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What’s Inside this issue... A cattle marketing legend find success with simmental, SimAngus and brangus genetics


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clM RepReSentativeS Jake Parnell ................................ 916-662-1298 George Gookin ........................ 209-482-1648 Mark Fischer ..............................209-768-6522 Rex Whittle................................ 209-996-6994 Kris Gudel ...................................916-208-7258 Joe Gates ................................... 707-694-3063 Abel Jimenez .............................209-401-2515 Jason Dailey .............................. 916-439-7761

Sale eveRy wedneSday Butcher Cows ........................................ 8:30 a.m. Pairs/Bred Cows ................................ 11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle .............................................12 p.m.

auction MaRket Address .....12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office.............................................209-745-1515 Fax ................................................. 209-745-1582 Website/Market Report ...www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ...........www.lmaauctions.com

weSteRn video MaRket Call to Consign: May 25 • June 8 • July 10-12 2 California Cattleman May 2017

Special Sale Schedule Wednesday, May 3

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

saturday, May 13

Cattlemen’s Special Feeder Sale, 10 a.m. Brunch, 9 a.m.

Wednesday, May 24

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

saturday, june 10

Cattlemen’s Special Feeder Sale, 10 a.m. Brunch, 9 a.m.

Wednesday, june 21

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

Wednesday, july 5 – no sale Happy Independence Day

Wednesday, july 19

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

saturday, july 29

Annual Bred Cow & Pair Sale, 11:30 p.m.


r u o y t e k r a M ith the w e l t cat ionals! s s e f o pr SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD BIDDING LINE: (530) 347-7830

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: MAY 17

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: MAY 31

bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

May 2017 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

PRESIDENT David Daley, Oroville FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Pat Kirby, Wilton Mike Miller, San Jose Mike Williams, Acton TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Jenna Chandler

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

4 California Cattleman May 2017

Trust...But Verify by CCA Feeder Council Chair Mike Smith The phrase “trust, but verify,” was made famous by President Ronald Reagan in the mid1980s during nuclear arms negotiations with then-Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev. The concept is a rather simple one that recognizes that agreements reached between two entities (whether between nations or between businesses) are based on trust, but also that a verification component must be inclusive of this agreement in order to confirm that the agreement is being followed by both parties. I am of the opinion the beef industry will soon be asked to not only accept, but place value in these verification practices in the not too distant future. Why the movement toward verification, generally in the form of on-site, third-party audits? In a nutshell, it is being driven by the continuous, albeit, slow erosion of consumer trust for those involved in production agriculture. And it should not come as a surprise to those in the industry given the incessant drone of negative press (and images) provided to the consuming public by those who are not friendly to our industry. Compounding this fact, is an increasing cynical and polarized consumer base that is quite frankly confused due to the bombardment of conflicting media “message” they receive on almost a daily basis. The end result is a consumer that does not know for sure who is telling the truth, and who they are to trust. At the end of the day; however, the principle driver for verification of the beef industry’s production practices are those companies on the front line (at both the retail and foodservice level) selling beef to the end user. With increasing frequency, these companies are challenged by consumer-activist

groups to require restrictive demands on companies they purchase beef from and the practices that are employed at the production level. At present, the beef industry’s use of antibiotics and its animal welfare practices are high on their radar screen. Beef packers/processors have been required to provide third-party verification of their food safety and animal welfare programs for well over a decade now, and feedlots are currently being asked to provide similar verification (ex. Tyson’s Farm Check). How soon before this “verification” requirement reaches the cow-calf producer? No one knows for sure. At a very minimum, all of those involved in beef production must become certified through the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program, first initiated by the National Cattlemen’s Association (predecessor organization to NCBA) in the early-1980s. At present, the BQA Advisory Board is working with NCBA’s Cattle Health and Well-being Committee to develop a standardized tool based on the BQA feedyard assessment program that is currently in place, in an effort to adopt similar assessments to be implemented at the cow-calf and stocker levels. I foresee in the not-too-distant future that producers will soon be asked to sign an affidavit establishing the fact that the cattle in their charge have been raised/produced following BQA guidelines. This should be a minimum requirement of doing business now. Independent third-party audits of these production practices are a logical next step. How quickly these third-party audits become mandatory at the farm or ranch level is anyone’s guess, but my money is on “sooner” rather than later.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Bakersfield, CA and additional mailing offices. Publication # 8-3600 National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

MAY 2017

Volume 100, Issue 5 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Mandatory verification could be on the horizon

4

BUNKHOUSE 8 CCA working to combat uncessesary taxes and regulation YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK A close eye on the new administration

12

VET VIEWS Avoiding persistently infected cattle in your herd

14

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER Climate change according to UC Davis professor

24

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR 44 Stockmanship and stewardship workshop coming soon RANGELAND TRUST TALK Conservation of the Avenales

SPECIAL FEATURES

Feeder profit calculator Shasta Livestock’s long history 39th annual Steak & Eggs Breakfast 1947-1957 brings big change for producers Stayability across breeds Pride in the Brangus breed

READER SERVICES

36

16 20 26 34 38 42

2017 CCA Livestock Market Directory 30 Buyers’ Guide 50 Obituaries 56 Advertisers Index 58

This month’s cover photo was taken by Jacob McAfferty, a student at the University of California, Davis. The photo was an entry in the annual CCA & CCW Photo Contst. For more information on how you can enter this year’s contest, please contact the CCA office.

UPCOMING CCA MEETINGS AND EVENTS May 17

2017 CBCIA Southern Valley Beef Conference Piccidilly Inn Airport, Fresno

May 24 & 25

June 21-23

CA & AZ Feeder Meeting San Diego CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting Harris Ranch, Coalinga

Sept. 22 Cattle-PAC Fundraiser Harris Ranch, Coalinga Nov 30-Dec. 2

101th CCA & CCW Convention The Nugget Resort & Casino, Sparks,Nev.

May 2017 California Cattleman 5


6 California Cattleman May 2017


Fourth annual

SHAW FEMALE SALE Saturday, June 3rd

12 noon MDT • At the Ranch • Caldwell, Idaho Real World, Functional Females Built by Cow Families

215 Head Sell as 132 Registered Lots HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

Spring Heifer Calf Pairs | Fall Bred Cow/Heifer Calf Splits | Fall Bred Heifers | Fall ET Heifer Calves | Spring Bred Heifers All females sell with heifer calves at side or are carrying heifer calves.

also SELLING 80 HEAD OF COMMERCIAL HEIFERS BRED FOR EARLY SPRING 2018 CALVES 45 Commercial Angus Heifers Bred to Schu-Lar Red Bull 18X (Hereford) 35 Commercial Hereford Heifers Bred to Andras Fusion R236 (Red Angus)

/S LAdY teSted 5199c

/S LAdY teSted 551c

SHAw LAdY PAYweiGHt 5398

SHAw LAdY cASH 5090

tested x651 x eFBeef Schu-Lar Proficient n093 tested x651 x tHR thor 4029 Sells bred AI to /S TRM Fort Payne 44573. Has a Sells bred AI to /S TRM Fort Payne 44573. Has a February heifer calf at side by /S Redbull 44676 ET. February heifer calf at side by /S Peerless 1571Y.

Basin Payweight 1682 x Sitz dimension 8607 Bred AI 11/21/16 to Musgrave Aviator. Ultrasounded safe with a heifer calf.

Barstow cash x BR Midland Sells bred AI to Baldridge Command C036. Has a January heifer calf at side by Connealy Comrade.

/S LAdY HoMetown 4514B et

/S LAdY HoMetown 4514B et

Hometown 10Y x HH Advance 286M Sells bred AI to R Leader 6964. Has a February heifer calf at side by /S Peerless 1571Y.

Hometown 10Y x HH Advance 286M Sells bred AI to /S TRM Fort Payne 44573. Has a February heifer calf at side by /S Peerless 1571Y.

SHAw LAdY PAYweiGHt 6012

Basin Payweight 1682 x GAR-eGL Protege January 2016 heifer bred AI 4/3/17 to Musgrave Aviator. A top set of bred heifers sells.

/S dixie LAdY conqueSt 3171A

Hxc conquest 4405P x GMRA Laramie 5110 Sells bred AI to Andras Fusion R236. Has a January heifer calf at side by LJC Merlin 937Z.

Catalog mailed with May Hereford World & on request. Contact the owners or the sale manager to request your copy. Also available for online viewing at: shawcattle.com mcsauction.com

SHAW CATTLE CO.

Since 1946

22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 Greg Shaw (208) 459-3029 www.shawcattle.com Sam Shaw (208) 880-9044 greg@shawcattle.com Tucker Shaw (208) 899-0455 Ron Shurtz (208) 431-3311 HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS THE 2016 BEEF IMPROVEMENT FEDERATION (BIF) SEEDSTOCK PRODUCER OF THE YEAR

&

SALE MANAGEMENT

incorporated

Matt Sims Voice/Text (405) 641-6081 matt@mcsauction.com www.mcsauction.com

May 2017 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE TAXING ISSUES CCA’s opposition to new diesel and gas tax by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield There is no question that regulations and laws impacting how we transport products, including livestock, greatly impact our businesses. For example, Gov. Jerry Brown announced on March 30, that his office, legislative leadership and business groups had reached a deal to increase gas and diesel taxes, by $.12 and $.32 (figure includes excise and sales taxes) respectively, to pay to fix California’s crumbling roads and highways. He also provided the legislature an unnecessary and arbitrary four-day window to deliver a two-thirds vote bill to his desk. .CCA and other agricultural organizations immediately put a stake in the ground in opposition to the bill irrespective of the support given for the bill by the California Chamber of Commerce, California Trucking Association and other business groups that helped broker a deal. Although CCA worked hard in opposition to the legislation until the very end, legislative leadership were unfortunately successful in securing the necessary twothirds vote in both chambers near midnight on April 6, to pass the bill. Diesel and gas taxes are a regressive tax not just paid for by business owners and the wealthy but everyone who operates a vehicle. It’s truly unfortunate that elected leaders have spent current money raised by gas and diesel taxes and weight fees to pay debt service on previous transportation bonds rather than on our roads and highways. In Washington, D.C., CCA is actively pursuing reforms to a regulation approved by the Obama Administration last year that requires truck drivers to comply with Hours of Service (HOS) regulations using an Electronic Logging Device (ELD) beginning Dec.17. Current HOS laws restrict a truck driver from being on duty for longer than 14 hours or driving more than 11 consecutive hours in the 14-hour window without taking a mandatory 10-hour break. California’s cattle producers are grateful for and, well-served by, in-state buyers who partner with ranchers to finish and harvest livestock in California, however a large percentage of buyers reside in the Midwest. As an industry we must balance roadway safety, animal welfare and the economic impact of regulations that will significantly affect ranchers in the West compared to other regions of the country.

8 California Cattleman May 2017

CCA brought policy to NCBA’s 2017 Annual Convention and Cattle Industry Tradeshow in Nashville, Tenn., directing the association to work with state affiliates like CCA to appropriately JUSTIN OLDFIELD seek reforms to the HOS and ELD regulations. In addition, CCA has been closely coordinating with the American Trucking Association and NCBA to highlight the concerns raised by CCA members and Western ranchers. Numerous CCA members, elected leaders and staff attended the 2017 NCBA Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C., in March and reforming the HOS and ELD regulations was a priority issue discussed by the CCA contingent. As part of that trip, CCA was successful in working with Rep. David Valadao (R-21) who serves as a member of the House Appropriations Committee to author legislation that will specifically prohibit the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) from implementing the ELD regulation until necessary reforms are made to the HOS regulation to address the concerns raised by the livestock industry. Specifically, the legislation calls for any time spent by a driver waiting to load cattle to be exempt from the 14 hour on duty time window and for a driver within two hours or 150 air miles from their destination to complete their haul even if it exceeds the 14-hour on duty time or 11-hour consecutive driving time window. Any changes would be made federally and benefit all producers and haulers. We continue to await appointments by President Trump to fill vacancies at the U.S. Department of Transportation including an Administrator for FMCSA. Once that occurs, CCA will be back at it again working with the new Administration to bring about necessary reforms to both the ELD and HOS regulations. These efforts are of course reinforced by the efforts made by Congressman Valadao and we sincerely appreciate his support. Transportation issues impacting you will remain a priority issue for CCA in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. Please stay tuned for further updates on our efforts.


CCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Zone 2 - Peach

Zone 1 - Yellow

1

Zone 3 - Light Blue Shasta-Trinity Plumas-Sierra Tehama Butte Glenn-Colusa Yuba-Sutter Tahoe (Placer-Nevada) Yolo

3

2

Humboldt-Del Norte Mendocino-Lake Sonoma-Marin Napa-Solano

Siskiyou Modoc Lassen Fall River-Big Valley

Zone 4 - Pink

San Mateo-San Francisco Santa Cruz Santa Clara Contra Costa-Alameda

Zone 5 - Green

Zone 6 - Purple

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Calaveras

Merced-Mariposa Madera Fresno-Kings

San Joaquin-Stanislaus

Tuolumne

Zone 7 - Tan

5 4

Zone 8 - Turquoise Santa Barbara Tulare Kern Inyo-Mono-Alpine High Desert

Monterey San Benito San Luis Obispo

Zone 9 - Orange Southern California San Diego-Imperial Ventura

6

CCA committee leadership POLICY COMMITTEES AG & FOOD POLICY Chair: Jack Lavers Vice Chair: Ramsay Wood

BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE Chair: Holly Foster Vice Chair: Randy Perry, Ph.D.

