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February 2014

DRY TIMES SupplementS MAY BE

more important than ever …Make LOOMIX YOUR SOURCE! ALSO IN THIS ISSUE… HEREFORD & BEEFMASTER

February 2014 California Cattleman 1

2 California Cattleman February 2014

TY YORK RANCHES

Sat., march 15, 1 p.m. Bulls

20 open yearling registered heifers

Sons and Grandsons of These Breed Leaders Sell ...

S a V FiNaL aNSwer 0035

we will again be offering special discounts california cattlemen’s association members.

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

-1.0

+61

+103

+25

+1.37

+.52

RE

CoNNeaLy right aNSwer 746

SAV Final Answer 0035 x Hyline Right Time 338

Sitz Traveler 8180 x Bon View Bando 598

$B

BW

+.47 +49.88

-.3

WW

YW

+67

+121

MILK +38

SC

MARB

+1.11

+.47

RE +.03

$B $64.06

can’t make it to this year’s sale? watch and bid live

LCC New StaNDarD

BV New Design 1407 x War Venture 8030 6008 BW -.5

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

+56

+108

+38

+.41

+.61

RE +.63

Connealy Front Page 0228 x TC Rancher 056

$B

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

$73.19

+0

+50

+86

+40

+.62

+.04

York ranches P.O. Box 18, Alturas California 96101

Terry & TOdd yOrk, OwnerS • ruSS dAviS, MAnAger THD ©

KeSSLerS FroNtMaN r001

(530) 233-4538 office • (530) 708-0487 cell download a Sale Book at www.yorkranch.com

RE +.88

$B $48.26

Matt Macfarlane Marketing (530) 633-4184 • (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net • www.m3cattlemarketing.com

February 2014 California Cattleman 3

California Cattlemen’s Association OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Tim Koopmann, Sunol

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Billy Flournoy, Likely

SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Fred Chamberlin, Los Olivos David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville Rich Ross, Lincoln

TREASURER

Jack Hanson, Susanville

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Stevie Ipsen

ASSOCIATE DIR. OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 • Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen stevie@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net

WORKING AS ONE TO PRESERVE HERITAGE by Rich Ross, CCA Second Vice President and chair of CCA’s Property Rights & Environmental Managment Committee

As California’s urban population grows and the agricultural population shrinks, we are going to see increasing pressure to manage agricultural land as if it were a public parkland. There will be growing pressure to take water from agriculture and restore “natural” environments, to restrict land use to “viewscape” and habitat for “natural” flora and fauna, significantly restrict use of medicines and chemicals, introduce wolves and grizzlies and treat grazers as known polluters who need to be taxed and regulated to protect society. Against those pressures the state’s aging and disappearing grazers will be more and more dependent on CCA to present their case – to educate the legislature, the regulators and the public about how food is produced, and the benefit of ranchers managing their own land. The increasing interest in “preserving” farm land, open space, wilderness and habitat has resulted in a variety of preservation programs designed to encourage those land uses. Preserving farm land is not the same as preserving farmers or sustainable farming businesses. The current trend is toward longterm deintensification of agriculture, which will have longterm effects. The new preservation programs fundamentally reverse the direction of American land use policy. From the founding of America, public policy encouraged resource development – clearing the forests, farming, mining and grazing. The 1862 Homestead Act provided 160 acres to anyone willing to work it. Resource development was essential to the nation’s development. In 1868, the transcontinental railroad opened the west and the Land Grant College Act provided tracts of land to the states to raise funds for colleges which were mandated to do agricultural research. A decade into the Homestead Act, Congress recognized that the trees that needed to be cleared in the east didn’t exist in the west.

BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

So, in 1873, the Timber Culture Act conditioned free land on cultivating trees for eight years. The government recognized the need to promote scarce resources while developing abundant ones. In the arid west people needed water and more acreage. The Desert Land Act in 1877 provided 640 acres if part was irrigated within three years. The environmental impact of diverting waterways, draining swamps and making the land productive was considered positive. As the 1800s ended, so did the unexplored west. In 1891, Congress passed the Creative Act to reserve all public forest lands as public reservations. People feared an overreach by environmentalists, so the Organic Administration Act in 1897 prohibited creation of national forests except to conserve water flow or provide timber. That pendulum continues to swing. We now have a state controlled by densely populated areas where people view rigid societal planning as essential to preserve what they assume is a nearly vanished rural landscape. The current trend is to undo our development of the past and remove agriculture, dams, power plants, roads and humans from vast areas of the west. Being from a family that was involved in the early settlement of America and the opening of Trans-Pecos Texas, Kansas, Montana, Arizona and California, I am saddened to see my family’s heritage dismissed as inappropriately exploitive of the land we all hold dear. Let’s all work together in CCA to find ways to deal with the growing pressures on our day-to-day management discretion over business assets and help the policy makers understand the benefits we provide.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomer, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100.

4 California Cattleman February 2014

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814.

FEBRUARY 2014 Volume 97, Issue 2

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN learn from CCA’s newest officer

THE COVER 4

BUNKHOUSE 8 the importance of “agvocacy”

CATTLEMEN’S UPDATE 10 legislative session underway

VET VIEWS 14 a warning for ranchers during dry times PROGESSIVE PRODUCER 28 culling and early weaning due to drought RANGELAND TRUST TALK

32

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR 46

SPECIAL FEATURES

Hereford is still king for many ranchers 22 Have you considered Beefmaster mamas? 36 Tax advice for destocking due to drought

42

READER SERVICES

Bull Buyers’ Guide 54 Advertisers’ Index 60

Loomix California, Inc., with distribution centers in Hughson and Alturas, is featured on this month’s cover with their customers, Jerry & Carmen Kresge of Alturas. The Kresges have been the owners of Modoc Auction Yard since 1996. Prior to that time and continuing through today they have been running various classes of cattle. They became customers of Loomix California in the fall of 2012. Due to lack of drinking water, they were forced to bring pairs home from Nevada that were thin and stressed. The Kresges started feeding Loomix Ore-Bac on good pasture and were able to costeffectively get the cows back in breeding condition. The result was an excellent breeding percentage, exceeding those cattle that had not been fed Loomix and were on similar quality pasture. In the fall of 2013, Kresges expanded their utilization of the Loomix line of supplements. Due to the severe drought they decided to wean some spring born calves early. Loomix California supplied Kresges with revolutionary premium liquid weaning product, CellaratOre CPR. Jerry and Carmen experienced exceptional daily gains and very little sickness on the weaned calves. It really set those calves up to go from the mothers right onto feed and they never stopped gaining weight. Don’t miss out on Loomix’s top-of-the-line products that can improve your herd health and bottom line. Join your fellow producers who have already discovered what Loomix has to offer. For more information on any products offered by Loomix, contact David Absher at (209) 883-1006 or (530) 863-3180.

Please be with us ...

2014 Bull Sales

520 Angus Sell! 320 Bulls & 200 Registered Females

Thomas Angus Ranch at LGW Sale February 14, 2014 • 3p.m. Hamley’s Steakhouse, Pendleton Oregon Selling 120 Fall long Yearling bulls sired by: Hoover Dam, Coleman Regis 904, Connealy Thunder, Summitcrest Complete 1P55, CRA Bextor 872 5205 608 Hoover Dam

CED +10; BW +0; WW +50; YW +95; Milk +37; CW +25; MB +.89; RE +1.20; Fat -.029; $W +37.16; $F +41.50; $G +55.39; $B +96.76

Coleman Regis 904

CED +14; BW -1.2; WW +56; YW +89; Milk +36; CW +27; MB +.30; RE +.74; Fat +.029; $W +46.40; $F +30.67; $G +26.49; $B +69.83

Thomas Angus Ranch • 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561

www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com 6 California Cattleman February 2014

SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

Thomas Angus Ranch at the Western Genetic Event

Thomas Angus Bull & Select Fall-Bred Female Sale March 4, 2014 • Baker City, Oregon Connealy Confidence 0100

AAR Ten X 7008 SA

CED +19; BW -3.1; WW +48; YW +91; Milk +31; CW +20; MB +.53; RE +1.19; Fat +.025; $W +44.80; $F +37.25; $G +41.68; $B +76.45

CED +8; BW +.2; WW +67; YW +135; Milk +27; CW +59; MB +1.31; RE +.75; Fat +.003; $W +59.24; $F +89.16; $G +51.46; $B +126.94

100 Spring Yearling BullS

sired by: AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Connealy Confidence 0100, Connealy Consensus 7229, EXAR Upshot 0562B, S Chisum 6175 and SAV Final Answer 0035

100 Fall long Yearling BullS sired by: Connealy Confidence 0100, Summitcrest Complete 1P55, Connealy Impression, Werner War Party 2417

200 Fall-Bred FeMaleS

Selling 200 head of select AI and natural bred heifers. Heifers will sell in groups of 5 sorted in 20 day calving intervals. Females are bred to: AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Connealy Confidence 0100, GAR Prophet and EF Authentic 0829

Thomas Angus Ranch • 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561

www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com February 2014 California Cattleman 7

BUNKHOUSE Inspiring You to Share Your Story by CCA Associate Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead Today, in a fast-paced world full of new technology and advancing tools, where there’s most likely “an app for that,” it’s important to remember our roots – and there’s not a group of people I know who do a better job of this than members of the cattle community. In a business where your consumers matter just as much as your bottom line does, sometimes the details can get a little dicey. Perception is key, and raising your cattle while sharing your story can be very difficult. Between managing your herd, praying for rain, budgeting your expenses and finding precious time away from the ranch, communicating can become overwhelming. That’s where your staff at the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) comes in. It has been said time and time again, but it’s worth repeating: communicating proactively is crucial for the beef industry, and even all of animal agriculture. Now, more than ever, consumers are curious not only

about where their food comes from, but how it is raised. No one can curb that curiosity better than you, the producer. We know you’re pros at providing your cattle with the best of care, but what you may not be aware of is that you are also the best at telling your own story. It’s my job to help you share your ranching story with the folks who want to hear it. Why do I love communication? There are so many facets of connectivity that make it easy to gather information. As far back as I can remember, my mom has always said that once I learned to talk, I never really stopped. There is some truth in that, but I have learned that speaking is only one piece of the communication puzzle. So, when it came time to choose a career path, I took the road less traveled. I studied agricultural communication at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly), and there I learned and practiced many “Learn by Doing” techniques that helped me gain hands-on experience in the industry, which helped lead me to where I am now – CCA! Serving as the 2009 California Beef Ambassador and as a member of the 2010 National Beef Ambassador Team helped me gain a greater understanding of the importance of sharing the beef story with beef consumers and cattle producers. Growing up on my parents’ cow-calf ranch in Livermore, I was fortunate to find a home in the beef community, and now I am so grateful to work in the industry serving amazing people like you. It’s important to remember that communication is not scary business. There are many ways to be proactive about communication, and it’s my job to help you do that. For example, did you know that there are 238 million Facebook users in the U.S. and

8 California Cattleman February 2014

MALORIE BANKHEAD Canada? That’s 2.7 times the number of cattle in the United States! Ninetyfive percent of these users log on each and every day to see what their friends have to say. Here is a perfect chance to share your story. Are you changing your regimen because of drought conditions? Snap a picture and post it to Facebook and explain the desperate need for rain in your caption. Are you using Beef Quality Assurance animal handling techniques when shipping cattle? Post a status about how it has helped your herd. The possibilities to communicate are endless, but they all begin with you. There is no doubt that I am very excited to be here at CCA working with you, our members. Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to work with the folks that I have had the privilege to get to know over the past several years and many that I hope to meet soon. Having been a previous member of the Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC), actively involved on the state and local levels, I am also excited to serve as the state YCC advisor and oversee the state YCC officer team. The four young people serving this committee are a group of outstanding individuals, and I look forward to seeing what they will accomplish in the year to come. I look forward to meeting you soon and working together to proactively share your beef cattle story!

Ward Ranches

PERFORMANCE GENETICS

UNIVERSITY

8th Annual Production Sale

50% SALE R S / 50% ANGUS His sons sell February 16th!

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 1 p.m. at the Ranch Gardnerville, Nevada

Ward Ranches Optimizers “Balanced Business” Salers and Angus are both proven to be compatible for calving ease and marbling quality. Both breeds offer maternal and carcass qualities that are valued in the industry today. We have been blending the best of the two breeds to develop the ideal Optimizer bull. An Optimizer can be from 25% to less than 75% Salers. This has resulted in a superior individual with the qualities that increase profitability for you, our customer.

71% Salers / 25% Angus University son sold in our 2013 sale

70 FALL 2012 RANCH-READY BULLS SELL FEBRUARY 16 Angus • Salers • Salers/Angus Composites • Performance test and ultrasound results • Bulls fertility tested & unconditionally guaranteed • All bulls tested BVD–PI negative • Free delivery to central locations within 500 miles

The focus at Ward Ranches is to produce a quality product, year after year. We know that the Angus breed is known as the “Business Breed” and that the Salers breed is known as the “Balanced Breed.” Experience has taught us, and research has proven, that these two breeds complement each other well. “Balanced Business,” as we call it. Be sure to attend the Nevada Cattlemen All-Breed’s Bull Sale at Fallon on Saturday, and especially plan to join us

Sunday, February 16th, for the 8th Annual Ward Ranches Production Sale at Gardnerville! We are a 1.5 hour drive southwest of Fallon.

Purebred Angus son of DPL Daybreak K82 sold in our 2013 sale

Guest Consignor: Hunsaker Livestock

Buhl, Idaho

Not on our catalog mailing list? E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com

/

Ward Ranches “YO UR

GARY WARD & FAMILY

(775) 790-6148 P. O. Box 1404, Gardnerville, NV 89410 E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com Ranch: 1155 Foothill Rd., Gardnerville

Western GEN ET IC SO U RCE”

February 2014 California Cattleman 9

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 2014 Well Underway as CCA Staff Are off and running Only weeks into the second half of the two-year legislative session in Sacramento, your California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) staff are already working hard on your behalf to defeat harmful legislation and ensure legislation that helps you reach the governor’s desk. Antibiotic Legislation

With the recent release of Guidance for Industry #213 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), several California legislators have taken it upon themselves to prematurely offer legislation that would codify this voluntary guidance in California state law. Guidance for Industry #213 (Guidance #213) is voluntary guidance that essentially encourages livestock producers to work closer with veterinarians in the use of antibiotics delivered through feed and water and ultimately seeks to phase out the use of antibiotics for “growth promoting” purposes. The guidance is carefully drafted to focus solely on “medically important” antibiotics and excludes ionophores such as Rumensin® which are routinely fed to improve feed efficiency. The guidance also clearly states that producers, working with their veterinarians, should have the ability to use antibiotics to control or prevent harmful diseases. Sen. Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo) and Assmeblymember Kevin Mullin (D-San Mateo) introduced Senate Bill (SB) 835 and Assembly Bill (AB) 1437 aimed at limiting the amount of antibiotics used to treat livestock. Specifically, and most concerning, the bills would restrict a rancher’s ability to purchase over the counter antibiotics like penicillin and oxytetracycline to treat and care for their own livestock. CCA is currently working with Hill and Mullin to remove provisions from the bill that threaten ranchers’ ability to care for their livestock. California ranchers have a long history of judiciously using antibiotics to care for sick livestock and it’s critical that ranchers maintain the ability to care for their livestock. CCA is working with the FDA and the National

Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and its producer members impacted by FDA Guidance #213 to ensure a smooth implementation over the next three years. As we work towards a smooth implementation of Guidance #213 it will be critical that other efforts like SB 835 and AB 1437 do not get lumped in with this process and add further restrictions that are unworkable. Transportation

On a positive note, CCA has sponsored and is working to pass AB 1101 by Assemblymember Wesley Chesbro (D-Arcata) that would extend provisions in the California Vehicle Code to allow semis with 48 foot livestock trailers to operate in Humboldt, Mendocino and Del Norte counties. Current restrictions exist on several portions of Highway 101 in those counties that, without this legislation, make it illegal to operate a 48-foot livestock trailer leaving cattlemen and auction yards trying to move cattle out of the area stranded. In addition, CCA is working to introduce legislation to follow up on last year’s AB 924 by Assemblymember Frank Bigelow (R-O’Neals) that was signed by the governor to provide additional resources to state brand inspectors to investigate cases of livestock theft. Legislation this year would seek to prohibit any individual convicted of livestock theft from holding a registered brand in California for a defined period of time, allow unannounced inspection of cattle by local law enforcement and require all livestock to be brand inspected prior to being shipped from any location or face steep fines. State Budget

January also marks the release of the new draft budget by California Gov. Jerry Brown. In a remarkable change, the governor has proposed a balanced budget that will include a rainy day fund which is the result of a large budget surplus brought on by the tax hikes included in Proposition 30, approved by voters in 2012.

