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June 2015

Topics this month... Everyone’s a Winner with Video Marketing Simmental offers full color spectrum real estate & ag lending June 2015 California Cattleman 1


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Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy. 2 California Cattleman June 2015


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June 2015 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Billy Flournoy, Likely FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Mark Lacey, Independence Jack Lavers, Glennville Rich Ross, Lincoln TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Pherigo

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Malorie Bankhead

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

4 California Cattleman June 2015

You Can’t Win Them All

an encounter with a food elitest by CCA Feeder Council Vice Chair Mike Smith As Chairman of the California Beef Council, I recently participated in a check-off funded “Pasture-to-Plate” tour that was conducted in late April. The target audience for the tour was people involved in the food service industry and included food distributors, restaurant owners and their purchasing agents, chefs and nutrition professionals. The tour included visits to a cow-calf operation, sale barn, dairy, calf-ranch, feedlot and beef processing facility. On balance, I believe the tour was a resounding success, and I am confident the industry’s message was well received by most of those who attended the event ….with the exception of perhaps one individual. At the first evening’s event, I found myself at the dinner table with the purchasing agent for an upstart fast-casual restaurant chain currently operating 18 units in the metropolitan areas of Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco. The gentleman described the restaurant concept as being “socially conscience” with an emphasis on locally grown, natural and organic food items. The company’s goal was to develop a connection between the one eating the food and the source of the food itself, an altruistic goal that I believe many would applaud. We spent most of our time during dinner discussing the beef industry, and answering questions he had about what he had seen during the course of the day, and what he expected to see and learn by the end of the tour. The next morning, while providing a tour of Harris Feeding Company, I found myself being inundated with questions

from the gentleman that I had dinner with the night before. And while his questions were not mean-spirited, his non-stop, innuendo-laden comments were quickly becoming tiresome…and my patience, wearing thin. Toward the end of the tour, I actually thought I had made significant headway with my “new-found” friend. That is, until he offered the following statement prior to leaving the feedlot. He said “I believe a study needs to be conducted to determine the resources required to produce various crops and livestock so society will know exactly where food should and should NOT be produced.” It was clearly apparent that I had failed in explaining “sustainability” to him, and he was obviously concerned about water requirements associated with producing beef and almonds. My response was short, and to be candid very pointed as I informed him that it was my strongly held belief that the free market system would ultimately determine “where, when and how” food is produced in this country...and as the bus left the feedlot, I kicked myself in the rear for not being quick enough to suggest that perhaps a companion study needed to also be conducted to determine exactly where people should or should not live and/or conduct their businesses due to natural resource requirements. I’m relatively confident that the Los Angeles basin and its “naturally”arid environment would not top that list! I know you can’t win them all, but I for one intend to keep trying.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

JUNE 2015 Volume 98, Issue 6

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE Water on the minds of all

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 10 Water board attempts curtailment HERD HEALTH CHECK Summertime tips for your herd

18

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Supply continues to tighten

24

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER UC Davis to host national reproduction event

30

FUTURE FOCUS YCA advisor with passion for industry

42

SPECIAL FEATURES

Video marketing a win for buyer, seller Veterans willing to work for you Simmental offers variety of hide colors Questions to be ready for when getting a loan California names new beef ambassadors

14 20 26 36 44

Over the past 25 years, Western Video Market (WVM), based out of Shasta Livestock Auction Yard, Cottonwood, has become known as one of the most innovative and practical way for cattlemen and women nationwide to market their livestock. With representatives throughout the West who are backed by at team of some of the most experienced and knowledgable marketeers in the business, WVM consignors and buyers can be sure the service they receive is unmatched. This month, WVM is featured on the cover with Tom Schene, Schene Enterprises, a Dixon rancher who has marketed his calves through WVM since the early 1990s. As his WVM representative, WVM General Manager Brad Peek works with Schene year-round to make sure his cattle will fetch the best premiums at marketing. A confederation of auction yards and bonded livestock dealers representing cattle producers in nearly every western state, every party in the WVM network is committed to helping each consignor’s cattle bring top dollar. WVM founders Ellington Peek, Cottonwood, and Col. John Rodgers, Visalia, and their dedicated team have spent the last quarter century building the thriving Internet and satellite marketing company into what it is today. With a track record of higher prices and low commission fees, coupled with a repuation for integrity and customer service second-to-none, WVM has had many of its consignors since the first WVM sale in 1989. WVM invites you to join them at their largest sale of the year, July 13-15 at the Silver Legacy in Reno, Nev. See the ad on page 2 for details. The sale can also be found live at www.wvmcattle.com or on DISH Network. To locate a representative near you, visit www. wvmcattle.com.

READER SERVICES

Buyers’ Guide 46 Obituaries 52 New Arrivals & Wedding Bells 53 Advertisers Index 54

Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado work the 2014 WVM Sale in Reno, Nev. June 2015 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE WATER WORRIES cca feels ranchers’ pain of drought situation by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield As most Californians likely know by now, on April 1, Gov. Jerry Brown announced that he would direct the State Water Resources Control Board to require mandatory cuts in urban water use by 25 percent. Media outlets throughout California, the United States and even overseas were quick to criticize the actions of the governor to specifically exempt agriculture from the mandatory reduction. Although typical and completely expected, opponents of agriculture and specifically livestock production were quick to spin the issue to favor their agenda. Statements like, “Why is agriculture exempt from the mandatory cuts when farmers and ranchers use 80 percent of California’s water” and “Did you know it takes 1,847 gallons of water to produce one pound of beef ” became prolific on social media. To an unsuspecting and uninformed audience, these statements are quite concerning notwithstanding their lack of truth. There are always two sides to

6 California Cattleman June 2015

a story and the other side of that story needs to be told today. It’s important for not only CCA and other agricultural organizations to tell this story but for you to do so as well. As professions, farmers and ranchers remain one of the most trusted and sharing your drought story is compelling and carries considerable weight. Public attention is certainly focused on the landmark drought we are in today, however little media attention seems to be focused on the poor lack of infrastructure planning that has exacerbated the state’s limited access to water for both urban and agricultural uses. Although voters approved $3.75 billion in bond funds for new surface water storage, new reservoirs (assuming they are built) will likely help us in the next drought. More still needs to be done considering California’s demand for water will only increase and our state’s water storage and conveyance infrastructure must outpace that

JUSTIN OLDFIELD demand. Farmers and ranchers don’t actually use 80 percent of California’s water. In fact, nearly 45 percent of water diverted in California is for resource protection like maintaining instream flows, wild and scenic rivers, wetlands and other environmental uses. The water farmers and ranchers use supports California’s greatest industry, agriculture, which not only feeds our state and nation but also provides an incalculable number of ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 8


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

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June 2015 California Cattleman 7


...CONTINUED ON PAGE 8 direct and indirect jobs. For those who argue that farmers and ranchers have not felt the pain of the drought, I would argue that no one has felt the pain more, especially ranchers. The lack of rainfall, forage and runoff to fill stock ponds has forced many to liquidate herds. While record-high prices have helped some stay in business, they have also been matched with a steady increase in input, business and other regulatory costs. The drought’s impact on ranchers is real, personal and, in most cases, far outweighs any impact associated with a 25 percent reduction in urban water use. CCA will continue to work with

other organizations, policy makers and consumer groups to raise awareness of the impacts the drought has caused. Though it is virtually impossible to accurately calculate the amount of water one pound of beef uses throughout a cow’s life cycle, the conversation should not be focused on how much water is used to produce one pound of beef, but the benefits maintaining a thriving beef cattle industry has for California. Not only do ranchers produce healthy, safe and nutritious protein, but consumers should not forget that nearly one-third of endangered species live on privately-managed grazing lands, grazing reduces fuel loads which helps decrease the severity of

wildfires, and grazing lands provide the pathway for virtually all surface waters that flow to populated areas in California and sequester 198 million tons of carbon dioxide every 30 years. Simply stated, these environmental benefits would not be made available without ranchers. Never hesitate to tell your drought story. As CCA continues to carry this important message publicly, we encourage all members to call the office for any assistance we might provide in helping you better communicate your message, respond to harmful editorials or speak with the press about the drought, water use or any other issue affecting beef cattle production.

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

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Jim Vann 530.218.3379

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Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! 8 California Cattleman June 2015


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YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA AT BAT AS STATE WATER RESOURCES CONTROL BOARD CONSIDERS CURTAILMENTS by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur In the wake of Governor Brown’s January 2014 declaration of a state of emergency resulting from California’s exceptional drought, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) issued curtailments impacting more than 9,000 water rights due to the lack of sufficient water supply. This January, the SWRCB issued a notice to water rights holders that “if hydrologic conditions do not significantly improve in the next several months, the State Water Board will once again begin notifying water right holders in critically dry watersheds of the requirement to limit or stop diversions of water under their water right, based on their priority.” Unsurprisingly (and unfortunately), drought conditions have persisted, resulting in a number of water right curtailments being issued by the SWRCB. Already in water year 2015, the SWRCB has issued curtailment notices for all post-1914 water rights holders in the Antelope Creek Watershed, the Deer Creek Watershed, the Scott River Watershed, the San Joaquin River Watershed, and the

10 California Cattleman June 2015

Sacramento River Watershed. At the time of this writing, the SWRCB was also in the process of considering four additional curtailments: curtailments of some pre-1914 water rights in the San Joaquin River and Sacramento River watersheds, and of some riparian rights in the San Joaquin River tributaries and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River watershed and Delta. Though curtailments of pre1914 and riparian rights are not completely unprecedented (according to the SWRCB, such curtailments occurred in the late 1970s), they are certainly uncommon, and their present consideration by the SWRCB underscores the severity of the current drought. Additionally, given the complexity and importance of such senior water rights, the SWRCB may see legal challenges from affected water rights holders or their representative organizations. Priority of Water Rights As noted by the SWRCB,

curtailments are made on the basis of priority, with “junior” water rights being curtailed before more “senior” water rights. Generally, riparian water rights—the right to use the natural flow of a water body for the benefit of parcels adjacent to the water body—are senior to appropriative water rights. Appropriative water rights are generally broken into two classes: pre-1914 water rights and post-1914 water rights, divided by the year in which California instituted its process for permitting water use. Pre-1914 water rights are, of course, senior to post-1914 water rights. In order to establish priority of right among appropriative water rights, the general property law rule of “first in time, first in right” applies. For post-1914 water rights, priority of right is based on the date upon which a permit application was filed. Last year, for instance, the SWRCB issued an order for the Russian River Watershed curtailing diversions for all rights holders with a permit application ...CONTINUE ON PAGE 12


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” ! w o C y l o H

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 date of Feb. 19, 1954 or later. For pre-1914 appropriative rights, priority is based on the date upon which the appropriation was initiated. Though this information was typically required to be filed with the county, tracking down documentation of pre-1914 water rights and otherwise proving that the right has been in continuous use can often represent significant challenges. A senior appropriative water rights holder is entitled to divert all of the water to which he or she has a right before a junior water right holder may divert any water. If water supplies remain insufficient after the curtailment of all appropriative rights, only then will riparian diversions be curtailed. Unlike with appropriative rights, however, no riparian water right holder is curtailed more than any other— rather, all riparian diverters must reduce their diversions proportionally. SWRCB’s process for issuing curtailments In order to determine if curtailments are necessary, SWRCB staff analyze watershed-specific data from the Department of Water Resources, regarding historic, current and projected water use and availability to determine whether and to what extent available water supply can meet water right holders’ demands. After determining a curtailment is necessary, the SWRCB will issue a curtailment order and will send out curtailment notices to affected water rights holders. Upon receipt of a curtailment notice, water rights holders must complete and submit to the SWRCB a Curtailment Certification Form certifying that they will not divert water under the specified water right curtailed and noting any alternative sources of water the right holder may substitute in its place (for instance, ground water or water used under a riparian or pre-1914 water right). The SWRCB will monitor impacted watersheds to ensure compliance with curtailment orders. Should individuals 12 California Cattleman June 2015

subject to curtailments divert water in violation of those curtailments, they may incur administrative fines of up to $1000 per day of violation and $2,500 for each acre-foot of water diverted in violation of the order. Additionally, the SWRCB may issue cease and desist orders to violators, and penalties for violation of such cease and desist orders can be as high as $10,000 per day. CCA of course will take a strong

stand against any action to curtail pre-1914 or riparian water rights without proper due process. For the most up-to-date information available on the SWRCB’s curtailments, see the SWRCB’s “Notices of Water Availability” for water year 2015 at http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/ waterrights/water_issues/programs/ drought/water_availability.shtml or contact Justin Oldfield or Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.


