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September 2019

Inside This Month... Legislation impacting you traceability & I.D. educating lawmakers CalPLC meetings prove fruitful September 2019 California Cattleman 1


Baldy Builders

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September 2019 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS

PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Tony Toso, Hornitos SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita Greg Kuck, Montague Cindy Tews, Fresno TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Brendlen DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Jenna Chandler DIRECTOR OF OUTREACH AND CREATIVE CONTENT Katie Roberti

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

THE POWER OF PROGRESSIVE THINKING by CCA President Mark Lacey

If you are not familiar with The California Rangeland Trust (CRT) it is a 501c3 founded in 1998 by a very insightful group of conservation minded ranchers who also happened to be CCA members which is one of several reasons why there is such a close relationship between the two organizations and why the missions of the two organizations complement one another. Prior to the founding of CRT there were very few options for ranchers if they needed to sell all or part of their property for estate planning purposes, they needed capital to expand, or were simply being forced out by urban sprawl. At that time the buyers were mainly state or federal governments or conservancy organizations that had no interested in continuing ranching operations. Then CRT came along and offered landowners an opportunity to receive capital in exchange for certain simple rights or protection of various resources. So, after 21 years CRT has by any measurement been wildly successful. Just in shear numbers CRT has permanently protected 328,900 acres of rangeland, and has 90 projects on the waiting list. It’s because of the invaluable opportunity that CRT provides to ranchers that I wanted to draw special attention the organization and its achievements. In particular I wanted to highlight CRT’s annual fundraising event “A Western Affair.” At the end of June, my wife and I were able to attend CRT’s “A Western Affair” in Livermore, and although my family has a long history with CRT this is the first time I have been able to attend because it is usually held in early June, when we are shipping cattle. The “Western Affair” was well attended and the entire evening was executed and planned to perfection. Complements to Executive Director Nita Vail, the CRT board and CRT staff on a

wonderful evening. The event was held at Wente Winery, which is beautiful venue located on the urban/suburban interface of Livermore along with their vineyard and rangeland making it the perfect place to emphasize CRT’s import mission of conserving working ranches, open space and habitat. The Wente family generously hosted and participated in the program. Eric Wente was the keynote speaker had imparted the family’s long history in Livermore. He also discussed the benefits and challenges of ranching and farming in highly populated areas. I found his comments particularly interesting in regards to how the winery enables him to engage his urban neighbors to give them a better understanding of agriculture operations, and ultimately perhaps a greater appreciation of the multitude of benefits provided due to ranching and farming i.e. open space, fire protection, wildlife habitat and economic diversity. The point Eric made is particularly important because every organization (CCA, CRT, CBC) whose mission it is to protect ranching or advocate for beef producers has no choice but to make outreach a priority in order to educate policymakers and the public about the benefits of ranching as mentioned above and to provide accurate information regarding environmental impacts that our opponents use against us. This is where CRT is uniquely positioned to take the message of working landscapes and the legacy of ranching to our urban neighbors. Based on the growth CRT has experienced and the diversity of the supporters I would say that CRT is optimizing the positive message about ranching to the fullest and to the right audience. Keep up the great work.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, MO. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman September 2019


ON THE COVER

SEPTEMBER 2019 Volume 102, Issue 8 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE PLC at bat for you

8

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 12 You win some you lose some

This month’s cover photo was taken by photographer Justin Bartels at Big Sur, on the scenic Central Coast. Known by tourists for its big waves and picturesque coastline, Big Sur is known by Californa beef producers as a place to raise hearty, sure-footed cattle on quality grass range.

RANGELAND TRUST TALK 44 2019 A Western Affair

SPECIAL FEATURES

Fire subcommittee plays offense Getting to know cattle council representatives CalPLC holds meeting in Paso Robles Legislator caring aboutag issues in his district Mitloehner addresses Capitol meeting I.D. and traceability ideas swirl Trade deals for European Union $M in Angus herds Cal Poly gives hands on education Mid State Fair recognizes catteman, woman Battling respiratory disease in calves

READER SERVICES

16 20 26 32 34 38 52 58 64 72 84

Buyers’ Guide 86 Obituaries 92 Advertisers Index 94

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS Sept. 6 Napa-Solano Cattlemen’s Fall Meeting Emigh Ranch, Dixon Sept. 28 Sept. 25-29

Farm- to-Fork Festival Sacramento Public Lands Council Annual Meeting Great Falls, Mont.

Oct. 18

Contra Costa-Alameda Cattlemen’s Fall Dinner Meeting Beeb’s at Las Positas Golf Course, Livermore

Dec. 4-6

103rd CCA & CCW Convention The Peppermill Resort & Casino, Reno, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they

would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

September 2019 California Cattleman 5


Angus ranch

Angus Female Sale Selling 100 Angus Females

Basin Lucy 3150

Mon., october 14

Sire: Basin Rainmaker P175 • Dam: Basin Lucy 1667

Brunch at 10 a.m.4Sale at 11 a.m.

eZ Angus ranch Headquarters, Porterville, cA

Selling this high growth and Marbling female that is the dam of Basin Paycheck 5249, featured at ABS Global and ORIgen. She has outstanding carcass figures and ranks in the top 1% of the breed for both $Beef and $Combined Values. CED +7

BW +2.8

WW +71

YW +122

MA +1.25

RE +.66

$M +47

$B +193

$C +297

Female sale offering highlights

4A large offering of Fall cow-calf pairs with calves at side by EXAR Monumental, Basin Paycheck, Basin Payweight Plus, and the $730,000 VAR Power Play 7018.

4Ten (10) donor females between 3- and 6-years-old that are right out of the elite ET program in the prime of their production.

4Over 20 fall yearling heifers by Jindra Acclaim, Sydgen Enhance, Basin Paycheck and EXAR Monumental, including 2 daughters out of the $120,000 full sister to Basin Yuma 4286.

Vintage Rita 5011

Sire: V A R Discovery 2240 • Dam: SJH Complete of 6108 1564

Selling this direct daughter of 1564, the Vintage donor with over 4The absolute top-end of the 2019 spring heifer calf crop with many ET females out of the top donors by Sydgen Enhance, Basin Payweight $3 million in progeny sales including the $60,000 VAR Heritage 5038, Plus, EXAR Monumental, EZAR Gold Rush and more. As a group, these high-selling bull from the 2016 VAR Bull Sale. She ranks in the females’ EPD profiles average +71 WW (top 2%), +133 YW (top 3%), top 1% of the breed for both $Beef and $Combined. +0.91 (top 15%), +0.74 REA (top 25%), +163 $B (top 10%) and SHe Sells bred to the $730,000 VAR POWeR PlAY 7018. CED +6

BW +1.3

WW +66

YW +125

MA +.86

RE +.94

$M +63

$B +197

$C +319

+293 $C (top 3%).

Live SALe broADcASt

tim & Marilyn callison ...............................................................................................................................owners chad Davis ............................................................................................................................ 559 333-0362 travis coy ............................................................................................................................. 559 392-8772 Justin Schmidt ...................................................................................................................... 209 585-6533 6 California Cattleman September 2019


Basin Joy 2015

R/M Lucy 1612

Bobo Henrietta Pride 3005

Sire: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 • Dam: Basin Joy 566T

Sire: Hoover Dam • Dam: Basin Lucy 3829

Sire: A A R Ten X 7008 S A • Dam: Sitz Henrietta Pride 643T

Calving-ease with extra marbling and a top 10% rannking for $Combined. She sells bred to VAR POWER PLAY 7018. CED +16

BW -2.5

WW +41

YW +78

MA +.84

RE +.55

$M +81

$B +136

$C +257

Outlier carcass with huge Ribeye and a top 1% ranking for $Beef and $Combined. Sells with a fall calf by VAR POWER PLAY 7018. CED +10

BW +.2

WW +48

YW +86

MA +.87

RE +1.15

$M +69

$B +190

$C +315

Full sister to EXAR Resistol 3710B out of the $6 million-producing full sister to Upward. She sells bred to BASIN RAINMAKER 4404.

CED +3

BW +2.8

WW +62

YW MA +118 +1.07

RE +.75

$M +54

$B +176

$C +282

Vintage Blackcap 4026

EZAR Joy 8258

EZAR Rita 8209

Sire: V A R Heritage 5038 • Dam: Vintage Blackcap 4026

Sire: Basin Yuma 4286 • Dam: EXAR Joy 4700

Sire: Basin Bonus 4345 • Dam: Vintage Rita 5011

High-carcass female out of a daughter of VAR Blackcap 9319. Top 3% $C Value. She sells bred to BASIN RAINMAKER 4404. CED +7

BW +1.7

WW +68

YW MA +117 +1.09

RE +.82

$M +67

$B +172

$C +290

Very maternal Yuma daughter with a top 5% $Beef and top 3% $Combined. Sells bred to VERMILION SPUR E143.

CED +8

BW +.3

WW +56

YW MA +107 +1.04

RE +.75

$M +75

$B +168

$C +293

Huge birth to weaning spread out of the VAR 5011 donor. Ranks in the top 3% for $Beef and sells bred to EXAR GURU 8719B. CED +13

BW -2.3

WW +69

YW +134

MA +.63

RE +.57

$M +53

$B +174

$C +279

EZAR Lucy 8182

Basin O Lass 337

EZAR Blackcap 8053

Sire: V A R Generation 2100 • Dam: R/M Lucy 1612

Sire: EXAR Monumental 6056B • Dam: Basin O Lass 235

Sire: Basin Rainmaker 4404 • Dam: EZAR Blackcap 6012

Attractive Generation daughter out of the Lucy 1612 donor and has top 3% $B and $C. She sells bred to EXAR MONUMENTAL 6056B. CED +12

BW +.3

WW +61

YW +106

MA +.63

RE +1.10

$M +67

$B +174

$C +293

Granddaughter of the full sister to Basin Payweight 1682 with huge growth figures. She sells bred to EZAR GOLD RUSH 6001.

CED +5

BW +.8

WW +73

YW MA +122 +1.47

RE +.53

$M +38

$B +177

$C +268

Rainmaker female out of the $115,000 full sister to EZAR Gold Rush 6001. Sells bred to EXAR GURU 8719B.

CED +13

BW +.3

WW +63

YW +114

MA +.57

RE +.91

$M +67

$B +125

$C +229

THD ©

Follow Us on Facebook or Visit Our Website for Links to the Sale Book and Videos: www.ezangusranch.com

Angus

RAncH

21984 Avenue 160

Porterville, CA 93257 September 2019 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE

CalPLC and PLC advocate on your behalf – even if you’re not a permittee by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur It’s been a busy—and for me, an eye-opening—summer for CCA and the California Public Lands Council (CalPLC). At this year’s Midyear Meeting in Rancho Murieta, members of CCA’s Federal Lands Committee urged the leadership of BLM’s California State Office and the US Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Region to provide CCA staff detailed maps of the 85 vacant BLM allotments and 211 vacant Forest Service allotments in California. True to their words, BLM and Forest Service staff had provided me those maps by mid-July. Since then, a handful of CCA members have reached out to me to learn about vacant allotments in their regions. To my surprise, almost none of those members are current permit-holders on federal allotments; some wondered if there might be opportunities for permit applications on federal lands, and others were merely concerned about federal management of public lands in their communities. When we hosted this year’s Southwestern regional meeting of the California Public Lands Council, I was likewise surprised when one-third of ranchers in attendance were not federal lands permittees (for more on

this summer’s CalPLC meeting, see page 26). Sure, a couple of attendees own private property adjacent to vacant allotments on the Los Padres National Forest and are eager to get the vacant allotments opened to graze their livestock there. But for the most part, folks are merely concerned with how federal agencies are managing public lands, as fire-prevention, wildlife management and a host of other management decisions have impacts that reverberate well-beyond the boundaries of our national forests and BLM allotments. One more public-lands-related anecdote: Last month, CCA and grazing permittees on the Stanislaus National Forest were handed a hard-fought victory in Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center v. Stanislaus National Forest, in which radical environmental groups had alleged violations of the federal Clean Water Act and California’s equivalent, the Porter Cologne Water Quality Control Act, resulting from livestock grazing on three grazing allotments (for more information about the lawsuit, see page 12). Early in the litigation, there was concern that victory for the environmentalists would allow them to weaponize the clean water laws even against

8 California Cattleman September 2019

KIRK WILBUR livestock grazing on private property; fortunately, that outcome has been avoided. These examples all reveal the same truth: management of our public lands does not merely affect federal grazing permittees, but potentially impacts all California ranchers. That is why I write to encourage ranchers throughout the state— permittee or not—to support the work of CalPLC and our national affiliate, the Public Lands Council, with a contribution to CalPLC. The ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 10


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 Public Lands Council—funded primarily by state affiliates such as CalPLC—is doing terrific work under the Trump Administration ensuring proper funding to combat wildfires and to reform the Endangered Species Act and National Environmental Policy Act, among a wide range of other problems. CalPLC advocates on California ranchers’ behalf before the Pacific Southwest Region of the US Forest Service and BLM California, and regularly goes to court to defend public lands grazing. None of this important work is possible without the contributions of California ranchers. And, of course, the greater the contributions, the greater the work we can accomplish. CalPLC’s funding primarily comes from voluntary dues of 30 cents/ AUM from public lands grazing permittees (though only 15% of public lands permittees have contributed so far this year). Anyone may donate to CalPLC, however; even one US Forest Service employee recently committed to remitting a modest contribution each year in recognition of the valuable work CalPLC and PLC do to ensure appropriate management of our national forests. Speaking of the excellent work PLC performs, I want to encourage you all—especially the federal lands grazing permittees among you—to join PLC at its Annual Meeting in Great Falls, Mont. September 25-28. This year’s meeting will be hosted at the Hotel Arvon, the oldest commercial building in Great Falls, and will be chock full of valuable information and insights, excellent speakers and engaging events. The meeting will include deepdives into issues like the American Prairie Reserve and the Endangered Species Act, and culminates in a daylong tour of the Rocky Mountain Front focused on predator pressures such as gray wolves and grizzlies. While this year’s presenters had not been finalized as of press time, PLC always attracts a top-tier slate of speakers: previous PLC events have included US Forest Service Chiefs

Tony Tooke and Vicky Christiansen, and Aurelia Skipwith—recently nominated to be Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service—has been a mainstay at recent PLC meetings. To register for the PLC Annual Meeting, go to www. publiclandscouncil.org. California will be well-represented by CCA Federal Lands Chair (and former PLC President) Mike Byrne, Tulelake, and CalPLC Chair and CCA immediate past president Dave Daley, Oroville,

but California needs a significant turnout to ensure that PLC prioritizes tackling the issues facing California ranchers. The meeting is sure to be informative, entertaining, and productive, and I hope to see you there! To contribute to CalPLC via dues or a donation, download the CalPLC dues form at https://calcattlemen. org/portfolio-items/calplc/.

HUMBOLDT

AUCTION YARD Fortuna, California Special Bred Cow Sale Saturday, September 7 1 p.m. •

FEATURING 200+ MODERATE FRAMED ANGUS CROSS MOUNTAIN COWS FROM WALT GIACOMINI! Over 20 years in Harris Program Bulls turned out December 1

ALSO OFFERING 90 TOP QUALITY FIRST CALF HEIFERS!

ALSO JOIN US FOR OUR REGULAR SALE EVERY WEDNESDAY LEE MORA (707) 845-7188

10 California Cattleman September 2019

JUSTIN MORA (707) 845-7388

603 3RD ST FORTUNA CA 95540 • (707) 725-5188


THD ©

Clm rEPrEsEntatIvEs Jake Parnell ..................916-662-1298 George Gookin ..........209-482-1648 Rex Whittle..................209-996-6994 Mark Fischer ...............209-768-6522 Kris Gudel .................... 916-208-7258 Steve Bianchi .............707-484-3903 Joe Gates .....................707-694-3063 Jason Dailey ................916-439-7761

CattlEmEn’s Fall sPECIal FEEdEr salEs: WEdnEsdays at 12 P.m. September 11 • October 2 • October 23 thomas angus ranCh CalIFornIa bull salE Tuesday, September 17, 12 p.m.

Featuring Angus Bulls from Thomas Angus Ranch, Baker City, Ore.

arEllano bravo/dIablo vallEy angus ProduCtIon salE Saturday, September 21, 12 p.m.

Featuring Angus Bulls and Females from California Seedstock Producers Arellano Bravo Angus and Diablo Valley Angus

Clm annual brEd CoW and rEPlaCEmEnt FEmalE salE Friday, November 1, 2 p.m.

WEdnEsday WEEKly sChEdulE Butcher Cows ...................................... 8:30 a.m. Cow-Calf Pairs/Bred Cows ........11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle ...........................................12 p.m.

auCtIon marKEt Address .. 12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office.......................................... 209-745-1515 Fax ...............................................209-745-1582 Website/Market Report www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ........ www.lmaauctions.com

Call to Consign to UPCoMing Western video Market sales October 24 • December 4

Featuring Females from Reputable California Ranches, followed by the CLM Annual Social

51st annual CEntral CalIFornIa ‘World oF bulls’ salE Saturday, November 2, 12 p.m. Featuring Top Angus, SimAngus, Hereford, Red Angus and Charolais Bulls from throughout California and the West

Parnell’s

Central California

51st annual

THD ©

W rld ofbulls

saturday, november 2

galt, California

September 2019 California Cattleman 11


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

PERPETUAL TUG OF WAR

WINNING ONE BATTLE BUT STILL FACING OTHERS CCA and ranchers prevail in lawsuit challenging grazing on Stanislaus National Forest In early August, Judge Lawrence O’Neill of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California dismissed a lawsuit by the Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center (CSERC) which challenged livestock grazing on three allotments on the Stanislaus National Forest. The ruling is a significant victory for CCA and the impacted permittees, who intervened in the lawsuit as defendant-intervenors with representation from the Western Resources Legal Center (WRLC). On March 28, 2017, CSERC filed a lawsuit against the Stanislaus National Forest alleging violations of the Clean Water Act, California’s Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Forest Management Act on three grazing allotments within the Stanislaus National Forest. A primary focus of CSERC’s suit was its claim that grazing had resulted in violations of federal and state water quality standards for fecal coliform in waters that flowed through the three allotments. CCA, the California Farm Bureau Federation and the permittees of the allotments intervened in the lawsuit to protect the ranchers’ grazing interests and to assist the US Forest Service in defending against the claims. The court’s 56-page opinion makes it clear that environmental groups like CSERC cannot make an endrun around the Porter-Cologne Act by demanding a court order to halt grazing on national forests within California when water quality violations are alleged. Rather, regulation of alleged nonpoint source pollution must be allowed to follow the processes dictated by the Porter-Cologne Act, which are already underway in the region. The court also held that the Forest Service complied with the Forest Plan and did not violate standards and guides related to water quality and protection of meadows, bogs and fens, upholding the Forest Service’s interpretation that standards and guides are intended to guide long-term management and are not intended to rigidly prescribe range conditions at a particular instant or in the shortterm. CCA applauds the decision, and will continue to defend livestock grazing on federal lands, including continued engagement with the state and regional water boards regarding non-point source pollution regulations. Lassen wolf pack kills two yearling cows and injures three more On July 24, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) published two depredation 12 California Cattleman September 2019

investigation reports, confirming that the Lassen Pack killed two yearling cows and injured three others in attacks in western Lassen County between July 13 and 17. The depredation of five cows over a five-day period marks the most severe depredation event by wolves in California to date. In the first depredation event, a ranch-hand observed the breeding female of the Lassen Pack feeding on the carcass of a 550-pound yearling around 2:00 p.m. on July 13 (the Lassen female briefly returned to the carcass around 4:00 pm). Wildlife Services was notified, and at 4:30 that afternoon CDFW and Wildlife Services investigated the carcass, finding scrapes with significant subcutaneous hemorrhaging on both rear legs and on the left side of the yearling’s back. Based on the injuries to the cow and the presence of the Lassen female, CDFW determined that “the yearling was killed by a wolf or wolves earlier on July 13.” The second depredation incident occurred roughly 600 yards away, and was investigated over three days. On July 14, CDFW staff discovered an injured 600-pound yearling cow in a pasture and notified the owner. The next day, a ranch hand found the injured cow dead. Investigating the carcass that night, CDFW discovered “external scrapes and rakes with associated subcutaneous and muscular hemorrhage” which “appeared consistent with a wolf attack,” and confirmed the death as a depredation by the Lassen Pack. On July 15, ranch employees found two injured yearlings in the same pasture, and on July 17 a third injured yearling was discovered. While CDFW was not able to examine the injured animals, based on photographs of the injuries and recent Lassen Pack activity in the area, CDFW ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


45th Annual

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 1 pm PDT • Tehama Angus Ranch, Gerber, California

Reputation Angus Genetics in Volume! 140 Spring and Fall Yearling Angus Bulls ese powerful bulls sell…

G204

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Tehama Advancement E766 5 Tehama Tahoe B767

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CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B +10 –0.1 +84 +139 I+0.5 +28 I+.57 I+.61 +75 +95 +126

CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B +9 –0.7 +72 +127 I+0.2 +33 I+.71 I+.70 +75 +86 +148

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Tehama Advancement E766 5 Tehama Titleist A203

Baldridge Command C036 5 JMB Traction 292

CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B +5 +3.1 +83 +143 I+0.4 +28 I+.52 I+.51 +61 +83 +130

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Let the Tehama Angus Ranch program work for you. Call or email today to request your catalog!