10 California Cattleman February 2014

The proposed budget totals $154.9 billion in spending and a $1.6 billion allocation to the state’s rainy day fund. The governor would also like to see the surplus used to pay down the massive amount of debt California has accrued from borrowing during the recession, restore funding to education and a small increase to social services that were cut previously to balance the budget. The governor has also called for spending restraint even with the surplus, which has set the stage for a likely battle between the governor’s office and Democratic leadership in the Senate and Assembly who are itching to use the surplus to increase spending on social services and fund new projects. The sectors receiving the most money from the budget remain K-12 eductation (42.4%), spending on health and human services (20.4%), higher education (11.6%) and spending on prisons and rehabilitation services (9%). CCA staff are still working to wade through the entire budget but several key additions stand out that include the allocation of $1.8 million and the creation of 11 new positions at the State Water Resources Control Board to specifically work to bring enforcement actions against illegal water diversions as the result of marijuana cultivation and $7.8 million to study new water groundwater storage opportunities, among others.

February 2014 California Cattleman 11

RED ANGUS AND RED/BLACK COMPOSITES

lorenzen THrIll oF IT 3125 Lorenzen Joshua x Lorenzen Leading edge CED

6

BW

-1.8

WW

63

YW

MARB

95

REA

0.62

0.44

Heaviest weaned bull calf out of the Blue Mountains in Eastern Oregon!

lorenzen ValIdaTe z920

Lorenzen expeCt Canyon x MessMer MiLLie

BW

WW

YW

MARB

CW

REA

0

74

115

0.70

38

0.36

lorenzen Broadway 3991 hxC Conquest x LsF expeCtation CED

11

BW

WW

-3.3

63

YW

102

MARB

0.62

REA

0.25

One of the most complete packaged bulls in offering from Phenotype to EPD’s

SELLING 200 BULLS THURS, FEB. 27, 2014

12PM PST

AT THE RANCH

YEARLING RED ANGUS BULLS STOUT 18 MONTH RED ANGUS BULLS RED & BLACK COMPOSITE BULLS Featuring: beckton epic • brown commitment • JAckHAmmer • wHAt’S GooD beefmAker • conqueSt • pAcker • JericHo • miSSion StAtement lorenzen JoSHuA • lorenzen penDleton • eXpectAtion • eXpec cAnyon

lorenzen Turn IT up 3194 1/2 ra 1/2 SIM

BeeF Maker x Lorenzen payLoad CED

4

BW

-0.4

WW

64

YW

94

MARB

0.74

REA

0.78

Growthy Red Composite - Top 10% for marbling and 1% for REA - 6 Full Sibs to this Stud!

lorenzen dJanGo 3803 1/2 anGuS 1/2 SIM

ConneaLy in sure x CCC tayLor

Calving Ease SimAngus bull with huge carcass numbers and API

Correspondence to: Larry Lorenzen P H 541.276.6108 | FAX 541.276.9696 or Sam Lorenzen PH 541.215.2687 12 California Cattleman February 2014 P.O. Box 1519, Pendleton, Oregon 97801 | larrylorenzen@hughes.net | lorenzenranches.com

February 2014 California Cattleman 13

VET VIEWS On the Lookout:

drought-related Poisoning and Nutritional Risks by Robert H. Poppenga, DVM, Ph.D.; and Birgit Puschner, DVM, PhD., veterinary toxicologists, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, 63 percent of California is currently experiencing extreme drought; moderate to severe drought covers 94 percent of the state as of early January 2014 and precipitation predictions for the coming year are grim. According to the California Department of Water Resources, the water content of the snowpack statewide is just 20 percent of the average for early January, which makes it the driest ever recorded for this time of year. It is likely, then, that California cattle producers are in for a difficult water year, which will necessitate additional vigilance to assure cattle health and productivity. Drought can increase the risks of animal poisonings and nutritional imbalances. In addition, should drought-breaking rains occur, the grazing conditions for cattle may dramatically change and pose additional health risks. The conditions most commonly associated with the end of severe drought conditions include bloat, plant poisonings and clostridial diseases. The following are some drought-related threats to cattle health and productivity.

temperature, humidity, lactation status, diet and level of production. Dry cows need 8 to 10 gallons of water daily, whereas cattle in the last three months of pregnancy might drink up to 15 gallons per day. Lactating cows require a water intake of approximately 5 times the volume of milk produced. Periodic assessment of basic water quality parameters such as total dissolved solids (TDS), sodium, sulfates and nitrates/nitrites should be considered. There are a number of certified water testing laboratories throughout California that provide sample analysis and interpretation of results specifically for livestock. TDS are all of the organic and inorganic substances in water that can pass through a 2 micron filter. Elevated TDS adversely affects the palatability of water and, therefore, water consumption. In general, TDS concentrations less than 1000 ppm (parts per million) should ensure safety from almost all of the inorganic constituents present, whereas individual components should be identified and quantified to more fully characterize potential problems if TDS values are more than 1000 ppm.

Water quality

Sulfate

Water is the most critical factor High sulfur concentrations reduce in the diet of food animals and is feed and water intake in animals involved directly or indirectly with resulting in reduction of growth and essentially all physiologic processes. performance. The most common When cattle don’t drink enough form of sulfur in water is sulfate. clean and safe water every day, feed Outbreaks of polioencephalomalacia intake and productivity declines. have occurred when water has been Drought conditions can potentially a significant source of sulfur. During affect all sources of water, including droughts, sulfate becomes more groundwater, but surface waters are concentrated in water and water intake especially vulnerable. Streams and increases during periods of high ponds can become completely dry, ambient temperatures. while water flows in rivers can be It is recommended that water significantly decreased. During a for livestock consumption contain drought, it is especially important less than 500 ppm sulfate with a to frequently monitor water quality, maximum safe level of 1000 ppm especially as quantity becomes more for cattle exposed to moderate limited, and have plans for alternate dietary sulfur concentrations or high water sources. ambient temperatures. Elevated Water consumption varies with sulfate concentrations (as low as age, weight, breed, species, ambient 500 ppm) is reported to decrease 14 California Cattleman February 2014

copper absorption, thus potentially exacerbating marginal or low copper intakes. Nitrate/Nitrite

Nitrate/nitrite contamination of water can occur from a variety of sources, mostly fertilizer and manure run-offs, but drought conditions can increase water concentrations. In addition, drought stunts plant growth, causing nitrate to accumulate in plants. Immediately after a rain, plants may take up even more nitrate and become particularly dangerous. Nitrate/nitrite can cause sudden death of ruminants and risk of intoxication needs to consider intake of nitrate/ nitrite from both feed (see discussion of plant nitrate accumulation below) and water. Frequent monitoring of water nitrate/nitrite concentrations is recommended. Nitrate/nitrite screening tests are quick and inexpensive. Water nitrate concentrations less than 400 mg/L and nitrite concentrations less than 100 mg/L should not cause poisoning in livestock. Water nitrate concentrations of more than 750 mg/L can be hazardous to non-adapted ruminants. Toxic Blue-Green Algae

During periods of hot and dry conditions, rapid proliferation of blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria) in water is more common. Increases in the number of blue-green algae result in noticeable bluish-greenish “blooms.� Stagnant water conditions and high levels of nutrients increase the potential for bloom formation. Blue-green algal blooms can reduce water quality and intake, and be potentially toxic. Windy conditions can concentrate algal blooms along water edges increasing the risk of ingesting algae. If algal blooms are noticed, testing of water for toxins is recommended, as not all algal blooms produce toxins. Cyanobacteria can produce toxins

that can affect the liver and nervous system. Depending on the specific toxin and amount ingested, animals may die suddenly, or suffer from weakness, staggering or photosensitization. It is important to limit access to water that has visible algal blooms until tested negative. Additional information about bluegreen algal blooms can be found on the California Department of Public Health website. Feed Quality and Nutritional Deficiencies

Drought conditions frequently result in the need to feed poor quality forages or to switch to alternative feed sources. Both can affect animal nutrition and increase the risk for intoxications. Use of poor quality forages can cause or exacerbate deficiencies of important minerals such as selenium, copper and phosphorus and vitamins such as vitamins A and E. In addition, drought affected forages are often deficient in energy and protein. Even in nondrought years, deficiencies in selenium and copper are common in California cattle, particularly beef cattle. Copper

Soils in many regions are low in copper resulting in low copper concentrations in forages. Copper deficiency is one of the most frequent mineral deficiencies identified by the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory in pastured cattle not receiving mineral supplementation. Forages for cattle are copper deficient if copper concentrations are less than 7 ppm on a dry weight basis; total rations are deficient with copper concentrations are less than 10 ppm on a dry weight basis. One of the earliest manifestations of copper deficiency is loss of hair color in dark-haired breeds of cattle and rough hair coats. Other manifestations of copper deficiency include ill thrift (poor doers), reduced production, diarrhea, decreased resistance to infectious agents and parasites, poor vaccine response, loss of bone strength in calves, weakness and wobbling in neonates,

reproductive failure and sudden death of adult animals. Severe copper deficiencies can be diagnosed in live animals from serum testing whereas liver testing is used to diagnose deficiencies in animals that die. Selenium

Selenium is essential to help protect cells from day-to-day damage and is a critical component of the body’s critical antioxidant enzymes. Soil and forage selenium concentrations are either marginally adequate or deficient in many areas of California. Like copper, selenium deficiency is one of the more frequently diagnosed mineral deficiencies in the State (combined copper and selenium deficiencies are common, particularly in unsupplemented beef cattle). Selenium deficiency causes white muscle disease of skeletal and heart muscle resulting in stiff gaits, slow movement, heart damage and weak neonates. Ill thrift and reduced production occur and, similar to copper deficient animals, there is less resistance to infectious agents and parasites. Selenium status of live animals can be assessed based upon testing of whole blood samples. Liver selenium concentrations are used to diagnose selenium deficiency in dead animals. Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that helps to protect cell membranes. Its actions are complimentary to those of selenium. Thus, an adequate intake of one can help, but not completely prevent, the adverse effects of a deficiency of the other. A concomitant deficiency of both can have significant adverse effects. Vitamin E deficiency occurs most commonly when animals are fed inferior quality hay or straw; this is more likely during periods of drought. Clinical signs of vitamin E deficiency are similar to those listed for selenium. The vitamin E status of animals can be assessed by testing serum or liver samples. Vitamin E in serum is susceptible to degradation so sample quality is critical; veterinarians should be consulted to assure proper

collection and storage of samples. Vitamin A

Primary vitamin A deficiency occurs in beef cattle on dry range pasture during periods of drought. Deficiency requires prolonged low intakes due to relatively good storage in the liver. Cattle can subsist on naturally deficient diets for 5 to 18 months before clinical signs of deficiency appear. Clinical signs in cattle include night blindness, dry eye, retarded growth rate, reproductive failures and increased mortality. Beef calves coming off dry summer pastures at 6 to 8 months of age are commonly marginally deficient. A maternal deficiency of vitamin A can result in herd outbreaks of congenital vitamin A deficiency in calves. Maternal deficiency of vitamin A can cause abortions, stillbirths or calves born alive but blind and weak and death within 1 to 3 days. Cows should be given an injection of vitamin A (and D) about 30 days prior to calving and calves should be given a vitamin A injection at birth. Vitamin A status can be assessed through the testing of serum and liver samples. Like vitamin E, sample quality is critical for proper determination of status based upon serum testing. Mechanically-Irritating Grasses

Grazing animals that eat sharp grass awns, spiny plants such as prickly pear cactus (Optunia spp.) or those with bur such as burdock (Arctium minus) and cocklebur (Xanthium spp.) can injure the lining of their mouths and digestive tracts. Some common grasses such as foxtain barley (Hordeum jubatum) and bristle grass (Setaria spp.) have seed with sharp awns that can become embedded in the tongue and gums of animals ingesting them. Initially excessive salivation occurs, but embedded awns or spines eventually lead to large ulcers.