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EF Complement 8088 Sire: Basin Franchise P142 Dam’s Sire: BR Midland

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sale details: www.raymarrancHes.com Ray Alger (Mobile) .............................................209 652-9601 Ray and Mary Alger ...........................................209 847-0187

Mailing Address: 6064 Dodds Rd., Oakdale, California 95361

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June 2015 California Cattleman 13


On The Big Screen

video marketing a benefit to buyer and consignor

by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

I

t has been said that a satisfied customer is the best business strategy of all. Few people would disagree with such a claim. In the world of livestock marketing the same philosophy holds true. Whether a rancher who is selling cattle or a buyer who is looking to feed cattle, being treated fairly and getting the product or payment they expect is paramount. In a time that is unprecedented in the beef business, no one knows for certain what the future holds, but if one thing is for sure it is that there are plenty of people talking about what lies ahead and just as many different theories as there are cattle being traded. Those who know the business best aren’t bankers or economists who punch numbers from a desk in a high-rise building. Those who likely have the best handle on what the future holds for the cattle industry are those who live and breath it day-in and day-out. Those who are in the business not to make money but rather because it makes them rich in countless other ways. That’s not to say the past couple of years haven’t been good to cattlemen and women. But even in a time with the highest cattle prices in history, there have been plenty of reasons to leave the business – drought, feed costs and regulation – just to name a few. When it comes to what the future holds for the cattle business in the West, perhaps its best to turn to those who have changed with the times to implement new technology into the livestock business as it has become available. Several decades ago, the idea of selling cattle on a video screen or a world-wide computer network like the Internet seemed about as far-fetched as Marty McFly’s DeLorean time machine. Fortunately for today’s cattle ranchers, there were cattle marketers who looked beyond the uncertainty of a farfetched idea and saw the potential that video marketing could hold for a industry in need of innovation at the time. Today, video marketing is one of the most widely-used marketing channels for beef cattle and those who operate the video sales have become the go-to-guys for buyers and sellers alike. From advise on what programs, companies and genetics they should use to what kind of prices and trends they can expect, video market representatives offer 14 California Cattleman June 2015

a whole lot more than just an extra hand at marketing time. Those representatives play an integral part in an operation’s success – or failure. According to Brad Peek, general manager of Western Video Market, based in Cottonwood, there are many enticing draws for a cattleman to sell on the video the first time. But after they are a customer, subsequent years all depend on customer service and the relationship the rancher has with their video representative. “Initially, the No. 1 reason for a seller to put their cattle on the video is the tremendous exposure they get from potential buyers all of the Western United States from Colorado and Texas to the coast,” Peek said. “Video sales also charge lower commissions than most sale yards and having large lots leave the ranch is more efficient that taking smaller loads to the sale barn.” This video method of selling allows the seller to be more in control of the whole marketing process. They, with the help of their market representative, organize the cattle into loads based on uniform color, size, sex and any special management programs the cattle may fall under. The representative videos the cattle, they set a timeframe for the cattle to be transported from their operation after weaning and the rest is up to the buyer. Feedyard operator Steve Lucas, Lucas Livestock, Paradise Valley, Nev., offers unique perspective as someone who has not only bought and sold on the video but he has also worked as a representative, helping market cattle for other video consignors. As a cattle feeder, Lucas is particularly mindful of how cattle will perform after they’ve arrived in a new environment. He says in his experience as a buyer videomarketed cattle often have less shrink, less illness and less co-mingling, meaning buyers know there is less risk. “Cattle never have to leave the operation until they are ready,” Lucas explains. “For me as a buyer, that is the top reason to buy video calves – they are coming right off the ranch.” Both Peek and Lucas agree that what keeps a buyer coming back is satisfaction in their purchase. “The greatest compliment a seller can have is for a buyer to come back next year to bid on or buy his or her


between the consignor and their representative and cattle, “ Peek says. “It means they had no health issues and consignor having confidence in the job their representative the cattle performed well.” is doing,” Peek said. “The job of the representative is to let Lucas says there are other benefits to buying via the their consignors know what buyers are looking for, offer video that other venues can’t offer. Based on the large any feedback and know that they’ve done all they can to number of lots offered at a video sale event, cattle are sold help their consignor get the best dollar the market has to based on demographic and programs they meet. “Some buyers are looking for natural, some organic, offer on sale day.” Similarly, Lucas said a relationship also forms betwen some age and sourced and some buyers want it all. No matter what specifics you want, when you are buying on the the buyer and the seller, though prior to their business agreement, the two may have never met. video you know which cattle sell from “In the cattle business, reputation which region and when in the sale they “The greatest is everything and if your cattle exceed will be up.” Peek says buyers also like that compliment a seller expectations, your buyer will be back to can have is for a buy – or try to buy – from you as long depending on the kind of cattle they are looking for, they can see in a matter buyer to come back as he is in business,” Lucas says. Arguably, an even bigger of seconds through the catalog or onscreen information if those cattle are next year to bid on compliment than having buyers bidding on cattle year after year is having what they need. or buy his or her multiply buyers bid on cattle. That is Lucas says consignors also have cattle.” when premiums are experienced and unique advantages when marketing on the consignor can rest assured that the the video. At a sale barn, your cattle marketing representative was successful have to be there live at sale time. On in working to benefit the consignor’s the video, a consignor has much more bottom line by helping to create a demand for his or her flexibility in terms of when the cattle are ready to go. cattle. If, say, a consignor hasn’t gotten rain in a while and a Perhaps therein lies the ultimate secret to any business; consignor’s calves are a little shy of what they should weigh at sale time, they can call their representative and have them To not just meet the customer’s expectations but to exceed them. For video market owners and representatives, pull the lot for the sale they were scheduled for and have customers are on both ends of the business – the them sell on the next scheduled video sale. consignors and the buyers. And through a transparent “After a couple go-rounds of selling on the video and and efficient system, if both parties walk away satisfied, realizing the ease of the process and their exposure they’ve everyone is better for it. gained it really becomes about personal relationships

-Brad Peek

June 2015 California Cattleman 15


Kevin is an award winning singer songwriter who's songs reflect his life as a working cowboy as well as a rodeo champion. He is known as an entertainer who can paint a picture with his songs and make you feel as if you were actually there. ‘Bayou Country’ native Waylon Thibodeaux has been dubbed “Louisiana’s Rockin Fiddler”. Today, this talented, self-taught Cajun musician has gained a notable reputation as one of Louisiana’s best known recording artists.

Sonny Burgess is a true Traditional Country Music Artist. The natural ease he exudes on stage is a hint that this ain’t his first rodeo. He is a CMA Artist Winner and Texas Country Music Hall of Famer.

International Country Music Star Jolie Holliday was born in Dallas, Texas. Since her debut, Jolie has opened for such great artists as Thompson Square, Pat Green, Lee Ann Womack, Randy Travis, Stoney LaRue and Marty Stuart to name a few.

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16 California Cattleman June 2015

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+52.67

$G

+27.80

$B

+93.81

BW WW YW MK CW MB RE FAT

-3.9 +71 +116 +29 +48 +.79 +.05 +.040

DOB: 07/22/2009 Tattoo: W618 CONNEALY LEAD ON #CONNEALY ONWARD .............................. ALTUNE OF CONANGA 6104 SITZ UPWARD 307R SITZ VALUE 7097 SITZ HENRIETTA PRIDE 81M.................... SITZ HENRIETTA PRIDE 1370 S S TRAVELER 6807 T510 S S OBJECTIVE T51O OT26 ...................... S S MISS RITA R011 7R8 101 EMMA T413 HYLINE RIGHT TIME 338 101 EMMA R535........................................ 101 ALLE TRAV 48 RAMBO G175

His Progeny & Service will be sold!

COWS BRED TO: Connealy Confidence 0100, Boyd Signature 1014, PA Full Power 1208, Rito 12E7 of 5F56 Rito 5M2, 44 Envision, Connealy Comrade 1385, Deer Valley All In, Connealy Western Cut, PA Fortitude 2500, JMB Traction 292, B/R New Day 454, GAR Composure, GAR Prophet, WHS Limelight 64V, AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Connealy Right Answer 746, TC Aberdeen 759, Connealy In Sure 8524, and many more.

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HERD HEALTH CHECK

SUMMER SCHOOL

a refresher course to your cattle this summer from CRYSTALYX® We have made it to June and for spring calving herds we have or soon will be turning the bulls in to start the breeding season. And fall calving operations are just around the corner from seeing new calves hit the ground. Although we are on the early side of summer, many will be asking in a couple of months, “just where did the summer go?” It happens every year. So to help make sure we stay on top of our summer cow management tasks I have a few reminders below to keep your herd producing those valuable calves that will reward your efforts. Check your bulls If your operation is a spring-calving one, make sure you are observing them interacting with cows, finding cows in heat and that they have no physical injuries or lack of desire preventing them from servicing the herd. Any sort of deficiency in your bull power will mean fewer and/or later calves next calving season and you can’t fix it then. You have to be on top of it now. It is especially critical in small pastures where you may only have one bull for the entire group of cows. Don’t let the mineral run out Whether you are providing loose mineral from a bag, or have moved to supplying vitamins and mineral with low moisture blocks like CRYSTALYX®, it is critical to make sure there is product available at all times, especially going into the breeding season. A quick note on using low moisture blocks for summer mineral delivery: our research has shown a substantial improvement in the number of cows actually coming to the mineral supplement when CRYSTALYX® was used compared to loose minerals under extensive grazing conditions. We are convinced the palatability of low-moisture blocks helps attract cattle to the supplement and provides a much more uniform consumption across the entire herd. If you haven’t tried it, we would invite you to consider using it this summer to see how you get along with a low moisture block delivery. Manage your fly control program A feed through program using IGR or Rabon® (Bayer Animal Health) can help control flies and provide for greater calf gains during the summer months. If you have been on a feed through program from the start of the summer you will want to simply make sure the supplement is available at all times. If you are starting a feed through program after the flies are out, you will want to provide the supplement containing either IGR or Rabon® and then use a knock-down spray treatment to

18 California Cattleman June 2015

take care of the adult flies that are already on the cattle. It will take one or two treatments initially to take care of these existing adult flies as the feed through products then eliminate any future flies from developing in the manure of treated cattle. Once again, CRYSTALYX® has several products that can deliver, fly control as a protein or as a mineral/vitamin supplement in one convenient, consistently consumed, weather resistant and waste proof product. Monitor your pastures for forage quality and quantity Depending upon the types of forages that you are grazing know when to move cattle to a new pasture in order to maintain the productivity of your forage resources from year to year. Forage types, grazing systems and variability in annual growing conditions make this impossible to provide a “one size fits all” recommendation that has any credibility. The main thing is to be actively involved in monitoring your pastures and beef cow condition throughout the summer to be proactive with your decisions rather than reactive. Most cases of “catchup” in both range and cow condition prove to be costly. Monitor your cow body condition While grazing practices and forages vary widely across North America, recommendations on cow body condition are much more consistent when evaluating nutritional effects on reproduction. This is an area where we have developed an App for your smart phone that can help easily monitor cows within your herd from season to season. Simply take photos of some of the cows within your herd and score them using comparative example photos. You then have a stored photo that you can compare with at any point in time going forward. Talk about a history of a cow. It can be documented as many times as you want to take photos. Evaluating condition scores can be very helpful if your pastures start drying out early or as you enter the fall. Use it to measure the overall nutrition program that your forages are providing for your herd. These are just a few key areas that producers should be closely monitoring during the summer months. They are areas that can impact your returns not only this year, but next year’s calf crop or future pasture health and productivity as well. We all know how good the calf prices have been in recent years and the current situation is probably near, if not at the peak. All of these reminders can help you cash in on the added weight gain with healthy, growthy calves as well as cows that breed on time and go into the fall/winter in great shape. The key is to be proactive.


Agriculture found to be one of best fields for new graduates Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in early May announced a new report showing tremendous demand for recent college graduates with a degree in agricultural programs with an estimated 57,900 high-skilled job openings annually in the food, agriculture, renewable natural resources and environment fields in the United States. According to the employment outlook report by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)

and Purdue University, there is an average of 35,400 new U.S. graduates with a bachelor’s degree or higher in agriculture related fields, 22,500 short of the jobs available annually.“ There is incredible opportunity for highly-skilled jobs in agriculture,” said Secretary Vilsack. “Those receiving degrees in agricultural fields can expect to have ample career opportunities. Not only will those who study agriculture be likely to get well-paying jobs upon graduation,

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they will also have the satisfaction of working in a field that addresses some of the world’s most pressing challenges. These jobs will only become more important as we continue to develop solutions to feed more than 9 billion people by 2050.” The report projects almost half of the job opportunities will be in management and business. Another 27 percent will be in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) areas. Jobs in food and biomaterials production will make up 15 percent, and 12 percent of the openings will be in education, communication, and governmental services. The report also shows that women make up more than half of the food, agriculture, renewable natural resources, and environment higher education graduates in the United States.While most employers prefer to hire graduates of food, agriculture, renewable natural resources and environment programs, graduates from these programs only fill about 60 percent of the expected annual openings. Even as enrollments in these programs increase and the job market becomes somewhat more competitive, good employment opportunities for the next five years are expected.Growth in job opportunities will be uneven. Employers in some areas will struggle to find enough graduates to fill jobs. In a few areas, employers will find an oversupply of job seekers. Expect to see a strong employment market for e-commerce managers and marketing agents, ecosystem managers, agricultural science and business educators, crop advisors, and pest control specialists. Job opportunities in STEM areas are expected to grow. Expect the strongest job market for plant scientists, food scientists, sustainable biomaterials specialists, water resources scientists and engineers, precision agriculture specialists, and veterinarians. The report, Employment Opportunities for College Graduates in Food, Agriculture, Renewable Natural Resources, and the Environment, United States, 2015–2020 The report was produced by Purdue University with grant support from NIFA. June 2015 California Cattleman 19


Serving those who have served us by Freelance Author Karen Pavone for Ranchin’ Vets ransitioning into civilian life after active military duty is a challenging and critical time for many returning American soldiers. After facing the adrenaline-charged atmosphere of combat, many veterans are forever changed. They often find themselves at odds when they come home, and desperately need a safe place to find peace as well as meaningful work. Meet Kevin and Corey Downs. Their fledgling non-profit mentorship program, Ranchin’ Vets, partners with ranchers nationwide to facilitate job opportunities in agriculture for post9/11 servicemen and women who are reentering civilian life following active duty in the United States Armed Forces. Now in its third year, the organization was founded on the ideal that livestock management is one of America’s oldest traditions and requires uncompromising work ethic, spirit, and sacrifice. The Downs believe that America’s veterans are tailor-made for that calling. “Nobody better understands sacrifice than our brave veterans,” says Kevin, “yet they have one of the highest unemployment rates in our country. We wanted to do something to be part of the solution. They answered the call to serve us. Ranchin’ Vets is here to serve them.” Ranchin’ Vets facilitates