TEHAMA ANGUS Ranch 23820 Tehama Ave., Gerber, CA 96035

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Ranch (530) 385-1570 Bryce Borror (530) 526-9404

Videos of bulls available on our website

“DRIVEN BY PERFORMANCE SINCE 1943” September 2019 California Cattleman 13


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 confirmed the three injury depredations as attacks by the Lassen Pack. While the herd was moved nearer to the ranch headquarters to allow better protection of the animals, CDFW notes in its depredation investigation report that “options are limited” to deter additional attacks. In total, CDFW has confirmed nine depredation incidents in the past two years, resulting in at least 10 livestock deaths and three injuries. Of those, two cattle deaths are attributed to OR-54. The Lassen Pack has perpetrated eight depredation incidents, resulting in the death of eight cattle and the injury of at least three more. In total, CDFW has investigated 32 suspected depredations since wolves were reestablished in California. You may view the depredation investigation reports at https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/mammals/graywolf under “Depredation Investigations.” In related news, on August 7 CDFW released trail camera footage from Lassen County dated June 18 showing the Lassen Pack breeding pair with three pups in tow. In the release, the Department stated that “A new litter was born to the Lassen Pack, California’s only currently known wolf pack. As of early July 2019, CDFW estimates the pack consists of a minimum of two to three adults/yearlings and three pups. The new litter, born this year, is the third litter born to the pack.” On August 12, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife published a depredation report confirming that the Lassen Pack killed a two-month-old calf on or around August 3 on public land in western Lassen County. The investigation report can be read at https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/ FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=172880&inline. On August 3, ranch hands working cattle witnessed two wolves in an open valley. Shortly thereafter, the ranch hands discovered two cow carcasses that they believed were wolf kills, and contacted USDA APHIS Wildlife Services. Wildlife Services investigated the animals the next morning, but the carcasses were too decomposed to accurately determine a cause of death. In the course of the investigation, however, the Wildlife Services investigator was drawn by the sight of scavenging birds to the fresh carcass of a 250-pound two-monthold calf. The investigator witnessed tooth scrapes and significant hemorrhaging on both hind legs and the right flank of the calf, consistent with a wolf attack. Additionally, ample evidence pointed to the recent presence of wolves, including the sighting of wolves by the ranch hands, the Lassen female’s GPS collar placing her within 1.4 miles of the carcass on August 3 and the presence of three wolves including the Lassen female in the vicinity of the carcass on August 5. While the cause of death could not be determined for the two cows initially discovered, CDFW was able to confirm the calf kill as a wolf depredation by the Lassen Pack. The confirmed depredation comes just three weeks after the Lassen Pack was confirmed to have killed two yearlings and injured three others in two other depredation events in western Lassen County. All told, CDFW has 14 California Cattleman September 2019

confirmed 10 wolf depredation events since wolves returned to California, nine of which are attributable to the Lassen Pack. Environmental Groups Seek Protections for Mountain Lions On June 25, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Mountain Lion Foundation filed a petition with the California Fish and Game Commission seeking to list what they deem an “Evolutionarily Significant Unit” of mountain lions as a threatened species under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA). Specifically, the petition seeks threatened status for mountain lions “in Southern California and on the Central Coast, including the Eastern Peninsular Range, Santa Ana Mountains, San Bernardino Mountains, San Gabriel Mountains, Santa Monica Mountains, and north along the coast to the Santa Cruz Mountains,” according to a CBD press release. While the petition does not seek threatened status for mountain lions statewide, approval of the petition would significantly curtail mountain lion management in Southern California and the Central Coast. Statewide, mountain lions are a “specially protected mammal” under Proposition 117, adopted by California voters in 1990. Proposition 117 contains a number of provisions for protecting the mountain lion species, but importantly allows for lethal take of mountain lions confirmed to have killed livestock or domestic animals or mountain lions which are caught in the act of such depredation. CESA protection for mountain lions is likely inconsistent with Proposition 117. CESA became law in 1984, but in 1990 the proponents of Proposition 117 elected not to extend CESA protection to mountain lions, and California voters therefore did not contemplate CESA protections for mountain lions when they approved the proposition. Additionally, Proposition 117 included a provision that neither the Commission nor the California Department of Fish and Wildlife may “adopt any regulation that conflicts with or supersedes a provision of ” Proposition 117, and extending CESA protection to mountain lions would conflict with numerous provisions of the proposition, such as lethal take of mountain lions confirmed to have killed livestock. The Commission formally received the petition at its August 7 hearing in Sacramento, at which time CCA expressed concerns that the petitioned action is illegal under Proposition 117 via written and oral comments. The Commission has referred the petition to the Department of Fish and Wildlife for evaluation, and will receive the Department’s evaluation at its December meeting. In February of 2020, the Commission will likely vote on whether the petitioned action “may be warranted,” a move that would extend CESA protections to the species on a “candidate species” basis and which would spur further evaluation of mountain lions by the Department. CCA will continue to actively oppose the petition on legal, scientific and policy grounds. For more information on the mountain lion petition, grizzly bear lawsuit or other predator issues, contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.


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cED BW WW YW MiLk MArB rE +5 +2.5 +71 +122 +27 +.72 +.49

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$M $B $c +57 +141 +240

BrAvo ArsEnAl 8409 4-2-2018

Connealy Arsenal 2174 x lD Kaboom 652 cED BW WW YW +13 +.3 +48 +94

MiLk MArB rE +25 +.57 +.32

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DiABlo roCK 4202 7-8-2018

K C f Bennett Therock A473 x A A r Ten X 7008 s A cED BW WW YW MiLk MArB rE $M $B $c +8 +1.6 +71 +129 +15 +1.39 +.76 +60 +176 +288

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MiLk MArB rE +26 +.82 +.45

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September 2019 California Cattleman 15

THD ©


CCA FIRE SUBCOMMITTEE OFFERS GUIDANCE IN STATE FIRE MITIGATION EFFORTS by CCA Fire Subcommittee Members Tony Toso and Anthony Stornetta With the spike in devastating wildfires throughout California over the past several years CCA President, Mark Lacey recently appointed a subcommittee to address the issue of fire for our members. The CCA fire subcommittee has been working on issues related to the use of prescribed fire and grazing as a fire fuel load reduction resource since earlier this year. The committee is made up of a diverse group with perspectives from ranching, the University of California and from fire suppression professionals. The members of the fire subcommittee are Tony Toso, Anthony Stornetta, Rich Atmore, Lenya Quinn-Davidson, Katie Delbar, Jeff Stackhouse, Mike Williams, Greg Kuck, Dean Hunt, Michele Stehly, and Adam Cline. Since its inception the committee has been working on short and long term goals to do our best to provide helpful advocacy and resources for our members. The committee wants to ensure progress is being made so we have conference calls quite regularly and meet up in person as needed. Research and project development is occurring throughout the year The first steps taken were to review CCA policy pertaining to both grazing and fire. Nine different policies were considered from both Federal Lands and Property Rights and Environmental Management (PREM) standing committees. Amendments to current policy were presented, discussed and approved at our Midyear Meeting in Rancho Murrieta back in mid-June. We have also been working on providing our members with resources to prepare for wildfires like a ranchers handbook and working to be able to get ranchers certified to become burn bosses for carrying out prescribed burns and to provide training for ranchers to gain emergency access to their lands when an event occurs instead of being prohibited from entry by first responders. The committee has also been active in speaking out to critical state leadership to advocate for beneficial changes to the fire issue that will help cattle producers across the state. A July 1 meeting with Cal Fire Chief Thom Porter and NRCS State Conservationist, Carlos Suarez were two of those highlights that will hopefully produce positive results for CCA members. As we write this article we have two fire committee members who are actively 16 California Cattleman September 2019

developing curriculum for a new program called “Prescribed Fire Burn-Boss”. Never before has the state allowed members of the public to write curriculum and develop a certification process. This is a rare event, and a diverse group has been formed with representations from Cal Fire, local government fire agencies, cattlemen, non-profit burn groups, The Nature Conservancy, and private burn contractors. The curriculum development committee met in Sacramento July 30 through August 2 and will then meet again for a week in September to complete the curriculum. We look forward to delivering this course sometime in January 2021. This timeline takes into account the process in which the curriculum has to be vetted out through Cal Fire Legal, State Fire Training and then back through the bills author to determine if all requirements of SB 1260 were met. SB 1260 was very vague when written, so the committee is trying to look at their intent as well as what best serves the local landowners and cattlemen to achieve their goals. SB 1260 was authored by Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) and in short, was intended to clear the path for enhanced forestry management to eliminate dead trees and brush that serve as fuel for wildfires. The bill also allows California’s fire agency to provide input during the planning of new home construction in fire hazard areas.


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September 2019 California Cattleman 17


BULL SALE 80 BULLS SELL 22575 Skyview Lane, Bend, Oregon 97702 | LARRY LORENZEN 541.969.8034 | SAM LORENZEN 541.215.2687

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18 California Cattleman September 2019


LORENZEN 8997

LORENZEN 8317

BIEBER FUSION B538 X SGLN X-FILES HB

200

GM

50

CED

BW

17

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51

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80

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10

LORENZEN 6007 X BROWN ROUND UP

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$11,543

LORENZEN 8256

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RANGE CATTLE PRODUCERS AND CATTLE FEEDER BOARD MEMBERS Meet the 12 range cattle producers and cattle feeder members, and the alternates serving on the board. Range Cattle Producer Member

DAVE DALEY Chair of the Board Term ends 2022

BUTTE COUNTY

Dr. Dave Daley is a fifth generation commercial cattle producer from Oroville, Calif. He is the is the immediate past president of the California Cattlemen’s Association and currently serves as chair of the Forest Service Committee for the Public Lands Council. In addition, Dr. Daley recently served as the Associate Dean of the College of Agriculture at California State University, Chico, and has been an animal science professor for the past 30 years.

What interested you in working on the Council campaign and now in serving on the board? I was interested in how to get more resources into the California cattle community, and with CCA I’ve been working at that on-and-off again for quite some time. In terms of the opportunity to develop the Council, once our board of directors voted for it at CCA, I spent a long time working on the campaign to make sure we had this opportunity. I’m excited I was selected to serve on the Council.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? In my mind there are several goals, but the overarching goal is “how do we reach the general public?” I hope we can effectively allocate the funds so they really benefit all sectors of the cattle industry in the state, and in ways that make us to be positive contributors, not just to the economy, but to the environment. I think that’s going to take a Council that spends a lot of time really sorting through their strategic priorities, and then putting the funds where we can have the most impact in influencing consumers and the general public in California. The second goal is we have to make sure producers understand where their investments are going. I think we owe it to them to make sure that whether they 20 California Cattleman September 2019

What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? We need to impact the perception of Californians about our impact on the environment in a positive way. I think we’ve done a really good job on beef and nutrition, but we are significantly challenged by people who see that we are negative to the environment. That’s the issue for me. We have to reposition ourselves effectively through using California Cattle Council resources. Range Cattle Producer Member

JAKE PARNELL

Term ends 2021 SACRAMENTO COUNTY Jake Parnell was raised on a small Angus cattle and Clydesdale horse ranch. Growing up in a family of auctioneers, Parnell followed his grandfather and father’s lead and attended the World Champion School of Auctioneering in 2001. Parnell is currently the Manager of Cattlemen’s Livestock Market and was a founding partner of Parnell Dickinson, Inc., a full-service livestock and fundraising auction company. He currently serves on the Livestock Marketing Association’s Board of Directors, and has been a member of the California Angus Association Board of Directors and the President of the Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Cattlemen’s Association.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? I was approached by people within our industry who wanted to nominate me. The more I talked to them about it, the more I realized the first few years will probably be the most critical because it’s shaping this Council that could be very positive for our industry. There are lots of things going on that I think are important early on in this procedure; I’m glad that I get to sit in the room and be a part of it.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? The number one goal for me is to make sure we do what we said we would do: structure this Council in a way that is very beneficial for this industry. I don’t want anyone to ever view it as a money pit. We really have to prove our value and need to make sure we are promoting the product. In agriculture, we all try to spread a positive message and it kind of all works together. Although the concentration of it probably needs to be beef cattle, I think there’s a bigger cause and it’s the agriculture industry in general. This Council gives us a tool to help educate. Whether it’s legislators or inner-city kids, this gives us a really good chance to spread the positive message about the agriculture industry. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? A lot of people don’t realize that dairymen and cattle ranchers are truly as environmentally conscious as they are. That’s one of the big topics that always comes up. Environmentalists think we’re not conscious of the environment—that we’re not doing our fair share to maintain all natural resources. I think what a lot of them don’t realize is that’s how we make our living. I think there is probably an opportunity to play a role in that area.


What interested you in on the board? JULIE MORRIS serving I am interested in Term ends 2020 SAN BENITO furthering the public’s COUNTY Julie Morris understanding of effective has been in the land management to California beef industry for the address critical issues past 28 years. Julie and facing Californians, such her husband, Joe, run T.O. as wildfires, open space Cattle Co., based in San Benito County. They run a and climate change. stocker operation and their Cattle, when managed own herd which they direct well, are one of the market as 100% grassfed under the Morris Grassfed most powerful tools we label, with more than 2,000 have to improve soil customers throughout the health, restore healthy state. Julie and Joe also offer land management rangelands, improve services to fellow ranchers the water cycle, and and landowners interested in sequester carbon from learning more about holistic management. the atmosphere, all while producing healthy, delicious, low calorie, and nutrient-dense food! I think the Council offers our industry the opportunity to get this message out there. Range Cattle Producer Member

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? 1. Unite our industry to promote a clear and consistent message about the benefits cattle offer our environment. 2. Develop a marketing plan in response to the false claims of fake meat. 3. Increase awareness about the health benefits of beef and dairy products. One industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? The health benefits of beef. It’s a superfood! Cattle Feeder Member

JESSE LARIOS

Term ends 2022 IMPERIAL COUNTY Jesse Larios is manager at Foster Feed Yard, a 36,000 head capacity yard located in the Imperial Valley. He takes lots of pride working for a fourth generation family farm with more than 62 years of experience raising beef in the desert Southwest. He’s called this same feedlot home and considered the employees as family for the last 15 years. Additionally, Larios enjoys reaching out to the community with a proactive presentation on our cattle industry and through social media.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? I am very grateful for what our founding fathers in the industry have set forward, but I believe as consumers are changing, it is time for cattlemen like myself to be involved with the key issues constantly coming at our industry. It’s crucial this founding board establish a strong foundation for the California Cattle Council for years to come.

What are a few of the goals you have for the California Cattle Council? A few of the goals I have for this first board are to establish a strong foundation, gain producers’ trust on the investment of the additional dollar so they can comfortably see it as an investment and not a tax and establish a strong line of communication in

which our industry can gain consumer’s trust through the proper investments that assure our great industry for future generations for years to come. One industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? Consumer trust. If we do not gain this we will cease to exist. Cattle Feeder Member

MIKE SMITH Term ends 2021

FRESNO COUNTY

Since 2004, Smith has had the unique opportunity to work with the Beef Division of Harris Ranch. He has assisted with the marketing and operational activities of both the cattle feeding and beef processing divisions of the company. From the very start, Smith says he was encouraged to become involved with beef industry organizations at both the state and national level.

What interested you in serving on the board? I was interested in the opportunity to provide a voice in the development and implementation of this new entity; and to provide my experience to hopefully ensure the success of this new initiative to defend and promote the beef industry in the state of California.

Name a few goals you have for the Council. To that end he has served on the Board of Directors of One goal is to provide the the California Beef Council, California beef industry with the California Cattlemen’s much needed production Association (Feeder Council), the National Cattlemen’s Beef research that can be used Association (Federation of State to counter those with Beef Councils), the Cattlemen’s Beef Board (Operating an agenda to decrease Committee) and the North beef consumption, and American Meat Institute. utilize this information to educate decision-makers in the state. Another is to leverage much needed additional monies to further the outreach and effectiveness of existing promotional and educational activities in the state. One industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? I am hopeful through the Council, a strengthened and more effective message can be developed regarding the role that beef production plays in the entire scheme of global warming and sustainability. This one issue has, in my opinion, done more to damage the image (and acceptance) of beef in recent years. Cattle Feeder Member

WILLIAM BRANDENBERG Term ends 2020

IMPERIAL For over 30 years, COUNTY Brandenberg was the owner and manager of Meloland Cattle Company. Prior to that he ran Brandenberg Feedyard from 1973-1980, when he purchased the Meloland Feedlot and merged operations into Meloland Cattle Company. Brandenburg currently does not manage any feeding operations, but still feeds 5,000 head of cattle.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? I have served on the California Beef Council board off and on since 1980, as well as the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and Operating Committee, so I have a background in beef promotion and wanted to help in creating this new organization. Interview continued...

September 2019 California Cattleman 21


William Brandenberg’s interview continued...

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? The main goal for the Council is obviously to promote beef in California. With our state’s large population and relatively sparse Beef Council budget, we needed more funding to accomplish these goals. Since many research issues are production related, they cannot be funded with checkoff dollars. The Council will be able to address these needs. We should use existing organizations to accomplish beef promotion to minimize overhead and will need to develop a plan to carry out other objectives. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? I hope the Council will help producers on environmental issues and disseminate our story to California’s consumers in a more efficient manner. Range Cattle Producer Alternate

SHEILA BOWEN Term ends 2022

KERN COUNTY

Growing up near Bakersfield, Sheila Bowen’s family farmed and raised cattle. She married Jeff Bowen in 1980, and today they live and work on the Carver Bowen Ranch near Glennville, Calif. The ranch is a commercial cow/calf operation that has been in Jeff’s family since the early 1870s. Sheila is active in CattleWomen’s groups at the local, state and national level and served as California CattleWomen’s president from 2015-2016. She is also currently serving as an alternate on the California Beef Council.

What interested you in serving on the board? There are all sorts of projects, research and marketing campaigns we need to spearhead in order to counteract the misinformation that is being disseminated about cattle ranching and beef. I want to help change the negative perception and see the Council as an invaluable vehicle to help bring this about. It is important that we are proactive in our efforts to explain to the public who cattle ranchers are and what ranchers do to provide food for our nation and our world.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? The people who make policy and regulate natural resources need to understand how detrimental their decisions can be to family ranches. Ranch tours with an educational emphasis could be very helpful in getting our story told. Also, we should fund research that uses science to counteract false claims about livestock and particularly cattle’s impact on our natural resources. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? Beef and the cattle industry have been attacked on numerous fronts over the years leading consumers to wonder: Is beef nutritious? Are cattle humanely raised? Does raising cattle consume too many of our resources? Should I be eating a plant-based alternative to beef? All of these topics beg the question: Is it moral to eat beef? The battle for my generation and that of my children’s is to be able to successfully argue that beef is the right moral choice for one’s family. We have to be able to show that eating beef does not make someone a co-conspirator in destroying one’s body or planet earth. 22 California Cattleman September 2019

Range Cattle Producer Alternate

BEVERLY BIGGER

Term ends 2021 VENTURA COUNTY Beverly Bigger and her partner run a cow-calf operation outside the city of Ventura. In 1983 they purchased six longhorn cows so they could watch their cattle when they rode on a friend’s ranch. Over time they have gradually grown their cattle operation to a small herd, and in 2016 when Bigger retired from Farm Credit West she became a full-time rancher.

Why were you interested you in serving on the California Cattle Council board? I saw the California Cattle Council to be a great opportunity to educate the public on beef production and possibly fund studies that would benefit our beef producers as well.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? I believe the California Cattle Council can effectively educate consumers on the merits of beef and disprove with science the false facts that have been spread in the media. What is one issue in our industry that you hope the California Cattle Council will be able to positively impact? Climate change is the hot topic particularly in California. I hope the Council can address the effect of cattle on climate change. Range Cattle Producer Alternate

SAM AVILA Term ends 2020

FRESNO

COUNTY Avila was born and raised on a ranch of 700 cows and attended Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. After college he returned to work on the ranch in 1992 and stayed until six years of drought resulted in selling the ranch.

In 2004, Avila moved to Tulare where he worked in the livestock marketing industry for 13 years. In 2017 Avila made the move to go out on his own buying and selling livestock, as well as working as a rep for Western Video Market. He is the past president of the Tulare Cattlemen’s Association, a member of Rancheros Visitadores and serves as chairman of the California Cattlemen’s Association’s Marketing and International Trade Committee.