...Continued on page 17

February 2014 California Cattleman 15

16 California Cattleman February 2014

...Drought-related toxicosis from page 15 Some sharp grass awns can also penetrate an animal’s skin, migrate through the tissues and cause abscesses and draining wounds far from the point of entry. Alternative Feeds

The higher cost of feeds and forages during periods of drought results in increased use of less common “alternative” feeds. • Moldy sweet potatoes: Sweet potatoes are a good energy source for cattle. Because of the high amount of readily available fermentable starch, cattle should be gradually adjusted to sweet potatoes in their ration to prevent ruminal acidosis. In addition, sweet potatoes that are infested with a fungus can contain a mycotoxin called 4-ipomeanol. The toxin results in severe lung damage, and cows develop acute respiratory distress. • Moldy pomegranates: Pomegranate byproduct has a wide assortment of nutrients that support productive purposes in dairy cattle. However, pomegranates contain tannins and other polyphenolic compounds that at some unknown levels might have negative effects on animal performance. In addition, the sugar in pomegranates is readily available to bacteria and fungi to support their growth when there is adequate air, moisture and heat present. Fungi (molds) produce mycotoxins that can negatively impact animal health. From limited reports, moldy pomegranates may cause liver disease in cattle. Increased Incidence of Plant Poisonings

Drought conditions increase the risk of plant poisonings in situations where available feed/forage is inadequate to maintain cattle. Cattle will seek out and consume plants that they would not otherwise find palatable. Plant-Associated Nitrate Poisoning

Nitrate poisoning is one of the most common plant associated intoxications diagnosed by the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory. Drought conditions

can result in high accumulation of nitrates with plant tissues. Normally, plants absorb nitrates from the soil converting the nitrate into plant proteins. Application of nitrate fertilizers along with stunting of plant growth as a result of drought can cause potentially toxic concentrations of nitrates to occur. The highest concentrations of plant nitrate typically occur in stems and not in leaves, flowers or fruits. Therefore, nitrate poisoning is unlikely to occur when cereal grains are fed. The potential for nitrate poisoning to occur is increased when livestock water sources also contain elevated concentrations. The threat of nitrate poisoning is greatest in ruminant animals since the environment of the rumen results in the reduction of nitrate to toxic nitrite. Nitrite interferes with normal oxygen delivery to tissues. Many common weeds, forage crops and cereal grain plants have the potential for nitrate accumulation during drought conditions (see Table 1 on page 18). The first sign of nitrate poisoning is often the sudden and unexplained death of one or more animals. Other clinical signs include drowsiness, weakness, muscle tremors, increased heart and respiratory rates, staggering or recumbency. Signs can develop with several hours of ingesting a toxic amount of nitrate. Nitrate concentrations can be easily and cheaply determined from samples submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory for testing. It is a good idea to consider testing forage samples prior to feeding to livestock when the potential for nitrate accumulation is high. Serum samples can be tested for nitrate levels from live animals showing clinical signs. A variety of samples including postmortem blood samples and ocular fluid can be used to diagnosis nitrate poisoning in dead animals. Properly prepared silage from impacted forage crops reduces nitrate concentrations significantly while there is little reduction of nitrate in dried hay. The use of some herbicides such as 2,4-D can increase the accumulation of nitrate within plants and also increase the palatability of treated

plants, thus increasing the risk of intoxication. Oaks/acorns

Acorns and oak leaves might be attractive to livestock during periods of scarce forage. There are a number of oak species (Quercus spp.) in California. High acorn production can occur during periods of drought. All parts of oak trees contain tannins and phenols and are potentially toxic. Young oak buds emerging in the spring contain the highest concentrations of tannins. Poisoning is most typically associated with consumption of large amounts of buds, leaves or acorns over a several-day period. Signs of poisoning vary with the amount of plant ingested. Initially, animals stop eating, become depressed and develop intestinal stasis. Excessive thirst and frequent urination might be noted. Initially feces are hard and dark, but black tarry diarrhea occurs later. Teeth grinding and hunched back are often indicative of abdominal pain. Severe liver and kidney damage occurs. Animals might live for 5 to 7 days after the onset of clinical signs. A condition called “acorn calf syndrome” can also occur in calves born to cows on a low plain of nutrition and which have consumed large quantities of acorns during the 3rd to 7th months of pregnancy. Clinical signs in affected calves include joint laxity, shortened legs, deformed hooves and either a domed skull or long narrow head. Conclusion

During periods of drought, cattle producers should be especially careful about the quality of feed and water available for their animals. Consideration should be given to monitoring water quality parameters that might indicate the potential for problems. Pastures and hay should be scrutinized for the presence of weeds or mechanically irritating grasses. Animals on over-grazed pastures should be provided with supplemental feed and adequate vitamins and minerals.

...Continued on page 17

February 2014 California Cattleman 17

...Drought-related toxicosis from page 17 If additional information is needed or, in the unfortunate event that one or more animals become ill and/or die, you can contact your local veterinarian or the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (www.cahfs. ucdavis.edu) for assistance. Specific contact information of the CAHFS Branch Laboratories is: CAHFS – Davis 620 W. Health Sciences Drive University of California Davis, CA 95616 Phone: (530)752-8700 . AHFS – Turlock (Poultry lab) C 1550 Soderquist Road Turlock, CA 95381 Phone: (209) 634-5837 CAHFS – Tulare 18830 Road 112 Tulare, CA 93274 Phone: (559) 688-7543 . AHFS – San Bernardino C 105 W. Central Avenue San Bernardino, CA 92408 Phone: (909) 383-4287

TABLE 1. Common Plants known to accumulate nitrates Common NAme Ragweeds Pigweeds Wild oat grass Lamb’s-quarter Canada thistle Field bindweed Jimsonweed Barnyard grass Sunflower Kochia weed Cheeseweed Sweet clover Smart weed Curly dock Russian thistle

Botanical Name Ambrosia spp. Amaranthus spp. Avena fatua Chenopodium spp. Cirsium arvense Convolvolus arvense Datura stramonium Echinochloa spp. Helianthus annuus Kochia scoparia Malva spp. Melilotus spp. Polygonum spp. Rumex spp. Salsola kali

Common Name Nightshades Goldenrods Johnson grass Oats Sugar beets Rape Soybean Flax Alfalfa Pearl millet Rye Sudan grass Wheat Corn

Botanical Name Solanum spp. Solidago spp. Sorghum halapense Avena sativa Beta vulgaris Brassica napus Glycine max Linum spp. Medicago sativa Pennisetum glauca Secale cereale Sorghum vulgare Triticum aestivum Zea mays

From A.P. Knight and R.G. Walter, A Guide to Plant Poisoning of Animals in North America, 2001.

While only a few of the potentially toxic plants are discussed above, a comprehensive resource for common poisonous plants in California can be found at: http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/8398.pdf

18 California Cattleman February 2014

February 2014 California Cattleman 19

Selenium BoluSeS

from Pacific Trace Minerals

Se 365 Selenium Bolus for nutritional supplementation of beef cattle. • treat once a year • for beef cattle over 3 months of age.

For sale and use in CaliFornia only

— organiCally listed— CCa member: $240/box CCa non-members: $288/box oF 60 shipping additional

ptm.inc@frontiernet.net www.pacifictraceminerals.com

Order frOm Or pickup at: california cattlemen’s association 1221 H Street Sacramento, ca (916) 444-0845 20 California Cattleman February 2014

Colyer Herefords

“Best of the Best”

34th Annual Production Sale Monday, February 24, 2014 At the Ranch • Bruneau, Idaho

276 Head Sell!

145 Hereford Bulls • 71 Angus Bulls 22 hereford heifers •14 Angus Heifers

Live internet Bidding At

BuLLs incLude two yeAr oLds, junior & senior cALves

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LOT 32 • C 8231 THRiLLER 3067 ET

Lot 54 • C R111 UNTAPPED 3125 these lots were in Colyer’s 2014 string of pen bulls at Denver!

BW 3.9 WW 52 YW 84 MiLk 22 iMF .03 REA .59

This big, stout, powerful son of the Reserve Denver Champion “Thriller” is a dark red well-marked bull that has extra muscle shape and bone. He has a great set of EPDs and the bottom side of his pedigree is filled with some of our most maternal lines of cattle.

BW 4.1 WW 56 YW 93 MiLk 22 iMF .11 REA .63

You won’t find many young bulls with this kind of muscle shape and look. He is huge-hipped, big-bodied and flashy-marked with a red neck and red eyes. His full sisters were lots 1 and 2 from our fall sale and both went to Bar One Ranch in Oregon.

Lot 43 • C NOTiCE ME NOW 3090 ET

Lot 72 • C CJC CHANELS SENTiNEL 3165 ET

BW 2.7 WW 50 YW 67 MiLk 28 iMF .17 REA .20

This is a blood brother to the world record selling bull “Miles McKee,” and two-time Reno Champion Bull “Stockman.” He was a candidate for our 2014 Denver pen show because of his extra length of body and muscle shape.

BW 3.0 WW 52 YW 80 MiLk 28 iMF .20 REA .51

This is the most balanced bull in the offering from every aspect. Not only is he flawless in terms of his phenotype but he combines that with having the most ideal set of EPD’s one could ask for.

85 Angus sell with mAny sons And dAughters by ConneAly right Answer 746, eXAr upshot 0562b And ConneAly FinAl produCt! eXaR UPshot 0562B

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31058 Colyer Road Bruneau, ID 83604 Fax: (208) 845-2314

Guy, Sherry & Katie Colyer (208) 845-2313 Kyle & Bobby Jean Colyer (208) 845-2098 Guy Cell (208) 599-0340 • guy@hereford.com Kyle Cell (208) 250-3924

sale catalog is available on our website www.hereford.com

In High Demand

Hereford Breeders Work to Satisfy Market

from the American Hereford Association, Kansas City, Mo. Despite drought and escalating costs in the beef industry, Hereford breed demand continues to increase as production sale averages increased $500 during fiscal year 2013. Hereford breeders continue to experience a dramatic increase in production sale prices and reports of private-treaty sales continue to out-pace the previous year reports. A total of 171 Hereford production sales were reported by American Hereford Association (AHA) field representatives in the last fiscal year, which ended Aug. 31, 2013. Bull sales averaged $4,763, up nearly $92, and females $4,202, up almost $873 per head. The second largest cattle breed in the U.S., Hereford reports 67,930 registrations and 35,957 transfers with 100,494 cows on inventory. AHA also boasts 3,507 active adult members and 2,490 active junior members. “Hereford demand continues to climb as referenced by record sale prices for bulls and females during fiscal year 2013,” says AHA Executive Vice President Craig Huffhines. “AHA experienced a near 5 percent increase in membership, further evidence of the popularity in the Hereford breed.” Hereford semen demand in the commercial industry is also increasing. According to the National Association of Animal Breeders (NAAB), domestic Hereford semen

sales increased 2 percent compared to last year and export sales increased 31 percent. Since 2006, Hereford domestic semen sales have increased 90 percent, a testament to the increasing demand for Hereford genetics in the commercial industry. Helping with this progress in the commercial sector has been the AHA’s Whole Herd Total Performance Records (TPR™) program. Now 12 years old, the program has helped the AHA and Hereford breeders build a database that documents the breed’s strengths. More and more Hereford breeders continue to go above status quo and submit ultrasound data, body condition scores, udder scores and cow weights, which all add to the integrity and accuracy of the AHA database. Because of this commitment to data collection a new udder quality EPD (expected progeny difference) was released during fiscal year 2013. This fiscal year AHA continued to offer genomic-enhanced EPDs (GE-EPDs) with updated correlations that more than doubled the predictive power for some traits. The AHA’s approach was to work with the National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium (NBCEC) to develop a Hereford-specific panel, utilize GeneSeek Inc. to run the high-density (HD) panels and produce molecular breeding values (MBVs) to incorporate the genomic information, phenotypes

22 California Cattleman February 2014

and pedigree information into the national cattle evaluation (NCE) to produce GE-EPDs. “The AHA’s genomic approach utilizes new genotype platforms and computing techniques to boost the predictive accuracy of breeding value for younger animals,” Huffhines says. “The mission of the AHA has always been to document the pedigree and performance information of Hereford seedstock in order to create economic improvement for the commercial beef industry. This approach is very important to both the AHA and the commercial cattle industry in that it allows the AHA to continually improve the predictive value of EPDs so that both seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen can make more reliable breeding decisions with less risk.” The association has also continued to focus its research on feed efficiency as well as a multi-year project with Idaho-based Simplot Livestock Co., which is documenting the benefits of using Hereford sires in a large-scale, predominately Angus heifer program. Also noted at the fiscal year’s end are top registrations by states and by breeder. Texas topped the list of registrations per state at 7,820 with Nebraska, South Dakota, Kansas and Oklahoma rounding out the top five.

California Nevada Hereford Association P.O. Box 1645 Grass Valley, CA 95945

Jim Mickelson – President, 707-481-3440 B.J. Macfarlane – Vice President, 530-518-1024 Shelly Truelock – Secretary, 209-988-8932 Gail Blagg – Treasurer, 530-265-9395 Mark Holt AHA Western Region Manager 208-369-7425

Annual tour April 26, 2014 CNHA Classic Sale and Show November 15 and 16, 2014, Roseville, California

February 2014 California Cattleman 23

& Californian AHA President shares insight on beef issues

CCA staff recently caught up with CCA member Steve Lambert, a Butte County rancher and county supervisor who is also the 2014 president of the American Hereford Association, based in Kansas City, Mo., to get his thoughts on the issues and opportunities facing the Hereford community and the beef industry as a whole. Below are some questions and his responses.

THE LAMBERT RANCH FAMILY Rossy, Clayton, Janet, Steve, Meghan and Nathan

Q

As the president of a prestigions beef breed association, what do you most look forward to during your time as AHA President?

A

I look forward to a lot of things, mostly the opportunity to travel throughout the country and learn from different facets of the cattle industry. I’m excited to be able to see what’s driving the market in the midwest, see what genetics are working for different climates and geographic locations and being able to learn new or different approaches to anything from feedlot experts to a cowcalf operation in the east. This is an incredible chance to gather all kinds of knowledge from cattlemen everywhere.

Q

Specifically speaking about Hereford beef, what goals do you have for the association this year?

A

I really look forward to capturing more market share. We have expanded our Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) Program with some new great hires in procurement and marketing. We have also put a strong emphasis on Genomic Testing to help identify economic benefiting traits quicker.

Q

As a lifelong Californian with deep roots in agriculture and the beef industy, what do you hope to show cattlemen across the country about ranching in California?

A

That we don’t run our

cattle on the beach and check them while riding a surfboard. California ranches vary from irrigated pasture to coastal ranges to mountain meadows to high desert. This can all be found in a 200-mile radius. The downside of that is that everyone wants to either develop it or “preserve it” for endangered species. As California farmers and ranchers, we face some of the toughest regulations and highest taxes and still have to find a way to make our operations work while learning to get along with our urban neighbors. The AHA board will be coming out here for our summer meeting. There will be cattlemen from Georgia, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Montana, Nebraska, Texas, Idaho, Iowa, Wisconsin, Kansas, South Dakota and Michigan. I look forward to showing them great California ranches and the people who make it all work.

Q

This is a great time for the Hereford breed. What do you think it is about Hereford cattle that have ranchers seeking Hereford genetics?

A

The Hereford breed is the most logical and the only way to make the baldie cow. As cow herds have gotten more black, the need for true heterosis has driven the strong comeback of the breed. White face cattle will add longevity, pounds and disposition that are needed to stay in business. The AHA has worked very hard to test and document all the advantages. Now it has the task

24 California Cattleman February 2014

to get a premium for white face cattle through CHB. We believe a pull through demand for our product, is much better than a push through demand. That is why we have put so much energy into CHB placement.

Q

As someone who is up on your local and state politics, what do you think are the biggest issues facing ranchers in the Golden State?

A

This year it will be water without a doubt. Our state needs to gain more water storage. This dry climate might help to get that moving. I truly believe we need to educate the urban population about how important ranching is to watershed, viewscapes, open space and whatever buzz word makes them feel good. We all know as people get further and further from the farm, the easier it is to mislead them to a destructive ideal. With that said, I believe if we can get people out to our farms and ranches they can see first-hand how important ag is to our economy and sustainability. We need to give them the chance to see that we are the best stewards of our land. As much as we may want to keep our distance, I think we need to change these ideals people may have by inviting a class of kids to our place or an urban politician. As a county supervisor, I see every day how much this generation is getting removed from the farm. People never leave their home or their computers so they have no idea how a cow is raised and that they can’t get one on Amazon.