20 California Cattleman June 2015

introductions between veterans and ranchers interested in mentoring them as working ranch hands. In addition, the non-profit provides each vet with a stipend to aid in defraying the cost of housing, clothing and transportation. Connecting ranchers and veterans has proven to be a good fit for both. Kevin’s wife, Corey, notes that the average age of a rancher in California is 55, and many are faced with successor generations that aren’t interested in continuing the family business. “Veterans can provide a sustainable work force to fill that need,” she says. “They are task-oriented learners who pick things up quickly and enjoy working with their hands.” Inspired by Kevin’s brother, Capt. Phil Downs, Jr., a Marine with three tours of duty in Iraq to his credit, the couple started the non-profit as a way of helping post 9/11 veterans find work in a therapeutic outdoor environment. Their mission is based on the belief that veterans, who often suffer from post traumatic stress issues, find peace working with animals in a quiet, rural farm setting. Ranchin’ Vets hopes its partnerships will result in longterm jobs for its veterans, but they recognize that many ranchers may only have openings for seasonal hires. “We have placed qualified vets in temporary positions,” says Corey, “and we encourage

Ranchin’ Vets Founders Corey and Kevin Downs interested ranchers to sign up on our website even if they don’t have a current opening, but may have one in the future.” Kevin originally came up with the concept for Ranchin Vets while attending college and working as a summer hire ranch hand at Stemple Creek Ranch near Tomales in West Marin County. He recalls, “At the end


of each day, when the sun was going down and the fog was rolling in, I would drive my four-wheeler to the top of the hill, turn off the engine, and just listen. All I could hear was the sound of the cows ripping the grass from the earth. It was incredibly peaceful. I wanted to share that experience with our veterans.” Fourth generation Stemple Creek Ranch owner Loren Poncia and his wife Lisa have been advocates of the program from the start, and sit on the non-profit’s board of directors. “We love being involved with Ranchin’ Vets because it is win-win,” says Poncia. “We get a great, hardworking employee to help us on the ranch, and the veteran gets a great job opportunity. We are honored to help military veterans in any way we can, and this is a perfect way to do it.” Cpl. Brett Billingsley is a Ranchin’ Vet placement currently working parttime at Stemple Creek Ranch while completing his studies in Fire Science at nearby Santa Rosa Junior College. A former Marine who was deployed to Afghanistan, Billingsley saw an ad posted by the non-profit in the college Veterans Affairs office. The experience has been transformational for him. “Ranchin’ Vets has been an amazing opportunity through and through,” he says. “Corey and Kevin are very supportive and truly enjoy helping vets like myself transition back into the civilian world. They introduced me to the great people at Stemple Creek who gave me the chance to work in the peaceful and therapeutic environment on their ranch. They also let me try my hand at product sales, which has helped improve my communication skills. I have nothing but great things to say about these amazing people and highly recommend the Ranchin’ Vets program to any vet transitioning back into civilian life.” Each Veteran’s Day, the organization hosts its annual Bike

For Heroes fundraising event. This year’s ten mile bike ride takes place on Saturday, Nov. 7, and stretches along Northern California’s scenic Highway 1 through the rolling farmlands of West Marin. The ride culminates with a grass-fed beef BBQ lunch hosted by Stemple Creek Ranch. All proceeds raised will go directly to support the Ranchin’ Vets program. All post 9/11 veterans are eligible to apply for admission to the Ranchin’ Vets program. Prior experience in agriculture is not required, but

applicants must have a willingness to learn through an apprenticeship approach, and are pre-screened for skill sets and prior work experience. Farmers and ranchers with present or future job opportunities who are interested in working with Ranchin’ Vets are encouraged to contact the non-profit. For more information on hiring a veteran, to sign up for the Bike For Heroes ride or to make a donation supporting the Ranchin’ Vets program, visit www.ranchinvets.org.

June 2015 California Cattleman 21


Broken Box Ranch Honored As AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year California Cattlemen’s Association members Jerry and Sherry Maltby, of Williams-based Broken Box Ranch, were recently honored with the 2015 AmericanInternational Charolais Association’s (AICA) Seedstock Producer of the Year Award. The presentation took place during the AICA annual Spring Meeting of the AICA Board of Directors, in Riverside, Mo. The award was presented by AICA President Larry Lehman and AICA Executive Vice President J. Neil Orth. In addition to raising purebred Charolais cattle, the Maltbys own and operate a 3,500-head backgrounding feedlot, have a commercial cowherd and raise conventional and organic rice on their ranch located in Colusa County. Originally, the Broken Box Ranch raised primarily rice, and like many operations in the 1950s, Hereford cattle called the Maltby ranch home. During Jerry’s college years he was exposed to Charolais cattle and after a short stint crossing Charolais and Hereford cattle, Jerry begain operating an all-breeds bull test center in Oakdale in 1978. In 1993, the Maltbys returned to the family ranch and slowly began to develop their own purebred Charolais herd, using strict selection protocols to ensure their bulls would benefit the commerical beef producer. Today, the Maltbys take full advantage of the technology the beef industry has to offer. From artificial insemination to genetic testing, their herd of Charolais cattle is among some of the best in the country. In addition to implementing beef technologies on their operation, the Maltbys also pride themselves on the use of alternative feeds which helps their cattle gain as they should while helping keep feed costs down. Broken Box has been a pioneer in the use of by-products in the California cattle industry. Jerry Maltby says his primary production philosophies are simple but strict. Broken Box Ranch bulls have to pass a structural exam, semen test and achieve a minimum scrotal circumference. The Maltbys work to maintain healthy, active bulls that are not fat, but have adequate condition to go to work. Their goal is simply to supply the best performance Charolais bulls available using sires known for moderate birth rates, heavy weaning and yearling weights and top ultrasound information. Similarly, Broken Box Ranch females are selected for ease of calving, fertility, udder quality, performance and disposition. Broken Box Ranch markets bulls to commercial producers through several consignment channels including the Red Bluff Bull Sale, Klamath Bull Sal, Fallon Bull Sale as well as private treaty. Raised in the Northern California agriculture community, both Jerry 22 California Cattleman June 2015

and Sherry are passionate about the beef business and are involved in a variety of agricultural leadership pursuits. Jerry has been integrally involved in the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association and Sherry is instrumental in the local GlennJerry and Sherry Maltby (center) Colusa unit of Receiving their award from AICA the California President Larry Lehman (right) and J. CattleWomen, Neil Orth (left). Inc. (CCW). In addition to her efforts on the local level, Sherry has also given much time to the statewide CCW organization. Jerry currently serves on the AICA Board as the chairman of the commerical committee. Known by their peers for their dedication to the beef business, the Maltbys were also recognized in 2010 at the CBCIA Seedstock Producers of the Year. CCA congratulates them on another well-deserved honor!


Cargill’s FRESNO Beef Plant Works to RAMP UP Resource EFFICIENCY In early May, Cargill announced it has collaborated with Tesla and Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), to install Tesla’s Energy Storage System at the company’s Fresno beef processing facility. Tesla’s batteries help to reduce energy costs by storing electricity at off-peak use times, then using it during peak periods. In total, the Tesla batteries have a 1 megawatt capacity that will be charged daily from the existing PG&E electricity grid system during off-peak hours, when electricity rates are lowest. The electricity stored in the batteries will then be used when rates are the highest each day during peak use times. By doing so, Cargill is reducing its contribution to the daily state power peak, when less environmentally friendly electricity generation might otherwise be required to meet demand. Electric utility cost savings are estimated to be more than $100,000 annually. As the first large-scale battery installation at a Cargill meat processing facility, the company hopes to learn from this project for future potential use of this technology at its plants around the world. “Tesla Energy Storage is another example of our willingness to employ new and different concepts for reducing our environmental footprint in ways that benefit the community and our beef business,” said Jon Nash, Cargill’s beef plant general manager at Fresno. “We understand that while we produce nourishing protein for millions of people on the West Coast, it is important for us to do so as responsibly as possible. Proper stewardship of the resources required to produce food is crucial to the ongoing success of our business and is important to current and future generations as the world’s population increases from more than 7 billion people today to more than 9

billion in 2050.” Installation of Tesla’s Energy Storage system at Cargill’s Fresno beef processing facility coincides with the company’s global Earth Day activities around the world. The company’s efforts range from resource conservation to trash removal from waterways; educating farmers in emerging nations how to optimize resources for long-term food production and more efficient transport of food that reduces emissions and use of fossil fuels; and collaborating with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and farmers and ranchers to improve agriculture. In recent years, Cargill pioneered the use of new technology to improve its environmental footprint at Fresno. In 2013, the company worked with a third party to install a solar water heating system on the roof of the beef plant’s main building, resulting in a reduction of the facility’s use of natural gas while also reducing its cost to heat water for food safety and plant sanitation purposes. Years earlier, the plant installed a methane gas recovery system for its wastewater pond, which captures this greenhouse gas for use as a fuel source to heat boilers. Water from the boilers is used for daily plant sanitation. Using this system eliminates greenhouse gas from being released into the atmosphere. Additionally, the plant’s water use has been significantly lowered through an ongoing program of reduction and reuse. “In 2015, Cargill is celebrating 150 years of feeding people in a way that helps people, communities where we have a presence, and the planet, thrive,” stated Nash. “Through sciencebased innovations and technologies, we believe our rich heritage will continue for the next 150 years.”

All bulls

ANGUS SIRES Connealy Black Granite Baldridge Waylon W34 A A R Ten X 7008 SA

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Connealy Confidence 0100 Rito 12E7 of 5F56 Sitz Top Game 561X

PA Fortitude 2500 Connealy In Focus 4925 Connealy Capitalist 028

Connealy Consensus 7229 Rito 9Q13 of Rita 5F56 Sydgen Trust 6228

Charolais Sires Winn Mans Lanza 610S LT Lanza Blue 1461 PLD ET

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Wulff

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woodland, california carl > 916-417-4199

DONATI RANCH

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dan & Barbara o’connell

O’Connell ranch colusa, california Dan > 530-632-4491 June

jerry & sherry maltby

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© Jerry > 530-681-5046 2015 California Cattleman 23


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD GLOBAL BEEF SUPPLIES STILL TIGHTENING LOWER OUTPUT FROM AUSTRALIA FORECASTED from the U.S. Meat Export Federation Already-thin global beef supplies are expected to further have had more abundant cattle supplies and each saw larger tighten in the second half of 2015, as USDA’s recently exports in the first quarter. Uruguay’s export growth (chilled/ released production, supply and distribution forecasts project frozen beef exports were 66,760 mt, up 17 percent) has been a 1 percent decline compared to last year. The Australian led by China, where exports doubled year-over-year to about cattle industry is hoping to see relief from the drought 25,000 mt. Paraguay’s beef/beef variety meat exports were conditions it has endured for nearly three years, which has led on a record pace in the first quarter, reaching 75,340 mt (+26 to the highest slaughter numbers since the 1970s. Australia’s percent). Exports to Russia were up 12 percent year-over-year beef production had not skipped a beat through April, still but still lower than in the first quarter of 2013, while exports exceeding last year’s record pace, but rainfall across parts of were significantly higher for Chile, Brazil and Israel. Australia spurred cattle prices to new records in late April The big news for the Paraguayan beef industry is that as the looming shortfall in slaughter cattle could be drawing it recently regained access to the European Union, which nearer. Since Australian beef is the primary competitor to suspended imports in 2011 due to foot-and-mouth disease. U.S. beef in the Asian markets, higher prices in Australia will Paraguay only has a 1,000 mt Hilton Quota allotment, under make U.S. beef more competitive. which chilled/frozen beef meeting its country-specific Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) is now projecting definition may enter the EU at 20 percent duty. However, an 11 percent decline in year-over-year beef production and frozen manufacturing beef from Paraguay can be shipped a corresponding 11 percent decline in exports for 2015. This to the EU under either of two larger quotas at a duty rate is a significant revision from its earlier projections, which of 20 percent. These are the quotas under which most called for a 14 percent drop in production and a 20 percent trade is expected to take place, with Paraguayan beef mostly decline in exports this year. MLA expects slaughter levels to competing with Brazilian and Uruguayan product. remain high through the current quarter before dropping The strengthening dollar and West Coast port congestion significantly in the second half of the year. But continued hampered the U.S. industry’s ability to fully capitalize on rainfall is necessary in order for the slowdown in production global opportunities in early 2015. March export numbers to materialize. – which will be available soon – should reflect some Australia’s January-April chilled/frozen beef export improvement in the port situation, given that the labor volume was 409,711 metric tons (mt), up 10 percent from dispute at the heart of the recent cargo backlog was settled a year ago. Exports were higher year-over-year to the U.S. Feb. 20. Port congestion issues lingered well into March, but (143,598 mt, +56 percent), Japan (92,467 mt, +14 percent), the tentative labor contract agreement helped reassure Asian Korea (47,867 mt, +1 percent) and Canada (14,453 mt, +46 buyers that the U.S. industry had put the worst of the crisis percent), but lower for China (40,788 mt, -20 percent). behind it, and weekly export data indicate that exports to Asia After surging in late 2012, Australia’s exports to China have exceeded year-ago levels since early March. have trended lower since May 2014, when China began enforcement of its hormone ban. At the same FIGURE 1. AUSTRALIA’S RECENT CHILLED/FROZEN BEEF EXPORTS time, exports to the U.S. have soared, driven by record prices for lean grinding beef and helped by the strong U.S. dollar. With lower U.S. cow slaughter again this year, demand for imported 90CL has remained robust. Brazil’s beef exporters had a more challenging first quarter, with beef/beef variety meat exports down 20 percent to 292,234 mt, reflecting difficult economic situations in key markets such as Russia, Venezuela and Iran. Brazil has also been challenged by relatively tight cattle supplies, with its January-February slaughter down 3 percent year-over-year. Concerns about the domestic economy, which takes around 80 percent of Brazil’s production, have also made it difficult for packers to pass along the higher prices they are paying for cattle. On the other hand, Uruguay and Paraguay 24 California Cattleman June 2015


