274075 • 1/2 SM 1/2 AN

Bruin Pay Scale 6232 • 7/23/16 • Reg 18812901 • Angus

A top-end Power Grid son that blends power and design in one package!

A 1682 son with all the look you could ask for! Call today!

VIDEOS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON ALL BULLS AFTER SEPT 8. CALL TODAY TO REQUEST YOUR DVD COPY OR VISIT US ON YouTube.com.

CONTACT EITHER PRODUCER TO BE ADDED TO THE MAILING LIST OR DOWNLOAD A SALE BOOK FROM EITHER BREEDER WEBSITE

BRUIN RANCH OFFICE: SACRAMENTO, CA • RANCH: AUBURN, CA Lloyd Harvego, Owner • www.BRUINRANCH.com Joe Fischer, Manager • 530-392-0154

Circle Ranch

Tim and Jill Curran • 209-765-1815 • 209-765-0450 1000 Cook Rd. • Ione, CA 95640 circleranch@volcano.net • www.CIRCLERANCH.NET September 2017 California Cattleman 45


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44

been greatly broadened, which will be a useful tool in her future career. She has also helped with many cattle Pozzi would like to thank the NCBA pasture rotations and drives as well as and PLC staff for an amazing and sortings and brandings. Maupin has also unforgettable summer, which he learned a lot of working techniques on will remember forever as one of the greatest learning experiences he has ever horseback to move cattle in a calm and collected manner. encountered. Some of her favorite parts of this experience were on horseback moving Harlee Maupin cattle and at brandings, but she greatly California State University, Chico treasures the memories made at the Harlee Maupin spent her summer bunkhouse with her fellow interns interning on the IX Ranch located and new friends. Maupin has enjoyed in Big Sandy, Mont. The ranch totals her summer at the IX Ranch and will 127,000 acres of private land, private forever cherish the memories she has leases and public land and runs 3,000 made as well as the knowledge and skills head of cows. Maupin chose this acquired. internship, because she has a passion for the cattle industry and wanted to further Veronica Staggs her knowledge and abilities. When she California Polytechnic State graduates from Chico State, Maupin University, San Luis Obispo hopes to work on a big producing ranch Veronica Staggs has been interning like the IX. with a large animal veterinarian in The IX produces roughly 10,000 northern New York this summer. She tons of hay during summer, which is has been working alongside doctors on used primarily to feed their cows in both beef and dairy cattle operations. the winter months. The majority of In addition, she has been traveling her time at the IX Ranch was spent with a U.S. Department of Agriculture in a tractor, swathing, raking and veterinarian to sale yards and harvest baling hay. Her knowledge of haying, facilities. At the latter locations, areas of inspection included residue protection, tractor driving and maintenance has

46 California Cattleman September 2017

humane slaughter, pathogen-control and HAACP regulations. Having worked in meat processing herself, she enjoyed seeing plants from the veterinarian’s point of view. Staggs is thankful to have had the opportunity to practice both in the field and in processing plants. The summer has opened her eyes to the wide array of career possibilities within the realm of veterinary medicine. Her favorite part of the internships is having the opportunity to connect with members of the cattle industry nationwide. Although operations may vary on the East Coast, she noted that the hard work, dedication and friendliness did not change one bit. Veronica is entering her fourth year and final year at Cal Poly where she is majoring in animal science and minoring in dairy science. She has been a Cal Poly YCC member for the last four years and has always had a passion for food animal production. Veronica hopes to make her contribution to the industry as a large animal veterinarian. Upon entering this career path, she plans to dedicate her time to the innovation of animal health as well as helping the public better understand the industry.


52nd famoso all-breeds bull sale 200 BuLLs • 1,000 FemaLes plus Ranch equipment auction

saturday, october 14th

western stockman's market

Ranch equipment auction > 9 a.m.

Western Stockman‘s Market will be Selling Farm and Ranch Equipment Onsite including Tractors > Pickups > Cattle Chutes > Tack Cattle and Horse Panels > Antiques > And More

aLL consiGnments WeLcome. tuRn YouR eXcess FaRm anD Ranch equipment in to ca$h.

annuaL BReD coW saLe > 10 a.m. Famoso aLL-BReeDs BuLL saLe > 1 p.m.

Selling the Best the West Has to Offer

THD ©

Sale to feature Fall-Calving Cows, Bred Heifers and Cow-Calf Pairs from Reputable Ranches located in California and Oregon, plus Top Quality Angus, Horned Hereford, Polled Hereford, Gelbvieh, Balancer®, Simmental, SimAngus, Charolais, Red Angus and Ultrablack® Bulls consigned by some of the West's Best Seedstock Producers.

come BY YouR BuLLs, FemaLes anD Ranch equipment aLL in the same DaY at Famoso!

Visit Us Online

For details on upcoming sales and events, visit us at www.westernstockmansmarket.com.

Your Southwest Livestock Market Leader

western stockman’s market 31911 highway 46, mcfarland, california 93250

THD ©

DWiGht meBane ........................................................ 661 979-9892 Justin meBane ...........................................................661 979-9894 Frank machado .......................................................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane.........................................................661 201-8169 office ..................................................................................661 399-2981 WeBsite .....................www.westernstockmansmarket.com September 2017 California Cattleman 47


Join the California Cattlemen’s Association for the

The

Nugget Casino Resort 1100 Nugget Avenue Sparks, NV 89431 Reservations must be made by Nov. 8 for discounted room rate: East/West Tower Deluxe Rooms = $59* per night Sunday - Thursday East/West Tower Deluxe Rooms = $79* per night Friday & Saturday

Committee Meetings Beef Industry Education Allied Industry Council Trade Show General Sessions and more!

* Single or Double Occupancy; Rates excludes 13.5% tax & $10 per night resort fee. Resort fee includes parking & guest room internet. By Phone: (800) 648-1177 Mention Group Code: GCCA17 (California Cattlemen/Cattlewomen) for discounted rate A credit card is required for your hotel reservation. Cancellation must occur at least 48 hours prior to arrival to avoid penalties. Check-in is at 3 p.m., check out is at 11 a.m. Valet and self-parking is complementary Visit www.calcattlemen.org to book your rooms online!

Detach and send registration form to the CCA office at 1221 H St., Sacramento, CA 95814 or register online by visiting www.calcattlemen.org


of the November 29 - December 1, 2017 | Sparks, Nev. | Nugget Casino Resort Cattlemen’s All Inclusive Registration

$250

$ # Tickets Amount

*denotes inclusion (no substitutes)

11 am - 5 pm

CCA Scholarship Interviews

8 am - 5 pm 8 am - Noon 8 am - 5 pm 10 am - Noon 11am - Noon Noon - 7 pm Noon - 2 pm 1 - 2 pm 1 - 2:30 pm 2 - 5 pm 2 - 3 pm 3 - 4 pm 4 - 5 pm 4 - 5 pm 5 - 6 pm 6 - 9 pm 6:30 - 9 pm

Registration Opens Western Video Market Sale CRT Board Meeting CCA Officer’s Meeting YCC Networking in the Trade Show Tradeshow Opens California Cattlemen’s Foundation CBCIA Finance Meeting Media training CBCIA Board Meeting CCA Finance and Membership Meeting Cattle PAC Meeting LMRF Meeting CCW Executive Committee Allied Industry Wine & Cheese Reception Tradeshow Welcome Party YCC Meeting & Dinner

6:30 - 7:30 am 7 am - 5 pm 7 am - 2 pm

7:30 - 9 am 8 - 9:00 am 9 - 10 am 10 - 10:30 am 10 am - Noon 10 am - Noon 10 am - Noon 11 am - 1 pm Noon - 1 pm 1 - 2 pm 1:30 - 4 pm 2 - 4 pm 2 - 4 pm 2 - 4 pm 4 - 5 pm 4 - 6 pm 5 - 6 pm 5:30 - 6:30 pm 6:30 - 10 pm

Prayer Gathering Registration Open Allied Industry Trade Show 7 - 8 am Breakfast in the Trade Show 7 - 10 am Bloody Mary Bar Noon - 1 pm Lunch in the Trade Show CCW President’s Breakfast General Session #1 Cattlemen’s College Session #1 CCW Heritage Meeting CCA Cattle Health & Well-Being CCA Cattle Marketing & International Trade CCA Federal Lands Cowbelle of the Year Lunch Past Presidents Lunch Cattlemen’s College Session #2 CCW Education Workshop Cattlemen’s Poster Session CCA Property Rights & Environmental Management CCA Agriculture & Food Policy Cattlemen’s College Session #3 CCA General Resolutions CCW President’s Reception CCA President’s Reception CCA & CCW Reception & Awards Banquet

6:30 - 7:30 am 7 - 9 am 8 - 9:15 am 9:30 am - 12:15 pm 9:30 am - Noon

CCA Nominating Committee CCW Awards Breakfast Cattle-Fax Breakfast CCW Board Meeting CCA Board and Membership Meeting

Full Registration (CCA Member)

$150

Full Registration (Non-CCA Member)

$200

Includes meetings, tradeshow, Welcome Party, breakfast and lunch in the tradeshow on Thursday and the Allied Industry Council Wine and Cheese Reception

Includes meetings, tradeshow, Welcome Party, breakfast and lunch in the tradeshow on Thursday and the Allied Industry Wine and Cheese Reception

YCC Registration

$50

CCW President’s Breakfast

$15

*Cattlemen’s College Session 1

$15

CCW Cowbelle of the Year Lunch

$25

*Cattlemen’s College Session 2

$15

*Cattlemen’s College Session 3

$15

*CCA & CCW Awards Banquet

$55

CCW Awards Breakfast

$25

*CCA CattleFax Breakfast

$25

Includes Welcome Party, all three Cattlemen’s College sessions, breakfast and lunch in the tradeshow on Thursday and YCC Dinner on Wednesday night

2017 Cattle-PAC Membership

$200

Please write separate check to CCA Cattle-PAC

PRE-REGISTRATION PRICES REFLECTED HERE WILL TOTAL INCREASE AFTER NOV. 10 Name(s) attending: ____________________________________ _________________________________________________ Local Affiliation: ______________________________________ Payment method: CHECK

Please make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association

Card #: ______ ______ ______ ______ Exp. ___/___ Cardholder’s Name: ___________________________________ Cardholder’s Phone Number: _____________________________ Billing Address: ______________________________________

__________________________

____

__________

City

State

Zip Code


FROM COAST TO COAST DON’T BE DECEIVED

NCBA WARNS OF UNHOLY ALLIANCES by NCBA Chief Executive Officer Kendal Frazier from pushing cattle off the land, By now you’ve probably seen that there’s a determined effort by sliding beef off the plate and driving activist organizations to undermine the cattle producers off the ranch. Don’t beef industry. Groups like Humane believe everything you read; this fight Society of the United States (HSUS) is about stopping the activists from and Public Justice are attempting to achieving those goals. And that’s all it’s change the way we do business and about. they’ve banded together with groups I’ve said it before, but I’ll repeat like R-CALF and other like-minded it again so it’s clear: HSUS does not organizations to target state beef care about beef producers or the councils and their work to promote checkoff. They care about stopping beef. We might disagree on policy the production and consumption of matters within the industry, but it’s meat! Every member of the beef another thing entirely to target the community that collaborates with this volunteer-led state beef councils group, for any reason, is helping them through unholy alliances with animal achieve that goal. They will stop at rights activists and others intent nothing to change your way of life, on driving beef producers out of drive beef producers out of business business. and irreparably harm the social and You read that correctly: R-CALF economic fabric of rural America. and like-minded groups have joined HSUS, Public Justice and their with activist organizations like Public armies of urban lawyers would love Justice. In this case the Public Justice/ nothing more than to remove beef R-CALF alliance is litigating a case from the plates of consumers. These against the Montana Beef Council. activists are working to drive good We’ve seen this trend increase lately. cattlemen and cattlewomen out of It was first begun by HSUS activists business by promoting a meatless who used their deep pockets to buy agenda (visit: http://bit.ly/2vCBzwP influence in the beef industry and and http://bit.ly/2uDNeyb for gain standing to file lawsuits against the checkoff in an all-out effort to end beef promotion, and ultimately, the production of beef in the United States. HSUS, Public Justice, R-CALF and others have been unsuccessful in the halls of Congress and they aren’t making progress among consumers or beef producers at the ballot box, so they’re spending their time and money to perpetuate misinformation and engage in a guerilla campaign against beef and the checkoff. They know ending the checkoff eliminates the only self-help program designed and led by beef producers and they know that’s all that stands between them and more meatless diets. We must work together to stop HSUS, Public Justice and their collaborators. We must stand together to prevent these activists 50 California Cattleman September 2017

KENDAL FRAZIER examples) and they’ve joined forces with some of your neighbors who have sold out and are helping them to accomplish that goal. We need to stand together and shine a light on these alliances between R-CALF and their activist partners at Public Justice and elsewhere. These shams must be exposed for what they really are. It’s time to stand together to stop the attacks, misinformation and propaganda. It’s not in our nature to challenge our friends and neighbors, but there’s too much at stake to continue in silence.