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Bulls Available at the Ranch •

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CHB Grows in 2013

Huffhines says. “Both harvested cattle numbers and carcasses certified that meet the specification were up by 5% during fiscal year 2013.” Much of the growth came from expansion of new retail store openings for existing customers along with a rejuvenated case-ready ground beef program. CHB LLC’s largest customer — The Fresh Markets (TFM), based in North Carolina — added eight new locations since the first of the year to bring total store numbers to 137 in 26 states. Total CHB® volume for TFM increased 12.6%, generating more than 8 million lb. of beef sold during the fiscal year. Cattle numbers required to supply the CHB program continue to create demand for Hereford and HerefordEnglish baldie cattle. More than 382,000 cattle were identified through CHB-licensed packing facilities during FY 2013 as eligible from a live specification standpoint, while more

Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC experienced another year of growth during fiscal year 2013 despite the challenging U.S. economy. The company posted a record year in volume with 48.8 million lb. sold – a 4% increase compared to the previous year. “Despite tight cattle supplies, record high beef prices and somewhat stagnant beef promotion due to the wide price spreads between beef and competing proteins, CHB LLC reported another record year for volume,” says Craig Huffhines, American Hereford Association (AHA) executive vice president. CHB LLC is a subsidiary of the AHA, with its fiscal year ending Aug. 31. “At a time when retailers and consumers are cinching their belts, CHB LLC expanded the program,” 26 California Cattleman February 2014

than 259,000 carcasses were certified for the program — a certification rate of 68% for FY 2013. “We are thrilled with the growth of the Certified Hereford Beef program and the continued credibility that the Hereford breed is gaining not only in the consumer food sector but also in the demand created for Hereford genetics within the commercial cattle industry,” Huffhines says. “The Hereford breed is a well-established iconic breed within the U.S. cattle industry that is bringing a rejuvenated value to the industry at a time when the industry needs it the most.” Currently CHB is offered in 301 retail supermarkets in 35 states, as well as through 38 foodservice distribution centers serving restaurants. Since the inception of CHB, 4.3 million cattle have been identified through licensed packing plants as meeting the live animal specifications, and 2.6 million carcasses have been certified to carry the CHB name.

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Tuesday, September 9, 2014

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Carl & Susan Schohr: (530) 846-4354 Steven and Joseph Schohr: (530) 864-2855 Tracy Schohr: (530) 868-6626

February 2014 California Cattleman 27

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Managing Cattle During Drought

Destocking and Weaning to deal with tough times by Morgan Doran, livestock farm advisor, University of California Cooperative Extension, Napa and Yolo counties 28 For some producers, drought response actions started last winter and spring by culling cows more aggressively and selling calves earlier than in normal years. During times of drought, destocking through culling and early weaning are two practices we often see. Such practices may have to continue this year, and perhaps even more aggressively. Every producer has their own cow culling criteria that are used every year, but this year producers may have to go beyond the normal criteria in order to further reduce their herd size.

Destocking

Cow culling should be based on productivity and a common practice is to cull non-productive cows from the herd. If a cow is open, it’s off to the auction, but sometimes they are given a second chance. And what about the low-producing cows? This is a time when you can’t afford to feed cows that are not producing at an adequate level. Giving cows a second chance and keeping those cows that wean smaller calves are practices that compromise the health and productivity of your higher producing cows, your entire herd and your ability to survive this drought. A study conducted at the University of California Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center showed that some production parameters, especially weaning weight of calves, decline when beef cows reach 10 years of age (Renquist et al., 2006). In this study, pregnancy rates declined dramatically in 10-year-old cows, primarily because they were unable to maintain sufficient body condition at the time of breeding. The results of this study provide a baseline cow-age culling criteria. The drought situation will likely require more aggressive culling criteria, such as culling all cows over 8 years of age, culling all open cows and keeping fewer (if any) replacement heifers. Even further destocking decisions may be necessary. Luckily cattle prices

remain strong, which provides another good incentive to cull aggressively and retain few replacement heifers. Good health and performance records of your cows help you make better and more objective decisions in general, and during a drought this information is especially critical when making severe culling decisions.

Early Weaning

Weaning calves earlier than normal is another effective strategy to survive a drought. Early weaning can occur between 80 and 120 days of age. Cows experience their highest nutritional demand when lactating, September through December for fall calving cows and February through May for spring calving cows. Under the current drought conditions, producers with fallcalving herds have likely been feeding supplemental hay and protein in order to maintain adequate body condition, which is especially important at breeding time. The multiple nutrient demands of lactating to raise a calf and sustaining body condition of fall-calving cows for breeding can be challenging under normal condition, but is even more difficult during years like this. The sooner a calf is weaned, the sooner the cow can dedicate energy to restoring her body condition instead of milk production. Cows that are nursing their first or second calf have an even greater nutritional demand because their bodies are still growing, which requires energy and protein levels above that of mature cows. If early weaning your entire calf crop is difficult to implement, consider a partial or stepwise implementation strategy starting with your youngest cows. Weaning is stressful on calves and early weaning can be even more so, but there are some steps you can take to minimize additional stresses and create a smoother transition and a better rebound. Early weaned calves will require a high quality diet or diet supplement in order to sustain an adequate growth

28 California Cattleman February 2014

rate. About two weeks prior to early weaning, introduce calves to the postweaning supplemental diet so that they can gradually adjust to the new feedstuffs. This will allow the rumen microbial populations to shift to the new diet, improve diet consumption once weaning has occurred and help sustain growth rates. Creep feeding calves is one option if you have the equipment to restrict feed access by cows. Providing the post-weaning diet to cow-calf pairs is another option and may encourage more rapid consumption of the diet by the calves as they observe and learn from their moms. If possible, try limiting early weaning to only those calves that are readily eating forage and other feeds, otherwise calves may require milk replacement or suffer a longterm setback in growth and development. Before and after early weaning, limit other stresses on the calves by avoiding vaccinations, branding, castration and other activities that can be postponed until a later time when calves have recovered from weaning stresses. Destocking and early weaning are strategies that focus your limited resources, mainly feed and forage, on the breeding stock you wish to maintain based on strictly selected traits and performance criteria. Having a drought management plan in place ahead of time that guides decisions during a drought will help you implement these strategies while minimizing negative impacts on your long-term ranch goals. Destocking decisions made in haste can have devastating consequences, requiring several years to correct. And don’t forget that destocking can have tax implications that should be factored into the overall equation. Renquist, B.J., J.W. Oltjen, R.D. Sainz and C.C. Calvert. 2006. Effects of age on body condition and production parameters of multiparous beef cows. Journal of Animal Science. 84(7):1890-1895.

Jerry Baker • 208.739.3449 Samuel Mahler • 208.739.0475

2175 Bench Rd. Vale, OR 97918 baker.baker@fmtc.com

Saturday, March 1, 1 p.m. • Vale, Oregon

135 Long-Yearling Angus Bulls & 80 Commercial Angus Heifers LARGE NUMBER OF LOW-BIRTH EPd ANd CALVING-EASE BULLS ULTRASOUNd dATA AVAILABLE ON ALL SALE BULLS $50 Rebate for Bulls Picked Up during the Sale Weekend Ask How To Qualify for Free delivery for Multiple Purchases No Charge for Bulls Kept at the Ranch through April 1, 2014

BULLS SELL SIREd BY: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Wilson Total Value 722 S A V Final Answer 0035 Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V S A V Brand Name 9115 S A V Pioneer 7301 WMR Timeless 458 S A V Bruiser 9164 Connealy Mentor 7374 VAR Rocky 80029 Baker Pioneer 2264 Kessler Performance 0597 Carter Onward 104

Select Bulls Sell Hd 50K Tested

Sale Manager

Matt Macfarlane Marketing (530) 633-4184 (916) 803-3113

mmacfarlane@wildblue.net www.m3cattlemarketing.com

Guest Consignor: MAHLER CATTLE CO., VALE, OR

BAKER MENTOR 3244 dOB 9/26/12

Sire: Connealy Mentor 7374 • MGS: Morgans direction 111 9901 BW 83/100 • WW 843/118 • YW 1,393/118 • REA Ratio 122 CEd +2

BW +1.4

WW +66

YW +113

MILK +36

MARB +.52

RE +.93

$W +41.09

$B +94.98

aUctiOneer: rick MachadO, (805) 501-3210

BAKER BRUISER 3172 dOB 9/5/12

Sire: S A V Bruiser 9164 • MGS: Wilson Total Value 722 BW 81/97 • WW 797/111 • YW 1,403/119 • REA Ratio 112 CEd +7

BW +1.6

30 California Cattleman February 2014

WW +71

YW +133

MILK +24

MARB +.44

RE +.49

$W +33.86

$B +85.73

BAKER WILSON TOTAL 3189 dOB 9/12/12

Sire: Wilson Total Value 722 • S A V Net Worth 4200 BW 87/104 • WW 754/105 • YW 1,356/115 • REA Ratio 104 CEd +0

BW +3.9

WW +57

YW +113

MILK +27

MARB +.50

RE +.60

$W +23.61

$B +91.12

THD ©

Producer Donation Builds Feed System at Chico State The College of Agriculture at California State University, Chico, received a donation of $50,000 from Green Valley Enterprises and Alturas Ranches to install six GrowSafe feeders at the University Farm. The generous donation was used as a match to obtain an Agricultural Research Institute grant, which is only offered to California State Universities for agriculture research. Obtaining the grant was a collaborative effort between animal science professors Dave Daley, Ph.D., Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., and Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D. GrowSafe systems collect individual data to monitor feed intake and animal behavior. Each steer is tagged with an electronic ear tag, which tracks and records feed intake each time the animal eats. The system automatically calculates intake by monitoring the weight of feed in the feed bin before, during and after each animal eats in a herd setting. Having individual intakes for animals in a pen allows operation managers to identify more efficient animals compared to herd mates and also helps manage potential health issues, identifying animals that go off feed. Barry Swenson, owner of Green Valley Enterprises and Alturas Ranches, made the donation in support of research that will compare the growth performance, feed efficiency and carcass traits of commercial and Lowline Angus-influenced cattle. Twenty commercial steers, 20 half-blood Lowline Angus steers and eight full-blood Lowline Angus steers were brought to the University Farm to study. The three breed groups will be fed out until they are market ready and will be slaughtered at the university farm meats lab. Through the spring semester, students at the beef unit will

assist in the research. The data collected through this research will also be used in various classes. “The GrowSafe system will revolutionize our ability to conduct feed intake research on an individual basis in a herd environment at the University Farm,” said Professor Patrick Doyle. Professor Kasey DeAtley added,

“Barry and the whole crew at Alturas Ranches have been tremendously supportive of our research program, which will give students the opportunity to be on the forefront of beef cattle feeding technology in breed research.” For more information about this project, contact DeAtley at kdeatley@ csuchico.edu.

Trinity Farms Generations of Excellence Sale Saturday, March 1, 2014 • At the farm in Ellensburg, WA

If you could increase your cowherd productivity by 25%... WHY WOULDN’T YOU? PB ANGUS

It’s a fact that crossbreeding PAYS! Upgrade your bull battery with SimAngus bulls from Trinity Farms ...The hottest brand in the West.

LOT 111 SIMANGUS

The 2014 Offering... 150 Bulls & 80 open heifers • Angus • • SimAngus • •Simmental •

SIMMENTAL

ONE SIMPLE DECISION CAN MAKE A HUGE IMPACT ON YOUR BOTTOM LINE!

LOT 30

LOT 3

Preview some of our outstanding sale bulls at www.TRINITYFARMS.info Call anytime & ask about our “Bull Chit” Program.

Robb & Debbie Forman (509) 201-0775 Mike & Paulette Forman (509) 968-4800

Video clips of complete offering will be available late February on our website and LiveAuctions.tv.

February 2014 California Cattleman 31

RANGELAND TRUST TALK A Win for Ranching Family and Wildlife Mitigation easement protects historic Walker Ranch from the California Rangeland Trust A historic 400-acre ranch in Contra Costa County, home to the Walker family, the California Tiger Salamander, San Joaquin Kit Fox, Western Burrowing Owl and the California Red-Legged Frog, will remain forever protected thanks to the teamwork of the family, an energy solutions company and the California Rangeland Trust. Through that unique partnership, the Walker family will continue to operate the ranch they love, and the species the ranch supports will benefit from good land management practices. In the early 1980s the Walker family, which has raised cattle on the Walker Ranch for nearly 100 years, was approached by a wind energy company that wanted to put windmills on their land to produce power for the surrounding communities. The Walkers agreed. With the lease of surface rights, that company put hundreds of windmills on the tops of the ranch’s largest hills. Those windmills provided power to the East Bay for two dozen years without fail. Years later, the wind technology on the ranch needed updating for increased efficiency. Commonly called “repowering” by locals, the energy company replaced the aging windmills with 15 larger and more efficient, 3.2MW Siemens turbines. That upgrade required the company to build new roads and slightly alter the landscape, triggering the requirement for a new permit. During the permitting process, the energy company found out that the new roads would impact the habitat of the California Tiger Salamander, California Red-Legged Frog, San Joaquin Kit Fox and burrowing owl, all of which thrive on the cattle-grazed wind farm. State and federal laws mandate the loss of those habitats must be mitigated by the permanent protection of similar habitat nearby. Together, the energy company and the Walker family found a viable solution to the problem using a conservation easement held by the Rangeland Trust. Because the Walker family employs sustainable practices to manage their ranch, the energy company was able to use 400 acres of the 1,956-

32 California Cattleman February 2014

acre Walker Ranch near the wind farm for mitigation. Mitigation easements are similar to other types of conservation easements in that the land is protected from development in perpetuity. The difference is that when a mitigation easement is purchased, it is usually done so by a large corporation or entity at the direction of a state or federal agency. It protects land containing wetlands, wildlife habitats or other ecological areas and then sets it aside to compensate for loss of lands of similar ecological value through development. “We feel honored to be able to help the Walkers, who are long-time advocates of the beef industry and rangeland conservation, forever protect the ranch they call home,” said Nita Vail, chief executive officer of the California Rangeland Trust. “Everyone who drives in the East Bay will be able to view this portion of the beautiful rolling hills of the Altamont forever.” Conservation of the property also meets the goals of the Conservation Lands Network, a conservation plan for the region completed by the Bay Area Open Space Council, with participation from more than 100 scientists and land managers. The plan emphasizes the importance of rangelands and ranchers, whose management practices support the incredible diversity of plants and animals found in our area. “This mitigation easement is another case where government agencies are endorsing the work of cattle ranchers to sustainably manage their land for generations,” said Darrel Sweet, chair of the Rangeland Trust’s Board of Directors. “The Walker family ranch is one example of how good stewardship is protecting the environment.” The California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the energy company and the Rangeland Trust have now entrusted the Walkers to sustainably manage the habitat of the California Tiger Salamander, the California Red-Legged Frog, San Joaquin Kit Fox and burrowing owl in that area for decades to come.

BUCHANAN ANGUS RANCH A TRUE Performance Program, where performance doesn’t START at the feedbunk.

For more than 50 Years, the ALGOMA ANGUS CATTLE have been defining performance with Practical Efficiency.

PICTURES THAT ARE WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

H

Sound, Fertile, Moderate Framed, Easy Fleshing Females that work hard and wean heavy calves every year!

Moderate Birth Weight, Rapid Growth … The best bulls in the breed are represented in the pedigrees of these “Genetic Packages” through generations of A.I.

Great Udders that will hold up for the lifetime of the cow. Our Bulls always sell with Performance and Ultrasound data. In addition, they are also tested PI-negative for BVD, DNA tested, and are fully vaccinated and semen tested.

Natural Muscling, Carcass Quality, Maternal Traits … All in one Eye Appealing Package

H

Sound Feet and Legs. At weaning the bulls are conditioned on a steep juniper covered hillside. These are NOT OVERFED bulls. They will be ready for the 2014 breeding season!

Lot 50: Algoma Copyright 598B Reg. #17577645 a 3/4/13 son of “Connealy Right Answer” who weaned off his “Connealy Front Page” dam on 10/17/13 at 860 lbs.

EPDs: CED +1 BW +2.9 WW +64 YW +109 $B +63.36

LOT 4: 512B Reg #17577601

LOT 3: Reg. #17581904

A “Connealy Consensus 7229” son who weaned off his “004” dam at 990 lbs.