What interested you in serving on the board? Just the love of the industry. There’s no better way to get started in an organization than from the ground floor, but especially just a love for the industry. Name a few goals you have for the Council. My number one goal would be education of the public. Another would be giving back to the industry whether it be local, state or national. Once we get organized and going, people are going to need to see some return. I think people have to be able to see what the Council is doing or there are going to be a lot more refunds.

What is one issue in our industry you hope will be positively impacted by the work of the California Cattle Council? Public education is the big one—and everyone agreed on that at the first meeting. We have to get up to times and educate. That’s been our industry’s biggest issue, but we’ve got to do it.


Cattle Feeder Alternate

ROGER GUESS Term ends 2022

As the CEO of TULARE Guess Cattle COUNTY Company, Roger Guess has over 25 years of knowledge focusing on the specialization of custom calf feeding. Being a part of the agriculture industry, as well as a third-generation cattle rancher, he’s had the opportunity to see how quickly the beef industry, specifically, can fluctuate. Guess has spent countless hours from dawn to dusk working alongside his employees to ensure he can produce healthy, quality cattle. Working with cattle is more than a business to Guess, it is a way of life.

What interested you in serving on the board? As cattle producers we face multiple challenges each day. A specific one that comes to mind and most importantly sparked my interest to serve on the Council is how media platforms continue to portray the cattle industry in a negative image. This misinterpretation of how we handle and care for the cattle creates a false impression. Another reason that piqued my interest to serve on the board is to share knowledge and insight with fellow like-minded cattle producers.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? 1. Educate consumers with factual evidence from research involving the nutrition benefits, as well as the impact beef cattle contributes to our ecosystem. 2. Create media depicting useful and positive information about beef production. 3. Strive to reach a further audience than only our beef community. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? One issue I hope the Council will positively impact is public awareness and perception of the beef industry. Cattle Feeder Alternate

BRAD PEEK Term ends 2021

TEHAMA

COUNTY For over 60 years, Brad Peek’s father and his family have owned and operated Shasta Livestock Auction Yard in Cottonwood, Calif. Additionally, the family has owned the Western Video Market for 30 years. Peek has been working full-time with the businesses for over 20 years.

Additionally, Peek has served a term as president of California Livestock Auction Markets Association, and he also sits on the California Department of Food and Agriculture Cattle Health Advisory Task Force.

What interested you in serving on the board? I was approached by a couple county cattlemen’s associations and individuals asking if I was willing to serve if nominated. The Tehama County Cattlemen’s ended up sending in my nomination, and the reason I was willing to serve is to provide a voice for the producers and marketers. Additionally, many of my friends and customers were not for the Council. Knowing this, I think it is important we as a board listen to the concerns of all.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? My main goal is to help make sure this is an industrydriven council that represents all segments. Another goal is to protect our life choices of being in the cattle business. There are so many in this state who want to eliminate our way of life, and our industry is being pressured and untruthfully attacked from so many angles. We have got to defend ourselves or we won’t have an industry to defend. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? Misinformation and false claims from our antagonists are something I hope we can positively impact through the Council. Whether it be attacks that beef is bad or cattle destroy the environment, we have to educate the public as a whole, not just other people already involved in the cattle industry. We also cannot allow lab grown “meat” to become mainstream. Cattle Feeder Alternate

JULIE BELEZZUOLI HATHAWAY

Term ends 2020 KINGS COUNTY Julie BelezzuoliHathaway currently serves as VicePresident and Chief Legal Counsel for Overland Stock Yard and Overland Cattle Company, located in Hanford, Calif. Overland Stock Yard was established in 1939 and has been operated by the Belezzuoli family for 60 years, and is one of the leading dairy, feeder, beef and native cattle auctions in the nation. The Belezzuoli family also runs range cattle, and raises a large amount of feeder cattle through Overland Cattle Company.

What interested you in serving on the board? The purpose and goals of the Council, which include performing research aimed at the development of best management practices to improve sustainability and efficiency of California’s beef industry; assisting with regulatory compliance; and most importantly to me — developing consumer education programs—is something that I feel very passionately about, and wanted to be involved in.

Name a few goals you have for the Council. Community outreach and consumer education programs are a few of the main goals that I have for the Council: working closely with the broader community and public to promote the beef industry and share this industry's positive message about our sustainable practices, health and nutrition, and compassionate care and treatment of our animals. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? There is often a disconnect between the consumer living in large urban areas and the producer, which leads to a lot of confusion by the consumer about how their food is produced, how animals are handled and cared for and even the nutritional value of the end product. This is an industry issue that I hope the Council will be able to positively impact and a gap that I hope the Council will be able to bridge.

All appointees were selected from nominations made by the cattle industry over a six-week nomination period and represent the diversity of cattle producers around the state, as required by the California Cattle Council Law. To learn more visit https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/ mkt/mkt/cattle.html. September 2019 California Cattleman 23


October 5 Turlock, CA

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209 634-4326 • 209 667-0811 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com

September 2019 California Cattleman 25


NEPA and Fire are Top-of-Mind at CalPLC Paso Robles Event by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur On Friday, July 12, the California Public Lands Council (CalPLC) descended on Paso Robles for the organization’s Southwestern Region meeting, serving permittees of the Los Padres National Forest and the Central Coast BLM Field Area. The meeting concluded CalPLC’s first swing throughout the state: prior meetings were held in the Northeast Region (Susanville, 2017), the Central Region (Sonora, 2018) and the Southeast Region (Visalia, 2018). Unfortunately, a Northern Region meeting scheduled for July 10 in Anderson had to be cancelled, but CalPLC will endeavor to better serve those permittees (from the Klamath, Mendocino, Shasta-Trinity and Six Rivers National Forest and BLM’s Arcata, Redding and Ukiah Field Offices) at future events. In Paso Robles, attendees gathered in the Grand Ballroom of the Paso Robles Inn, and were greeted by CalPLC Chair Dave Daley, Oroville, who grazes cattle on the Plumas National Forest, and Vice Chair Emilio Huarte, operations manager of Talbott Sheep Company, which holds grazing permits within the BLM Central Coast Field Area and the Eldorado National Forest. The first item on the agenda was a D.C. issues update prepared by CalPLC’s national affiliate the Public Lands Council (PLC) and delivered by Daley and CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur. Permittees were provided an update on PLC’s efforts at promoting regulatory amendments modernizing the Endangered Species Act (which have since been finalized by the Department of the Interior). Thanks in large part to PLC’s lobbying efforts, the Department of Interior will amend regulations implementing the ESA to prioritize occupied habitat (as opposed to merely ‘suitable’ habitat) when designating species’ critical habitat, streamline interagency consultation and remove the “blanket 4(d)

rule” under which endangered species protections had been extended to most threatened species. Attendees were updated on a Proposed Rule by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to remove gray wolves from the federal list of endangered species and were encouraged to file their own comments in support of the delisting prior to the July 15 deadline. More relevant to the Southwestern Region permittees, however, was news of an attempt by the Center for Biological Diversity seeking to list mountain lions within Southern California and the Central Coast as a threatened ‘evolutionarily significant unit’ of the species under the California Endangered Species Act, an effort which would severely limit the permittees’ ability to protect their livestock from mountain lions if adopted. The presentation also highlighted PLC’s efforts at combating regulatory efforts promoting “wildlife migration corridors,” an effort that has already impacted ranchers in California’s Ventura County. Finally, PLC’s presentation focused on an issue that has been top-of-mind for permittees at all of CalPLC’s regional meetings over the past three years: the need to reform and bring efficiency to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Attendees were again greeted with good news, as the U.S. Forest Service had just recently issued a Proposed Rule reforming its policies for implementing NEPA analysis. But while those regulations are a step in the right direction, permittees were informed that the Proposed Rule provides little direct regulatory relief for term grazing permittees, and were encouraged to submit comments insisting that the Forest Service include relief from NEPA burdens for term grazing permits (for instance by the addition of a categorical exclusion for permits reissued under the same or similar terms and conditions) before issuing its Final Rule.

Carolyn Napper, acting deputy forest supervisor of the Los Padres National Forestoke on top forest issues at the meeting. 26 California Cattleman September 2019

CCA’s Kirk Wilbur shared insight for members at the meeting.

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 28


165 springs & falls sell by These leading sires: • Baldridge Colonel C251 • Connealy Legendary 644L • MGR Treasure • Baldridge 38 Special • Spring Cove Reno 4021 • VDAR Wulffs Altitude 423 • KM Broken Bow 002

• Diablo Deluxe 1104 • Basin Paycheck 5249 • Basin Payweight 1682 • D R Advance D141 • S S Niagara Z29 • 3F Epic 4631 • Baldridge Denali D744 Also selling sons of Baldridge Atlas A266, G A R Drive, Jindra Acclaim, KCF Bennett Absolute & Vintage Upshot 4046!

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$2,200-$3,400 $3,500-$4,500

BullS

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$M

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$M +76

+63

15%

$W

$W

+59

+80 5%

$f

$f

+122

+111

1%

4%

$g

D r treasure f227 7-25-2018 ced bW +8

+1.7

WW

YW

+62

+133 +.95

25%

sc Milk cW

4%

+26

+60

+72

20%

10%

$b

+182

MGr Treasure x connealy Black Granite

$g

+60

2%

Mb re +.60 +1.04 3%

10%

D r treasure f348 8-6-2018

$b

+183

MGr Treasure x sitz Top Game 561X ced bW +8

+1.8

WW

YW

+77

+153 +.90

3%

2%

sc Milk cW

1%

+28 25%

+68 2%

Mb re +.83 +1.06 20%

$M

3%

$M

+70

+76

15%

$W

$W

+90

+92

1%

1%

$f

$f

+125 1%

+76

$g

$g

+51

O’cOnnell Pay cHeck 8038 7-17-2018 Basin Paycheck 5249 x connealy Black Granite ced bW +7

+3.5

WW

YW

+86

+145 +1.22 +28

1%

1%

sc Milk cW 25%

25%

+69 2%

Mb

$b

+176 3%

re

+.66 +.49

+43

O’cOnnell PayWeIGHt 8053 7-30-2018 Basin Payweight 1682 x connealy capitalist 028 ced bW

WW

YW

+11

+66

+116 +1.36 +36

15%

-.7

15%

15%

15%

sc Milk cW 15%

3%

+50 25%

Mb

$b

+120

re

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September 2019 California Cattleman 27


...CONTINUEDFROM PAGE 26 Alan Peters, CAL FIRE San Luis Obispo Unit Forester, provided an update on CAL FIRE’s fire prevention efforts in the region and spoke on the benefits of prescribed fire—a fuels-management method many permittees would like to see the US Forest Service employ more often to avoid catastrophic wildfires in national forests. CCA First Vice President Tony Toso, Hornitos, also attended the meeting to update permittees on the progress CCA’s Fire Committee has been making through discussions with CAL FIRE and other agencies throughout the state (for more details on the Fire Committee’s efforts, see Toso’s article on page 16). Marc Horney, an associate professor of Rangeland Resource Management at Cal Poly and chair of CAL FIRE’s Range Management Advisory Committee, provided insights into the prevalence of vacant allotments within the region— vacancies largely attributable to failure to complete NEPA analyses for grazing on the allotments. Fortunately, BLM allotments in the area are relatively up-to-date on NEPA analysis, and there are thus no vacant allotments within the Central Coast Field Area (though there are former grazing allotments which have since been closed to livestock grazing). The Los Padres National Forest, on the other hand, has approximately 43 vacant grazing allotments (out of approximately 100 total). The issue of vacant allotments was a central one during an issues panel that Daley hosted with Carolyn Napper, Acting Deputy Forest Supervisor of the Los Padres National Forest, and Ben Blom, Central Coast Field Manager. When pressed on the vacant allotments, Napper offered that the Forest is currently undertaking NEPA analysis on three vacant allotments, and will undertake NEPA on one additional vacant allotment in 2020. Fire prevention also took center stage during the issues panel, with Blom announcing that the Central Coast Field Area had just undertaken its first prescribed fire in six years this June, with hopes to implement the tool more liberally in the future. After a lunch of tri-tip sandwiches, permittees were joined by the US Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region’s Deputy Regional Forester for Resources, Barnie Gyant. With his energetic and charismatic style, Gyant commanded every attendee’s attention. Gyant began by discussing fire suppression, noting that in 2018 the Forest Service spent $1 billion on fire suppression in California, with CAL FIRE spending an equivalent amount. While a “fire funding fix” in the 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill should free up some of the Forest Service’s funds intended for range and other programs, Gyant noted that, at present, 95% of the Forest Service’s workforce is devoted to fire suppression—not to range. Gyant then turned his attention to NEPA, discussing the Proposed Rule recently issued by the Forest Service. Gyant explained a new tool included in the Proposed Rule, the “Determination of NEPA Adequacy,” which would essentially allow the Forest Service to adopt the NEPA analysis of a previously-authorized action when a proposed action is substantially similar to that previously-authorized activity. If properly applied, determinations of NEPA adequacy might allow the Forest Service to re-authorize grazing under the same terms and conditions as a previous NEPA analysis without undertaking a new analysis, or may allow similar allotments to be better “grouped” for analysis for landscape-level NEPA. Gyant encouraged attendees to comment on the Proposed Rule to advocate for application 28 California Cattleman September 2019

of the new tool to term grazing permits. The day concluded as all regional CalPLC meetings do: with permittees and agency personnel listing the regional issues of greatest concern and prioritizing those upon which CalPLC should focus its efforts. As with the other regions throughout the state, NEPA, vacant allotments and the risk of catastrophic wildfire topped the list. Attendees also noted problems with rural crime, including vandalism from recreational shooting, and more than a dozen other issues of concern. Fortunately, there is reason to believe we can make substantial progress on these concerns. CCA and our national affiliates have made substantial progress in recent years on ESA reform, NEPA reform, wild horses and water quality issues addressed at prior CalPLC meetings, suggesting we can bring relief to ranchers in the Los Padres National Forest and the Central Coast Field Area, as well. With the Southwestern Region meeting in the books, CalPLC’s initial slate of regional meetings is behind us. CalPLC and CCA will continue to work hard on the issues that continue to face public lands grazing permittees, and will continue to roll out regional meetings to bring permittees face-to-face with agency leadership at all levels. CalPLC will also seek to expand its scope moving forward: recognizing the oft-repeated wisdom of past CCA president Tim Koopman, Sunol, that public lands go well beyond federal lands, Daley has directed that CalPLC should expand its focus to all public lands, including state- and county-managed public lands. Stay tuned for what CalPLC has in store in the coming months and years!

Barnie Gyant, deputy regional forester for resources, USFS Pacific Southwest Region addressed the group.

CCA officers Tony Toso and Steve Arnold attended the meeting.


10 th Biennial

Ranch & Performance Horse

Production Sale

horses from the reputable ranches of Will Gill & Sons

Jim Wheatley

Joe Murray

Sunday, October 13 — the Historic Adobe Ranch 21501 Road 400, Madera, CA Preview Time 10:30 a.m. with sale immediately following preview

Selling approximately 70 Head: Weanlings to Broke Horses

Guest Consignors: Joe Clarot Tyler Holzum Sparrowk Livestock Dan & Andra Erickson

Sires include: Fiestas Gotta Gun Lights Out Ike Shoot Me Ike Alfana 194 Starlight N Ike Frosted Sunman Trapper Bar Drop Four Gill Espuela Tom Azulipas All in Alfana Codys Shining Spark KD Playmaker

To request a sale catalog call Julie Vigna at (831) 801-6124 www.wgnsons.com www.facebook.com/willgillandsons www.facebook.comJimWheatley September 2019 California Cattleman

29


USDA Announces Details of Support Package for Farmers U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced further details of the $16 billion package aimed at supporting American agricultural producers while the Administration continues to work on free, fair, and reciprocal trade deals. In May, President Trump directed Secretary Perdue to craft a relief strategy in line with the estimated impacts of unjustified retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural goods and other trade disruptions. The Market Facilitation Program (MFP), Food Purchase and Distribution Program (FPDP), and Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP) will assist agricultural producers while President Trump works to address long-standing market access barriers. “China and other nations have not played by the rules for a long time, and President Trump is the first President to stand up to them and send a clear message that the United States will no longer tolerate unfair trade practices,” Secretary Perdue said. “The details we announced today ensure farmers will not stand alone in facing unjustified retaliatory tariffs while President Trump continues working to solidify better and stronger trade deals around the globe.

“Our team at USDA reflected on what worked well and gathered feedback on last year’s program to make this one even stronger and more effective for farmers. Our farmers work hard, are the most productive in the world, and we aim to match their enthusiasm and patriotism as we support them,” Secretary Perdue added. Background: American farmers have dealt with unjustified retaliatory tariffs and decades of non-tariff trade disruptions, which have curtailed U.S. exports to China and other nations. Trade damages from such retaliation and market distortions have impacted a host of U.S. commodities. High tariffs disrupt normal marketing patterns, raising costs by forcing commodities to find new markets. Additionally, American goods shipped to China have been slowed from reaching market by unusually strict or cumbersome entry procedures, which affect the quality and marketability of perishable crops. These boost marketing costs and unfairly affect our producers. USDA is using a variety of programs to support American farmers, ranchers, and producers.

Craig Edling | 209.531.7037 Inquire about full truckload pricing and ranch deliveries.

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30 California Cattleman September 2019

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Joey & Kristy 209-765-1142 Mike & Stacy 209-531-4893 Joe & Debbie 209-523-5826 7243 Maze Blvd., Modesto, CA

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Roger & Andy Flood 530-534-7211 Office 507-532-6694 636 Flag Creek Rd, Oroville, CA Val Cell 612-805-7405 View sale offering at Greg Mauchley & Sons 435-830-7233 www.ebersale.com 11375 N.September 10800 W,2019 Bothwell, UT California Cattleman 31


WHEN VALUES ALIGN

SoCal Lawmaker sees value in protecting and promoting agriculture industries by CCA Director Communications Jenna Chandler Since a high school job recording city council meetings ignited a passion for policy and public service, Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia, proud father, husband and lifelong resident of Coachella, California, has been making waves with the status quo and sticking up for underserved communities across the state. And the California Cattlemen’s Association has been lucky enough to join in on the ride for some of the best of it! Like many in Coachella and Imperial Valley whose lives somehow intersect agriculture, Assemblymember Garcia’s ties to the ground there run deep. It was agriculture, in fact, that brought his parents there in the first place as they worked in the fields up and down the state. After graduating high school and attending his local community college, College of the Desert, Garcia went on to obtain a degree in Political Science with a minor in Native American Studies from the University of California, Riverside. He then attended the University of Southern California School of Policy, Planning and Development, earning his master’s degree. After serving nearly a decade as the City of Coachella’s first elected Mayor, in 2014 he was elected by 56th district voters to represent them in the California State Assembly, with the district encompassing the Imperial Valley and parts of the Coachella Valley and the Colorado Desert. The region is heavily rural. When asked about his personal governing philosophy, equity and sticking up for those communities that sometimes get left behind when it comes to distributing state resources, often the rural ones, top the priority list. “Equity is at the core of my public policy philosophy. All of my legislative endeavors are aimed to help level the playing field for rural, underserved regions like ours to ensure that we get our fair share of state resources and that we can leverage every possible opportunity for our communities and economies to prosper,” he said. And prosper the region does, largely due to the vibrant agriculture there. “Agriculture is the economic engine of my district. Local farmers in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys produce over 100 different commodities, including fruits, nuts, dates, alfalfa, and livestock. Agricultural production in Imperial Valley contributes about $2 billion to our regional economy and sustains over 20,000 direct and indirect jobs, with cattle remaining as our number one commodity for the last 60 years,” he boasts. His deepest tie to agriculture though, and to California Cattlemen’s Association itself, is that one of the most iconic places for cattle feeding in the country, the Imperial Valley, is nestled right within the bounds of his assembly district. Since right around the beginning of the 20th 32 California Cattleman September 2019

Century, the water and rich soil there has transformed the region, feeding consumers hungry for beef products to the north, the east and beyond. “The history of modern cattle feeding began here in Imperial Valley,” Garcia says. “We are renowned by our strong ties to agriculture and ranching and this foundation plays a major role in our district’s cultural identity. I became very familiar with the California Cattlemen’s Association while working as a policy aide with the Office of Assemblymember Manuel Perez, Congressman Juan Vargas and Sen. Ben Hueso. Now serving in the California State Assembly, I am happy to have developed a stronger relationship with the Association and its membership.” And in a political climate where it is a steep uphill battle to show an increasingly urban legislature how integral the beef cattle industry is to California beyond just producing a tasty steak, the value of that strong relationship can’t be measured. And that’s why the first step is to have representatives that understand the industry in the first place, and then that work their hardest to preserve this important economic driver and historic golden state tradition. And even though Assemblymember Garcia isn’t involved in agriculture himself these days, he’s no stranger to ag policy. Before being elected to the California State Assembly, he worked for several other elected officials, getting his hands dirty with many legislative issues early, including land use, ag and water issues, before serving as the Mayor of Coachella. In 2014 after he was elected to the Assembly he became a leader for agriculture there. In addition to authoring stock pond legislation for CCA, he has championed legislation supporting and prioritizing the sale of California grown produce and has presided over important water measures as the chair of the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee. And it is through that


expertise as chair of the committee, that has led CCA to turn to him on many water issues. Like many legislators, those water issues top Assemblymember Garcia’s list of priorities each session, with access to safe and affordable drinking water being the most urgent. “This was our top legislative priority of the year,” he says, “and thanks to a huge collaborative effort, including support from statewide agricultural groups like the Cattlemen’s Association, we were able to pass SB 200 (Monning/E. Garcia), establishing the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund without placing burden on our taxpayers.” With this legislation and more, Assemblymember Garcia has long been a leader in thinking outside the box to agriculture’s benefit. One key piece of legislation he authored was AB 398, a measure that paired California’s focus on reducing emissions with opening up new funding sources for farmers and ranchers to improve their operation’s efficiency. “Within AB 398 (E. Garcia, 2017), we were able to direct millions of additional investments for California agriculture. Opening up these climate resources allowed us to expand the highly successful State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program (SWEEP) grant as well as establish the new Funding Agricultural Replacement Measures for Emission Reductions (FARMER) Program – providing much-needed support for local farmers while stimulating our economy and reducing emissions.” But it was his work on CCA-sponsored AB 448 that truly pushed the ball forward for ranchers facing complicated and costly bureaucratic red tape when it comes to registering small stock ponds. This year’s AB 448, authored by Assemblymember Garcia, sought to provide a streamlined and cost-effective pathway for ranchers to obtain a water right for currently-constructed stock ponds with a capacity of no more than 10 acre feet, built prior to January 1. And while the bill did end up stalling, ultimately held up in the Assembly Appropriations Committee amid concerns over costs to the state, it identified a problem and a solution and opened the door for further talks in coming years.