CATTLE HEALTH & WELL BEING Chair: Tom Talbot, DVM Vice Chair: A.E. BUD Sloan, DVM

CATTLE MARKETING

7

Chair: Col. Jake Parnell Vice Chair: Holly Foster

8

FEDERAL LANDS Chair: Mike Byrne Vice Chair: Buck Parks

PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

9

Chair: Adam Kline Vice Chair: Clayton Koopmann

2017 CCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS President Dave Daley

Zone Director 5 Gib Gianandrea

First Vice President Mark Lacey

Zone Director 6 Bob Erickson

Second Vice President Mike Williams

Zone Director 7 Anthony Stornetta

mbw61@aol.com • (805) 823-4245

anthony.stornetta@sbcfire.com • (805) 391-0044

Second Vice President Pat Kirby

Zone Director 8 John Hammond

pat.kirby@algilbert.com • (209) 604-3719

hamdawg66@gmail.com • (559) 623-1538

Second Vice President Mike Miller

Zone Director 9 Bud Sloan

western-beef@juno.com • (408) 929-8425

Asloan5119@aol.com • (805) 340-0693

Rob von der Lieth, Treasurer

Feeder Council Member Paul Cameron

ddaley@csuchico.edu • (530) 521-3826 mjlacey@wildblue.net • (760) 784-1309

rvdlieth@aol.com • (916) 769-1153

Feeder Council Chairman Mike Smith

msmith@harrisranch.com • (559) 301-0076

Feeder Council Vice Chair Trevor Freitas

trevor@mendescalfranch.com • (559) 805-5431

Zone Director 1 Ramsey Wood

ramseywood83@gmail.com • (530) 680-8985

cgianandre@aol.com • (209) 256-3782 bobericksonequipment@yahoo.com • (209) 652-3536

pcmesquitecattle@sbcglobal.net •(760) 427-6906

Feeder Council Member Jesse Larios

lariosjess1@gmail.com •(760) 455-3888

At Large Appointee Myron Openshaw

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVMENT ASSOCIATION President: Cheryl Lafranchi Vice President: Rita McPhee Secretary: Celeste Settrini

YOUNG CATTLEMEN’S COMMITTEE Chair: Rebecca Swanson Vice Chair: Steven Pozzi Secretary: Rebecca Barnett Publicity Chair: Melissa Hardy

kmarknelson@gmail.com •(916) 849-5558

Zone Director 3 Wally Roney

At Large Appointee Darrel Sweet

Zone Director 4 Mike Bettencourt

At Large Appointee Jerry Hemsted

mbteamroper@aol.com • (209) 499-0794

Chair: Heston Nunes

At Large Appointee Mark Nelson At Large Appointee Rob Frost

bjr@billieweb.com •(530) 519-3608

ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL

openshaw4@gmail.com •(530) 521-0099

Zone Director 2 Hugo Klopper

hugoklopper@frontier.com • (707) 498-7810

CCA affiliate leadership

rbmaf@juno.com •(805) 377-2231 dsweet@cattlemen.net • (209) 601-4074

For more information about CCA’s Board of Directors or commiittees, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

Jhemsted@att.net • (530) 949-6294

May 2017 California Cattleman 9


U.S. Beef Exports to CHina May RESUME after 13-year ban As the Easter holiday approached, many news outlets announced that China had reopened the market for U.S. beef products. Though U.S. agriculture enthusiasts are hopeful a deal has really been struck, no official annoucement has been made by the U.S. government as of press time. President Trump met with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Florida, to begin hashing out the details of a plan to help reduce China’s massive trade surplus with the U.S. White House spokesperson Sean Spicer said the next step is to work out the details within a 100-day time frame. The 13-year ban, started in 2003 following a confirmed case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In a recent note to investors, Stephens Inc. analyst Farha Aslam urged caution, pointing out that China has twice before agreed to grant market access to U.S. beef, but regulatory hurdles have prevented any real trade to materialize. Last September, similar discussions took place and China conditionally lifted the import ban at that time, but to date, there has been little U.S. beef exported to the country, in part because of the U.S.’s traceability program, according to USMEF. Thad Lively, senior vice president for trade at USMEF told reporters that, in order for Chinese supermarkets to sell American beef, authorities need to approve proposed rules on issues including the traceability of individual animals. NCBA, USMEF, and the North American Meat Institute sent a letter to Trump on March 27, hoping to encourage him to make beef a priority of the meeting. Unfair U.S. trade relations with China were a campaign

THINKING OF MOVING YOUR HERD TO IDAHO? 1,280 acres in Owyhee County now available 1 1/2 hours from Boise!

Call Duncan Farris (208) 861-7562

10 California Cattleman May 2017

point of Trump’s, and he threatened to levy Chinese products by as much as 45 percent. Following the meeting of the two leaders, media coverage and discussions have analysts sharing the huge potential benefits. Global AgriTrends calculates the greater China region (China, Hong Kong, Vietnam) as a $7 billion market, according to Aslam. With a population of more than 1.3 billion people, China presents a huge potential market for U.S. beef. By comparison, the U.S. population is 324 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. As the most populated country in the world, with a growing middle-income class, gaining better access to China would be great news for U.S. beef producers. In comparison, over the past 10 years, Japan, population 127 million, has been the biggest importer of U.S. beef. According to NCBA Director of International Trade Kent Bacus, China has one-fifth of the world’s population and is the second largest importer of beef. “We’re thankful for President Trump for highlighting beef access to China as part of his first meeting with the Chinese president. Considering there are a lot of other issues that need to be addressed from security to trade, we’re just happy that beef was a priority issue. Even though there has been a nominal lifting of the ban from China, we are still unable to send beef into the Chinese market because we still face some technical barriers of trade. Over the next 100 days, the Chinese and U.S. leaders are going to identify a path forward where they are going to address some of these technical barriers like traceability, so we still have a little bit of time before we see beef enter the Chinese market,” Bacus said in an NCBA podcast. USMEF’s Vice President of Communications Joe Schuele, is still cautious on any victory lap. “China is the fastest-growing beef market in the world, taking about $2.6 billion in imports last year. It is also the only major export market that never reopened to U.S. beef following the 2003 BSE case,” said Schuele. “So gaining access to China would be an important step forward for the U.S. beef industry and would contribute to our overall export growth. But it’s difficult at this time to project how much U.S. product will be exported to China, because we do not yet know what the specific export requirements will be. Those requirements will determine how much of the U.S. beef supply is eligible.” A number of senators, including Senators Steve Daines (R-MT) and Jon Tester (D-MT) have also been urging Trump to prioritize U.S. beef access to China. In a letter, the senators emphasized the value of an agreement between the countries. The senators also emphasized the quality of U.S. beef and the importance of expanding trade opportunities to increase economic opportunity for farmers and ranchers. The support of the senators has been praised by producers and industry stakeholders. While the general consensus of the market reopening is good news overall, it is not surprising that R-CALF USA has taken a slightly different view of the news, worrying that the financial benefits won’t reach the farmers and ranchers, and could pose a danger to the U.S. beef industry, and taking the opportunity to ask for country of origin labeling to be revisited.


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AT THESE SPRING EVENTS! SPRING FEEDER SALE , TUESDAY, MAY 2

35TH ANNIVERSARY FEEDER SALES

CONTRA COSTA-ALAMEDA & SAN JOAQUIN-STANISLAUS SHOWCASE FEEDER SALES BRUNCH AT 9 A.M. • SALE AT 10 A.M.

SAT., MAY 20 • SAT., JUNE 3 • SAT., JUNE 24

SELLING SOME OF THE FINEST CALVES AND YEARLINGS FROM THESE COUNTY ASSOCIATIONS: MERCED-MARIPOSA, SANTA CLARA, NAPA-SOLANO, MADERA, CALAVERAS, TUOLOMNE, FRESNO-KINGS, SAN BENITO AND TAHOE. CALL US TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONSIGNING CATTLE TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES!

JOIN US IN COTTONWODD MAY 4, MAY 25 AND JUNE 8!

FROM THE SIERRAS TO THE SEA, OUR TEAM IS ALWAYS HERE TO ASSIST YOU IN MEETING YOUR BUYING AND SELLING NEEDS! TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA................................ 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA ................................ 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES............................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI .............................. 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .................................... 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ..................................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA......................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ................. 209 262-4019 TIM SISIL ...................................... 209 631-6054

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE:

209 634-4326 • 209 667-0811 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com

May 2017 California Cattleman 11


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

FOLLOWING THROUGH FOR YOU

CCA MONITORING TRUMP ADMINISTRATION EFFORTS President Donald J. Trump has made it clear that his Administration intends to tackle several outstanding issues this year. First of course was repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act also known as Obama Care. The president and Republican leadership in the U.S. House of Representatives were not able to garner the necessary votes to pass the bill and thus, the president has made it clear that he intends to move on to the next issue. The next issue the Trump Administration intends to tackle is federal tax reform. Of all the issues pursued by the administration, tax reform is likely to be one of the most complex and controversial efforts to be taken up by the 115th Congress. Tax reform is paramount to farmers and ranchers across the county and specifically a full repeal of the federal estate tax. Current law provides a $5.45 million exemption per person and estates that exceed the value of the exemption in both liquid and non-liquid assets must pay Uncle Sam $.40 on every dollar exceeding the exemption. It’s not difficult for a farm or ranch to exceed the exemption given all assets are accounted for in the value of an estate including cows, fence posts, out buildings, tractors, etc. While NCBA and CCA are taking advantage of this opportunity and are actively pursuing the elimination of the death tax at the federal, one California senator is seeking to backfill the repeal of the federal estate tax with

12 California Cattleman May 2017

a state estate tax. Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) has introduced SB 726 which will place a referendum on the 2018 ballot for California voters to decide if they want to reinstitute a California-only estate tax. The legislation proposes for the referendum to call for a tax that mirrors the current federal tax rate of 40 percent for estates exceeding the exemption thresholds recognized under federal law. Upon learning of the introduction of SB 726, CCA immediately moved to oppose the legislation and is working with members of the California State Senate and other agricultural and business associations to oppose the bill. CCA members that attended CCA’s 39th Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast in March had the opportunity to lobby on the bill and spoke directly to their legislators about the devastating impacts the death tax has had on the transition of our nation’s farms and ranches to the next generation. CCA will be working on both fronts this year, both in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., to oppose SB 726 and work with members of Congress and the Trump Administration to eliminate the federal death tax. These efforts will remain a priority to prevent government intrusion in your ability to pass on your ranch to the next generation.


monday, june 12@noon

Famoso Opportunity bred cow & Pair special

THD ©

EARLY CONSIGNMENTS

500 Fancy, Black Fall Calvers Don't miss this opportunity to purchase 500 Black Angus 3- to 5-Year-Old Fall Calvers, Bred to Leachman Angus Bulls.

100 Black, Charolais & Red Pairs Looking for Spring Cow-Calf Pairs? Offering 100 Black Angus, Red Angus and Charolais Cows with Spring Calves at Side.

PLUS MANY OTHER CONSIGNMENTS FROM REPUTABLE RANCHES ON SALE DAY!