EPDs: CED +8 BW +0.9 WW +56 YW +95 $B +80.41

A powerful calving-ease and carcass son of “Confidence” who weaned off his young Dam at 890 lbs. EPDs: CED +19 BW -3.1 WW +52 YW +95 $B +79.14

LOT 5: 513B

Reg # 17577602

A very gentle and powerful son of “Sitz Wisdom” who weaned off his Dam on October 17th at 1000 lbs. EPDs: CED +9 BW +.9 WW +46 YW +92 $B +80.41

SELLING SONS OF: Connealy Right Answer, Connealy Imprint, Connealy Consensus 7229, TC Aberdeen, Connealy Confidence, TC Franklin, Sitz Wisdom, Upshot and others.

THESE BIG, STOUT GROWTH AND CALVING-EASE BULLS WILL SELL AT THE..

Traynham Ranches Loop Ranch Santos Angus Country Inn Cattle Co and DDP Angus Call Today for your Sale Book or more information.

ANNUAL BULL SALE NOON SUNDAY, Buchanan B February 23, 2014 Angus on

at the

A

with Guest Consignors:

KLAMATH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS Also Broadcast Live at:

Cattle Business, Our ONLY Business

ROBERT, KATHLEEN BUCHANAN & FAMILY 13490 Algoma Rd., Klamath Falls, OR 97601

541-883-8471 b u c h a n a n a n g u s @ h u g h e s . n e t • w w w. b u c h a n a n a n g u s . c o m February 2014 California Cattleman 33

Grandin draws record audience to Animal Handling Seminar CCA members, animal health practioners and students gathered in record numbers for the 3rd Annual Beef Improvement and Low-Stress Animal Handling Seminar, hosted by the University of California, Davis, Livestock Medicine and Surgery Center in conjunction with the UC Davis veterinary student-based Food Animal Reproduction and Medicine (FARM) Club, held on the UC Davis campus, Jan. 11. The major draw to this year’s sold-out event was animal handling expert Temple Grandin, Ph.D., of Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. Grandin, known within the animal agriculture community for her innovative approach to animal handling and facility design, has also gained notoriety outside of the industry for her awardwinning HBO feature film, Temple Grandin, which highlights Grandin’s stuggle with and triumph over autism. Grandin has become a heroin for people worldwide in proving success can be acheived despite limitations. Many who attended the event expressed their excitement over hearing Grandin’s animal handling message and said they were eager to return home to their own operations and put her advice and methods to use. There were nearly 200 attendees at the standing-roomonly event, with dozens more tuning in to the live webinar to hear from Grandin and other event speakers. Other featured speakers included: Joe Campbell, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc.; Bruce Hoar, DVM, Ph.D., an epidemiologist at UC Davis; cattle ultrasound expert Tommy Perkins, Ph.D.; Anita Varga, DVM, a large

Escalon livEstock Annual MarkEt

rEcrEational roping cattlE salE Saturday — March 22 — NooN

animal clinician with the Livestock Medicine and Surgery Service at UC Davis; climate change expert and animal scientist Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., UC Davis; Birgit Puschner, DVM, Ph.D., a toxicologist with UC Davis; feedlot nutritionist Gary Sides, Ph.D., TEMPLE GRANDIN, Ph.D. Zoetis; and Leslie Woods, DVM, Ph.D., a professor of clinicalpathology, microbiology and immunology at UC Davis’ School of Veterinary Medicine. Pictured at left, CCA President Tim Koopmann and his wife, Melinda, Sunol, were among the many CCA members who attended the UC Davis event. Bud Sloan, DVM, and his wife Kim made the long trip to UC Davis from Santa Paula to hear from Grandin and other event speakers.

FeaturiNg FreSh aNd ready-to-rope

LoNghorN & corrieNte SteerS & heiFerS

Also Selling:

LoNghorN pairS Bred cows Breeding sTock

consignMEnts WElcoME!

miguel a. machado (209) 595-2014

If you are a buyer of roping stock, don’t miss this event!

Joe vieira (209) 531-4156 Thomas Bert (209) 605-3866 dudley meyer (209) 768-8568

25525 Lone Tree rd, escaLon, ca 95320 • Phone: (209) 838-7011 Fax: (209) 838-1535 • www.escaLonLivesTock markeT.com

34 California Cattleman February 2014

CCA members Jack and Barbara Cowley also made a long trip, coming from Siskiyou County to attend the 3rd annual event.

Dean Michael Lairmore, DVM (left), and Greg Ferraro, DVM (center), both of UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, with CCA member Gene Harlan, DVM, Penngrove.

Shaw Cattle Co. Production Sale

February 19, 2014 - 12 p.m. (MST)

400 Hereford, Angus & Red Angus Bulls

SITZ DIMENSION 8607 52 Sons Sell

• •

CONNEALY FINAL PRODUCT 68 Sons Sell

Other AI sires include TEN X, Rito Revenue, Impression, Brilliance & Right Answer.

SCHU-LAR RED BULL 18X 16 Sons Sell

Other Hereford AI sires include Redeem, Peerless, 8502, 175 & Efficient.

First Season Breeding Guarantee All cattle PI tested negative for BVD

Ultrasound and RFI/Feed Efficiency data available • All bulls are born and raised on our ranch. No Cooperators • SIGHT UNSEEN PURCHASES FULLY GUARANTEED • Family Owned and Operated for over 65 years

Shaw Cattle Co.

THR THOR 4029 18 Sons Sell

S

Angus Hereford Red Angus

Greg: (208) 459-3029 Sam: (208) 453-9790 Tucker: (208) 455-1678 February 2014 California Cattleman 35 Ron Shurtz: (208) 431-3311 The Bull Business Brand

22993 Howe Rd. Caldwell, ID 83607 www.shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com

No Better Mama Those who raise ‘em say there’s no cow like a Beefmaster cow by Beefmaster Breeders United Communications, San Antonio, Texas “There is no better mama cow than a Beefmaster,” says Wes Carlton, a Florida cattle producer. This is common language being thrown around the Southeastern states and even into Tennessee and Kentucky. BBU staff members travel the country visiting with cattle producers and discussing the Beefmaster breed that was founded on ‘The Six Essentials’ which are weight, conformation, milk production, fertility, hardiness and disposition.  Beefmaster cattle optimize traits necessary to rebuild the nation’s cow herd because they excel in fertility, docility and longevity. Commercial cattlemen understand the economic advantages that improvements in these traits offer a beef operation. These include, but are not limited to, higher conception rate, more weaned calf per cow and reduced replacement heifer development costs.  Wes Carlton owner of RuMar, Inc., located in central Florida and headquartered in Indiantown, Fla., is a strong advocate for the Beefmaster breed and the ranch has used Beefmaster and Beefmaster cross females for 20 years. Carlton shares that Beefmaster cattle thrive in his part of the country and serve as excellent replacement heifers due to low cost and low maintenance. Ernie Ford of Georgia has also been utilizing Beefmaster for over 20 years. Ford says that he uses the breed for the added weight gain of the calves and the value of the Beefmaster replacement female. Cattle producers appreciate the high quality calves that Beefmaster females produce and the low input cost of the replacement females, feedlot steers and bred cows. Lykes Bros. Inc., located in South

Central Florida is one of the top five cow/calf producers in the country and they utilize Beefmaster bulls on their cows in their maternal cow herd in order to produce replacement females. Lykes Bros. Inc., Ranch Manager Flint Johns shared with Beefmaster Breeders United that he uses the Beefmaster breed for their maternal and fertility traits. Cattle producers appreciate the high quality females that Beefmaster bulls produce as they will excel in the hot, humid environments of the South to the wet, cool climates up north and everywhere in between. Beefmaster cattle are excelling in other areas of the Southeast such as Tennessee and Kentucky and even reaching into the Midwest such as Missouri and Arkansas. Cottage Farms in Jackson, Tenn., held there annual Beefmaster sale this past summer where the animals averaged $8,905 and the enthusiasm for the breed was at an all-time high and that enthusiasm continues. The Beefmaster breed is expanding due to the value of the Beefmaster cow and increased weight gain of the calves. Producers are recognizing that with the increasing input costs, the high weaning weights of Beefmaster calves is more important than ever. The BBU staff has visited with several breeders up the Southeastern coast and into the Midwest and the story is always the same. They use Beefmaster cattle for the excellent fertility and added growth, as well as the longevity of the cows. Efficiency is also a strong attribute of the Beefmaster breed. In a recent all-breeds performance test in Texas, yearling Beefmaster bulls were the highest average daily gain (ADG)

on test as well as the lowest residual feed intake (RFI) on test. Beefmaster cattle not only have high daily gains, they also consume less feed per pound of gain. Use of Beefmaster influenced cattle allows producers to be a low-cost producer with reduced input levels in the cow/calf enterprise. These cost cutting measures have been built into the Beefmaster influenced female and will be necessary for cow/calf operators to survive in the developing beef industry. From a dollar stand point, no other breed can compete with a Beefmaster. This statement is fully supported by Three Rivers Ranch of Dade City, Fla. “Since 2000 our Beefmaster-sired steers have sold for more dollars per head than any other calves we produce,” says John McCarthy, Three Rivers Ranch cattle manager. BBU staff members have had the opportunity to visit with the Nail Cattle Company of Palm Bay, Fla. The cattle company runs about 500 head of cows and utilizes Beefmaster bulls on their cows. Ryan Martin and Bonnie Nail-Martin of Nail Cattle Company shared that they love the heavy weaning weights and good disposition of the calves that are sired by the Beefmaster bulls. When rebuilding a herd, the Beefmaster cow will provide a cattle producer with everything they need from docility to fertility and efficiency to longevity. The economic traits that helped develop the Beefmaster breed continue to help cattle producers rebuild and improve their cow herd. Get more bang for your buck with Beefmaster bulls and females.

©BBU

36 California Cattleman February 2014

Beefmaster Breeders United www.Beefmasters.org 210.732.3132 6800 Park Ten Blvd., Suite 290W San Antonio, Texas 78213

Beefmaster Bulls The Best of Both Worlds Extremely fertile, functional and docile females to rebuild America’s cowherds Profitable and efficient feeders calves that deliver results in the current market place

February 2014 California Cattleman 37

Western States Beefmaster Breeders Association For a list of members or upcoming beefmaster sales, visit www.wsbba.org PRESIDENT John Pierson Vacaville, CA (707) 448-9208

SECRETARY Currently Vacant

BOARD MEMBER Les Chappel Miramonte, CA (559) 336-2485

BOARD MEMBER Dalton Lowery Fallon, NV (775) 867-4099 Fax

VICE PRESIDENT Ann Poppen Ione, CA (209) 274-6246

TREASURER Jeffrey Blair Salinas, CA (831) 754-1403

BOARD MEMBER Virgil Tucker Caldwell, ID 208) 340-9833

EX-OFFICIO John Evangelo Lemoore, CA (559) 924-2904

©BBU

We Believe...

We Believe...

Cherry Glen

Beefmasters

...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that are Breeding that for creates Qualitypregnancies and Performance Since 1989 designed to meet your desired outJohn & Sue Pierson come. Low birth weights, high grid P.O. Box 6897, Vacaville, CA 95696 • Phone 707.448.9208 values andpiersons@castles.com female replacements that improve your bottomline.

...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

Calving ease. Carcass. Cows. 1-800-278-8254 www.selectsiresbeef.com contact@allwestselectsires.com

Calving ease. BEEFMASTERS Carcass. The Best of Both Worlds Cows.

1-800-278-8254 Bulls Available at www.selectsiresbeef.com

contact@allwestselectsires.com Texoma Performance Bull & Female Sale, McAlester, OK • 3/15/14 • Bulls also available private treaty at the ranch!

38 California Cattleman February 2014

Herdsire, CG3031

February 2014 California Cattleman 39

THD ©

snyder’s buLLs For The 21sT CenTury Consignors: anguS

amador angus bar Lr angus Cardey ranches Cooper Cattle diablo valley angus Fox angus venture gomez angus ranch gudel Cattle Company hone ranch pozzi ranch roman Cattle schafer ranch smoky’s angus ranch steve smith angus and gelbvieh Westwind ranch angus Wild West angus

charolais

Jorgensen ranch

gelbvieh/balancer

Cardey ranches steve smith angus and gelbvieh

hereford

bell ranch shamrock herefords

Lim-Flex

easterly romanov ranch

red angus

mcphee red angus moore Creek red angus phillips red angus Trotter red angus

you’LL Find onLy The besT

aT The ToughesT damn buLL TesT... period

Snyder

buLL teSt and SaLe Sunday, March 9

only the best of the 180 bulls on test from california, utah nevada and oregon sell having completed one of the toughest bull tests in the west ... • • • • • •

Weaning perFormanCe FerTiLiTy - dam and individuaL gain on TesT ConFormaTion and musCLing Feed eFFiCienCy uLTrasound CarCass CharaCTisTiCs

Bull Buyer’s Seminar & Social

Shorthorn

sat., march 8, 4 p.m., pioneer crossing convention center, yerington, nevada

Watch and Bid Live

FeaTuring a paneL disCussion abouT CLimaTe Change WiTh nCba’s daren WiLLiams serving as moderaTor. paneLisTs inCLude uC davis’ Frank miTLoehner, ph.d., James TayLor and oTher indusTry experTs.

Cardey ranches

Snyder LiveStock company, inc. Lucy Rechel/Eddie Snyder • Office (775) 463-2677 Lucy’s Cell: (775) 790-0801 • www.slcnv.com Funded in part by grants from the City of yerington and Lyon County Tax boards.

40 California Cattleman February 2014

THD ©

— 6 Epic SonS —

SEll at SnydErS!

Get More for Your Money with Moore Creek

Beckton epic R397 k BW -.2 lot # 4601 4602 4603 4604 4605 4606

WW 72 YW 120 MK 17 STAY 17 MB .67 REA .49 BW -.2 -.4

WW 67 66

yW 102 103

MK 19 20

Stay 15 11

MB .50 .58

rEa .34 .24

-1.0 -1.2 -.7

64 67 69

102 105 111

20 20 20

14 13 15

.50 .54 .55

.32 .15 .26

Don’t Settle for Average! Gudel Cattle Company is selling 6 POWERFUL UPward Sons on March 9!

sitZ uPWard 307r

the numbers speak for themselves... GCC Bulls averaGe ePds

VS.

BW 1.9 • WW 57 • YW 105 • mK 31 re .43 • $W 35.02 • $B 90.06

Breed average of 2014 nOn-Parent Bulls

BW 1.8 • WW 47 • YW 83 • mK 46 re .42 • $W 30.10 • $B 69.56

Free delivery OF Bulls tO CaliFOrnia! Kris, Casey, Gentry & Kade Gudel

PO BOx 591, WiltOn Ca 95693 (916) 208-7258 • Krisgudel@gmail.com

where onLy the beSt dare to teSt

WILD WEST PRODUCES WINNERS

Why Are You Waiting?

Bell Ranch Baldies

Make a Difference!

Producing the same quality as our past champions!

Featuring 3 sons and 2 grandsons!

Look for 6 standout bulls by: Sitz Upward 307R • Mytty In Focus • SAV Final Answer 0035 • Rito 6EMA of 4L3 Emblazon • Boyd Poundmaker 21

CRR 719 Tulo 928 Reg #P43032041 Calved: 2/25/09 Owned with: Coyote Ridge Ranch BW 4.4 WW 79 YW 111 MK 21 SC 1.2 MB -.21 REA .81

WILD WEST

ANGUS

2014 sale bulls Measure up to this 2012 overall chaMpion froM wild west!