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September 2017 California Cattleman 51


1977-1987 PUTTING UP A FIGHT

Ranchers Work to Combat Consumer Concerns and Mother Nature’s Wrath by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

T

he circumstances of 1977 have some interesting parallels that ranchers today can likely relate to. In 1977 and 1978, California, under the leadership of a much younger Gov. Jerry Brown, was nearing the end of what was then called one of California’s worst droughts on record. Cattlemen and women up and down the state today are familiar with such rhetoric. A major difference however is that at a population of only 22 million, the state’s population in 1977 paled in comparison to today’s nearly 40 million residents. The drought was just one factor ailing the industry. The number of beef cows in each of the four major U.S. cow-calf production regions declined by about one-fifth between 1975 and 1980 in response to sharp reductions in feeder cattle prices and increases in production costs and feed shortages during the mid-1970s. In addition to the lingering drought situation in the 70s, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) oil embargo in the mid 70s was also largely to blame for the economic fallout and sharp increase in production costs. According to a report from USDA’s Economic Research Service, the Jan. 1, 1980 U.S. inventory of beef cows totaled 37.1 million head, down 19 percent from the 1975 peak of 45.7 million. This era marked some interesting change in the national beef industry. According to CCA Executive Secretary Bill Staiger in 1981, the number of feedlots in California had fallen from 175 in 1973 to only 90 by 1981. Likewise, the number of feedyards in the major beef production states sharply declined, but the number of head marketed actually increased, which speaks to the efficiency improvements that were be implemented across the industry. Similarly, the number of beef packers also declined. The industry shift in processing technology from 52 California Cattleman September 2017

carcass to boxed beef played a roll in the decrease in the number of packers. The loss of packers was especially felt by California cattle feeders. California feedlots were traditionally markets for California cow-calf producers but out of state competition began putting a strain on Southern California feeders. While stocker ventures were considered to be highly speculative because cash flow demands were high, University of California Cooperative Extension data from 1974-1986 shows that approximately 1.4 million animals were transported into California for stocking, feeding or slaughter. At that point in time, nearly 30 percent of the state’s beef cow herd was located in the San Joaquin Valley, but toward the 1990s many ranchers would move cattle into the northern mountain country. Not surprisingly, as the population in California grew over time, so did consumer preferences, and the beef industry was faced with a smaller portion of consumers’ grocery budget going toward the purchase of beef. From price increases to health recommendations, the beef industry found itself playing defense at a level it had not yet experienced. Jack Russ, a Ferndale cattle producer who served as CCA president in 1980, recognized that beef prices were hurting cattlemen at the meat counter and expressed CCA’s concern over the issue to statewide media outlets. “It is not surprising….Supply is down and production costs – energy, labor and transportation keep spiraling upward,” Russ told the Chino Valley News in January 1980. “Ranchers had to drastically cut back their herds when the drought hit. They were short on feed and when they could get it, costs were prohibitive. As the number of cattle went down, the price went up.” In addition to cattlemen finally turning a profit by 1980, more favorable news was on the horizon as legislation was


pending that would control beef imports, simply put. Russ desire for a superior product lead you to veto a bill that’s said the legislation would ensure that if supply was short, really pretty good.” imports would increase and if the nation’s cattlemen were It seems the same mentality holds true today, both producing enough, imports could be reduced. within the California Cattlemen’s Association and in As the national and state beef industry were at a society as a whole. Ranchers might not all agree all the crossroads never before visited, cattlemen saw the need to change up their game. In a way of life that had traditionally time but if they work together toward the common goal of bettering the beef industry they will get more done been widely-accepted and favorable in the eyes of the overwhelming majority of Americans, the deck of cards than going it alone. stacked against ranchers was seeming to grow taller. As this article will examine in subsequent issues, Not only did cattlemen have to deal with the California’s cattlemen were just getting warmed up to play longstanding issues of mother nature and production serious defense as their way of life came under attack. costs, they were now being bombarded by health claims, growth in other protein industries, animal rights activists as The issues of the 1980s would be magnified as the state’s population would grow, putting more demand on mother well as the growing population that was pushing them off nature’s resources. As in its first 70 years as an association, of the rangelands they had traditionally utilized. Seeing a need to increase beef promotion efforts, in CCA members would continue to show their ingenuity and 1981, CCA lobbied its members to try to pass a national resilience, both as a group and as individually. “beeferendum,” which would raise $1/head marketed. The money would go to a national fund that would pay for This article is the seventh in a 10-part series covering top promotion projects within the beef industry. On the state issues within each decade of CCA’s 100-year history. front, CCA’s lobbying efforts were successful as nearly 80 percent of the state’s beef producers voted in favor of the measure. However, on a national level producers weren’t as enthusiastic and the referendum failed, getting only about 30 percent support across all states. A persistent bunch, cattlemen kept seeking ways to increase research and promotion funds that might help counteract the negative issues plaguing their industry. Again CCA members voted at their 1985 midyear meeting to support a product promotion and research measure. On Sept. 18, 1985, Bill Staiger told the Petaluma Argus-Courier the beef industry was undergoing its greatest financial stress in 25 years, citing consumer health concerns about beef, poor public image of beef production and unfavorable government policies as the main reasons for strife within the ranching community. “The answer,” Staiger said, “lies in the adoption of a national program for promotion and research of the beef industry and its products. The Beef Promotion and Research Act (the Act) was passed as part of the 1985 Farm Bill and A young Gov. Edmund “Jerry” Brown opens the Governor’s Drought provided the mission and the base for development Conference in March 1977. of a producer-funded beef promotion and research program – the Beef Checkoff Program – aimed at building demand for beef and beef products, both domestically and internationally. The Act authorized the U.S. Department of Agriculture to develop a Beef Promotion and Research Order covering specifics of the program’s operation. Making amendments to the Act requires U.S. congressional action and, ultimately, a producer referendum with a majority favoring the change. While the 1985 Farm Bill did not come without controversy, the beef promotion aspect has worked exceptionally well for beef producers, though it has come with its fair share of turmoil as well. Even Reagan himself said the Farm Bill as a whole could use improvement but recognized the need to come to an agreement for the good of the country. “The farm bill of 1985 is not what we wanted,” Reagan said. “But, in government, you can’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. You can’t let your President Ronald Reagan signs the 1985 Farm Bill. September 2017 California Cattleman 53


MANAGING QUALITY IN BEEF CATTLE by Certified Angus Beef ’s Justin Sexton

The day you make breeding choices, purchase bulls or buy bred heifers, marketing the calf crop begins. With those decisions in the rear view, it’s time to consider how to make the most of a great mating. Sale day for your spring-born calves grows closer as each day grows shorter, and that brings up weaning. Three considerations dominate all related plans: when to wean, what to feed and how to keep them healthy. Timing implies giving some thought to “the market,” along with local forage availability and cow body condition scores (BCS). Predicting the best time to market I will leave to others. As summer wears on and calves get older, cow condition falls off with the decline in forage

availability. Weaning is the way to improve cow BCS while reducing the stress on grazing resources. You may have read or heard that creep feeding can reduce grazing pressure and cow nutrient requirements, but don’t expect a big response. It’s more of an add-on for the calves; while eating creep, they will consume less forage but that does not change nutrient needs for their dams. It takes weaning to remove the requirements for milk production that make up 20 percent of those needs. Weaning before cow BCS drops below a 4 (where 5.5 is average at calving) lets you start developing the next generation’s high-quality carcass. While the influence of fetal programming during the first trimester is not fully understood,

54 California Cattleman September 2017

placental and organ development patterns suggest nutrient limitation then can reduce performance and quality grade later. That’s because underdeveloped lungs are more likely to be affected by a health stress. While we are discussing future health, let’s consider this year’s calf, obviously nearer to marketing. We have often discussed the importance of calf vitality because sickness means lower quality grades. Preventative measures to enhance health ring bells for both management and marketing, so work with your veterinarian to develop a specific plan and your marketing agent to match that plan to a program. Working in concert ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 56


Bull Sale

i Angus, Hereford & SimAngus Bulls Sell monday, October 2

Fort Klamath, Oregon

Plan your weekend

@Traynham Ranches sunday, October 1

Traynham Ranches Female Sale will feature Angus, Simmentals & Composites with guest breeders Sweet T Land & Cattle and Winterbrook Cattle Company. The sale begins at 2 p.m., at the Fort Klamath Ranch.

Traynham UlTimaTe answer D57 Traynhams Black GraniTe D155 Sire: OCC Ultimate Answer 118 Dam’s Sire: EXAR Upshot 0562B BW -.4 • WW +66 • YW +116 • MILK +30 MARB +.35 • RE +.63 • $W +66.38 • $B +143.36

Sire: Connealy Black Granite Dam’s Sire: S A V Wall Street 7091 BW I+2.0 • WW I+54 • YW I+93 • MILK I+23 MARB I+.42 • RE I+.57 • $W +46.45 • $B +120.25

monday, October 2

Long-Yearling Angus & SimAngus bulls from Traynham Ranches, and Hereford bulls from Hufford’s Herefords, sell at 1 p.m. All 100 bulls selling are ultrasound-tested, semen-tested and trich-tested, and backed by a complete herd health program.

i matt macfarlane, sale manager maTT macfarlane markeTinG

cell 916-803-3113

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

aUcTiOneer: eric DUarTe, 541-533-2105

Traynhams Black GraniTe D142

Traynham BrOker D30

Sire: Connealy Black Granite Dam’s Sire: Exar Unleashed 84111 BW -.3 • WW +56 • YW +96 • MILK +19 MARB +.34 • RE +.64 • $W +48.88 • $B +122.52

Sire: MR Hoc Broker Dam’s Sire: BR Midland CE 1.7 • BW +2.8 • WW +55.3 • YW +74.1 • MILK +14.7 CW 17.9 • MARB +.26 • RE +.31 • API +89.4 • TI +57.6

h3l mr 028X sensaTiOn 2D

h3l 592r rancher 19D

Sire: Churchill Sensation 028X Dam’s Sire: TPR 029X Domino 32A BW -1.0 • WW +54 • YW +79 • MILK +38 • M&G +65 RE +.29 • MARB +.33 • $BMI +25 • $CHB +31

Sire: Churchill Rancher 592R Dam’s Sire: UPS Domino 6162 BW +2.5 • WW +55 • YW +92 • MILK +25 • M&G +53 RE +.31 • MARB +.35 • $BMI +23 • $CHB +30

Follow Us on Facebook for Details

BRad & BuCKLey COx 1881 Brophy Road eagle Point, OR 97524 541-840-5797 Brad 541-840-8788 Buckley www.traynhamranch.com info@traynhamranch.com

REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS 79337 Soto Lane • Fort Rock, OR 97735 www.huffordsherefords.com

Ken & Leslie Hufford 541-576-2431 541-403-1044 Cell ijhufford@yahoo.com Jesse: 541-576-3541 541-810-2460 Cell

THD ©

September 2017 California Cattleman 55


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54

9th Bi-Annual

with these advisors helps value-added health programs capture more of that value for the calf producer. Creep feeding can play an important role of course, and that is partly because it helps transition calves Horses With A History From The Ranch To The Rodeo from only nursing and grazing to a feed ration as well. Illinois data suggest creep should be fed for 56 days to see a difference in performance. While a consensus of earlier studies suggested starch-based creep to optimize Joe & Cathy Murray Jim Wheatley Will Gill & Sons marbling development in young calves, new Illinois research opens doors to other options, such as corn coproduct-based rations relatively 21501 Road 400, Madera, CA higher in fat and protein. Futurity at 4 p.m. Saturday, October 7 This recent work showed an “up Sale: Sunday, October 8 • Preview Time 10:30 a.m. regulation” of genes associated with Sale immediately following preview marbling and fat deposition, although there were no changes in ultimate Selling approximately 75 Head carcass composition. A corn-based control diet showed similar up-Weanlings to Broke Horses regulation while tending to enhance quality grade in the finished cattle. Alfana 194 Trapper Bar Drop Although this mechanism (upLights Out Ike Blue Light Ike regulation) and its link to final carcass Codys Shining Spark Four Gill Ike quality may not be fully understood, data shows the genes are moving in Joe Clarot & the right direction to improve quality. Holzum Quarter Horses Further down the supply chain, cattle feeders can tell you it pays to include these coproducts in the diet because they help keep cattle on feed while moderating rumen acid load. Opportunities to meet the nutritional needs of growing calves continue to expand with our knowledge of animal genetics, gene regulation and feed composition. As we approach the time when responsibility for calf nutrition shifts from the cow to the yard manager, we can still capitalize on a genetic decision made long ago if we talk about potential added value and collaborate to develop a diet that allows calves to express their genetic David Gill 559-647-5619 Joe Murray 209-613-6310 Jim Wheatley 209-613-1135 potential. 56 California Cattleman September 2017

Ranch & Performance Horse

Production Sale

From the ranches of

Sunday, October 8 • the Historic Adobe Ranch

Sires include:

Guest Consignors:

More information contact:


TFemale Sale

raynham ranches

SunDay, OctOBER 1 • 2 P.m.

Fort Klamath, Oregon GuEst ConsiGnors:

sweet t land & Cattle and Winterbrook Cattle Co.

anguS, SImmEntalS anD cOmPOSItES: >> Show Heifers >> Bred Females >> cow-calf Pairs >> Pregnancies & Embryos

FEatuRIng tOP cOw FamIlIES anD gEnEtIcS

Owned with Sweet t land & cattle, llc

EXaR clOuDy gIRl 9712 Born 1-3-2009

SwEEt PRIncESS D58 Born 2-24-2016

This 2010 NJAS Division Champion and 2011 NW Regional Grand Champion Cow-Calf sells with a fall calf at side, sired by Vin Mar Pursuit 5572.

This daughter of the 2015 NJAS Grand Champion Cow-Calf sells bred to calve next spring to WR Journey-1X74.

Bc 7022 Raven 7965 x BR midland

Styles cash R400 x Dameron First class

yaRDlEy cHaRISma c213

EvErElda EntEnsE E543 Born 2-17-2017

Selling a pregnancy out of this 2016 Oregon State Fair Supreme Champion and 2017 NWSS Reserve Division winner, sired by WS Revival B26.