Join Us Every Monday in May, June and July for Stocker and Feeder Specials Western stockman’s market 31911 Highway 46, mcfarland, california 93250

www.westernstockmansmarket.com

THD ©

dWIGHT meBane ................. 661 979-9892 JusTIn meBane ....................661 979-9894 Frank machado ................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane..................661 201-8169 office ...........................................661 399-2981

Mark Your Calendar 52nd annual Famoso all-Breed Bull sale sat., october 14, 2017

May 2017 California Cattleman 13


VET VIEWS

PREVENTING PERSISTENTLY INFECTED ANIMALS

BOOST IMMUNITY AND PRODUCTIVITY OF YOUR HERD from Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. A herd infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) via the presence of persistently infected (PI) animals will never be as productive as it could be. BVDV exposure can drag down performance in cattle herds not only by reducing milk production and reproductive efficiency, but also by suppressing herd immunity and making animals more susceptible to other diseases. A three-part approach to controlling BVDV can help prevent and eliminate persistently infected (PI) animals in the herd. There's a specific window of time when the dam can become infected with BVDV and can produce a persistently infected (PI) calf. If the unborn fetus is exposed to the BVDV during the first 120 days of gestation, a calf may be born persistently infected with BVDV. "If the pregnant cow doesn't have adequate protection herself, the BVDV can reach the calf fetus," said Mark van der List, DVM, a senior professional services veterinarian at Boehringer Ingelheim. "The immune system of the fetus is developing during this time frame and recognizes the virus as 'self' or part of its own body and so doesn't try to eliminate the virus. These PI animals therefore generate and shed enormous amounts of BVDV, which can infect unprotected herd mates." STEPS TO REDUCE PI RISK BIOSECURITY Biosecurity is a critical step in preventing PI calves. The goal is to minimize the possibility of pregnant cows encountering the virus. One of the main sources of virus exposure is from PI cattle that are shedding the virus

14 California Cattleman May 2017

through bodily secretions every day, all day. PI calves must be identified and removed from the herd. If new animals are being introduced into the herd, confirm they are not PI. Avoid mixing cows together from outside the herd for at least 30 days in case they have a transient infection of BVDV. REMOVAL OF PI ANIMALS AND CONTINUOUS HERD MONITORING Removing PI animals from the herd is key. There are different methods to identify PI animals including ear skin notches, blood samples and milk samples. Samples can often be pooled and then progressively broken down to find the individually infected animals. Once PI animals are removed, constant monitoring is recommended to detect any new PI animals. The presence of BVDV usually indicates the presence of PI animals. In calves, ear notching at birth is also a good management practice. Your veterinarian can have tissue samples from dead calves and aborted fetuses checked for the presence of BVDV. "The spread of BVDV ultimately depends on the underlying immunity of the herd," said Dr. van der List. "If the herd has zero protection, then it can spread very rapidly. However, if a good vaccine and biosecurity program are in place, PI animals have been removed and the herd is being monitored, there will be minimal risk of BVDV." VACCINATION Producers should work with their veterinarian to develop a good vaccination program using products that are labeled correctly and backed by solid research. Effective immunization of the herd minimizes the chance of development of PI calves, thus protecting the herd. Proper vaccine handling is critical to effectively immunize the herd. Make sure the vaccine doesn’t get overheated or exposed to sunlight, and be sure to properly store it in a refrigerator that maintains the desired temperature range. Vaccines should also be administered at the appropriate time to ensure maximum protection during the critical first 120 days of pregnancy. Generally, vaccination right before breeding maximizes the protection against PI calf development.Work with your veterinarians to develop a comprehensive BVDV control plan that will protect your herd.


SHASTA

LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD

Cottonwood, California

The Spring Run Is On! Friday, May 5

TEHAMA COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL • FEATURING 2,500 HEAD OF ALL CLASSES •

Friday, May 19 SPRING SPECIAL

• SELLING 3,000 HEAD OF ALL CLASSES •

Friday, June 9

SUMMER KICKOFF SPECIAL • INCLUDING 2,500 HEAD OF QUALITY STOCK •

! y a d i r F y r e v E e l a S For Information, Please Call Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793

May 2017 California Cattleman or visit our website at www.shastalivestock.com

15


International Genetic Solutions Feeder Profit Calculator by Will Townsend and Chip Kemp for the American Simmental Association The Problem Imagine you had to find bulls for your operation but you didn’t know any breeders, nobody used EPDs, or even shared actual data. It’s obvious to anyone interested in building quality cattle and maximizing profit this would be a major blow to the bottom line. Yet, this is how the feeder calf business exists today. Frequently, when purchasing quality feeder calves, we can receive crucial information regarding environmental factors such as management and health protocols, weights, etc. However, when it comes to genetic awareness, color and polled status are often asked to substitute for true knowledge. A common scenario, and at times the best-case scenario, is that the calf buyer has a previous relationship with the seller and has owned and experienced the performance of the seller’s calves before. In more rare cases, we may have some information on the seller’s bull purchases. Again, this is a powerful step forward. It provides at least some insight into a portion of the genetics within the program. However, in a data-driven world, this level of genetic awareness is woefully inadequate. Especially since the financial stakes for feeder calf procurement are even higher than the stakes for bull

procurement. Understandably, most large cattle buyers have technology to estimate genetic and environmental performance on feeder cattle but that information is not public and, for obvious reasons, is kept to those companies. Therefore, price discovery as we know it today, most often does not take into account the actual performance potential of a producer’s feeder cattle. The Solution Attempts to determine relative value of feeder cattle have been made for a long-time; however, certain issues have made it difficult. The foremost limitation has been accurately gauging the profit potential in the largest genetic group within the beef industry — the crossbred calf. It is a known scientific fact that commercial beef producers wishing to maximize cowherd fertility and longevity must crossbreed. This not only provides them a sustainable and profitable cow base, but fortunately generates an end product that is known to be the best combination of growth potential and carcass merit — the crossbred calf. The history of the Feeder Profit Calculator (FPC) has its roots in ASA’s Terminal Index ($TI). The $TI was developed over a decade ago by the American Simmental Association (ASA) in collaboration with Michael MacNeil, Ph.D., who was a USDA research geneticist at the time. The $TI is an economic selection index designed for selecting terminal sires. Though $TI could do a reasonable job valuing feeder calves, it was determined that evolving $TI into a tool that could account for such things as a current accounting of prices/costs, heterosis and non-genetic factors (e.g., vaccination status), would improve the accuracy of predicting feeder calf values. MacNeil, now with Delta G Genetics, was tapped to evolve $TI into that tool — the FPC. Many of the FPC’s non-genetic components were sourced by David Lalman, Ph.D., of Oklahoma State University. Providing the most robust genetic awareness of crossbred calves requires the most robust multi-breed genetic evaluation. Fortunately, International Genetic Solutions (IGS) provides the ideal platform to generate unparalleled information on crossbred and composite feeder calves. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

16 California Cattleman May 2017


ASA#2854458 – Black Polled 3/4 SM 1/4 AN BD: 2/23/14 – BW: 86 – WW: 792 – YW: 1506 MCM Top Grade 018X x Hooks Yuma 49Y Ce

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Bounty sons selling on September 20th at the 2017 Bulls eye Bull Sale!

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 IGS, along with its member associations, the science team at Theta Solutions, and scientific contributions by Matt Spangler, Ph.D., of the University of Nebraska, is ideally suited to provide the industry’s benchmark in gauging feeder calf value. The IGS Feeder Profit Calculator empowers producers to market with confidence and allows feeders to maximize their purchasing dollars. The Future Capitalizing on novel technology usually requires a tremendous learning curve and a major outlay of dollars. Not this time! The IGS Feeder Profit Calculator is unique. It will offer a level of genetic awareness of crossbred feeder calves that has not been previously possible in the beef business. The IGS science team, the IGS partner associations, and the world’s largest beef genetic evaluation database allows the IGS FPC to be delivered at no cost to producers. That is correct. No Cost! Beef producers looking for a transparent and straightforward assessment of their calves will harness the power of IGS by simply making a call, sending an email or visiting the IGS website. IGS and/or breed association personnel will request information on herd health, basic management protocols, the bull battery used in previous years and insight into the makeup of the cowherd. The more thorough the inputs from the producer, the

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

better the predictive ability of the FPC. While individual sire identification isn’t required, identification used in the operation is required. Producers will be asked to share preconditioning information and the health program in place. The IGS FPC prototype was unveiled at the 2017 NCBA Convention in Nashville, Tenn., and garnered a great deal of industry attention. The IGS FPC will become available to producers mid-2017. For producers who have interest in having their calves evaluated through the IGS FPC please contact one of the IGS breed partners or contact beef@ internationalgeneticsolutions.com.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.CATTLEVACBOX.COM, OR CALL 1-877-VAC-BOXX 18 California Cattleman May 2017


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May 2017 California Cattleman 19


SHASTA

L I V ESTOCK AUCTION YARD

The Legacy of Forward Thinking

E

llington Peek was born in Stockton in 1928. For generations his family was deeply involved in the livestock industry. His greatgrandfather, Samuel Peek came to California in the 1850s and ran a livery stable in Mokelumne Hill, Calaveras County. Ellington’s grandfather, George Peek, was a cattle rancher and his father, Ellington Sr., was a highly respected cattle buyer. As a boy, Ellington spent a lot of time with his dad procuring cattle to haul to the slaughter plants in Stockton. At a dance in 1950 he met Betty Gomes, a ranch girl from San Andreas, and they were married the same year. Betty’s family also traces its roots to early California settlers. The Gomes arrived in California in the 1850s and homesteaded 500 acres on Dogtown Road near San Andreas. Their brand, the anchor, was first registered in 1862. The Gomes Ranch is still owned and managed by the Peek family today. After a stint in Korea serving his country, Ellington came back home to resume buying and trading cattle in Angels Camp, then the Stockton area, and eventually expanded his territory up into Oregon. Ellington and Betty had four children: Andy, Callie, Laurie and Brad. Betty took care of the day-to-day family responsibilities while Ellington was on the road. In 1955, Ellington was asked to run the Susanville Auction Yard. While there, he learned that the Shasta Auction Yard in Anderson was for rent, so with a $3,000 bank loan, Ellington and Betty signed a three-year lease and started working for themselves. After that lease was up and the owners would not sell, Ellington took an offer to build and manage a new auction yard in Red Bluff for Producers Livestock Co-op. After a year working there, Ellington decided he needed to work for himself and run the business the way he thought best for himself, as well as the ranchers who trusted him. Within two years, he was back in Anderson. Ellington and Betty bought the old yard and started Shasta Livestock Auction Yard.

20 California Cattleman May 2017

“Some people like to shoot dice or something, but I like to trade cattle,” Ellington said. “It’s a challenge, and I like the people, so that’s why I decided to get into the business.” Under Ellington’s ownership, the sales quickly outgrew the facility in Anderson, so in 1966, Shasta Livestock Auction Yard moved to a new facility in Cottonwood. It became the highest volume auction yard west of the Rockies and one of the largest in the country, and kind of a cultural center, as well. The facility has included a popular restaurant, farm supply store, veterinary clinic and a western store operated by Betty. She first opened the Shasta Western Shop in the small Anderson yard as a one-day per week venture, and it grew to a very popular western store known throughout the state. The beef cattle business is a tough business, Ellington says. “You have to be dedicated, and you’ve got to be willing to work all kinds of hours and be able to visit with people and get along with people, and that’s not easy sometimes,” Ellington said. “And most of all, do what you say you’re going to do. Even if it costs you money in the end.” Shasta Livestock Auction Yard is truly a family-run business. Andy and Callie started working at Shasta Livestock late 1970s, eventually taking on roles of yard manager and office manager, respectively. Shasta Livestock


is also a business that has had a great family of longtime employees that have contributed to the company’s longevity. “I think our relationships we have with consigners and buyers make us special,” Brad Peek said. “We are family oriented, and they aren’t really our customers, they are friends of ours.” In 1990, Ellington joined John Rodgers of the Stockman’s Market to establish the Shasta/Stockman’s Livestock Video Auction, at the urging of Andy and local ranchers, which would eventually become known as Western Video Market. Today the company is an industry leader producing cattle auctions throughout the Western United States that are broadcasted on the Internet and Dish Network to a nationwide audience. Continuing the family tradition, Brad joined the family business in 1998 to help ship cattle sold on Western Video Market. When Andy lost his fight with pancreatic cancer in 2008, Brad stepped up to help fill the manager position. Today, Callie and Brad work with Ellington to continue to grow Shasta Livestock and Western Video Market. Ellington and Betty’s daughter Laurie, who along with her husband, Jerry Norene, farm and raise cattle and can always be called on to help with the out-of-town video sales. Laurie’s son, Matt Norene, joined the family business in 2001. Andy’s wife Rhonda, serves on the Western Video Market Board of Directors, and their son Mason, who was born in 2006, has already started showing an interest and often comes by the yard on Friday sale days. Over the years, Shasta Livestock Auction Yard has developed a close working relationship with county cattlemen’s organizations and has annually donated a percentage of their commissions on special sales for the Tehama, Shasta, Siskiyou, Lassen, Fall River-Big Valley and Plumas-Sierra Cattlemen’s Associations. Shasta Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. has been a member of CCA and NCBA for many decades. Ellington considers himself lucky to have received many awards in his lifetime including the 1993 California Livestock Man of the Year Award, the 2007 Chester A. Reynolds Award at the Western Heritage and National Cowboy Museum, and the 2009 National Cattlemen’s Foundation Beef Industry Vision Award, along with John Rodgers, for livestock marketing, and remains humble about it all. Callie and her husband, Darrell Wood, ranch in Tehama and Lassen counties and have been involved in CCA, as well as NCBA. Darrell served as second vice-president of CCA and their daughter, Dallice, was California Beef Ambassador in 2005 and earned a spot on the National Beef Ambassador team. Darrell and Callie’s son, Ramsey currently serves as a state director to CCA from Lassen County. The family received the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Environmental Stewardship Award in 2010 and has also been the recipient of the California Cattle Beef Improvement Association Commercial Producer of the Year. Brad has continued Andy’s legacy of being active in the California Livestock Marketing Association, and is

currently serving as president just as Andy did. Shasta Livestock and Western Video Market have also been supporters of NCBA’s Livestock Marketing Council. Shasta Livestock Auction Yard has become a landmark in Northern California, and is a place where a livestock producer can get advice on current methods of improving herd quality, range management, marketing, or up to date knowledge of events in the industry that might affect him. Ellington’s generous spirit has inspired his family, and a great crew of long-time employees to be there over the years to serve the community, state and the cattle industry. “It’s a great business,” Ellington said. “If we can help our customers get more money for their cattle that’s what we’re here for. Our main goal is to do a good job marketing cattle for them.” To Brad and most of their customers, Ellington has been the bright spot in the cattle industry. “You’re going to get a good, straight deal if you’re working with Ellington Peek,” Brad said. “We like to think we follow the same footsteps. In our business, you shake our hand and you’ve got a deal. My dad taught us that.” This CCA member profile and more than 100 others can be found in CCA’s commemorative coffee table book, Since 1917—A Century of Family Legacies in the California Cattlemen’s Association. To get your copy of this limited edition book, contact the California Cattlemen’s Association at (916) 444-0845.