24551 hwy. 140 e. dairy, or 97625

It’s All There!

Offering 12 Hereford Bulls on test that will add value for the long term! Lilla & Woodie Bell • Dan Bell • Dan & Theresa Bell

Mitch cain • 541 892-5900

Micain6075@aol.coM www.wildwestangus.coM

ModERATE SizE ExTREME lEngTh ExTRA MuSClE SupERioR STRuCTuRE

Like us on Facebook at Bell Ranch Herefords

(775) 578-3536

PO Box 48, Paradise, NV 89426 bellranches@gmail.com

February 2014 California Cattleman 41

#1 RFI EARLY FALL!

from Trotter Red Angus A Paternal Brother to the 2013 Test Champion Bull is the #1 RFI early fall bull on test! #1 RFI Bull - lot 4607 is sired by LJT Citadel 812 with EPDs that can’t be beat! BW -2.6 • WW 60 • YW 92 MILK 16 • STAY 10 MARB .38 • REA .05

14

Awesome Amador Bulls on Test

•AAR Tex X 7008 SA • SAV Angus Valley 1867 • Connealy Right Answer 746 • Connealy Damay 5398 • Connealy in Focus 4925 • BR New Day 454 • 4 sons of this breed-changer sell March 9!

2013 SNYDER

TRoTTERS SToNGhoLD ChAMPIoN NoW FEATURED AT GENEx!

Also featur ing:

5 sons of Red Northern Fat Tony 605U • 2 sons of Beckton Epic R 397k 2 sons of Messmer Packer 5008 • 1 son of JLT Packer 028

Offer ing Something for Everyone!

All Bulls DNA-Tested • 11 bulls averaged 3.92 lbs/day • 8 are RFI efficient with minus scores • 5 will work on heifers!

TroTTer LANA TROTTER

red Angus

(661) 548-6652 • (661) 330-4617 lanaj548@gmail.com Rt 4, Box 206A • Porterville, CA 93257

8 Spring yearlings 5 fall yearlings

AAr tEn X 7008 sA

sirE: mytty in FoCus mGs: sAV AdAptor 2213

BW .1 WW 67 yW 135 mK 28 mB 1.32 rE .74 $W 59.64 $F 89.16 $G 51.76 $B 127.25

If you are looking for calving & growth

AMADOR ANGUS

=

Granger Pioneer 052 SAV Duke 6242 VDar Really Windy 4097

(775) 782-4571

honeranch@nanosecond.com

Ced 12 • BW-2.4 WW 42 • yW 87

loT 4852

loT 4852

WW YW MK 72 111 39

Po Box 1956 Minden, nV 89423

From Easterly Romanov Ranch Sire: hoover dAM MGs: Wulfs GuaRdian 5074G

Featuring 2 fall yearling sons of this powerhouse!

Charlie hone

(209) 538-4597

loT 4851

Apex Windy 078

BW 3.9

Ed & Josh AmAdor 5136 LAird rd, modEsto, CA 95358

NE RANCH HO

h

42 California Cattleman February 2014

siRe: sydGen Mandate 6079 MGs: eXlR BenChMaRk 145l

Ced 11 • BW-1.7 WW 50 • yW 102

BW of 72 lBs • 205-day Wt of 812 lBs • 365-day Wt of 1306 lBs loT 4851 365-day RiBeye of 13.94” • adG of 3.88 lBs on test BW of 78 lBs • 205-day Wt of 812 lBs • 365-day Wt of 1375 lBs loT 4852 365-day RiBeye of 15.88” • adG of 4.08 lBs on test

They’re Thick! They’re ModerATe!

And They Sell!

4 Calving Ease Specialists Charolais Champions Sell at Snyders! from Jorgensen Ranch Look for the same quality as our past champions in this year’s sale bulls! Lot No. 4619 4620 4621 4622

BW -4.0 -2.8 -3.0 -4.6

WW 32 42 37 38

The Most Consistent bulls... from the most consistent program... ....Year After Year!

YW MILK MARB 46 16 .37 61 18 .28 54 15 .27 57 18 .59

• BIG PERFORMANCE • • EXTREME VALUE • MODEST BIRTHWEIGHTS •

Known for low-birthweight bulls that are loaded with carcass, you will not want to miss out on this year’s offering!

from SonS of:

Phillps Ranch

LT CHeyenne BLend 7142 LT BLUeGraSS 4017 dr reveLaTion 467 LT SiLver diSTanCe 5342 Hoodoo diamond 1142 fJT rio Bravo m6018

Red Angus

Cecil & Sandy Felkins (209) 274-4338 550 Buena Vista Rd. Ione, CA 95640

2013 Bulls for 21st Century Champion Charolais

Jorgensen Ranch Fred & Toni Jorgensen: 530. 865.7102 • 209.602.8130 25884 Moller Ave. • Orland, CA 95963

Plan Now to Spend March 8 & 9 in Yerington!

WESTERN RANCHERS BEEF PROFIT CONFERENCE XVIII

WRB is Teaming up with Snyder Livestock Company

Feedlot Tours • Seminars with Industry Experts • Bull Buyers’ Social • Bull Test Sale Saturday, March 8, 2014

Snyder Livestock Sale Bulls Available to Preview at Feedlot ......................................................................................................................8 a.m. Snyder Livestock Company Feedlot Tours ................................................................................................................... 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. WRB Profit Conference XVIII Luncheon at the Convention Center ($10 plus tax and tip) ..........................................................................1 p.m. WRB Proft Conference XVIII Keynote Address: Estate, Tax Planning & Lawsuit Protection������������������������������������������������������� 1:30 p�m. American Society for Asset Protection Senior Advisor G.L. Mangelson will lead this FREE Seminar, “How Ranchers Can Become Invincible to Lawsuits and Save Thousands in Taxes,” featuring tips on lawsuit protection, tax reduction and estate planning strategies - all directed toward landowners, ranchers and business owners.

Snyder Livestock Bull Buyer’s Seminar & Panel Discussion on Climate Change with NCBA’s Daren Williams serving as moderator� This FREE Seminar is sponsored by Zoetis�

After the seminar, enjoy cowboy camaraderie, adult beverages and some long-on-beef hor d’oeuvres at Snyder Livestock’s Annual Bull Buyers’ Social, sponsored by Laird Mfg, Warren Reed Insurance, Pinenut Livestock Nutrition, Prudential Mortgage Capital Company, Muckel Anderson CPAS and Yerinton Rotary.

Sunday, March 9, 2014

Bulls Available at the Feedlot to Preview.....................................................................................................................................................8 a.m. Snyder Livestock’s “Bulls for the 21st Century” Lunch at Noon, followed by the Annual Sale ....................................................................1 p.m. Download a sale book at www.slcnv.com. For details on the sale, tours or seminar, call Lucy Rechel at (775) 463-2677. The WRB Profit Conference Luncheon, WRB Keynote Speakers and Bull Buyers’ Seminar and Social will be held in Yerington, Nev., at the Pioneer Crossing Convention Center, formerly Casino West Conference Center.

up for Ride for the Range & Win to $20,000! Ride the Range tickets & Lunch

400 tickets available • $100/ticket

Reverse drawing held during Bull Buyers’ Social, March 8, approx� 6:30 p�m� Last ticket wins the grand prize, which is one-half of the value of total tickets sold!

Reservations: 1-866-723-3348.

Or send your name, address and phone with a payable check to WRB Beef for Ride for the Range tickets to WRB, PO Box 1688, Alturas, CA 96101. NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN. ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT RANGE MAGAZINE, Call 1-800-726-4348 for credit card orders. THE WRB YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM & OTHER WRB PROGRAMS. Western Ranchers Beef provides management and source verification for WRB CERTIFIED PREMIUM CATTLE, and PANORAMA™ Grass-Fed Beef, and can do the same for you�

February 2014 California Cattleman 43

Straight Talk:

your options on Selling Livestock due to Drought by Clay Singleton, CPA, SingletonAuman PC, Susanville

O

ne of the most common questions I am asked these days by my farm and ranch clients is, “Should I take advantage of that rule that allows me to avoid paying taxes on the sale of my livestock because of the drought?” Of course, like most tax questions, the answer depends on your situation and your plans for several years down the road. This article provides some insight on an issue that far too many ranchers are dealing with during this latest dry spell. Farmers and ranchers (along with clergymen, I might add) have some of the best tax provisions available in the tax code. Any preaching ranchers out there? First, I would like to summarize the provisions of this potential tax benefit, which those of you who feed our country can take advantage of. There are actually two opportunities for postponing having to fork over taxes on the sale of Livestock. First, if livestock are sold due to drought or other weatherrelated conditions, cattlemen or women may elect to recognize the gain a year later, for the livestock that was sold above and beyond normal sales

for that time of the year. Also, the income may be deferred only when the area has been federally-declared a disaster area, or other area designated as eligible for assistance by the federal government. By the way, just in case you have missed it, every county in California qualifies in 2013 as a drought county. The niftiest provision of this tax benefit is that ranchers may choose to recognize drought-related sales income a year later, up to four years later, by going back and filing an amended return. Is your tax professional considering this for you? Depending on your situation, this could save you some money! The second opportunity for postponing the recognition of gain is the more commonly known sale of breeding stock, which you don’t have to replace for four years, or even longer if allowed by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). This topic is beyond our discussion here but your tax professional should be able to answer those questions for you. Once again, the key point to remember is that the IRS only allows you to defer the gain on sales

44 California Cattleman February 2014

of livestock that are a result of the drought and that exceed your normal sales for that time of the year. Also, you should keep in mind that you must replace the breeding stock by the end of the year, four years later. If you don’t fully replace the livestock within the required replacement period, you have to report the difference as income, which can result in a considerable expense for your operation. However, pay attention, because this can be a good deal! If, because of weatherrelated conditions, it is not feasible to purchase replacement livestock, other agricultural property may be substituted. You read that right. To replace the cattle, you can buy a tractor, fencing, an agriculture well, irrigation pipe, etc., just not real property. Great tax benefits, right? Well, there are lots of situations where a cattleman might be advised to go ahead and recognize the capital gain now, rather than putting it off until later. See the next page for questions you might want to answer for yourself before making the decision to recognize the gains tax now or later.

Should you claim capital gains tax now or later? 1. What direction do you feel tax rates will be heading? If you are like me and have an expectation that more of our hard-earned dollars will be going to the government down the road, it might be wise to pay the taxes on income now, rather than deferring it until later. 2. Do you realize that a married couple can make up to around $90,000 in 2013 (Single - $45,000), and if any of that income is capital gains, such as the sale of breeding stock, the federal tax rate is 0 percent? If you fall in this range for 2013, it might make sense to recognize the gain and pay no tax! Keep in mind, you will still owe some to the Golden State of California. 3. If you have Net Operating Loss (NOL) carrying over from prior years, you may want to recognize the income from sale of livestock, because it would be decreased by the NOL carryover. 4. Did you purchase a higher than

normal amount of depreciable property in 2013, such as Breeding Stock or Equipment? If so, tax laws allow you to write off a lot of that equipment in 2013. This could offset the gain you realize on the sale of livestock due to drought. Then again, maybe that depreciation should be saved for deduction later when tax rates are higher. 5. Have you considered what your income will be like down the road, compared to 2013? If your income is lower in 2013 than it will be in future years, it might be smart to recognize the income on livestock sales now. If it is higher now in 2013, then, 6. Did you sell any property for a loss in 2013? If so, the losses recognized could offset the gains on livestock sales due to drought. This would probably be better than deferring the livestock sale gains until later. 7. If you will be applying for financing during the upcoming year, you may want to show the gains on

the sale of the livestock so you can qualify for the financing more easily. 8. If you defer the recognition of gain on the sale of breeding stock, will you be in a position to purchase replacement livestock, or other assets within the next four years? 9. In support of NOT recognizing the income in 2013, if your kids will be applying for financial aid for college in 2014, and you can keep that additional income from livestock sales off of your tax return, you may qualify for more financial aid. Your tax professional should be able to assist you in understanding what road – to postpone the gain or recognize it now – is best for you to travel down. And, of course, our tax professionals at SingletonAuman PC are always happy to assist! As an agriculture accountant, my last piece of advice for you is: Don’t forget to pay your kids if they work on the ranch. It can be the best tax break of all!

Your Financial Plan Is Only As Strong as Your Accountant SingletonAuman PC not only knows your lifestyle

...we live it.

Rurally located, we’ve been proudly serving the agricultural community in California for over 60 years. we specialize in tax planning and tax minimization for farmers and ranchers.

John Auman jauman@sa-cpas.com Clay Singleton csingleton@sa-cpas.com 1740 Main Street, Suite a, SuSanville, Ca 96130 • Phone: (530) 257-1040 • Fax: (530) 257-8876

February 2014 California Cattleman 45

Corsair Angus Ranch Inaugural Bull & Heifer Sale Thursday, March 6, 2014 • 1 p.m.

Herdsires

Connealy Confidence 0100 War Party 2417 Coleman Regis 904 Sydgen CC&7 HA Program 5652

Selling 41 Yearling • 16 Two-Year-Old Angus Bulls for the 2014 Breeding Season 36 AI Bred Registered • 4 AI Bred Commercial Heifers

Steve & Jan Puntenney 66062 Hwy 74, Ione, OR 97843 (503) 784-8691 www.corsairangus.com

Phenotypically Correct Fit for Function, not Fat These Bulls will get out there and cover your cows

Take Exit 147 off of I-84. Follow Highway 74 to Milepost 21½. From Heppner, OR, we’re 22 miles North on Highway 74.

JOIN US AT NOON FOR A BBQ LUNCH ON SALE DAY!

Braised Short Ribs & Red Wine Sauce Total Recipe Time: 2 1/2 to 3 hours

Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds beef Short Ribs 1 teaspoon vegetable oil 1 can double-strength beef broth 1 cup dry red wine 2 small onions, quartered 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 fresh thyme sprigs 1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms 2 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup chopped shallots 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme 2 teaspoons cornstarch dissolved in 1/2 cup dry red wine

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat oil in large stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown Short Ribs on all sides. Season with as desired. Add broth, 1 cup wine, onions, garlic and thyme to stockpot; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly and simmer 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until beef is fork-tender. 2. Remove Short Ribs from stockpot; keep warm. Strain vegetables and skim fat from cooking liquid. Reserve 3/4 cup cooking liquid for sauce; discard remaining cooking liquid. 3. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add mushrooms, shallots and minced thyme; cook and stir 5 minutes or until mushrooms are tender. Add reserved cooking liquid and cornstarch mixture to skillet. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes; stirring often. Remove skillet from heat; stir in remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Serve sauce over Short Ribs.