WTO DECLARES COOL VIOLATION OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE rewritten in an earlier attempt to bring it into compliance with Early on May 18, a World Trade Organization panel rejected Washington’s appeal to an October 2014 ruling international trade law. USDA’s own economic analysis says declaring U.S. country-of-origin labeling (COOL) law in COOL is a burden on livestock producers, meat packers and violation of international trade law, again urging that it be processors with no consumer benefit. brought into compliance. Meanwhile, U.S. lawmakers are lining UPDATE: Early the morning of May 20, the House up to repeal the legislation as the threat of retaliatory tariffs Agriculture Committee approved legislation that would from trading partners loom. repeal Country of Origin Labeling (H.R. 2393) by a biThe appellate body’s report issued is the WTO’s fourth and partisan vote of 38 to 6. The National Cattlemen’s Beef final ruling against COOL, which requires U.S., Canadian and Mexican livestock to be segregated from birth and identified on Association and others applauded the swift action and urged the full House to take up this legislation as soon as meat labeling. Canada and Mexico have led a charge against the possible. measure at the WTO, contending mainly that it depresses the value of their livestock. With this final ruling, those Canada and Mexico are justified in impose billions of dollars’ worth of retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods as early as late summer, according to a letter from the COOL Reform Coalition noted to the U.S. Senate. Meanwhile, House Agriculture Committee Chairman Michael Conaway (R-TX) has said he will lead a charge in Congress to repeal the legislation, which he has called “a failed government mandate with serious economic implications.” Nearly all livestock lobby organizations continue to urge swift action by Washington. Barry Carpenter, president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute said, “We look forward to working with Congress to repeal COOL once and for all, so that the United States can comply with its trade Bull sell by these proven AI sires and more... obligations, avoid unnecessary retaliation against our products and restore our strong relationships with important trading partners.” National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Hoover Dam President (NCBA) and Wyoming cattleman, SAV Brilliance AAR Ten X Philip Ellis said NCBA has long been been Connealy Final Product encouraging lawmakers to repeal COOL in Benefield Substance a statement released shortly after the panel’s Coleman Regis reection of COOL. “We have long said that COOL is not just burdensome and costly to cattle producers, it is generally ignored by W/C United consumers and violates our international HL Tool Time trade obligations,” said Ellis. “Now that the SS Ebonys Grandmaster SDS In Force WTO has ruled for a fourth time that this rule discriminates against Canadian and CONTACT ANY OF THE BREEDERS BELOW TO BE ADDED TO THE LIST TO RECEIVE A CATALOG. Mexican livestock, the next step is retaliation by Canada and Mexico. Retaliation will irreparably harm our economy and our gonsalves Joey and Kristy relationships with our top trading partners (209) 765-1142 Ranch Mike and Stacy and send a signal to the world that the (209) 531-4893 7243 Maze Blvd Roger and Andy Flood • (530) 534-7211 U.S. doesn’t play by the rules. It is long Joe and Debbie Modesto, CA 95358 636 Flag Creek Rd., Oroville, CA 95965 (209) 523-5826 past time that Congress repeal this broken regulation.” NCBA calls on Congress to fix this Diamond Oak Cattle Company DOUBLE M RANCH Greg Mauchley & Sons: Cell (435) 830-7233 broken rule and supports legislation to STEVE OBAD: (209) 383-4373 • CELL: (209) 777-1551 11375 N. 10800 W. Bothwell, UT 84337 1232 W. TAHOE STREET, MERCED, CA 95348 repeal COOL before retaliation is awarded. GUEST CONSIGNOR: TIM & IRME AZEVEDO, AZEVEDO LIVESTOCK • NEWMAN, CA • (209) 873-4664, (209) 652-6577 Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has said in recent months that it would be up to Congress to fix the rule, which USDA had June 2015 California Cattleman 25

Take aim at higher Profits Annual Bull Sale

Angus

Simmental


The Coat of Many Colors SimGenetics offer entire complete spectrum

by Jackie Atkins, Ph.D., American Simmental Association Director of Science and Education, Bozeman, Mont.; and Sally Buxkemper, RX Ranch, Ballinger, Texas

C

oat color is an important trait with many sought-after varieties. Some breeders take advantage of the Certified Angus Beef program and breed mainly black cattle. Other breeders develop heat tolerant cattle with black hides and red hair. No matter your preference, coat color is one of the first things we notice about cattle. Here we dive into the physiology of coat color and the genetic control of various coat color phenotypes.

The Physiology of Coat Color The coat color that we see in an adult animal is the result of many physiological steps that have to occur correctly beginning in the developing fetus. Early in pregnancy, cells called melanoblasts migrate from the neural crest of the fetus to the base layer of the skin or the hair follicle. Melanoblast migration is under the control of many different signals and is the first step in the future coat color phenotype — if these cells don’t make it to the hair follicles throughout the body then those places will be white. The melanoblasts eventually mature into melanocytes, the cells responsible for coloring (pig- mentation) the skin and hair. Melanocytes produce melanin through a process called melanogenesis. Melanin is a generic term for the chemicals responsible for coloring hair and skin. There are two melanins, pheomelanin makes yellow to red colors and eumelanin makes black/brown coloring. After the melanins are made they are transferred to hair follicle (a process called pigment transfer). In summary, colored hair — red, black or anywhere in between — requires the following chain of events 1) melanoblast migration; 2) melanoblast maturation to melanocytes; 3) melanogenesis (making of pheomelanin or eumelanin); 4) distribution of the melanins

26 California Cattleman June 2015

to the follicles; and 5) maintaining a healthy population of melanocytes. Disruption anywhere along this chain results in white hair. Coat color in cattle has two main categories 1.) the basic solid color from black to white and 2.) patterned color that alters the basic coat color (blaze, brindle, brockle, spotting, etc.). The basic coat color depends on the ratio between the two melanins, pheomelanin and eumelanin. Black animals have more eumelanin production and red animals have more pheomelanin production (see how in the next section). There are dilution mutations that can alter the base color uniformly across the entire body. The dilution gene in Simmental cattle is dominant or semi-dominant meaning it only takes one copy to alter the phenotype. The dilution gene affects the eumelanin transfer to the hair follicle and is typically noticed in genetically black animals (change from black to grey). Charolais cattle have a different mutation on this same dilution gene (PMEL-17) fixed in their population that results in the light coat color typical of the Charoloais breed. White patterning in blazed faced, spotted, belted or brockled cattle is usually caused by genes involved in melanocyte migration or survival.

The Gene Players In order to understand the genetic control of coat color, you need to understand some basic principles in genetics. A gene refers to a specific sequence of DNA on a specific location of a chromosome that makes a specific protein in the cell. Variations in the sequence of DNA can have either no change to the resulting protein, slight change in the shape of the protein, or make the protein nonfunctional. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 28


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gonsalves Ranch

7243 Maze Blvd Modesto, CA 95358

Joey and Kristy .....................................(209) 765-1142 Mike and Stacy ................................... (209) 531-4893 Joe and Debbie ...................................(209) 523-5826

Mark your calendar for

Bulls Eye Breeders Bull Sale Sept. 16 • Modesto, CA!

June 2015 California Cattleman 27


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

 Coat color depends on the ratio of Eumelanin and Pheomelanin production. More Eumelanin leads to blacker pigmentation and more Pheomelanin results in red to yellow coat color. Each animal carries two copies of every gene and each gene can have different DNA sequences called alleles which result in different proteins. The main gene involved in coat color in cattle goes by several names, the extension locus, melanocortin 1 receptor (MCR1) or melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor (MSHR). This gene has three alleles (variants in DNA sequence): black (E), red (e) and wild type (E+). Most of us have a pretty solid understanding of black coat color vs. red coat color but there is quite a bit of confusion when it comes to the wild type variant. First of all, “wild type” has nothing to do with an animal’s disposition. Wild type is a generic term in genetics referring to the normal allele or in this case the original allele. In the extension locus, the wild type variant is the original DNA sequence and the black and red variants are mutations of the wild type sequence. The black allele is a mutation that causes the pathway for eumelanin to be constantly active resulting in black pigmentation. The red allele has a mutation that results in a non-functional protein important in eumelanin production. Without this protein, eumelanin cannot be made and the animal will only produce pheomelanin resulting in a red coat color. Wild type animals have a functioning protein to make eumelanin (black) but this protein is susceptible to other signals to either increase eumelanin production for darker pigmentation or increase pheomelanin production for redder coat color. In other words, wild type coat color can be varying degrees of red/yellow to brown/black. The order of dominance for these alleles is thought to be E>E+>e, in other words black is dominant to wild type which is dominant to red. However, a new study suggests in some cattle, particularly in Bos indicus x Bos taurus crosses, black is not completely dominant to wild type. Hulsman Hanna and colleagues published an article (Genetics Selection Evolution, 2014) on the genetic control of coat color in over 200 heterozygous (E/E+) AngusNelore cross cattle. Based on the previous thinking, we would expect all these heterozygotes to be black as black is dominant to wild type and red alleles. However, there were varying degrees of pigmentation in these 200 cattle from black all the way to red. 28 California Cattleman June 2015

This study found some potential secondary genes that could cause the E/E+ cattle to have reddish coat, and it presented strong evidence that the black allele is not completely dominant to the wild type allele in Bos indicus x Bos taurus cattle. Jersey, Brown Swiss, Tarentaise, Texas Longhorn, Brahman and other Zebu cattle carry the wild type allele but it is not limited to these populations (note picture of the E+/e SimAngus Bull). Due to its prevalence in the Brahman breed, Simbrah cattle frequently carry the wild type variant. As wild type animals have the ability to make both red or black hair, their coat color can be more variable. Homozygous wild type cattle range in coat color from yellow to black although the most common coloration is reddish brown or brownish black. Frequently wild type animals become darker as they age and wild type bulls are typically darker pigmented than wild type cows (see pictures for examples). Wild type animals commonly have darker pigmentation at the feet, head, and neck and have a tan ring around the muzzle. As wild type animals can make black or red hair, other genes that affect the ratio of pheomelanin to eumelanin production will affect wild type animals but not black or true red (ee) cattle. The agouti gene is one such gene with three different variants. The agouti gene makes a protein that can modify the ratio of eumelanin and pheomelanin in wild type cattle. Variants in the agouti gene can make a wild type animal almost completely black, and may control the darker pigmentation associated with the head, neck and feet in some E+ cattle. The brindle gene is another case where the gene has no effect on either red (ee) or black (E/_) cattle but can cause black stripes in wild type cattle. Cattle can be blazed, spotted, brindled, roan, brockle, belted, diluted, dun and the list goes on and on. There are many genes involved in these variations of coat color. With the genomic era, scientists are digging deeper into these variations and adding to the list of gene players continually. While the above information may be viewed as the tip of the iceberg when it comes to coat color control, hopefully this provides you with a little better understanding of the physiology and genetic control of hair pigmentation.


It’s with the crossbred cow that the chief rewards of heterosis are reaped. 1.3 years increased cow longevity (Cunduff 1993) 20% more calf weaned per cow (Gregory1980) 1 more calf weaned in her lifetime (Weaber 2007)

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AMERICAN SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION NEW HEADQUARTERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION The American Simmental Association (ASA) has broken ground on a new, state-of-the-art headquarters building located on a 4.3 acre lot one mile north of its current location. “A favorable building climate, high-value real estate property, and available funds have created an opportunity too good to pass up,” said the Board of Trustees Chairman Bob Lanting, Idaho Falls, Idaho, commenting on the decision to build a new national ASA facility. “Approval to build is the most important financial decision this organization has made in years.” Since 1973, the ASA’s national headquarters has been located at the original, Swiss chalet-style building in Bozeman. ASA will be moving to the updated three-level facility by the end of the year. ASA maintains the world’s largest genetic evaluation database for the Simmental and Simbrah breeds, as well as for 12 other US and international breed associations. ASA also maintains one of the strongest youth organizations in the cattle industry with an emphasis on education and hands-on experience. Western Region Trustee Susan Russell from Sugar City, Colo., says, “The new building, nestled between Bozeman’s scenic mountains, will allow Simmental to upgrade its facilities so our staff may more efficiently serve our breeders and their SimGenetic customers, as well as our multi-breed evaluation constituents.” June 2015 California Cattleman 29