May 2017 California Cattleman 21


Madera, California

Join us for these

Off-the-Grass Special Sales MONDAY, MAY 22 • 1 P.M. MONDAY, JUNE 19 • 1 P.M.

Lunch provided for all consignors, buyers and families!

EXPECTING A LARGE RUN OF TOP QUALITY FEEDERS!

SALE EVERY FRIDAY AT 11 A.M.

Butcher cattle followed by pairs/bred cows, stockers and feeders.

(559) 674-4674 WWW.PRODUCERSLIVESTOCK.COM

COL. MICHAEL IMBROGNO MANGAGER JACKIE SILVA 559-363-7009 CLIFF ODOM 559-349-1286

1022 SOUTH PINE STREET • MADERA, CA

Beef Sales 3:30 p.m. Tuesday & Thursday yearlings, calves, cull cows & bulls replaement female CALL FOR DETAILS ON UPCOMING SPECIAL SALES OR TO CONSIGN TO THE NEXT WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALE JOHN MCGILL: (209) 631-0845 OFFICE: (209) 862-4500 FAX: (209) 862-4700

2011 e stuhr rd. • newman, ca

Tulare county

Stockyard

ESTABLISHED 1950

Join us at our upcoming Special Feeder Sale THD ©

Friday, May 26 WEEKLY SALE SCHEDULE

MONDAYS: DAIRY, FEEDERS, SLAUGHTER BULLS & COWS THURSDAYS: FEEDERS, SLAUGHTER BULLS & COWS

Beef Sales Every Friday

SALE INFORMATION

Dinuba, california

OFFICE ..................................................................209-387-4113 JOEL E. COZZI ......................................................209 769-4660 JOEL A. (JOEY) COZZI .........................................209 769-4662

Regular Friday Sale Schedule

GARRETT JONES ............................................... 209-710-7904 DOUG GALLAWAY ................................................209 617-5435 MIKE VIEIRA..........................................................209 761-6267 BILL ENOS ............................................................209 761-1322

559-591-0884 • www.tularecountystockyard.com

Small Animals ......................................... 10:00 a.m. Feeder Cattle .......................................... 12:30 p.m. Weigh Cows ..............................................2:30 p.m.

22 California Cattleman May 2017

FIELD REPRESENTATIVES

Visit us online at www.dpyauction.com

16575 S. HWY 33 • DOS PALOS, CA 93620 located 1/8 mile south of Hwy. 152 on Hwy 33


May 2017 California Cattleman 23


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

LIVESTOCK AND CLIMATE CHANGE:

DIVORCING POLITICAL FICTION FROM SCIENTIFIC FACTS by University of California Cooperative Extension Livestock Farm Advisor Carissa Koopmann Rivers, Siskiyou County The annual Siskiyou County Animal Health Meeting in Montague had a wonderful turnout with record attendance as local cattlemen and women gathered on Monday, Feb. 13, thanks in large part to the event’s sponsors, the Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association, Siskiyou County CattleWomen’s unit and the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association. The speaker lineup is also clearly to be credited for this year’s success. Tina Saitone, Ph.D., Livestock and Rangeland Economics Specialist with Univerity of California (UC) Davis, gave an economic outlook of the beef industry, which is timely as ranchers transition into a new political administration and away from the historic drought. Local producers, Tara and Chet Porterfield, Greg Hanna, and Greg Kuck, along with local veterinarian Amy Fousek, DVM, discussed vaccine protocols and marketing correlations as part of an open rancher-to-rancher discussion panel aimed at encouraging information sharing and to learn about improved heard health techniques. My favorite part of the evening was hearing from five of our local 4-H and FFA members. Callahan Zediker and Emily Smith from Big Springs 4-H gave us some insight on Brucellosis, while Jackson Duchi and Jackson Wood of Gazelle 4-H covered the topic of new-born calf care. Our local FFA representative was Kara Lipke, Yreka FFA, who went into some detail on signs and symptoms of pneumonia. All of the kids did a great job, not only presenting their topic and sharing their knowledge, but by showing their passion for the agricultural industry, and I commend them for being leaders of our next generation. Our key presenter was Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., professor and air quality specialist with Cooperative Extension in the Department of Animal Science at UC Davis. Mitloehner is an expert in agricultural air quality, livestock housing and husbandry. His research focus is understanding and mitigating air emissions from livestock operations, including the potential effect of these emissions on the health and safety of farm workers and neighboring communities. Mitloehner has also served the agricultural community in numerous capacities including nationally and internationally as chairman of a global United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) partnership project to benchmark the environmental footprint of livestock production. He has served as a workgroup member on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and as a member on the National Academies of Science Institute of Medicine committee on “A Framework for Assessing the Health, Environmental, and Social Effects of the Food System”. 24 California Cattleman May 2017

Mitloehner truly makes an impression on the ranching community with his presentation on greenhouse gasses (GHG) and the facts and fictions of livestock and climate change. He presents scientific information in a down to earth manner with unwavering passion for his research and the agriculture industry that everyone, including children, can relate to. The topic of greenhouse gases as they pertain to climate change generally strikes the agriculture industry with a negative blow, but Mitloehner has done instrumental work that convinces producers that what we are doing as an industry is not wrong, but is worth sharing proudly. From 1970 to 2015, Mitloehner claims the U.S. beef cattle population decreased from 140 million to 90 million head, a decrease of 36 percent while production is the same at 24 million tons annually. This paints a much more accurate picture than that portrayed by anti-animal agriculture advocates who claim that the livestock industry is responsible for large GHG contributions—comparable to all transportation sectors such as cars, trucks, planes, trains and more, which just is not comparable when all

FIGURE 1. U.S. GHG CONTRIBUTIONS (MITLOEHNER, F. 2016) Species Beef cattle Dairy cattle Swine Poultry Sheep Goats Other livestock Total

GHG Contribution 2.2% 1.37% .47% .08% .03% .01% .04% 4.2%

FIGURE 2. U.S. GHG LIVESTOCK CONTRIBUTIONS


solutions for the global food supply that allow us to production steps are factored in. The livestock industry needs to tell our story, and we reduce our impact on the planet and its resources.” need to tell it with science. Leading scientists throughout I think that the take home for each of us should be, the U.S. have measured the actual impacts of livestock as Mitloehner encourages, we need to stop defending production on GHG emissions in the U.S., finding that what we do. Stop defending agriculture. We have a nationally livestock production is responsible for just 4.2 lot to be proud of as we continue to improve our percent of all GHG emissions, Mitloehner says. Figure production practices. We need to insert ourselves into the 1 from Mitloehner’s presentation helps put this number conversation, start educating more folks in our day-tointo perspective for overall U.S. emissions. Figure 2 day interactions, and let them know that we are doing our breaks down livestock emissions by species in the U.S. part. Being less reactive and more proactive starts with us. According to Mitloehner, not eating meat one day a week for one year, this would reduce the annual national GHG 2017 Southern Valley emissions by only 0.6 percent. To break Beef Conference that number down even further, if the U.S. did not eat beef for one day a week, Saturday, May 13, 2017 for one year, it would only decrease total Piccadilly Inn Airport, Fresno emissions by 0.3 percent annually. Sponsored by California Beef Cattle Improvement Association in While it is important to continue cooperation with Fresno State Animal Sciences Department, UC seeking emission reductions from Cooperative Extension and Fresno-Kings Cattlemen’s Association. livestock, putting so much emphasis on Saturday, May 13, 2017 livestock is misguided when one considers 8 a.m. Registration the contribution from livestock compared 9 a.m. “Managing Ranches for Profitability – Even in Tough Economic Times” with other sources. By targeting the Burke Teichert, Teichert Management & Consulting, Orem, Utah livestock industry, a very small percentage of GHG concerns are being addressed 11 a.m. Experiences from 70 Years of Breeding Angus Cattle Bill Borror, Tehama Angus Ranch, Gerber and they are being addressed emotionally rather than with scientific sustenance. 12:30 p.m. Lunch Advances in science-based solutions like 1:30 p.m. Panel Discussion on How to add Value to Beef Calves at Weaning genetics and management have played a John Rodgers, Western Video Market and The Stockman’s key role in reducing our environmental Market, Visalia footprint for over 60 years now and will Dave Thompson, Cargill Beef Solutions and Famoso Cattle continue to keep us on the right track in Company, Chiloquin, Ore. assuring food security both at home and Dennis Metzger, Superior Livestock Auction Company, Anderson abroad. Mitloehner has a message to help build some industry resiliency, $30 registration includes lunch and refreshments “The livestock sector is committed Pre-registration available online at: http://ucanr.edu/csuf_spring to continuous improvement of their environmental impact in North America, Hotel Reservations can be made by contacting Piccadilly Inn Airport (559) 375-7760 • 5115 E. McKinley Avenue, Fresno, CA 93727 and to doing its part in transferring knowledge, technologies and best A tour of various cattle operations in the south valley on Friday, practices to enhance global environmental May 12, for the California Young Cattlemen’s Committe. Anybody is welcome to participate in that tour. Vans will leave the Piccadilly Inn livestock impact by region. Now is the Airport at 8:00 am on Friday morning. No cost for the tour – you will time to end the rhetoric and separate facts be responsible for covering the cost of your lunch. from fiction and the numerous sectors that contribute emissions and to identify May 2017 California Cattleman 25


CCA Members in Action 39th annual Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead

O

n a welcomed rainy day in March, members of the California Cattlemen’s Association, California legislators, regulators and their staff filled the Sutter Club to its gills in downtown Sacramento, as they eagerly awaited their steak meal for CCA’s 39th Annual Steak and Eggs Legislative Breakfast. The event gives ranchers and legislators a chance to meet at the fence line to discuss important topics as they pertain to California ranching and the beef industry. “Ranchers all work toward the same goal but are diverse in how we do it,” CCA President Dave Daley, Oroville told the crowd to open the event after CCA Executive Committee member Cindy Tews, Fresno, gave the invocation for the morning asking for rain and fat calves, like she said her niece usually says during pre-meal prayers. Daley encouraged everyone to engage in conversation and challenged them to teach their table mates something they didn’t show up that morning with previous knowledge of. “We know we won’t agree on everything,” Daley said. “But thank you for coming to discuss what matters.” The morning included a few guest

26 California Cattleman May 2017

speakers like Assemblymember Jim Cooper (D-Elk Grove), Sen. Cathleen Galgiani (D-Stockton ), State Treasurer John Chiang and Board of Equalization member Fiona Ma, who shared their thoughts about topics they are currently working on or have been involved in with ranching in California. Cooper joked that he was vying for the title of “King of Ag Tours” to compete with Ma’s self-proclaimed title of “Queen of Ag Tours.” “I knew there was agriculture in my district,” Cooper said. “But it wasn’t until I started going on visits and tours that I came to understand just the impact that it has.” Daley concluded the breakfast by mentioning that all too often, the scenario of ranchers suffering from unintended consequences of wellintended regulations plays out. The legislative visits to follow the meal would relay the many real impacts placed on cattle producers and allow ranchers to share their stories with legislators and their staff. During a break in the storm, everyone made their way to the Capitol, walking through the California Grown archway into California Agriculture Day at the Capitol on the building’s west lawn. As was inevitable in a group of

people who work outdoors, pockets knives were checked in at security— but only two this year! As belt buckles and cowboy hats were put back in their places, the faint echo of the heels of cowboy boots could be heard in the hallways for the rest of the afternoon. CCA members split up in smaller groups with fellow ranchers who shared the same home counties and made their way to their scheduled

CCA President Dave Daley accepting a centennial honor at the State Capitol Building on behalf of CCA.


visits with their legislators. Current topics members addressed in their meetings included bills on water reporting and monitoring, mountain lion depredation, estate tax and the California Beef Research, Promotion and Education Commission. Assemblymember James Gallagher (R-Sacramento), no stranger to agriculture himself and a tireless advocate for his fellow agriculturists, met with Northern California ranchers and alerted CCA members that they may be running out of options when it comes to protecting their livelihoods. “Unfortunately, being engaged is no longer an option, it’s a requirement,” Gallagher said. “It should be part of your business plan.” He encouraged ranchers to continue showing up for opportunities to share their stories with legislators and their realworld issues about how legislation may impact them. As meetings concluded and CCA members made their way home to their respective ranches, they could reflect back on a day well-spent in Sacramento, helping to make a difference in protecting ranching in California and sharing realworld stories and experiences where some would argue they matter the most. Afterwards, members were encouraged to look around Agriculture Day at the Capitol, which included numerous agriculture commodity representatives like the California CattleWomen who handed out 2,750 tri-tip sliders in a two and onehalf hour time frame to booth visitors—a crowd favorite each year. Toward the end of the event, several people were brought to the make-shift stage in front of the Capitol doors to say a few words and thank folks who had helped make the day possible. As the ceremony celebrated milestone achievements in California agriculture, CCA President Dave Daley was called to the stage to accept a proclamation bestowed upon CCA for its 100th anniversary by California Secretary of Food and Agriculture Karen Ross, to thank the organization for its work on behalf of California ranchers for the past century and express well wishes for continued success as the association moves ahead doing what it does best: keeping California ranchers ranching since 1917.