46 California Cattleman February 2014

Angus and Hereford Bull Sale Monday, March 10th, 2014 1:00 PM at Spring Cove Ranch in Bliss, Idaho

Selling 150 Angus Bulls Yearlings & Falls

50 Hereford Bulls 3 Red Angus yr. Bulls Yearlings, Falls & 2’s

25 Angus yr. Heifers 13 Hereford yr. Heifers

Selling sons of CCA Emblazon 702 Reg 15980098 CED+16 BEPD-1.8 WEPD+60 YEPD+106 MEPD+22 SC+1.01 CW+30 MARB+.50 RE+.63 $W+51.22 $B+79.37

Selling sons & grandsons of SLL Overload T18 Reg 15843888 CED+7 BEPD+1.3 WEPD+60 YEPD+100 MEPD+18 SC+1.12 CW+50 MARB+.71 RE+.57 $B+107.78

Selling sons & daughters of KCF Bennett 9126J R294 Reg P42651401 CED+10.1 BW-1.5 WW+54 YW+96

Selling sons of Apex Windy 078 Reg 16237970 CED+1 BEPD+3.9 WEPD+72 YEPD+110 MEPD+40 SC+1.60 CW+41 MARB+.38 RE+.16 $W+51.02 $B+76.03

M+33 Milk & Growth +60 SC+1.4 RIB+.06 MARB+.58 CHB+$39

For Catalogs Call: 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com

February 2014 California Cattleman 47

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Meet the 2014 CBC Chairman & Executive Board by the staff of the California Beef Council The California Beef Council (CBC) team strives to effectively and creatively promote beef, provide important nutrition education and resources, educate consumers and work hand-in-hand with producers to address industry issues as they arise. Offering leadership and guidance along the way to the CBC staff is a 42-member board representing every sector of the beef industry. As the CBC launches another year of promotion and education activities, a new leader has taken the helm of the council. Rich Silacci, San Luis Obispo, is the council chairman for 2014, following the term of immediate past chair Mark Lacey, Independence. Silacci, who represents the dairy sector, has been a member of the CBC board since 2007. Silacci comes from a long line of dairy farmers and grew up on a 200-head Petaluma dairy that was established by his great grandfather in 1913. During the 1970s and 1980s, Silacci’s family dairy was home to one of the most productive and wellknown herds of Guernsey cows in the country. Silacci grew up working alongside his father managing the family business before going on to California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) for his education. After college (and a few years spent working in the industry), he returned to the family dairy full-time and went into partnership with his parents until an opportunity at the Cal Poly Dairy Science Department presented

itself in 2007. Today, Silacci manages Cal Poly’s dairy farm, which is home to 110 Jersey Cows and 120 Holsteins with about 200 young stock. The dairy employs 25 to 30 students each semester. With Silacci’s guidance, the students run and provide all labor for the dairy, getting a truly hands-on and immersive experience. “Working with these students on a day-to-day basis on dairy management, animal heath, and other dairy business decisions is what makes our whole operation worthwhile. Training our future dairy leaders is both meaningful and exciting,” says Silacci.

Issues on the Horizon

As is likely the case for anyone in this business, drought is the number one issue on Silacci’s mind these days. He is hopeful the CBC’s efforts to promote beef and provide outreach to consumers and producers alike will help the industry weather the storm of dry conditions and high feed costs. But on the broader horizon, Silacci notes that animal welfare and public perception are two issues that will always be top-of-mind for him, which underscores the importance of the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program. At Cal Poly, he incorporates dairy BQA lessons and practices in his dairy classes, conveying to his students the responsibility dairy producers have to the consumer with regard to beef quality.

2014 CBC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE CHAIR, RICH SILACCI VICE CHAIR, MIKE SMITH PAST CHAIR, MARK LACEY MANUEL RODRIGUES JIM BARNEBEE TROY MURRAY BILL SANGUINETTI RICHARD NOCK

DAIRY PACKER FEEDER DAIRY FEEDER FEEDER RANGE RANGE

SAN LUIS OBISPO SELMA INDEPENDENCE TIPTON BRAWLEY COALINGA FARMINGTON SAN LUIS OBISPO

For a full list of the CBC board and more about the CBC’s efforts, visit www.calbeef.org. And be sure to find us on Facebook and Twitter, too! 48 California Cattleman February 2014

“Even though milk is our primary output, beef is a huge component of the dairy industry. It’s encouraging to see the many improvements that we’ve made in the dairy sector with an eye toward beef quality and animal welfare, and I’m proud to see so many future dairy producers embrace BQA practices and standards.” When it comes to the CBC, Silacci works with his fellow board members to provide a well-rounded, comprehensive industry perspective to determine the most effective ways to invest checkoff dollars. But beyond that, Silacci notes that it’s also important for him to share with fellow dairy producers what the CBC is doing on their behalf. “The CBC has worked hard to put tools in place that dairy farmers and other producers can use, especially with regard to BQA. There are some excellent resources and guidance available on issues that affect beef quality, such as proper injection site management, effective evaluation of cull cows going to market and other such matters. These resources are available to ensure that we all have access to the latest practices and guidelines that ultimately lead to a better product.” Silacci encourages his fellow producers to reach out to the CBC with any questions or issues. “You’ll find that not only is there a dedicated staff ready to work with you, but there is a board of 42 producers just like you who have strong roots in this industry and a vested interest in the future direction of the beef market. I’m proud to work alongside so many professional and experienced representatives of the beef industry and I look forward to a successful year ahead.”

The TIME FoR TRAYnHAM BULls Is NOW! February 23, 12 p.m. • Buchanan Angus Ranch

Klamath Falls, OR

Quality bulls sell with breed-leading genetics! LoT 73 • #17701933 • caLved 2/27/13

LoT 67 • #17551411 • caLved 2/01/13

BW 89 adJ WW 826 adJ YW 1,290

BW 89 adJ WW 940

Sired by eXaR Upshot 0562B MGS: occ emblazon 854e

Sired by connealy consensus 7229 MGS: Rito 616 of 4B20 6807

CED

BW

WW

YW

Milk

Marb

RE

($W)

($B)

CED

BW

WW

YW

Milk

Marb

RE

($W)

($B)

+12

I+1.5

+59

+101

I+33

+.26

+1.01

+47.06

+78.49

-8

+3.7

+59

+97

+35

+.41

+.71

+37.19

+91.18

One of our heavier muscled bulls! Thick, stout-made, sound-footed! Our Upshot calves are one of our more consistent sire groups. This is a paternal brother to the high-selling bull at the 2013 sale. Top 2% RE, $W • 10% CED, Milk, $B • 15% WW, YW, $YG

LoT 66 • #17562391 • caLved 1/09/13

THESE HERD SIRE PROSPECTS SELL!

BW 87 adJ WW 880 adJ YW 1,333

Sired by dameron First class MGS: occ emblazon 854e

Our only Consensus son in this sale. Outstanding individual with WW of 940! He will sire deep-sided cattle that will tip down the scale. A real genetic package with maternal sire being 6I6. Top 3% $W, Milk • 10% $B, WW • 15% RE

LoT 70 • #17684459 • caLved 02/05/2013

BW 89 adJ WW 880 adJ YW 1,349

Sired by eXaR Upshot 0562B MGS: occ emblazon 854e

CED

BW

WW

YW

Milk

Marb

RE

($W)

($B)

CED

BW

WW

YW

Milk

Marb

RE

($W)

($B)

+1

+2.8

+61

+95

+29

+.12

+.50

+44.26

+55.61

+1

+3.7

+55

+99

+30

+.24

+.94

+38.80

+83.01

3908 is stout with tremendous thickness & depth of body. First Class semen is valued at over $3,000/unit. One of the first First Class sons to sell on the West Coast!

Top 2% $W • 10% WW

OFFERING THE FIRST ET SONS OUT OF DONOR, EXAR RITA 9728, OWNED WITH EXPRESS RANCHES!

Full brother to Lot 67 and displays as much quality. A heavymuscled, deep-bodied, sound-structured bull. He’ll give you quality cattle and steers that tip down the scales.

Top 2% Re, $W • 10% ced, MILK, $B • 15% WW, YW, $YG

Join us for our Female Sale Labor Day Weekend! Like us on Facebook

BRAD & BUCKLEY COX

eXaR RITa 9728 - #16267805

1881 Brophy Road Eagle Point, OR 97524 (541) 826-3650 Cell (541) 840-5797

info@traynhamranch.com www.traynhamranch.com February 2014 California Cattleman 49

Steve McCarthy presented Steve Zane with an engraved silver buckle as McCarthy assumed the presidency of the local Cattlemen’s Association. Other officers announced were vice president Chad Amen, secretary The 62nd Annual Tehama County Cathy Tobin, treasurer Cindy Brown. Cattlemen-CattleWomen winter dinner Directors are Adam Davy, Larry and scholarship auction once again Galper, Ron Humphrey, Mike proved successful as $21,685 was McCluskey, Jeff White, Bryce raised. Borror, Andy Cox, Wally Roney and 2013 Tehamea County Cattlemen’s Dave Stroing. Association (TCCA) Scholarship In addition to these items of recipients Bailey Brownfield, Sarah regular business, both the Tehama Brown, Corey Carpenter, Brooke County Cattlemen and CattleWomen Hencratt, Stacey Stroing and Savannah recognized their respective members of Miller were each presented $2,000. the year. Tehama County CattleWomen Tony Turri, Flournoy, pictured (TCCW) Scholarship recipients Corey below, was recognized as the TCCA Carpenter, Brooke Hencratt, Jadda Man of the year and Betty Peek, Miller, Stacey Stroing and Margo Cottonwood, and Jeanne Smith, Dawley were also presented with Corning, were both recognized as scholarships in the amount of $2,000. TCCW CowBelles of the Year.

TEHAMA COUNTY HOLDs WINTER DINNER

Extended-Release Injectable Parasiticide 5% Sterile Solution NADA 141-327, Approved by FDA for subcutaneous injection For the Treatment and Control of Internal and External Parasites of Cattle on Pasture with Persistent Effectiveness CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS FOR USE LONGRANGE, when administered at the recommended dose volume of 1 mL per 110 lb (50 kg) body weight, is effective in the treatment and control of 20 species and stages of internal and external parasites of cattle: Gastrointestinal Roundworms Cooperia oncophora – Adults and L4

Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus – Adults

Cooperia punctata – Adults and L4 Cooperia surnabada – Adults and L4 Haemonchus placei – Adults

Grubs Hypoderma bovis

Oesophagostomum radiatum – Adults Ostertagia lyrata – Adults Ostertagia ostertagi – Adults, L4, and inhibited L4

Mites Sarcoptes scabiei var. bovis

Trichostrongylus axei – Adults and L4 Trichostrongylus colubriformis – Adults Parasites

Durations of Persistent Effectiveness

Gastrointestinal Roundworms

Past president of CCA and TCCA, Jerry Hemsted, Cottonwood (left) and newly-installed TCCA President Steve McCarthy, Red Bluff (right) presented the TCCA Man of the Year Award to past TCCA President Tony Turri, Flournoy.

TCCW honored its 2013 CowBelles of the Year. Pictured ( L to R) are Winter Dinner Chair Cathy Tobin, Flournoy; CowBelles of Year Betty Peek, Cottonwood; Jeanne Smith, Corning; and TCCA President Steve McCarthy, Red Bluff.

50 California Cattleman February 2014

Cooperia oncophora Cooperia punctata Haemonchus placei

100 days 100 days 120 days

Oesophagostomum radiatum Ostertagia lyrata Ostertagia ostertagi Trichostrongylus axei Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus

120 days 120 days 120 days 100 days 150 days

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) should be given only by subcutaneous injection in front of the shoulder at the recommended dosage level of 1 mg eprinomectin per kg body weight (1 mL per 110 lb body weight). WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Withdrawal Periods and Residue Warnings Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 48 days of the last treatment. This drug product is not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Animal Safety Warnings and Precautions The product is likely to cause tissue damage at the site of injection, including possible granulomas and necrosis. These reactions have disappeared without treatment. Local tissue reaction may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Observe cattle for injection site reactions. If injection site reactions are suspected, consult your veterinarian. This product is not for intravenous or intramuscular use. Protect product from light. LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) has been developed specifically for use in cattle only. This product should not be used in other animal species. When to Treat Cattle with Grubs LONGRANGE effectively controls all stages of cattle grubs. However, proper timing of treatment is important. For the most effective results, cattle should be treated as soon as possible after the end of the heel fly (warble fly) season. Environmental Hazards Not for use in cattle managed in feedlots or under intensive rotational grazing because the environmental impact has not been evaluated for these scenarios. Other Warnings: Underdosing and/or subtherapeutic concentrations of extended-release anthelmintic products may encourage the development of parasite resistance. It is recommended that parasite resistance be monitored following the use of any anthelmintic with the use of a fecal egg count reduction test program. TARGET ANIMAL SAFETY Clinical studies have demonstrated the wide margin of safety of LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin). Overdosing at 3 to 5 times the recommended dose resulted in a statistically significant reduction in average weight gain when compared to the group tested at label dose. Treatment-related lesions observed in most cattle administered the product included swelling, hyperemia, or necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue of the skin. The administration of LONGRANGE at 3 times the recommended therapeutic dose had no adverse reproductive effects on beef cows at all stages of breeding or pregnancy or on their calves. Not for use in bulls, as reproductive safety testing has not been conducted in males intended for breeding or actively breeding. Not for use in calves less than 3 months of age because safety testing has not been conducted in calves less than 3 months of age. STORAGE Store at 77° F (25° C) with excursions between 59° and 86° F (15° and 30° C). Protect from light. Made in Canada. Manufactured for Merial Limited, Duluth, GA, USA. ®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks of Merial. ©2013 Merial. All rights reserved. 1050-2889-02, Rev. 05/2012

WITH SEASON-LONG CONTROL, YO UR CAT TLE

T HE NE IGHBORS WILL STARE.

will look so good

Introducing new LONGRANGE with 100 to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose.1

Nothing else comes close to the control of LONGRANGE.2,5-7* DECTOMAX® (doramectin) Injectable

SMALL INTESTINAL WORM (C. oncophora) SMALL INTESTINAL WORM (C. punctata) STOMACH HAIRWORM

A pasture full of thicker, slicker cattle is a beautiful sight. Get the look with LONGRANGE. Its unique THERAPHASETM Technology gives you 100 to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose.2 Break the parasite life cycle and see the performance benefits all season.3,4 Ask your veterinarian for prescription LONGRANGE.

CYDECTIN® (moxidectin) Injectable

LONGRANGE Injectable

BARBER’S POLE WORM NODULAR WORM BROWN STOMACH WORM (O. ostertagi) BROWN STOMACH WORM (O. lyrata) LUNGWORM 0

30

60

90

120

DAYS *SAFE-GUARD® has no demonstrated persistent activity.

For more information, visit

150 Available in 500 mL, 250 mL and 50 mL bottles. Administer subcutaneously at 1 mL/110 lbs.

theLONGRANGElook.com

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: Do not treat within 48 days of slaughter. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows, or in veal calves. Post-injection site damage (e.g., granulomas, necrosis) can occur. These reactions have disappeared without treatment. 1

®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks, and THERAPHASE is a trademark, of Merial. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. ©2013 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. RUMIELR1213-E (09/12)

Dependent upon parasite species, as referenced in FOI summary and LONGRANGE product label.

