Page 1

What’s Inside... simmental & Brangus genetics Growth of the U.S. Cow herd Cattle Feeders’ annual meeting May 2016 California Cattleman 1


call to consIGn your cattle to these uPcoMInG Western vIDeo Market sales: May 26 • June 9 • July 11-13

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may 11 • June 1 • June 22 Visit Us Online

For upcoming special sales and market reports, visit www.clmgalt.com (209) 745-1515 office (209) 745-1582 Fax

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Representatives

Jake Parnell ........ (916) 662-1298 GeorGe GookIn ..... (209) 482-1648 Mark FIscher ....... (209) 768-6522 rex WhIttle.......... (209) 996-6994

Joe Gates .............. (707) 694-3063 abel JIMenez ........ (209) 401-2515 Jason DaIley ........ (916) 439-7761

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SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: MAY 18

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Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy. bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

May 2016 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Words Matter When Discussing Antibiotic Use by CCA Feeder Council Chairman Mike Smith For a number of years there’s been a coordinated effort on the part of consumer activists to limit the use of antibiotics in food animal production. These groups have taken a two-prong approach to accomplish their goals. One avenue is through regulatory oversight, and as a result, livestock producers will soon be challenged with new rules under the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA)Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD), which becomes effective Jan. 1, 2017. The VFD will require veterinary oversight of antibiotics administered via feed or water. Here in California, there is an additional level of regulatory burden through SB-27 that becomes law in 2018. The state rule will require similar veterinary oversight through a valid Veterinary-Client-Patient-Relationship (VCPR) and will discontinue the ability to purchase all “medically-important” antibiotics over-thecounter without a prescription. While adding additional burdens to the livestock industry, these actions at both the federal and state level are actually workable. The other manner by which activists are forcing their will on the livestock community is through pressure applied to those who sell products directly to the consuming public. Through public relations campaigns, large and well-known food establishments (fast food and fast casual) are being forced into making the decision to source meat products marketed as “antibiotic free” (ABF) or those produced without the use of antibiotics. This later tactic is having the greatest impact on the livestock industry’s continued use of antibiotics. Unfortunately, many of these food companies have not given serious consideration to the food cost and/or supply-chain ramifications associated with their decisions. The phrase “antibiotic free” is actually a serious mischaracterization as ALL meat proteins (regard of species) must be free of violative levels of antibiotics…PERIOD. It is against federal law to sell meat into commerce that contains antibiotics. Moreover, this term does the entire food animal industry a disservice, as it suggests ALL meat products that are not labeled ABF must – by default – contain antibiotics …

which they cannot! The other term that needs to be used carefully when discussing antibiotics is “medically important.” These are antibiotics commonly used in human medicine, and as such, come under enhanced scrutiny. It’s important to use this term because there are compounds commonly used in the feedlot industry (ionophores) that are technically antibiotics. These compounds (ex. Rumensin) are generally added to feedlot rations, or in some cases pasture mineral mixes, to prevent/treat Coccidiosis. Additionally, these feed additives improve feed efficiency by changing the micro-flora of the rumen. However, these compounds are NOT used in human medicine, and in fact, the FDA does not identify them as being of concern. The livestock industry can ill-afford to allow consumer activist groups to severely restrict our use of antibiotics as they are necessary to maintain the health and well-being of animals in our care. Limiting or denying these lifesaving products for use in food animals would be inhumane. Just like children that become sick and need medical attention, antibiotics are needed to treat sick or injured livestock in order to make them well again. To do otherwise would only result in unnecessary pain, discomfort and possible death for the animals in our care. It is imperative we communicate to the public that antibiotics are used judiciously under the direction of veterinarians and that withdrawal times, the interval between when the antibiotic is administered and the time the animal is slaughtered, are strictly followed to ensure no antibiotics are present in the meat generated from the animal. Only antibiotics approved for use in beef cattle by the FDA are used, and decades of research show these products to be safe. The continued use of antibiotics to prevent, control and treat injured or sick animals is a moral imperative to ensure the health and wellbeing of cattle in our care, and to enable those in animal agriculture to meet customers’ desire for both proper animal husbandry and food safety.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917

4 California Cattleman May 2016

Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

MAY 2016

Volume 99, Issue 5

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE Supporting our supporters

8

This month’s cover photo, taken by CCA member Cain Madrigal, at Snyder Livestock Company, Inc., in Yerington, Nev. Snyder Livestock’s 5,000head capacity facility is managed by Lucy Rechel. In fall and winter, Snyder backgrounds light calves. The small feedlot is an ideal place to get calves acclimated to feedlot life before they transition to the larger finishing feedlots. Snyders also develops and collects data on heifer in addition to artificially inseminating heifers at the owner’s request. Bull development is also a key component of Snyder’s feedlot operation. Many California and Nevada seedstock producers trust Lucy to develop their bulls from weaner calves to yearlings or long yearlings ready to be sold to commercial cattlemen.

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 12 CCA works to preserve grazing at Point Reyes PROGESSIVE PRODUCER Combining new ideas and old traditions

24

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD A glance at China’s beef import forecast

34

FUTURE FOCUS Young Cattlemen on the Capitol event

36

CHIMES 48 CattleWomen learn from state agriculture leaders

SPECIAL FEATURES

CCA members recognized for stewardship What attendees learned from 2016 Summit California bid-callers competing at WLAC Why consider Simmental genetics? What Brangus cows are capable of 2016 Feeder Meeting on horizon U.S. herd expansion underway

READER SERVICES

UPCOMING EVENTS MAY 26 & 27

CCA FEEDER COUNCIL’S ANNUAL FEEDER MEETING San Diego

JUNE 22

CCA LEGISLATIVE STEAK & EGGS BREAKFAST Sacramento

26 28 34 38 44 50 52

2015 CCA Livestock Market Directory 30 Buyers’ Guide 54 Obituaries & New Arrivals 60 Advertisers Index 62

JUNE 22 TO 24 CCA & CCW ANNUAL MIDYEAR MEETING Sacramento DEC. 1 TO 3

100-YEAR CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

May 2016 California Cattleman 5


Third Annual

SHAW FEMALE SALE New Date!

Saturday, June 4th

12 noon MDT • At the Ranch • Caldwell, Idaho

TheLadies

Selling

BEHIND

TheBull BusinessBrand Real World, Functional Females Built By Cow Families

236 Head Sell as 135 Female Lots

69 HEREFORD LOTS | 52 ANGUS LOTS | 14 RED ANGUS LOTS Spring Heifer Calf Pairs, Fall ET Heifer Calves, Fall Heifer Calf Splits, Fall Bred Heifers…All fall calvers are confirmed with heifer calf pregnancies!

SHAW LADY FINAL PRODUCT 4164

S: Connealy Final Product | MGS: L T Bandwagon 3105 Bred AI to Connealy Black Granite. Her January heifer calf by Mohnen Substantial 272 sells at side.

SHAW LADY FINAL PRODUCT 3039

S: Connealy Final Product | MGS: G A R Evas Exceptional Bred AI to Connealy Black Granite. Has a January heifer calf at side by Basin Payweight 1682.

SHAW LADY DIMENSION 20051

S: Sitz Dimension 8607 | MGS: Connealy Thunder Dam of 5389 heifer calf, pictured opposite. Bred AI 12/17/15 to Connealy Black Granite; ultrasounded safe with a heifer calf.

Room reservations: Best Western Plus, (208) 454-7225 or (800) 454-3522. Several major airlines service the Boise Municipal Airport, just 30 minutes east of the sale facility.

Catalog mailed with the Hereford World and on request. Contact the owners or the sale manager to request your copy. Also available for online viewing at: shawcattle.com mcsauction.com

SHAW CATTLE CO. 22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 www.shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

Since 1946 Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

6 California Cattleman May 2016

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

&

SALE MANAGEMENT

incorporated

Matt Sims Cell/Text (405) 641-6081 matt@mcsauction.com www.mcsauction.com


/S Lady ON TaRGET 4078B

S: hyalite On Target 936 | MGS: Pw Victor Boomer P606 Feature two-year-old with a January heifer calf at side by SHF York 19H Y02. Sells bred to /S Wonder 44753 ET.

/S Lady PEERLESS 4007B

S: /S Peerless 1571y | MGS: UPS domino 3027 The two-year-olds with spring calves at side are phenomenal! Bred to Hyalite On Target 936 and has a February heifer by York.

Shaw Lady CONSENSUS 4412

S: Connealy Consensus 7229 | MGS: Shaw New day 5572 8/30/14 heifer bred AI 11/23/15 to KG Solution 0018. Ultrasounded safe with a heifer calf.

/S dIXIE Lady CONQUEST 215Z

S: hXC Conquest 4405P | MGS: hXC Jackhammer 8800U This four-year-old Red Angus has a March heifer calf at side by /S Conquest 33049A and will sell bred to Brown JYJ Redemption.

Shaw Lady FINaL PROdUCT 4190

S: Connealy Final Product | MGS: Boyd New day 8005 Dam is a maternal sister to Sitz New Design 458N “Bull Durham.” 4190 sells bred AI to Connealy Black Granite. Her January heifer calf by Mohnen Substantial 272 sells at side.

/S Lady JET 4155B

S: ShF wonder M326 w18 ET | MGS: Schu-Lar Proficient N093 Bred AI to Hyalite On Target 936 and has a February heifer calf at side by EFBeef TFL U208 Tested X651 ET.

Shaw Lady CaPITaLIST 4460

S: Connealy Capitalist 028 | MGS: Sitz dimension 8607 9/4/14 heifer bred AI 12/15/15 to KG Solution 0018. Ultrasounded safe with a heifer calf.

/S dIXIE Lady BOONE 2320Z

S: /S Boone 7830 | MGS: Neo-Sho Paradox K040 Four-year-old Red Angus sells bed to KCC Pinnacle 949-109 and has a March heifer calf at side by /S Conquest 33049A.

/S Lady wONdER 4396B

S: ShF wonder M326 w18 ET | MGS: JET Mr G905 Selling 17 head of fall-calving Hereford heifers, all safe with heifer calves. 4396 sells bred AI 11/23/15 to /S Redbull 44676 ET.

Shaw Lady PaywEIGhT 5389

S: Basin Payweight 1682 | MGS: Sitz dimension 8607 8/31/15 open heifer. Her three-year-old dam, 20051, is pictured opposite and also sells June 4th.

/S Lady wONdER 5428C ET

S: ShF wonder M326 w18 ET | MGS: STaR Boomer 63L Selling this top 9/5/15 show and donor prospect from the Josi cow family along with her maternal sister by Hometown 10Y.

May 2016 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE Giving Credit Where It’s Due Recognizing CCA’s Allied Industry Members by CCA Director of Finance Lisa Pherigo April marked my five-year anniversary with the . California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), and time sure does fly when you are doing something you truly enjoy. Speaking of time flying, I can’t believe that we are already past the halfway point for our 2015-2016 fiscal year. This year our membership numbers are staying fairly consistent; CCA’s total membership remains just over 2,440. Producers make up a majority of that total at 1,738 members, followed by 425 associate members, 252 young members and 35 Feeder Council members. CCA is optimistic about the retention rate of our membership base, but as day-to-day business costs continue to climb and the political landscape becomes more complex, more revenue is needed to successfully influence policy and uphold a strong voice for the California cattle industry. CCA’s long-term success depends on one solution – we need more members. More members will increase dues revenue, strengthen our presence within the industry and allow us to better fight back against regulatory and legislative attacks on your rights and property. Staff will continue on a daily, weekly and monthly basis with recruitment efforts to increase our member totals, but I would like to ask all CCA members to contact a neighbor or members of your local association and encourage them to join CCA. While increasing revenue through membership dollars is key to CCA’s success, CCA also seeks to stretch every dollar that we receive here in Sacramento. One way that we are able to do this is in partnerships with groups like the Allied Industry Council, which is made up of individuals or businesses that offer goods and services that are directly related to the production of beef cattle, such as pharmaceutical, identification, supplement and feed companies, banks, sale yards and veterinarians. There are also many other professionals whose livelihoods rely on beef producers and are members of this group. In addition to overseeing membership and financial issues for CCA, serving as a staff liasion between this group and the association is one of my duties as CCA staff. The Allied Industry Council’s mission is to assist CCA in promoting the economic and general well-being of the state’s cattle producers, but the Council’s members have their irons in many other fires, as well. The Allied Industry Council fundraises so they can sponsor and give back to the cattle ranching community, joining ranching in tackling the many issues we face every day. 8 California Cattleman May 2016

Currently there are over 40 members of the Council, and many have been longstanding members since the Allied Industry Council was formed in the early 1980s. As part of their membership, the LISA PHERIGO Allied Industry Council pays CCA dues which are critical to the continued success of the association as a whole. As a special type of associate member, Allied members contribute substantially to the growth and sustainability of CCA. But not only do their dues help with general operating expenses, the Allied Industry Council has been, and continues to be, especially generous in their sponsorship of CCA events. As many of our members have noticed over the years, Allied Industry Council members sponsor and help fund some of CCA’s biggest and most important events. The support from these members is absolutely critical to the success of CCA’s events. Allied members and other association sponsors support functions such as the upcoming Feeder Council Meeting, May 25-27 at the Marriott Marquis, San Diego Marina; our 38th Annual CCA Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast, June 22 at The Sutter Club, Sacramento; CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting, June 22-24, at the Lions Gate Hotel & Conference Center, Sacramento; and our 100 Year CCA & CCW Convention and Trade Show set for December 1-3, 2016 at the Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev. We are extremely fortunate to have such a strong partnership with these companies and their employees. Without the support from Allied members, CCA’s events and voice in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., would not be as strong. But just as Allied Industry Council businesses strengthen our producers, so too can our producer members benefit the Allied Industry Council and the success of CCA as a whole. I encourage you to continue to support these hardworking folks who continue to give back to our organization and our industry. If you have any questions, or are interested in becoming a member of the Allied Industry Council, please contact me in the CAA office at (916) 444-0845 or at lisa@ calcattlemen.org.