But it isn’t just through legislation that representatives can advocate for agriculture and Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia is proof positive of that, showing that promoting the needs and addressing the concerns of the state’s food producers happens on a personal level too. “First and foremost, it is really important to help educate my colleagues from urban districts, that perhaps do not have a direct connection to agriculture as I do, about the challenges facing rural communities and these crucial industries. Concerns over labor shortages and water have been prominent among our policy conversations in Sacramento,” he says. And as much outreach as CCA can muster, it is those member-to-member conversations with advocates like Assemblymember Garcia that truly drive home the points that rancher office visits, legislative breakfasts and briefings introduce. And while he’s in Sacramento, he’s often doing just that. These days though, unless on legislative business, he doesn’t stray far from his district and can often be found riding his bike around town, using this unique way to stay accessible to residents and constituents, or snacking on his two favorite things, banana cream pie and Brandt beef steaks from the Original Town Pump in Westmoreland. All while watching Dodger baseball of course! When asked if he had any tips for Californians when getting involved with their government, he says that the first step is to just reach out! He explained that most offices, including his own, have open door policies and encourage those interested to come by, ask questions and become part of the legislative process themselves. “As elected officials, we are here to serve and share resources. My office and I have an open-door policy for anyone looking to get involved, learn more about the legislative process, or volunteer to gain hands-on experience. We want to hear from you and are more than happy to help make connections.” We are certainly glad that he is, and if history is any indicator, CCA will be working with this champion for agriculture and California’s beef producers, for years to come!

Garcia speaks as Assemblymember and rancher Frank Bigelow and rancher John Lacey look on.

Garcia talks with employees at One World Beef in Brawley. September 2019 California Cattleman 33


EYE OPENING EDUCATION CCA FACILITATES LEARNING OPORTUNTY FOR LAWMAKERS by CCA Communications Director Jenna Chandler You can’t open up a newspaper or scan social media these days without stumbling across some new article about the dire straits that the world is in due to climate change. 10 years, even 5 years left before irreversible damage is caused and the earth is headed for a global meltdown. Read a little further and 9 times out of 10, the assumption made in those articles is that animal agriculture is primarily culpable. Livestock’s “long shadow,” AOC, the Green New Deal. These terms swirl around in the heads of consumers. Those terms become feelings, those feelings become concerns and those concerns become legislation. And that legislation impacts the very people who put food on the table, and their ability to continue to do it. So, last month, the California Cattlemen’s Association, along with Western United Dairies and the California Teamsters Public Affairs Council, hosted a briefing at the State Capitol featuring UC Davis professor and world-renowned expert on livestock and climate change, Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., combatting commonly held misconceptions and trying to stem the tide of misinformation about livestock’s global impact. Mitloehner entered to a packed house. Members and staff from both sides of the aisle and everywhere in between filled the beautiful brick room in the Capitol’s basement. With dozens of climate change bills coming down the pike each year, this important—and timely—topic, drew a crowd. Assemblymember Jim Wood gave the introduction and told the group what an informative and surprising presentation they were about to see. “The first time I heard him my jaw dropped,” Assemblyman Wood shared during the introduction, “he knows what he’s talking about.” Mitloehner started with a basic chemistry lesson about the tiny gas molecules that are the cause of so much discussion in today’s headlines. He explained that there are three greenhouse gasses: carbon dioxide (CO2) with a Global Warming Potential (GWP) of 1, methane (CH4), the greenhouse gas most attributed to the eructation of ruminant animals such as cattle, with a GWP of 28, and nitrous oxide (N2O) with a GWP of 298, indicating its 298 times more warming capability than carbon dioxide. This, Mitloehner said, is often where the conversation often stops. And it shouldn’t. He went on to clarify that the amount of methane emitted by livestock and the GWP of that methane are only half the story. The lifespan of these molecules must be taken into consideration. The amount of time that it takes to break down one molecule of carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide, according to Mitloehner, is between 200 and 1,000 years. “Once that molecule [of CO2 or N20] is in the air, it pretty much stays there forever. Every time you have ever driven your car some place, you produced CO2. That CO2 you produced throughout your lifetime, is still in the air […]

34 California Cattleman September 2019

That’s why every time you put CO2 in the atmosphere, it adds to current stock,” he said. Methane though, is different. “Methane has a lifespan of only 10 years. And there is a process in the atmosphere that actually breaks down methane almost at the rate it is produced. To most people in this room, that is news.” But to cattle ranchers, that isn’t news at all. They have been watching the sequestration, or breakdown and binding, of atmospheric carbon for generations—in the raising, feeding, grazing and growing of cattle, or as science calls it, the Biogenic Carbon Cycle. “Photosynthesis of plants requires two things, sunlight and CO2 from the atmosphere. Plants gobble up CO2 and it’s that carbon that becomes carbohydrates in the crops, the crops that the animals eat,” Mitloehner went on to explain. “The livestock belch a part of that carbon out as methane […] but the amount of CO2 left after the methane is oxidated [broken down into CO2], is not any more than is consumed. We are NOT adding additional warming. “We are NOT adding additional warming,” he reiterated to a surprised crowd. But it isn’t that way everywhere. With the group still reeling from the realization that livestock production truly is sustainable in terms of greenhouse gasses, Mitloehner then took the conversation on a global scale, showing a map with the total greenhouse gas emissions by countries in the world. He explained that 1 percent of the total greenhouse gas amount in the world is contributed by U.S. agriculture. Every single thing we grow and eat in the United States contributes only 1 percent of total greenhouse gasses in the world. Animal agriculture? 0.5 percent. Half of a percent. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., shares climate change research and insight with lawmakers in Sacramento


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34 He then showed another map, this time of population growth, depicting the immense boom in certain part of subSaharan Africa at over 200 percent and in Bangladesh and India, almost 25 percent. Why? Increasing standards of living and lifespan. And as people start living longer and the standard of living and income go up, so too does the demand for meat. And in those regions, livestock herds are expanding to meet that need, but not in the sustainable way seen in the west. “In emerging countries, greenhouse gasses are going up and the reason why they are going up is because people have more disposable income and the more money people make, the relatively more animal sourced foods they choose to buy. And how they choose to meet that demand is by growing more livestock. We don’t want that. And we haven’t done that in America and Europe. Greenhouse gasses aren’t going up even though we are producing drastically more food than we have in the past. That’s what we want to do globally.” What does he attribute that to? Better genetics, management, nutrition and technology. In the U.S. the average cow produces 23,000 pounds of milk per year. In India, it produces only 1,000 pounds per year. It takes 23 more methane-producing cows to yield the same equivalent. And India has three times more bovines than the United States—low producing, “idle” cattle that are utilizing resources and emitting greenhouse gasses, but not really producing much of anything. “And we have to change that,” Mitloehner says. “By helping others, building a better dairy system, importing proper genetics, using better nutrition, etc.” But aside from helping other emerging countries build more sustainable livestock herds, what can developed regions like the United States and Europe do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? The 800 pound gorilla in the room, according to Mitloehner? Transportation, with U.S. fossil fuels contributing 11 percent of greenhouse gasses globally. Finding better, more renewable source of energy is the first step, not refraining from eating meat one arbitrary day of the week. “Can we eat our way out of climate change?” the slide that clicked on the screen read, in a room where presumably more than a few participate in Meatless Monday. “Let’s assume you are an omnivore and you decide to go vegan for one year, what would that do to your carbon footprint?” Mitloehner asked. “Going vegan for a year would save 0.8 tons of CO2 equivalents, 0.8 tons of greenhouse gasses. If you take one transatlantic flight, one person, that costs 1.6 tons of CO2 equivalents. Going completely vegan for one year has half the impact of skipping one transatlantic flight.” He went on, “What would happen if we as a nation, 20 million Americans, go Meatless Monday? “We would reduce the carbon footprint of this country by 0.3%. If we as a nation were to go vegan, all 20 million, no animal sourced foods whatsoever, that would reduce our carbon footprint by 2.6 percent.” Then while many in the group sat silent, stunned by the numbers, Mitloehner gave one of the most poignant demonstrations on the importance of livestock agriculture on global food supply. He began by holding up a piece of paper. “This piece of paper represents the earth,” he started, before folding the paper into thirds, ending with one third showing. “Two-thirds of the earth is covered by water. This one-third 36 California Cattleman September 2019

left represents all of the land on planet earth, all of it.” He then went into his wallet and held up his business card next to the one-third sheet of paper. “The equivalent amount of land that is represented by my business card equals all agricultural land. I will now take my business card and fold it into one piece that is two-thirds and another piece that is one-third and then I will rip my business card in two.” Holding up the two-thirds of a business card he said, “This represents what we call marginal land, that cannot be used to grow crops, either because the soil is not fertile or there is not enough water. It is called marginal land. Do you know what that land is used for today? Grazing. For grazing with ruminant livestock. “And ONLY ruminant livestock can make use of that land […] that cannot be used for any other food producing process.” With an ever-increasing global population, decreasing the food-producing amount of land by two-thrids to adopt a purely plant based diet just doesn’t make sense. The world just couldn’t be fed. So what can Americans do to combat what contribution they do have on greenhouse gas emissions? Mitloehner had an answer for that too! “40 percent - four zero percent - of all food produced in the United States goes to waste, goes to a landfill. Four, zero. I don’t care what you eat, whether you are a vegan, vegetarian, omnivore or carnivore, this is sick, to throw away almost half of what we produce […] that by far as the most environmental footprint. Think of all of the resources that went in to that and we aren’t even eating it.” The numbers were sobering, and who to blame was even more so. “By far the greatest section of our society responsible for food waste is the consumer. You and I, in a restaurant or at home. That’s where the vast majority of food waste occurs and this is something we have to do something about as a society. I feel very strongly about it.” And with that, the group was left to ponder. The realizations were so overwhelming that it even took a few moments to sink in before anyone could think of a question to ask. “So if people tell the public, all we need to do is replace our burgers with a few plant based burgers, that sets us on the wrong path to find solutions,” Mitloehner left as a final warning. And a sobering warning it was. But that’s what the afternoon was all about, finding real solutions to the global issues facing the food supply, not false panaceas. And if the reactions of those in attendance were any indication, it was a success, sending policy makers and staff in the right direction to make meaningful change. “It was an honor to co-host Frank Mitloehner at the Capitol to brief legislators and staff on some of the misconceptions people have about the impacts that cattle have on greenhouse gas emissions. The only way we can make informed votes on legislation is by listening to the experts,” Assemblyman Heath Flora said about the event. And that’s all that livestock producers can ask, is for representatives and staff to be open to the experts and make informed decisions, the decisions that impact the livelihood of so many. It seems, though that with Mitloehner and the truth of the numbers on animal agriculture’s side, the pendulum is starting to swing back to the right direction, toward celebrating America’s farmers and ranchers as the answer to the reversal of greenhouse gas emissions, not the problem.


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Casino Bomber R140

Reg No: 19281032 • Sire: Casino Bomber N33 • MGS: Deer Valley All In

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

DOC

CW

MARB

RE

$W

$F

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

DOC

CW

MARB

RE

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+23

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+651

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85

74

123

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72

82

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Casino Officer R148

Reg No: 19405480 • Sire: Baldridge Colonel C251 • MGS: Connealy Consensus

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

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CW

MARB

RE

$W

$F

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

DOC

CW

MARB

RE

$W

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$B

+14

+.7

+79

+146

+39

+32

+62

+1.08

+.76

100

99

174

+3

+1.3

+83

+147

+20

+40

+58

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83

88

152

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A NEW ERA

I.D. & TRACEABILITY OPTIONS CONTINUE TO EVOLVE by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield In July, I had the opportunity to attend the International Livestock Identification Association (ILIA) annual meeting in Calgary, Alberta to discuss traceability and transportation issues with livestock identification and law enforcement officials from throughout the West and the British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan Provinces. Animal identification and traceability were, without a doubt, the hot issue with many of the presentations focusing on the personal viewpoints of a more unified traceability program in the United States from producers and industry leaders. Currently, the United States’ mandatory animal identification program extends to sexually intact beef cattle older than 18 months of age. Many of these cattle move with visual forms of identification including a brand for pasture-to-pasture permits or a brucellosis vaccination or “silver brite” metal tag for cattle changing ownership across state lines. Although there is no movement to expand this identification requirement to feeder cattle moving interstate, the Trump Administration is pursuing a change in policy that would require all current forms of official identification to transition to a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 840 Electronic Identification Device (EID) tag by January 1, 2023.

Specifically, the USDA proposes to: • At the end of this year, USDA will no longer provide metal tags free of charge, although tags can be purchased from private vendors on a state-by-state basis and used until December 31, 2020 as an official form of identification. • Beginning January 1, 2021, USDA will no longer accept the production, distribution and application of metal tags to be used as an official form of identification. • Beginning January 1, 2023, all sexually intact beef cattle moving interstate will require an 840 EID tag to move interstate, including cattle with previously accepted metal tags. More detailed information on the proposal is available at: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/traceability/downloads/ plan-to-achieve-eid-factsheet.pdf The proposed timeline is ambitious and the policy is certainly not without its flaws. For example, requiring cows that were previously allowed to move with a metal tag, but must be retagged with an 840 EID tag is unnecessary and unfeasible. A number of stakeholder working groups have been formed to review the proposed policy and discuss the feasibility and challenges associated with the U.S. cattle industry adopting a mandatory identification program in the future. The Producer Traceability Council, Co-Chaired by Joe Leathers, the General Manager of the 6666 Ranch in Guthrie, Texas, is one of several groups actively working on this. Leathers is joined by other cow-calf producers, feeders, livestock market auction representatives, dairy farmers and Tyson Foods. At the ILIA conference, I was humbled to serve on a panel with Leathers, former CCA President and Immediate Past President of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Kevin Kester, along with three other ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

38 California Cattleman September 2019


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California Cattleman 39


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 38 producers to discuss this USDA proposal, the need to maintain a strong state-by-state hot iron brand program and further explore the opportunities and challenges with adopting a more formal traceability program across the industry. Although opinions vary about the need for such a program, it is a fact that the United States is the only major beef producing nation without an industry wide animal identification and disease traceability program. On May 15, 2019, the Producer Traceability Council announced their endorsement of the mandatory use of Ultra High Frequency (UHF) tags for inclusion in USDA’s January 1, 2023 transition target. In a press release issued following the announcement Leathers stated, “Being deeply involved in the cattle business, I feel it is imperative that we come together as producers and help lead the effort to enhance cattle traceability. It just makes sense that we, as producers, use the best technology available so that while traceability is being achieved, we are also able to better manage our operations using that technology.” NCBA has also formed a Traceability Working Group comprised of industry leaders across the country to provide recommendations on the development of a framework for a nationally significant animal identification program. CCA is fortunate to have the appointment of CCA immediate past president Dave Daley. The working group is in the process of formalizing their recommendations and will be submitting them for review by cattle producers in the near future. The working group has identified five issues in particular to focus their time. Those issues in order of priority set by the working group are: • Maintaining the use of a single premise ID issued by USDA that is referenced to the main ranch or headquarters for the purposes of issuing 840 tags for an entire herd. In other words, the working group seeks to ensure a separate premise ID is not necessary for each ranch a producer owns or leases. • Providing recommendations relative to USDA’s proposal to eliminate the use of metal tags. • Implementing the use of an electronic health certificate for the importation of Mexican feeder cattle to the U.S. • Assessing the feasibility, cost and effectiveness of using UHF back tags. • Determining what information is necessary to be included in a database associated with a nationally significant animal identification program. Recommendations by either group would only apply to the current regulatory structure and apply only to sexually intact cattle older than 18 months of age moving interstate. To be clear, it would not incorporate feeder cattle. Both the Producer Traceability Council and the NCBA Traceability Working Group have recognized that several existing challenges must first be overcome before moving forward with any transition to the use of an 840 EID tag as proposed by USDA, including the 40 California Cattleman September 2019

cost of implementation, privacy and the protection from the misuse of data that is collected. Early discussions regarding the cost of implementation have focused on what USDA should subsidize, particularly whether government funds should be used to reduce the cost of the tags or offset the cost associated with purchasing equipment needed to read the tags. That discussion will evolve with stakeholder input over the coming year and no doubt both groups will weigh in. Although CCA is closely watching the recommendations, concerns and opportunities that will be voiced by various stakeholder working groups, CCA is independently engaged in the proposal released by USDA to represent the interests of our members and California beef cattle producers. As always, positions advocated by the association are based on policies approved and adopted by the CCA membership and Board of Directors. It’s clear that early engagement, specifically with cow calf producers, is key to the success of any future program. This reality was captured in a comprehensive feasibility study conducted by World Perspectives and commissioned by NCBA in 2018 titled: U.S. Beef Cattle Identification and Traceability Systems, Evaluation of Opportunities, Obstacles and Incentives Across the U.S. Beef Industry Value Chain. Seeking to meet this need, CCA recently received a grant to conduct a series of listening sessions throughout the state to talk about the future of animal disease traceability and livestock identification in order to directly hear from you and your fellow producers on the opportunities, challenges and concerns on the implementation of a more formal animal identification system in the United States. Stay tuned for further information on the upcoming workshops. I highly encourage any and all ranchers to participate to be sure your voice and opinions are heard.


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NCBA, PLC Welcome Finalization of Federal Rules Modernizing ESA Implementation On Aug. 12, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and Public Lands Council (PLC) welcomed the finalization of federal rules to modernize implementation of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This package from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) consists of three rules which improve the manner in which those agencies administer the ESA. The rules address Sections 4, 4(d), and 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which deal with listing and critical habitat, threatened species protection, and interagency consultation, respectively. “The ESA affects cattle-producing families across the country,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “We are grateful to Secretary Bernhardt and the staff at FWS and NMFS for bringing this long-awaited regulatory relief to American cattle farmers and ranchers.” “With these new rules, commonsense will once again be inserted into the ESA process,” added PLC President Bob Skinner. “Among other things, prioritizing critical habitat designations on occupied territory, streamlining the consultation process, and rolling back the ‘Blanket 4(d) Rule’ [which extended endangered species protection to most species listed as threatened] demonstrates that the agencies are reaffirming their commitment to both conserve sensitive species and safeguard rural economies.” Barring court action, the rules package will officially take effect following a 30-day objection period.