This Primo show heifer prospect, whose granddam is BT Everelda Entense 566P, has been the favorite of visitors!

yardley aspen a425 x yardley Royal Jet w251

colburn Primo 5153 x limestone Darkhorse u322

Brad & Buckley cox

BID lIvE OnlInE:

Watch for Sale Details on Facebook

Stay for the Baldymaker Bull Sale: monday, October 2

1881 Brophy Road • Eagle Point, OR 97524 Brad 541-840-5797 • Buckley 541-840-8788 SALE MANAGER Matt Macfarlane 916-803-3113

SalE BOOk REquEStS: info@traynhamranch.com

SalE DEtaIlS: www.traynhamranch.com

THD ©

September 2017 California Cattleman 57


Silverbelly 10X & 30X

10X hat band buckles made by Vogt Silver

Black 10X & 30X

30X hat band buckles made by Vogt Silver

58 California Cattleman September 2017

Each hat is stamped with a gold foil centennial logo

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All hats are silk lined


Saturday, OCTOBER 7, 2017

par t ners for performance FEMALE SALE -

3 p m ; at t h e r a n c h n e a r F i r e b a u g h , C A l i f o r n i a

recen t champions -

Shown By Shayne Myers - Colusa, California

SILVEIRAS SARAS DREAM 6322 Champion Div. III Junior Heifer 2017 National Jr. Angus Show

Shown By Case Wilson - Bowden, Georgia

SILVEIRAS SARAS DREAM 4540 Res. Champion Senior Heifer 2017 National Western Stock Show we proudly use + recommend:

Owned with Pollard Farms - Waukomis, Oklahoma

SILVEIRAS SARAS DREAM 6318 Grand Champion Angus Female 2017 California State Fair

Shown By Carly Wheeler - Paso Robles, California

SILVEIRAS SARAS DREAM 5339 Res. Grand Champion Female 2017 National Western Angus Futurity

M3 Marketing MATT MACFARLANE (916) 803-3113

w w w . S I LV E I R A B R O S . c o m

more info-

RICK BLANCHARD // ( 5 5 9 ) 2 1 7 . 1 5 0 2 • DARRELL SILVEIRA // (559) 2 1 7 .1 5 0 4 G A R R E T T B L A N C H A R D // ( 5 5 9 ) 9 7 8 . 2 7 7 8 • M A T T L E O // ( 2 0 9 ) 5 8 7 . 5 8 3 8 KELSEY SCHOTT - CUSTOMER RELATIONS // (760)877.8135 • CAROLE SILVEIRA - OFFICE // (559)240.6004

September 2017 California Cattleman 59


HEREFORD YOUTH FOUNDATION OF AMERICA, SIERRA RANCHES LAUNCH FOUNDATION 1 CLUB The Hereford Youth Foundation of America (HYFA) and Tim and Kara Coleman, Sierra Ranches, Modesto, are teaming up to launch the HYFA Foundation 1 Club at the Western Treasures Vol. 1 Sale Monday, Oct. 9, at 1 p.m. The Foundation 1 Club is a group of breeders who donate 1 percent of their sale gross to HYFA to benefit leadership, scholarship and educational experiences for Hereford youth. “Kara and I have always been passionate about junior programs, so we started looking at what we could do as Sierra Ranches to help foster the junior program and support it in the future,” Coleman said. “I was reflecting last spring on the good programs that take place throughout the year

for HYFA and thought ‘what would 1 percent of a sale be?’ It started to sound right. Whether it is an online sale, bull sale or production sale, there is no amount too big or small to donate back to HYFA.” Through HYFA, Hereford youth have the opportunity to gain invaluable leadership skills that enable them to become self-directing, educated leaders in today’s world. “The Hereford Youth Foundation of America is fortunate to have such a gracious network of donors,” said Amy Cowan, American Hereford Association director of youth activities and foundation. “The Foundation 1 Club sets the stage for amazing growth for our leadership and educational programs. I can’t

Join us 21st annual “Cattlemen’s Select” Range Bull Sale!

Sunday, September 24 • 1 p.m.

Featuring hand-selected bulls from reputation breeders. ALSO select females from local ranches prior to the bull sale.

thank Sierra Ranches and the Coleman Family enough for having the foresight to be the inaugural members of this prestigious club and committing 1 percent of their sale proceeds this fall to HYFA. Our future is in good hands thanks to donors like Sierra Ranches.” To become a member of the Foundation 1 Club, contact Amy Cowan at (816) 218-2256 or acowan@ hereford.org.

Hand tooled Cactus Ranch saddle to the lucky buyer whose tag is drawn at the conclusion of the sale! SPONSORED BY:

— BBQ LUNCH SERVED AT NOON — Our experienced staff offers weekly Wednesday auctions as well as Internet video marketing via www.RoundupCattle.com, order buying and processing. Also, we have receiving facilities and can help you with the transporation of your cattle!

733 NORTH BEN MADDOX WAY, VISALIA, CA – (559) 625-9615 TEMPLETON RECEIVING YARD: 4350 RAMADA DRIVE, TEMPLETON, CA – (805)434-8334 BUELLTON RECEIVING YARD, HWY 101, BUELLTON •(805) 835-8900 Settrini ©

60 California Cattleman September 2017

RANDY BAXLEY 559.906.9760 • WWW.VISALIALIVESTOCK.COM


Offering Spring and Fall Yearling Bulls

TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO.

Sale by the Sea Friday, October 6, 2017 • 4 p.m. At Thousand Hills Ranch Pismo Beach, California

TEX Payweight 6169

GAR Phenom 7953

Birth Date: 3-29-2016

Bull 18570690

Tattoo: 6169

Sire: TEX Payweight 3764 +17729373 Dam: TEX Everelda 4132 17824883 +8 CWT $W

CED

.35 +62 +65.01

+1.2

BW

MRB $F

.52 +64 +1.02 +80.69

WW

.46

RE $G

+114 +.90 +50.28

YW

.37 FAT $B

+24

MILK

.27

+.001 +183.97

TEX Payweight 6143 Birth Date: 3-6-2016

Bull 18582183

Tattoo: 6143

Sire: TEX Payweight 3764 +17729373 Dam: TEX Empress 4012 +17824849 +13 CWT $W

TEX Phenom 6162 Birth Date: 3-1-2016

Bull 18734234

Tattoo: 6162

Sire: GAR Phenom +17623634 Dam: TEX Pamela 1088 16900614 CED

+9 CWT $W

.34 +40 +56.88

-.2

BW

MRB $F

.54 +54 +1.04 +54.62

WW

.47

RE $G

+98 +.72 +51.12

YW

.42

+30

FAT $B

MILK

.29

+.014 +142.15

Birth Date: 2-21-2016

Tattoo: 6120

Sire: GAR Phenom +17623634 Dam: VA Ambrosia 1313 17689500 +15 CWT $W

CED

.31 +34 +51.53

-.9

BW

MRB $F

.51 +42 +1.19 +38.35

WW

RE $G

.44

+78 +.53 +50.77

Selling 11 Brothers to Phenom 6120!

YW

.39 FAT $B

+33

MILK

+.032 +136.31

.25

-.8

BW

MRB $F

.46 +69 +1.18 +101.61

WW

.40

RE $G

+126 +.66 +50.12

YW

.36 FAT $B

+24

MILK

.22

+.014 +181.22

TEX Absolute 6708 Birth Date: 3-10-2016

Bull 18776136

Tattoo: 6708

Sire: KCF Bennett Absolute 16430795 Dam: TEX Miss Effie 12070 +17097835 CWT $W

Bull 18434954

.32 +56 +70.42

Selling 10 Brothers to Payweight 6143!

+14

TEX Phenom 6120

CED

CED

.36 +48 +73.61

-.8

BW

MRB $F

.53 +70 +.70 +84.67

WW

RE $G

.46

+120 +.48 +34.52

YW

.42 FAT $B

+19

MILK

.34

+.039 +145.98

Selling 2 Brothers to Absolute 6708!

Also offering 2 sons each from the powerful Teixeira Donors Basin Joy 566T and Rita 1C43 of 9M26 Complete!

TeX DemAnD 2791

This full sister to Playbook sells October 6! SALE MANAGED BY:

John, Heather, Nathan, Joseph & Ben Teixeira 805-448-3859 John cell Allan & Cecilia Teixeira 805-310-3535 Allan cell

131 Robin Ct. Howell, MI 48855 517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com Psalm 50:10

www.teixeiracattleco.com cattle@thousandhillsranch.com September 2017 California Cattleman 61


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All calls with InfinityDISH are monitored and recorded for quality assurance and training purposes. Offer for new and qualifying former customers only. Important Terms and Conditions: Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. Offer ends 10/18/17. 2-Year Commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $49.99 advertised price: America’s Top 120 programming package, Local channels HD service fees, and equipment for 1 TV. Included in 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($59.99 for AT120+, $69.99 for AT200, $79.99 for AT250), monthly fees for additional receivers ($5-$7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15) and monthly DVR fees ($10-$15). NOT included in 2-year price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), DISH Protect, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: HBO: After 12 mos., you will be billed $15/mo. unless you call to cancel. 3 Mos. Free: After 3 mos., you will be billed $40/mo. for Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality and all prices and fees not included in price lock are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., you will be billed $8.99/mo. for DISH Protect unless you call to cancel. After 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard professional installation only. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Internet: Internet speeds, prices, and providers vary by customer address. Call for details. Visa® gift card must be requested through your DISH Representative at time of purchase. $50 Visa® gift card requires activation. You will receive a claim voucher within 3-4 weeks and the voucher must be returned within 60 days. Your Visa® gift card will arrive in approximately 6-8 weeks. InfinityDISH charges a one-time $49.99 non-refundable processing fee which is subject to change at any time without notice. Indiana C.P.D. Reg. No. T.S. R1903.

62 California Cattleman September 2017


2017 Leachman TopLine Bull Sale 250 $Profit Angus & Stabilizer Bulls Saturday, Oct. 21st • 101 Livestock • Aromas, CA 5 Reasons to buy a Leachman TopLine bull: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Industry leading guarantee. Tested for feed efficiency. Evaluated on the industry’s best index: $Profit. Bred to build cows that work and steers that pay. Over half of the bulls selling will work on heifers.

Bulls worth the money!

“This will be the 6th year of selling Topline Leachman Bulls, and they average about the same as most other bull sales across the state. Yes, you get the most futuristic bulls in the United States for about the same price of any bulls in any sale. It’s like going car shopping and you decide to buy a nice Chevrolet because it fits your budget, then when you go to pick the car up they give you the most expensive Mercedes they make at the Chevrolet price. Next year when you start seeing the Topline Leachman calves hit the ground you will know you bought a lot better bull for the same money. ” – Jim Warren, 101 Livestock

Mike Browning and Jim Warren, 101 Livestock, Aromas, CA

68% Prime on 458 Steers!

We don’t chase big weaning weights. We don’t chase big yearling weights, because that just makes a big cow,” says Jerry Kusser. “We are trying to stay moderate. We feed a lot of these two- and three-year olds and we see feed intake going down,” he says. During the growing phase, some lines of the cattle converted as well as 4.2 pounds (lb.) of feed per lb. of gain (4.2:1)…. It was no mistake, the 2016-born K Lazy K calves were 68% Prime, and 88% qualified for the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand or CAB Prime. A proud smirk spread across Kusser’s face: “I knew it!” Kusser has a quick solution for anyone wanting to copy his success: “They just need to come to me and I can go buy them some Leachman bulls,” he says. Jerry Kusser, K Lazy K Ranch, Highmore, SD

– Reprinted with permission from the Angus Journal, July 2017 Lee Leachman (970) 219-8519 ● Ryan Peterson (970) 672-6828 Ric Collins (707) 803-3334

20572 Big Canyon Rd, Middletown CA 95461

Kevin Unger (785) 470-1131 ● Zech Browning (707) 295-6802 September 2017 California Cattleman 63