Kendal Frazier tapped to Lead cattlemen as CEO of NCBA National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Tracy Brunner announced March 22 that Kendal Frazier has been selected as NCBA’s chief executive officer. “It was the belief of the officers and others involved with the search process that NCBA owed it to our members, our stakeholders and the beef community to take our time as we selected the right individual to serve as the next chief executive officer,” said Brunner. “Today, we can say with confidence that Kendal Frazier is the right leader for the association. With many years of experience working for state and national beef organizations, he has helped to guide our industry through some of its greatest challenges. “Kendal’s dedication to NCBA and his leadership abilities have been tested and proven while serving as interim CEO since June 2015. During that time, NCBA has not wavered from its responsibility to its members and affiliates as a grassroots policy organization. Likewise, NCBA has continued its partnership with state beef councils to protect and increase beef demand.” “My priorities as CEO will be working with NCBA’s stakeholders and other organizations to vigorously oppose the continued assault by the government on private property rights; work to expand and open markets around the world for U.S. beef; increase trust in U.S. beef production and ensure consumers fully understand the importance of beef ’s role in their diets,” said Frazier. “By focusing on these key areas, we ensure there is a prosperous future for the next generation of cattlemen and women. “It has been my privilege to serve our industry. I have spent my career working with and for beef producers, so I am well versed in the many challenges and exciting opportunities that face our industry. I’m looking forward to working with NCBA’s leadership, membership, staff, state affiliates, state beef councils and other

stakeholders.” Frazier was raised on a diversified cattle and grain operation in southcentral Kansas. He is a graduate of Kansas State University and began his career as a farm broadcaster for WIBW Radio/Television before joining the staff at Kansas Livestock Association as director of communications. He joined the staff of the National Cattlemen’s Association in 1985 and has held several staff leadership roles during his

career with the association. “As CEO, I will continue to focus on working to ensure we are implementing NCBA’s contributions to the Industry Long Range Plan,” said Frazier. “We will also ensure that we are delivering on NCBA’s memberdirected policy priorities and executing NCBA’s Strategic Plan. These documents are the roadmap for NCBA and by delivering on their promises, we will ensure success for NCBA, our members and our industry.”

As individuals and companies who benefit from the sale of products and services that ranchers need, the CCA Allied Industry Council is a group striving to give back to the industry that provides their livelihoods. Through scholarship funds and program sponsorship, the Allied Industry Council is continually giving back to the beef industry. CCA has listed below the companies which are currently represented on the Allied Industry Council.

Agrilabs Allflex USA Andreini & Co Bacchi Ranch Bar Ale Feed Co. Bayer Animal Health Cargill Beef CKP Insurance Diamond V Easton Ag Consulting Farmers Livestock Market, Inc. Global Animal Products, Inc. Golden State Farm Credit Hearst Corporation Immucell ImmVac Inc. Jensen Precast Kirby Manufacturing Inc. Kovac Ranch Equipment Kunafin Laird Mfg LLC Lander Vet Clinic-ET Merck Animal Health

Merial Microbeef Technologies Monsanto MSBiotec MultiMin USA Inc New Generation Feed Newport Labs Nunes Farms Ridley Block Operations Sierra View Animal Health Slash C Ranch Stanislaus Farm Supply Trailhead Designs & Marketing Umpqua Bank Veterinary Services, Inc. Western Video Market, Inc. Westway Feed Products WSR Insurance Yosemite Farm Credit Zinpro Corporation Zinpro Corporation Zoetis

For more information on the Allied Industry Council, or to join, contact Lisa Pherigo at (916) 444-0845 or by-mail at lisa@calcattlemen.org. May 2016 California Cattleman 9


10 California Cattleman May 2016


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center JOIN US FOR THE 2016 CONTRA COSTA, ALAMEDA, SAN JOAQUIN, STANISLAUS COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATIONS’ SPECIAL SHOWCASE FEEDER SALES FEATURING NHTC, NATURAL, AND AGE & SOURCE PROGRAM CATTLE. NO MATTER WHAT PROGRAM YOU ARE ON, WE WILL PROMOTE YOUR CATTLE!

BRUNCH AT 9 A.M. • SALE AT 10 A.M.

SAT., MAY 14 • SAT., JUNE 4 • SAT., JUNE 25

SELLING SOME OF THE FINEST CALVES AND YEARLINGS FROM THESE COUNTY ASSOCIATIONS: Merced-Mariposa, Santa Clara, Napa-Solano, Madera, Calaveras, Tuolumne, Fresno-Kings, San Benito and Tahoe.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6 10 ANNUAL CALIFORNIA CATTLE PRODUCERS’ FALL-CALVING FEMALE SALE TH

FEATURING 1,000 HEIFERS AND COWS!

CALL US TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONSIGNING CATTLE TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES!

JOIN US IN COTTONWOOD MAY 5, MAY 26, & JUNE 9!

FROM THE SIERRAS TO THE SEA, OUR TEAM IS ALWAYS HERE TO ASSIST YOU IN MEETING YOUR BUYING AND SELLING NEEDS! TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA................................ 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA ................................ 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES............................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI .............................. 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .................................... 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ..................................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA......................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ................. 209 262-4019 TIM SISIL ...................................... 209 631-6054

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE:

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May 2016 California Cattleman 11


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS SUE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE OVER GRAZING AT POINT REYES by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur On Feb. 10, the Resource Renewal Institute, the Center for Biological Diversity and Western Watersheds Project sued the National Park Service (NPS), alleging that grazing authorizations at the Point Reyes National Seashore violate federal law. The Seashore, located in Marin County, has a considerable history and tradition of beef and dairy ranching long pre-dating the establishment of the National Seashore. Though the 1962 legislation creating the Point Reyes National Seashore contained provisions safeguarding continued ranching at the Seashore, agricultural practices at Point Reyes have regularly come under fire. For instance, in 2012, the NPS and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar elected not to renew the permit of Drake’s Bay Oyster Company, which had operated since 1972 under a 40-year lease. Though some feared that this would be the beginning of the end for agriculture at the Seashore, Salazar reaffirmed the federal government’s intent to retain historic ranching activities at the Seashore, and issued a memo directing the NPS “to pursue extending permits to the ranchers within [the] pastoral lands up to 20-year terms.” In May of 2014, the NPS undertook Salazar’s charge by initiating a “Ranch Comprehensive Management Plan” (RMP) to address various issues impacting historic ranching at the National Seashore. Among the primary purposes of the RMP was to establish consistent grazing permits with twenty-year terms. Those long-term grazing permits are under direct attack in Resource Renewal Institute v. National Park Service,

12 California Cattleman May 2016

however, as the plaintiffs have alleged that the RMP process cannot proceed until NPS first completely revises its 1980 General Management Plan for the National Seashore. The lawsuit also claims that ranching authorizations issued in the past six years have violated the National Environmental Procedures Act (NEPA) and the Administrative Procedures Act, and that these leases must be set aside pending full NEPA analysis. Finally, the lawsuit alleges that ranching at Point Reyes National Seashore has degraded the environment, violating the National Park Service Act and the Point Reyes Act, which seek to protect the “natural values” of the Seashore. Those claims of environmental degradation at the Seashore are at odds with reality, however. As Marin County Agricultural Commissioner Stacy Carlsen stated at a recent Marin County Board of Supervisors meeting, many of the Point Reyes ranches are certified organic, and all are “sustainable beyond reproach.” Point Reyes’ ranchers also provide habitat for at least eight endangered species at the Seashore, and according to David Lewis of the University of California Cooperative Extension for Marin County, the Seashore ranchers are all in compliance with water quality standards set by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board. The responsible stewardship of the Point Reyes ranching community has garnered the group significant community support. Moderate Marin County ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


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stockeR & FEEDER Specials mondays IN MAY, JUNE & juLY calf special every monday in june & july

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DWIGHT MEBANE ...................................... 661 979-9892 JUSTIN MEBANE .........................................661 979-9894 Frank Machado .....................................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane.......................................661 201-8169 Office ................................................................661 399-2981 May 2016 California Cattleman 13


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 environmental groups have come to the ranchers’ defense, and Congressman Jared Huffman—a former attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council whose Congressional district includes Point Reyes National Seashore—is a vocal supporter of Seashore ranching. Marin County has also come to the defense of the ranchers. On April 5, the Marin County Board of Supervisors voted to seek intervention into the lawsuit as defendant-intervenors, siding with the NPS to protect ranching at Point Reyes. The county cited economic interests as its primary rationale for intervention: Point Reyes’ agricultural output amounts to roughly $22 million annually, or roughly 20 percent of Marin County’s overall agricultural output, and Point Reyes ranches contribute significantly to both onfarm employment and demand for off-farm jobs to service the Seashore. Additionally, County Counsel noted that federal law requires federal agencies such as the NPS to comply with state and local coastal plans. Thus, any change in ranching policy sought by NPS as a result of the lawsuit would have to comply with the Marin County Local Coastal Program, which explicitly provides for continued ranching at Point Reyes National Seashore. While ranchers themselves have not been named in the lawsuit, the case clearly implicates the rights and interests of the ranchers at Point Reyes National Seashore. The ranchers have been closely tracking the litigation, and are considering how best to engage to protect their livelihoods. The lawsuit is in its earliest stages—while the environmental groups have filed their complaint, the NPS has not yet filed its answer, and civil litigation typically progresses slowly—which provides the ranchers at Point Reyes some time to carefully consider how best to proceed. CCA continues to advise the Point Reyes ranchers, and has been in regular contact with the Public Lands Council and other industry allies, our litigation partners, Congressman Huffman, and the Marin County Board of Supervisors to coordinate a unified response to this litigation, which poses a direct threat to continued ranching at Point Reyes and which could reverberate to other federal lands. For any comments or questions about the litigation at Point Reyes, please contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.

14 California Cattleman May 2016

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Cottonwood, California The Spring Run Is On! May 6

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15


TEHAMA COUNTY HOLDS SPRING FIELD DAY March 19 and 20 marked the second year of the Tehama County Cattlemen's Association (TCCA) holding their annual Spring Field Day at the Rolling Hills Casino in Corning. Prior to the last two years the annual field day has been a one day event held at various ranches throughout the county. Availability of cattle and various other factors prompted the field day committee to attempt a new experimental format for the last two years. The new location is easily accessed off I-5, and has excellent facilities that allow an expansion from a half day of cattle events to a full day of cattle events including a stock dog contest, working cow horse, sorting, and three man team branding. In addition, a second day was added that includes a morning clay shooting followed by a golf tournament.

Events kicked off on Saturday, March 19, with a stock dog trial, won by Danny Oilar and his dog "Jake." This was followed by the working cow horse won by Missy Boozenny and horse "Chilli." The subsequent three-man ranch sorting won by Justin Davis, Roy Owens and Justin Niesen. The final event was a three person calf branding with winners of KC Abrey, Roy Owens and Wyatt Williams. Buckles and cash prizes were given to all event winners. Vic Woolery finished the evening off with a beautiful New York Steak dinner. Sunday’s events started with sporting clay shoot at the Clear Creek Sports Club. After the clay shoot the 18 holes of golf tournament began at Sevillano Links Golf Course. TCCA thanks their sponsors for making the events possible.

2016 TCCA SPRING FIELD DAY SPONSORS Alson Inc. Lockwood Seed and Grain/A.L. Gilbert Wootens Bee Farms Nutrena Shasta Farm & Equipment Inc. Furtado Ag Construction Bar Ale Feed Norcal Structures Inc. Crystal Amen Photography Doug Lamalfa Shasta Livestock Auction Yard Animal Health International Tehama Angus Ranch Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health Zoetis Animal Health Orland Livestock Commission Yard Inc. Golden State Farm Credit Multimin USA The Copy Center The Screen Machine Cottonwood Large Animal Clinic Radient Reds Cottonwood Small Animal Clinic Mid-Valley Veterinary Hospital Crain Ranch Dawson Sales Bucke’s Feed & Grain Harman Ranch Linnets Tire Rick Nye Insurance

ANADA 200-495, Approved by FDA

® Enroflox 100 (enrofloxacin) 100 mg/mL Antimicrobial Injectable Solution

For Subcutaneous Use in Beef Cattle, Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle and Swine Only. Not for Use in Female Dairy Cattle 20 Months of Age or Older Or In Calves To Be Processed For Veal. Brief Summary: Before using Enroflox® 100, consult the product insert, a summary of which follows. CAUTION: Federal (U.S.A.) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal (U.S.A.) law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: Each mL of Enroflox 100 contains 100 mg of enrofloxacin. Excipients are L-arginine base 200 mg, n-butyl alcohol 30 mg, benzyl alcohol (as a preservative) 20 mg and water for injection q.s. INDICATIONS: Cattle - Single-Dose Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle; and for the control of BRD in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M. haemolytica, P. multocida, H. somni and M. bovis. Cattle - Multiple-Day Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. Swine: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment and control of swine respiratory disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis and Streptococcus suis. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Cattle: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Swine: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 5 days of receiving a single-injection dose. HUMAN WARNINGS: For use in animals only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes. In case of dermal contact, wash skin with soap and water. Consult a physician if irritation persists following ocular or dermal exposures. Individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to quinolones should avoid this product. In humans, there is a risk of user photosensitization within a few hours after excessive exposure to quinolones. If excessive accidental exposure occurs, avoid direct sunlight. For customer service, to obtain a copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) or to report adverse reactions, call Norbrook at 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: The effects of enrofloxacin on cattle or swine reproductive performance, pregnancy and lactation have not been adequately determined. The long-term effects on articular joint cartilage have not been determined in pigs above market weight. Subcutaneous injection can cause a transient local tissue reaction that may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Enroflox 100 contains different excipients than other enrofloxacin products. The safety and efficacy of this formulation in species other than cattle and swine have not been determined. Quinolone-class drugs should be used with caution in animals with known or suspected Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. In such animals, quinolones have, in rare instances, been associated with CNS stimulation which may lead to convulsive seizures. Quinolone-class drugs have been shown to produce erosions of cartilage of weight-bearing joints and other signs of arthropathy in immature animals of various species. See Animal Safety section for additional information. ADVERSE REACTIONS: No adverse reactions were observed during clinical trials. ANIMAL SAFETY: In cattle safety studies, clinical signs of depression, incoordination and muscle fasciculation were observed in calves when doses of 15 or 25 mg/kg were administered for 10 to 15 days. Clinical signs of depression, inappetance and incoordination were observed when a dose of 50 mg/kg was administered for 3 days. An injection site study conducted in feeder calves demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue and underlying muscle. In swine safety studies, incidental lameness of short duration was observed in all groups, including the saline-treated controls. Musculoskeletal stiffness was observed following the 15 and 25 mg/kg treatments with clinical signs appearing during the second week of treatment. Clinical signs of lameness improved after treatment ceased and most animals were clinically normal at necropsy. An injection site study conducted in pigs demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue.

©CRYSTAL AMEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Cowboys competing in the calf branding event at the 2016 TCCA Spring Field Day on March 19 in Corning. 16 California Cattleman May 2016

Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland I01 March 2015 The Norbrook logos and Enroflox® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


THE WAIT IS OVER ENROFLOX速 100 NOW APPROVED FOR SINGLE-DOSE BRD TREATMENT & CONTROL enrofloxacin

ENROFLOX 100 速

enrofloxacin

Single-Dose BRD Treatment & Control Same Active Ingredient & Dosing Regimen as Baytril速 100 in Beef & Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. Cattle intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Use with caution in animals with known or suspected CNS disorders. Observe label directions and withdrawal times. See product labeling for full product information.

www.norbrookinc.com FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY The Norbrook logos are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited Enroflox is a registered trademark of Norbrook Laboratories Limited Baytril is a registered trademark of Bayer Animal Health

0815-495-I01B

May 2016 California Cattleman 17


Cindy’s passion for the cattle industry developed at an early age when she spent time with her dad who was an order buyer and helped him ship cattle. She owned her first cow when she was three. The various colors of ear tags in the pasture would distinguish between her sibling’s cattle and hers. She is a third generation rancher who developed a love for the industry through the lifestyle. Currently, Cindy serves as the FresnoKings County Cattlemen’s Association president, an alternate on the California Beef Council, and sits on the membership services committee for Livestock Marketing Association.