LONGRANGE product label. Morley FH, Donald AD. Farm management and systems of helminth control. Vet Parasitol. 1980;6:105-134. Brunsdon RV. Principles of helminth control. Vet Parasitol. 1980;6:185-215 5 CYDECTIN® Injectable product label. 6 DECTOMAX® Injectable product label. 7 SAFE-GUARD® product label. 2 3 4

CCA Staff Member Promoted to Legislative Role CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin recently announced that Kirk Wilbur, formerly CCA’s membership and office administrator will fill the role of Director of Government Relations, left vacant by former legislative team member Margo Parks. Wilbur, who has been with the association nine months, has become familar with many of the issues facing California ranchers. That knowledge, coupled with his law degree from University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law, Sacramento, will serve CCA members well as Wilbur works closely with CCA’s Justin Oldfield, to tackle issues in the legislature as well as at California’s regulatory agencies. “I’ve really enjoyed getting to know CCA and its members over the past nine months. I’m looking forward to my new role and the chance to apply more of my legal education in my work. I’m also excited to work even more closely with CCA’s passionate members to advocate for this extraordinary industry,” Wilbur said. As staff responsibilities evolve in the Sacramento office, CCA Director of Finance Lisa Pherigo will head up membership efforts on the state and local level. As always, for more information or questions about issues impacting you, you may contact your CCA staff in the office at (916) 444-0845.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. A reliable business partner is difficult to come by. At the American Angus Association®, a team of skilled Regional Managers can guide your operation toward success.

Rod Wesselman, Regional Manager

Radale Tiner, Regional Manager

P.O. Box 746 Moses Lake, WA 98837 509.750.2185 rwesselman@angus.org

3707 Marielene College Station, TX 77845 979.492.2663 rtiner@angus.org

Contact a Regional Manager to locate Angus genetics, select marketing options tailored to your needs, and to access Association programs and services. Put the business breed to work for you.

Idaho Oregon Washington Hawaii

New Mexico Texas

To subscribe to the Angus Journal, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report on RFD-TV Monday mornings at 7:30 CST. © 2013-2014 American Angus Association

3201 Frederick Ave. • St. Joseph, MO 64506 816.383.5100 • www.ANGUS.org

TRUCK SCALES • LIVESTOCK SCALES • WAREHOUSE SCALES • RENTAL SCALES MOBILE LIVESTOCK RENTALS AVAILABLE AT:

Bullet Rental – Klamath Falls, OR • ACW Rentals – Burns, OR • Powell Scales – Scio, OR

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YOUR TRUCK AND LIVESTOCK SCALE SPECIALISTS • Axle Scales • Truck Scales • Livestock Scales • Floor Scales • Electronic Low-Profile Scales • Portable Truck Scale Rentals • Self-Contained Livestock Scales • Mechanical/Electronic Pit (and Pitless) Scales

SCALE SERVICE • SYSTEMS • PARTS • SALES & CONSTRUCTION

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Main Office Powell Scales NW, Inc. 39120 West Scio Rd. Scio, OR 97374 503.394.3660 Toll Free: 1.800.451.0187

SCALES NW POWELL - INLAND

Spokane Office Inland Scales NW 5602 E. Desmet Ave. P.O. Box 11335 Spokane, WA 99211 509.535.4295

www.scalesnw.com • SteveOrr@scalesnw.com • Steve Orr 503.510.3540

52 California Cattleman February 2014

Monsanto FUND’s educational Grant Helps Rural Schools Across the U.S., school districts are working to incorporate common core state standards and hands-on learning opportunities into their math and science curriculum. These new opportunities are designed to provide real world experiences that help grow the next generation by preparing them for success in college and in their careers. Now in its third year, the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education Program, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, is once again gearing up to help rural school districts by investing over $2.3 million to strengthen math and science education in rural communities. Between now and April 6, 2014, farmers have the opportunity to nominate their local public school district to compete for a grant of either $10,000 or $25,000. Administrators from nominated school districts can then submit grant applications for either amount, through April 21, 2014, to enhance their math and/or science programs. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,� said Michelle Insco, Monsanto Fund program officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.� The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education Program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same USDAappointed Crop Reporting District (CRD). CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same

state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August 2014. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education Advisory Council, a group of 30 farmer leaders from across the country, will select the winning grant applications. Advisory Council members were selected based on their passion for agriculture and education, as well as experience in rural school districts.

In 2013, more than 73,000 farmers and ranchers demonstrated their support for education by nominating 3,851 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to 181 recipients. This year, the number of eligible counties has expanded from 1,271 to 1,289. For more information about the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education Program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www. GrowRuralEducation.com.

Don’t Tell HIM That A GOOD DEAL Isn’t A BIG DEAL Noromectin brand dewormers continue to provide beef producers with a proven, cost-effective approach to deworming. And Norbrook RIIHUVEHHISURGXFHUVWKUHHFRQYHQLHQWà H[LEOHGHZRUPLQJRSWLRQV WRÀWDQ\VL]HRSHUDWLRQ Ž

NoromectinŽ 1% Injection ‡2QHORZYROXPHGRVHIRUWUHDWPHQWDQGFRQWURORILQWHUQDODQG H[WHUQDOSDUDVLWHV ‡8QEUHDNDEOHSODVWLFKDQJHUERWWOHV ‡$YDLODEOHLQP/P/ P/ DQGP/ ERWWOHV +DQJHU%RWWOHV

NoromectinÂŽ PLUS

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NoromectinŽ Pour-On ‡&RQYHQLHQWSRXURQIRUPXODWLRQIRUHDVHRIDGPLQLVWUDWLRQ DQGOHVVVWUHVVIRUWKHSURGXFHUDVZHOODVWKHDQLPDO ‡3URWHFWLYHFDUWRQZLWKFRQYHQLHQWFDUU\KDQGOHHDV\JULS SRXURQMXJ ‡$YDLODEOHLQ/DQG/FRQWDLQHUV

'RQ¡WWKURZDZD\\RXUKDUGHDUQHGPRQH\RQPRUHH[SHQVLYHGHZRUPLQJ WRROVZKHQ1RURPHFWLQSURYLGHVDOOWKHSURWHFWLRQRIWKHSLRQHHUSURGXFWV

NoromectinŽ ‌ A Good Deal Observe label withdrawal times. Do not use in female dairy cattle of breeding age, as a withdrawal time has not been established. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Do not use in unapproved animal species as severe reactions, including fatalities in dogs, may result. See product inserts for full directions for use and additional precautions. The Norbrook logos and Noromectin are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited

www.norbrookinc.com 0214-000-M03A

February 2014 California Cattleman 53

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February 2014 California Cattleman 55

The Best of Both Worlds

Phone 707.448.9208

h

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

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February 2014 California Cattleman 57

58 California Cattleman February 2014

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

for these

2014 CCA EVENTS CCA meetings like the midyear meeting and convention are your opportunity to voice your concerns on the issues that impact your way of life. In addition to policy meetings, CCA also features several events in which members can help assist CCA in its lobbying and fundraising efforts. Below is a list of CCA events you should mark on your calendar for 2014.

CA/AZ Feeder Council Meeting Coronado Marriot, Coronado May 23-23

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

Intersted in advertising in our buyers’ guide? Contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113 to reserve your space TODAY!

CCA Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast Sutter Club Downtown Sacramento June 11 CCA/CCW Midyear Meeting Sacramento Doubletree, Sacramento June 12-13 98th Annual CCA/CCW Convention John Ascuaga’s Nugget, Sparks, Nev. Nov. 20-22

February 2014 California Cattleman 59

CBCIA Presents the

2014 “Your Future’s At Stake” Tour

of Northern California June 21-24

Tour stops include:

Tour & dinner aT Sierra nevada Brewery, ChiCo California STaTe univerSiTy, ChiCo, SChool farm KiSh BuCKing BullS. red Bluff TrouT fly fiShing and Tying demonSTraTionS, haT CreeK Bidwell ranCh Cow-Calf operaTion, hydroeleCTriCiTy & TrouT farm, haT CreeK praTher ranCh CaTTle operaTion, wild riCe, STrawBerry nurSery, Collagen operaTion, haT CreeK driSColl nurSery and STrawBerry/raSpBerry growerS Burney fallS STaTe parK Bengard ranCheS’ gooSe valley ranCh, Burney wooTen’S Queen Bee operaTion, palo Cedro Byrd CaTTle Co. SeedSToCK Beef operaTion red Bluff

...and much more!

Lodging, transportation & meals provided throughout tour. Registration information coming soon. For more information contact Abbie Nelson at (916) 804-4990 or abigail5star@aol.com.

Advertisers’ Index All West Select Sires.................................................................. 38 Amador Angus..................................................................... 42, 54 American Angus Association............................................ 53, 55 American Hereford Association.............................................. 23 Baker Angus............................................................................... 30 Bar R Angus............................................................................... 54 Beefmaster Breeders United..................................................... 37 Bell Ranch Herefords................................................................ 41 BMW Angus.............................................................................. 54 Bovine Elite, LLC....................................................................... 57 Broken Arrow Angus Ranch.................................................... 54 Broken Box Ranch..................................................................... 55 Buchanan Angus Ranch..................................................... 33, 54 Byrd Cattle Company, LLC................................................ 54, 64 California Custom..................................................................... 57 California Nevada Hereford Association............................... 23 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc............................................... 56 California Windmills................................................................ 56 Cargill.......................................................................................... 20 Charron Ranch.......................................................................... 54 Cherry Glen Beefmasters......................................................... 38 Cherry Glen Beefmasters......................................................... 55 Colyer Herefords Angus........................................................... 21 Conlan Ranches California...................................................... 56 Conlin Fence C ompany........................................................... 56 Conlin Supply............................................................................ 27 Corsair Angus Ranch.......................................................... 46, 54 Cow Camp Ranch..................................................................... 20 CSU Chico.................................................................................. 55 Dal Porto Livestock................................................................... 54 Diamond Back Ranch............................................................... 56 Donati Ranch............................................................................. 54 Easterly Romanov Ranch......................................................... 42 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc........................................................ 56 Escalon Livestock Market......................................................... 34 Fair Oaks Ranch........................................................................ 55 Five Star Land and Livestock................................................... 55

Freitas.......................................................................................... 20 Fresno State Ag Foundation..................................................... 55 Furtado Angus........................................................................... 55 Furtado Livestock Enterprises................................................. 57 Genoa Livestock........................................................................ 55 Gonsalves Ranch....................................................................... 55 Gudel Cattle Co......................................................................... 41 Harrell Hereford Ranch............................................................ 13 Harris Ranch.............................................................................. 61 Haugen Limousin Cattle Ranch.............................................. 55 Have Angus................................................................................ 55 Hoffman...................................................................................... 11 Hone Ranch.......................................................................... 42, 55 J/V Angus................................................................................... 55 Jorgensen Charolais................................................................... 43 Kennedy Nutrition Services..................................................... 57 Kerndt Livestock Products....................................................... 56 Lambert Ranch.......................................................................... 55 Laurel Fowler ............................................................................ 56 Lee Hutchens Herefords........................................................... 55 Loomix...................................................................................... 1, 5 Lorenzen Ranches..................................................................... 13 McPhee Red Angus................................................................... 56 Merial.....................................................................................50-51 Moore Creek Red Angus.......................................................... 41 Mrnak Herefords West............................................................. 26 Multimin..................................................................................... 18 Noahs Angus Ranch............................................................ 45, 55 Norbrook.................................................................................... 53 Novartis...................................................................................... 19 O’Connell Ranch....................................................................... 55 ORIgen ....................................................................................... 57 Orvis Cattle Company.............................................................. 55 Pacific Trace Minerals......................................................... 20, 56 Pedretti Ranch ........................................................................... 25 Phillips Ranch Red Angus........................................................ 43 R&R Farms................................................................................. 55

60 California Cattleman February 2014

Ray-Mar Ranches...................................................................... 55 Riverbend Ranch....................................................................... 63 Romans Ranches....................................................................... 39 Sammis Ranch........................................................................... 55 San Juan Ranch.......................................................................... 55 Scales NW.................................................................................. 52 Schohr Herefords................................................................. 27, 55 Shafer Ranch.............................................................................. 55 Shaw Cattle Co........................................................................... 35 Sierra Ranches............................................................................ 55 Silveira Bros................................................................................ 55 Singleto Auman PC................................................................... 45 Skinner Livestock Transportation........................................... 57 Snyder Livestock Co.................................................................. 39 Sonoma Mountain Herefords............................................ 26, 55 Spanish Ranch............................................................................ 55 Tehama Angus Ranch............................................................... 55 Teixeira Cattle Company...................................................... 2, 55 The Cattlemen’s Connection/Spring Cove............................. 57 Thomas Angus Ranch.............................................................. 6,7 Traynham Ranches.................................................................... 49 Trinity Farms.............................................................................. 31 Trotter Red Angus..................................................................... 42 Tumbleweed Ranch................................................................... 55 Universal Semen Sales.............................................................. 57 Veterinary Services, Inc............................................................ 56 VF Red Angus............................................................................ 29 Vintage Angus............................................................................ 55 Ward Ranches.............................................................................. 9 Western Fence & Construction, Inc........................................ 56 Wild West Angus....................................................................... 41 Winnemucca Ranch Rodeo Nevada ...................................... 16 Wulff Brothers Livestock.......................................................... 55 Yara Pure Nutrient..................................................................... 62 York Ranches................................................................................ 3

Yield or environment? I care for both. Historically, ammonium nitrate produces the highest yield and quality forage compared to other nitrogen fertilizers. The nitrate is immediately available for uptake by plant roots leading to a “quick green up”. The result is a higher yielding forage with a higher protein content and an increased return on investment. Greenhouse gas emissions for nitrogen fertilizer occur during manufacturing and from reactions in the soil. Of all the nitrogen fertilizers, nitrates are the most environmentally sound with low ammonia volatilization and leaching since grasses are highly efficient bioaccumulators of nutrients. Through innovative production technologies, Yara has further improved nitrates’ environmental performance by reducing their carbon footprint by 29%. This is why Yara’s nitrate-based fertilizers are pure nutrients, offering higher yields, better crop quality and lower environmental burden than any other.

62 California Cattleman February 2014

Scan for more information on Yara’s crop nutrition products. www.yara.us • 800-234-9376

February 2014 California Cattleman 63

Have your feed costs been high during this extremely dry winter? There is a soluTion ... buying bCC bulls ThaT are proven for feed effiCienCy. Think about the following real world scenario ... Bull A’s daughters eat $800 of feed over the winter. Bull B’s daughters eat $400 of feed over the winter.

the cost of raising cattle, we believe in offering our customers every opportunity to save money by purchasing tested, documented feed efficient genetics.

If you have 50 daughters by each bull, there is a $20,000 difference in the wintering cost of those daughters. If both sets of cows wean the same pounds of calf, which would you rather have?

Every bull in our sale sells with individual Residual Feed Intake (RFI) data, in addition to Zoetis 50K DNA percentile rankings. This adds a substantial cost on our end, yet the benefit to you, our customer, is priceless.

At Byrd Cattle Company, we’re continually moving forward with new technology. We see feed efficiency as an untapped “great frontier” in the beef business. And we don’t just talk about it, we’ve been testing for it for generations. With feed costs accounting for nearly 70% of

If you’re thinking about buying Angus bulls or females, let us show you how BCC genetics can make you more profitable. We sell affordable bulls and females bred with cow sense – but most importantly with common sense!

every bull sells with individual residual feed intake (rfi) data and Zoetis 50K dna percentile rankings!

14th Annual “Best of Both Worlds” Angus Bull & Female SalE

Friday, September 5

150 Bulls & 80 Females sell

2002 CBCIA SeedStoCk ProduCer of the YeAr

BYrd CAttLe CoMPANY, LLC P.O. Box 713 • Red Bluff, CA 96080

Dan 530-736-8470 • Ty 530-200-4054 byrdcattleco@hotmail.com • www.byrdcattleco.com THD ©

The West’s #1 Source for Low Birth, High Growth Bulls with Marbling, Muscle and Feed Efficiency!


February 2014