Ranching

California Communities working to keep western tradition alive

by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead

T

he dinner bell at the chuck wagon, cowboys telling stories by the campfire after a long day, horses, cattle, dogs and many, many miles are some of the things that come to mind when cattle drives are mentioned. Historically, cattle drives were the only way to get cattle to market, or eventually the railheads, to take them to delivery points throughout the United States. While they certainly haven’t lost their nostalgic luster in today’s world, cattle drives are not as prevalent as they once were with the increase of technology and changes in the beef industry over time. However, several communities in California have brought the memories of the western frontier days back to urban areas thanks to someone who is more than all hat and no cowboy. Doug Lofstrom is no stranger to the western industry, in particular the fair industry. With a career that started at the Hemet Fair in 1980 by a bit of surprise, Lofstrom would contribute to several fairs in Southern California over time. Managing a small county fair meant connecting the community to agriculture for Lofstrom, and he knew he wanted to do things differently. In 1985, after developing a close relationship with a cattle rancher on the fair board, Lofstrom gathered up a group of cowboys, and he and his team held their first cattle drive to kick off a team penning event – really the first of its kind in Southern California – and that’s how it all started, Loftsrom said. He would help put together three more cattle drives for the Hemet Fair in 1985, 1986 and 1987 before moving to work as a vice president at the Los Angeles County Fair. The Los Angeles County Fair had heard about Lofstrom’s cattle drives and so in 1996, he helped host another cattle drive to the fairgrounds in LA through the community of Laverne and even tied in the chuck wagon from the Calgary Stampede. For the next three years, the cattle drive would be a repeat event in LA, and Loftstrom said it was well received as a very special event. Cattle drives help fairs take a piece of what they are all about into their communities, Lofstrom said. “These cattle drive events are a unique way for fairs to get 64 California Cattleman September 2017


off of the fairgrounds,” Loftstrom said. “They bring a slice of the western lifestyle into communities and especially urban areas.” The way children light up when they see real cowboys and the animals makes a positive impact on everyone, Lofstrom said. They have a chance to experience something they wouldn’t normally get to in school or otherwise. In 2000, Loftstrom went on to become a member of the executive staff at the Orange County Fair and in 2007 the theme was Herefords, Surfers and Sand, so you might have a hunch about what helped kick off the fair that year. The fair ran during the U.S. Surfing Open, so they did a cattle drive on Huntington Beach. Loftstrom says hands down that was the most unique cattle drive he was ever a part of! “To think we got permission in today’s environment to take 99 steers and 40 riders under the pier at Huntington Beach,” Lofstrom said. “It was incredible!” He chuckled as he remembered the scene, recalling that the 10-year anniversary of that particular drive was the week he was interviewed for this story. In 2012, Lofstrom retired from the fair, but little did he know he wouldn’t be able to stay away from it for very long. In 2015, he helped put on one last cattle drive to celebrate the 125 anniversary of the Orange County Fair, and then he says, he hung up his spurs, so to speak. But, the phone rang on January of this year. It was the San Diego County Fair on the other line and a good friend of his, CEO Tim Fennell, asked if he’d rally the troops once more to help kick of their “Where the West is Fun” themed fair. The San Diego County Fair had wanted to do a cattle

drive for several years, so they knew with this theme the equation was right. After many meetings with the city of San Diego, they got the green light to kick off the fair with a cattle drive. Cattle would be trucked in 23 miles to the staging area to run from the marina through the Gas Lamp District of San Diego. Of course there were extreme safety measures, police escorts, and a clean up crew because of their proximity to the ocean, but Katie Mueller, Deputy General Manager of the San Diego County Fair says it was all worth it, because the community absolutely embraced the event! She says businesses opened early to help get cattle drive viewers breakfast and overall, it was well received by everyone who attended. Russ Fields, Castro Valley, has been involved in about eight of the cattle drives that Lofstrom has helped organize, including the San Diego County Fair cattle drive. He manages his group of cattle dogs who help keep curious cattle in the herd on the city streets. “Some people have no idea where their meat comes from,” Fields said. “These events help connect them a little more to the western way of life.” After the San Diego County Fair, Lofstrom’s phone rang again. This time on the other line was Alameda County Fair CEO and his former Orange County Fair colleague, Jerome Hoban. So, Lofstrom would gather up his crew once again and head for Pleasanton where the turnout was one of the ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 66

September 2017 California Cattleman 65


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 65 largest he had ever seen for the 13th cattle drive he has been involved in. Fields’ son, Colton Fields, Castro Valley, rode in this cattle drive along with his dad, with his dogs in the back of the herd, keeping an eye for any cattle that might have been headed for the ferris wheel. Fields has also participated in other cattle drives in San Francisco produced by one of California’s favorite cowboys, Cotton Rosser, Marysville. Rosser has been hosting cattle drives with his wellknown rodeo stock contracting outfit, Flyer U Rodeo Company, for more than 50 years! “If you can think of a city in California, we’ve probably done a cattle drive there,” Rosser jokes. The list of cities he and his crew have covered with cattle include places like Daly City for the annual Cow Palace livestock show and rodeo and even Hollywood! He recalls a video that has resurfaced recently of the time when a longhorn steer drug him on his boots across the parking lot of the Cow Palace, but he never did let go. Tried and true, the Flying U has been a main staple in the rodeo community and Rosser enjoys what cattle drives bring to each community where he has driven cattle. For the cattle drive crew and the fairs involved, community was the most important factor in the event and of course, promoting the western lifestyle was at the top of everyone’s list too. “In order to pull any of these off, we had to get the support of community and we have to get support of riders,” Lofstrom said. “Everywhere we’ve gone, everyone always gives us 110 percent, and I believe that’s what makes them so wildy successful.” Alameda County Fair’s (ACF) theme this year was Best. Summer. Ever., so naturally, the cattle drive followed suit as the Best. Cattle. Drive. Ever. Angel Moore, ACF’s Marketing and Communications Manager said it made sense to host a cattle drive in Pleasanton, because it is important for the fair to celebrate the heritage of its

66 California Cattleman September 2017

community and the cattle drive helped convey that purpose. Moore explained there’s a lot that goes into planning a cattle drive including extra fencing, route maps, media, event paraphernalia, and working to include local businesses. She says they gave downtown Pleasanton businesses the chance to sign up as an event supporter and they in turn would get fair tickets to give out to customers on the morning of the cattle drive. She says five thousand tickets were given out and eager on-lookers had placed all of the cow hats provided at the event on their heads by 8:45 a.m. that morning. The drive didn’t begin until 10:15 a.m. Moore says that’s a testament to how excited the community was about the event. In fact, she said, people were calling to book a table on the patios of restaurants on Main Street months in advance so they would have the best seat in the house. Of course, while fairs are a wonderful way to connect urban visitors to their western heritage, some cattle ranchers in California still do drive their cattle for various purposes. But for whatever reason, the thought of a cattle drive really ties people to a nostalgic feeling of the old West. Some readers may recall a couple of years ago when PBS filmed a documentary on the McGarva Ranch in Likely That piece recorded Ken McGarva’s last ride as cow boss before he and his wife, Jackie, passed on their operation to the next generation. The crew had such a wonderful time creating “A Likely Story” that they sent it in for a regional Emmy award—and it won! Another example, the Hunewill Ranch, a commercial cow/calf ranch in Bridgeport, holds an annual cattle drive to move their herd from a climate that gets really, really cold during the winter to their winter ranch in a bit milder weathered Nevada. Leslie Hunewill, the sixth generation to run the Hunewill ranch says her family’s ranch was founded in 1881 by her great, great, great grandfather who made his way ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 68


s e r u s a e r T n r e We st

SIERRA RANCHES

___ V 1 OLUME

COLUMBUS DAY

MONDAY, OCTOBER 9

1 p.m. pdt • At the Ranch near La Grange, Calif.

95 registered lots sell

45 Hereford Female Lots — Proven Donors, Show & Donor Prospects, Bred Heifers, Pairs, Pregnancies & Embryos 45 Hereford Bulls + 5 Angus Bulls — Service-age Bulls…Ready to Work

GO Ms 3196 Advance T90

HH Advance 3196N x GO Ms L18 Excel P8 CED +0.9, BW +1.8, WW +32, YW +72, MILK +25, M+G +42, REA +.02, MRB +.13, CHB +16 This legendary donor and top income generator sells in her entirety along with several progeny, including production age females.

SR W49 Bonnie 6006 ET

Ribeye 88X ET x GO Ms 7195 Advance W49 CED +4.8, BW +1.7, WW +55, YW +83, MILK +36, M+G +63, REA +.18, MRB +.33, CHB +31 January 2016 bred heifer out of GO Ms 7195 Advance W49. Several maternal sibs also sell.

SR TKC 2018 Addison 6007 ET SR 5139R Miss Montana 6171 ET

Revolution 4R x H B/R Addison 2018 ET CED +2.8, BW +2.5, WW +59, YW +95, MILK +22, M+G +52, REA +.73, MRB +.23, CHB +31 Selling 1/2 interest in this outstanding January 2016 bred heifer plus maternal brothers and sisters. Sells bred to Churchill Red Bull 200Z.

SR X1 Cadence 7079 ET

H H Fast Forward x GO Ms 7195 Advance X1 CED +3.9, BW –0.3, WW +49, YW +81, MILK +24, M+G +49, REA +.34, MRB +.16, CHB +23 This 2/21/2017 daughter of H H Fast Forward 2268 ET sells along with other progeny and the service of her sire.

Hometown 10Y x HH Miss Advance 5139R ET CED +5.4, BW +0.8, WW +56, YW +89, MILK +35, M+G +62, REA +.65, MRB +.21, CHB +29 This top fall prospect sells plus other progeny from her famous dam, HH Miss Advance 5139R ET.

H Kinsey 2508 ET

H Payback 807 x HH Miss Advance 5139R ET CED +1.2, BW +3.4, WW +58, YW +73, MILK +30, M+G +59, REA +.71, MRB –.13, CHB +25 This 2013 Junior National Hereford Expo Reserve Grand and Division II Champion Owned Horned Female sells in her entirety.

TKC 2018 Ribeye 88X 6126 ET TKC 2090 Townsensation 6073 ET Ribeye 88X x H B/R Addison 2018 ET

Sensation 028X x H Raylee 2090 ET

CED +4.2, BW +3.0, WW +55, YW +86, MILK +31, M+G +59, REA +.41, MRB +.34, CHB +33

CED +7.0, BW –0.2, WW +50, YW +71, MILK +40, M+G +65, REA +.50, MRB +.16, CHB +26

Polled 3/7/2016 herd bull prospect. Maternal brother to 6007, above.

Polled 3/8/2016 son of the Hereford breed’s No. 1 sire for Calving Ease EPD, Churchill Sensation 028X.

The Western Treasures, Volume 1 sale catalog is available with the September issue of the Hereford World. Also available online at SIERRARANCHES.NET & mcsauction.com, or contact us to request your mailed copy.

www.sierraranches.net

Tim & Kara Coleman, Owners Tyler & Kathryn Coleman Tim (209) 968-7232 | tim@sierraranches.com Kara (209) 613-6062 | kara@sierraranches.com Dan DeMeyer, General Manager (209) 857-0455 | dan@sierraranches.com P.O. Box 577980, Modesto, CA 95357 Business Office (209) 526-2333 Fax (209) 524-4561

SALE MANAGER

incorporated

Matt Sims (405) 641-6081 matt@mcsauction.com www.mcsauction.com

Sale broadcast at superiorlivestock.com

September 2017 California Cattleman 67


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 66 from Maine to California to mine for gold. After a number of years selling lumber, he moved into the cattle business to provide beef for the gold and silver miners in the area. Every November, the cattle are moved from the home ranch in Bridgeport to their winter ranch in Smith Valley, Nevada, about 60 miles from Bridgeport, which today consists of about a five day journey. Originally the cattle drive included a very large group of cattle with numerous families involved and as they reached a destination, the cattle would be sorted off. Today, the Hunewills are the only family who still drive their cattle to winter range, but they bring guests with them, usually about 15 to 22 extra people. The family started taking guests in the 1930s as part of their guest dude ranch experience, which was encouraged and managed by Hunewill’s great grandmother who knew how people loved to come stay on the ranch. So, she made it her mission to host guests on the ranch, which eventually lead to having guest riders on the cattle drive. This year celebrates the family’s 86th year as a guest ranch and over 150 years in the Bridgeport Valley. “Generally, people who come on the drive are guests that come to stay on the ranch in summer or fall, and they want to come back for another experience,” Hunewill said. “It’s become a tradition we look forward to, because it marks the end of the summer and fall seasons and we get to see people we haven’t maybe seen in a year.” While some modern day cattle drives take a more public route, the Hunewill family takes visitors on real life cattle drives in California’s back country where they gain firsthand appreciation for the ranching industry.

68 California Cattleman September 2017

Driving about 600 head of cattle on a 60 mile journey, for five days is hard work, says Hunewill. But since the cows have been doing this their whole life, they know the route. She says they put the first calf heifers in the back so they can eventually learn the way, too, as they are a little cautious at first. Keeping this particular tradition alive is important to her family, and Hunewill says it is well worth it in the end. “We have a lot of the same people who come on the drive year after year, and they become really great friends of ours,” Hunewill says. “The end of the drive is a little bitter sweet, because you have to wait a whole year to do it over again, but we’re happy with each successful drive and the friendships we build while maintaining such a meaningful tradition.” Whether it’s through downtown city streets or down dusty country back roads, cattle drives will forever remain a favorite symbol of the American West. Though urbanization and technological advances and practicalities may have changed the dynamic of cattle drives over the years, the traditions still remain strong and active bringing urban communities, and even agricultural ones, back to their roots! No matter if it’s engaging the community or moving cattle from one ranch to another interests you most, something tells me you may find yourself humming the theme song to the old T.V. show Rawhide with visions of a young Clint Eastwood in your head a little bit later on. Move ‘em out and keep those doggies rollin!...You know the rest.


DON’T LET ONE BAD BULL TAKE DOWN YOUR WHOLE HERD.

When it comes to trichomoniasis, the odds are stacked against you. It takes just one infected bull to spread the venereal disease across an entire herd, leaving you with open cows, lost pregnancies and lost profits. The good news is there’s TrichGuard,® the first and only vaccination licensed to reduce the shedding of trich organisms. So play your cards right, and keep your operation protected.