Question: What does being involved in the beef community mean to you? Answer: I love to be a spokesperson for something that is my livelihood and my way of life. I enjoy talking to everyone and will strike up a conversation in an airport, on an elevator or at the coffee shop. I have the unique opportunity during my busy times to speak to 100 customers each week that come to my counter at the market. I have a passion for the land, for the livestock and our customers. My favorite times of the year are calving and shipping. This industry is all about the interactions, seeing a finished product as a cowcalf producer and for me, it all starts by going to bull sales with my dad. It’s a family connection, a land connection and a livestock connection. Question: What’s your day job? Answer: I’m fortunate to wear a couple of different hats in my line of work. I’m lucky to be partners with my dad, Col. Phil Tews, and together with my sister Wendy Kenison, we own and operate Fresno Livestock Commission, LLC. We also run a commercial Angus cow-calf and stocker operation. It also seems like attending meetings have become a part of my job. It is important to be present at the table during discussion and problem solving. Question: Why do you ranch? Answer: There’s nothing like the feeling of riding through cows and calves horseback. There just isn’t. This year it’s been a lot better than the past couple of years, but we push through the tough times because it’s what we love. I always wonder in certain situations whose steps have been here before mine. I really appreciate the cow trails that were laid before me because each day on our ranches we continue in those footsteps and make our own history.

18 California Cattleman May 2016

FEATURING CCA EXECUTIVE MEMBER APPOINTEE AT LARGE CINDY TEWS BEEFNMORE@AOL.COM | (559) 970-6892 Question: Why are you serving on the CCA Executive Committee? Answer:I want to give back to my industry. I want to lend my time, energy and voice to something I believe strongly in. I have worked alongside my father for years and am responsible for many customer interactions. As partners, women are involved in seed stock selection, financial decisions, stocking ratios and marketing avenues. I strive to be a positive roll model to others. There are many roles to play in the beef industry, and opportunities like serving in leadership positions allow us to do our part. Question: What issues matter most to you in the beef industry? Answer: Improving the quality of our product while using the resources responsibly matters the most to me in the beef industry. Question: Why should someone join CCA? Answer: CCA is our voice for ranching in California. There are great people in place telling our story, in ways that it needs to be told. Our effectiveness in the greater scheme of things only grows when organizations like CCA and members like us work together for the industry.


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Featuring 60 Lots of the Best the West has to Offer

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sale helps benefit the 2017 national angus futurity in reno Watch & Bid Live

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May 2016 California Cattleman 19


Madera, California Join us for these

Off-the-Grass Special Sales MONDAY, MAY 2 • 1 P.M. MONDAY,JUNE 6 • 1 P.M. Featuring quality stocker and feeder cattle from reputable Central Valley ranches!

SALE EVERY FRIDAY AT 11 A.M.

Butcher cattle followed by pairs/bred cows, stockers and feeders.

(559) 674-4674 WWW.PRODUCERSLIVESTOCK.COM

COL. MICHAEL IMBROGNO MANGAGER JACKIE SILVA 559-363-7009 CLIFF ODOM 559-349-1286

2011 E. Stuhr Rd • Newman, CA

BEEF SALE • 3:30 P.M.

EVERY TUESDAY & THURSDAY yearlings, calves, cull cows & bulls replacement females Call for details on upcoming special sales or to consign to the next Western Video Market sale. John McGill: (209) 631-0845 Office: (209) 862-4500 Fax: (209) 862-4700

1022 SOUTH PINE STREET • MADERA, CA

ESTABLISHED 1950

jon & summer dolieslager: 559.591.0884 www.tularecountystockyard.com

Beef Sales Every Friday in Dinuba upcoming special spring feeder sales: May 6, May 20 & June 3 @ 12:30 p.m.

Thurs., May 26 • June: Call for date WEEKLY SALE SCHEDULE

MONDAYS: DAIRY, FEEDERS, SLAUGHTER BULLS & COWS THURSDAYS: FEEDERS, SLAUGHTER BULLS & COWS

SALE INFORMATION

OFFICE ..................................................................209 387-4113 JOEL E. COZZI ......................................................209 769-4660 JOEL A. (JOEY) COZZI .........................................209 769-4662

FIELD REPRESENTATIVES

GARRETT JONES ............................................... 209-777-0817 DOUG GALLAWAY ................................................209 617-5435 MIKE VIEIRA..........................................................209 761-6267 BILL ENOS ............................................................209 761-1322 Visit us online at www.dpyauction.com

16575 S. HWY 33 • DOS PALOS, CA 93620 located 1/8 mile south of Hwy. 152 on Hwy 33

20 California Cattleman May 2016


ABS Global Celebrates 75 Years of Genetic Progress Many things across the cattle industry have evolved over the last 75 years, but one thing has remained constant—ABS® Global has been at the forefront of providing products and services to help its customers profit from genetic progress. Since 1941, ABS has been the world leader in developing first-class bovine genetics and providing the best cattle reproduction expertise in the industry. Formed as the American Dairy Guernsey Associates of Northing Illinois with just three Guernsey bulls, ABS has since built a diverse breed and genetic lineup and now serves dairy and beef producers in nearly 80 countries. Over the years, ABS has brought industry-changing genetic progress to its customers—including the global sensation, 29HO12209 PICSTON SHOTTLE, who was the number one Holstein bull in the world for seven straight sire summary releases, and 29AN1640 IN FOCUS—one of the all-time top Angus bulls in the industry for calving ease, growth, maternal value, and docility. One of ABS Global’s proudest moments is the introduction of frozen semen in 1953, followed by the development of the first storage container for frozen semen using liquid nitrogen. These major milestones completely transformed the way the animal genetics

industry operates—and are considered best practice even today. ABS also built intelligence behind the genetics offered to farmers by developing the Estimated Daughter Superiority measurement in 1963 and being the first-tomarket with a computerized mating program, Genetic Mating Service, in 1968. Innovation continues to be a driving force at ABS. Most recently, ABS made headlines by introducing TransitionRight™ genetics—a revolutionary index that helps customers prevent costly transition cow health issues. As ABS celebrates 75 years of serving some of the very best beef and dairy producers around the world, it is affirming its commitment to its customers by announcing a new tagline: Profit from Genetic Progress. “It is a very exciting time to be leading the ABS team. Not only are we celebrating a major milestone that most organizations never get to experience, we are also positioning ourselves to lead profit-focused genetic improvement for the dairy and beef industries,” said Saskia Korink, ABS Global Chief Operating Officer. “As we look to the future, our focus will be on providing the next generation of genetic solutions that will improve herd profitability—and everything we do will align with that customer promise.”

CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

SQUEEZE CHUTES HEAD GATES CATTLE WORKING SYSTEMS

Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products... 576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • May 2016 California Cattleman 21


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

IMPLEMENTING NEW IDEAS WHILE EMBRACING TRADITION from the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association Board of Directors In 1957, the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) was a producer driven organization created to further education. The goal of the organization from 57 years ago remains true today, as CBCIA supports beef cattle improvement and economic production. The organization serves at the educational arm of the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) with a commitment to extending knowledge and advancing beef cattle research. CBICA has honored California’s seedstock and commercial producers since 1972 who embrace genetic technology, scientific research and are involved in industry organizations along with their local communities. Currently, CBCIA is looking for producers and industry affiliates to nominate ranchers for the Commercial Producer of the Year that will be awarded at the 100th CCA convention this fall. Last year, CBCIA developed a new award, the Young Producer Award, that was presented at the 2015 California State Fair. The award recognized a state fair exhibitor who was exhibiting their bred and owned genetics at the fair. The award was based on an interview, stall walkthrough and herd book. Royce McPhee-Bayha of Lodi, was awarded first place receiving a cash award of $1,000 and second place ($500) went to Riley Gonsalves of Modesto. A total of nine contestants entered the contest last year and included: Aaron Kerlee (Hughson FFA), Dervin Murphy (Escalon FFA), Steven Pozzi (Petaluma FFA), Rose McPhee (Linden Peters 4-H), Elizabeth Vietheer (Elk Grove FFA), and Mackenzie Woods (Pleasant Grove FFA). “During the interview portion of the contest, we asked each contestant a series of questions pertaining to their background, current cattle management practices, future career and beef production goals and knowledge of current issues in the beef industry,” recalls judge Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., California State University, Chico. “All of the judges were very impressed by the caliber of applicants in this year’s contest and hope to have even more interest in the following

years.” Applicants, were tasked with completing a herd book, to showcase themselves, their breeding program and marketing strategy of their herd. Applicants were also required to develop a promotional flyer advertising one of their animals was exhibited at the fair. Other judges for the 2015 award were Greg Ahart, Superior Farms, Inc., Dixon; and Abbie Nelson, Five Star Land and Cattle, Wilton. The CBCIA Board felt this award was a great way for the organization to engage in the State Fair, and promote young cattlemen – the future of our industry. “I am excited that CBICA continues to find new ways to engage and educate producers, supporting the future of California livestock production,” said Cheryl Lafranchi, CBICA president, Calistoga “We are an organization created by producers, working for producers, to improve rancher profitability through education and research.” CBCIA will be celebrating their strong heritage at the “Summer Extravaganza” scheduled for Saturday, June 25, at UC Davis. The day long program will include educational seminars and workshops featuring Gary Sides, Ph.D., Beef and Feedlot Nutritionist, Zoetis and Andy Gottschalk, Ph.D.; with Hedgers Edgers. Also scheduled to present on the latest research are University of California Cooperative Extensions Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D.; Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D.; and Jim Oltjen, Ph.D. The event will conclude with honoring past recipients of the CBCIA Seedstock, Commercial and Horizon awards. For more details and to register visit www. calcattlemen.org. The CBCIA Board of Directors sincerely thanks all of you who continually support our efforts by participating in our event, supporting our fundraising, and paying your annual dues! We are looking forward to another great year in 2016 hosting educational workshops and supporting youth who are committed to improving California’s beef cattle industry.

The first place winner in CBCIA’s Inaugural Young Producer Award Program was Royce McPhee-Bayha, Lodi, who is shown here receiving his $1,000 cash prize from Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D. 22 California Cattleman May 2016

Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., awards $500 to young producer Riley Gonsalves, Modesto, for second place in CBCIA’s Young Producer Award


CBCIA NEWS YOU CAN USE

Thank you for your CBCIA membership and support of its programs. As the education arm of the California Cattlemen’s Association, CBCIA’s purpose is to help cattle producers become more efficient and productive. We do this with information, recognition and scholarships to students with a focus on promoting beef cattle production. The board is planning several activities of interest in for the future. On June 25, we will be hosting our Summer Extravaganza and in the summer of 2017 we invite you to join us on our tour of Northern California and Southern Oregon ranches. Educational Grants: CBCIA offers small grants to encourage and support educational events. In 2015 we extended $2,000 to events across the state. Eligibility is open to colleges, universities, youth organizations, University of California livestock and natural resources advisors and related organizations. To apply, submit a written proposal to a CBCIA director prior to a CBCIA board meeting that describes the event and includes the organization name, contact information and funds requested. There is a $250 limit for youth organizations and $500 for others. Young Producer Award: Recognizes a California State Fair beef exhibitor based upon their livestock

production records, breeding program and marketing plan. Last year we awarded $1,500 in cash prizes. The 2016 Young Producer Award is due on June 30, 2016. For more information visit http://www.calcattlemen. org/cca_affiliates/cbcia.aspx or email cbciaboard@ gmail.com. Hank Stone Memorial Scholarships: In 2014, the CBCIA Board of Directors voted to honor longtime CBICA supporter and past president, Hank Stone, by dedicating our annual scholarship in his memory. Last year, a total of $2,500 was awarded to two college student’s pursuing careers to improve the beef industry. Board Meetings: We encourage members and interested producers to attend our quarterly board meetings. The February and August meetings are held at the FFA Center in Galt. Our other meetings are held at the CCA Midyear Meeting and annual CCA & CCW Convention. For more information email cbciaboard@ gmail.com. Board of Directors: The CBCIA Board of Directors is a committed group of individuals who make things happen! Please let us know educational activities that CBCIA can offer to you and your fellow cattlemen and women.

2016 CBCIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Cheryl Lafranchi (President) Rita McPhee (Vice President) Carole Silveira (Secretary/Treasurer) Tim Curran Kacey DeAtley Jerry Maltby James Moller Carissa Koopmann Rivers Tracy Schohr Lana Trotter Ryan Nelson

May 2016 California Cattleman 23


GENERATIONS OF STEWARDSHIP California Ranching Family Honored with Excellence in Range Management Award by Jeffery Stackhouse, University of California Cooperative Extension Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor Humboldt/Del Norte In 1896, Thomas F. Hunter purchased the Lone Star Ranch. Shortly thereafter, the first registered Hereford bull entered Humboldt County via barge to join Hunter and his family on Lone Star Ranch. As a child, Mark Moore, Thomas F. Hunter’s great, great grandson, says his grandmother remembers driving three-year-old steers into Eureka to the boats to be shipped to San Francisco at the turn of the century, and although those 3-year-old steers are now yearlings, and boat transport shifted to trucks, the same principals apply today as the family continues the ranching tradition. The Lone Star Ranch, and the Moore Family, were recently recognized as the winner of the 2016 Society for Range Management’s Excellence in Range Management award. First successful at the regional level when the California-Pacific Section of the Society for Range Management recognized the Lone Star’s Excellence in Range Management in fall 2015; then again at the 69th Society for Range Management Annual Meeting in Texas this spring when the ranch was presented with the international award. “We are so incredibly humbled by this recognition and value the opportunities we have to work locally and to represent our colleagues at the national level,” said Dina Moore. Lone Star’s success in the Excellence in Range Management competition was largely based upon the positive impacts of the Moore family’s efforts in environmental stewardship, community support and

24 California Cattleman May 2016

inter-agency collaboration. For seven generations, the Moore family has demonstrated innovative environmental stewardship, providing collaborative leadership and blazing new trails for private landowners as they navigate the nation’s changing environmental climate. The Lone Star Ranch excels in conservation of California’s working forests and rangelands through social and economic stewardship that benefits water quality, wildlife resources and their community. As a multi-generational family, diversification and sustainability of the ranch enterprise are the utmost priority. Yet, all family members remain humbly dedicated to community involvement and provide astonishing levels of local, regional and national service. The ranch employs numerous business enterprises, including, but not limited to: sustainable beef grazing and timber harvest, goat grazing for vegetation management and a heavy equipment business to install restoration projects and improve roads. Sediment reduction in streams from road runoff is one of the greatest successes of the Lone Star Ranch and the Yagger/Van Duzen Environmental Stewards (YES), a landowner non-profit organization, that Dina Moore has been instrumental in founding and leading. On Lone Star for twelve decades, the family’s seventh generation is now learning the love of the land and community responsibility. Just a few strides ahead, the sixth generation is gaining ground as leaders within their community. Mark and Dina’s daughter Lauren Sizemore


is the current president of the Humboldt County Cattlewomen, a fulltime mom and recently took the job of executive director for a strong, local non-profit organization called The Buckeye. Teal Moore, the youngest of the three siblings, is making her own mark on Humboldt County where she is becoming increasingly involved with many organizations, including her new roles on the Humboldt County Cattlewomen and Humboldt/Del Norte Cattlemen Association’s boards. Lastly, Mark and Dina Moore’s dedication to the community have had astounding, positive impacts for many organizations at the local and national level including their involvement in and support of: Humboldt County Resource Conservation District Board, Northcoast Regional Land Trust Board, Kneeland School Board, Humboldt/Del Norte Cattlemen’s Association Board, Humboldt Cattlewomen’s Board, Humboldt County 4-H, Regional Water Quality Control Board, University of California President’s Advisory Commission on Ag and Natural Resources and Partners for Conservation, a national network of private landowners, led by ranchers, farmers and silviculturist, with a focus and a vision that public-private conservation efforts are key to sustaining working landscapes for wildlife, agricultural production and rural communities. “Mark and Dina’s level of effort and persistence

MARK AND DINA MOORE working on tough issues for their industries and community is worthy of winning the award itself,” said Yana Valachovic, County Director of UC Cooperative Extension in Humboldt/Del Norte Counties. From top to bottom, the Moore family personifies civic engagement, community involvement and promotion of the cow-calf production lifestyle. CCA applauds the Moore family for all they do for the beef industry and congratulates them on this great honor.