Assemblymember Jim Cooper spoke at the annual breakfast.

Cattlemen and women making their way to the capitol.

Contra Costa-Alameda Cattlemen’s Association members prepare to meet with their elected representatives in Sacramento.

A group of beef producers from the Central Valley meet with politicians after the 39th annual Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast. May 2017 California Cattleman 27


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28 California Cattleman May 2017


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2017 California Cattleman

Auction Market Directory FEATURING CALIFORNIA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARDS WHO HAVE ADVERTISED THEIR SERVICES IN THIS ISSUE

OFFICE........................................ (209) 745-1515 E-MAIL..................................... info@clmgalt.com WEBSITE.................................. www.clmgalt.com CONTACTS Frank “Butch” Loretz..............................President Jake Parnell, Manager................. (916) 662-1298 12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA 95632

CATTLE AUCTION............................ Wednesday MEMBERSHIPS........ .NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA OFFICE.........................................(209) 387-4113 FAX.............................................. (209) 387-4476 WEBSITE............................www.dpyauction.com

16575 S. Hwy 33, Dos Palos, CA 93620

ESCALON

Livestock Market, Inc.

CONTACTS Joel E. Cozzi................................ (209) 769-4660 Joel A. (Joey) Cozzi..................... (209) 769-4662 Col. Doug Gallaway..................... (209) 617-5435 Mike Vieira................................... (209) 617-5435 Bill Enos....................................... (209) 761-1322 Garrett Jones............................... (209) 710-7904 OFFICE.........................................(209) 838-7011 FAX.............................................. (209) 838-1535 WEBSITE........www.escalonlivestockmarket.com E-MAIL.....escalonglivestockmarket@yahoo.com PRESIDENT Miguel A. Machado...................... (209) 595-2014

REPRESENTATIVES Joe Vieira..................................... (209) 531-4156 P.O. Box 26 25525 Lone Tree Rd, Escalon, CA 95320 Thomas Bert................................ (209) 605-3866 Tony Luis...................................... (209) 609-6455 Michael Machado......................... (209) 495-9208

FARMERS

OFFICE.........................................(209) 847-1033 FAX...............................................(209) 847-4425

6001 Albers Road, Oakdale CA 95361

CATTLE AUCTION...........Monday and Thursday

LIVESTOCK MARKET

HUMBOLDT AUCTION YARD, INC.

603 S. 3rd Street, Fortuna, CA 95540

CONTACT Steve Haglund..............................(209) 847-1033

OFFICE...........................................(707) 725-5188 FAX.................................................(707) 725-9822 E-MAIL......................humboldtauction@hotmail.com CONTACTS Col. Lee Mora.................................(707) 845-7188 Col. Lou Mora.................................(707) 845-7288 CATTLE AUCTION......................... Wednesday

30 California Cattleman May 2017

AUCTIONEERS...................... .Jake Parnell, Brian Pachaco, Mark Fischer, Matt Morebeck UPCOMING EVENTS CLM will feature large runs of calves and yearlings on May 3, May 13, June 24 as well as Wednesday June 10, June 21, July 19 and July 29. Visit www. clmgalt.com for an up-to-date list of upcoming events and market reports. CATTLE AUCTION..................Monday and Thursday MEMBERSHIPS............... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS.........Doug Gallaway and Garrett Jones UPCOMING EVENTS Holding special upcoming feeder sales Thursday, May 26. Join us for lunch prior to the sale.

Dudley Meyer..................................... (209) 768-8586 CATTLE AUCTION......................................... Monday MEMBERSHIPS............... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..............................Miguel A. Machado, UPCOMING EVENTS Big strings of yearlings and calves sell Mondays in May and June. Call now to consign to our special feeder sales May 1 and plan to join us for our 26th Anniversary Feeder Sale May 22. Visit our website for more information on what we have to offer. www. escalonlivestockmarket.com MEMBERSHIPS................NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS............. Clint Haglund, Ken Tompson UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for auction sales every Monday and Thursday for dairy, beef and feeder cattle.

MEMBERSHIPS.......................... CCA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..................................Lee Mora ............................................................Lee Mora UPCOMING EVENTS The Mora family invites you to join them ringside every Wednesday in Fortuna.


MODOC AUCTION YARD Hwy 299 W, Alturas, CA 96101

OFFICE...........................................(530) 233-3442 CONTACTS Jerry Kresge....................................(530) 640-1302 CATTLE AUCTION......................... February to August: first and third Saturdays; September to February every Saturday.

OFFICE...........................................(209) 862-4500 FAX.................................................(209) 862-4700

P.O. Box 756 • 2011 E, Stuhr Rd., Newman, CA 95360

CONTACTS Col. John McGill..............................(209) 631-0845 CATTLE AUCTIONS..........Tuesday and Thursday MEMBERSHIP....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

ORLAND LIVESTOCK

OFFICE...........................................(530) 865-4527 FAX.................................................(559) 582-6261

P.O. Box 96 3877 Hwy. 99 West, Orland, CA 95963

CATTLE AUCTION............................. .....Thursday MEMBERSHIP....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

COMMISSION YARD, INC.

PRODUCER’S LIVESTOCK MARKETING ASSOCIATION

1022 S. Pine Street, Madera, CA 93637 P.O. Box 510 Madera, CA 93639

CONTACTS Col. Ed Lacque............................... (530) 865-2643 Col Wade Lacque, Manager...........(530) 570-0547

MEMBERSHIPS.......................... CCA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS......................Gary Pennington UPCOMING EVENTS Call us for dates on special feeder sales. See our ad on page 28.

AUCTIONEERS........................... John McGill UPCOMING EVENTS Currently accepting cattle for Tuesday and Thursday sales plus Western Video Market sales from Cottonwood on May 4 and June 25 and Reno, Nev., in July. For details see our ad on page 22.

AUCTIONEERS.........Wade Lacque, Ed Lacque UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for our special bred cow sale July 24. Call us for details. Also see our ad on page 28. Join us Thursdays at noon for our regular beef sales. ALSO CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK!

OFFICE...........................................(559) 674-4674 E-MAIL...............producersmadera@sbcglobal.net WEBSITE..................www.producerslivestock.com

MEMBERSHIPS......NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS......................Michael Imbrogno

CONTACTS Jackie Silva.......................................559-660-6752 Dean Penero.....................................209-649-7341 CATTLE AUCTION....................................Tuesday

UPCOMING EVENTS We hope to see you at our off-the-grass special sales May 22 and June 19 at 1 p.m. See our ad on page 22 for details. Also watch for big runs of calves and yearlings on our regular sale days in May and June.

2017 California Livestock Auction Markets Association OFFICERS & DIRECTORS President........................................................... Alana McGill Chairman................................................................Brad Peek Vice President....................................Col. Jake Bettencourt Secretary.......................................................Forrest Mangan Treasurer................................................ Col. David Macedo Director...............................................................Beth Baxley Director...............................................................Cindy Tews

Director.......................................................Sherrie Linhares Director..................................................... Col. Garrett Jone Nominating............................................. Col. John Rodgers Nominating.................................................Col. Max Olvera LMA Director....................................... Col. David Macedo LMA Director.............................................Col. Jake Parnell May 2017 California Cattleman 31


SHASTA

LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD 3917 N. Main Street, Cottonwood, CA 96022 P.O. Box 558, Cottonwood, CA 96022

OFFICE...........................................(530) 347-3793 FAX.................................................(530) 347-0329 WEBSITE.......................... www.shastalivestock.com CONTACTS Ellington Peek.................................(530) 527-3600 Brad Peek.......................................(530) 347-3793 Donald Doverspike..........................(541) 377-6298 CATTLE AUCTION....................................... Friday OFFICE...........................................(559) 591-0884 FAX.................................................(559) 591-0808 WEBSITE...............www.tularecountystockyard.com

9641 Ave. 384, Dinuba, CA 93618

CONTACTS Jon Dolieslager...............................(559) 358-1070 Summer Dolieslager, bookkeeper....(559) 591-0884 AUCTIONEER............................... Jon Dolieslager OFFICE...........................................(209) 634-4326 FAX.................................................(209) 634-4396 WEBSITE.......................... www.turlocklivestock.com

10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381

CONTACTS Karen Cozzi.....................................(209) 634-4326 Col. Max Olvera..............................(209) 277-2063 Col. Steve Faria............................. (209) 988-7180 Col. Chuch Cozzitorto.....................(209) 652-4479 Buddy Cozzitorto.............................(209) 652-4480 Tim Sisil...........................................(209) 631-6054 OFFICE...........................................(559) 625-9615 FAX.................................................(559) 625-9012 WEBSITE...........................www.visalialivestock.com CONTACTS Col. Randy Baxley..........................(559) 906-9760 CATTLE AUCTION...................... ........Wednesday

733 N. Ben Maddox Way, Visalia, CA 93292 OFFICE.............................................(61) 399-2981 FAX.................................................(661) 399-0177 WEBSITE......www.westerstockmansmarket.com

31911 Hwy. 46, McFarland, CA 93250

CONTACTS Dwight Mebane...............................(661) 979-9892 Col. Justin Mebane.........................(661) 979-9894 Frank Machado...............................(805) 839-8166 Col. Bennet Mebanre......................(661) 201-8169

MEMBERSHIP...NCBA, CCA, LMA. CLAMA CATTLE AUCTION Join us for our regular Friday sales, as well as specials on May 5, May 19 and June 9. Don’t miss the Western Video Market sales on May 4, May 25 and June 8 in Cottonwood. For more information, visit us online at www.shastalivestock.com or wvmcattle.com. MEMBERSHIPS...NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA BEEF SALES EVERY FRIDAY AT NOON WITH COWS AT 2 P.M. Join us for Special Feeder Sales May 5, May 19 and June 2 featuring large runs of calves and yearlings.

BEEF SALE DAYS....Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday MEMBERSHIPS....NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..........Max Olvera, Steve Faria, Chuck Cozzitorto, Eddie Nunes, Jake Bettencourt UPCOMING EVENTS Special cattlemen’s association sales May 2, May 24, June 3 and June 24. We hope to see you there! See our ad on page 11 for details.

MEMBERSHIPS.... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..........................Randy Baxley CATTLE AUCTION Join us for weekly sales and take advantage of our transporation options from the central coast! Join us Wednesdays in May and June for large runs of stockers and feeder calves.

BEEF SALE DAY.................................... Monday Butcher Cows at 10:30 a.m./Feeders at 12:30 p.m. MEMBERSHIPS...................... NCBA, CCA, LMA UPCOMING EVENTS Special Feeder Sale June 12, featuring large runs of stockers and feeders. See our ad on page 13 for details.

2017 CLAMA MEMBERS 101 Livesetock Market, Inc. Cattlemen’s Livestock Market, Inc. Dos Palos Y Auction Yard Escalon Livestock Market, Inc. Euclid Stockyard Farmer’s Livestock Market, Inc. Fresno Livestock Commission, LLC 32 California Cattleman May 2017

Humbolt Auction Yard, Inc. Newman Stockyards, LLC Orland Livestock Commission Yard, Inc. Petaluma Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. Producers Livestock Marketing Assn, Madera Shasta Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. The Stockman’s Market, Inc..

Tulare County Stockyard, Inc. Tulare Sales Yard, Inc. Turlock Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. Western Stockman’s Market, Famoso Western Video Market Fallon Livestock Exchange, Inc.