TrichGuard is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. ©2017 Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. BOV-0467-REPRO717

September 2017 California Cattleman 69


PLC SPEAKS OUT IN RESPONSE TO ESA ISSUES On Aug. 7, the Public Lands Council (PLC) and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) issued the following statement from PLC President Dave Eliason after the release of the Department of the Interior report on Order 3353, “Greater Sage Grouse Conservation and Cooperation with Western States”: “During an initial review of the report, I was encouraged by several key priorities including the compatibility of proper grazing management and conservation. The report acknowledges the need for a more collaborative approach between grazing permittees and federal leadership, as well as a reexamination of the Habitat Objectives Table and its application – both key elements to successful conservation efforts for the Greater Sage Grouse. The report also reinforced the need to pursue outcome-based grazing demonstration projects and targeted grazing pilot projects, two critical tools for responsive management of ecosystems and fuel loads. The Public Lands Council and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association stand ready to collaborate with the

Department of the Interior moving forward.” In another hotly contested endangered species topic, Ethan Lane, executive director of the Public Lands Council and NCBA federal lands, released a statement on Aug. 1 in response to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding the listing of the gray wolf in the Western Great Lakes Region: “Today’s ruling is a perfect example of the need to modernize the Endangered Species Act. At well over 4,000 wolves, it is abundantly clear that the population in the region is recovered and thriving. Rather than celebrating the successful recovery of this species, Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin will continue to be held hostage to the whims of radical environmental activists. It is now incumbent upon Congress to take action to carry out the proper delisting of the gray wolf and modernize the Endangered Species Act so that it works for every American, not just well-funded judicial activists.” As these and other public lands topics continue to evolve, CCA will keep members apprised on updates as well as ways they can get involved.

52nd Annual

Tuesday, November 7 12 o’clock noon •

Shasta Livestock Auction• Cottonwood, California

Offering 125 Top Quality Bulls BULLS WILL BE GRADED AND SIFTED ON MONDAY, NOV. 6 Hereford Red Angus Charolais Angus Composites Join us for Western Her itage Night

A HOSTED BAR & STEAK DINNER! MONDAY, NOV. 6

Sale Book Requests & Western Heritage Night Reservations:

Greg and Maureen Thomas, Sale Managers (541) 545-3417 or ycross@centurylink.net

70 California Cattleman September 2017


September 2017 California Cattleman 71


Barry ranches annual Production sale

octoBer 22, 2017 • 1 P.m.

At the Ranch • Madras, OR also selling out of our elling the cream of the croP 15 Hereford Show Heifer Prospects - Broke and ready to go! outstanding angus Program-

s

!

15 Hereford Bred Heifers - Right off the top! 15 Bred Cows - Productive young cows with solid pedigrees and EPDs Select Embryos and Pregnancies!

5 Angus Show Heifer Prospects 5 Angus Bred Heifers 5 Angus Bred Cows

The cattle will be on video by September 10th.

C 1311 5280 LAD 6167 ET {DLF,HYF,IEF}

C DOUBLE YOUR MILES 6077 ET {DLF,HYF,IEF}

Sire: CRR 5280 • MGS: NJW 98S R117 RIBEYE 88X ET

Sire: CRR 5280 • MGS: NJW 98S R117 RIBEYE 88X ET

CE

BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC

CW FAT REA MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$

CE

BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC

CW FAT REA MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$

2.3

3.4

64 -0.022 0.67 0.04

2.3

2.3

64 -0.020 0.64 0.04

64

93

34

65

2.4

95

1.22 1.22 0.8

17

15

12

32

• Featuring the first service of the $15,000 herd sire purchased this spring and member of the 2017 NWSS Reserve Champion Pen of Bulls.

-3.8 4.1

49

78

27

51

2.0

78

1.18 1.15 0.9

33

62

2.4

81

1.22 1.22 0.6

16

16

11

29

CSF BR GABRIELLE 8129 ET {DLF,HYF,IEF}

Sire: STAR SHOCK WAVE 13Y ET • MGS: UPS DOMINO 5216

BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC

81

• The $105,000 NWSS Champion Bull! His AI service is featured in the bred females.

BHR SW DOMINETTE 504 {DLF,HYF,IEF} CE

59

Sire: DM BR SOONER • MGS: BR LANSING 3060

CW FAT REA MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$

CE

BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC

CW FAT REA MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$

60 0.030 0.36 -0.05 14

2.2

3.4

84 -0.009 0.76 0.06

• This 2017 Western Nugget Champion Female now anchors our donor program. • Embryos and pregnancies sell, as well as quality show prospects bred just like her. Same look and same kind!

11

12

18

71

112

27

63

2.5

109 1.37 1.29 0.8

15

12

36

• Selling a January heifer calf by the $600,000 C Miles McKee 2103 ET out of this powerful Iron Lake and Burns Farms donor.

BARRY RANCHES

Matt Macfarlane Marketing mmacfarlane@wildblue.net HEREFORDS AND ANGUS www.m3cattlemarketing.com M A D R A S, O R E G O N 916-803-3113 Joe Barry, Owner • 503-807-9397 Scott LeQuieu, Manager • 541-639-7509 Charlie Woo, Show and Sale Cattle • 541-410-1029 72 California Cattleman September 2017

18


P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Genetics

SELLING STANDOUTS AT CAL POLY, OCT. 1 LOT 163 GCC FERDINAND 16045 ET Sire: HUTH PS PROSPECTOR M015 MGS: CHURCHILL RED BULL 200Z Reg # 43740826 • DOB: 10/31/16 Index

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

REA

MB

$CHB

103

3.4

.8

64

118

25

.60

.38

40

Actual BW: 78 lbs. HE’S CALVING EASE!

LOT 127 5T RED BULL TARGET 15011

LOT 163

LOT 164 GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 16029 Sire: NJW 73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y ET MGS: THR THOR 4029 Reg #43768130 • DOB: 9/5/16 Index

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

REA

MB

$CHB

102.7

3.1

2.5

54

83

27

.55

.25

29

Actual BW: 80 lbs.

LOT 165 5T LORD PROSPECTOR 16035 Sire: HUTH PS PROSPECTOR M015 MGS: H EASY DEAL 609 ET Reg #43767425 • DOB: 10/5/16

ALSO AVAILABLE PRIVATE TREATY!

• Both horned and polled Herefords • Extensive use of embryo transfer and A.I. • Top cow families represented • Cattle have good disposition • Bulls available year-round private treaty • Free delivery within a 500-mile radius for more information visit

pwgillibrandcattle.com

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

REA

MB

$CHB

3.1

1.5

58

103

17

.54

.32

35

Actual BW: 82 lbs.

Dwight Joos

Ranch Manager P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co. P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA September 2017 California Cattleman 73


Sudden & Hollister Cattle Co. Putting their best to the test!

Bulls Bred to preform at the top of the Angus breed

LOT 53

S&H Complete 6005 Reg: 18649703

S&H Discovery 6102 Reg: 18605565

Sire: V A R Complete 1209 • MGS: 21AR Roundup 7005

Sire: V A R Discovery 2240 • MGS: TC Aberdeen 759 CED BW WW YW MK MB $B 8 1.0 80 147 23 1.12 153.94 Top 1% in the breed for WW, YW, $W and $F!

LOT 58

LOT 55 CW 11

BW WW YW MK MB $B -.1 51 96 30 .89 108.71 Calving ease and carcass quality!

Sudden & Hollister Cattle Co.

S&H Rampage 6009 Reg: 18604715 Sire:Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • MGS: TC Aberdeen 75 CED BW WW YW MK MB $B 7 2.1 88 137 22 .83 142.89 Top 1% in the breed for WW, YW and $W!

David Hollister 444 South N Street • Lompoc, CA 93436, (805) 588-5668

Aced the Test

Borges Bulls move to head of the class! A multi-trait Angus performer with a test index of 108.3!

Lot 62

AAA REG NO. 18749194 Lot 65 The low-Birth Angus division leader with with a test index of 118.2! Sire: A A R Ten X 7008 S A MGS: D R Sierra Cut 7404

BORGES Angus rancH

JOE & PATRICIA BORGES 3130 BYER ROAD, BYRON CA (925) 634-3072 • (209) 456-0632

74 California Cattleman September 2017

Sire: Vintage Legacy 4409 MGS: Bon View New Design 878

A top Contender in the Angus Division with a test index of 110.9!

Lot 61

Sire: Connealy Earnan 076E MGS: Bear Mtn Owyhee 5012

Top Preformers at Cal Poly...Year after Year


— 61 Annual — st

Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Sunday, October 1, 1 p.m. 130 YEARLING BULLS

Angus, Hereford, SimAngus and Red Angus

JOIN US FOR THE YOUNG CATTLEMAN’S COMMITTEE FUNDRAISER DINNER SATURDAY, SEPT. 30. CAL POLY ALSO INVITES YOU TO ATTEND THE STOCKMANSHIP & STEWARDSHIP EVENT HOSTED WITH THE CALIFORNIA BEEF COUNCIL ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 29 AND SATURDAY, SEPT. 30 FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REQUEST A CATALOG CONTACT: Aaron Lazanoff Keela Trennepohl, Ph.D. Beef Operations Manager Beef Cattle Specialist (805) 801-7058 (805) 440-8421 alazanof@calpoly.edu kretalli@calpoly.edu @calpoly bull test

www.bulltestcalpoly.edu

@cp_ bulltest

September 2017 California Cattleman 75


A LEAGUE OF HIS OWN

Westwind brings a calving-ease powerhouse to Cal Poly DOB: 8/16/16 Reg No: 18551258

Sire: HF Tiger 5T x MGS: A A R Ten X 7008 S A CED

BW

WW

YW

DOC

MILK

RE

$W

$F

$B

17

-1.9

71

131

35

32

.75

84.12

95.81

152.35

1%

3%

4%

2%

1%

5%

1%

3%

LOT 81 ALL WESTWIND BULLS COME DNA TESTED AND PARENTAGE VERIFIED!

WESTWIND RANCH ANGUS Where Cowmen Buy Bulls

David J. Holden • (530) 736-0727

38 Montana Ave, Oroville, CA 95966 wstwind@hotmail.com • www.westwindangus.com

CATTLEMEN, WOMEN HONORED AT MID-STATE FAIR Three leaders in San Luis Obispo County’s agricultural industry were honored at the California Mid-State Fair in July. Ken Dewar was named 2017 Agriculturalist of the Year, Fran Pritchard earned 2017 CattleWoman of the Year honors and Elena Twisselman Clark was chosen as the 2017 Cattleman of the Year. Dewar, highly regarded by his peers, was honored by the San Luis Obispo County Farm Bureau — which represents about 1,100 members — for his work to improve agriculture as a whole.Dewar is president of JB Dewar Inc., founded by his grandfather in 1933 in Santa Maria. He and his wife, Sandi, have two daughters, Morgan and Rachel Dewar. Ken Dewar is the founder and supporter of the annual JB Dewar Tractor Restoration Program and Contest at the Mid-State Fair, and is a member of the SLO County 4-H Management Board, COLAB Board of Directors and Cal Poly Rodeo Boosters Board, among others. He is also a member of the Heritage Foundation. “Throughout his entire life, Ken Dewar has worked closely with agriculturalists, earning their trust and praise,” according to the Farm Bureau, “exemplifying the qualities of leadership, outstanding service and a continued commitment to the betterment of agriculture and its people who farm, ranch and work in the industry.” The San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen’s Association honored Pritchard for her decades-long dedication and leadership in promoting and protecting the beef industry. Pritchard and her husband Chuck, the 2015 Cattleman of the Year, have spent decades building a ranching and agricultural heritage at the Bitterwater Land and Cattle Company in Paso 76 California Cattleman September 2017

Robles. Pritchard has been a member of the San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen’s Association since the early 1980s and served on its board of directors for six years. She also has supported numerous events and organizations such as the Paso Robles Main Street Association, the county Farm Bureau, Echo Homeless Shelter, Olive Festival and Lavender Festival. “Fran Pritchard embodies all that is admirable about the local cattle industry and its people and its philosophy and practice of neighbors-helping-neighbors,” according to the Cattlewomen’s Association. The San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association honored Clark for her many accomplishments, dedication and commitment to the cattle industry. Clark is a fifth-generation Californian who grew up in the Bitterwater Valley, attending a one-room school from first to sixth grade. She graduated from Cal Poly with a degree in animal science. She returned to the family farm and continues the tradition of ranching operations with her husband, Pete Clark, the 2009 Cattleman of the Year and has volunteered with numerous groups including 4-H, the county Farm Bureau, San Luis Obispo Children’s Museum and Central Coast Cancer Support Community. She was the 1993 Cattlewoman of the Year and served three decades as the Mid-State Fair Horse Show secretary. “Elena Twisselman Clark has worked tirelessly to bring people together to understand important issues and protect and promote the cattle industry as a longtime member of the Cattlemen’s Association,” according to the SLO Cattlemen’s Association


BUTTE Bull

Sale

OCTOBER 21 — 1 P.M.

LAMBERT RANCH, OROVILLE, CA Horned and Polled Hereford bulls bred and raised to perform in any environment! THANK YOU TO THESE EVENT SPONSORS FOR THEIR SUPPORT...

Mark your calendar for February 16, 2018 for our Alturas Bull Sale! We hope to see you there!