Cattlemen’s WEBINAR SERIES

INTERNATIONAL BEEF TRADE – AN UPDATE FOR CATTLEMEN REGISTER TODAY @ MAY 12, 2016 7PM CENTRAL WWW. BEEFUSA.ORG

Beef trade has long been an important component of the cattle industry and often a confusing topic for cattlemen. Trade issues have made recent headlines in ag media and in the popular press’ coverage of the current election season. The upcoming webinar will feature the insights of industry experts; Kent Bacus, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Director of International Trade and Market Access; and Dan Halstrom, U.S. Meat Export Federation Senior Vice President of Global Marketing. Join the free webinar to hear an update on the current state of beef trade, policy issues that are effecting beef trade today and what the experts see in the future for beef trade. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions immediately following the presentations. Visit beefusa.org for additional information and to register. May 2016 California Cattleman 25


OUTSIDE THE BOX Rangeland Summit Provides Insight for Land Managers from the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition The 2016 Rangeland Summit addressed challenges and opportunities to improve rangeland management aimed at reducing the incidence (scope and severity) of catastrophic wildfire. Two of the state’s most devastating wildfires occurred in the past year and yet the full impact of these fires to conservation interest and rancher sustainability is yet to be determined. The prospect of a normal rainfall year raised additional wildfire concern. Co-sponsored by California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (CRCC) and University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE), the January event brought together more than 300 individuals from various walks of life to learn more about the topic that they could apply on their own private or public rangelands and in their communities. Sixty participants toured fire sites where local experiences and lessons were shared and discussed - Butte Fire (Amador/ Calaveras County), Rim Fie (Tuolumne County) and Tesla Fire (Alameda). Summit speakers from UCCE, the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), Cal Fire, UC Berkeley and local ranchers each shared their expertise. High school Range Camp contest winners, Mary Marsh and Jane Wood also shared their personal experiences about rangeland management and wildfire. Each talk was individually videotaped and published on the UCCE website to expand the Summit’s reach. A presentation by CCA Vice President Government Affairs Justin Oldfield, A Beef Industry Perspective: Economic, Social & Range Management Impacts Caused by Wildfire was enlightening to the non-ranchers in the room. Other presentations covered fire and fuels and impacts of catastrophic fire on California’s rangelands and grazing management after wildfire: State of the Science. http://cestanislaus.ucanr.edu/Agriculture/Livestock_ and_Range_Management/2016_Rangeland_Summit/. Everyone had wildland fire and rangeland management in common, and they wanted information to use as the plan forward. Participation was very diverse by profession (29 percent ranchers, 13 percent public land managers, 22 percent ‘other,’ 19 percent organizations and 18 percent academic/ student). Nearly half of the participants, most likely agencies and consultants, impact or influence more than 10,000 acres. Participants were both first time (35 percent) and repeat attendees. Sixty-five percent of them had personal experience with rangeland wildfire, and half of those had it within five years. The Summit provided useful information that facilitated consensus among these diverse stakeholders on several items. • Livestock grazing is valuable as a management tool on

26 California Cattleman May 2016

pre-fire management to reduce wildfire severity. • Research is needed about connecting wildfire and rangelands, post-fire grazing, the values of different livestock species and about cattle behavior. Importantly, we need to utilize the available research. • Participants told us how they plan to utilize what they heard. Based on the pre-and post-presentations survey there was a change in attitude about management tools that favored better planning, collaboration and use of livestock grazing. Some of the written comments from attendees are outlined below and demonstrate the insight gained by those who participated. • “I will look at opportunities to reduce understory vegetation.” • “I need to work with neighbors and address agency barriers.” • “On my property: keep roads graded, open & mapped; have water trucks and tanks FULL; build more firebreaks.” • “Work closer with fire departments and other agencies, resource conservation districts at all levels for local planning. Be collegial and persistent. Consider how local ranchers can help. Know the logistics & position of wells, ponds, roads, driveways and the neighboring operators.” • “I will promote communication between different departments in my agency and expand grazing on our agency property as part of forest management program and bring in stakeholders to influence it.” • “Our agency could potentially act as a liaison between ranchers & agencies to help communicate needs and initiate coordinated planning and emergency responses.” Broader than the wildfire topic, non-ranchers increased their understanding about ranching. They better understand regulatory barriers in management decision-making, and the relationship of private land to public allotments, and ranching economics and viability. Non-ranchers shared these comments. • “We need economic and market solutions for ranching sustainability. It’s not profitable.” • “I learned the importance of public land allotments for ranching vitality.” • “I need to consider long term licenses on my agency’s land.” • “I learned to consider things from multiple perspectives, including the ranchers.” Perhaps the last statement best summed up what as learned by the land managers in attendance. That, after all is the purpose of the CRCC.


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2016 California Cattleman

Auction Market Directory FEATURING CALIFORNIA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARDS WHO HAVE ADVERTISED THEIR SERVICES IN THIS ISSUE

OFFICE........................................ (209) 745-1515 E-MAIL..................................... info@clmgalt.com WEBSITE.................................. www.clmgalt.com CONTACTS Frank “Butch” Loretz..............................President Jake Parnell, Manager................. (916) 662-1298 12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA 95632

CATTLE AUCTION............................ Wednesday MEMBERSHIPS........ .NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA OFFICE........................................ (209) 387-4133 FAX.............................................. (209) 387-4476 WEBSITE............................www.dpyauction.com

16575 S. Hwy 33, Dos Palos, CA 93620

ESCALON

Livestock Market, Inc.

CONTACTS Joel E. Cozzi............................... (209) 769-4660 Joel A. (Joey) Cozzi..................... (209) 769-4662 Col. Doug Gallaway..................... (209) 617-5435 Mike Vieira................................... (209) 617-5435 Bill Enos....................................... (209) 761-1322 OFFICE.........................................(209) 838-7011 FAX.............................................. (209) 838-1535 WEBSITE........www.escalonlivestockmarket.com E-MAIL.....escalonglivestockmarket@yahoo.com PRESIDENT Miguel A. Machado...................... (209) 595-2014

REPRESENTATIVES Joe Vieira..................................... (209) 531-4156 P.O. Box 26 25525 Lone Tree Rd, Escalon, CA 95320 Thomas Bert................................ (209) 605-3866 Tony Luis...................................... (209) 609-6455 Michael Machado......................... (209) 495-9208

FARMERS

LIVESTOCK MARKET

OFFICE.........................................(209) 847-1033 FAX...............................................(209) 847-4425 CONTACT Steve Haglund..............................(209) 847-1033

6001 Albers Road, Oakdale CA 95361 CATTLE AUCTION...........Monday and Thursday

HUMBOLDT AUCTION YARD, INC.

603 S. 3rd Street, Fortuna, CA 95540

OFFICE...........................................(707) 725-5188 FAX.................................................(707) 725-9822 E-MAIL......................humboldtauction@hotmail.com CONTACTS Col. Lee Mora.................................(707) 845-7188 Col. Lou Mora.................................(707) 845-7288 CATTLE AUCTION......................... Wednesday

28 California Cattleman May 2016

AUCTIONEERS...................... .Jake Parnell, Brian Pachaco, Mark Fischer, Matt Morebeck UPCOMING EVENTS CLM will feature large runs of calves and yearlings on May 21, June 11 as well as Wednesday May 11, June 1 and June 22. Visit www.clmgalt.com for an up-to-date list of upcoming events and market reports. CATTLE AUCTION..................Monday and Thursday MEMBERSHIPS............... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS.........Doug Gallaway and Garrett Jones UPCOMING EVENTS Holding special upcoming feeder sales Thursday, May 26 and in June on an undecided date. Join us for lunch prior to the May 26 sale.

Dudley Meyer..................................... (209) 768-8586 CATTLE AUCTION......................................... Monday MEMBERSHIPS............... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..............................Miguel A. Machado, UPCOMING EVENTS Big strings of yearlings and calves sell Mondays in May and June. Call now to consign to our special feeder sales May 14, May 23, June 6, June 20 and July 11. Visit our website for more information on what we have to offer. www.escalonlivestockmarket. com MEMBERSHIPS................NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS............. Clint Haglund, Ken Tompson UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for auction sales every Monday and Thursday for dairy, beef and feeder cattle.

MEMBERSHIPS.......................... CCA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..................................Lee Mora ............................................................Lee Mora UPCOMING EVENTS The Mora family invites you to join them ringside every Wednesday in Fortuna.


Buying or Selling Livestock?

We’ve Got Your Back.

LMA member auctions have your best interests in mind. In the livestock business, success is based on established relationships and trust. Members of the Livestock Marketing Association have a vested interest in helping livestock producers stay in business, and thrive even in these challenging times.

We’re here to ensure: • You earn top dollar for your livestock • Receive immediate payment whether the market receives payment or not • Hassle-free compliance with state and federal livestock disease trace and other health rules • Your animals are handled humanely to reduce shrink and stress • You complete all documentation needed for packers and COOL compliance

Auction markets that belong to the LMA are the most professional and reliable markets in the business. To find LMA members in your area call 1-800-821-2048 or visit www.lmaweb.com. May 2016 California Cattleman 29


MODOC AUCTION YARD Hwy 299 W, Alturas, CA 96101

OFFICE...........................................(530) 233-3442 CONTACTS Jerry Kresge....................................(530) 640-1302 CATTLE AUCTION......................... February to August: first and third Saturdays; September to February every Saturday.

OFFICE...........................................(209) 862-4500 FAX.................................................(209) 862-4700 CONTACTS Col. John McGill..............................(209) 631-0848 P.O. Box 756 • 2011 E, Stuhr Rd., Newman, CA 95360

CATTLE AUCTIONS..........Tuesday and Thursday MEMBERSHIP....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

ORLAND LIVESTOCK

OFFICE...........................................(530) 865-4527 FAX.................................................(559) 582-6261

P.O. Box 96 3877 Hwy. 99 West, Orland, CA 95963

CATTLE AUCTION............................. .....Thursday MEMBERSHIP....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

COMMISSION YARD, INC.

OVERLAND STOCKYARDS 10565 9th Ave, Hanford, CA 93230

PRODUCER’S LIVESTOCK MARKETING ASSOCIATION

1022 S. Pine Street, Madera, CA 93637 P.O. Box 510 Madera, CA 93639

CONTACTS Col. Ed Lacque............................... (530) 865-2643 Col Wade Lacque, Manager...........(530) 570-0547

OFFICE...........................................(559) 582-0404 FAX.................................................(530) 865-2643 CONTACTS Col. Peter Belezzuoli.......................(559) 816-2618 David Howze...................................(559) 816-2999

MEMBERSHIPS.......................... CCA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS......................Gary Pennington UPCOMING EVENTS Call us for dates on special feeder sales. See our ad on page 33.

AUCTIONEERS........................... John McGill UPCOMING EVENTS Currently accepting cattle for Tuesday and Thursday sales plus Western Video Market sales from Cottonwood on May 26 and June 9 and Reno, Nev., in July. For details see our ad on page 20.

AUCTIONEERS.........Wade Lacque, Ed Lacque UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for our special bred cow sale July 18. Call us for details. Also see our ad on page 33. Join us Thursdays at noon for our regular beef sales. ALSO CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK!

AUCTIONEERS........................ Peter Belezzuoli UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for L7 Cattle sales May 2, May 23, June 13 and June 27. Call us for details. Also see our ad on page 42.

FEEDER & BEEF SALES.................. .....Thursday MEMBERSHIP....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

OFFICE...........................................(559) 674-4674 E-MAIL...............producersmadera@sbcglobal.net WEBSITE..................www.producerslivestock.com CONTACTS Jackie Silva.......................................559-660-6752 Dean Penero.....................................209-649-7341 CATTLE AUCTION....................................Tuesday

MEMBERSHIPS......NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS......................Michael Imbrogno UPCOMING EVENTS We hope to see you at our off-the-grass special sales May 2 and June 6 at 1 p.m. See our ad on page 20 for details. Also watch for big runs of calves and yearlings on our regular sale days in May and June.