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1947-1957 CHECKOFF CHALLENGE

Cattlemen fight for product promotion bill by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

T

he mid-20th Century proved to be a great time to be a rancher. Though the business climate could have been better, the ending of the world war era brought optimism to all industries in all parts of the country. California was no exception. The effects of the war were very different on the United States compared to most countries that participated heavily in the war effort. While Europe and Asia were in the midst of rebuilding from the ravages of war, the continental U.S. was physically untouched. Winning the war effort dictated a new direction in American culture that was dominated by a new found wealth and independence that soldiers, and perhaps more importantly,women, experienced during this time. Americans now wanted something new and better, and many were earning enough money to find that better life. Since its inception, California has been known for leading the nation in all things agriculture. And, much like we see today, California’s beef community led the charge in both bringing innovation and fighting regulation. The national cattlemen’s group, the American National Live Stock Association (ANLSA) was led in 1950 and 1951 by Loren Bamert, from Ione, who was the youngest president ever to serve the association. At the young age of 38, the record for youth leadership still holds today. Bamert was known for his fights against Korean War era price controls. “The politicians knew price controls wouldn’t work,” he said, “but claimed they had to do it politically. The politicians won, but it was a mess.” During his term, the association changed its name from the ANLSA to the American National Cattlemen’s Association. After CCA came into existence in 1917, many local cattlemen’s associations began to form over the next 34 California Cattleman May 2017

few decades in order for their regional concerns to get addressed by the state association. In such a large state with vast production differences, the need for activism on the local issues is still paramount to the success of CCA today. Through the 1940s and 1950s, the forward-thinking of cattlemen and women in every corner of the state was made apparent. In 1948, the Kern County CowBelles, an auxiliary group of rancher’s wives formed – three years before the California CowBelles came to fruition. Today, known as California CattleWomen, Inc., this group of proactive, enthusiastic women work to educate the public – consumers and young people alike – on importance of including beef in the diet and supporting cattle ranching in California. As the CowBelles got off the ground as an auxiliary group, the need for funds to promote the ranching industry and keep beef on America’s dinner table became more apparent. Thanks to plummeting beef prices and a record supply of cattle, CCA members formed the California Beef Industry Committee (BIC), which represented all segments of the production chain in California. The purpose of the committee was to create greater consumer interest in beef and beef products in order to stabilize the industry. In order to fund this effort, in 1954 the BIC recommended that funds be raised by voluntary contributions of 10 cents per head sold from cattlemen, feeders and dairymen, to be collected at the point of sale. It wasn’t long before the “voluntary” sentiment shifted toward a mandatory assessment that would ensure the effort had greater support, which could result in more widespread and effective support for the promotion programs the funds would create. In 1956, a bill was passed that would create a 15-member board, drawn in equal numbers from


cattlemen, dairymen and cattle feeders, as well as require a mandatory per-head assessment. The bill passed the state senate and assembly unanimously. For the bill to take effect it had to be approved by at least 65 percent of producers in a statewide referendum. Only 54 percent of producers voted for the bill. Statewide campaigns promoting beef were initiated, including films about beef and various marketing and education programs. After paving the way for the first state checkoff referendum, other states followed closely behind. Montana, Florida and Alabama created their own beef councils and the National Beef Council was formed in 1955. After things were learned from the first failed referendum vote, another bill was introduced in 1957 and included a new option for producers not wanting to pay the 10 cents per head. Those producers could get an exemption from the Department of Agriculture to preserve the voluntary status of the program. After the exemption was included, the law passed. A former livestock superintendent at the Cow Palace in Daly City, Walt Rodman, a former Modoc County rancher, was selected to serve as the California Beef Council’s (CBC) leader. He is still revered today for his innate ability and innovative approach to promoting beef. Though today’s beef checkoff on both the state and national levels is different than the original version, its purposes remains the same. The original focus was often on the American housewife and helped her to put the best tasting beef meals on her family’s dinner table. The program’s more well-known promotion, “Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner,” television ad campaigns became known across the country by consumers of all demographics. Today, the CBC continues to focus on young families,

the rest of the country to learn from. an audience that has remained a core target for decades. EDITOR’S NOTE: As the California Though not a part of the Cattlemen’s Association celebrates its centennial year in 2017, this article is part California Cattlemen’s Association, the CBC is only one organization that of a year-long series addressing each of CCA’s 10 decades. Many of the facts in California’s beef producers helped this article are attributed to The Long and form for the purpose of enhancing and furthering the beef community in Winding Trail: 75 Years of the California Cattlemen’s Association. California. Groups like the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association and the California Rangeland Trust are other examples of organizations that exist because of the progressive minds of California ranchers. While the lessons California ranchers have learned over the last 100 years have not always been pleasant, the passion and perseverance has always benefitted the industry as a whole. Like the modern day CCA, ranchers of the 1940s and 1950s likely had a different take on many of the issues directly impactting the association and the California business climate, but through the fortitude of sticking together for the greater good, CCA and ranchers in the state Walt Rodman, the California Beef Council’s first chairman. continue to be leaders for

CCA President Bob Johnson hands Gov. Goodwin J. Knight the Beef Promotion Bill for his signature in 1957. Also pictured (L to R) are: California Milk Producers’ Joe Hart, CCA First Vice President Brunel Christensen and California Cattle Feeder’s Association Vice President Fenton O’Connell. May 2017 California Cattleman 35


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36 California Cattleman May 2017

Cattlemen Applaud Delay of GIPSA Rule The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) applauded the April 11 announcement that the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) is delaying the effective date of its interim final rule an additional six months to Oct. 19, 2017. “This is another step toward common sense and away from counterproductive government intrusion in the free market,” said NCBA President Craig Uden. “That said, while a delay is welcome, ultimately this rule should be killed and American cattle producers should be free to market our beef without the threat of governmentsanctioned frivolous lawsuits.” Two proposed rules and one interim final rule came out on December 20, 2016, one month before the end of the Obama Administration. The interim final rule regarding the scope of the Packers and Stockyards Act and the proposed rule regarding undue preference and unjust treatment have a direct negative impact on the cattle industry. Current systems that allow producers to market their cattle as they see fit reward them for producing the higher-quality beef that consumers demand. Under the interim final rule, USDA or a producer no longer needs to prove true economic harm. Instead, one only needs to say that he or she was treated “unfairly” to file a damaging lawsuit that could discourage cattlemen from continuing to invest in improving the quality of beef being produced. “Trial lawyers are salivating at the prospect of this rule becoming the law of the land,” Uden said. “If this rule isn’t killed once and for all, cattle producers will lose nearly all incentive to invest in the production of higherquality beef. That would mean less revenue for producers and lower quality for consumers. That’s a lose-lose proposition and exactly why the rule needs to not only be delayed – it needs to be killed outright.”


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W e strive to produce the most sound, functional, and marketable cattle possible. It is our mission to have each and every one of our customers obtain success with their bull purchases. Call for more information about our customer service programs! May 2017 California Cattleman 37


MULTI-BREED STAYABILITY First EPDs Using

BOLT

by American Simmental Association’s Jackie Atkins, Ph.D.; Lauren Hyde, Ph.D., and Wade Shafer, Ph.D. It’s here! The Spring 2017 evaluation includes a multibreed stayability EPD using the much anticipated new genetic evaluation software, dubbed BOLT. The stayability EPD uses a random regression approach to predict stayability developed by Dr. Janusz Jamrozik and colleagues from the University of Guelph and the Canadian Simmental Association. Dr. Scott Speidel at Colorado State University, Dr. Bruce Golden (Theta Solutions), and the genetics team at International Genetic Solutions (IGS) (Lauren Hyde, Wade Shafer, Mahdi Saatchi, and Steve McGuire) worked together to incorporate the new methodology into the IGS evaluation. The new stayability evaluation includes data on animals of varying breed composition, directly incorporates genomic data, produces true accuracy values and provides stayability EPDs to all IGS partners on a common base. 1) Multi-breed stayability. As mentioned, the new stayability EPD is calculated for all cattle in the database (not just for purebred and fullblood Simmental). As stayability is a very important economically relevant trait for female production, the ability to have stayability calculations on all cattle will improve the prediction of the All Purpose Index in hybrid cattle and cattle of other breeds. 2) Direct incorporation of genomic data. Because BOLT was used to calculate the Stayability EPD, the evaluation used the DNA markers, pedigree information, and phenotypic data simultaneously in the prediction of the stayability EPD. Previously molecular breeding values (MBVs) were calculated from the genomic information and those MBVs were blended separately into the EPD prediction. The new direct method of including DNA markers not only improves the genomically enhanced EPD for the genotyped animal but also uses this information in the EPD calculations of relatives. 38 California Cattleman May 2017

3) Better prediction of accuracy. The BOLT software calculates a true accuracy of the EPD rather than an approximation of accuracy. With the limitations of the old software and computer memory, calculating true accuracy was not an option as the system of equations was too large and cumbersome to manipulate. In addition, the method of approximation tended to inflate accuracy values. What does this mean to breeders? In most cases, animals will have a decrease in reported accuracy for stayability but this reported accuracy will be the true accuracy for the EPD. True accuracy values help producers better manage risk associated with bull selection. 4) Change in base: With all the changes made to the stayability evaluation, the base for stayability has changed for purebred and fullblood Simmental. All cattle in the IGS collective will be on the same base and comparable directly with each other. Breeders will see movement in stayability EPD from previous evaluations, not only because of changes to methodology but also because of a base change. However, changing the base does not affect the ranking of cattle; it simply shifts all EPDs up or down by the same increment.


May 2017 California Cattleman 39


Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D.

Professor at University of California, Davis and Air Quality Extension Specialist

Keith Belk, Ph.D

Professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at Colorado State University and the Center for Meat Safety & Quality

Rooms are available at the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, located at 333 West Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92101. Reservations can be made by calling 1-877-622-3056 or by visiting the CCA website at www.calcattlemen.org.

Name on card: __________________________ Card No. _____ _____ _____ _____ Exp. Date _____ / _____ 40 California Cattleman May 2017 Signature __________________________________________

Make checks payable to California Cattlemen’s Association


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TELLING the BRANGUS

STORY

by International Brangus Breeders Associaiton’s Bonnie Ramierez “Go Brangus!”“Build with Brangus!”“Any Country is Brangus Country!” What do these slogans mean to you? Brangus cattle have a long and rich history, dating back to the early 1900s. There’s a great story to tell about Brangus cattle. Are you telling it? Brangus possess many favorable traits: heterosis, consistency, longevity, maternal excellence, environmental adaptability, disease and parasite resistance, reliability and value. These traits are invaluable and offer significance to our breed’s unique characteristics. Why not choose Brangus? Build with Brangus; it’s the way to go, folks. The unparalleled combination of Brahman hardiness and Angus quality certainly sets Brangus apart from the rest. So here’s the question: Are you spreading the great Brangus message? That’s the test and task at hand. And it all starts with us. We, as Brangus breeders and supporters, must tell our story, the great Brangus story, from pasture to packer to plate. Did you know that when we say, “any country is Brangus country,” we mean it? That mantra is supported by facts. Brangus are adaptable to any country, worldwide. Brangus cattle are known for their overall thriftiness. They have outstanding maternal strengths, they perform well in feedlots, they yield high carcass merit, and they exude balanced performance all the way around. Sharing this story will enable us to retain current breeders and membership and recruit new breeders and members. Retaining current membership and breeders may be the most difficult challenge, because we must ensure that they remain engaged, vested, excited and interested. The recruiting aspect is a bit simpler. All we have to do is educate by providing pertinent breed information, raise awareness about breed statistics, and all said and done, create a buzz of interest regarding Brangus cattle. Currently, the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) is the nation’s eighth largest cattle association. How can we shift those numbers to an upward scale? Well, first and foremost, we begin by telling our story. Simply put, we can tell our story with photos and utilizing the ever so popular and growing social media channels. As the saying goes, “pictures are worth a thousand words.” Social media includes platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. IBBA has a presence on all of these channels. Social media is fast, constant and ever-changing. It’s the way the 42 California Cattleman May 2017

world communicates now, and it definitely is the way of the future as it continues to evolve. Social media is free, instant, easy, and you can communicate 24/7, year-round across the globe. Social media is a great way to share our Brangus story. So, my Brangus friends, today I challenge you to go forth and tell the Brangus story. Let’s market and promote BONNIE RAMIEREZ Brangus cattle worldwide with our ultimate goal being to grow our breed and association. Let’s show the world what Brangus is all about and why they, too, should Build with Brangus! ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Yvonne Ramirez, better known as Bonnie, is a South Texas native who graduated from Sam Houston State University (SHSU) with a bachelors degree in agriculture with an emphasis in animal science, coupled with a minor in communications. Her spirited passion runs deep within the agricultural world. Ramirez’s roots stem from growing up in a small, rural community, being active in both 4-H and the National FFA Organization, and showing market swine and breeding heifers. During her collegiate career, Ramirez was enthusiastically involved in both SHSU’s junior and senior livestock judging teams. Some of her prior professional experience includes serving as the Texas Animal Health Commission’s director of communications, San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo’s assistant livestock director and marketing coordinator and Ultimate Genetics - Sire Services customer relations. Ramirez was recognized by the Texas Farm Bureau in 2005 with an Excellence in Journalism award. Being an avid supporter of 4-H and FFA programs, and wholeheartedly believing in the future of agriculture, she has enjoyed judging several public speaking contests at both the Houston and San Antonio stock shows. Currently, she is on the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo Ranch Rodeo Finals Committee and a BEEF TIP on the Texas BEEF Team. In loving memory of her grandmother, Ramirez founded the annual Forget Me Not Benefit Alzheimer’s Team Roping fundraiser. In her spare time, Ramirez enjoys announcing at team roping events. Ramirez currently serves as assistant to the executive vice president for the International Brangus Breeders Association.