THE LAMBERT FAMILY

Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 slambert@digitalpath.net lambertranchherefords.com

September 2017 California Cattleman 77


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR

CHECKING IN ON YOUR BEEF CHECKOFF

CBC PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR RANCHERS by California Beef Council Director of Producer Communications Jill Scofield Stockmanship & Stewardship Events Come to California Over the past few months, an exciting road show of sorts has been taking place throughout the country. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program – in partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim – have held several regional Stockmanship & Stewardship clinics for producers to expand their learning, and it all started right here in the Golden State. On June 23 and 24, over 100 producers and students gathered at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) for the kick-off Stockmanship & Stewardship event. As luck would have it, this inaugural event came during one of Northern California’s notorious heat waves, with temperatures hovering in the low 100s as the outdoor seminar began. Despite the heat, audience members enjoyed an insightful session on low-stress animal handling featuring well-known clinicians Curt Pate and Ron Gill. The two demonstrated some good techniques for working cattle, both horseback and on foot, and were careful not to work them too hard or too fast due to the heat. In fact, the temperatures gave a good backdrop for talking about important heat mitigation techniques when working cattle. The live animal handling portion of the event culminated with a chute-side demonstration on proper

78 California Cattleman September 2017

vaccination practices, with Jim Oltjen, Ph.D., and Bret McNabb, Ph.D., of UC Davis joining Pate and Gill for this portion of the seminar. It was an enlightening, though hot, afternoon. In a blog post he later wrote summarizing the event, Pate best summed it up by saying, “We all have opinions and ideas on how animals should be cared for and handled. I am really trying to understand how to truly look at things from the animal’s point of view, and how to fit that to our human needs to make it best for everyone.” The evening ended in fun, with a delicious Prime Rib dinner prepared by the UC Davis Meat Lab team, local beer and wine selections, and entertainment provided by Jim Hunter and the Simpson Creek Band. The second day of the event included a full BQA certification training, a screening of the new documentary Food Evolution, a tour of the UC Davis Meat Lab with an educational presentation on carcass defects caused by improper handling, and a panel discussion on environmental stewardship featuring cattleman Scott Stone, UC extension specialists Dan Macon and Luke Macaulay and UC Davis professor and air quality specialist Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D.. The CBC was proud to partner with a number of organizations to carry out this event, the success of which ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 80


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September 2017 California Cattleman 79


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 76 would not have been possible without the collaboration and support of UC Davis, the California Cattlemen’s Association, California Beef Cattle Improvement Association, and Rustici Rangeland and Cattle Research Foundation. But the bulk of the hard work came from a number of UC Davis staff and faculty, including Dan Sehnert, Oltjen, Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., McNabb, Caleb Sehnert, Don Harper, Chris Akins, the team at the UC Davis Meat Lab and many other behind-the-scenes folks who came together to make the event a success. Thank you to everyone who was a part of it! One More Opportunity to Attend! If you missed the fun in Davis, there’s another opportunity to attend a Stockmanship & Stewardship clinic. At the end of this month, Cal Poly will host the fifth and final of these regional events, and will also feature some hands-on and enlightening demonstrations from Pate and Gill. The Cal Poly event will feature a BQA Certification, and will also include results from the recently released National Beef Quality Audit, a fabrication demonstration highlighting emerging beef cuts and the evolution of beef carcass quality over the years, and sessions on facility and design considerations and lessons in cattle health, just to name a few. Cal Poly SLO Stockmanship & Stewardship Event • Friday, September 29 – Saturday, September 30 (Prior to the 61st annual Cal Poly Bull Sale on Sunday, October 1) • Registration: $75 (student discount available) • For more information and to register, visit www.stockmanshipandstewardship.org

80 California Cattleman September 2017

CBC Welcomes Damon McCune as Director of Food & Nutrition Outreach This summer, the CBC welcomed Damon McCune as its director of food & nutrition outreach. McCune, who joined the team following the departure of James Winstead earlier this year, will work to advance the CBC’s nutrition education program and broaden its reach to key health and nutrition influencers and audiences. This important role is funded in part by the Nebraska and Kansas beef councils, helping California producers’ checkoff dollars go further in the area of nutrition outreach. Prior to joining the CBC, McCune served as the director of the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and Coordinator of Performance Nutrition for UNLV Athletics. He is a Registered Dietitian with extensive experience in assisting professional, amateur, and collegiate athletes in achieving their optimal performance. An athlete himself, McCune grew up playing hockey in Michigan and was recruited to play at the Junior level. He has spent the last 15 years involved in the fitness industry with an emphasis on strength training and physique sports. His educational background includes a B.S. in Nutrition Sciences, an M.S. in Exercise Physiology, and he is currently completing a doctorate in Exercise Physiology. He completed his Clinical Dietetic Internship with Sunrise Hospital in Las Vegas. If you’d like to welcome Damon to California’s beef community, please e-mail him at damon@calbeef.org.


Quail valley ranch angus FEmale Sale

1 p.m. • sunday, October 15

join us at the ranch near prineville, oregon

Selling

Follow Us On Facebook Follow Us On Facebook

30 Spring Bred heifers and cows plus 30 Fall cow-calf pairs CED I+11 BW +1.0 WW +64 YW +106 Milk +22 Marb +.21 RE +.38

qv emblynette 5004 DOB: 1-8-2015 REGISTRATION: 18190242

SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 DAM: SAV Emblynette 7411 DAM’S SIRE: SAV Bismarck 5682 Featuring this valuable two-year-old full sister to the Accelerated Genetics proven sire SAV Thunderbird 9061.

qv emblynette 5304

This double-bred Emblynette by SAV Interntaional 2020 from a dam by SAV 8180 Traveler 004 will sell with a fall calf at side.

qv blackcap heiress 5317 This daughter of SAV International 2020 out of Rita 3B81 of 2536 BW will sell with a fall calf at side.

Quail valley ranch KURT LOCKHART 541-480-0773, quailvalleyranches@gmail.com Travis & BEcky TEkansik: Travis 541-699-8563 BEcky 541-699-8562, magibell2@hotmail.com

sale facility

7311 s. crooked river Hwy. Prineville, Oregon 97754

For your free reference booklet, contact anyone in the office of the sale manager TOM BURKE, KURT SCHAFF, JEREMY HAAG of the AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME, at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660 Phone 816-532-0811 • Fax: 816-532-0851 • E-mail angushall@earthlink.net

THD ©

September 2017 California Cattleman 81


CHIMES

FIRST CLASS EDUCATION

CCW SHARES LINEUP OF CONVENTION SPEAKERS by California CattleWomen President Cheryl Foster It is early, but not too early, to be talking about our annual convention. It will be late November before we know and time to head to Reno. The California CattleWomen, Inc. (CCW) have had a couple of great meetings so far this year where the ladies have learned about new Ag in the Classroom classes and how to build their own Beef Ambassador contest. Now the focus will shift a bit to learn how to run an effective meeting, how to be an excellent beef promotor and how to answer the concerns expressed about the impact cattle have on the environment. I am most thrilled with the lineup of speakers we have for convention. Suzanne Menges, Ph.D., will be leading an Effective Meeting Management Class. She has a wonderful way of getting everyone involved in the presentation which makes everyone pay attention. Celeste Settrini, Salinas, is going to share how she promotes beef and give us some tips on how to share our enthusiasm about beef. Frank Mitleohner, Ph.D., is world-renowned for his climate change expertise and has some wonderful facts to share with our industry that are fact-based and very enlightening. A brief background of each presenter is included below. The intent is for you to enjoy the convention but go home armed with information that will help you in most all aspects of interacting with others about the beef industry and sharing the true facts about the positive influences of our everyday work. SUZANNE T. MENGES, PH.D. Menges entered the ranching world when she married her husband, Jeff. As a classically trained musician, she certainly was not planning to end up on a working cattle ranch in the mountains of eastern Arizona, but she says she would not trade it for anything! Menges met many of the local ranching families and learned the importance of advocacy and correcting misinformation about the beef industry - both in the media and at the meat case. The Menges have three wonderful sons - Mark, Ben, and Luke - and she was determined they would be raised in this rich Western heritage they have as fifth generation ranchers. Over the years she became heavily involved in the beef community as a 4-H leader, the Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association’s junior livestock program coordinator and an FFA volunteer. Menges also continued her education, eventually earning masters and doctoral degrees in educational leadership. She served as a state commissioner on the 82 California Cattleman September 2017

Arizona Commission on Higher Education and has created many training programs for teachers and for volunteer organizations. In addition to her work in school districts, she has applied that education to one of her favorite focus areas - creating training programs that help bolster volunteer agricultural associations. Suzanne especially loves working with cattlewomen from all over the country, helping them learn how to improve the effectiveness of their projects and programs. In her own words, “In all my years working with volunteers in many different types of organizations, I can honestly say none are more passionate than those in the ranching community. The history, the dedication, the sheer stamina and hard work, and the intense understanding of their land—I have seen all of these characteristics exemplified every time I meet ranching families. It is humbling, and inspiring. I have developed a deep love of ranchers and the ranching life, and I am ever grateful that I have had the opportunity to share a small part of this profound legacy.” CELESTE SETTRINI Perhaps the Celeste Settrini we know today as the articulate media guru got her start as a three year old when she was on the cover of Farm and Ranch magazine with her dad Gus Settrini. Together they were advocating the eating of beef for Father’s Day, a promotion through the cattlemen’s association and often carried out by local, state and national CowBelles. According to Monterey County CattleWomen President Marianne Madson, “You can find Celeste at various events throughout the United States ‘Celebrating the American Rancher’ and sharing her story. Whether her audience is Nebraska Women in Ag, the Utah Farm Bureau, or the Farm and Forestry Alliance in Minnesota, Celeste represents the beef industry with pride and professionalism. Interviews on the California drought and beef production can be heard on RFDTV and on radio stations throughout the Mid-West.” Bill Dale, executive director of California Beef Council, shares, “As a Master of Beef Advocacy program graduate, Celeste has been a popular resource for both agricultural publications as a contributing writer, and agricultural organizations as a guest speaker. Her messaging to farmers and ranchers is that we all have a positive story to tell and ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 84


ERB – RIV

E N D RA N C H

Genetic Edge female sale I DA H O FA L L S, I D | O CTO B E R 21, 2017 EXAR Rita 4756 +17765301 BW +2.5, WW +54, YW +104, Milk +26, CW +46, MARB +.45 RE +.52, FAT -.020, $W +48.07, $F +69.46, $G +33.69, $B +141.48

Featuring half interest in Rita 4756 the featured Rita in the Riverbend Ranch donor program and full sister to the popular Express Ranches and Edisto Pines Farm sire, Hi-Tech. Rita 4756 blends the Pathfinder® Sire, Ten X with the $124,000 valued Express and Pollard Farms donor, Rita U049. Half interest in Rita 4756 headlines the 2017 Genetic Edge Sale and she sells open and ready to flush with a heifer calf by Woodside Rito 4P26 of 0242.

Riverbend Blackcap Z1110 17311665 BW +1.3, WW +61, YW +105, Milk +29, CW +48, MARB +1.02 RE +.27, FAT +.010, $W +70.56, $F +71.82, $G +43.35, $B +159.42

Blackcap Z1110 is a second-generation donor in the Riverbend embryo program and she is a direct daughter of the $330,000 Riverbend Ranch matriarch, Rita 2811 sired by the female sire, Consensus 7229. Blackcap T114, a maternal sister to Blackcap Z1110 is the $205,000 record-selling Riverbend Ranch female and she is today featured in the Jac’s Ranch program. Ankony Angus selected a heifer pregnancy from this proven donor for $19,000 in the record-setting 2017 Bases Loaded Sale. Blackcap Z1110 sells along with pregnancies by the 44 Farms, Vintage Angus Ranch and EZ Angus sire, Index 3282 and the exciting Express Ranches and Wilks Ranch sire, Cowboy Up.

150 Females Sell

Proven females from the heart of the donor program. Donors, Bred & Open Heifers, Pregnancies and more.

2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot , Owners SALE 131 Robin Ct. Rhett Jacobs, General Manager, 208-681-9841 MANAGED Howell, MI 48855 BY: 517-546-6374 Dale Meek, Purebred Operations Manager, 208-681-9840 www.cotton-associates.com Chris Howell, Marketing Manager, 208-681-9821

www.riverbendranch.us September 2017 California Cattleman 83


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 82 ‘we need to celebrate the good that we are doing.’” A few years ago Settrini was the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association representative for the United States Farmer and Ranchers Alliance during their time in Hollywood, visiting with food writers, chefs and consumers. Last year she was the Marketing Ambassador for NCBA at the Cattle Industry Convention in San Diego. Settrini’s creativity is expressed through CS Connections, a boutique graphic design and promotion business she owns. Her day-to-day life is shared with her brother John as they manage their 101-year-old family cow/calf operation in the Salinas Valley foothills. California’s Settrini is a unique, caring, bubbly individual with a strong passion for agriculture. The information in this article may give you a glimpse into her life, but is only part of the reason she was selected as ANCW’s 2016 Promoter of the Year. FRANK MITLOEHNER, PH.D. Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., is a professor and Air Quality Specialist in Cooperative Extension in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California, Davis. He received his MS degree in Animal Science and Agricultural Engineering from the University of Leipzig, Germany, and his doctorate degree in Animal Science from Texas Technical University.

Mitloehner is an expert in agricultural air quality, livestock housing and husbandry. Overall, he conducts research that is directly relevant to understanding and mitigating air emissions from livestock operations, as well as the implications of these emissions for the health and safety of farm workers and neighboring communities. Mitloehner has served as chairman of a global United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) partnership project to benchmark the environmental footprint of livestock production. He served as workgroup member on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and as member on the National Academies of Science Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee on “A Framework for Assessing the Health, Environmental, and Social Effects of the Food System.”

CALIFORNIA CATTLEWOMEN CORRECTION

Scholarship winner Molly Sparrowk was inadverdently omitted from this column in the July/August 2017 issue. Sparrowk, a freshman at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, was raised on a cattle ranch in Clements. School has always been a major focus in her life, but when not doing school work she could be found helping her dad on the ranch or practicing in the arena for rodeo. She is a member of the Cal Poly Rodeo team and is proud to be a third generation family member with an education from Cal Poly. She is pursuing a career in agriculture.

SELECT YOUR SERVICE

ALL WEST / SELECT SIRES Turlock, CA 1-800-426-2697 contact@allwestselectsires.com www.allwestselectsires.com

84 California Cattleman September 2017

The All West Beef Team assisted with my sire selection and provided the schedule of a timed breeding with a 7day CIDR. They brought their portable breeding boxes, set them up at my ranch and walked me through the process. They helped me sort the heifers in to pens, gave them shots, put the CIDRs in, took them out, applied Estrotech heat detection patches on the heifers backs and followed through by breeding them. They were here to assist and educate me from start to finish."