2016 California Livestock Auction Markets Association OFFICERS & President.................................................................Brad Peek Chairman.....................................................Col. Jake Parnell Vice President.................................................. Alana McGill Secretary.......................................................Forrest Mangan Treasurer................................................ Col. David Macedo Director...............................................................Beth Baxley 30 California Cattleman May 2016

DIRECTORS Director..........................................................Bonnie Bolcoa Director.......................................................Sherrie Linhares Director..............................................Col. Jake Bettencourt Nominating............................................. Col. John Rodgers Nominating.................................................Col. Max Olvera


SHASTA

LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD 3917 N. Main Street, Cottonwood, CA 96022 P.O. Box 558, Cottonwood, CA 96022

OFFICE...........................................(530) 347-3793 FAX.................................................(530) 347-0329 WEBSITE.......................... www.shastalivestock.com CONTACTS Ellington Peek.................................(530) 527-3600 Brad Peek.......................................(530) 347-3793 Donald Doverspike..........................(541) 377-6298 CATTLE AUCTION....................................... Friday OFFICE...........................................(559) 591-0884 FAX.................................................(559) 591-0808 WEBSITE...............www.tularecountystockyard.com

9641 Ave. 384, Dinuba, CA 93618

CONTACTS Jon Dolieslager...............................(559) 358-1070 Summer Dolieslager, bookkeeper....(559) 591-0884 AUCTIONEER............................... Jon Dolieslager OFFICE...........................................(209) 634-4326 FAX.................................................(209) 634-4396 WEBSITE.......................... www.turlocklivestock.com

10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381

CONTACTS Karen Cozzi.....................................(209) 634-4326 Col. Max Olvera..............................(209) 277-2063 Col. Steve Faria............................. (209) 988-7180 Col. Chuch Cozzitorto.....................(209) 652-4479 Buddy Cozzitorto.............................(209) 652-4480 Tim Sisil........................................................... (209) OFFICE...........................................(559) 625-9615 FAX.................................................(559) 625-9012 WEBSITE...........................www.visalialivestock.com

733 N. Ben Maddox Way, Visalia, CA 93292

WESTERN STOCKMAN’S MARKET 31911 Hwy. 46, McFarland, CA 93250

CONTACTS Col. Randy Baxley..........................(559) 906-9760 Sam Avila........................................(559) 799-3854 CATTLE AUCTION...................... ........Wednesday OFFICE.............................................(61) 399-2981 FAX.................................................(661) 399-0177 WEBSITE......www.westerstockmansmarket.com CONTACTS Dwight Mebane...............................(661) 979-9892 Col. Justin Mebane.........................(661) 979-9894 Frank Machado...............................(805) 839-8166 Col. Bennet Mebanre......................(661) 201-8169

MEMBERSHIP...NCBA, CCA, LMA. CLAMA CATTLE AUCTION Join us for our regular Friday sales, as well as specials on May 6 and May 22. Don’t miss the Western Video Market sales on May 26 and June 9 in Cottonwood. For more information, visit us online at www. shastalivestock.com or wvmcattle.com.

MEMBERSHIPS...NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA BEEF SALES EVERY FRIDAY AT NOON WITH COWS AT 2 P.M. Join us for Special Feeder Sales May 6, May 20 and June 3 featuring large runs of calves and yearlings.

BEEF SALE DAYS....Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday MEMBERSHIPS....NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..........Max Olvera, Steve Faria, Chuck Cozzitorto, Eddie Nunes, Jake Bettencourt UPCOMING EVENTS Special cattlemen’s association sales May 14, June 4 and June 25. We hope to see you there! See our ad on page 11 for details.

MEMBERSHIPS.... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..........................Randy Baxley CATTLE AUCTION Join us for weekly sales and take advantage of our transporation options from the central coast! Join us Wednesdays in May and June for large runs of stockers and feeder calves.

BEEF SALE DAY.................................... Monday Butcher Cows at 10:30 a.m./Feeders at 12:30 p.m. MEMBERSHIPS...................... NCBA, CCA, LMA UPCOMING EVENTS Special feeder sales June 6 and July 11 featuring large runs of stockers and feeders. See our ad on page 13 for details.

2016 CLAMA MEMBERS 101 Livesetock Market, Inc. California Livestock Commission Co. Cattlemen’s Livestock Market, Inc. Chino Livestock Market, Inc. Dos Palos Y Auction Yard Escalon Livestock Market, Inc. Euclid Stockyard Farmer’s Livestock Market, Inc. Fresno Livestock Commission, LLC

Humbolt Auction Yard, Inc. Newman Stockyards, LLC Orland Livestock Commission Yard, Inc. Overland Stock Yard Petaluma Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. Producers Livestock Marketing Assn, Madera Roundup Livestock Internet Marketing Shasta Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. Templeton Livestock Market

The Stockman’s Market, Inc.. Tulare County Stockyard, Inc. Tulare Sales Yard, Inc. Turlock Livestock Auction Yard, Inc. Western Stockman’s Market, Famoso Western Video Market Fallon Livestock Exchange, Inc. Nevada Livestock Marketing, LLC May 2016 California Cattleman 31


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD

ALL ACCESS

U.S. BEEF GRANTED FULL ACCESS IN PERU AND COLOMBIA from the U.S. Meat Export Federation Colombia and Peru recently lifted all remaining BSE-related restrictions on imports of U.S. beef, creating additional opportunities for export growth in these promising – but very competitive – South American markets. U.S. beef exports resumed to both Colombia (2005) and Peru (2006) fairly quickly following the December 2003 BSE case, but certain bone-in cuts from cattle more than 30 months of age remained ineligible. Both countries also prohibited beef from directslaughter cattle imported from Canada. Now that these restrictions have been lifted, the USDA export verification (EV) programs for Colombia and Peru are no longer in effect, which means all federally inspected U.S. beef plants are now eligible to serve these markets. Elimination of the EV programs also lowers production costs, enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. beef. Since the U.S.Peru Trade Promotion Agreement entered into force in 2009, Peru has developed into a very solid market for U.S. beef – especially for beef variety meat items such as tripe and hearts. Exports to Peru declined in 2015, but still exceeded $25 million. Under the trade agreement, Peru will 32 California Cattleman May 2016

eliminate all import duties on U.S. beef by 2020. But in the meantime, most U.S. beef products are already entering Peru duty-free under tariff rate quotas (TRQs). The United States is Peru’s largest beef supplier, holding about 25 percent market share by volume and 35 percent in value, but faces significant competition from South American suppliers and Canada. The United States is also the largest beef supplier to Colombia, where the U.S.-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement entered into force in 2012. Chile is a close second, followed by Argentina, Canada and Paraguay, and Colombia also has significant domestic beef production. U.S. exports to Colombia reached $14.4 million in 2014, before settling back to $10.4 million last year. Similar to the situation in Peru, all import

duties on U.S. beef will be eliminated by 2021, but most products already enter under duty-free TRQs. U.S. exporters have had significant success serving high-end restaurants in the metropolitan areas of Bogota and Medellin, and have also begun to make strides in Colombia’s retail sector. Chile remains the largest South American destination for U.S. beef, with last year’s exports totaling about $55 million. U.S. beef also has access to Ecuador and Uruguay, with last year’s exports to each country totaling about $1.4 million. While Uruguay is self-sufficient in beef production and imports only a small volume annually, it could develop into a reliable destination for certain U.S. beef items, such as sweetbreads. Beef livers make up much of the volume currently exported to Ecuador.

FIGURE 1. CHINA’S BEEF AND VARIETY MEATS IMPORTS


Auction Yard Alturas, California

Regular Sales

February to August: the first and third Saturdays September to January: every Saturday Serving Cattle Producers From Northeastern California, Southern Oregon and Western Nevada

YOUR COMPLETE MARKETING SERVICE ... We’ve Got You Covered!

TEMPLETON RECEIVING YARD:

4350 RAMADA DRIVE, TEMPLETON, CA (805) 434-8334

SALES EVERY WEDNESDAY

733 North Ben Maddox Way Visalia, CA 93292 (559) 625-9615

BUELLTON RECEIVING YARD:

OFF HWY 101 - 2201 JONATA PARK RD, BUELLTON,CA (805) 835-8990

Take advantage of our weekly live auctions in Visalia or our first-class Internet marketing service (for those with load lots) as well as order buying and great transportation services for our Central Coast customers.

WATCH SALES LIVE AT WWW.LMAAUCTIONS.COM

RANDY BAXLEY (559) 906-9760 • SAM AVILA (559) 799-3854 WWW.VISALIALIVESTOCK.COM

Jerry Kresge (530) 640-1302 • Office (530) 233-3442 P.O. Box 1866 •Hwy 299 W, Alturas, CA 96101

Also watch for daily cattle sale listings five days a week WWW.ROUNDUPCATTLE.COM, with live Internet auctions monthly.

May 2016 California Cattleman 33


California Auctioneers to Compete for World Title from the Livestock Marketing Association Three California livestock auctioneers have qualified for the 2016 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship (WLAC). The state will be represented in the “super bowl” of livestock auctioneering by Col. Michael Imbrogno, Fresno; Col. Garrett Jones, Los Banos; and Col. Justin Mebane, Bakersfield. Paris Stockyards, Paris, Ky., will host the 2016 WLAC on June 18. The 53rd annual WLAC will take place in conjunction with the Livestock Marketing Association’s (LMA) Annual Convention at the Hilton Lexington Downtown. For the World Livestock Auctioneer Champion title, 31 semifinalist auctioneers will compete in live interview and auctioneering contests. Because of this important, high-profile role, each WLAC semifinalist must establish their knowledge of the livestock marketing business, and demonstrate ability to express that knowledge with clarity, in a live interview competition. The interviews will be on Friday, June 17, at the Hilton Lexington Downtown. The interview competition can be viewed live on www. LMAauctions.com starting at 2 p.m. (EST). The Saturday, June 18, auctioneering competition will be at Paris Stockyards during a live sale where contestants sell cattle to actual bidders in the seats. It will be streamed live beginning at 8 a.m. (CST) on www. LMAauctions.com and broadcast as a special, one-hour show on RFD-TV June 27, starting at 7 p.m. (CST). Reigning World Livestock Auctioneer Champion, Brandon Neely, 34 California Cattleman May 2016

will serve as event emcee. Many past world livestock auctioneer champions will attend this year’s contest, and each will sell cattle during the Parade of Champions, a portion of the WLAC sale between the semi-finalist and finalist rounds. Should one of these three auctioneers take the title, they would join a club of California elites to claim the prestigious award, including Col. H. Skinner Hardy, Col. John Rodgers, Col. Max Olver, Col. Rick Machado and Col. David Macedo. The remaining contestants are Neil Bouray, Superior, Neb.; Darren Carter, Ninety Six, S.C.; Leon Caselman, Long Lane, Mo.; Dan Clark, Winner, S.D.; Brian Curless, Pittsfield, Ill.; Justin Dodson, Welch, Okla.; Will Epperly, Dunlap, Iowa; Philip Gilstrap, Pendleton, S.C.; Mike Godberson, Pawnee, Okla.; Brandon Hamel, Damar, Kan.; Brennin Jack, Prince Albert, Sask.; Lynden Judy, Omaha, Ark.; Marcus Kent, Dunnellon, Fla.; Dan Koupal, Dante, S.D.; Kyle Layman, Morland, Kan.; Jacob Massey, Petersburg, Tenn.; Blake McDaniel, Tallassee, Ala.; Jared Miller, Leon, Iowa; Daniel Mitchell, Cumberland, Ohio; Paul Ramirez, Tuscon, Ariz.; Jay Romine, Mt. Washington, Ky.; Duane Rus, Rock Valley, Iowa; Jason Santomaso, Sterling, Co.; Kevin Schow, Paxton, Neb.; Ethan Schuette, Washington, Kan.; Russele Sleep, Bedford, Iowa; Preston Smith, Imperial, Neb.; and Andy White, Ashland, Ohio. More information about the WLAC and LMA Annual Convention can be found at www. LMAweb.com.

COL. MICHAEL IMBROGNO

COL. GARRETT JONES

COL. JUSTIN MEBANE


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FUTURE FOCUS TOMORROW’S LEADERS TAKE TO THE CAPITOL TO FACE TODAY’S INDUSTRY ISSUES by YCC Publicity Chair Rebecca Swanson

Early in April, seven eager California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) members descended upon the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) office to kick off the second annual Young Cattlemen on the Capitol event. Before delving into the day’s agenda, YCC Advisor Malorie Bankhead asked each member to share an individual goal and a group goal for the day. These goals ranged from improving advocacy skills to learning the role CCA plays in combatting issues the industry faces. Young Cattlemen on the Capitol consists of two components, the first of which takes place at the California Capitol. The group first met with the Senate Agriculture Committee Consultant Anne Megaro,

36 California Cattleman May 2016

Ph.D., and the Assembly Agriculture Committee Consultant Jim Collin. Megaro and Collin spoke to the group about their roles in the committees and what they do to best achieve their roles. They are non-partisan individuals that are able to educate their respective committees on what exactly a bill will do, how all parties involved will be affected and what the proponent’s and opponent’s concerns are, in order for the committee to make an educated decision on a bill. “We know the bills and legislation passed at the Capitol affect our state’s farmers and ranchers. This was a great opportunity for young leaders with passion in the agriculture industry to experience. We need more active youth in our industry if we want to continue our family’s heritage,” YCC Chair and California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo student Crystal Avila said. Next, the group was welcomed to the Assembly floor by the 6th District’s Assemblywoman Beth Gaines (R- Lincoln) for a meet and greet where she addressed our interests, future career goals and potential opportunities in the legislature. Assemblywoman Gaines welcomed the Clerk’s Chief of Staff to the floor to share interesting facts about the Assembly, its architecture and history. Thereafter, the group joined the 3rd District’s Assemblyman James Gallagher (R-Nicolaus) in his office for an exclusive conversation on the issues he has been specifically focused on during his two-year term. Assemblyman Gallagher is a sixth generation farmer, which made for an intriguing conversation. We learned that as an agriculturalist and representative, Gallagher shares similar ideologies with many cattlemen and faces issues related to the beef industry. “Assmeblymember Gallagher made a really big impression on me. He took the time to meet with young agriculturalists and show us how he works to provide for the needs of agriculture in California,” California State University, Chico (Chico State) student Luke Benton said. Back at the CCA office, the group met with Jason Bryant, a private lobbyist who works with CCA in a variety of capacities. Bryant spoke about his journey to becoming a contractual lobbyist and utilizing his passion as the driving force behind his success. He was engaging and very encouraging to the next generation. CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin presented on the Political Action Committee (PAC).


He explained what the PAC is, how it works, and how imperative it is to CCA’s success in the political arena. One of Gatlin’s driving points to the YCC members was the importance of their role in fighting for themselves in the legislature. Gatlin expressed the significance industry men and women have when they step foot in the Capitol to fight for their livelihoods. I found this statement to be inspiring and I hope that my peers also found this to be not only true, but also as an indication of how important beef advocacy is. To round out the day, CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield sat down and spoke with the group about the issues facing the beef industry, CCA’s role in combatting those issues, his specific role, as well as how members can do their part. Oldfield took the time to explain the issues in detail and answer questions attendees had, as well as provide materials for the group to take home and share with others. “This experience made the idea of our government more tangible to me. The Capitol was not a far off place where things are decided. It was living, breathing and intelligent people right in front of us,” Chico State YCC member Angela Faryan said. “It made me realize that we can make a real difference just by being ‘boots on the ground’ and a voice to those who have the power to make change.” All attendees gained an ample amount of knowledge and understanding in regards to the inner workings of government and industry groups, such as CCA. YCC on the Capitol is truly a unique event that all young cattlemen should take advantage of. The group would like to extend a special thank you to all of the people who took the time to participate in educating the next generation of the beef industry.

YCC members met with rancher and Assemblymember Frank Bigelow (R-O’Neals).

YCC members had the chance to take a tour of the Assembly floor. They are pictured here with Assemblymember Beth Gaines (R-Lincoln).

Assemblymember James Gallagher (R-Nicolaus) took the time to sit down and discuss current issues with the young cattlemen.