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RANGELAND TRUST TALK

A WESTERN AFFAIR 2019: CELEBRATING LAND, LEGACY AND LOVE OF COUNTRY by Alyssa Rolen for the California Rangeland Trust In June, the California Rangeland Trust brought together Panorama beef was served, Rangeland Trust Chief Executive urban and rural communities at A Western Affair 2019 at Officer Nita Vail announced the 2019 Conservation Impact Wente Vineyards in Livermore, California to celebrate our Award recipient, Russell Austin and the Conservationists Western heritage and mutual love of land, legacy, and all of the Year Recipients, Marilyn and Jerry Russell. While things country. Hosted by the Wentes, a family with a long accepting her award, Marilyn brought the audience to tears and rich history in both wine-making and ranching, the event as she recounted her family’s history in ranching, her reasons highlighted the importance of keeping our land and country for donating the development rights on their Mendocino vibrant and available to support and improve California for County ranch to the Rangeland Trust in 2017, and her plans generations to come. And since red meat and red wine go (with no children of her own) to pass on the land to her so well together, the event was extra special with a culinary experience like no other. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 46 The weekend kicked off on Friday, June 28 with an exclusive reception and VIP wine blending class at Wente’s Wine Maker’s Studio. Led by Eric Wente—a man who brings humor and a lifetime’s worth of expertise to the art of winemaking— guests uncorked their inner winemakers by blending their own custom creations. After the class, guests mingled with one another, enjoyed delicious food and wine paired to perfection, and relaxed under the stars while enjoying a spectacular performance by Rangeland Trust’s Emeritus Director Scott Stone and his band, Stone’s Throw. The following day, friends of the organization gathered for the main event, A Western Affair. Before entering the venue, they were immediately “wowed” when they spotted the Rangeland Trust’s new showstopper— a traveling bar and entertainment system to be used for outreach events on ranches; this would later be auctioned off for use for one day to the highest bidder. After Eric Wente leads Friday night’s VIP wine-blending class. reveling over the trailer’s endless possibilities, guests checked-in and were greeted with live country music by Buck Ford, a superb glass of wine, and friendly faces both new and old. Next, they headed over to the Tirage building and stepped into a world of Western wonder with stunning décor, carefully planned to the very last detail by the Alameda County Cattlewomen, and a silent auction filled with an array of special items. It was clear the evening would be one to remember. Following the cocktail-hour, Rangeland Trust Chairman Mark Nelson welcomed guests and thanked Eric and Arel Wente and the Wente family for hosting the event along with the group of generous sponsors including: Raley’s, Murphy Austin Attorneys, Panorama Organic Grass-fed Meats, Farm Credit, E&J Gallo Winery, Rabobank, East Bay Regional Parks District, Lucas Public The new Rangeland Trust teardrop trailer was auctioned off for use Affairs, and Westervelt Ecological Services. for one-day to the highest bidder. As the meal of mouthwatering grass-fed 44 California Cattleman September 2019


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JOEY COZZI 209/769-4669 JOEL COZZI 209/769-4660

September 2019 California Cattleman 45


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44 long-time ranch caretakers. “I didn’t have a lot of wants or wishes, I just wanted to make sure that I was leaving my family’s ranch as a heritage to my parents, and to the wildlife, and to the landscape, and to agriculture,” she said. “That’s when I sought out the California Rangeland Trust; when I read the easement language, I thought, ‘yes! This is the organization that’s by and for ranchers.’” After listening to Marilyn’s heartwarming story, Mark returned to the podium with Rangeland Trust Director Bonnie Atmore to emphasize the importance of bringing various groups together around a common table. “Whether you’re a mother in the city worried about the type of food you put on your family’s plates, a rancher working to preserve the watersheds and natural habitat that pull toxins from the air, or a developer looking to balance the need for more housing with the need for natural resources preserved by grazing” said Mark. “we all have common concerns, and we are all connected.” And as Bonnie so beautifully articulated, “If we lose our connection to the land, we will lose our connection to each other and the bonds we have built on the land. In bridging our diverse communities, we can find common ground and common purpose. And we can celebrate those whether at A Western Affair, or with friends like you year-round.” As the program ended, auctioneer Jake Parnell introduced an exciting lineup of oneof-a-kind experiences. Energy ran high as guests raised their paddles to further rangeland conservation efforts that benefit all of us with local food to eat, clean air to breathe, and magnificent open spaces to cherish. As this remarkable weekend concluded, guests danced the night away under the stars. This weekend affair served as the perfect reminder of why the Rangeland Trust does what it does—to serve the land that provides for all of us, honor the legacy of our nation’s ranchers (past, present and future) who steward our valuable natural resources, and join with neighbors from different backgrounds to enjoy some of life’s simplest pleasures. Mark your calendars for A Western Affair 2020 on April 18 at Rancho Mission Viejo in Orange County! 46 California Cattleman September 2019

Mark Nelson and Nita Vail with award winner Russell Austin.

Award winners Marilyn and Jerry Russell enjoying the evening with friends and family.

Guests dancing the night away to live music from Buck Ford.


Promoting PROFITABILITY through PRODUCTIVE DAMS that deliver POWERFUL SIRES.

Fall Round Up - Sheila Font

Selling POWERFUL herdsire prospects backed by GENERATIONS of PROBLEM-FREE females that are bred for PREDICTABLE maternal performance and EFFICIENCY.

Sept. 26, 2019 1 p.m. PDT • Circle Ranch • Ione, CA

90 SimAngus Bulls 80 Angus Bulls TM

Circle Power Grid F121 • Reg# 3547812 BD: 8/01/18 • BW: 1.4 • WW: 73 • YW: 113 • Milk: 22 5/8 SM 3/8 AN • Circle Power Grid X WS Beef King

Circle Nightride F707 • Reg# 3498976 BD: 04/13/18 • BW: -2 • WW: 60 • YW: 94 • Milk: 21 1/2 SM 1/2 AN • Nightride X Entrepreneur

Circle King Wally E390 • Reg# 3414267 BD: 12/15/17 • BW: 0 • WW: 62 • YW: 92 • Milk: 22 5/8 SM 3/8 AN • Circle Beef King X Legacy

Bruin Friction 8231 • Reg# 19466329 BD: 08/02/18 • BW: 2.3 • WW: 65 • YW: 114 • Milk: 25 PB AN • Kozi X International

Bruin 5261 Torque 7342 • Reg# 19466361 BD: 11/16/17 • BW: -.9 • WW: 51 • YW: 97 • Milk: 30 PB AN • Torque X Impression

Bruin 4061 Atlas 7387 • Reg# 19466372 BD: 12/22/17 • BW: -1.3 • WW: 45 • YW: 82 • Milk: 23 PB AN • Atlas X Final Product

SELLING SONS OF: Bruin Torque 5261 • Koupal Kozi 418 • TJ Diplomat Myers Keystone M263 • SAV Resource 1441 • Hooks Broadway • Circle Old School

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Angus Seedstock Joe Fischer, cow herd partner • (530) 392-0154 www.BruinRanch.com

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SimAngusTM Seedstock Tim & Jill Curran • (209) 765-1815 www.CircleRanch.net

PRIME RIB LUNCH BEGINS AT NOON

September 2019 California Cattleman 47


Farmers Prevented from Planting Crops on More than 19 Million Acres

Agricultural producers reported they were not able to plant crops on more than 19.4 million acres in 2019, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This marks the most prevented plant acres reported since USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) began releasing the report in 2007 and 17.49 million acres more than reported at this time last year. Of those prevented plant acres, more than 73 percent were in 12 Midwestern states, where heavy rainfall and flooding this year has prevented many producers from planting mostly corn, soybeans and wheat. “Agricultural producers across the country are facing significant challenges and tough decisions on their farms and ranches,” USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey said. “We know these are challenging times for farmers, and we have worked to improve flexibility of our programs to assist producers prevented from planting.” Cover Crops USDA supported planting of cover crops on fields where farmers were not able to plant because of their benefits in preventing soil erosion, protecting water quality and boosting soil health. The report showed where producers planted 2.71 million acres of cover crops so far in 2019, compared with 2.14 million acres at this time in 2018 and 1.88 million at this time in 2017. To help make cover crops a more viable option, USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) adjusted the haying and grazing date of cover crops, and USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service held signups in select states that offered producers assistance in planting cover crops. Meanwhile,

48 California Cattleman September 2019

USDA added other flexibilities to help impacted producers, including adjusting the deadline to file acreage reports in select states. About the Report This data report aggregates information from crop acreage reports as of August 1, 2019, which producers file with FSA to maintain program eligibility and to calculate losses for various disaster assistance programs. The crop acreage data report outlines the number of acres planted, prevented from planting, and failed by crop, county and state. To find more information, view the Aug. 12 report. Because some producers have not completed their filing and data are still being processed, FSA will make available subsequent data reports in September, October, November, December and January. You can find reports from 2007 to the present on FSA’s Crop Acreage Data webpage. To receive FSA program benefits, producers are required to submit crop acreage reports annually regarding all cropland uses on their farm. This report includes data for producers who had already filed for all deadlines in 2019, including the mid-July deadlines. Other Prevented Planting Indicators In addition to acreage reports filed with FSA, producers with crop insurance coverage for prevented planting file claims with their insurance providers. These claims are provided to RMA and may differ from the prevented planted acres reported to FSA. More information on prevented plant coverage is available on the RMA website. Official estimates of total acres planted, harvested and to be harvested, yield, and production are available from USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service at nass.usda.gov.


r e v i l e D s ll u B y Mid Valle PounDS PAy frIDAy, SEPTEMBEr 20

lunCh: 12 P.M. SAlE: 1 P.M.

Modesto Jr. College Ag Pavilion • Modesto, CA 75 AnguS BullS SEll By BrEED-lEADIng A.I. SIrES

Sale Bulls on Display Prior to the live Broadcast register at www.bidonwvmcattle.com

The 2019 Schafer and Amador offering features a large group of bulls that excel for Weaning Weight EPDs with the added value of Top Dollar Angus and Certified Angus Beef® premiums. If you sell your calves by the pound, these bulls are a perfect fit for you!

MorE ThAn 85% of ThE 2019 MID VAllEy SAlE BullS rAnk In ThE ToP 30% of ThE AnguS BrEED for WW EPDS

ThESE BullS & MorE SEll BACkED By: PI-negative Test for BVD • genomic Enhanced EPDs • DnA Sire Identified • 1st Breeding Season guarantee CED +10 BW +1.7 WW +82 YW +145 MILK +31 CW +74

SChAfEr BIg TEn 1814

DoB 3-30-2018 AAA *19287041 Sire: hoffman Big Ten 4056 ET • Dam’s Sire: W h S limelight 64V CED +5 BW +3.1 WW +74 YW +112 MILK +26 CW +48

SChAfEr frAMEWork 1821

CED +7 BW +3.1 WW +69 YW +121 MILK +31 CW +49

MARB +.93 RE +1.11 $W +90 $F +126 $B +206 $C +330

AMADor WEIgh uP 0118 8213 DoB 2-28-2018 AAA 19326604 Sire: Plattemere Weigh up k360 • Dam’s Sire: Mytty In focus CED +11 BW +.7 WW +73 YW +129 MILK +23 CW +43

MARB +.32 RE +.78 $W +87 $F +72 $B +111 $C +232

DoB 4-19-2018 AAA *19289610 Sire: Bruin framework 3225 ET • Dam’s Sire: Schafer 21st Century

MARB +.60 RE +.71 $W +77 $F +98 $B +151 $C +265

MARB +.85 RE +.95 $W +74 $F +71 $B +140 $C +225

AMADor rAMPAgE 3106 8216

DoB 2-28-2018 AAA *19326609 Sire: Quaker hill rampage 0A36 • Dam’s Sire: Connealy right Answer 746

THD ©

AmAdor Angus

Ed, Carlene, Joshua & Jessica Amador LMI©

Ed (209) 595-3056 • Josh (209) 499-9182 •

Ranch (209) 538-4597 • AmadorFarms@msn.com 5136 Laird Road • Modesto, California 95358

SAlE MAnAgEr

Greg and Louise Schafer

rAnCE long

918-510-3464

Cell 209-988-6599 • Home 530-865-3706 rlong@rancelong.com 6986 County Road 6, Orland, CA 95963 www.rancelong.com

September 2019 California Cattleman 49


103RD ANNUAL CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S & CATTLEWOMEN, INC.

Convention

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN AT CALCAT TLEMEN.ORG!

WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALE Before the convention begins, drop by the Western Video Market Sale on Wednesday from 8 am-Noon at the Peppermill Resort Hotel.

TRADESHOW WELCOME PARTY Enjoy the opening of the California Cattle Industry Tradeshow Wednesday evening while catching up with your fellow cattle producers from across the state!

POLICY AND COMMITTEE MEETINGS Come Thursday to participate in the policy-making process—one of the best ways to get involved and make your voice and vote count.

CCA & CCW RECEPTION & AWARDS BANQUET Spend the last evening of the 2019 convention celebrating those honored in the California beef cattle community for the year!

BOOK YOUR ROOM AT THE PEPPERMILL RESORT HOTEL Please call (866) 821-9996 and mention ACCA19 for the discounted group rate, or visit www.calcattlemen.org/convention2019 today for more information about reservations at the Peppermill Resort Hotel. Reservations must be made by NOVEMBER 3, 2019 for the discounted group room rate.

50 California Cattleman September 2019


103RD ANNUAL CCA/CCW CONVENTION

Tentative Schedule

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3RD 11 am - 5 pm

CCA Scholarship Interviews

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4

TH

8 am - 6:30 pm 8 am - Noon 8 am - 5 pm 10 am - Noon 11 am - Noon Noon - 9:30 pm Noon - 2 pm 1 - 2 pm 2 - 3 pm 2 - 5 pm 2:30 - 4 pm 3 - 4 pm 4 - 5 pm 4 - 5:30 pm 5:30 - 6:30 pm 6:30 - 9:30 pm

Registration Open Western Video Market Sale CRT Board Meeting CCA Officer’s Meeting YCC Networking in the Tradeshow Tradeshow Open Calif. Cattlemen’s Foundation Board of Directors CBCIA Finance Meeting CCA Finance and Membership Meeting CBCIA Board Meeting CCW Executive Committee Cattle-PAC Meeting YCC Meeting Opening General Session Allied Industry Wine & Cheese Reception Tradeshow Welcome Party

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5

TH

6:30 am - 5 pm 6:30 - 7:30 am 7 am - 2 pm 7 - 8 am 7 - 8 am 7 - 10 am 8 - 9:00 am 8 - 9:00 am 9 - 10 am 9 - 10 am 10 - 11 am

Registration Open Prayer Gathering California Cattle Industry Tradeshow Breakfast in the Tradeshow LMRF Meeting Bloody Mary Bar General Session #2 CCW WIRED Committee Meeting Cattlemen’s College Session #1 CCW Heritage Meeting CCW Meet and Greet with Standing Committee Chairs 10 am - Noon CCA Cattle Health & Well-Being/Cattle Marketing and International Trade 10 am - Noon CCA Federal Lands 11:15 am - 1:30 pm Cowbelle of the Year Lunch Noon - 1 pm Lunch in the Tradeshow Noon - 1 pm Past Presidents Lunch 1 - 2 pm Cattlemen’s College Session #2 2 - 4 pm Cattlemen’s Poster Session 2 - 4 pm CCA Property Rights & Environmental Management 2 - 4 pm CCA Agriculture & Food Policy/Tax and Credit 2 - 4 pm CCA Federal Lands (Policy Meeting) 2 - 4:30 pm CCW Board Meeting 4 - 5 pm Cattlemen’s College Session #3 4 - 6 pm CCA General Resolutions 5 - 6 pm CCW President’s Reception 5 - 6 pm CCA President’s Reception 6:30 - 10 pm CCA & CCW Reception & Awards Banquet

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6TH 6:30 - 7:30 am 7 - 9 am 8 - 9:15 am 9:30 am - Noon

CCA Nominating Committee CCW Awards Breakfast Cattle-Fax Breakfast CCA Board and Membership Meeting

r RegistTeo day!

REGISTRATION PACKAGES

# $ Tickets Amount

Full Registration (CCA/CCW Member)

$200

Includes policy meetings, tradeshow access, Allied Industry Council Wine and Cheese Reception, Welcome Party, Cattlemen’s College Sessions, breakfast & lunch in the tradeshow on Thursday & the CattleFax Breakfast or CCW Awards Breakfast.

Full Registration (Non-CCA Member)

$250

Includes policy meetings, tradeshow access, Allied Industry Council Wine and Cheese Reception, Welcome Party, Cattlemen’s College Sessions, breakfast & lunch in the tradeshow on Thursday & the CattleFax Breakfast or CCW Awards Breakfast.

Young Cattlemen’s Registration

$75

Includes policy meetings, tradeshow access, Allied Industry Council Wine and Cheese Reception, Welcome Party, Cattlemen’s College Sessions, breakfast & lunch in the tradeshow on Thursday & the CattleFax Breakfast or CCW Awards Breakfast.

THURSDAY A LA CARTE REGISTRATIONS CCW Cowbelle of the Year Lunch

$35

CCA & CCW Awards Banquet

$75

FRIDAY A LA CARTE REGISTRATIONS $25

CCW Awards Breakfast

SUPPORT THE CATTLE -PAC 2019 Cattle-PAC Membership Please write separate check to CCA Cattle-PAC

PLEASE NOTE REGISTRATION REFUNDS WILL NOT BE GIVEN AFTER OCTOBER 31ST, 2019!

$200

TOTAL

Name(s) attending:

Local affiliation: Payment Method: Card #:

Check made payable to the Calif. Cattlemen’s Association

Exp.

/

Cardholder’s Name: Cardholder’s Phone: Billing address: City/State/Zip:

Register online today at www.calcattlemen.org/convention2019 or mail registration form to the CCA office at 1221 H St., Sacramento, CA 95814. September 2019 California Cattleman 51


United States and European Union Sign Agreement on U.S. Beef Access to EU compiled by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield California ranchers and producers across the U.S. will be guaranteed a bigger share of Europe’s beef market over the next seven years, as duty-free beef exports to the European Union (E.U.) are set to triple under a new agreement signed by the White House at the beginning of August. Once fully implemented, annual duty-free exports are expected to top $420 million, up from $150 million previously. “American ranchers produce the best beef in the world. Thanks to President Trump’s leadership, this new agreement ensures that American ranchers can sell more of that beef to Europe,” said U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer, who signed the agreement with the Honorable Jani Raappana of Finland, representing the Presidency of the E.U., and Ambassador Stavros Lambrinidis of the Delegation of the E.U. The agreement establishes a duty-free tariff rate quota exclusively for the U.S. That quota, initially set at 18,500 metric tons annually, is valued at approximately $220 million. Over the next seven years, that quota will grow to 35,000 metric tons annually with a value of approximately $420 million. Under the current arrangement, dutyfree beef exports to the EU are approximately 13,000 metric tons with a value of $150 million and prior to the agreement, risked declines moving forward. The action taken by the U.S. and E.U. on August 2, firms up a previous deal made between the U.S., E.U. and Canada in response to a settlement before the World Trade Organization regarding the import restriction of beef with hormones to the E.U. The original deal was intended to establish a duty-free tariff rate quota of 45,000 metric tons for the U.S. and Canada, however other countries entered the market shortly after the agreement was put in place lowering the U.S. share of the quota to its current level. Ensuring the E.U. lives up to the original agreement of 45,000 metric tons has been a key priority for the industry, originally working with the Obama Administration and now the Trump Administration to rectify the situation. CCA is thankful the Trump Administration has worked to see this issue across the finish line and we are hopeful with the agreement in place, the E.U. will do its part to acknowledge the original deal made nearly a decade ago. NCBA President Jennifer Houston and past CCA and NCBA President 52 California Cattleman September 2019

Kevin Kester were both in attendance with President Trump for the signing of the agreement. Speaking shortly after President Trump, Houston said “Today is a good day for America’s cattlemen and cattlewomen. President Trump and his trade team deserve a lot of credit for standing up for America’s cattle industry and securing this important market access to Europe. For many years it has been difficult for us to sell our high-quality U.S. beef to European consumers because of the restrictive tariff and non-tariff barriers, but the establishment of this 35,000 metric ton duty-free quota sends the signal to America’s cattle industry that Europe is ready for U.S. beef. All across America, our beef producers go to great lengths to raise safe and delicious beef products that are enjoyed by consumers around the world. It is exciting to know that European families will enjoy more of the delicious U.S. beef that we feed our families.” The agreement will not affect the current requirement that U.S. beef exported to the E.U. comply with the Non Hormone Treated Cattle Program (NHTC) Program. Cattle must be certified to meet the NHTC requirements through approved third-party verification programs. In addition, NHTC cattle are segregated at the packing plant and tissue samples are collected at slaughter in order to receive an export certification. The industry is already gearing up to revisit the NHTC requirement with future trade talks with the E.U. and the United Kingdom (U.K.), as it is set to leave the E.U. by Oct. 31, 2019. Although renegotiating a deal without NHTC will no doubt be difficult with both the E.U. and the U.K, it’s imperative our trade agreements are science based and the use or limitation of production technologies are based on the best available research.