Rick Machado Livestock Rick Machado Shandon, CA


CATTLEMEN ... Get all your Vaccine, Wormer, & Animal Health Supplies for the Year and “Pocket Big Savings!” September at Central Oregon Ranch Supply is all about Round Up and Trade Show! This year marks our 16th annual trade show! With that, we have expanded the size of our show ... more vendors, bigger promotions, and more give-aways than ever before. Thirty four vendors ranging from large animal vaccine and parasite control products ...to pet products and toys ... as well as equine feeds, supplements, wormers and grooming supplies ... and of course the best buy on Muck boots EVER! The “Cowbell Stampede” has become an event all its own and a huge success with CABELAS Gift Cards, AMAZON Gift Cards, coolers, Traeger Grills, Green Mt. Grills, Moore Maker Knives, Buy One ... Get Ones, and the list goes on and on with Deeper Discounts than ever before. Painted Hills Beef BBQs both days. There is literally something for everyone! Regardless of the size of your operation you will be afforded the opportunity to procure your animal health supplies at volume producer pricing. Powell Butte Community Charter School will again be the beneficiary of our fund raising efforts for assisting in preparing our meals! Please accept my invitation to stop by September 22-23 to shop, eat a steak, listen to a little live music, and catch up with your neighbor! Who knows, you may go home with 1 of 2 expense paid trips to the NFR in December!

WE SHIP UPS DAILY to Pacific NW! Call today ROD and Save$$$

Mark Malott Full Line of Vaccine, Dewormers, and Animal Health Products in stock! 1726 S. Hwy 97 • Redmond • 541 548-5195 Toll Free 800-235-1623 Madras • 541 460-5100

DAVID MALOTT: 541 410-3715 MARK MALOTT: 541 480-7157 www.centraloregonranchsupply.com

e-Mail us: CORS@centraloregonranchsupply.com September 2017 California Cattleman 85


RANGELAND TRUST TALK

DIVERSIFICATION THROUGH MITIGATION EASEMENTS by California Rangeland Trust Communications Director Jessica Kong Over the last 19 years, ranchers throughout the Golden State have sought to partner with California Rangeland Trust to place conservation easements on their working ranches. State and federal agencies, recognizing the value of well-managed working landscapes, provide funding for these conservation easements, paying the landowner for the value of certain property rights like the right to develop and subdivide. The easement, recorded in the county assessor’s office, is in perpetuity – the land will always be used for livestock grazing. California Rangeland Trust – a land trust governed by and for ranchers – plays an essential role, partnering with the landowner to create and decide what goes into the easement. Once the conservation easement is in place, the Rangeland Trust holds the easement and monitors it yearly, coordinating with the rancher to ensure the easement terms are carried out. With 300,000 acres already conserved, California Rangeland Trust is the largest statewide land trust in the state. Another 400,000 acres await funding, but traditional funding sources are dwindling. To meet the demand, the Rangeland Trust is developing a culture of philanthropy

86 California Cattleman September 2017

and striving toward making the benefits of working landscapes common knowledge. In addition, another funding source has emerged that has the potential to be far more lucrative for some lucky ranchers than a traditional conservation easement. Conservation easement values are typically determined by the appraised value of the rights that will be separated such as the right to develop, subdivide, or convert to intensive agriculture. Proximity to urban areas, soil type, and the real estate market all affect the appraised value. If the appraisal value is low, the project may not be as attractive to the rancher. Enter mitigation easements. It’s no secret that housing, industry, and infrastructure development impacts wildlife habitat and open space values. To counter this, developers are often required to permanently protect similar habitat to the type they will be impacting through a mitigation conservation easement. While mitigation conservation easements can be slightly more restrictive than a typical conservation easement, they are similar in that the landowner agrees to never develop, subdivide, or intensify agricultural operations on the property. Often the easement will require that the land be grazed under some sort of management plan. Mitigation policy often makes compliance with it a sellers’ market. If a rancher has the only vernal pools within the required proximity of the development project, he or she may be all that stands in the way of the project being completed. Because these are private deals between the developer and the landowner, mitigation easements can sell for much more than the appraised value. In addition,


depending on the species or habitat being mitigated, these easements can close faster than traditional conservation easements. Obvious benefits to mitigation easements are the ability to pay down debt or buy out family members who want to sell the ranch. But mitigation easements also offer ranchers a way to diversify without needing to alter their land management practices much, if at all. The most recent Rangeland Trust mitigation easement is on Van Vleck Ranch in Rancho Murieta, the result of an agreement between Teichert Construction and the Van Vleck family. Thinking 50 years to the future, Stan Van Vleck noted that while land values continually increase, the income stream from agriculture does not and that the “asset value is too high for the return.” The family pragmatically recognizes what John Maddux of Maddux Cattle Co., Wauneta, Neb., summed up brilliantly: “The hard truth is that if the returns to ranching were equal to or better than equities, bonds or other investments, there would be little incentive for family members to call for a ranch sale.” Van Vleck Ranch, now 161 years old, almost didn’t make it to the 8th generation. As the only family member who wanted to be in agriculture and with a vision that the ranch still be in agriculture 100 years from now, Stan Van Vleck bought everyone out and began implementing a forward-thinking plan. Instead of trying to convince future generations to stay – even needing to work several jobs to pay for the business – his goal is to make the business much more profitable so it becomes a “good business decision” to keep the business and not just for the love of agriculture. To put this goal in perspective, the ranch sits directly across the highway from 3,000 homes; the current average price sitting at just under half a million dollars – $498,680 to be exact. Mitigation easements are helping to make this formidable goal a reality. The cash inflow is allowing the family to expand their operations beyond agriculture and beyond California by investing in commercial real estate and other business ventures out of California. And yes, this expansion does involve the entire family. Stan, and his wife Nicole Montna Van Vleck, have brought their children,

Christian and Tori, into the easement and investment decision process – the entire family participates in the business. In an interview, Stan said that up until now, rancher’s choices were limited. They could either sell for development or stay in ranching. Mitigation conservation easements offered their family a third alternative. Other ranches throughout the state have mitigation easements with the Rangeland Trust. Agua Fria Ranch, Merced County, preserves wildlife habitat and safeguards scenic views along State Route 152 and Interstate 5. Vernal pools on the Dutchman Creek Ranch, also in Merced County, are under a mitigation conservation easement and managed by Westervelt Ecological Services, a mitigation bank. The nearby Roen Le Grand Ranch is also home to vernal pools. The East Sheridan Vernal Pool Preserve permanently protects 386 acres in Placer County, one of the fastest growing counties in California. Several easements on the Koopmann Ranch in Alameda County protect wildflower populations and provide habitat for the California tiger salamander, a state-listed species, and the California red-legged frog, a federally threatened species. Tejon Ranch Company donated an easement to protect San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat as mitigation for a commercial development project on the ranch. Jack Ranch, owned by the Hearst Corporation, is the Rangeland Trust’s largest mitigation easement project, permanently conserving 7,270 acres in Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties that offset the environmental impact of solar fields being built on the same ranch. These easement projects are unique in that wellmanaged grazing plays a critical role in the maintenance of wildlife-friendly habitat. Not bad for continuing to manage the ranch in essentially the same manner as it has been for many years. The Rangeland Trust has just under 11,000 acres in mitigation easements, making up a small fraction of the total portfolio. But looking to the future, the opportunity is great for ranchers interested in participating.

Nicole, Christian, Stan and Tori Van Vleck out walking together on the longtime family ranch. September 2017 California Cattleman 87


American ANgus Announces New DNA Test Option The American Angus Association (AAA), based in St. Joseph, Mo., recently announced Aug. 14 that on Nov. 4, the American Angus Association will be introducing a new genomic test, AngusGSTM. AngusGS will be a high density 50K test designed by the team of geneticists at Angus Genetics, Inc. (AGI) with testing conducted by Neogen. The new genomic test is built specifically for Angus cattle which over time will mean improved accuracy and better results. The AGI team has worked to saturate the new genomic test with markers targeting specific genomic regions of influence in Angus cattle. This means future improved test accuracy once a subset of animals has been tested with AngusGS. Additional markers for traits like fertility, feed efficiency and tenderness, including Calpain and Calpastatin, have been included to advance research for future trait selection. While AngusGS will become the latest in new technology offered by AGI, producers will also be pleased to learn the testing cost will be significantly lower than similar tests in the marketplace. The AngusGS price will be $37. That’s a savings of over 50 percent of current HD genomic tests in the marketplace. Initial utilization of AngusGS will be similar to upgrading all newly tested animals from a low density test to a high density test available through AGI. The current genomic markers utilized in the Angus weekly genetic evaluation will be included on AngusGS and will continue to be included in the genetic evaluation. Producers should feel confident using the current genomic tools to test and make decisions until the new test arrives. In addition, AngusGS parentage markers are included in the test design and are compatible with all previously reported parentage results in the Association’s database. While the new test won’t be available until November, AAA advises not putting off submitting tests in order to realize the significant price savings and perhaps negatively impact breeding decisions for your herd. As a result, effective today members can order the Neogen GGP/LD and the Zoetis i50K test for the same price ($37) as the AngusGS test. 88 California Cattleman September 2017

SELENIUM BOLUSES From Pacific Trace Minerals Se 365 selenium bolus for nutritional supplementation of beef cattle. • treat once a year • for beef cattle over 3 months of age.

For sale & use in California Only — Organically Listed— CCA member: $240/box o f60 CCA Non-Members: $288/box shipping additional

cmaas@pacifictraceminerals.com www.pacifictraceminerals.com

ORDER FROM OR PICKUP AT: California Cattlemen’s Association 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA • (916) 444-0845


September 2017 California Cattleman 89


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs M i d Va l l e y

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

M i d Va l l e y

JOIN US AT THE MID VALLEY BULL SALE ON SEPT. 8 IN MODESTO!

M i d Va l l e y

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Join us Friday, Sept. 1 for our annual production sale and after-sale dinner!

90 California Cattleman September 2017


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2017.

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES! O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

THANK YOU TO OUR M“COMMITMENT i d V a l l e y TO 2016 PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2017 bull sale!

M i d Va l l e y

M i d Va l l e y THANK YOU TO OUR 2017 PERFORMANCE PLUS BULL BUYERS! JOIN US ON OCT. 6 FOR OUR ANNUAL SALE BY THE SEA IN PISMO BEACH!

Join us on Sept. 15 for the 43rd annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale.

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

(530) 385-1570

THURSDAY, SEPT. 14, 2017

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

September 2017 California Cattleman 91


Join us at our annual “Partners for Performance” Bull and Female Sales! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

JOIN US SEPT. 3 FOR THE HERITAGE BULL SALE IN WILTON! CALL US TO LEARN ABOUT BULLS AND FEMALES AVAILABLE PRIVATE TREATY AT THE RANCH.

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition JOIN US IN LAGRANGE 9/7/17

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Thank you to our 2016 bull and female sale supporters! 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales!

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

H

Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

JOIN US FOR BULL SALES OCT. 21, 2017 IN OROVILLE AND FEB. 16, 2018 IN ALTURAS!

RED RIVER FARMS Call today about 13750 West 10th Avenue private treaty Blythe, CA 92225 offerings! Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

P.W. GILLIBRAND

h

92 California Cattleman September 2017


Jared Patterson: 208-312-2366

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

PRODUCTION SALE SEPT. 9, IN KENWOOD!

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

Progressive Genetics for over years

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

The Best of Both Worlds

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch! Phone 707.448.9208

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com THD ©

September 2017 California Cattleman 93


Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby (707) 876-3567 (707) 876-1992

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

$2,650 PER IRRIGABLE ACRE! 2,830± Irrigable acres, 5,285± Deeded acres. 41,000± Acres with seller’s interest in BLM Grazing Permits. $7,500,00 (Includes some cattle & equip) $6,500,000 (No cattle or equipment)

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

SALE PENDING!

Pay for itself in first season!

208-345-3163 • www.knipeland.com

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

94 California Cattleman September 2017

THD ©


Your business could be listed here! Market directly to your target audience through one of the most reputable publications in the west and the only publication that puts your advertising dollars back to work for you! the California Cattleman is sent monthly to subscribing cattle producers and members of the California Cattlemen’s Association who need your services!

$450 for the first 11 months $400 for each annual renewal To learn more about an annual advertisement in this buyer’s guide, contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113.

September 2017 California Cattleman 95


IN MEMORY ERNEST WINEMAN Ernest C. Wineman Jr, 94 of Nipomo passed on Sunday July 9, at his ranch in Nipomo. He was born on March 7, 1923 in Santa Maria. Ernest graduated from Santa Maria High with the class of 1941. He went on to attend Cal Poly University in San Luis Obispo for a year before being called back to the ranch where he spent the balance of his long and fruitful life working at what he loved the most, cattle ranching and farming. Ernie was a life member of Vaqueros de los Ranchos and served as President in 1967. He also belonged to the Santa Maria Elks Club, California Cattleman’s Association, and was a lifelong member of the Santa Maria Gun Club. Ernie had a real passion for hunting and shooting. When farming and ranching obligations allowed he traveled the Western United States in pursuit of deer, elk, and antelope. For many years he competed with rifle and shotgun. He was an accomplished long range shooter and won many trophies, ribbons,

and belt buckles at the local and state level. He was the top shooter for the 1000 yard iron sight competition at the State meet in 1957 setting a National Civilian Rifle record . Likewise he won stacks of awards with his shotgun and the local and state trap competitions. Ernie was a friend, advisor and mentor to so many in the area. He was a champion story teller and kept his family and friends entertained for hours with stories of his and his friends exploits in the hunting field. Ernie was proceeded in death by his wife Peggie (Darling) Wineman, parents Ernest Wineman wife Cecelia (Nelson) Wineman, his brother Henry, his sisters Irene Ferini, and Margaret Williams, and his grandson Robbie Huguenard. He is survived by his children Linda Huguenard and husband Bob, Susan Wineman, Chris Wineman and wife Joanie, Bill Wineman and wife Debbie, and Dennis Wineman, numerous grandchildren and great grandchildren. Grave side services were held July 17 at the Santa Maria Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Santa Maria Gun Club or your favorite charity.