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGIES IN BEEF CATTLE CONFERENCE COMES TO DAVIS IN AUGUST by UC Davis Cooperative Extension sprecialist Alison Van Enennaam, Ph.D. The 2015 Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle (ARSBC) Symposium will be held Aug. 16-18 at the new stateof-the-art University of California, Davis, Conference Center, which is located adjacent to the host hotel, the Hyatt Place in Davis. This roving national conference provides an opportunity to combine training on basic reproductive function with novel approaches for improving reproductive performance in beef cattle. The conference is put on annually by the Beef Reproduction Task Force (BRTF), a national committee comprised of university faculty members with appointments in research and extension who have dedicated interests in reproductive management of beef cattle. Key goals of the BRTF include promoting widespread adoption of reproductive technologies among cow-calf producers, educating producers in management considerations that will increase the likelihood of successful breeding of animals through artificial insemination and educating producers about marketing options to capture benefits that result from use of improved reproductive techniques. The goal of the conference is to facilitate improvements in reproductive performance and enhance knowledge and use of technologies to increase profitability and sustainability in the beef industry. The program will include six general sessions which will cover a variety of topics, from physiology to genetics to management, and will present the latest information on reproductive technologies including estrus synchronization protocols, artificial insemination, the use of sexed-semen and other approaches to improve the rate of genetic gain. Speakers from across the nation, in addition to researchers, veterinarians and producers from here in California, will be presenting at the conference. This year’s event will kick off on Sunday, Aug. 16, with an optional tour of the renowned Kunde Winery, Glen Ellen Century Vineyard in Sonoma County, wine caves tour and lunch, followed by a visit to a water buffalo artifical insemination center. The early registration deadline for this event is June 30, and the cost is only $200, which includes dinner at the UC Davis Horse Barn on Monday night, and lunch on both Monday and Tuesday. Students can register for the bargain rate of $100 for the whole conference and are highly encouraged to attend. Additionally, 10 undergraduate or graduate students will received complimentary registration – check on the website for more information on applying for the student registration fee waiver. The California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) has also generously agreed to help pay hotel accommodation for a limited number of student attendees at the conference – students should check with their University adviser about this opportunity. At a time when drought is significantly impacting the California cattle industry, the organizing committee, local producers, and university faculty, staff and students enthusiastically welcome ARSBC conference participants as we come together to discuss available and future technologies and management techniques that have the potential to improve 30 California Cattleman June 2015

the efficiency of beef reproduction, even in the face of fewer resources and challenging environmental conditions. One session will focus specifically on heifer development with a particular emphasis on drought management of cows and heifers, and the effect that maternal nutrition can have on fetal development and programming. Topics will include Eric Scholljegerdes, Ph.D., fom New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N.M., asking “Drought: Devastating natural event or a wake-up call for better cattle management?”; John Hall, Ph.D., from the University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, on “Heifer development”; Richard Funston, Ph.D., from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb., on, “Fetal programming – Implications for beef cattle production”; and Jeffrey Stott, Ph.D., and Bryan Welly from UC Davis on the topic of “Managing Foothill Abortion.” On the afternoon of Monday, Aug. 17, there will be a producer panel featuring: Doug Worthington, Vintage Angus Ranch, Modesto; Herb Holzapfel, Cattle producer and rice farmer, Willows; Mike Hall, Cal Poly Professor Emeritus and Wulf Cattle West Coast Representative, Arroyo Grande; and Kevin Borror, Tehama Angus Ranch, Gerber. These panelists will speak on how they are using applied reproductive strategies in their operations. Vish Vishwanath, Ph.D., from Sexing Technologies, Inc., Navasota, Texas, will discuss “Sexed sperm vs Conventional sperm, a comparative discussion”; and Mark Allan, Ph.D., from Trans Ova Genetics, Iowa, will give a presentation entitled “Genetic Gain Full Throttle: Acceleration of Genetic Improvement Through Today’s Technologies.” Many additional talks are featured and the full program can be viewed online at http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com. Both ARPAS and veterinary medicine continuing education credits have been requested for the meeting. Updated information regarding continuing education credits will be posted on the website. The speaker program will be held Monday, Aug. 17 and Tuesday, Aug. 18, wrapping up with a fun afternoon of wine tasting aboard pontoon boats on Lake Berryessa. Both of these side events require preregistration and space is limited so please register early. The current program and registration information can be viewed online at http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com. The setting of this year’s conference at UC Davis provides the unique opportunity to combine the strengths and expertise of the Department of Animal Science, the School of Veterinary Medicine and UC Cooperative Extension (UCCE) to create an event that will deliver the most current comprehensive information and cutting edge technologies to participants. The meeting is sponsored in part by the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Department of Animal Science. Anyone seeking additional information about the 2015 ARSBC conference should visit the conference website at http://www.appliedreprostrategies.com or e-mail Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., at alvaneenennaam@ucdavis.edu.


beef industry works on traceability system for access to China After being closed to U.S. beef since 2003 upon the first discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the U.S, China is coming to the table to discuss options for importing U.S. beef once again. U.S. beef industry interests said they have agreed to implement a traceability system that would satisfy China’s demands for one, and thereby gain access to its beef market. In a letter to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, the Meat Institute (NAMI), National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) urged a quick conclusion to negotiations with Beijing to reopen its market to U.S. beef.

The groups outlined a voluntary traceability system to meet China’s requirement that the U.S. certify at the slaughter plant the birth premise of every animal from which beef is derived to export to that country. The system includes cattle in existing animal identification programs — such as the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (APHIS) National Uniform Eartagging System and the brucellosis ear tagging system — that permit the documentation of birth premise. Information that would permit the identification of the birth premise or any animal that falls under this traceability system would be made available to APHIS in the event of an animal health incident.

CattleFax Webinar for Value-Added Calves

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Seasoned cow-calf producers recognize the calf market’s recordhigh prices are likely to decline as cowherd expansion brings additional supplies. Producers can maintain higher profitability by recognizing this shift and quickly adjusting management and marketing strategies. CattleFax will discuss these topics during its next Trends+ Cow-Calf Webinar at 5:30 p.m. MT, June 10, 2015. To participate in the webinar and access program details, producers and industry leaders simply need to register online at www.cattlefax.com/meetings.aspx. The one-hour session will include a variety of relevant topics for the cowcalf audience: • A second half 2015 price outlook for the cattle and feedstuff markets, • Expectations for 2015 value-added premiums in the calf market, and • Considerations for estimating returns on value-added management practices. The Trends+ webinar is designed to inform cattle producers about current market realities and provide producers with decision-friendly information to assist in making intelligent marketing decisions. More than 2,000 producers have benefitted from the analysis and strategies shared through the webinar series since fall 2013. Elanco Animal Health is sponsoring the webinar – making it free for all cattle and beef producers to participate.

June 2015 California Cattleman 31 AAC_Cattlemens_4.72x7.5_Ranchblood_bw.indd 1

5/14/2015 1:03:06 PM


Spanish Ranch Delivers i Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

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Brangus Genomic-Enhanced EPDs make joint transition The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) has joined forces with a large group of entities to formulate breed specific genomic enhanced EPDs. The evolution in IBBA genomic technology is a result of a collaborative effort between IBBA, Livestock Genetic Services, Iowa State University, National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium (NBCEC), Colorado State University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NeogenGeneSeek and Zoetis. In late June 2014 IBBA transitioned its DNA testing to GeneSeek Inc. located in Lincoln, Neb. With this move, Brangus breeders had the option to utilize an 80k panel or a reduced 30k panel to obtain genomic information to enhance the accuracy of Brangus expected progeny differences (EPDs). IBBA has adopted use of the newly released GeneSeek® Genomic Profiler™, the GGP HD150K panel, that is replacing the 80K panel. Brangus GE-EPDs will be made available on all traits reported by the IBBA including growth, reproduction and ultrasound traits. The GE-EPDs were estimated by John Genho, President of Livestock Genetic Services, using the approximately 2,200 profiles generated at Neogen or Zoetis on the 30K, 50K, 80K, 150K, 770K and 850K panels. “Genomic-enhanced EPDs are the tool of choice in breed improvement strategies in the livestock industry

32 California Cattleman June 2015

today.” says Tommy Perkins, Ph.D., IBBA Executive Vice President. “It is our role to give IBBA members the most current tools to make improvement in beef production. Genomically enhanced EPDs will allow Brangus breeders to make the most accurate and rapid genetic improvement available.” GE-EPDs combine an analysis of pedigree, individual performance and genomic information to hasten the rate of genetic progress in a population of cattle. Most importantly, GE-EPDs increase the accuracy of EPDs on younger, non-proven animals. The increase in EPD accuracies allows breeders to identify the best genetics earlier in an animal’s life without the extreme cost of progeny testing. Information gleaned from a single DNA sample may be as informative as the first calf crop of a bull or the lifetime production record of a cow. “Although the process to get Brangus GE-EPDs has taken longer than desired they will certainly benefit commercial bull buyers and members for years to come,” Perkins says. “The Brangus breeders continue to add to the genomic database which will further improve the accuracy of Brangus genetic predictions.” For more information about IBBA’s genomic testing, contact Tommy Perkins at 210-696-8231 or tperkins@intbrangus.org.


HOUSE PASSES BILL TO STOP WATERS OF U.S. FROM GOING INTO EFFECT The House passage of the Regulatory Integrity Protection Act (HR. 1732) by a vote of 261 to 156 on May 13 requires EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers not only halt moving forward on the currently proposed rule, but also begin working with states and local stakeholders to develop a new and proper set of recommendations. One of the greatest complaints has been a lack of coordinated effort with state and local authorities and the federal overexpansion of jurisdiction from rights previously held at the lower levels. Philip Ellis, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Assn. noted the rule that the Army Corps and EPA is quickly trying to finalize would put yet another regulatory burden on the rural economy and private landowners. “This action by Congress will ensure that our private lands remain viable and productive, leaving landowners free to undertake stewardship and production decisions without interference by the EPA and the Administration.” According to House Agriculture Committee Chairman Michael Conaway (R-TX), “What makes the rule ambiguous is the claim made by EPA and the Army Corps that the rule is not all encompassing, yet the agencies also declared they will use their best professional judgment on when they will regulate a water and when they will not. These vague statements hold little comfort for farmers and ranchers who will face steep civil fines for any violation,” Conaway said. Statement by Public Lands Council president and Idaho rancher Brenda Richards looks forward to passage of the bill which requires regulators to work with stakeholders to clarify the Clean Water Act in a way that works for those closest to the land. “This needs to be a process that starts at the grassroots, not a process dictated upon us by those with no connection to the land and economic reality,” she said. Rep. Mimi Walters (CA-45), an original co-sponsor of H.R. 1732, said the bipartisan bill would require the Obama Administration to withdraw the proposed Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule – a rule which

significantly expands the federal government’s jurisdiction to regulate waters and adjacent lands. “The EPA’s proposed rule on our nation’s waters significantly expands the federal government’s jurisdiction over waters never intended for regulation, including: streams, ponds, puddles and ditches. This flagrant power grab by the Obama Administration threatens American jobs, increases the cost of doing business, and heightens the likelihood of costly litigation...Our bill, which passed overwhelmingly in the U.S. House today with my support, would rein in the EPA’s burdensome

regulatory overreach and require that a proper and transparent rulemaking process is followed in the future. I hope the Senate will act swiftly in passing this bipartisan, common-sense bill.” Similar legislation has also been introduced by a bipartisan group of senators. That bill, the Federal Water Quality Protection Act (S 1140), would also direct the agencies to withdraw the proposed rule and develop a new rule in consultation with states and stakeholders, but it would also establish principles the new rule should be based on.

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June 2015 California Cattleman 33


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34 California Cattleman June 2015

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WHAT ARE LENDERS LOOKING FOR? Get the answers before taking the test by Joel Larson, Credit Team, AgStar Finance

Among all of the things that agriculture producers have to think about, here’s one more thing to contemplate — what is my lender looking for when he is making a loan to me? At AgStar, we have many things to consider when a client applies for a loan. Questions used to evaluate an applicant’s character range from subjective questions about their community involvement to more objective considerations, such as payment history. Below are five of the top areas AgStar considers. Included are questions that we often ask as a lender to evaluate each area. In preparation for working with a lender, think through these questions to identify what areas you might need to strengthen to be considered an ideal candidate.

Character

This can be subjective, such as how are you viewed in the community? Are you a good neighbor? Are you active in the community – in a positive way? • Do you have good communication skills? • Does your family have a good history with the lending institution? Character can also be measured by your repayment history. Do you pay your obligations on time as agreed? Lending institutions use a credit bureau score to assess how you deal with your different creditors. A low credit bureau score (less than 700) may indicate late payments, disputes or too many accounts. A good credit bureau score (700 to 800) is an indication that you pay your accounts on time and ultimately there will be less risk to the lender.

Financial and Production History

What do your financial trends say about your business? Are you showing a trend of profitability and net worth growth? • What is your history of capital expenses? • Are your records timely and accurate? Do you provide your lender financial information that is current and reconciles change in net worth to your earnings? • Do you know your family living expense? • Do you know what the key ratios say about your business? • What is your past production history?

Cost of Production

• Do you know your cost of production on a whole herd or per cow basis? • If you know your break even, are you marketing from that information? • How do you compare to a benchmark?

Cash flow Projections

• Do you have a monthly cash flow plan? • Are you completing actual to budgeted comparisons throughout the year? • If you have a major expansion in mind, do you have a structured business plan that you can present to your lender?

Risk Management

• How do you deal with risk in your operation? • Do you have adequate levels of crop insurance, property & casualty, and life insurance? • Do you have a will?

Whether you are a young farmer just starting out your farming career or a farmer with 25 years of experience, these management areas are all important to you and your lender. There is a lot to consider. As most veteran farmers know, it takes a lot of effort to properly manage these various areas. But, there is a significant payoff. Clients who are strong in these areas will benefit from more options and better rates when financing their operations. 36 California Cattleman June 2015


American AgCredit pays 39 Million in Cash Dividends to Shareholders American AgCredit, a farmerowned financial cooperative, recently announced net income of $98.9 million for the 2014 calendar year along with a cash dividend distribution of $39 million to its shareholders. This compares to net income of $111 million and a cash dividend of $37 million in 2013. American AgCredit has returned over $215 million to its customer-owners since 2005. “American AgCredit experienced another successful year, and we’re proud to once again pay a strong cash dividend to our customer-owners,” said Byron Enix, President and CEO. “With an increase of 5.2 percent in loan volume, we continue to see solid growth in agriculture. American AgCredit is well positioned to support

this growth through our strong capital position and consistent earnings. We are continuously improving our operations to better serve our customers as we strive to be the very best lender to agriculture.” Loan volume ended the year at $6.36 billion compared to $6.05 billion from a year ago, an increase of $314 million. American AgCredit’s capital position continues to be very strong and increased by $92 million during the year to $1.71 billion at December 31, 2014. Profitability for 2014 was solid as $98.9 million of net income was recorded for the year compared to $111.2 million for 2013 “Agriculture has experienced a sustained period of favorable economic conditions during the past

few years contributing to the on-going success of the industry. However, the continuing drought conditions in the West are creating some challenges. American AgCredit is honored to serve our customer-owners and will be there to help agriculture meet those challenges,” said Chief Financial Officer Vern Zander. “As a cooperative, we share our profits with our customer-owners through our patronage program,” added Zander. “This year we’re pleased to return $39 million of cash patronage dividends representing 39 percent of our 2014 net income. This effectively reduces our customers’ interest rates by 0.75 percent.”