BREAK THE

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WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK.

INTERNATIONAL BRANGUS BREEDERS ASSOCIATION info@gobrangus.com | GoBrangus.com | (210) 696-8231 May 2017 California Cattleman 43


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR

CHECKING IN ON YOUR BEEF CHECKOFF CBC OFFERING OPPORTUNITY TO PRODUCERS from the California Beef Council Stockmanship & Stewardship Events Planned in California This year, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) in partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. (BIVI) and the checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program, are hosting regional Stockmanship and Stewardship (S&S) events in each of the NCBA regions, and California is the proud host of two of them! The California Beef Council (CBC), working together with UC Davis, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, the California Cattlemen’s Association and the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association, is planning two, two-day cattle handling and educational events highlighting proper stockmanship and stewardship techniques as well as local stewardship information. The first event, slated for June 23 and 24, will take place leading up to the 25th Annual UC Davis Horse Production Sale. The second event will be held Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, just prior to the university’s 61st Annual Bull Sale. Both events will feature engaging educational programs, BQA certification, and lively stockmanship

stockmanship & stewardship June 23 – 24 University of California, Davis Culminates in the 25th Annual UC Davis Horse Production Sale

September 30 – October 1 Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Culminates in 61st Annual Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Bull Sale For more information or to register for these events, visit: www.stockmanshipandstewardship.org.

44 California Cattleman May 2017

lessons that will prove timely and relevant for producers of all ages. The Davis S&S event will start the afternoon of June 23, beginning with a live demonstration by well-known stockmanship clinicians Curt Pate and Ron Gill. Special emphasis will be placed on horsemanship and lowstress cattle handling. The morning of Saturday, June 24 will include a BQA certification with BIVI, and educational sessions including a screening of the new documentary “Food Evolution;” a producer panel offering insight on environmental stewardship and partnerships that lead to success in this arena; and various demonstrations in the UC Davis Meat Lab. The event will also include dinner and entertainment on June 23. Those staying for the Horse Production Sale, which begins Saturday, June 24 with a preview at 3 p.m., will also have the opportunity to enjoy a Sirloin steak dinner on Saturday evening. A similar program is being developed for the Cal Poly event in the fall, with a balance of live animal handling demonstrations, a BQA certification opportunity, and educational sessions on timely and relevant topics. For more on these and other S&S events planned throughout 2017, visit www.stockmanshipandstewardship. org. Cinco de Mayo Spring Promotion Underway Another CBC beef promotion involving the popular consumer app Ibotta is underway, this time centered around Cinco de Mayo festivities. The promotion, which started in early April and extends through early May, follows successful efforts in previous months to boost beef sales at California retailers by partnering with the app. Consumers can find a $.50 rebate on any brand fresh ground beef using the Ibotta app, which will be good at any participating California retailer. While the promotion has primarily focused on Cinco de Mayo and recipes, it also includes an emphasis on downloading the CBC’s recently launched mobile app, BEEFabulous. An advertising campaign done in


conjunction with the promotion targets the Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco and Sacramento markets, and includes radio spots featuring on-air personalities in each of the markets talking about how they like to celebrate Cinco de Mayo with food, friends and family. The CBC was one of the first state beef councils in the country to partner with Ibotta, in part because of the app’s wide use and success, and the ability to tap into multiple retailers throughout the state. The CBC’s most recent promotion with Ibotta, in late 2016, garnered impressive results, including: • Over 1.6 million total impressions for beef through the Ibotta app and supplemental advertising • A total of 14,261 holiday roast units sold in California during the promotion • 38,370 brand engagements, in which consumers answered a poll question about beef, and added beef to their shopping list through the app • A 37.2 percent redemption rate of the rebate, which is significantly higher than most of the traditional coupon incentives offered through retail promotions For more about the CBC, visit www. calbeef.org.

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RANGELAND TRUST TALK

300,000 ACRES CONSERVED THE STORY OF THE AVENALES by California Rangeland Trust Director of Communications Jessica Kong The laws of mankind favor early adopters. From the industrial revolution to social media, fortunes were won and lost off the ability to recognize opportunity first and the courage to bet on that opportunity. Bernard Sinsheimer was such a man. The Sinsheimer family, who later anglicized their name to Sinton, immigrated from Burstadt, Germany to the U.S. in 1863 – the year ground was broken in Sacramento for the construction of the first transcontinental railroad – when Bernard was 15. At the age of 26, he came to San Luis Obispo where he worked as a clerk for Pollard & Beebee. Two years later he purchased the business with his brother. The store they later built still stands today in downtown San Luis Obispo. Bernard almost immediately began purchasing land in earnest. By his early 50s he had acquired 5,000 acres in the Avenales area, half of which he subsequently lost, along with almost everything he owned, when he was unable to pay off a mortgage. The turn of the last century was rife with opportunity for the enterprising and land hungry. Unable to own land in his native Germany, Bernard seemed intent on purchasing as much land as possible. Over the next 27 years, he would piece together land in what would become the Canyon Ranch near Shandon and reclaim the rest of

46 California Cattleman May 2017

the Avenales Ranch in the Los Padres National Forest. The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed Americans to claim 160 acres of federal land. After meeting certain requirements, including living on the property for five years, the claimant could win title to the land. In the eastern states these 160 acre parcels were large enough to sustain a family. But in the remote, arid Avenales, 160 acres just wasn’t enough and most homesteaders would sell soon after they received title to the land. Bernard bought every parcel he could. Land scrip, redeemable in federal land, was given to veterans of our country’s early wars but by the early 1900’s was nearly worthless in the eastern states as there was no public land left. It was sold to speculators for 10 cents on the dollar who then exchanged it for large tracts of land in the west. Bernard acquired the Canyon Ranch from such speculators. Bernard’s grandson Jim Sinton’s earliest memories are of working with the cowboys gathering wild horses and cattle at the Avenales Ranch. Raised in Burlingame and Hillsborough, he spent summers on the ranch and although he was raised with everything a young San Francisco could offer, always knew that the ranch would be his home. The early days on the Avenales were right from a Zane Grey novel. While Jim and the men would ride into the Avenales on horseback, a trip that would take all day from the more accessible Canyon Ranch, Jim’s mother Flo-Flo, came down with her friends on the train. A ranch hand was sent with a buggy to pick them up in Santa Margarita which was 35 miles away – a trip that probably took eight hours. The days were spent playing bridge, talking, walking, and of course riding. BBQs and stories told by


larger than life characters filled the evenings. Jim would have liked to raise his family on the Avenales but settled on the Canyon Ranch instead so his children, Patricia, Gail and Steve, could attend school in Shandon. Like his father, Steve also always knew that the ranch would be his home. His children, Julie and Daniel, were also raised on the ranch, attending school in Shandon and then Stanford University just as he did. Daniel is now raising his children, the sixth generation, on the ranch. Explosive growth has dramatically changed the nearby landscape over the course of these six generations. Jim recalls a time when Paso Robles had 60 children attending school. Now there are about 5,000. Miles of ranchettes, in what was once wilderness, line the now paved roads. Through the generations, land has slowly been sold for a variety of reasons. But stories of the land are inextricably woven with people who care for it and the Avenales is no exception. Values of stewardship and the desire to leave the land in better condition than when they found it ran deep through the generations. The Avenales is now owned by Bernard’s great-great grandchildren in trust with the goal of preserving it for future generations. The plan was to mitigate the ever present pressure to sell off parts of the ranch by placing it under a conservation easement. After seven years on the California Rangeland Trust’s waiting list, the 12,284 acre Avenales Ranch is finally conserved forever through a partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Board and the Rocky Mountain Elk

Foundation. Bordering the Carrizo Ranch which is also conserved by California Rangeland Trust, the Avenales conservation easement brings the total connected acreage conserved by the Trust to nearly 40,000 acres. The Avenales also borders the Nick Ranch, conserved by the Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo County, and the Los Padres National Forest, bringing the total connected wilderness area to over 1.8 million acres. Home to the headwaters of the Salinas River and Santa Maria River, the ranch provides breeding, migratory, and hunting habitat for a variety of species and is critical California red-legged frog and California condor habitat. The family is not only committed to conserving the ecosystem values – over the last 50 years many UC Cooperative Extension studies were conducted on the ranch and it was the original release site for Tule elk by the California Department of Fish and Game (now Department of Fish and Wildlife) over 25 years ago – they are also generous in sharing this piece of land with the public. Riding groups come to the ranch to ride and camp and several Sierra Club hikes occur each year. As the Rangeland Trust nears its 20th birthday, the closing of this generational treasure brings with it a significant milestone. Already the largest statewide land trust in California, the addition of the Avenales Ranch brings the total conserved acreage in California Rangeland Trust’s portfolio to over 300,000 acres – something worth celebrating!

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YOUNG CATTLEMEN participate in CAPITOL event On April 4, eight California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) members traveled to Sacramento to attend the third annual Young Cattlemen on the Capitol event. This event allows YCC members to learn more about the California legislature, regulatory agencies, the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) and the issues that impact California ranchers that CCA works on. The students are also given the opportunity to foster new connections with those who meet with the group during the day. The purpose of the event is to heighten YCC members’ knowledge of the legislative process and their ability to advocate and learn more about working in political and regulatory areas upon graduation. The students met with and heard from a number of guest speakers including Assemblymember Frank Bigelow and his chief of

staff, Katie Masingale; California Secretary of Agriculture, Karen Ross; Maddie Dunlap, account executive for West Coast Advisors, a strategic public affairs firm; Jason Bryant, Bryant Government Affairs; Billy Gatlin, CCA Executive Vice President; and Justin Oldfield, CCA Vice President of Government Affairs. After attending the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee, the group took a brief tour of the Capitol, from there headed to the California Department of Food and Agriculture building and finished up the afternoon at the CCA office. YCC members who have goals to work in the cattle industry, have an interest in going into political work or are looking to know more about how the legislative process works are encouraged to attend this annual event in the coming years!

Brangus breeders to hold spring field day in Greeley Hill May 20 The Western States Brangus Breeders Association is holding its spring field day for seedstock and commerical beef producers on Saturday, May 20, at the Tumbleweed Ranch in Greeley Hill. At the event, cattlemen and women will hear from a variety of speakers who will provide insight to the Brangus breed and its advantages in today’s marketplace. Among the events speakers will be International Brangus Breeder’s Field Service Representative Matt Murdock from Texas. Murdock will share current events and projects at the national breed association level and how the association is benefitting its members.

John Openshaw an ultrasound practitioner will talk to attendees about ultrasounding for tenderness and quality in beef carcasses. Ranchland manager Billy Freeman will share tips on pasture and weed management and the field day will culminate with a tour of the Tumbleweed Ranch by owner Stephen Dunckel. Whether you are a Brangus breeder or not, this event has something for everyone! Field day includes materials, continental breakfast and barbeque lunch. Event RSVPs must be made by May 10 and can be made by contacting Sally by email at srucker53@aol.com (209) 532-3052.

48 California Cattleman May 2017

FIELD DAY AGENDA

Tumbleweed Ranch, 10532 McMahon Rd., Greeley Hill, CA 9 a.m. Registration & Coffee 10 a.m. Welcome – Steve Dunckel, Tumbleweed Ranch Featured Speakers “Todays IBBA” Matt Murdoch, Field Service Representative “Ultrasound Testing for Tenderness & Quality” John Openshaw, Ultrasound Practitioner Noon Tri Tip Lunch “Pasture and Weed Management” Billy Freeman, Ranchland Manager

Ranch Tour Stephen Dunckel, Tumbleweed Ranch THERE IS NO CELL SERVICE IN GREELEY HILL! Directions: From north: Highway 99 to Highway 120E, go south on Hwy 49 to Coulterville, turn left on J132, go 6 miles to left McMahon Rd, 1 mile to ranch on right. From south: Highway 99 to J59 to right on J132 to Coulterville, proceed 6 miles to left McMahon Rd, 1 mile to ranch on right.


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Thank you to our 2016 bull buyers! We look forward to seeing you in 2017!

50 California Cattleman May 2017


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Join us on Sept. 15 for the 43rd annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale.