May 2016 California Cattleman 37


MAKING THE CASE FOR

SIMMENTAL Why you should consider SimGenetics for your herd by Marty Ropp, Allied Genetic Resources

B

efore I go any further there are a few important facts about breeds and the beef business that need to be cleared up. 1. Maximum commercial profitability requires heterosis, which results in 25 percent more lifetime production and 1.5 years greater longevity per commercial female than their purebred counterparts. This is confirmed by almost every crossbreeding research trial reported for the past 40 years. 2. Continental x British crossbred cattle make more money year-in and year-out for cow/calf operations, cattle feeders and packers than any other breed combinations. 3. Angus, Red Angus and Hereford, in that order, are the British breeds of choice in the United States and are an important and necessary part of the American beef business. 4. Simmental is the highest ranking Continental beef breed in the United States for direct calving ease, maternal calving ease, puberty, weaning weight, post weaning gain, percent Choice, tenderness and most measures of feed efficiency. (US MARC Research Center Report #22) If you consider these facts, there are several logical conclusions that become evident. First, regardless of some marketing propaganda to the contrary, progressive, profit-driven commercial cattlemen use crossbreeding to enhance their success. The second conclusion is that the most successful crossbreeding systems utilize the complimentary traits of British and Continental breeds in combination. Data from the ASA Carcass Merit Program suggest

38 California Cattleman May 2016

these Simmental-British cross cattle will finish at around 1,300 pounds, grade Choice or better at a rate of 74 percent and with an average fat depth of .4 inches of fat, while placing nearly 60 percent of the carcasses in Yield Grades 1 and 2. This is not to guarantee that a 50/50 combination is right for every situation. For most, somewhere between 25 percent/75 percent and 75 percent/25 percent will be optimal with an American breed component often being advantageous in heat-challenged climates. These producers count on British breeds to contribute maternal efficiency, marbling and convenience while the Continental component offers accelerated performance, carcass cutability and growth efficiency to their programs.

Conclusion number three: Angus is by far the most popular British breed in the U.S.. This is not a slur toward other British breeds, nor does it mean it has always or will always be this way, but today it is a fact. Actually, the Angus and Red Angus gene pools and breed strengths are so similar they could be considered one for the purpose of crossbreeding programs. Finally, if you accept facts above, one must choose a Continental component to complete the puzzle, and Simmental is the logical choice. After years of advanced genetic evaluation, a commitment to research and consistent breed improvement, Simmental and SimGenetics are poised ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 40


May 2016 California Cattleman 39


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 38 to fill that position as the most logical and profitable choice for Continental genetics. No other Continental option offers the combination of growth, carcass value, calving ease, maternal and efficiency traits that Simmental does. Some provide comparable terminal value, others bring some useful maternal traits to the table, but SimGenetics combine both. In fact, they rank first or second in almost every economically important trait category listed in the latest MARC data. This is no accident. The American Simmental Association’s Carcass Merit Program, Calving Ease Project, Tenderness Testing and new Feed Efficiency research programs are all member-funded and provide significant opportunity to evaluate and prove the next generation of superior genetics. When you combine this with the largest database among all Continental breeds and the most proven multi-breed genetic evaluation in the entire U.S. beef industry, Simmental breeders have all

the tools necessary to make positive, consistent change faster than our competitors. So whether you choose Simmental to complement British breed commercial females or one of our

popular SimGenetics options to preserve a balance of Continental and British genetics while retaining heterosis in your herd, you can be confident you are using all of the facts available to make the most logical choice possible.

Ranchers in Western U.S. Brace for Possibility of National Monument About 300 concerned ranchers, residents and county officials from Eastern Oregon, Western Idaho and Northern Nevada joined forces in the Jordan Valley high school gymnasium in Jordan Valley, Nev., to participate in a town hall held by U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Oregon) on the topic of federal land management policies in the Owyhee Canyonlands. Everybody who spoke expressed some degree of disagreement with a proposed 2.5 million acre national monument in the area. A coalition of environmental groups is advocating for a monument, which can be created by the president of the United States. The issue raised by ranchers who attended the event came down to the effect that possible future regulations on grazing would have on their livelihoods if the canyonlands monument proposal comes through. Environmental groups have maintained no such regulations would come into play if the monument is created. For some ranchers in the monument’s proposed area, 100 percent of their land would be encroached upon Another coalition is being built with local communities in mind and has started a fundraising campaign in that effort. While the president can declare an area a national monument - President Barack Obama has approved 19 during his time in office - it takes an act of Congress to create wilderness. An alternate proposal by the Owyhee Coalition, led by the Oregon Natural Desert Association and other environmental groups, seeks a combination of wilderness, wild and scenic river, and conservation designations. That plan also totals 2.5 million acres. Walden, when told of the Owyhee Basin Stewardship 40 California Cattleman May 2016

Coalition, praised the group for its efforts and added his own 2 cents into the mix. “We ought to have a say at the congressional level,” he said, earning a round of applause from the crowd. “However, at the very minimum, we ought to have a say at the local level.” Environmental groups have raised concerns in the past that those living on the lands aren’t being good stewards, a notion local ranchers brought up and dismissed, citing the land’s current good condition. Walden agreed. “I think we all do a pretty good job of taking care of the land,” he said, to short cheers and murmurs of agreement. “This is one of the most beautiful places. I think that is in part because of how it is being managed.” State Rep. Cliff Bentz (R-Oregon), asked Walden what to do about the issue that the Canyonlands proposition has turned into an “us versus them” mentality. Walden acknowledged this and called for cooperation between all sides for any possible resolution to be made. Walden said he was looking to get other congressmen on board along with changing language in the federal Antiquities Act of 1906, which allows Congress or the U.S. president to make monument designations. He also, along with Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe, called for local communities to spread the word and educate others on the canyonlands proposal and to write letters to state officials expressing their concerns. “The size of the crowd was the second largest turnout I’ve been in,” he said. “That, in and of itself, reinforces the idea that the government needs to hear this and listen.”


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W e strive to produce the most sound, functional, and marketable cattle possible. It is our mission to have each and every one of our customers obtain success with their bull purchases. Call for more information about our customer service programs! May 2016 California Cattleman 41

more to come in 2016!


Ag Day Celebrated at California State Capitol

On Wednesday, March 16, The California Department of Food and Agriculture partnered with California Women for Agriculture and the California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom to host the state’s annual celebration of agriculture, California Ag Day at the Capitol. As a way to honor farmers and ranchers and all they provide, the theme of Ag Day 2016 was “Golden State On Your Plate.” Legislators, staffers and the public had the opportunity to shake a farmer’s hand and advance their understanding of the importance of our food supply Each year during the ag day festvities, members of California CattleWomen, Inc. (CCW), from up and down the state make their way to Sacramento to participate in what has become one of the more popular booths at the event. Along with the help of the renowned Buckhorn Grill in Sacramento, the CCW members and Buckhorn staff pass our tri-tip sandwiches to ag day attendees and passersby. In all, nearly 450 pounds worth of tri-tip sandwiches is given out. CCW would like to express thanks to the Buckhorn Grill’s Jared Raymond for his continued supprt of this important event.

CALIFORNIAN Elected to American SIMMENTAL BOARD CCW members take a break from passing out tri-tip sandwiches to pose for a photo with CDFA Secretary Karen Ross (center). Also pictured (L to R) are: Maxine DeCosta, CCW President Sheila Bowen, California Cattlemen’s Malorie Bankhead; Camille Borba; and Young Cattlemen’s Committee member Rebecca Swanson.

42 California Cattleman May 2016

Tim Curran of Ione has been elected by the American Simmental Association (ASA) membership to serve on the Board of Trustees. Tim Curran’s Circle Ranch maintains a herd of primarily SimAngusTM females in the foothills of California’s rugged, majestic Sierra Nevada mountain range. Cattle winter at lower elevations but summer above 5,000 feet. His cowherd is comprised of 80 percent seedstock while 20 percent are commercial females. Genetics are marketed through the Beef Solutions Bull Sale, held annually on the fourth Thursday of September in conjunction with an area Angus breeder. Curran sells 100 SimAngus bulls through the sale and another 40 to 50 SimAngus bulls by private treaty. A member of the American Simmental Association since 1992, he is a strong advocate for performance cattle, having served as a director of the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) and was named CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year in 2010. In addition, he serves as Open Pen Show advisor and Replacement Heifer Project advisor at the local County Fair. Curran was formally seated at ASA’s 48th Annual Meeting held Jan. 17, in Denver, Colo.. Also seated were newly elected trustees Clay Lassle, Glendive, Mont.; John Irvine, Manhattan, Kan.; and re-elected trustee, Tim Smith, Giddings, Texas.


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BRANGUS BEEF Brangus Offer Value of Genomic-Enhanced EPDs from the International Brangus Breeders Association

T

he new breeding season is in full swing in cattle country and cattlemen have been busy sorting through actual performance information, ratios, expected progeny differences (EPDs), phenotypes and other available information. These bull purchasing decisions will impact the cowherd for years to come because of the replacement heifers that are kept back for long term production. For example, bulls turned out this spring will have twoyear-old replacements in production by 2019. Those same cows are expected to remain in the herd for a minimum of eight to 10 years which would put them through the 2025 calving season and beyond.

TRADITIONAL EPDS

Historically, genetic evaluations have used pedigree information and performance records to generate EPDs. Even in the absence of any individual performance data, the genetic merit of an animal can be predicted based on the average breeding value of its parents by using the pedigree information. Pedigree estimated EPDs have very low accuracies and high possible change values. With only pedigree information, full sibs and/or flush mates will have the same EPDs (based on pedigree estimates) until individual performance data is entered into the system. Performance data on the individual, as well as its progeny, collected and reported over time will improve the accuracies. Individual performance of an animal, as well as performance of its descendants, create a more accurate “genetic difference estimate” for that animal. It takes considerable time, effort and money to collect needed performance data, the additional performance data leads to a more precise or accurate EPD for use in bull selection. It generally takes 15 to 20 additional progeny to move accuracies from a “pedigree estimate” to a more reliable 0.40-0.50 level. This can mean the lifetime production of a cow or at minimum, the first calf crop of

44 California Cattleman May 2016

a young sire.

GENOMIC-ENHANCED EPDS

The Brangus breed has chosen to incorporate DNA testing results alongside the traditional EPD methodology of using the extensive pedigree and phenotype database we have. The combination of pedigree, performance and DNA have produced better EPDs with higher accuracies. Pedigree, phenotype and genomics are included in a single step approach or GBLUP. This process yields an EPD presented in the same, easy-to-use fashion of traditional EPDs. Ultimately, the advantage to GE-EPDs is the increase in accuracy, especially for animals that are younger and have lower accuracies in traditional genetic evaluations. Because DNA tests can be done at birth, they have the potential to increase the accuracy of genetic predictions on very young animals. “GE-EPDs are just another tool in a breeder’s toolbox for breed improvement strategies,” says Tommy Perkins, Ph.D., executive vice president, International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA). “They will allow Brangus seedstock suppliers and commercial bull buyers the ability to make more accurate and rapid genetic improvement.” Although most of the focus on any genetic selection process is weighted heavily to selecting the correct herd sire, genomics can play an important role in selecting the proper replacement females as well. A single DNA sample can yield improvements in EPD accuracy of a female equal to her lifetime production record. Therefore, I find it important to submit DNA for testing on all of your potential replacement females alongside your yearling bulls. The improvement in accuracy is independent of sex, so it is just as important to measure the females as it is the males. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 46


May 2016 California Cattleman 45


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44 A GE-EPD is just another selection tool for bull buyers to aid in proper selection. However, it can be used as an aid for in-herd culling and/or selection measures as well. Most recently, IBBA announced the adoption of lowdensity (LD) testing through both GeneSeek and Zoetis for Brangus breeders. The use of LD testing is the most cost effective way to get GE-EPDs with an accuracy of 0.98-0.99 existing between the low- and high-density (HD) tests. Purebred breeders now have the ability to test a greater percentage of their cattle population because of the reduced cost between an LD ($45) and HD ($80) test while yielding virtually the same result.

SUMMARY Bull buyers first select potential bulls on their appearance (design, feet and leg soundness, etc.), performance data (birth weight, weaning weight, etc.) and their Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs). This selection process has worked for many years but they now have the use of a new tool, GE-EPDs, to further validate their selection. The addition of individual animal DNA information

is used to improve the dependability of the traditional EPD value by increasing the accuracy level of each EPD. This new tool gives bull buyers the ability to sort through young breeding stock and make purchases with more confidence. Selecting bulls with more reliable genetics; thus greater confidence, will positively impact the herd for years to come. Whether you are a commercial cattleman or a seedstock producer, nothing has changed except the GEEPDs are more accurate than traditional EPDs in young animals. Inclusion of genomics into the EPDs were made in order to reduce confusion of their use by both the seedstock producer and commercial cattlemen alike. Take advantage of GE-EPDs whether you are producing the next purebred herd sire or purchasing the next commercial herd bull. Utilizing GE-EPDs to select your next heifer bull can be done more accurately, which should reduce calving disasters in young females. Likewise, buying young bulls using GE-EPDs for growth (weaning weight, yearling weight, etc.) can improve production efficiency at a faster rate than has ever been possible before. Lastly, improving carcass merit in offspring of young sire selection using GEEPDs for ultrasound traits can add value throughout the production chain.

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46 California Cattleman May 2016

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ZOETIS NOW OFFERS GE-EPD & HORNED TESTING FOR BRANGUS CATTLE Commercial beef producers have long-established breeding programs that propagate polled animals. Now, by using a new genomic test called GeneSTAR Horn/Polled available from Zoetis, beef producers can identify homozygous and heterozygous polled for Brahman, Brangus, Limousin and Simmental at an early age. This latest innovation from Zoetis has the opportunity to positively support the welfare of these animals as well as the beef industry overall, proliferating the number of polled animals in the marketplace. “Dehorning animals is a management practice that costs beef producers money in terms of time, labor and lost performance, and there are animal wellness elements associated with the practice that cause sensitivity among some consumers,” says Dr. Paulo Moraes, senior marketing manager for beef genomics and reproductives at Zoetis. “We are committed to delivering new resources like GeneSTAR Horn/ Polled to help beef producers and the larger beef industry.” Animals that are visibly polled may either be heterozygous or homozygous genetically, meaning they carry either one or two copies of the polled gene, respectively. Heterozygous polled animals possess one copy each of the polled and horned alleles, and consequently transmit the horned allele to one-half of their progeny. Animals with horns have two copies of the recessive horned allel and thus do not need to be tested in order to determine their horn/polled genotype. Homozygous polled animals carry two copies of the dominant polled allele and produce only phenotypically polled offspring. The GeneSTAR Horn/Polled test is currently available and can be ordered as a stand-alone test or in combination with applicable i50K or SireTrace testing. For more information, please contact your Zoetis representative or call (877) 233-3362. Thanks to a collaboration with the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA), the i50K™ genomic test from Zoetis is also now available to Brangus breeders and commercial producers using registered Brangus genetics. i50K results enable Genomic Enhanced Expected Progeny Differences (GE-EPDs), with notable

increases in accuracy for the full scope of traits evaluated in Brangus bulls and females. Knowing more information sooner an animal’s genetic potential helps Brangus breeders make selection, mating and management decisions with greater efficiency and, ultimately, greater returns. Brangus breeders can more dependably know whether tested females should be: · Selected to enter the breeding herd

as replacement females · Further developed and marketed as open or bred females · Used as donors in embryo transfer and in vitro fertilization programs Brangus breeders can also know what sires to use in matings or which should be culled for feeding purposes. i50K also guides decisions on whether bull calves should be performance tested and eventually sold as bulls for a variety of more clearly determined purposes.