WEdding Bells PHERIGO & BRENDLEN

Alongside family and friends Lisa Pherigo and Noah Brendlen were married at the Sterling Hotel in Sacramento on August 18. Lisa, the director of finance for the California Cattlemen’s Association has one son Nolan. Noah has two daughters Kelsey and Abbie, and is a Corporate Account Manager for ORR Safety. The new family of five makes their home in Roseville. SWICKARD & DOUGHERTY

Kirby Swickard and Brian Dougherty were married in a ceremony at the Swickard family’s Five Dot Ranch in Susanville on August 5. Parents of the bride are Todd and Lori Swickard, Susanville. The groom’s parents are Neil and Mary Dougherty, Chico. The bride currently works on the management team for Five Dot Ranch and the groom is employed by PG&E as a field engineer. The couple has made their first home in Chico. 96 California Cattleman September 2017

DON PERRY Donald Bird Perry, longtime cattle buyer and rancher, passed away July 3, at his Yuba City home. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn, and by sons Kenneth Perry and his wife, Jan; and Jim Perry and his wife, Jenny; grandchildren Kate, Jill, Jamie, Monica, and Chad; great-grandchildren Paige, Quinn, and Nathan Glenn. Don is predeceased by his first wife, Geraldine, his son, Glenn, and his brother and sister-in-law, Wayne and Claudine Perry. Don spent many years in the cattle business, working at times for the Willows Auction Yard, Marks Meat Company, Fat City Cattle Company, Bareback Cattle Company, and Simplot. He was a regular fixture at Orland Auction Yard’s Thursday cattle sales and a longtime buyer at Shasta Livestock in Cottonwood. He was known for his big, friendly smile, and his penchant to make a deal. As a member of the Clark Avenue ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Don enjoyed taking the visiting missionary students to experience ranch life and see the cattle. He also appreciated the church messages and personal assistance from his home teachers and other members of the LDS community. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 11.

New Arrivals BYRON TIPTON

Clint and D’Ambra Tipton, Loma Rica, welcomed their first baby, a boy, Byron Wilson Tipton on July 7 in Marysville. He weighed 8 punds and was 20 and one-half inches long. Grandparents are Bo and Beverly Tipton, Marysville and Fred and Janette Wilson, Montezuma, Kan. COLTON IMBACH

Colton Lane Imbach was born to Ryan Imbach and Tracy Schohr, Gridley, on Aug. 12. He weighed in at 8 pounds 12 ounces

and was 21 inches long. Colton’s grandparents are Carl and Susan Schohr, Gridley and Ron and Cindy Imbach, Canby.


Do you Enjoy

Photography ?

Enter the 2017 CCA & CCW Photo Contest!

$500 GRAND PRIZE plus cash prizes for all categories

California Landscapes • People • Rural Life Animals • Beef. It’s Whats for Dinner. Plus a special category for cell phone photos!

DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 1, 2017 VISIT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG FOR COMPLETE RULES AND ENTRY DETAILS. September 2017 California Cattleman 97


Wulff Brothers Livetock.............................17, 91 9 Peaks Ranch...................................................99 All-West/Select Sires........................................84 Amador Angus.................................................90 American AgCredit............................................6 American Hereford Association.....................92 Andreini & Company......................................16 Arellano Bravo Angus......................................11 Baldy Maker Bull Sale......................................55 Bar R Angus......................................................90 Barry Ranches...................................................72 Beef Solutions Bull Sale...................................45 Black Gold Bull Sale.........................................17 BMW Angus.....................................................90 Boehringer Ingelheim......................................69 Borges Angus Ranch........................................74 Bovine Elite, LLC..............................................95 Broken Arrow Angus.......................................90 Broken Box Ranch............................................94 Bruin Ranch......................................................45 Buchanan Angus...............................................90 Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale..............................31 Byrd Cattle Co...................................................90 Cal Poly Bull Test Sale......................................75 California Bullfest.............................................39 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc......................94 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market.........................13 Central Oregon Ranch Supply........................85 Charron Ranch.................................................90 Cherry Glen Beefmasters................................93 Circle Ranch......................................................45 CoBank................................................................6 Conlan Ranches California.............................94 Conlin Supply Company, Inc..........................37 Corsair Angus Ranch.......................................90 CSU Chico College of Ag................................94 Dal Porto Livestock....................................35, 91 Diablo Valley Angus.........................................11

Diamond Oak Cattle Co..................................31 Dish Network....................................................62 Donati Ranch..............................................17, 90 Double M Ranch..............................................31 Eagle Pass Ranch..............................................51 Edwards, Lien & Toso......................................94 Farm Credit West...............................................6 Five Star Land Company.................................94 Flood Bros Cattle..............................................31 Freitas Rangeland Improvements...................88 Fresno State Ag Foundation............................94 Furtado Angus..................................................91 Furtado Livestock Enterprises........................95 Genoa Livestock.........................................39, 93 Gillibrand Cattle Co...................................73, 92 Gonsalves Ranch........................................31, 91 Grand National Rodeo.....................................89 Harrell Hereford Ranch...................................93 HAVE Angus.....................................................91 Hogan Ranch....................................................92 Hone Ranch.......................................................92 Hufford’s Herefords....................................55, 93 J-H Feed Inc......................................................94 J/V Angus..........................................................92 Knipe Land Company......................................94 Lambert Ranch...........................................77, 92 Lander Veterinary Clinic.................................94 Leachman Topline Bull Sale............................63 Little Shasta Ranch...........................................93 Lorenzen Ranches......................................26, 27 Maag Angus Ranch..........................................29 McPhee Red Angus....................................41, 92 Multimin, USA.................................................46 Noahs Angus Ranch.........................................91 Norbrook Animal Health................................79 O’Connell Ranches.....................................17, 91 Oak Ridge Angus..............................................15 ORIgen...............................................................95

98 California Cattleman September 2017

Orvis Cattle Company.....................................92 Pacific Trace Minerals................................88, 94 Pedretti Ranches.................................................2 Performance Horse Production Sale..............56 Pitchfork Cattle Co...........................................93 Quail Valley Ranch...........................................81 Ranch Casino....................................................35 Ray-Mar Ranches.............................................91 Red River Farms...............................................92 Riverbend Ranch..............................................83 Sammis Ranch..................................................91 Schafer Ranch...................................................91 Schohr Herefords........................................39, 93 Shasta Bull Sale.................................................70 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard..........................9 Sierra Ranches.............................................67, 93 Silveira Bros.................................................59, 92 Silveus Rangeland Insurance..........................38 Skinner Livestock Transportation..................95 Sonoma Mountain Herefords.....................7, 93 Spanish Ranch...................................................93 Sudden & Hollister...........................................74 Tehama Angus Ranch................................23, 91 Teixeira Cattle Co.......................................61, 91 The Cattle Range...............................................30 Thomas Angus Ranch................................42, 43 Traynham Ranches.....................................55, 57 Tumbleweed Ranch..........................................93 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard................18,19 Veterinary Service, Inc.....................................94 VF Red Angus.............................................71, 92 Vintage Angus Ranch............................. 100, 92 Visalia Livestock Market.................................60 Western Stockman’s Market............................47 Western Video Market.......................................3 Westwind Angus Ranch..................................76


ONE OF THE HARDEST WORKING SEEDSTOCK HERDS IN THE WEST!

The 9 Peaks cowherd spends the spring and summer grazing BLM and Forest Service allotments raising the next generation of bulls that sell in our annual fall bull sale. We believe the best way to develop a range bull is on the range!

11 TH ANNUAL

9 PEAKS RANCH BULL SALE OCTOBER 10, 2017 • 1 P.M. • FORT ROCK, OR

Selling 50 Spring Yearling and 50 Fall Yearling Angus Bulls SALE BULLS SIRED BY THESE LEADING SIRES! S A V RESOURCE 1441

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

3.7

69

130

22

.26

1.41

60.93

176.37

S CHISUM 6175

RANKS TOP 1% OF THE BREED FOR CW, RE, $F & $B!

MAR INNOVATION 251

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

2.9

65

108

22

.32

.87

86.09

152.67

RANKS TOP 1% OF THE BREED FOR CW, $W and Top 5% for $B!

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

2.9

68

111

23

.66

.89

61.32

102.45

RANKS TOP 10% OF THE BREED FOR SEVEN EPD TRAITS!

ALSO FEATURING SONS FROM THESE TOP HERDSIRES: SIRE

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

BALDRIDGE OPTIMUM Z045

.3

47

75

22

.9

.71

51.32

160.81

BENFIELD REALITY 6211

-.2

62

96

21

.07

.71

66.73

113.84

CONNEALY THUNDER

-1.1

42

82

26

.58

.53

54.08

95.40

COLE CREEK CEDAR RIDGE 1V

-1

40

69

34

.41

.57

77.05

68.08

SITZ LOGIC Y46

2.2

61

113

31

.65

.32

61.11

125.89

AARON AND REBECCA BORROR

Contact us for more information,or to request a Sale Catalog.

Aaron Cell: (541) 633-3284 Rebecca Cell (541) 771-4151 www.9peaksranch.com P.O. Box 38, Fort Rock, OR 97735

September 2017 California Cattleman 99


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Sunday, October 8, 2017

31st Annual “Genetic Gold” Production Sale Selling 86 Female Lots • At our headquarters in Modesto, CA • 1 p.m. TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $B

+9 +1.1 +73 +128 +21 +70 +.69 +.70 +73.02 +102.05 +182.37

BREED RANK

2% 2% 1% 2% 1% 1%

VINTAGE HENRIETTA PRIDE 7043 • REG NO. 18717060 Maternal sister to the Lot 1 bull of the 2016 VAR Bull Sale, V A R Legend 5019. Sired by Basin Payweight 1682, whose progeny are in high demand and limited supply. Look at 7043’s data profile and you will see one of only two 1682 daughters in the breed that have above average CED, below average BW EPDs and a $Beef index in the $180.00. Selling one-half interest in this Vintage donor prospect. TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $B

+5 +2.5 +92 +156 +19 +71 +.79 +1.07 +85.11 +145.51 +206.95

TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $B

+9 +.7 +78 +141 +27 +58 +.91 +.87 +81.87 +115.95 +179.77

EPD

CED BW WW YW Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $B

+4 +2.5 +87 +154 +26 +71 +.90 +.99 +84.00 +124.77 +191.34

BREED RANK

1% 1% 1% 2% 1% 1% 1%

VINTAGE BLACKBIRD 7203 • REG NO. 18745213 A direct daughter of the

VAR donor Blackbird 8809, this female is known as the dam of herdsires. 7203’s dam has generated more than $3.5 million in progeny sales at Vintage Angus. Sired by V A R Discovery 2240, he is the only highly-proven bull in the breed to rank in the top 5% or better for all 6 $Value indexes. Make Blackbird 7203 a donor prospect to build a herd on.

BREED RANK

1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

VINTAGE BLACKCAP 5417 • REG NO. 18211453 This fall-calving donor prospect by V A R Generation 2100 is from one of the best producing donors at VAR, Blackcap 9319. 17 daughters of 9319 have accounted for $589,000 in sales to average $34,676 each. She ranks in the top 1% of the breed for WW, YW, RADG, CW $W, $F and $B making her a multi-trait excellence individual for the future. Sells due to calve by sale day to TEX Playbook. Selling one-half interest in this female ready to flush for fall calves.

TRAIT

TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $B

+3 +3.4 +76 +136 +24 +48 +.85 +.77 +69.59 +113.73 +171.73

BREED RANK

1% 1%

4% 1% 2%

VINTAGE BLACKCAP 5419 • REG NO. 18211455 We have sold some top end V A R Discovery daughters at Vintage, but 5419 just may be the best ever offered. Sired by the only highly proven bull in the breed to rank in the top 5% or better for all 6 $Value Indexes, V A R Discovery. Her dam’s progeny are always at the top of the V A R sale averaging $34,676 each on 17 females. With a proven cow family, powerful data, outstanding phenotype, Blackcap 5419 has everything it takes, she sells bred to calve 2/7/18 to Baldridge Colonel.

BREED RANK

1% 1% 4% 5% 1% 1% 1%

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

VINTAGE BLACKCAP 5142 • REG NO. 18085481 Beautiful best describes this

first-calf heifer and Vintage donor. Beautiful in her design and in her data. From one of the most proven female lines at Vintage, her famous dam Blackcap 9319 commanded a bid of $48,000 on 6 frozen embryos in the Bases Loaded Sale at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. Live daughters of 9319 have averaged over $34,000 in the Vintage Sale. Look100 to addCalifornia Blackcap 5142 to your donor pen Oct. 8th. Cattleman September 2017

(209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

CALL, E-MAIL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK!

September 2017 California Cattleman  
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