Looking to buy or sell ag real estate in California? Look no further than Five Star Land Company. The principles have over 150 years in California agriculture. As a past CCA President and a past Young Cattlemen’s President, no one knows what you do like we do.

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KEENE RANCH

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The 8,940±-acre Keene Ranch is located just 8 miles from Tehachapi, 2 hours from downtown Los Angeles, between Golden Hills and Bear Valley, making this a prime development opportunity. A cattle ranch with oak covered grasslands, pine trees, and year round springs. Equestrian ranch with amazing trails and beautiful valleys: a ranch teaming with wildlife, deer, elk, bear, quail, and more. *Video available on You Tube. Kern County, California $15,900,000

First time on the market in nearly 150 years, this 1,118±-acre California heritage ranch is one of the oldest in Marin County. Only 50 minutes from San Francisco, the lands are USDA-Certified Organic, producing grass-fed Wagyu beef cattle. A ranch home lies within sound of the ocean, barn, equipment garage, corrals, shop, natural spring ponds and reservoirs, quarry and wildlife habitat. *Video available on You Tube. Marin County, California No Price

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BRISCOE CREEK RANCH

2,870 acre 100% organic alfalfa & barley production farm with beautiful views of Mt. Shasta. Water is gold and this ranch has lots of it, 9 wells over 15,000 gpm. The farm has 5 homes, 2 barns, shops, outbuildings, scales, organic grain silos, and is enrolled in the Private Lands Management program that allows for late season hunts. There are 13 pivots with room to expand. Great investment opportunity. *Video available on You Tube. Siskiyou County, California $7,750,000

8,184 +/- deeded-acre property is located in Glenn County about 5 miles from Stonyford, CA. The ranch has 7 year round ponds and in the northern end of the property you have over one half mile of Briscoe Creek, a year round creek with trout. The headquarters has a great barn, shop, guest cottage and caretaker home. Runs 200 pair for the season or 100 pair year round. *Video available on You Tube. Glenn County, California / $6,250,000

38 California Cattleman June 2015


SHILLING YOSEMITE RANCH 3,680 +/- acres, 19 parcels, 16 of them are zoned Mountain Preserve and 3 parcels are zoned exclusive agriculture and in the Williamson act. Yosemite is just 25 miles away. Fenced/cross-fenced for livestock, with springs and ponds supplying year round water. Raise livestock, horse back riding, hiking, hunting, vineyards and of course gold mining. Located in the D-6 zone, hunt for trophy black tail deer and black bear as well as turkey, quail and doves and the golfer will be happy with several golfing choices! *Video available on You Tube. Mariposa County, California $4,999,000

BV4 RANCH Organic alfalfa ranch located just outside of Dorris, CA. Certified Organic. 553 acres with 525 acres under irrigation. Four Reinke 3 wheel drive automated Pivots with phone link remote, 700 ton capacity pole barn, well w/new 300 HP Turbine, new pump, new 350 Hp VFD & all new electrical & power systems. Alfalfa, clover & rye planted in 2013 and 2014. Soil deep ripped & amended for high yield performance. Siskiyou County, California $4,400,000

CROOK RANCH This is your classic California winter grass ranch. 5,101 deeded acres that usually run 300 pair or 1,000 yearlings from Nov. 15 to May 15. It is 21 miles from Red Bluff, CA and is currently in the Williamson act. The ranch sits at 1,000 ft. elevation and rises to a high of 1,520 ft. elevation. Miles of trails and beautiful scenery make the camping, hunting, fishing, swimming, and horseback riding possible. all without ever leaving your own ranch! *Video available on You Tube. Tehama County, California $ 3,999,500

DOUBLE “A” RANCH Top of the line operation offering 911 acres with over 725 acres under pivot and linear, plus an additional 125 acres in dry land farming and a 20 acre irrigated pasture. This ranch has WATER, over 7,700 GPM provided from 4 great wells tied together with underground mainline all on Surprise Valley Power. Three 2,000-2,200 ton pole barns, barn, shop, and fenced with nice corrals. Lassen County, California $3,750,000

THE HUMPHREY RANCH 2,291 acres, 1 1/2 man, 400-cow operation, easy to run inside operation. Great irrigation well, 3,000 GPM, 610’ deep with a 14” casing and two 147 acre center pivots. The pivots are on some of the valleys best sandy loam soils. Located in both X6a and X6b, the ranch comes with 2 landowner deer tags. Beautiful pine and oak forest with mountain meadows, springs, and buck brush patches. Lassen County, California $3,500,000

SUNSHINE RANCH 288 acres with 185 acres of irrigated cropland growing high altitude alfalfa hay. There are 3 wells, all tied together with underground mainline. Main home & 2 additional homes, hay barns, livestock barn, shop, equipment storage and several outbuildings. You can run about 50 pair for the summer in the east field, more or less depending on rainfall. Shasta County, California $3,495,000

NO FENCES HAY RANCH 320 +/- acres under production growing the highest quality, high altitude timothy hay in the area. 40 acres of the 320 is now in mint, on it’s final year and will be replanted in timothy or Sudan. Three wells produce plenty of water to flood irrigate the entire ranch with underground main line and return ditch system. Three pole barns and plenty of water to flood the ranch. Shasta County, California $3,000,000

EAST PARK RANCH This 1,989 +/- acre property is a classic recreational ranch located about 3 minutes from the town of Lodoga, and approximately 23 miles from Maxwell, CA. Just 145 miles from San Francisco. Eight ponds, six wells, 120’ x 60’ shop, barn, bunk houses, run 200 pair for season, great black tail deer, turkey and pig hunting. The property borders the East Park Reservoir known for its bass fishing and great boating. *Video Available on You www.californiaoutdoorproperties.com Tube. Colusa County, California $2,900,000 June 2015 California Cattleman 39

707 Merchant St. Suite 100 Vacaville, CA 95688 Office: (707) 455-4444 Fax: (707) 455-0455


Rabobank report evaluates beef industry as U.S. grazing acres decline According to a report released this year from the Rabobank Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory group, cattle producers across the U.S. are heeding economic indications to rebuild and expand their herds, but a 32 million-acre decline in pasture availability over the last ten years is hindering expansion and causing producers to weigh options that require less land. The report, “Outside In: Confined Cow-Calf Production as a Viable Model for Rebuilding the U.S. Cow Herd Numbers” finds that more innovation is paramount to the growth of the U.S. cattle sector. “The U.S. cow herd must grow if the industry is going to preserve existing infrastructure and regain lost market share,” says report author and Rabobank Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory Group Senior Analyst Don Close. “In order to for that growth to occur, the beef and cattle community must address main expansion constraints: high capital barriers, declining availability of grazable acres and ageing producers. In many parts of the country, incorporating systems for confined calf production is an important stop to overcoming these constraints.” Close notes confined cow-calf production is an avenue to enable young producers entry into the industry. It is also a means in which land-locked corn belt row crop producers can expand their revenue stream, allowing young family members to return to the farm. The report finds that confined production systems present an alternative that replaces high capital requirements with intensified management and labor. The report’s economic evaluation shows that two systems—confined calf production in excess feed yard space and in confinement buildings that are 40 California Cattleman June 2015

typically built in the Corn Belt— are very competitive compared to conventional production models. “While the primary method of U.S. calf production will remain the traditional cow-calf grazing model, the benefits of confined and semiconfined programs – primarily increased efficiency from the cow

herd and healthier animals – makes them a truly viable and valuable option,” notes Close. “The ability to adjust the nutritional needs of the cow to the pregnancy/post-calving stage, and the ability to sort cows and adjust feed requirements based on their body condition scores isn’t an option with open grazing.”


CRATER LAKE REALTY, INC. Linda Long, Principal Broker & Owner

Cell: (541) 891-5562 • E-mail: Linda@CraterLakeRealtyInc.com Junction of Hwy 62 and 97 • P.O. Box 489 • Chiloquin, OR 97624 BUCK MOUNTAIN RANCH

PRIVATE TURNKEY RANCH

PASTURE RANCH

7,565 acre cattle and premier mountain hunting ranch offering world class elk and trophy mule deer hunting. The ranch is located in Grant County, Ore., midway between Burns and John Day. The ranch is incredibly well watered and has exceptional improvements. Buck Mountain Ranch consists of 4960+/contiguous deeded acres together with a USFS grazing permit of approximately 2604 +/- contiguous acres on the Malheur National Forest. MLS #87170 $4,200,000. Contact Linda or M.T. Anderson, Broker, 541-377-0030, mtanderson@craterlakerealtyinc.com.

660 acres of pines, pasture & juniper with 167+/- acres irrigated from 4 reservoirs. Flood irrigation plus 4 wheel lines & water cannons. Ideal for cattle, horses, or grass hay. 3000sf, 3 bedroom/2 bath home inside a 6000sf building, three 2 bedroom cabins, RV garage, stable, indoor arena w/stalls, separate stall barn, shop, 6 bay equipment shed, hay barn/airplane hangar, airstrip. Fully furnished plus equipment and more! A lot here for the money. OWC/OAC. Klamath County, MLS 83233 $1,500,000.

Along ¾ mi of Lost River in Henley area. 240 acres, approximately 195 acres irrigated with estimated stocking rate of 300 yearlings. Perfect for horses or purebred operation. Fenced, cross fenced, corrals, scale, livestock/hay barn & shop, pumps, mainline, 5 guns, much equipment included. 3 bedroom home overlooking the river valley. Abundance of waterfowl, cranes and birds of prey along peaceful & private Lost River frontage. Geothermal lease and wooded butte with beautiful buildings sites. Klamath County, MLS# 86024 $1,295,000.

MT. SHASTA VIEW – IRRIGATION WELL

BLACK BUTTE RANCH

Private 167 acres, 2 pivots, 5 wheel lines, new variable speed pump and boles.108 irrigated acres are excellent soils for alfalfa, grain & pasture, has been in spuds. Balanced for cattle and hay rotations with pole barn, livestock barn, corrals, fenced and cross-fenced, BLM lands close! Gorgeous 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2700+ sq ft manufactured home with high ceilings, tile and carpeted floors, huge kitchen with island, grand master suite. Views every direction, decking on 3 sides, garage/shop, beautiful landscaping and garden. MLS 86927 $835,000.

ANTELOPE CREEK RANCH

1545 ac private valley 180 acres water rights with irrigation well & creek for pivot & gravity flow. 180’x120’ indoor arena with 18+ stalls, welded steel pipe fencing, 96’x90’ shop, 45’x100 pole barn. 2 reservoirs attract deer and wildlife. 3700sf 4 bd/3ba beautiful home with 360 degree valley & butte view! Borders BLM with grazing permit. An immaculate bargain at $1,750,000 Klamath County.

CASCADE MT VIEW SETTING

SCENIC, PRIVATE, UNIQUE

Home to countless birds, deer and other wildlife—this only begins to describe this special 431 acre ranch located alongside miles of the Sprague River, and only 8 miles to Chiloquin. Currently in wild rice ponds providing ideal bird habitat, pasture, pine and aspens trees. Open meadows & river front are just a few of the amenities. Ranch has certified water rights from the river and private well for about 190 acres. Log home with 3 BR, 2 Baths, and numerous outbuildings for equipment storage plus a log horse barn. In the past this was a working cow ranch and could be put back to that use. Klamath County, MLS #84375 $1,500,000.

FORT KLAMATH

A 16,750 acre (7050 deeded plus USFS permits) cattle and premier mountain hunting ranch in the Izee Valley, Grant County, Oregon midway between Burns and John Day. The ranch is extraordinarily well watered with over 40 springs and miles of live water creeks supplying free irrigation; the majority bearing a priority date of 1885. Homes, shops, corrals, 5 LOP tags! $5,900,000. MLS# 87093 Contact Linda or M.T. Anderson, Broker, 541-377-0030, mtanderson@craterlakerealtyinc.com.

Restored historic home & garage on tree lined private drive, 79 acres with flood irrigated pastures plus optional pump for farm crops. Setup for horse owners, underground water and power to stallion facility, horse barns and shelters, pipe paddocks, plus room for an arena! Fenced and cross fenced…MOVE IN, the work is done! Klamath County, MLS# 85671 $458,800.

Ideal retreat for anglers, waterfowl hunting and horseback riding on adjacent state forest lands. The Wood River meanders for nearly a mile through the ranch, providing cover for brown and redband trout and duck ponds crafted for training retrievers. Irrigation for grazing 160± head of summer yearlings from Anna Creek. Two-story home, oversized garage, outbuildings, with breathtaking Cascade Mountain views and Crater Lake Park nearby. Priceless, but available at $1,700,000. Klamath County, MLS 79146.

HORSE LOVER’S DREAM

MADRAS

HOG CREEK

On this 9.55 acre setting with views of the Henley/Merrill valley! Graceful 2649 s.f. 3+ bedroom, 3 bath home with circulating water heating, sauna, covered entrance/patio, 3 fireplaces, decks, attached 2-3 car garage plus separate 4 car garage, shop and kennel. Fruit trees! First class horse facilities include 70’x150’ indoor riding arena, 66’x110’ stall barn, and 4 fenced pastures. All this within minutes of Klamath Falls! Klamath County, MLS# 87138 $525,000.