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IN MEMORY

DON JACKSON

“J. R.” McCOLLISTER

Donald Dale James Robert “J.R.” Jackson was McCollister, Jr. passed away March born in Weiser, 29, after a lengthy illness, at home Idaho to John and with his family and beloved dogs. Nell Jackson on Born in Red Bluff graduating October 25, 1926. Red Bluff High, he then graduated Don is survived from Humboldt state, with an by a brother associate and bachelors degree James Jackson, in Forestry and was a California his three children registered professional forester. He Bill (Nancy) retired from California Department Jackson, Terry Jackson, and Tom (Pam) Jackson, six grandchildren, and five great- of Forestry April 1995. He started as seasonal grandchildren. firefighter 1958, retiring as Unit Don graduated from Stockton High Chief, Humboldt - Ranger Unit, he School where he was the student body over saw the resource protection president and graduated in three and half of over two million acres. J.R. years in 1945. He then joined the Navy and Lynn continued the family and received scholarships to attend U.C. Berkeley where he lettered all four years in tradition, and maintained a cow calf‚ track, and was member of the Beta Theta Chi Fraternity. He graduated in 1950 with Marshall Walker a Bachelor of Science degree. While attending Berkeley, he married Marshall Dorothy Rodden and joined his father Rozelle in law, V.A. Rodden, in his livestock Walker, age operation in the Oakdale area. 82, died at Don was an active member of the his Dairyville community and served on committees home on and boards for the Oakdale Elementary April 6, from School Board, Oakdale Rural Fire Board, complications St. Matthias Episcopal Church and Vestry, FFA/ 4-H, Boy Scouts of America, of Parkinson’s Oakdale Team Roping Committee, and disease. Del Rio Country Club. He was also He was born on Aug. 8, 1934 associated in different leadership duties in in Oroville, to parents John and the livestock industry such as, California Margery Walker. The family Cattle Feeders Association, California moved to the Capay area where he Beef Council, Stanislaus – San Joaquin graduated from the Capay Rancho California Cattlemen’s Association, elementary School. After his National Cattlemen’s Association, Meat Export Federation, National Livestock parents divorced, he boarded with and Meat Board. In 1990 he was chosen farm families during his high school as California Livestock Man of the Year. years graduating from Orland High Later in life Don was diagnosed with School in 1954. He served in the Parkinson’s disease and was a resident of U.S. Army 1955-56 and then moved Samaritan Village in Hughson where he to Red Bluff to apprentice in the received wonderful care. sheet metal trade. In 1957 he met If so moved, please make a Linda Hulseman at the Tehama contribution in his honor to Parkinson’s Institute and Clinical Center, 675 Almanor County Fair. They married in 1959 Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 or Community and two children followed soon Hospice Foundation, 5368 Spyres Way, after. Modesto, CA 95356 or your favorite Marshall loved growing hay charity. and raising Hereford cattle. In 1966 Per Don’s request there will be no he purchased registered cattle and services.

56 California Cattleman May 2017

operation on their ranch outside Red Bluff. Predeceased by his father James Robert McCollister, Sr. and mother Helen Lorene McCollister, survived by his wife of 45 years Charlette Lynn McCollister children Michael Scott Kinzer (Renae); Dori (Dave) Haig; Kim Ann Van Meier (Chris); Debi Magilligan (Mike); grandchildren James Houston (Amber); Kenthen Kinzer; Kendra Houston; Ashley Kinzer; Jennifer Kinzer; and three great grandchildren Jacquelyn and Rory Houston, Steven Kinzer. Memorial to be held May 20, 2 pm, Elks Lodge, Gilmore Rd. in Red Bluff.

continued raising Polled Herefords until his death. He like raising bulls for commercial cattlemen and marketed them at Famoso, Fallon, Shasta and the Red Bluff Bull Sale. His steer calves often went to 4-H or FFA students and he took care to make sure they got a “good one.” He was a past president of the Northern-Cal Appaloosa Association; past director of Tehama County Farm Supply and Tehama Co. Cattlemen and a member of the California Cattlemen’s Association and California/Nevada Hereford Association. He is survived by his spouse, Linda, and daughter Laurel Walker of Los Molinos; son Scott and wife Anne Walker of Livermore, and his adored grandchildren, Jacob, Molly and Kate Walker of Livermore. A celebration of life was held on April 14. Memorial contribution can be made to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, P. O. Box 65012, Albert Lea, MN 560079805.


Bill Cutting Born in Kansas, in 1929, and moving to Fresno, at age 12, William “Bill” Cutting attended Roosevelt Junior High School for a year and then moved to Sacramento, where he became California’s youngest Eagle Scout. Returning to Fresno High School, he lettered in track, basketball and tennis, and was elected 1946 to 1947 Senior Class President. Bill earned a 1951 Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture, Animal Science, at Fresno State College. As a Delta Sigma Phi fraternity member, a United States Marine Reservist, and Homecoming Chair, Bill was named in Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities. In 1951, Bill helped develop the family’s Cutting Veterinary Supply to become United States fifth largest animal health business with nine stores from the Imperial Valley to Sacramento. After a 1971 buyout, he guided a two year transition to Harvest Industries. The western wear division became his landmark “Golden Horse” store on Blackstone Avenue in Fresno. His 1870 Visalia Stock Saddle Company currently markets custom leather goods, bits and saddles. He was an avid youth program supporter as Cub Master. Scout Master, and Sequoia Council member. As co-founder, advisor, and ring-man for ‘Friends of the Fresno Fair Kids’ Junior Livestock Auction, he helped create thousands of dollars for 4-H and FFA members for which the Big Fresno Fair gave him a service award in 1991. He chaired the advisory committee for Fresno Unified School District’s Duncan High School Farm program and California FFA honored him with their highest award. Bill served 30 years on the Agricultural Foundation Board at Fresno State. His recognition at California State University, Fresno included Fresno State College Alumni Board; Block and Bridle Club’s first alumni award; service to the Ag One Board of Directors; and the 1998 College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology Lifetime Service award. Bill was president of the 1958 to 1960 California Fryer Festival in

Modesto, director of Far West Turkey Association, advisor for Ag Fresno and the Fresno Horse Trials, charter member of American Belgian Blue Beef Breed Association and American Hanoverian Association, plus a member of Clovis Rodeo Association, California Cattlemen’s Association, and American Quarter Horse Association. Bill was 1971 co-founder and President of the West Coast Western Wear Dealers and later a director of the successor national organization. Bill served the Fresno Zoo Society Board of Directors and the Elks Club by applying his horse show expertise for fundraising events. He belonged to the Episcopal Church of Fresno and the Christian Church of Vermillion, Kan. Bill’s word was his bond and his handshake better than a signed contract, claiming ‘if your word is not good, neither is your check’. He heard the ‘rattle of the chains and the clank of the armor’ when facing new

challenges raising polled Herefords, Belgian Blue cattle, quarter horses, and Hanoverian horses. He was the farmer of record on his grandfather’s homestead grain farm in Northeast Kansas through 2016. He loved to hunt, fish and backpack in the mountains. Bill passed peacefully at home in Morro Bay, surrounded by his children on March 4, 2017. He was preceded in death by his wife Sharon; his parents, George and Gloria Cutting; and his sister, Carolee. He is survived by his daughter Pamela; two sons, William, and Michael and wife Sarita; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A private Graveside remembrance was held on March 17. Memorial gifts may be directed to the Ag One William C. “Bill” and Sharon Cutting Scholarship Endowment, Ag One Foundation, California State University, Fresno, 2910 East Barstow Avenue, M/S OF115, Fresno, CA 93740-8009.

MONDAY, MAY 22 FEATURING LARGE RUNS OF QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS!

25525 LONE TREE RD. P.O. BOX 26 ESCALON, CA 95320 (209) 838-7011

ESCALONLIVESTOCKMARKET.COM ESCALONLIVESTOCKMARKET@YAHOO.COM

MIGUEL A. MACHADO, PRESIDENT (209) 595-2014

FIELD REPRESENTATIVES

JOE VIERA......................(209) 531-4156 THOMAS BERT ................(209) 605-3866 TONY LUIS .....................(209) 609-6455 CJ BRANTLEY ..................(209) 596-0139

STAY UP TO DATE BY FOLLOWING US ON FACEBOOK! May 2017 California Cattleman 57


Advertisers’ Index

Amador Angus............................................................................................ 50 American Hereford Association ��������������������������������������������������������������� 52 American Simmental Association ������������������������������������������������������������ 39 Anchor T Land, LLC................................................................................... 10 Andreini & Company................................................................................. 49 Bar R Angus................................................................................................. 50 Beef Solutions Bull Sale.............................................................................. 37 BMW Angus................................................................................................ 50 Bovine Elite, LLC......................................................................................... 55 Broken Arrow Angus.................................................................................. 50 Broken Box Ranch....................................................................................... 54 Bruin Ranch................................................................................................. 37 Buchanan Angus.......................................................................................... 50 Byrd Cattle Co.............................................................................................. 50 California Custom....................................................................................... 54 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc. ��������������������������������������������������������������� 54 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market ��������������������������������������������������������������������� 2 CattleVacBox................................................................................................ 18 Charron Ranch............................................................................................ 50 Chico State College of Agriculture ����������������������������������������������������������� 53 Circle Ranch................................................................................................. 37 Conlan Ranches California........................................................................ 54 Conlin Supply Company, Inc. ������������������������������������������������������������������� 45 Corsair Angus Ranch.................................................................................. 50 Dal Porto Livestock..................................................................................... 51 Diamond Back Ranch................................................................................. 54 Donati Ranch............................................................................................... 50 Dos Palos Y Auction Yard.......................................................................... 22 Eagle Pass Ranch......................................................................................... 29 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc......................................................................... 54 Escalon Livestock Market........................................................................... 57 Farmers Livestock Market.......................................................................... 28 Five Star Land Company............................................................................ 54 Fresno State Ag Foundation....................................................................... 53 Furtado Angus............................................................................................. 51 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ������������������������������������������������������������������ 55 Gherry Glen Beefmasters........................................................................... 52 Gonsalves Ranch...................................................................................17, 51 Greer Cattle.................................................................................................. 29 Harrell Herefords......................................................................................... 53 HAVE Angus................................................................................................ 51 Hone Ranch.................................................................................................. 52 Hufford’s Herefords..................................................................................... 53 Humboldt Auction Yard, Inc. ������������������������������������������������������������������� 18 International Brangus Breeders Assn ������������������������������������������������������ 43 J-H Feed, Inc................................................................................................ 55 J/V Angus..................................................................................................... 51

58 California Cattleman May 2017

Knipe Land Company................................................................................. 54 Lambert Ranch............................................................................................ 52 Lander Veterinary Clinic............................................................................ 55 Little Shasta Ranch...................................................................................... 53 Livestock Marketing Association ������������������������������������������������������������� 29 M3 Marketing.............................................................................................. 54 McPhee Red Angus..................................................................................... 53 Memory Ranches......................................................................................... 23 Modoc Auction Yard................................................................................... 28 Newman Srockyards................................................................................... 22 Noahs Angus Ranch.................................................................................... 51 Norbrook Animal Health........................................................................... 19 O’Connell Ranches...................................................................................... 51 ORIgen.........................................................................................................55 Orland Livestock Commission Yard �������������������������������������������������������� 28 Orvis Cattle Company................................................................................ 53 Pacific Trace Minerals................................................................................. 54 Pitchfork Cattle Co...................................................................................... 53 Producers Livestock Marketing Association, Madera............................22 Ray-May Ranches........................................................................................ 51 Sammis Ranch............................................................................................. 51 San Juan Ranch............................................................................................ 52 Scales Northwest.......................................................................................... 45 Schafer Ranch.............................................................................................. 51 Schohr Herefords......................................................................................... 53 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard ������������������������������������������������������������������ 15 Shaw Cattle Company................................................................................... 7 Sierra Ranches.............................................................................................. 53 Silveira Bros.................................................................................................. 52 Silveus Rangeland Insurance �������������������������������������������������������������������� 49 Skinner Livestock Transportation ������������������������������������������������������������ 54 Sonoma Mountain Herefords ������������������������������������������������������������������� 53 Southwest Fence & Supply Co., Inc ���������������������������������������������������������� 55 Spanish Ranch.............................................................................................. 52 Tehema Angus Ranch................................................................................. 52 Teixeira Cattle Co........................................................................................ 51 Tulare County Stockyard............................................................................ 22 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard ��������������������������������������������������������������� 11 Veterinary Service, Inc................................................................................ 54 VF Red Angus.............................................................................................. 54 Vintage Angus Ranch...........................................................................52, 60 Visalia Livestock Market............................................................................ 28 Western Fence and Construction, Inc. ���������������������������������������������������� 55 Western States Angus Association ����������������������������������������������������������� 41 Western Stockman’s Market....................................................................... 13 Western Video Market.................................................................................. 3 Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................................................ 51


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May 2017 California Cattleman 59


A special “Thank You” from

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH to our valued customer

DELL’ORTO RANCH

Knox, J.W., Anne, Waylon, Robin, Stan, Jackie, Lindsey, Mattley and Terese Dell’Orto

“Our cattle are raised on a very dynamic variety of feed conditions, spending winters in the rolling foothills of the Central Valley and summers following the feed on allotments in the Sierra Nevada mountains since the 1880s. We have found since including Vintage Angus genetics in our crossbred commercial cattle, we have increased weaning/yearling weights in the fall and the maternal traits are really starting to show in the cows. We first attended the Vintage Angus sale to purchase bulls for our registered Angus cattle and immediately knew we were going to use them in our commercial operation as well. Now we look forward to selling our calves to repeat buyers and attending the Vintage Angus sale every September.”

24th Annual

“Carcass Maker” Bull Sale Thursday, Sept.7, 2017 LaGrange , CA

60 California Cattleman May 2017

– Stan & Robin Dell ‘Orto

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

May 2017 California Cattleman  
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