Celebrating 100 Years of CCA

< special edition coffee table book >

Pre-order copies for you, your family and your friends before Oct. 1 to receive special pre-sale prices! Pre-order until Oct. 1: $40 per book + flat rate shipping* After Oct 1: $50 per book + flat rate shipping - Call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 for special pricing on orders of 5 or more books -

*Pre-ordered books can be picked up in person at the 100th Annual CCA & CCW Convention Dec. 1-3 in Sparks, Nev. or shipped for an additional flat rate fee. Detach and fill out the form below and mail with a check or call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 to pay over the phone by credit card.

Name: ______________________________________ Phone number: _________________ Please reserve _____ coffee table books @ $40 each = _______ Shipping: $14 (up to 2 books) = _______ + $7 per each add’l book x _____ books = _______

___ Yes, I will pick up my order in person at Convention ___ No, I won’t be able to make the convention, please ship to:

Total: _________

_____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ Make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association and mail to: California Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: 100 Year Coffee Table Book 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

< No refunds will be granted >

May 2016 California Cattleman 47


CHIMES

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE LEADERS HOLD ANNUAL MEETING IN COALINGA from the California CattleWomen, Inc. On March 12, more than 150 members of California CattleWomen, Inc. (CCW), and California Women for Agriculture (CWA) met at Harris Ranch Inn and Restaurant in Coalinga for the CattleWomen’s Annual Beef Promotion Meeting. Ethan Francis, California FFA regional vice president, awakened the group dressed appropriately in his National Blue and Corn Gold. The title of his speech says it all, “What’s the Beef with Beef ? Shedding Light on Two Major Myths about the Meat We Eat.” Hormones in red meat and of course, cancer, were key discussion items. Ethan’s research discovered there is actually a higher probability of getting cancer from a chemical found in yoga pants than eating red meat. We all know that eating right and exercising are keys to a long and healthy life. Planning for death is not something that most people are comfortable tackling. Luckily, the women had Kevin Spafford, founder of Legacy by Design, LLC, as a presenter. Kevin shared some scary figures. According to Spafford, 70 percent of family farms will not transition to a second generation. Of those that do, 90 percent will fail in transition to a third generation and of the few remaining, 96 percent will not make it to a fourth generation. Spafford really shed light on the succession planning with colorful stories of families that he has worked with over the years. One of the ladies in the 4 percent category, a fourth generation family farm owner, is California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary Karen Ross. As one of the morning’s speakers, Ross reminded the group

48 California Cattleman May 2016

of agriculture enthusiasts of the large role that California agriculture plays in the national and global food markets. Jill Scofield of the California Beef Council shared with meeting attendees the last minute meal planning routine of many millennials that make all of the dietary decision for their households. She walked through the grocery shopper’s decision procession and their tolerance levels for price/ satisfaction. The bottom line is that consumers are willing to pay more if they feel it’s worth it. We all know that water is a critical component of agriculture production. The group was very fortunate to have Mike Wade of the California Farm Water Coalition as a guest speaker. He shared a number of very factual slides with the group and also dispelled some myths in the audience. Luckily, Wade spoke after lunch because he shared pictures of some great California grown dishes and encouraged foodies to

post and tag #caonmyplate and #foodgrowswherewaterflows. Keeping California grown on our plates proves to be more challenging by the day. Emily Rooney from Agriculture Council of California shared with us some of the latest regulations and what changes agriculturists are having to make to comply. Just think of all the warning labels that would be on foods from the United States and not from overseas competitors if Rooney and her team weren’t out there challenging the process. There is a reason that the proposition 65 warning doesn’t appear on every can of tomato sauce! The day ended with the ladies laughing, eating, drinking and networking while sharing stories of their own personal battles and successes whether it be succession planning or peach canning. A huge thank you to the staff members at Harris Ranch for making our weekend so tasty and enjoyable!


2016 Beef Ambassadors Selected in New Regional Format Twenty-one county beef ambassadors, their families and Ambassadors are: Northern Region, Jordon Somervill, Placer/Nevada guests converged on San Jose for the 2016 California Beef County; Central Region, Alyssa Mondani, Amador/El Ambassador Contest on April 9. Dorado/Sacramento counties; and Southern Region, Tanya Organizer, Jill Bright, California Beef Ambassador Chair, and several Santa Clara County CattleWomen hosted Enlow, San Diego County. Junior Beef Ambassadors are: Northern Region, Adam the event where the county Beef Ambassadors vied for the Balack, Shasta; Central Region, Ashley Mabery, Alameda titles of junior and senior California Beef Ambassadors. County; Southern Region, Samantha Carver, Kern County. Jill Scofield of the California Beef Council and the All in all, the California CattleWomen are proud to California Cattlemen’s Association’s Malorie Bankhead showcase these passionate young people who will do big presented a Beef Quality Assurance overview to the contestants Friday evening before an ice cream social where things for the California beef industry and beyond! If you are interested in having a California Beef contestants got to meet each other and get their pre-contest Ambassador at your event, please contact your local jitters out. CattleWomen president. Saturday morning kicked off the contest where contestants put their beef knowledge and advocacy skills to the test in three areas of competition including a letter to the editor response to an article about beef, a mock consumer event and a media interview. Eight senior county beef ambassadors and thirteen junior county beef ambassadors competed representing their respective counties from across the state. While students competed in the written response portion, guests heard from 2015 California Beef Ambassador Abby Grisedale and her travels throughout her year of service. A beautiful fajita lunch was prepared and served by the local 4-H group including decorated cakes and cookies. The afternoon wrapped up the rest of the contest, and the group heard from Adam Mendonza, Farmers Best Feed sales 2016 California Beef Ambassador Contestants representative who gave an inspiring talk encouraging the contestants to do their best work and let their passion always shine. Jill Scofield played a few rounds of Beef Jeopardy to test the Beef Ambassador’s knowledge in a fun, playful way to round out the day. This year, the conclusion of the contest looks a bit different than it has in past years. As a result of program restructuring for the American National CattleWomen, the National Beef Ambassador Contest will no longer take place. A collegiate-driven program will replace the National Beef Ambassador Program, but states are still able to hold their own respective beef ambassador contests. California decided to divide the state into three regions and create a California Beef Ambassador team, of sorts. Each 2016 California Beef Ambassador winners (L to R): respective region, Northern, Central Senior Beef Ambassadors: Northern Region, Jordon Somervill, Placer, and Southern, will have a senior and Nevada counties; Central Region, Alyssa Mondani, Amador, El Dorado, junior California Beef Ambassador. The Sacramento counties; Southern Region, Tanya Enlow, San Diego County. ambassador pairs from each region will be Junior Beef Ambassadors: Southern Region, Samantha Carver, Kern responsible for attending beef promotion County; Central Region, Ashley Mabery, Alameda County; Northern activities in counties within their regions. Region, Adam Balack, Shasta County. This year’s Senior California Beef

May 2016 California Cattleman 49


50 California Cattleman May 2016


Cattle Producers Urge TPP Passage on Capitol Hill

PINKEYE NEVER RESTS… NEITHER SHOULD YOUR TREATMENT

the importance of this issue than cattlemen and women As part of the the National Cattlemen ‘s Beef meeting directly with their representatives and senators. Association’s annual Legislative Conference in April, Capitol Hill needs to understand that delaying action on TPP Ambassador Michael Froman, U.S. Trade Representative, is costing cattlemen real money.” stressed the cost of inaction on the Trans Pacific Partnership. Passage of TPP is not only a priority for the cattle “For the past seven years, the Obama Administration has industry, but is supported by a broad coalition of agriculture worked together with NCBA to expand export markets for American beef and cattle,” said Froman. “In that time, United and food organizations and associations. “We were very pleased this week to sign a letter with 224 States beef exports have more than doubled, rising from $3.1 other groups supporting TPP,”’ said Kester. “This showing billion to $6.3 billion last year. However we have more work of support from a diverse group of commodity associations, to do together – most especially, guaranteeing that American ranchers and farmers across this country see the full economic producers, manufacturers and food companies demonstrates the potential economic impact we all expect from TPP. While grains the TPP will mean for them and their communities. some cling to the past or dig their heels doggedly in the For example, by 2030, two-thirds of the world’s middle class present, trade is for the future, and cattle producers embrace will call Asia home. However, exports of American beef to that future.” countries in the TPP are being hit with tariffs as high as 50 percent, and face all manner of non-tariff barriers. This high-standard agreement cuts over 18,000 foreign taxes on U.S. exports, opens markets for American ranchers and farmers in one of the world’s fastestgrowing regions, and advances regulations that are transparent and based on science.” Froman stressed that U.S. beef exports would increase by 444 million pounds as a result of TPP, resulting in increased cash receipts totaling $1.14 billion. “All told, it’s estimated that TPP will boost annual net farm income in the United States by $4.4 billion,” said Froman. “With these benefits at hand, the cost of inaction is alarming – together, let’s ensure we never pay them.” The message resonated with cattle producers who experience daily erosion of U.S market share in leading export markets like Japan. NCBA Vice President Kevin Kester said the U.S. must continue to embrace trade and expand market access for its products. “The U.S. cattle industry relies on Rely on Noromycin® 300 LA international trade to add value and stabilize when Pinkeye attacks: markets,” said Kester. “Global consumers ¹ Fast activity and effective in treatment of demand high quality U.S. beef muscle cuts, pinkeye but exports are especially critical in adding ¹ Most economical, broad-spectrum 300 mg value to otherwise undervalued cuts such oxytet you can buy without a prescription as variety meats and offal. While they have ¹ Delivers the same dose of oxytet as little value domestically, cuts such as tongue Liquamycin® LA 200 and Bio-Mycin® 200 in a lower dose volume and tripe, fetch premiums in the Asia and Pacific Rim markets. There are no other global markets that can absorb that demand if we cannot remain competitive in the Pacific.” Following Froman’s address, an estimated 300 cattle producers from across the country hit Capitol Hill to meet with Observe label directions and withdrawal times. Not for use in lactating dairy animals. Adverse reactions, including injection site swelling, restlessness, ataxia, trembling, respiratory abnormalities (labored breathing), their Congressional representatives. collapse and possibly death have been reported. See product labeling for full product information. “Swift passage of TPP is the top legislative priority for cattle producers, www.norbrookinc.com and we need to see passage of TPP this Congressional session,” said Kester. “There is simply no better way to show Congress The Norbrook logos and Noromycin 300 LA are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Liquamycin is a registered trademark of Zoetis, Inc. Bio-Mycin is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim. 0316-143-I03A

May 2016 California Cattleman 51


THE PROGRESS REPORT: U.S. Cowherd Expansion By Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension We are now two years into herd expansion and that leads to questions of how much more herd expansion is ahead and, to a lesser degree, questions about how fast remaining herd expansion will occur. Beginning with a January 2014 low of 29.1 million head, the beef cow herd expanded (based on U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agriculture Statistics Service revised 2015 numbers) 217 thousand head in 2014 and another 1.03 million head in 2015. The January 2016 total of 30.3 million beef cows represented a 3.5 percent year over year increase in the beef cow herd, an undeniably aggressive rate of herd expansion. The sharp adjustment in cattle prices in late 2015 has been viewed by some as a result of this large herd increase and the feeling that it was, perhaps, too much, too soon and a sign that herd expansion is mostly over. It looks now (with the benefit of hindsight) that the spike in feeder cattle prices from 2013 through 2014 was a market signal to ensure that herd expansion got an aggressive jump-start. Having succeeded in that, market prices have adjusted back to levels that allow the industry to follow through with what has been started. Therein lies the question of how much more expansion will occur. In 1990-1996, the last complete herd expansion in the beef industry, the beef cow herd increased about 2.9 million head, from 32.5 million head in 1990 to 35.3 million head in 1996. This included one year of expansion of 3.7 percent, three years of growth in the range of one to two percent annually, spread out on either side of the big expansion year, and two years of very slow growth at the beginning and end of the expansion. The patterns we have seen so far in this herd expansion are similar and consistent with the 1990s. Should we expect something like 2.9 million head of herd increase this time? Probably not, after all, it’s really pounds that matter, and we

52 California Cattleman May 2016

will not need that much increase in beef cows to increase beef production. Carcass weights are over 100 pounds heavier now compared to 20 years ago. However, this expansion did not start when it intended to begin. The industry attempted herd expansion beginning in 2004 with a herd size of 32.5 million head – the same level at which the 1990 expansion started. After two years, with minimal herd growth (less than 200,000 head), the herd continued liquidating in 2006 in the face of unprecedented cost shocks, a recession, etc. In 2011, the industry showed signs of herd expansion with an inventory of 30.9 million cows, but drought forced additional liquidation to the ultimate bottom of 29.1 million head in 2014. The current 30.3 million head is still smaller than pre-drought levels. The real question may be: where does recovery stop and where does expansion really begin? A moderate pace of herd growth in 2016, perhaps 1.5 to 2.5 percent year over year, might leave the herd inventory close to pre-drought levels going into 2017. Ultimately, it is demand that will determine the size of the industry. Domestic and international markets will be the key to how big the beef cow herd will be. Beef carcass weights will also be important in determining how many animals are needed to meet that total market demand. It seems clear that expansion will continue in 2016, albeit at a more moderate pace than 2015, and into 2017 as well. At this point, it seems likely that the herd will peak cyclically at an inventory somewhere between 31 and 33 million head. The ultimate total is a moving target that must be monitored along the way. Unfortunately, that will be more difficult given USDA’s recent announcement to suspend the July Cattle report. This means that there will be no indication of the size of the 2016 calf crop; the status of heifer retention; nor the estimated feeder supply until 2017.


ELANCO SHARES four-step PLAN FOR FOLLOWING VFD Rules The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) new VFD rule for managing antibiotic use in livestock will go into effect Jan. 1, 2017, which means now is the time for producers to update their herd-health plans. Elanco has developed informational resources about the VFD, and suggests four steps farmers and ranchers can take to meet this deadline. “With just 11 months until the final VFD rule is in place, it’s important that every cattle operation start preparations so there are no surprises,” says Kerry Keffaber, DVM, advisor for scientific affairs and policy at Elanco. “Collaboration plays a critical role in implementing these updated regulations successfully. That is why working closely with your veterinarian and feed supplier is the first of four steps we recommend for good antibiotic stewardship.” Producers can get a start making sure their health and feeding programs reflect the new VFD rules with four key steps:

human medicine” and used in both animals and humans: penicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, sulfas, glycopeptides and others. By next January, these shared-use antibiotics no longer will be used for growth promotion. And, antibiotics approved to prevent, control or treat a disease can be used only under the oversight of a veterinarian. Easy-to-understand details about VFD requirements are available at VFD Central (feedstuffs. com/vfd.aspx), an online educational resource provided by Elanco and Feedstuffs.