112 acres, 93 acres irrigated, large capacity bull and heifer facility. Several calving fields, Hay/livestock barn w/ heated vet room, portable scales and outstanding pipe corrals. Incredible mountain views. New 3000 sq. ft. home, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, teak floors, knotty hickory cabinets, granite countertops, marble showers, stainless appliances, juniper mantle and fantastic decks. Jefferson County, MLS 82972 $1,250,000 Please contact M.T. Anderson, 541-377-0030, MTAnderson@ CraterLakeRealtyInc.com for a private tour.

1252 DEEDED ACRES PLUS USFS permit for 1.057 AUM (235 pair) 6/1 THRU 10/15, for total 500 pairs summer cattle grazing. 802 sq ft cabin with 2 bedrooms and a loft, propane utilities with shower, outhouse and generator. Other features include 2 sets of corrals, 20,000# scale and 16’ x 20’ shed/tack room. Excellent quality grazing for 500 pair throughout summer and fall with deeded acres plus 30,000+/- acre USFS permit. 3 creeks feed into huge meadow with irrigation permit for 750 acres. Private and secluded, yet easily accessible. MLS 81292 $2,225,000.

VIRTUAL TOUR AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AT WWW.CRATERLAKEREALTYINC.COM June 2015 California Cattleman 41


FUTURE FOCUS Influencing The Beef Industry’s Future professor exemplifies calling as educator, producer from the Young Cattlemen’s Committee This month the California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) features Kasey L. DeAtley, Ph.D., assistant professor of Animal and Range Science at California State University, Chico (Chico State). The Chico State College of Agriculture is lucky to have this Northern California native as both an instuctor and alumna. The old adage goes, “If you love what you do, you’ll never work a day in your life.” Kasey DeAtley could not agree more. “I love my job,” DeAtley said, “I can remember being asked in second grade what my career would be and my reply was, ‘Something in agriculture.’” It has been a while since that statement was made, but her passion has only grown stronger. DeAtley, along with her sister Kallie, had the good fortune to be raised as the sixth generation in the beautiful Fall River Valley on a small cow/calf and trucking operation working alongside their parents, Tom and Peggy DeAtley. The girls’ youth was filled with 4-H and FFA events at the county and state levels. After high school, DeAtley attended Lassen Community College then transferred to Chico State and graduated in 2005 with a degree in animal science. She stayed on for two additional years as a research associate with Dave Daley, Ph.D., Oroville, where she was mentored by many faculty who helped focus her career goals into teaching. So, in 2007 DeAtley traded the beautiful California grasslands for the mesquite, cactus and eared cattle of the Chihuahuan Desert at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N.M. She completed a master’s degree in 2009, then a doctorate in 2012 in animal science with an emphasis in reproductive physiology and beef cattle genetics. In 2013, she moved back to California and 42 California Cattleman June 2015

worked as a Postdoctoral scholar and lecturer at UC Davis and Chico State, respectively, before accepting her current Assistant Professor position in the College of Agriculture at Chico State in January 2014. “I have been grateful to travel this path,” DeAtley said. “However, it would not have been possible without support from my family, friends, mentors and many organizations such California Cattlemen’s Association and the Young Cattlemen’s Committee.” DeAtley’s first exposure to CCA was as a YCA member at Chico State. She jumped right in and served as vice president and chairman of the 2005 Chico State Beef Day during her senior year. All of these experiences provided lessons in leadership and organization, but also helped develop relationships with cattlemen at many levels. “Honestly, these experiences were as valuable as the formal education that I received as they provided realworld perspective that sometimes can be lost in the classroom,” DeAtley said. This became apparent to her while living in New Mexico. Although, she enjoyed her time there, she sincerely missed the industry connections. In between taking classes and conducting research there was not extra time or money for attending industry meetings. Needless to say, she was beyond excited to move back to California and get re-involved with CCA and YCC. Her current role within CCA has really come full circle. She started as a youth member and now serving as a board member for the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association and co-advisor to the Chico State YCA. This position is as rewarding to her as it is challenging. YCA enrollment at Chico State has doubled in the last five years. Couple that unprecedented growth with an increasing number of urban-raised students and you have an

KASEY DEATLEY, PH.D. equation for a large knowledge gap - in all areas of agriculture. “I find myself constantly challenged to make every interaction, either in the classroom or out of it, a teaching opportunity,” DeAtley said. In the past year, DeAtley and her sister, Kallie Graham, DVM, were able to purchase a portion of their folk’s herd and started Two Doc’s Land and Cattle. This has been a great and stressful learning curve. They have faced many of the common challenges that other producers have (i.e., drought, estate planning, etc.). However, one of the benefits of this “second job” to DeAtley is that she gets to bring much of that experience (good or bad) into the classroom. This has two major benefits that she sees in her students: 1) real-life experience helps them retain the science and management principles that are taught; and 2) for those students who come from an urban background, it helps put a face and heart behind livestock production which, in turn, builds trust. “When students graduate they may not be able to remember how to calculate a breakeven carcass price, but they will remember the person who produced that Memorial Day T-bone, and how they genuinely cared for the well being of the animal and the sustainability of the western lifestyle,” DeAtley said. “To me, that is a VERY big victory!”


Tuscan Burgers & Avocado-Tomato Spread Time: 30 minutes • Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS 1 Fresh California Avocado, peeled and pitted 2 tablespoons finely chopped oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 pound ground beef (95% lean) 1/2 cup basil leaves, divided 1 teaspoon kosher salt 4 whole-grain hamburger buns, split 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh fennel bulb (core removed)

A past winner of the INSTRUCTIONS: National Beef Cookoff 1. Mash avocado in small bowl (should be chunky, not smooth). Add sun-dried tomatoes and half of garlic; mix well. Set aside. 2. Combine beef, remaining garlic, 2 tablespoons minced basil leaves and salt in medium bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Lightly shape into four 1/2-inch thick patties. 3. Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Place patties in skillet; cook 10 to 12 minutes to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Remove patties from skillet. Place buns, cut side down in skillet, cook 1 minute or until lightly toasted. 4. Place burgers on bottom of buns; top each with equal amounts avocado-tomato spread, fennel and remaining basil leaves. Close sandwiches.

Come see us about our variety of Wilson Stock Trailers! “A Good Name to Have Behind You.™”

831-726-3220 WWW.101TrAiler.Com 4400 Hwy 101, Aromas, CA

June 2015 California Cattleman 43


Kern and Siskiyou County Youth Take Beef Ambassador Honors Kern County native Abby Grisedale and Siskiyou County high school sophomore Angelee Dowling have been selected from among 24 contestants as this year’s senior and junior California Beef Ambassadors. The runners-up in the competition, held April 25 in San Jose, were Haley Kaae of Siskiyou County in the Senior Division, and Emyli Palmer of Tehama County in the Junior Division. The California Beef Ambassador Competition prepares youth in agriculture to educate consumers about beef and beef production on a statewide level. The ambassadors share personal experiences, product samples and key beef messaging on nutrition, recipes, animal welfare, the environment and other key issues. In this year’s contest, 14 students in the junior division (ages 12-16) and 10 students in the senior division (ages 17-20) competed in three categories: a mock media interview, a mock consumer event and issues response, in which they were judged on a written opinion piece. Grisedale and Dowling will both advance to the National Beef Ambassador competition to be held September 25 and 26 in Denver, Colo., where they will compete with representatives from other states for the chance to be among five young adults chosen to serve on the National

Beef Ambassador Team and educate consumers on a national level. National Beef Ambassadors increase consumer reach through their attendance at promotional events during consumer expos, health fairs and in-store demonstrations. “The Beef Ambassador Program provides youth who are passionate about farming and ranching with the preparation, training and platform to connect with consumers about beef, its benefits, and how it is produced,” said Jill Bright of the California CattleWomen and chairwoman of the 2015 California Beef Ambassador Competition. “Not only do the contestants become important voices for California’s beef producers, but they also gain skills and experience that will benefit them for years to come.” “Given the questions today’s consumers have about where their food comes from, programs like this are vital to connecting the community with agriculture and fostering a greater understanding of how food is produced,” added Bill Dale, Executive Director of the California Beef Council. The 2015 Beef Ambassadors both bring passion and enthusiasm for agricultural advocacy to the position. Abby Grisedale is part of the fifth generation of the Grisedale Ranch, a cow-calf operation in Granite Station.

A sophomore at Oklahoma State University majoring in Animal Science and Business, Grisedale plans to work within the beef industry after she graduates and remains actively involved in her ABBY GRISEDALE family’s ranch. Dowling, who is active in her local FFA Chapter in Etna, is planning to attend Cal Poly San Luis Obispo upon graduating from high school. The California Beef Ambassador Competition is made possible each year by the California CattleWomen and the California Beef ANGELEE DOWLING Council, and this year’s contest included support from the Santa Clara CattleWomen and the East Side Union High School District in San Jose.

Ten beef enthusiasts vied for the title of California Beef Ambassador in the senior division in San Jose on April 25. 44 California Cattleman June 2015


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA 95814 916-444-0845 (Office) · 916-444-2194 (Fax) www.calcattlemen.org NAME(S):

RANCH/BUSINESS NAME:

ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

PRIMARY PHONE:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE OUR WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE E-MAIL BULLETIN?

Yes

ZIP:

Recruited By_________________________

No

Step 1: CCA Membership PRODUCER MEMBERSHIP

FOR CATTLE OWNERS AND THOSE SEEKING A VOTING MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Cattle Numbers 2500 & Over 1600-2499 1000-1599 800-999 500-799 300-499 100-299 0-99 

Dues $1,690 $1,220 $930 $695 $590 $440 $310 $230

Calves under 6 months of age are not counted. Stockers pay at ½ the total number of stockers owned each year or minimum dues, whichever is greater.

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP

PRODUCTION BUT DO NOT OWN CATTLE NON-VOTING MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Statewide Allied/Feeder Associate $220

REGULAR MEMBERSHIP Cattle Numbers 1501 & Over 1001-1500 501-1000 251-500 101-250 0-100

Dues $750 + Fair Share $550 + Fair Share $400 + Fair Share $300 $200 $100

FAIR SHARE: ______@ 25¢/cow calf unit ______@ 12.5¢/feeder or stocker ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: $100 (ASSOCIATES CANNOT OWN CATTLE)

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00

Humboldt-Del Norte Inyo-Mono-Alpine Kern County Lassen County Madera County Mendocino County Merced-Mariposa Modoc County

Young Cattlemen’s Committee

$ 25

Statewide Stewards of the Land

Applicant’s Birth Date:_______________

$150

(Available to non-producers that own land on which cattle could or are run.)

CCA Supporting Member

$100

(Available to non-producers who support the industry.)

Must own fewer than 100 head of cattle. Must be 25 years of age or younger or a full-time student

- OR -

if over 25 years of age Applicant’s expected date of Graduation:

Step 3: Total Payment

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

MEMBERSHIP CBCIA is an affiliate of CCA and is a producer driven organization that fosters beef cattle improvement and economical production based on information and education.

CCA

$

NCBA

$

CBCIA

$

Payment Options:

□ Check payable to CCA

Local (All) $ TOTAL

$

Regular Members: $35

Card #___________________________________

Associate Members: $35

Exp______/________

Young Cattlemen:

Name on Card ____________________________

$5

LOCAL ASSOCIATON MEMBERSHIP: (Circle up to four below) Amador-El Dorado-Sac Butte Calaveras Contra Costa -Alameda Fall River-Big Valley Fresno-Kings Glenn-Colusa High Desert

NON-VOTING MEMBERSHIP

(includes Feeder Council Associate, Allied Industry membership and second membership. Second membership does not include Allied Industry voting rights.)

Step 2: Other Optional Dues NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION

YOUNG CATTLEMEN MEMBERSHIP

FOR THOSE WHO SUPPORT CALIFORNIA CATTLE

$15.00 $25.00 NA $7.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00

Monterey County $10.00 Napa-Solano $5.00 Plumas-Sierra $10.00 San Benito $20.00 San Diego-Imperial $10.00 San Joaquin-Stanislaus $5.00 San Luis Obispo $20.00 Santa Barbara $10.00

Signature ________________________________ Santa Clara Shasta County Siskiyou County Sonoma-Marin Tahoe Tehama County Tulare County Tuolumne County

NA $20.00 $10.00 $5.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $10.00

Ventura County Yolo County

$35.00 $25.00


California Cattlemen’s Association

BUYERS’ GUIDE Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 BULL BUYERS!

Join us on Sept. 4, 2015 for our annual “Best of Both Worlds” Bull and Female Sale!

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2015 46 California Cattleman June 2015


THURSDAY, SEPT. 17, 2015

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2015.

O’Connell Consensus 2705

JUNIOR HERDSIRES O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR Really Windy 7261

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2015 bull sale!

SIRE: VDAR Really Windy 4189 MGS: Sinclair Telecast 01S3

FCR Final Answer 0103 SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 MGS: N Bar Prime Time D806

+1.5 +56

+95 +31 +.94 +.71 +105.36

JOIN US SEPT. 19, 2015 FOR OUR 5TH ANNUAL MID VALLEY BULL SALE!

President’s Day 2016 THANK YOU TO OUR BUYERS AT THE 2015

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2015

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

June 2015 California Cattleman 47


Join us Sept. 11 2015 for our 41st Annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

2015 Bull Sale: Sept 2. 2015 Female Sale: Oct. 10

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 41 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

JOIN US AT OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE 9/3/15!

Progressive Genetics for over 36 years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2366

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 48 California Cattleman June 2015

h

Mark your calendars for Oct. 17 for our 2015 sale in Kenwood!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR 2014 BUYERS!

JOIN US OCTOBER 17, 2015 IN KENWOOD

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Thank You To All Who Supported Our 2014 Production Sale

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com June 2015 California Cattleman 49


REAL ESTATE

“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

50 California Cattleman June 2015


Your Business Could be here! For information on placing and annual ad in this buyer’s guide, contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113 or by e-mail @matt@wildblue.net.