SONOMA MOUNTAIN HEREFORDS Bulls Available Private Treaty

Horned and Polled Hereford Bulls available at the ranch in Bodega, CA 2-year-olds and long yearlings raised in the mountains and ready to go to work for you!

8119

8023

8032

8033

8034

8061 For more information or to request performance data on the bulls, contact: Jim, Marcia and Jamie Mickelson (707) 481-3440 (707) 396-7365 JMMick@sonic.net Bobby and Heidi Mickelson (707) 396-7364 P.O. Box 2689 Petaluma, CA 94953 sonomamountainherefords.com September 2019 California Cattleman 53


CALIFORNIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAILEY MORRELL APPOINTED TO JUNIOR HEREFORD BOARD Four National Junior Hereford Association (NJHA) College of Agriculture Sciences associate senator, the Block members were elected to the NJHA board of directors and Bridle Club vice president, the Collegiate Livestock at the 2019 VitaFermÂŽ Junior National Hereford Expo Association secretary and is an Agriculture Ambassador. (JNHE) July 6-13 in Denver, Colo. Wyatt Lawrence is the 19-year-old son of Bryan Noah Benedict, Dewey, Ill.; Bailey Morrell, Willows, and Marytina Lawrence from Princeton, Minn., and is a N AmMADCities I Calif.; Wyatt Lawrence, Princeton, Minn.; and Luke Daniels, sophomore at the University of Minnesota Twin E cA si e E I N A D ri 921 r M e 1 Dalhart, Texas, were welcomed in their maroon jackets majoring in agribusiness with a minor in animalncescience. 19 ic ce m 21 A n A si as the new NJHA directors during the Thursday evening After graduating, his dream is to return home to work AmMoperation. AD awards ceremony July 11. DE INicA1 alongside his father and grandfather on the family si e E I N A r 92 nc r M e 1 e 19 ic The 2019-20 officerAteam In high school, Wyatt held leadership positions in both msince includes chairman Taylor 21 A Belle Matheny, Mays Lick, Ky.; vice chairman Rylee Barber, athletics and arts. He has also been active in his church Channing, Texas; communications chair Hannah Williams, for the past 10 years. He is currently the Minnesota Junior Kearney, Neb.; leadership chair Samuel Lawrence, Avilla, Hereford Board secretary. Ind.; fundraising chair Abigail Spindle, Moriarty, N.M.; and Luke Daniels is the 17-year-old son of Scanlon and membership chair Montana Lawrence, Princeton, Minn. Angela Daniels from Dalhart, Texas, and is a senior at Also serving as directors are Brooklyn Adam, Lathrop, Mo., Dalhart High School. After graduation he plans to attend and Brandt Downing, Culver, Ore. a junior college before majoring in pre-veterinary science. Two delegates from each junior state Hereford Luke has been an active member of the Texas Junior association cast their votes and elected four of the eight Hereford Association and has been a director for the past candidates in the running for the junior board. The NJHA six years. He has been involved in student council, 4-H and board is comprised of 12 individuals who serve three-year FFA and has held several leadership roles in each program. terms and govern the 3,000-member organization. He is also a member of the National Honor Society. Noah Benedict is the 19-year-old son of Chad and Becky Benedict from Dewey, Ill., and is a sophomore at the University of Illinois majoring in agribusiness markets and management. Upon graduation he plans to work in the livestock feed and nutrition industry. Noah has held a variety of leadership roles in 4-H and FFA and is currently a director for the Illinois Junior Hereford Association. He earned the NJHA Golden Bull Achievement Scholarship in 2018. Bailey Morrell is the 18-year-old daughter of Barry and Carrie Morrell Fresh water without from Willows, and is a sophomore draining your wallet. is smart(CSU) water. atRitchie Coloradowater State University Save Time. Save Money. Save Water. Heck, save Pure and Simple. The Genesis waterer is easy on majoring in agriculture education with your back, too. Provide fresh water for your animals, the wallet due to simpler mechanics, but is still a and concentration in left agriculture literacy. have enough for the other things in yourmade with genuine Ritchie engineering and quality. M busygraduation life. See A what Ritchietoautomatic A Da plans IN Have time and money left to start something new. After earn an waterer can mshe E cA si e E I NA M do for you at www.ritchiefount.com. A D ri 2I1N nc r AD M m E held a A e 1 ic She 19 Learn more at www.ritchiefount.com agricultural law degree. 92 A si n e has I msiMenAceDeE ri19c21 1 c e ri N A Partner to the American Cattleman since 1921. 19 c e c 21 A variety of offices and leadership roles Amsin through her involvement in 4-H and FFA. While at CSU she served as the

Introducing the new

54 California Cattleman September 2019


September 2019 California Cattleman 55


LIVESTOCK GROUPS LAUNCH MONTH-LONG CAMPAIGN HIGHLIGHTING THE BENEFITS OF GRAZING The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the

positive perceptions surrounding ranching.” The campaign will continue to share impactful stories about the importance of livestock grazing this August through social media content, online blog posts, and videos. To learn more about the value of livestock grazing in the United States, visit www.ncba.org or www. publiclandscouncil.org.

Public Lands Council launched a digital campaign on Aug. 7 focused on the value of grazing. The digital campaign was created to explore key elements of grazing that benefit the environment, rural communities, and local economies across the United States. The four-week campaign launched with a video and blog post featuring Rich Atmore, a California rancher that lived through the destructive 2017 Thomas Fire. With the use of livestock grazing, Atmore mitigated the intensity and damage anGuS, hEREFORDS of wildfires around his home and anD SIMMEntalS: surrounding urban landscapes. >> Show heifers “Wildfire mitigation is just one of >> Bred Females SunDay, OCtOBER 6 • 2 P.M. >> Cow-Calf Pairs the many benefits of livestock grazing,” >> Pregnancies said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “Cattle positively contribute to the Featuring top Cow Families Backed by Powerful Genetics environment and our food production system, and it’s a story many need to hear. We need to arm the public with facts; it’s livestock who provide natural nutrients to the soil, ensure our native grasslands remain intact, and ensure rural America remains economically supported.” aEC EvERElDa EntEnSE E543 DaMEROn FR SanDy 4155 Research finds that managed Colburn Primo 5153 x limestone Darkhorse u322 Dameron First Class x Roth Regulator 0405 a full sister to the 2017 sale topper angus and Simangus progeny sell out of livestock grazing prevents catastrophic Everelda Entense E543 (above) sells! this popular traynham Ranches donor! wildfire, cycles nutrients through the soil, fosters healthy habitats for wildlife, and supports rural economic development. In fact, ranchers maintained and preserved seven million acres of habitat for the Greater Sagegrouse, a bird that does not need federal protections thanks largely to the benefits of livestock grazing. “Whether someone enjoys fishing, tRaynhaMS kEnDRa E667 ExaR RIta 0824 S a v Resource 1441 x aEC vegas 1308 ExaR lutton 1831 x BR Midland biking, or camping on public lands, Cows with Fall Calves at Side and Spring Calves heifers like this lot 12 Bred heifer from 2018 its livestock grazing that preserves Sell like this lot 7 Sale Feature from 2018 Sell Bred to ExaR Monumental 6056B this open space for others to enjoy,” Auctioneer: Eric Duarte, 541-533-2105 said PLC President Bob Skinner. Brad & Buckley cox BID lIvE “Without ranching partners, the federal OnlInE: 1881 Brophy Road • Eagle Point, OR 97524 government would face difficulty Brad 541-840-5797 • Buckley 541-840-8788 Sale Consultant Watch for Sale Details on Facebook Matt SalE BOOk REquEStS: info@traynhamranch.com Macfarlane maintaining such large landscapes. My Stay for the BaldyMaker Bull Sale: Monday, October 1 916-803-3113 SalE DEtaIlS: www.traynhamranch.com THD hope is our campaign highlights the © value added by grazing and expands the 56 California Cattleman September 2019

T

raynham ranches Female Sale

Fort Klamath, Oregon


bull sale

Monday

OctOber 7

SonS of TheSe Top SireS Sell 10-7 1 p.m. at the ranch FOrt Klamath, Or

100 Long-YearLings

angus, simangus & Herefords BuLLs seLL: • Semen, Trich and HD50K-Tested • Genomic Enhanced EPDs • Complete Herd Health Program • Wintering Available

HA cOwbOy up 5405

Sire: HA Outside 3008 Dam’s Sire: Sitz Upward 307R BW +2.6 • WW +75 • YW +137 • MILK +9 MARB +.14 • RE +.42 • $W +48 • $B +125

pVF InSIgHt 0129

Sire: S A V Brilliance 8077 Dam’s Sire: P V F New Horizon 001 BW +2.0 • WW +62 • YW +108 • MILK +24 CW +61 • RE +1.46 • $W +68 • $B +151

Also selling FAncy, commerciAl Angus FemAles: spring Bred Heifers & 1st calf Heifer Pairs sell following the Bulls

your DoLLAr MATTErS

2018 Angus, Hereford & SimAngus Sale Bulls: 59% SoLD For LESS THAn $5,000 EACH

37.2% $5,000$6,499

cHurcHILL SenSAtIOn 028X

cHurcHILL rAncHer 592r

Sire: MH Dakota 0230 Sire: UPS Domino 3027 Dam’s Sire: HH Advance 767G 1ET Dam’s Sire: GH Rambo 279R BW -2.6 • WW +49 • YW +68 • MILK +49 • M&G +73 BW +4.7 • WW +59 • YW +98 • MILK +27 • M&G +56 RE +.31 • MARB +.25 • $BMI +229 • $CHB +108 RE +.51 • MARB +.35 • $BMI +455 • $CHB +102

BrAD & BuCKLEy Cox EAGLE PoinT, orEGon

w/c LOADeD up 1119y

Sire: Remington Lok N Load54U Dam’s Sire: 3C Macho M450 BZ BW +1.5 • WW +62 • YW +89 • MILK +25 MARB -.09 • RE +1.08 • API +127 • TI +64

www.traynhamranch.com info@traynhamranch.com 541-840-5797 Brad 541-840-8788 Buckley

Female Sale Sun., OctOber 6, 2019

Angus, Herefords, Simmentals & Composites • Fort Klamath, OR • 2 p.m. • LiveAuctions.tv

42.3%

$3,750 -$4,999

3.8%

$6,500+

16.7%

$2,750 -$3,749

REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS

ForT roCK, orEGon www.huffordsherefords.com Ken & Leslie Hufford 541-576-2431 541-403-1044 Cell ijhufford@yahoo.com Jesse: 541-576-3541 541-810-2460 Cell

FOllOw us On FacebOOK

THD ©

September 2019 California Cattleman 57


ANGUS PRODUCERS MAKING THE MOST OUT OF $M by American Angus Association’s Kelli Retallick Earlier this year the American Angus Association released a new maternal dollar value index ($Value), maternal weaned calf value ($M). The $Value aims to predict pre-weaning profitability and includes traits that affect the profitability of the commercial cow-calf herd from conception to weaning. The underlying breeding objective being that a commercial producer will replace 25% of their breeding females in the first generation and 20% of their breeding females in each subsequent generation with replacement heifers retained from within the herd. The rest of the cull female and male progeny are presumed to be sold as feeder calves with the assumption that commercial producers get no economic benefit from postweaning traits. Nine traits directly affect this index including calving ease direct (CED) and maternal (CEM), weaning weight (WW), maternal milk (Milk), docility (DOC), heifer pregnancy (HP), mature cow weight (MW), foot angle (Angle) and claw set (Claw). Since the release of $M, many producers have asked, “How do I get the most of out the $M index?” The answer to this question is simple — record! In order to increase the accuracy and efficiency of $M for individual herds, members need to be sure they are recording the necessary phenotypes to increase the accuracy of the underlying traits. Most producers do a great job of recording all their weaning weights in their herd and that pays dividends to increase accuracies of two very important traits in $M, WW and milk expected progeny differences (EPDs). In fact, members of the Association have sent in more than 9.2 million weaning weights over the years through the Angus Herd Improvement Records (AHIR) program, which is beyond impressive. However, when we start to look at mature cow weights, docility scores, heifer pregnancy records or foot scores, members have recorded just over 220,000, 298,000, 100,000 and 58 California Cattleman September 2019

20,000 of these observations, respectively, to date. One must realize that the recording and scoring systems for these traits haven’t been around nearly as long as a trait like weaning weight. Nonetheless, in order to take full advantage of the $M index and all it can possibly do to help aid in selecting profitable individuals for the pre-weaning sector, increased data recording is imperative. Increased data recording results in more accurate EPDs. More accurate EPDs leads to more accurate $Values. More data recording also leads to more variation in EPDs because more data collection from differing environments helps to captures more variation for these traits. More variation increases the spread of these EPDs allowing producers to find the very best animals for each individual trait and in return the very best animals for individual $Values. While additional data collection, no doubt, takes addition time and effort, one could consider that the ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 60


54th Annual

Tuesday, October 15 • 12 o’clock noon

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION, COTTONWOOD 125 top Quality bulls

• Hereford • Angus • Red Angus • Charolais • Bulls will be graded and sifted Monday, Oct. 14

-NEW EARLIER FALL DATE! -SAME LOCATION! -SAME GREAT SELECTION FROM REPUTABLE CONSIGNORS! Catalogs available online at www.shastalivestock.com Online bidding also available at shastalivestock.com and registering for a buyer number at least 24 hours in advance.

Join us monday night for

Western Heritage Night Hosted Bar & Steak Dinner!

Sale Book Requests & Western Heritage Night Reservations: Greg and Maureen Thomas, Sale Managers

(541) 545-3417 or ycross@centurylink.net

September 2019 California Cattleman 59


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 58 benefits of more accurately and objectively describing the cowherd can clearly outweigh the costs of data collection. In Figure 1, one can see the parameters surrounding data collection of these maternal traits. One may ask for example, “Why is it important to collect mature height (MH) if it is not included in the index?” Mature height (MH) is correlated (or has a relationship) to mature weight, meaning the variation captured in MH helps us to further explain the differences in MW and vice versa. The more holistic data collection members can capture across the board not only increases the accuracy of the $Values, but also continues to validate the genomic predictions and EPD accuracy. All in all whatever one’s motivation may be, good, honest performance data collection and accurate pedigree recording will always be crucial when it comes to accurate genetic selection tools. For more information about AHIR performance recording of any kind feel free to contact the Performance Programs Department at 816-383-5100. Figure 1. AHIR guidelines to submitting data. TRAITS Heifer Pregnancy Observation Mature Cow Weight

Mature Cow Height

Docility

Foot Score

Weaning Weight

GUIDELINES • Record all A.I service sires and dates or pasture exposed sires and dates • Report pregnancy check data if taken • Taken within +/- 45 days of calf weaning date • Record body condition score (BCS)(range of 1-9) • Record calf weaning weight • Taken within +/- 45 days of calf weaning date • Record BCS • Record calf weaning weight • Collect 320-440 days of age •Scores: 1 - docile, mild disposition; 2 restless, quieter than average; 3 - nervous, typical temperament is manageable; 4 - fighty, wild, jumpy and out of control; 5 - aggressive; 6 - very aggressive and extremely tempermental • Scores should be taken as the animals are exiting the chute or lofting in a pen. • Be consistent with entire group. • Collect at 12-18 months old or on mature females. • Can be taken at yearling age or older. • Multiple foot scores can be collected and used in the evaluation. • Be consisten with entire group. • Collect between 120-280 days of age. • Individual weights should be recorded on the entire weaned group on the same day. • Contemporary groups: Management codes, creep vs. non-creep fed and group code (additional codes if calves manageed differently.)

60 California Cattleman September 2019

2019 Categories include:

California Landscapes People Rural Life Animals Plus a special category for cell phone photos!

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Twenty Five Years of Family Tradition

SALE BY THE SEA ELITE BULL SALE • October 11, 2019 • 4:00PM • Pismo Beach, CA • SELLING 60 BULLS

Selling these Playbook bulls, top 1% of the breed in $M!

TEX PLAYBOOK 8382

TEX PLAYBOOK 8104

$M =107

$M =101

O ur family would love for you to join us on October,

11th at our annual Sale by the Sea. Viewing anytime and lunch starts at 11:00AM. Come see how how our herd and family business is structured. We strive to be innovative from our matings, to Igenity TCC, combining our animals’ phenotypes, EPD’s, and DNA are all of great value to us.

Serving California and Oregon John, Heather, Nathan, Joseph and Ben Teixeira John’s Cell: 805-448-3859

Allan and Cee Teixeira Allan’s Cell: 805-310-3353 Thomas Hill Tom’s Cell: 541-900-5479

w w w. t e i xe i r a c a t t l e c o . c o m | 8 5 5 T h o u s a n d H i l l s R d . , P i s m o B e a c h , CA 9 3 4 4 9 | c a t t l e @ t h o u s a n d h i l l s r a n c h . c o m

September 2019 California Cattleman 61


VALUE-ADDED TAGGING PROGRAM BUILDS PRODUCER POCKETBOOKS Value-added programs are on the rise in the beef industry as input costs increase and margins remain tight. Enterprising beef producers are exploring new ways to improve their return on investment and open doors to new marketing avenues. The Red Angus Feeder Calf Certification Program, the oldest tagging program in the industry, is expanding and helping more producers than ever before earn premiums on their calves. In fact, during the 2018-19 fiscal year, more than 210,000 calves were enrolled in the FCCP; a testament to the program’s growing popularity and proven track record of returning dollars to producers’ pockets. “The value of the FCCP to commercial ranchers across the country has been nothing short of tremendous. The success we have seen in the number of calves enrolled in the past fiscal year directly correlates to the program’s creation of extra dollars for Red Angus-influenced calf crops,” said Chessie Mitchell, RAAA tag programs coordinator.” Tom Brink, RAAA CEO, added, “What we’re most excited about is how this program is generating a solid return for commercial cattle producers, and that is evident by the growing number of ranchers who utilize the FCCP to expand their marketing options and improve their bottom line.” The FCCP combines three important components into a single value-added program: genetics, source and age verification. Red Angus producers recognize the value of the yellow FCCP tag and continue to see market-topping premiums for a minimal investment by enrolling their Red Angus-sired calves. The $0.99 tag returns, on average, a $2.98 per hundredweight (cwt) premium, which equates to nearly $18 on a 600-pound feeder calf and more than $1,400 on a truckload of tagged calves. Compound that figure in terms of truckloads of calves, and beef producers are quick to realize the value of verified Red Angus 62 California Cattleman September 2019

genetics. Producers who enroll in the FCCP are able to capitalize on demand from feedlots and packers to fill various Angus product lines. The FCCP was first established in 1995 and to date nearly 2.75 million head of Red Angus-influenced calves have worn the profitable yellow tag. Despite the program’s age, several innovative changes were made during the past year, including an EID-only option and China export eligibility. To enroll, producers must answer a few breeding and management questions such as, verifying traceability to at least 50 percent Red Angus breed influence, to enroll in the program and can do so by contacting Chessie Mitchell at 940-2264762. For more information on Red Angus marketing programs and the FCCP, please visit RedAngus.org.


Is She a Good Cow?

A 1,250 lb. Top 1% Ranch five-year-old cow, that 1st calved at 23 months, has bred and calved in the 1st cycle four times with a 365 day calving interval, and has weaned an average of 698 lbs per calf.

Most profit minded ranchers increasingly see the key to profitability as controlling costs while still increasing performance. For them, the key cow herd profitability factors are:

• Moderating feed intake so you can run more cows on the same land.

• Increasing fertility so that more cows bring in a calf every year.

• Improving longevity to reduce the costs of turnover and depreciation.

• Adding hybrid vigor to increase pounds weaned per cow exposed.

Buying high growth, high carcass, purebred bulls that have been selected for maximum output will not build a low cost, high profit cowherd.