BRANDING SEASON IS HERE!

Strengthen relationships with your veterinarian and feed supplier, enlisting their help as you review your operation’s current health protocols. • Evaluate the various rations and feeds in your operation, and identify the ones that include shared-class antibiotics affected by VFD rules. • Work with your veterinarian and feed supplier to update standard operating procedures (SOPs) for antibiotic use, and begin training employees on the revised SOPs. • Mark your calendar to review SOPs at regular intervals, perhaps annually, to ensure your health protocols remain up-to-date and effective. “For years, farmers have been good stewards of antibiotics, following label directions to use them responsibly,” says Keffaber. “Taking time to update management practices, confirming they reflect VFD regulations, is an excellent way to ensure compliance while protecting animal health and food safety. In turn, this has the potential to encourage consumer confidence that antibiotics are being used judiciously when administered to animals.” In June 2015, the FDA published new VFD regulations to promote judicious use of antibiotics, protect public health and help limit the development of antimicrobial resistance. The rules provide direction for antibiotics deemed “important for

HOW PREPARED ARE YOU?

65% of California cattle are at risk of selenium deficiency, which can cause health problems such as White Muscle Disease, abortions, retained placenta, infertility and others. One Pacific Trace Minerals Se365 selenium bolus per animal prevents selenium deficiency for a year.

CCA Member Pricing

1-19 boxes: $240 per box * 20 + boxes: $216 per box *

Bolus gun: $78 per gun

*Non-members pay $288/box, at any quantity * 60 boluses per box

Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. This parasite causes severe anemia, weakness, fever, lack of appetite, depression, constipation, decreased milk production, jaundice, abortion and sometimes death. The killed anaplasmosis vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age from infection and requires a booster given 4 to 6 weeks after the initial vaccination

Available in 10 or 50 Dose Bottles 10-40 doses: $8.50 per dose * 50 +: $7.50 per dose * 10 dose/$85 minimum

Flat rate shipping: $10 per order

Shipping & Handling

First box: $10 Additional boxes: $7 per box Bolus gun: $10 per gun

May 2016 California Cattleman 53


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

THANK YOU TO ALL THE BUYER’S WHO MADE THIS YEAR’S HERITAGE BULL SALE A SUCCESS!

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Join us Friday, Sept. 2 for our annual bull sale at the ranch in Los Molinos!

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016 54 California Cattleman May 2016


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2016.

O’Connell Consensus 2705

JUNIOR HERDSIRES O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR Really Windy 7261

THANK YOU TO OUR 2015 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2016 bull sale!

SIRE: VDAR Really Windy 4189 MGS: Sinclair Telecast 01S3

FCR Final Answer 0103 SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 MGS: N Bar Prime Time D806

+1.5 +56

+95 +31 +.94 +.71 +105.36

WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN NEXT YEAR!

PRESIDENT'S DAY 2017, TERREBONNE OR JOIN US FALL 2016 FOR THE

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

May 2016 California Cattleman 55


Thank you to the buyers at our 41st “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Join us Sept. 7, 2016 for our annual “Partners for Performance” Bull Sale! Oct. 8, 2016 “Partners for Performance” Angus Female Sale

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

JOIN US AT OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE 9/1/16!

Progressive Genetics for over 36 years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2386

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 56 California Cattleman May 2016

h

Join us once again October 2016 in Kenwood, CA!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS We hope to see you out for our 2016 Production Sale in Lodi!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com May 2016 California Cattleman 57


“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

58 California Cattleman May 2016


SALE MANAGEMENT SALES MANAGEMENT LIVESTOCK MARKETING LIVESTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY CONSULTING ORDER BUYING

MATT MACFARLANE

SHERIDAN, CA • (916) 803-8133 MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET WWW.M3CATTLEMARKETING.COM

TOM PERONA, DVM 209-996-7005 Cell

LANDER

VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

THD ©

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

IT’S A WIN-WIN

To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

Dan VanVuren 209.484.5578

jimv@wsrins.com matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com danv@garibaldiins.com Lic #0B48084 Lic #0124869 Lic #0E44519

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! May 2016 California Cattleman 59


IN MEMORY

Ethan McKinney

On Monday, March 21, Ethan James McKinney lost his courageous 15-month battle with bone cancer. He passed peacefully at home in the embrace of his family. McKinney Ethan was born on December 15, 2000 in Stockton, to Matthew and Rika McKinney. The family moved to Gardnerville, Nev., in October 2001 after the passing of Ethan’s godfather, Mark Costa. Ethan grew up on the Bently Ranch with his parents and two sisters, helping his dad with the cows and the hay though he always loved tractors more than horses. He went to school at St. Gall Pre-School and later attended Minden Elementary School through second grade. Ethan was homeschooled through middle school where he enjoyed co-op classes and participated in science fairs and was a member of the Lego robotics team. For high school, Ethan was proud to attend Stanford University’s Online High School. Ethan was always very active in the community, especially in Douglas County 4-H where he was a member of the Carson Valley Shepherds, Science Club, Speaking Club, Shooting Sports and Teen Leadership. Ethan and his sisters owned a successful breeding sheep flock and won many champion ribbons. Ethan could always be relied upon to volunteer to be a presenter for Ag in the Classroom or for livestock demonstrations for 4-H Cloverbuds. He also participated in the historical society’s Young Chautauqua program and enjoys performing historical characters like Paul Revere and Theodore Roosevelt for local elementary groups. Ethan began playing violin at age six and later began playing the double bass where he was honored to perform with the Carson Valley Sinfonia, the Carson Valley Pops, and the Carson City Symphony. All of these activities, however, paled in comparison to Ethan’s love of the theatre. After his first ever rehearsal at the age on 10, Ethan proudly announced, “I have found my people.”

60 California Cattleman May 2016

Ethan loved being on stage with his friends with the Youth Theatre of Carson City, the Carson Valley Young Thespians, and with the D.G. Menchetti Young Shakespeare Program. Theater was Ethan’s “team sport” and he loved performing not for the spotlight, but for the process—all of the cast members had to come together and feed off of each other and everyone had their part to play no matter how big or small. He loved to hear the audience laugh. He loved to laugh. He wanted us to laugh with him. Ethan spent 15 months battling cancer and he faced that battle with the same courage and strength that he lived his life. He spent the year charming the nurses and joking with his doctors. Ethan told them that if he lost his positive attitude and sense of humor than cancer had already won. Not content to lay around, Ethan passed the time in the hospital by starting his own charity called Ethan’s Little Library to collect new storybooks for other

kids at the hospital. With the help of caring hospital staff, Ethan employed his acting skills to record story times to be played on the hospital’s TV channel. He enjoyed reading stories to the little kids and giving them free storybooks. He also played his bass in the hospital and gave mini concerts for the other kids. Ethan is survived by his father and mother, sisters Leah (17)and Lillie (12), grandparents Jim and Lee McKinney of Gardnerville; Carol Counter of Baldwin City, Kan.; and Rick and Rita Nitschke of Fresno; his uncle and aunt Seth and Mica Nitschke of Turlock; and cousins Henry, Elle and Charlotte as well as many great-aunts and great-uncles and his godmother Erin Costa. A Celebration of Life was held April 2. Those wishing to make memorial contributions may donate to the Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer Foundation or Children’s Hospital Oakland Foundation, c/o Ethan’s Little Library.

NEW ARRIVALs

Mesa Ipsen

Cash Mebane

Mesa Fae Ipsen was born early Easter morning, March 27, weighing in at 8 pounds and 18 inches long. She was eagerly welcomed by older sister, Sterling. Parents are Logan and Stevie Ipsen, New Plymouth, Idaho. Grandparents are Mark and Becky Ipsen, Dingle, Idaho; Jack and Debi Clark, Rexburg, Idaho; Jay and Kathy Nelson and Wayne and Sandy Stewart, all of Fairview, Utah. Justin and Jennifer Mebane, Bakersfield, welcomed a son, Cash Lewis Mebane, on April 13. He tipped the scales at 8 pounds 3 ounces and was 21.5 inches long. Cash joins big sister Haley. He is also welcomed by grandparents Dwight and Helen Mebane of Western Stockmans Market, McFarland, and Bill and Sharon Wonderly of Bakersfield.


Advertisers’ Index Amador Angus............................................................................................54 American Hereford Association ���������������������������������������������������������������56 American Simmental Association ������������������������������������������������������������39 Andreini & Company.................................................................................46 Bar Ale 27. 27 Bar R Angus.................................................................................................54 Beef Solutions Bull Sale..............................................................................41 BMW Angus................................................................................................54 Bovine Elite, LLC.........................................................................................59 Broken Arrow Angus..................................................................................54 Broken Box Ranch.......................................................................................58 Bruin Ranch.................................................................................................41 Buchanan Angus..........................................................................................54 Byrd Cattle Co..............................................................................................54 California Customs.....................................................................................58 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc. ���������������������������������������������������������������58 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market................................................................2, 28 Charron Ranch............................................................................................54 Cherry Glen Beefmasters...........................................................................56 Circle Ranch.................................................................................................41 Conlan Ranchers California......................................................................58 Conlin Fence Company..............................................................................58 Conlin Supply Company, Inc. �������������������������������������������������������������������21 Corsair Angus Ranch..................................................................................54 CSU, Chico...................................................................................................57 Dal Porto Livestock.....................................................................................55 Diamond Back Ranch.................................................................................58 Donati Ranch...............................................................................................54 Dos Palos Y Auction Yard....................................................................20, 28 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.........................................................................58 Escalon Livestock Market.....................................................................14, 28 Farmers Livestock Market....................................................................28, 33 Fresno State Ag Foundation.......................................................................57 Furtado Angus.............................................................................................55 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ������������������������������������������������������������������59 Genoa Livestock..........................................................................................56 Gonsalves Ranch...................................................................................42, 55 Harris Ranch Beef Company ��������������������������������������������������������������������61 HAVE Angus................................................................................................55 Hogan Ranch...............................................................................................56 Hone Ranch..................................................................................................56 Hufford’s Herefords.....................................................................................57 Humboldt Auction Yard, Inc...............................................................28, 40 International Brangus Breeders Assn ������������������������������������������������������45 J/V Angus.....................................................................................................55 Kerndt Livestock Products.........................................................................59 Lambert Ranch............................................................................................56 Lander Veterinary Clinic............................................................................59

62 California Cattleman May 2016

Little Shasta Ranch......................................................................................57 Livestock Marketing Association �������������������������������������������������������������29 M3 Marketing..............................................................................................59 McPhee Red Angus.....................................................................................57 Modoc Auction Yard.............................................................................30, 33 Newman Srockyards.............................................................................20, 30 Noahs Angus Ranch....................................................................................55 Norbrook Animal Health.............................................................. 16, 17, 51 O’Connell Ranch.........................................................................................55 ORIgen 59. 59 Orland Livestock Commission Yard ��������������������������������������������������30, 33 Orvis Cattle Company................................................................................57 Overland Stockyards.............................................................................33, 42 Pacific Trace Minerals.................................................................................58 Pitchfork Cattle Co......................................................................................57 Producers Livestock Marketing Assn, Madera ���������������������������������20, 30 Ray-Mar Ranches........................................................................................55 Razzari Auto Centers..................................................................................35 Sammis Ranch.............................................................................................55 San Juan Ranch............................................................................................56 Scales Northwet...........................................................................................14 Schafer Ranch..............................................................................................55 Schohr Herefords.........................................................................................57 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard.............................................................15, 31 Shaw Cattle Company...............................................................................6, 7 Sierra Ranches..............................................................................................57 Silveira Bros..................................................................................................56 Silveus Rangeland Insurance ��������������������������������������������������������������������59 Skinner Livestock Transportation ������������������������������������������������������������58 Sonoma Mountain Herefords �������������������������������������������������������������������57 Southwest Supply Company, Inc. �������������������������������������������������������������58 Spanish Ranch..............................................................................................56 Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................................................56 Teixeira Cattle Co........................................................................................55 Tulare County Stockyard......................................................................20, 31 Tumbleweed Ranch.....................................................................................56 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard..........................................................11, 31 Universal Semen Sales................................................................................59 Veterinary Servic, Inc.................................................................................58 VF Red Angus..............................................................................................57 Vintage Angus Ranch...........................................................................56, 64 Visalia Livestock Market......................................................................31, 33 Western Fence & Construction, Inc. ��������������������������������������������������������58 Western States Angus aasociation ������������������������������������������������������������19 Western Stockman’s Market.................................................................13, 31 Western Video Market..................................................................................3 Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................................................55


2016 BULL BUYERS GUIDE

RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY! CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE

MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET • (916) 803-3113 DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2016

May 2016 California Cattleman 63


VAR

FOREMAN

3339

V A R FOREMAN 3339 AAA REG. 17607585

SIRE: AAR TEN X 7008 SA MGS: CONNEALY ONWARD

EVERY RANCH NEEDS A GOOD FOREMAN

• V A R Foreman is the only bull in the breed today in the top 35% for calving ease direct

and ranks in the top 1% of the population for all these important traits: top 1% $B, top 1% $QG, top 1% $G, top 1% $F, top 1% $W, top 1% RE, top 1% Marb, top 1% CW, top 1% Milk, top 1% YW and top 1% WW. • VAR Foreman was the featured Lot 1 bull of the 2015 Vintage Angus Bull Sale. • V A R Foreman’s first progeny are on the ground at VAR in the Spring 2016 calves, they are standouts in a very competitive group. • VAR Foreman is an easy choice if you are looking to raise ALL your data to the highest level. • V A R Foreman posts the highest Marbling EPD among 8809 sons, the dam of Foreman that has produced three natural calves that post a BW ratio of 94, WW ratio of 116 and YW ratio of 105. Progeny sales from Foreman’s dam have exceeded $2,500,000 in the last four years at VAR.

EPDS +8 +1.5 +73 +130 +1.02 +14 +34 +66 +1.42 +1.22 +85.24 +102.25 +58.99 +49.66 +210.44

TRAIT CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $QG $B

EPDs as of 4/19//2016

Semen: $30

BREED RANKINGS

1% 1%

1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

Certificates: $40

OWNERS: VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH, CA DIAMOND BAR ANGUS, TX

VAR BLACKBIRD 3082 - The $300,000 valued full sister to Foreman and donor for VAR and Deer Valley Farms, TN.

SANDPOINT BLACKBIRD 8809 - The dam of Foreman is a $440,000 valued donor for VAR and Herbster Angus, NE.

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

California Cattleman May 2016  
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