June 2015 California Cattleman 51


IN MEMORY Rich W. Hamel Richard Ward “Rich” Hamel, born a fourth generation cattleman on Aug. 18, 1934, passed away Nov. 14, 2014 in Alturas. Raised in Davis, Hamel both sustained and innovated upon his family’s legacy throughout his life. Early on, Rich excelled at raising prizewinning livestock, particularly registered Hereford cattle. He was an active member of 4-H and regularly won awards at 4-H events and shows. After serving his country as a supply sergeant in the National Guard, Rich partnered with his father to operate Oak Meadows Ranch near Putah Creek in Sacramento County. Oak Meadows was considered by many to be a model of modern agriculture and was distinguished with a Ford Farm Efficiency Award. While ranching with his father, Rich continued his passion for developing pedigreed livestock. He and his animals earned top prizes at national shows and auctions, including a blue ribbon at John Ascuaga’s Nugget Bull Sale. In addition, Rich supported his community by assuming countless service positions over his lifetime. His appointments included president of the California Hereford Association, vice president of the California Cattlemen’s Association, Modoc County Cattleman of the Year, Modoc County Planning Commission Board Member, Modoc County Land Use Committee Member, Modoc District Fair Director, Likely Fire Department Commissioner, 4-H leader and Modoc Tribe Ride. He was instrumental in establishing the fire truck barn in Jess Valley, named Hamel Fire Barn in his honor. During his college years at the University of California, Davis, where Rich earned an agriculture degree, he became acquainted with the sons of several Modoc County ranchers and in visiting Modoc County fell in love with the area. He made it his dream to relocate his ranch and cattle from California’s Central Valley to the high desert rangelands of Modoc. When his father retired in the 1960s, Rich moved his operation north and never looked back. For many years, he ran his own 52 California Cattleman June 2015

cattle ranch and developed a secondary business with his wife, Christy, operating the Romero Hunt Club. This venture included breeding and raising pheasant and chukar game birds and hosting hunters from all of the country. Ever charismatic and endlessly a dreamer, during Rich’s years in Modoc he also conceived and led the development of large-scale recreation facility, Likely Place RV & Golf. He was a creative and forward-thinking man who endlessly pursued his own unique “acres and acres of dreams.” He is survived by his wife Christy Hamel of Likely; his sister and brother-in-law, Fran and Jerry Henderson of Chico; two nephews

Brad Henderson of Davis and Tim Henderson of Chico; his greatnephew and niece, Silas Henderson of Indiana and Shay Henderson of Chico. Since Rich had no children, he thought of Jose Madrigal of Likely as a son. He will forever be remembered and missed by a great score of people who will carry treasured memories of Rich’s inspired company, stories, jokes and kind heart. Memorial donations may be directed to the Likely Volunteer Fire Department, P.O Box 515, Likely, CA 96116. A celebration of life will be held in Rich Hamel’s Honor on Aug. 8, 2015 in Likely.

Joe Gwerder

Frank Joseph “Joe” Gwerder passed away in Stockton on April 4. A third generation Walnut Grove farmer and cattleman, he was born in Sacramento on June 18, 1932 to Frank and Murrice Sheehan Gwerder.He grew up in Walnut Grove and graduated from Walnut Grove Elementary, Courtland High School and the University of California, Berkeley, where he was president of his fraternity, Delta Tau Delta. He served on the Boards of River City Bank, Sacramento Federal Land Bank, Sacramento and Western States Angus Breeders, Thompson and Folger Company and Reclamation District 1002. He was a member of Rancheros Vistadores, the Sacramento Grandfather’s Club and the California Cattlemen’s Association. Joe adored his family and friends and loved spending time with them, especially at Lake Tahoe, boating, water skiing and snow skiing. He also enjoyed hunting, pack trips, cattle drives, traveling and ski trips with his good friends, horseback riding on the ranch and playing Polo. He enjoyed life to the fullest. Joe is survived by his devoted family: wife Caroline Goodwin Gwerder, children and their spouses: Carrie and Jeff Twitchell, Jim and Julie Gwerder, Ann and Fritz Durst; grandchildren, Caroline and Sarah Twitchell, Laura Hatheway (Ryan), Garrett, Patrick, Molly and Nikolaus Durst, Jennifer and Jane Gwerder, great granddaughter Paisley Hatheway, sister-in-law Alice Lenz and eight nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, his sister and brother-in law Jane and John Wheeler and his brother-in-law Howard Lenz. A memorial Mass was held in Sacramento on April 16. In Joe’s honor, his family prefers donations to: The Dr. Paul Barnes Community Park, PO Box 1122, Walnut Grove, CA 95690 or St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, PO Box 436 Walnut Grove, CA 95690 or a charity of your choice.

Michael Bentz Michael “Mike” Bentz, 51, died May 14, in a single-occupant airplane crash near Juntura while helping to herd cattle. Recitation of the Holy Rosary was held Thursday, May 21, and Mass of Christian Burial Friday, May 22, both at Holy Family Catholic Church in Burns. A luncheon was also held in his honor at the Harney County Fair

Grounds. Bentz was a well-known Eastern Oregon rancher who was a friend to cattlemen and women throughout the West. Memorial contributions may be made to Young Ranchers Land and Livestock Fund through LaFollette’s Chapel, P.O. Box 488, Burns, OR 97720.


NEW ARRIVALS wedding bells Devyn Dyt Darren and Haylee Dyt, Visalia, welcomed a baby girl, Devyn Renee Dyt, on March 2, 2015. Devyn weighed in at 8 pounds, 14 ounces and 20.5 inches long. She joins siblings Deryka and Dylan. Grandparents are Richard and Patti Dyt, Tulare and Bob and Janet Hansen, Hanford.

Bartholomew/Hansen Adele Bissett Bartholomew and Jerry E. Hansen were united in marriage April 18, in Columbia, at the historic “Church of the 49ers.” Adele is the daughter of Lester and Elizabeth Bissett, both deceased, who were long time cattle ranchers in Madera and Mariposa Counties. Adele retired from teaching at Oakhurst Elementary School in 1998 to help her parents at the ranch. She was a two-time President of Madera County CattleWomen Jerry is a Contractor/Consultant for the California Trucking Association. He the son of Mr. & Mrs. Chris Hansen. The couple will reside at both the Bissett Ranch in Mariposa County and at Jerry’s home in Kelseyville.

Valentino Hansen Valentino Albion Hansen arrived on Dec. 10, 2014 weighing 7 pounds 8 ounces and was 19 inches long. He was eagerly welcomed by parents Louis and Candice Hansen and big sister Gia. His grandparents are Ron Silva and the late Mary Reid Silva, Tulare and Bob and Janet Hanson, Hanford.

Clayton Borror Clayton William Borror was welcomed into the world on May 14 by new parents Bryce and Erin Borror, Gerber. Clayton tipped the scales at 8 pounds 11 ounces and 21 inches long. Father, Bryce, currently manages ranch oerations at family-owned seedstock operation Tehama Angus Ranch and mother, Erin, is an economist for the U.S. Meat Export Federation. Grandparents are Kevin and Linda Borror, Gerber and Frank and Sheila Daley, New Castle, Colo. Great Grandparents are Bill and Sandy Borror, Gerber and Jean Barton and the late Bill Barton of Red Bluff.

PRP

SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS WITH US! Send birth announcements, wedding announcements or obituaries to us at stevie@calcattlemen.org or fax information to (916) 444-2194. California Cattleman June 2015 53


101 Ranch.....................................................................................................17 101 Trailer Sales...........................................................................................43 Amador Angus............................................................................................46 American Ag Credit..............................................................................31, 35 American Hereford Association ���������������������������������������������������������������48 Andreini & Co.............................................................................................12 Bar R Angus.................................................................................................46 Black Gold Bull Sale....................................................................................23 BMW Angus................................................................................................46 Broken Arrow Ranch..................................................................................46 Broken Box Ranch.................................................................................23, 50 Buchanan Angus..........................................................................................46 Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale.........................................................................25 Byrd Cattle Co................................................................................. 46, 56, 49 California Association of Longhorn Breeders ���������������������������������������34 California Custom.......................................................................................50 California Outdoor Properties............................................................38, 39 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc. ���������������������������������������������������������������50 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market ���������������������������������������������������������������������3 Central Valley Dodge..................................................................................51 Charron Ranch............................................................................................46 Cherry Glen Beefmasters...........................................................................48 Circle Ranch.................................................................................................29 Clark Company Ranch Real Estate ����������������������������������������������������������34 CoBank........................................................................................................35 Community West Bank..............................................................................34 Conlan Ranches California........................................................................50 Conlin Fence Company..............................................................................50 Conlin Supply..............................................................................................19 Corsair Angus Ranch..................................................................................46 Crater Lake Realty, Inc................................................................................41 CSU Chico College of Agriculture �����������������������������������������������������������49 Dal Porto Livestock.....................................................................................47 Diamond Back Ranch.................................................................................50 Diamond Oak Cattle Company ����������������������������������������������������������������25 Donati Ranch.........................................................................................23, 46 Double M Ranch.........................................................................................25 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.........................................................................50 Farm Credit Alliance...................................................................................35 Farm Credit West........................................................................................35 Five Star Land Company......................................................................37, 50 Flood Bros. Cattle........................................................................................25 Freitas Rangeland Management ���������������������������������������������������������������43 Fresno State Agricultural Foundation �����������������������������������������������������49 Furtado Angus.............................................................................................47 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ������������������������������������������������������������������51 Genoa Livestock..........................................................................................48

54 California Cattleman June 2015

Gonsalves......................................................................................... 25, 27, 47 HAVE Angus................................................................................................47 Hogan Ranch...............................................................................................48 Hone Ranch..................................................................................................48 Hufford’s Herefords.....................................................................................49 J/V Angus.....................................................................................................47 Kerndt Livestock Products.........................................................................51 Lambert Ranch............................................................................................48 Little Shasta Ranch......................................................................................49 McPhee Red Angus.....................................................................................49 Memory Ranches Horse Sale ��������������������������������������������������������������������22 Noahs Angus Ranch....................................................................................47 O’Connell Ranch.........................................................................................23 O’Connell Ranch.........................................................................................47 ORIgen.........................................................................................................51 Orvis Cattle Co............................................................................................49 Pacific Trace Minerals...........................................................................29, 50 Pitchfork Cattle. Co.....................................................................................49 Poor Richards Press.....................................................................................53 Ray-Mar Ranches..................................................................................13, 47 Ritchie Manufacturing................................................................................21 Sammis Ranch.............................................................................................47 San Juan Ranch............................................................................................48 Schafer Ranch..............................................................................................47 Schohr Herefords.........................................................................................49 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard ������������������������������������������������������������������11 Sierra Ranches..............................................................................................49 Silveira Bros..................................................................................................48 Silveus Rangeland Insurance ����������������������������������������������������������������������8 Skinner Livestock Transportation ������������������������������������������������������������50 Sonoma Mountain Herefords �������������������������������������������������������������������49 Southwest Fence & Supply Company, Inc. ����������������������������������������������50 Spanish Ranch........................................................................................32, 48 Superior Livestock.......................................................................................16 Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................................................48 Teixeira Cattle Co........................................................................................47 Tri-State Livestock.......................................................................................40 Tumbleweed Ranch.....................................................................................48 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard �����������������������������������������������������������������7 Universal Semen Sales................................................................................51 Veterinary Service, Inc................................................................................50 VF Red Angus..............................................................................................33 Vintage Angus Ranch.................................................................................48 Western Fence & Construction, Inc. ��������������������������������������������������������50 Western Stockman’s Market ������������������������������������������������������������������������9 Western Video Market..........................................................................1, 2, 5 Wulff Bros. Livestock............................................................................23, 47


RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY IN THE

2015 BULL BUYERS GUIDE

CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET • (916) 803-3113 RESERVATION DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2015 June 2015 California Cattleman 55


how big is too big? are You Breeding

When you buy a bull, you are buying the cowherd and management practices that created him ... it’s that simple. do you want to buy a bull that is produced by a cowherd that never has a hungry day, lives a life of luxury, and therefore produces cattle so big they could be mistaken for elephants? Or, do you want to buy a bull from someone who runs cows the way you do?

Few purebred breeders offer genetics that will make you profitable in the future. We are different.

if you match your cowherd to your environment, you’ll discover their aren’t many ranches in the West that can sustain an 1,800 lb. cow; yet, many purebred breeders are selling bulls with huge growth EPDs that will create these inefficient, hard-fleshing, monstrous cows.

At Byrd Cattle Company, we breed, raise and sell cattle that are designed to excel in an environment with limited feed resources – leaving you efficient, moderately-sized daughters that wean in excess of 50% of their body weight, while producing steers that will top the market, then gain, yield and grade with any in the industry; yet, we realize all the data in the world won’t tell you about the “common sense� intangibles like udder quality, mothering ability and the ability of a cow to wean a calf and breed back in a harsh environment year after year.

As a general rule, increasing growth also increases mature cow size and decreases fleshing ability – simply breeding the function right out of your cowherd.

If you want to buy your bulls from a purebred breeder with a common sense approach – who runs cows like you do – then we’ll see you at BCC on September 4!

Mark Your Calendar for the 15th Annual

‘Enhanced Efficiency’ Angus Bull Sale at 3:30 p.m.

Friday, September 4

110 Bulls Sell All with the BCC Bull Buyers’ Bonus

All bulls sell Zoetis HD 50K tested with RFI, DMI and ADG data

Our famous BCC dinner and party will follow the sale!

E-mail byrdcattleco@hotmail.com or call 530-527-9036 to be added to our mailing list

BYRD CATTLE COMPANY, LLC 0/"MV`2CB"JSDD #!

THD Š

56 California Cattleman June 2015

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California Cattleman June 2015  
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