Over 1,000 Leachman Leachman Topline California Sale Saturday, Nov. 2, 2019 Selling 200 Angus Bulls 101 Livestock, Aromas, CA

Bulls will sell this fall. Leachman California Stabilizer Sale Saturday, Nov 23, 2019 Selling 100 Stabilizer Bulls Tulare County Stockyard, Dinuba, CA

Call today to find out about putting a Leachman bull to work in your herd. Lee Leachman, Managing Partner Jerrod Watson, Bull Customer Service (303) 827-1156 2056 West County Road 70 • Fort Collins, CO (970) 568-3983 • www.leachman.com


Putting the Mantra into Action Cal Poly Bull Test puts students to work in most effective ways by Zach McFarlane, Ph.D., California Polytechnic State University One of the most intriguing aspects of the beef cattle specialist position at Cal Poly was the opportunity to serve as the Bull Test Advisor. Where else in the country is there an opportunity to work with a group of excellent students to run a well-respected Bull Test? Additionally, the facility design is another incredibly interesting aspect of the Cal Poly Bull Test. I have never seen another facility that has 2-acre pastures developed on a hillside. Feed bunks are located at the bottom of the hill, with the water troughs at the peak. This average change of elevation of approximately 45 feet in the pens is an intriguing approach to bull development and management. Bulls are expected to exercise in order to thrive in this facility. The goal of this design has been to develop highquality, range-ready bulls for commercial beef producers over the past decade. Sixty three years of tradition is a daunting prospect for a new faculty member, but the topnotch bulls, consignors, and students have made the Cal Poly Bull Test something that has truly been an honor to advise. Many challenges arise when managing a completely student-run bull test. However, the sheer amount of experiential learning opportunities provided to students by this program are truly unbelievable. My college education was spent in the land-grant system. These wonderful agricultural institutions afforded me the opportunity to work with incredible research

64 California Cattleman September 2019

scientists and fellow students. However, Cal Poly is truly a special program. The educational mantra of “Learn by Doing” is demonstrated in all aspects of the university. Cal Poly Bull Test is the complete embodiment of this approach to education. The ability to expose students to the real-world applications of beef cattle management, along with the multitude of biotechnologies available to the beef industry are truly unmatched in any other program. This year’s group of students have really challenged themselves to improve our media, marketing, and event planning strategies. The passion and creativity of this incredible group of students has been very inspiring. My media and marketing team have been diligently working on revitalizing our social media presence. It was very important for the program to establish an educational component to social media, and I am very proud of the strategies my students have employed. Two social media campaigns in particular have stood out as very exciting prospects--“Meet the Member Monday” and “Why Wednesday”. As an educational institution, I find it very important for students to understand why we utilize certain management practices in the beef industry. Likewise, I believe it is absolutely imperative for the general public to understand these practices as well. Our event planning team has really focused on revamping the tradeshow at the sale where ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 66


Breeding curve-bending cattle that perform!

2019 Cal Poly Champion Hereford

Bulls available at Cal Poly and off the ranch! na me

5T Long Awaited 18054 et 5T Tested Highlight s 18038 et 5T Tested Rough Rider 18039 et GCC Cud a Supers tar 18041 GCC Genetic Design 18055 et GCC Heavy Hit ter 18040 GCC Hill Top 18044 et GCC Home Run 18043 et GCC Knight Gillib ra nd 18035 GCC Mon tana Foremost 18051 et GCC Rest Easy 18037

ced +2.6 +10.3 +5.7 +6.8 +8.1 +9.7 +2.9 +10.9 +13.5 +9.3 +17.5

bw +3.3 +0.0 +1.0 +2.0 +0.2 +1.0 +3.2 +0.9 -1.5 +0.9 -2.8

ww +72 +65 +61 +66 +65 +63 +81 +70 +57 +61 +58

yw +130 +96 +98 +107 +116 +104 +134 +113 +90 +106 +95

sc +1.7 +1.3 +0.8 +1.1 +1.6 +1.7 +1.8 +1.7 +1.2 +1.2 +1.5

m +22 +32 +26 +29 +22 +26 +16 +16 +24 +29 +25

mb +.17 +.45 +.54 +.19 +.20 +.15 +.64 +.70 +.64 +.66 +.32

rea +.48 +.42 +.65 +.58 +.63 +.45 +.46 +.39 +.41 +.58 +.44

$bmi $chb +357 +99 +451 +88 +435 +112 +449 +144 +368 +109 +360 +104 +383 +111 +370 +94 +427 +108 +450 +120 +378 +111

We stand behind our bulls 100%. Give us a call today! 805-428-9781

GCC Cuda Superstar 18041 He sells at Cal Poly Oct. 6

-Also selling private treaty Lot 185the high performing Hereford bull from Cal Poly

GCC HEAVY HITTER 18040

Call us about this superstar and others like him available at the ranch

Horned and Polled Genetics Extensive use of ET and AI technology Top cow families represented Great dispositions Cattle available year round by private treaty

805-428-9781 Dwight Joos, manager Brandon Theising, owner 805-358-2115

www.pwgcattle.com

September 2019 California Cattleman 65


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 64

will continue to help improve beef cattle production. I hope to continue driving improvements at the Cal Poly Bull Test. I have been privileged to have a wonderful group of students, co-workers, mentors, and consignors to work with during my short time at Cal Poly. The legacy of this program continues to thrive, and I look forward to seeing many of you down the road at the Cal Poly Bull Sale Weekend, Oct. 5-6. Please visit the Cal Poly Bull Test website and Facebook page for updates as the sale approaches.

industry partners will have the opportunity to engage with the local beef community. We are also planning an educational field day and the Young Cattlemen’s benefit dinner the day before the sale, October 5. The goal is to have members of other Young Cattlemen’s groups from institutions across California in attendance. This networking opportunity is one of the only options for these students to network aside from the annual California Cattlemen’s Convention. I am hoping to continue offering educational field days in the future for students, consignors, and buyers to network the day before the sale. My vision is to bring this group of people together so we can continue to inspire and educate the next generation of beef industry leaders. Aside from the many bull test duties, a dedicated group of students has been BALANCED EPDS WITH GREAT CARCASS POTENTIAL! conducting research projects that focus LOT 60 SPCC SPUR F812 on the Cal Poly Bull Test. Students have been delving into the decades of data that have been collected to determine trends in growth performance and sale prices. Examples of research questions we have started to ask are the following: What are price indicators of the annual Cal Poly Bull Sale? Are predictions of genetic merit (EPDs) matching BW WW YW MK MB RE FAT $B phenotypic expression (body weights)? +3.1 +67 +110 +30 +.76 +.70 +.016 +144 What are common health issues over the years? How does physical activity LOT 65 SPCC SPUR F832 influence bull growth performance and fertility? Many of these questions have become senior projects for students, and may lead to research that benefits bull breeders and buyers. In the very near future, I hope to conduct a survey with California bull breeders and buyers that can start to answer crucial questions about bull purchasing decisions and bull management post-sale. BW WW YW MK MB RE FAT $B +2.2 +61 +107 +33 +.77 +.63 +.032 +154 The western United States is a diverse environment in which beef cattle management has to be dynamic. I Contact us about have always strived to perform research Jerry & Anne Spencer everything from calving that is relevant and applicable to beef 7879 Van Vleck Rd ease to carcass bulls Rancho Murieta, CA 95683 producers. I hope molding my research H: (916) 354-0369 • C: (916) 275-5422 program around the Cal Poly Bull Test

FOUR SPUR SONS FROM SPENCER CATTLE CO. SONS OF CONNEALY SPUR

SPENCER CATTLE CO.

66 California Cattleman September 2019


Rhoades Ranch Puts its Best to the Test Selling an outstanding set of bulls at Cal Poly, Visalia and privately off the ranch.

Raised in the hills and ready to go to work! Lot 139

Lot 136

Rhoades Magic 805

ADG

Test Index

ADG

Test Index

4.42

105.21

4.22

123.56

Reg No: 19291343

Sire: Byergo Black Magic 3348 MGS: Mytty In Focus

Rhoades Medal of Honor 836

Reg No: 19287280

Sire: Baldridge Colonel C251 MGS: JMM Traction 292

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$F

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$F

$B

-2

4.4

79

150

27

.90

.69

145

212

8

.2

76

137

31

.74

1.27

100

171

Registered and Commercial Angus Cattle Raised in the same tough hill country Justin Rhoades • (805) 440-5664 • PO Box 384, Cambria CA 93428 Contact us anytime about current consignments and cattle available private treaty!

3 Powerful Prospects from Poly! LOT 151

LOT 152

V A R Ranger 3008 X S A V Bismarck 5682 BW .6

LOT 150

BW 4.1

WW 64

YW 111

Milk 21

Marb .35

$B 142

Aaron Lazanoff Beef Operations Manager (805) 801-7058 alazanof@calpoly.edu

Index 101.3

YW 105

Milk 22

Marb .28

$B 144

Index 97.2

V A R Foreman 3339 X S A V Pioneer 7301 BW 4.2

V A R Ranger 3008 X S A V Bismarck 5682

WW 59

WW 65

YW 117

Milk 23

Marb .62

$B 151

Index 102.10

Contact us about these and other bulls from Cal Poly in this year’s offering!

Zach McFarlane, Ph.D. Beef Cattle Specialist (805) 756-2685 zmcfarla@calpoly.edu

September 2019 California Cattleman 67


MID STATE FAIR HONOREES SWAN, LOFTUS AMONG 2019 AWARD RECIPIENTS from the San Luis Obispo County Farm Bureau Local agriculture organizations recognized three San Luis Obispo County farmers and ranchers at the 2019 Mid State Fair during the Cattlemen and Farmers Day. CCA members Kathy Arnold Loftus and Rex Swan were bestowed this year’s honor The awards were selected by members of the San Luis Obispo County Farm Bureau, San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen, and the San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association. “We are grateful for the contributions these three people have made to San Luis Obispo County agriculture,” said Farm Bureau Executive Director Brent Burchett. “Our county’s nearly $1 billion agriculture industry is built on the hard work of farmers and ranchers, and today we are proud to recognize a few of our very best.”Kathy Arnold Loftus The San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen have selected rancher Kathy Arnold Loftus as the 2019 Cattlewoman of the Year. A longtime advocate for preserving the community’s ranching heritage, Loftus has worked her entire life in San Luis Obispo County agriculture. Today, she has turned over the family ranching duties to her son, Claude, who raises cattle on several ranches throughout Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties, including their home ranch in the Cuyama Valley. Loftus has two children, Claude Loftus (wife Bonnie) and Katie Cooley (husband Stan), and five grandchildren, Hazel, Elsie, Ada, Clayton and Grady. She is the daughter of the late Claude and Hazel Kuhnle Arnold, who farmed and ranched at the Chimineas Ranch in Carrisa Plains since the early 1940s. Her father’s family moved to the Pozo-Santa Margarita area in 1913, and the Kuhnle and Weir families on her mother’s side moved into the Estrella and Shandon area in the 1880s. Both families were farmers and ranchers. “The grandchildren will be the sixth generation of my family here in San Luis Obispo County working in agriculture,” Loftus said with pride. She said her love of the ranching lifestyle goes back to her childhood with her twin sister, Claudia. “My sister and I reminiscence about going to Bakersfield with my dad to receive cattle off the railroad cars, sometimes in the middle of the night. We’d fall asleep on the catwalk waiting to unload cattle and take them back to Chimineas.” She said the ranch offered everything a kid could ask for growing up. “We’d take a drive on the ranch every night, or we’d have a picnic and go check cattle or look at wildlife, and for us, it was the best vacation we could have asked for. When you truly love the land, you just 68 California Cattleman September 2019

never want to leave it.” Through the 45 years she leased and lived at the Santa Margarita Ranch raising cattle, Loftus was also a champion for agriculture education and outreach. She worked to promote and preserve the community’s ranching heritage by hosting and volunteering for countless farm tours, barbeques, and events. From journalists to farmers from foreign REX SWAN countries, leadership groups, teachers, students, and even a Russian nuclear scientist, Loftus is proud of her legacy as an ambassador for agriculture. “No matter what the event, ag or otherwise, I always made sure people went away knowing they had been part of something special, and that it was because of agriculture, especially ranching, that they were there!” She served in a number of leadership positions in KATHY LOFTUS agriculture, including a decade at the San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen as a board member and chair of several committees, 16 years as a San Luis Obispo County Farm Bureau board member, a Cal Poly Rodeo Booster director, Paso Robles Pioneer Museum Historical Society board member, San Luis Obispo County Agricultural Education Committee board member, and an Agricultural Liaison Representative for former County Supervisor. She also volunteered in local philanthropic causes, including as a founding board member of Hospice Afternoon at the Ranch and as a fundraiser for Jack’s Helping Hand. Loftus said the importance of supporting people with terminal illness and their families “really hit home” when her husband Don Loftus passed away from cancer at the age of 36. Her peers have long recognized Loftus’ contributions to the community. Today, thanks to the generosity of an anonymous friend, she has the honor of presenting ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 70


— 63 Annual — rd

Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Sunday, October 6, 1 p.m. 110 YEARLING BULLS

Angus, Hereford, SimAngus, Red Angus, & Simmental

PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR FIELD DAY FOCUSING ON BEEF CATTLE TRACEABILITY ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5. THIS WILL BE FOLLOWED BY THE YOUNG CATTLEMAN’S ASSOCIATION FUNDRAISER DINNER. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REQUEST A CATALOG CONTACT: Aaron Lazanoff Beef Operations Manager (805) 801-7058 alazanof@calpoly.edu @calpoly bull test

Zach McFarlane, Ph.D. Beef Cattle Specialist (805) 756-2685 zmcfarla@calpoly.edu

www.bulltestcalpoly.edu

@cp_ bulltest

September 2019 California Cattleman 69


...CONTINUED ON PAGE 68 the Cattlewomen’s annual college scholarship in her name. “Nothing has been as rewarding as serving on the Scholarship committee,” Loftus said. “Reading all those applications gives you faith in the future of agriculture.” “My main passion was sharing the ranch history with children. Through the years, probably every fourthgrade class in the county toured Santa Margarita Ranch. I called it, ‘Early California Rancho Days, Past, Present and Future.’” Loftus’ love for telling the story of cattle ranching continues today. “We started a museum on the ranch, and presently I’m in the process of turning a cargo trailer into a traveling ranch museum so I can go anywhere throughout the state and give presentations.” She treasures having opened up her home and the ranch to college students over the years. “I was extremely proud to have helped in a small way over 20 college kids live at the ranch with us, and of those, 17 went on to graduate at Cal Poly.” Looking back, Loftus said some the best times she ever had were at Cattlewomen events. “From making beef promotion videos at Caroline Bello’s home, to volunteering with Lesa John to represent Cattlewomen at a Cal Poly cooking demo, only to find out we were just the dish washers, to preparing dinner for school teachers in the County, I am grateful for all the friends and good memories I’ve made.” The San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association has selected rancher Rex Swan as the 2019 Cattleman of the Year. Swan’s legendary career advancing cattle genetics in San Luis Obispo County and the western United States included working with over 1 million cows. He and his wife KC have been active citizens in the Templeton community for decades, volunteering for numerous civic and cattle industry causes. The Swans are the parents of three children, Ben, Lindsay and Ted, and several grandchildren. Raised in California’s Chino Valley, a region rich with Thoroughbred horses, farms and dairies in Swan’s youth, he fell in love with the open country and cowboy lifestyle. There were 17 different farms and ranches in the Swan family when he was born, but “they were all gone by the time I came of age,” Swan recalled. The summer before he began high school, Swan worked on a large cattle ranch in Central Nebraska, the Loop River Valley hard grass country. “It was the best summer of my life, cementing a lifelong love of Nebraska and the cattle industry.” Swan’s leadership and service in agriculture started at Chino High School, where he played football and wrestled, was named to American Legion Boys State, and was heavily involved with FFA. His time in FFA would shape much of his future career. Aside from winning competitions for public speaking, parliamentary procedure, livestock judging, three Round Robin livestock contests, and earning his State Farmer degree, Swan attended the state FFA convention at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo for two years. He and 40 FFA State Farmer students toured farms in 13 European countries, including a divided Berlin and 70 California Cattleman September 2019

Communist Czechoslovakia and Poland, “with the likes of John Stone, John Tracey, Harry Miller and so many others who I would become great friends with at Cal Poly during the following four years,” Swan said. Rex put himself through Cal Poly as a professional artificial insemination (A.I.) technician in Chino and on the 75 dairies that were still operating in San Luis Obispo County at that time. His work in the field and in the classroom prepared him for a “Blue Chip” position on the Genetics, Inc. beef staff. “During my five years at Genetics, I got to meet all of the cattlemen on the coast from Santa Rosa south to Imperial Valley, an opportunity of a career,” Swan remembered. “Genetics was importing semen on all the European “exotic” breeds, impacting our beef industry.” He helped build the Genetics Range Bull Program, which included 2,000 bulls grown out, gain-tested, and marketed in a three-year period, including Tehama Angus. The program was the model for the Cal Poly Bull Test program format for all the years since. Rex’s industry expertise continued to grow, serving as the first coordinator for Genetics’ pioneering Embryo Transfer Program and leading the first section of the Angus National Sire Evaluation program, along with eight other breeds, as progeny testing coordinator. He left Genetics in 1975, starting his own business, California Cattle Services, where he helped field-trial UpJohn’s Lutalyse synchronization drug in Oakdale. He ran the nation’s first 1500-head heifer synchronized A.I. program with Wolfsen’s in Los Banos. Swan eventually performed A.I. on over 150,000 cows, and fertility-tested over 12,000 bulls. He froze bull semen for A.I. and conducted successful embryo transfers on his own. He earned an industry-renown reputation for accuracy in pregnancy testing, having tested over 850,000 cows in the last 45 years. Added all together, Swan has performed A.I. on over a million cows. In his off-seasons, Swan taught short courses on genetic A.I. and created the International Herdsman School. For over 23 years, more than 1,200 students benefited from his technical skills and industry experience. His International Herdsmen School held trainings at the Templeton Livestock Market, and courses at Cal Poly, UC Davis, Sierra College and countless other venues all over the western states. In traveling two million miles through the West, he found there was no other place he would have rather raised his family than Templeton and the California Central Coast. Swan has served as a volunteer and leader on numerous organizations, including the California Cattlemen’s Association, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, San Luis Obispo County Farm Bureau, and the Templeton High School Athletics Booster Support Club. “The warm relationships with the coast cattlemen have given my family a livelihood and filled us with great memories,” Swan said. “I want to thank all of my old friends and customers for a great career and for this Cattleman of the Year honor.” But, don’t put Swan out to pasture just yet. “I’ll still be marketing great Swan Angus bulls for years to come.”


An injectable aqueous supplemental source of zinc, manganese, selenium and copper

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN CAUTION: FEDERAL LAW RESTRICTS THIS DRUG TO USE BY OR ON THE ORDER OF A LICENSED VETERINARIAN. ACTIVE SUBSTANCES PER ML: Zinc ............................................................................................................... 60 mg/mL Manganese .................................................................................................. 10 mg/mL Selenium ........................................................................................................ 5 mg/mL Copper ........................................................................................................... 15 mg/mL OTHER SUBSTANCES: Chlorocresol 0.1% w/v (as preservative). DOSAGE RECOMMENDATIONS: CALVES: Up to 1 year ..................................................... 1 mL/per 100 lbs. bodyweight CATTLE: From 1-2 years ............................................. 1 mL/per 150 lbs. bodyweight CATTLE: Over 2 years .................................................... 1 mL/per 200 lbs. bodyweight PRECAUTION: Selenium and copper are toxic if administered in excess. Always follow recommended label dose. Do not overdose. It is recommended that accurate body weight is determined prior to treatment. Do not use concurrently with other injectable selenium and copper products. Do not use concurrently with selenium or copper boluses. Do not use in emaciated cattle with a BCS of 1 in dairy or 1-3 in beef. Consult your veterinarian.

MULTIMIN® 90, is on top of our list. . . It has probably had the most dramatic effect on what we do in those protocols as anything we have done over the years.

CAUTION: Slight local reaction may occur for about 30 seconds after injection. A slight swelling may be observed at injection site for a few days after administration. Use standard aseptic procedures during administration of injections to reduce the risk of injection site abscesses or lesions. DIRECTIONS: This product is only for use in cattle. MULTIMIN® 90 is to be given subcutaneously (under the skin) ONLY. It is recommended to administer the product in accordance with Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) guidelines. Minimum distance between injection sites for the MULTIMIN® 90 product and other injection sites should be at least 4 inches. Inject under the loose skin of the middle of the side of the neck. Max volume per injection site is 7 ml. Subcutaneous injection in middle of side of neck.

Store Between 15°C and 30°C (59°F and 86°F).

Through research that had been done, we found out that trace minerals are so essential. They are the spark plug that drive the immune system, reproduction and performance. The sooner we could get them into an animal, the better off we could be.

SUPPLEMENTATION PROGRAM BULLS

3 times per year

BEEF COWS

4 weeks before breeding 4 weeks before calving

DAIRY COWS

4 weeks before calving 4 weeks before insemination at dry-off

CALVES

at birth at 3 months and/or weaning

HEIFERS

every 3 months – especially 4 weeks before breeding

DOSAGE TABLE

50 100 150 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400

CALVES UP TO 1 YEAR 1 ml/100 lb BW 0.5 ml 1 ml 1.5 ml 2 ml 3 ml 4 ml 5 ml 6 ml 7 ml -

CATTLE 1 - 2 YEARS 1 ml/150 lb BW 5.3 ml 6 ml 6.6 ml -

When MULTIMIN 90 came out, we saw a real enhancement. In this last year we had the opportunity, for some time, to be in a single digit pull at one of the backgrounding yards that really follows the protocols diligently and worked really well with us and got under a 3% death loss with cattle out of the southeast. And this year on 3,000 head, we are running around 6.7% pull and a .82% death loss. Fantastic! I never thought we would get under a 10% pull. And a lot of that is as a result when you get the trace minerals in the immune system adequate.

MULTIMIN® 90 is on top of the list to address that. We get all those sources of cattle on the same page in 8-10 hours with MULTIMIN® 90. In fact, it is the number one thing on our list of enhancing the health in our animals. It has probably had the most dramatic effect on what we do in those protocols as anything that we have done over the years. What I am addressing is enhancing performance and reducing their costs. And a lot of time these protocols do cost more on the front end, but the dollars returned on the back end is tremendous. I would highly recommend it.

®

(program gives planned dates that can be varied to suit management programs)

ANIMAL WEIGHT (lbs)

I’m Dr. L.D. Barker, my sons and I have a veterinary clinic and practice in Newcastle, Oklahoma. Over the years using health program protocols, we still had high pulls and death loss. We were seeing pull rates drop from 70-80% pulls down to 30’s and 40’s and we still weren’t there. Our goal at some of the backgrounding yards was to get under 15% pull and under 3% dead.

CATTLE > 2 YEARS 1 ml/200 lb BW 5 ml 5.5 ml 6 ml 6.5 ml 7 ml

Dr. L.D. Barker and sons Dr. Matt Barker and Dr. Mark Barker Professional Animal Health Center | Newcastle, OK

In our three legged stool approach addressing nutrition, health and management, we offer MULTIMIN® 90. The high risk stocker calves coming out of the southeast are coming from variable farms of management, different trace mineral or no trace mineral program.

Packaged in 100 mL & 500 mL size

NDC No. 49920-006-01

NDC No. 49920-006-05

MANUFACTURED FOR:

MULTIMIN NORTH AMERICA, INC.

Fort Collins, CO 80528

September 2019 California Cattleman 71

Copyright © 2018, MULTIMIN USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved. A201809-11


TYSON FACILITY FIRE WILL LIKELY REAP NEGATIVE REPERCUSSIONS FOR BEEF MARKETS, CATTLE PRODDUCERS

The fire that destroyed Tyson Foods’ Holcomb, Kan., beef packing facility on Aug. 9 will likely have far-reaching implications for both cattle markets, beef producers and and associated meat industries. In a statement issued the day following the fire, Tyson said the plant will be closed “indefinitely.” For now, that means about up to 30,000 cattle will not be harvested for each week while the facility is out of operation. With a fed cattle market outlook already not seeming optimistic, the timing of the fire offers yet another blow. “It will definitely hurt front-end demand,” Sterling Marketing president John Nalivka said. “There’s the potential that with Holcomb out of commission the marketing pace will slow down and carcass weights will increase. That could certainly take the bloom off this fall’s fed cattle market.” Speculation about the impact the fire has on Monday’s CME cattle futures was rampant on social media Saturday. Nearly all of those speculating called for both Live Cattle and Feeder Cattle markets to trend lower. Friday’s close before the fire was weak, lending support to ideas another break lower is ahead. Those with cattle scheduled to ship to Tyson in Holcomb next week – and until the plant reopens – are

72 California Cattleman September 2019

scrambling to determine where and when those cattle can go. The Holcomb plant is about mid-way between Tyson’s Amarillo, Texas, plant and its Lexington, Neb., facilities. But, Nalivka said, “beef slaughter capacity utilization was running about 92 to 93 percent before the fire. This could throw a wrench in the whole thing.” Tyson’s Holcomb plant was harvesting 4.5 to 5 percent of the industry’s weekly slaughter. While cattle feeders have an anxious weekend to fret over the market and where they’ll send finished cattle, the impact of the Tyson fire also will have a dramatic impact on the Garden City area. Tyson said 3,800 people work at the plant, and their jobs will definitely be affected by the plant’s closure. However, a Tyson spokesman confirmed the company will pay Holcomb plant employees “a weekly guarantee until production resumes. We are here to ensure our team members are taken care of. We understand that this is a difficult time.” Dozens of other businesses and workers will also see an impact. Truck drivers, local businesses and the whole community will feel the pain as Finney County’s largest employer takes a forced time out.


Est. 1974

Bull Sale

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The Lambert Family Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 slambert@digitalpath.net

September 2019 California Cattleman LambertRanchHerefords.com

73


BURNING INVASIVE WESTERN JUNIPER MAINTAINS SAGEBRUSH DOMINANCE LONGER Burning invasive western juniper increases the time— Evaluating cutting and prescribed burn effects over an post-fire—that native mountain sagebrush will remain the extended time not only provided evidence that prescribed dominant woody vegetation in the plant community by at burns provided extended juniper control, it also validated the least 44 percent compared to cutting juniper back, according ecological model that had predicted this outcome. to a new study in Ecology and Evolution by Agricultural “We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of cutting Research Service (ARS) scientists and their collaborators. versus prescribed burns because we thought we were It is important to maintain sagebrush as the dominant observing more young juniper trees in areas that had been woody vegetation in sagebrush steppe communities in cut in the last decade or so compared to burned areas,” the northwestern U.S. where western juniper (Juniperus Davies explained. occidentalis Hook) is encroaching on and replacing With this research, federal and state land management sagebrush. Among the benefits are providing endangered agencies and private landowners will be able to make better sage-grouse better long-term habitat. However, as soon as decisions about selecting control methods. juniper cover reaches 3 percent, sage-grouse stop using the “In the end, if you burn, in the long run you will have a area. In addition, juniper encroachment greatly increases lot more sagebrush habitat,” Davies said. erosion risks, and reduces forage production by 2- to 10-fold, The Agricultural Research Service is the U.S. Department depending on the specific site. of Agriculture’s chief scientific in-house research agency. A team of scientists from the ARS Range and Meadow Daily, ARS focuses on solutions to agricultural problems Forage Management Research Laboratory in Burns, Oregon, affecting America. Each dollar invested in agricultural Oregon State University and The Nature Conservancy research results in $20 of economic impact. compared the results of prescribed burns with areas where cutting down juniper was employed as the control method at 77 sagebrush steppe locations in Southeastern and Southcentral Oregon, Northern California and Southwestern Idaho. The researchers looked at ecological data for as long as 33 years after either fire or cutting down juniper was used to control junipers. “Counter to commonly held beliefs, Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA what we found was prescribed burns and gives a portion of insurance premiums were a better conservation practice back to the association watching your back in for encouraging long-term sagebrush dominance in areas that had been Sacramento! encroached upon by western juniper compared to mechanically cutting,” ARS rangeland scientist Kirk W. Davies said. Previously, shorter term studies had suggested that cutting was a more effective practice. “If we need to restore immediate sagebrush dominance in an area that is a mix of juniper and sagebrush, cutting will achieve that,” Davies pointed out. “But if we want longer term sagebrush Aaron Tattersall Jim Vann Matt Griffith Dan VanVuren 303.854.7016 530.218.3379 530.570.3333 209.484.5578 aaron.tattersall@cropins.net jimv@wsrins.com matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com dan@dvvins.com dominance, prescribed burning of Lic #0B48084 Lic #0124869 Lic #0E44519 Lic #0H15694 encroaching juniper can be a logical choice.” Both fire and cutting have critical When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better! roles in the conservation of sagebrush communities.” Removing juniper by cutting is significantly more expensive than using prescribed fires. But cutting does not Contact a Silveus agent today to result in any immediate loss of sagebrush see how they can help you! and sage-grouse habitat as prescribed burning does. 74 California Cattleman September 2019

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you!


Selling

S L L U B 0 3 2

Thomas angus Ranch Fall Bull Sale

October 17 • Noon • Baker City, Oregon

Featuring sons of these leading sires Sydgen Enhance 18170041 Thomas Absolution 18614107 Thomas Xpansion 5810 18368349

$Profit $20,702

$Profit $22,887

$Profit $30,180

CED +19; BW -1.7; WW +70; YW +130; Milk +30; MRB +.87; RE +.59 $M +68; $W +85; $F +102; $G +62; $B +164; $C +281

CED +6; BW +.9; WW +60; YW +120; Milk +32; MRB +.72; RE +1.49 $M +57; $W +66; $F +133; $G +74; $B +207; $C +326

CED +13; BW -.1; WW +70; YW +138; Milk +33; MRB +1.12; RE +.84 $M +81; $W +82; $F +143; $G +80; $B +223; $C +370

Plattemere Weigh Up K360 16692552

Jindra Acclaim 17972810

G A R Sure Fire 17328461

$Profit $18,867 CED +9; BW +1.6; WW +76; YW +138; Milk +26; MRB +.55; RE +.74 $M +63; $W +89; $F +107; $G +56; $B +163; $C +274

CED +9; BW +.6; WW +78; YW +154; Milk +28; MRB +.69; RE +.70 $M +51; $W +75; $F +153; $G +62; $B +215; $C +330

$Profit $27,698 CED +14; BW -.3; WW +56; YW +106; Milk +31; MRB +1.38; RE +.70 $M +76; $W +78; $F +94; $G +88; $B +181; $C +311

Thomas Elsa 0502 16698162 CED +6; BW +1.6; WW +46; YW +87; Milk +26; MRB +1.17; RE +.65 $M +37; $W +43; $F +92; $G +79; $B +172; $C +260 Sire: Thomas Grade Up 6849 • Dam’s Sire: GAR US Premium Beef

The dam of Thomas Xpansion 5810 sells November 21 along with 350 Spring Calving Cows and 100 Fall Calving Pairs

Sale Managed by:

www.cotton-associates.com

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Clint Brightwell, Customer Relations Manager: (417) 359-6893 Cole Owens, Marketing Specialist & Cooperative Manager: (918) 418-7349 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

September 2019 California Cattleman 75


In Focus for the Future

Leading Seedstock Visionary Joins GENETRUST by Jessica White for GENETRUST In an effort to continually meet and exceed their customer’s needs, the GENETRUST partners are excited to announce that Steve Harrison has joined their industry leading team, effective August 19. Steve brings an extremely valuable skill set and unique work experience to GENETRUST which will allow GENETRUST to make the leap from being one of the leaders of the seedstock industry in the United States to one of the truly elite suppliers with the ability to assist customers in genetics and marketing, having a hand in the supply chain from the pasture to the plate. Steve brings a high valued resume from the Angus breed, where he has held leadership positions in leading seedstock herds for over 20 years. Most recently Steve was the Director of Procurement & Sales at 44 Farms in Texas, where he was responsible for securing all of the feeder cattle inventory for their 44 Steaks program and had a large hand in the establishment of the Prime Pursuits branded beef marketing agreement launched with Wal-Mart. Prior to his time at 44, Steve was the General Manager at Riverbend Ranch in Idaho for over 10 years, where he oversaw the growth of their large bull business and expansive commercial operations. Steve and his wife, Mary, will continue to call Bryan, TX their home, along with their two children, Thomas and Elizabeth. With experience from every angle in the beef industry, Steve joins GENETRUST as the President of the organization, overseeing the genetic development, marketing and end product growth for GENETRUST and its customers. “I am excited to join the GENETRUST team,” stated Steve, “there is tremendous future in this program and their genetic merit may be one of the best kept secrets in the U.S. as they have quietly and consistently ranked among the nation’s leading seedstock producers.” As part of the growth of the organization, along with the hiring of Mr. Harrison, Cody Gariss will transition from President into the role of Chief Financial Officer, over seeing the office administration, finances and printed sale materials. Vernon Suhn, partner and former President of GENETRUST will continue in a treasured advisory and 76 California Cattleman September 2019

consulting role within the organization. Craig Green will remain as the Marketing Director of GENETRUST, as he has for the entirety of GENETRUST, servicing customers throughout the Southeastern United States and Mexico. Emmy Todd continues as the Office Manager in the Lamar, MO headquarters, valiantly handling the day-to-day tasks of the organization. “We are extremely excited to bring someone with Steve’s talent level, experience and high character to the GENETRUST team. His understanding from every angle of the industry will serve us well as we enter one of the most genetically advanced and demanding times this industry has ever seen,” stated GENETRUST Chairman, Bill Davis. “In addition to his experience, Steve’s tremendous network throughout the United States, especially the western half, gives us the ability to open doors to ranches who have long used English genetics, but can benefit greatly from our Brangus and Ultrablack bulls, utilizing the many tools GENETRUST bulls bring to the table, adding dollars to their bottomline.” GENETRUST was formed in 2009 and is owned by 8 like-minded partners, marketing Brangus and Ultrablack genetics throughout the United States and the world. Consistently ranking in BEEF magazine’s top 20 list of seedstock producers, their team develops and markets over 700 bulls, 250 registered females and nearly 1500 commercial females annually. For more information on GENETRUST or their power packed fall sales November 1-2nd in Concord, AR and November 15-16th in Jacksonville, TX visit www. GENETRUSTBrangus.com.


SIMPLY THE BEST CATTLE IN THE COUNTRY with unmatched customer service. They continually raise the bar through multi-trait selection. ALTO, TX

NOT JUST A BREED. 2019 FALL SALES NOVEMBER 1-2

NOVEMBER 15-16

Chimney Rock Cattle Co. • Concord, AR 150 Brangus & Ultrablack Bulls 100 Registered Females 350 Commercial Females

Cavender Ranches • Jacksonville, TX 220 Brangus & Ultrablack Bulls 25 Charolais Bulls 550 Commercial Females

MARCH 26

Suhn Cattle Company Eureka, KS 160 Brangus and Ultrablack Bulls

Steve Harrison • (208) 270-3065 steve@genetrustbrangus.com Craig Green • (870) 834-1976 craig@genetrustbrangus.com

Vernon Suhn • (620) 583-3706 vern@genetrustbrangus.com Cody Gariss • (417) 425-0368 codygariss@gmail.com

www.GENETRUSTBrangus.com • 1-877-GENETRS (436-3877) September 2019 California Cattleman

77


PUBLIC LANDS OFFICIAL TO CONGRESS: FEDERAL WILD HORSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM “CRIPPLED TO POINT OF CATASTROPHIC FAILURE” The current system of managing wild horses and burros on public lands “has been crippled to the point of catastrophic failure” and Congress needs to step in to improve the system “to the benefit of all wildlife, rangelands, and the multiple uses of those rangelands.” That was the direct message on Capitol Hill in late July from Ethan Lane of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and the Public Lands Council (PLC). Lane testified on behalf of NCBA, PLC and the National Horse and Burro Rangeland Management Coalition at a hearing held by the Senate’s Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining. In his testimony, Lane pointed out the dire situation now playing out on the West’s public lands: while the rangeland can appropriately support approximately 26,000 wild horses and burros, more than 88,000 currently roam across 10 Western states as of March 2019, according to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM.) Even more concerning is that on-range populations are doubling every four to five years, with a population of approximately 366,000 on-range horses

Circle AK Ranch Your source for calving ease, carcass, performance and maternal superiority year after year!

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CALL NOW FOR A GREAT SELECTION! Ted & June Katsinis • Galt, CA (209) 329-0809 or (209) 369-1998 cakangus@netzero.com 78 California Cattleman September 2019

and burros likely by 2028. “Excessive populations deplete scarce food and water resources on the arid rangelands, leading to starvation and dehydration of the horses and burros,” Lane testified. “Maintaining the status quo places our public lands - and all animals and multiple-use activities that rely on those rangelands - at risk.” In addition to laying out a variety of specific ways that wild horse and burro populations could be brought under control, Lane also endorsed and submitted for the record a compromise proposal that has been agreed to by stakeholders across the political spectrum - from ranchers to municipalities to national humane advocacy groups. “The management recommendations set forth are the product of extensive negotiation, debate, and compromise amongst groups with wildly disparate views on this issue,” Lane pointed out. “Such compromise between political opponents is a rarity in the modern political arena, and I would urge the Committee to look closely at what we have managed to accomplish through good-faith collaboration.”

INVEST IN DEPENDABLE GENETICS FROM

L & N ANGUS 6 STOUT SPRING YEARLING ANGUS BULLS calving ease • maternal • performance WITH SUPERIOR CARCASS VALUE

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G A R Prophet Deer Valley Old Hickory

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Turlock Livestock’s California Breeders Bull Sale Oct. 5, 2019 World of Bulls in Galt Nov. 2, 2019

L & N ANGUS -NANCY POTTS

(209) 931-2307 • nlp11551@gmail.com 11551 E Tokay Colony Rd. Lodi, CA 95240


September 2019 California Cattleman 79


FETUS TO FEEDYARD Immunometabolism’s impact on animal health by Kylee Kohls for Certified Angus Beef This isn’t a research topic you’d find at the middle-school science fair. It’s so new, research is just beginning to explore this 16-letter term for immune cells sharing nutrients with major organs: immunometabolism. So far, there are still more questions than answers. Barry Bradford, animal scientist at Kansas State University, presented his work with cattle at the American Society of Animal Scientists annual meetings in July. That interaction of cells competing, sharing and utilizing nutrients is especially key in times of illness, he said. “The body makes a lot of adaptations to make sure the immune system has what it needs to combat infection,” Bradford said. The same systems collaborate with metabolism for growth, development and health throughout life – from fetus to feedyard or pasture. The cost of disease, he said, includes increased metabolic activity, reduced nutrient availability, altered priorities for nutrient utilization, increased turnover rates in the immune system, damage to tissue and a “genetic loss” to offspring. Logic says easing the impact of stress helps more cattle realize their genetic potential for premium carcass merit, too. Bradford’s research focus is the inflammatory response during times of stress and that impact on liver health. “To combat potential invading organisms quickly, the immune system uses cells like macrophages,” he said. “These are the cells looking for any signs of bacteria.” Unlike many immune cells, macrophages live in tissues

80 California Cattleman September 2019

– not swimming around the bloodstream – and they are present all the time, monitoring for abnormalities. “What we are learning now is they’re not just looking for signs of bacteria or infection, but they’re also playing really important roles in regulating how the tissue works day to day,” Bradford said. “Turning on a breakdown of body fat when the animal doesn’t have enough energy is actually influenced by these immune cells.” Traditionally only thought to play a role in infectious scenarios, Bradford said, “The interactions between normal organ function and the immune system are becoming much tighter than we used to think.” Research animals faced with an immune challenge have a dramatic change in nutrient availability in the bloodstream. That affects the building blocks of protein synthesis available for normal growth and development. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 82


13 TH ANNUAL

9 PEAKS RANCH BULL SALE OCTOBER 8, 2019 • 1 P.M. • FORT ROCK, OR SELLING 120 SPRING AND FALL YEARLING ANGUS BULLS SELLING SONS OF THESE RENOWN A.I SIRES: TEHAMA TAHOE B767

ALSO SELLING SONS OF: SS Niagara LD Emblazon 999 Tex Playbook MAR Innovation Coleman Charlo 3212 SAV Resource 1441

BW

WW

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MK

MB

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-1.6

73

123

29

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93

140

9 PEAKS BULLS ARE:

S CHISUM 225

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– raised on 100,000 acres of desert bunch grass –

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40

134

•Performance tested without getting too fat •Ultrasound measure for carcass traits • Genomically tested to enhance their EPD accuracy •Semen tested • Culled ruthlessly for docility and foot problems

HOOVER DAM

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-.3

46

88

25

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58

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Aaron Cell: (541) 633-3284 Rebecca Cell (541) 771-4151 P.O. Box 38, Fort Rock, OR 97735

AARON AND REBECCA BORROR

www.9peaksranch.com September 2019 California Cattleman 81


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 80

them a different diet that’s intended specifically to enhance

“There’s interest in how this might affect a growing

immune response to that infection,” Bradford said. By managing cattle through times of stress to

fetus, say a cow that’s carrying a calf,” the scientist noted. “But also,

reduce the effects of the immune system’s response to

what nutrients might be important and effective in helping an animal fight off an immune challenge like

inflammation—linked to metabolic changes—producers can prepare cattle to perform.

scours.”

Researchers are continuing to dig into this “new” topic.

He said research doesn’t know exactly what those

Feedyard efficiency, fetus development, long-term cow

nutrients look like yet. The same questions surround the

health – all remain on Bradford’s radar. “It kind of amazes

impacts on feedyard efficiency and nutritional supplements.

me, actually, that we haven’t dug into that to this day.”

“It’s tricky to nail down,” Bradford said. “When we see differences in efficiency, is it, to some extent, due to immune-system activation stealing nutrientss?”We know cattle become less efficient when they are sick. “What we don’t know as much

SHOULD YOU ORDER THE ANAPLASMOSIS VACCINE?

Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. The killed anaplasmosis vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age from infection and requires a booster given 4 to 6 weeks after the initial vaccination. Find out below if you should order the vaccine!

is this: If you try to ramp up the

Do you own cattle?

NO

immune system all the time so that

YES

they’re less likely to get sick, does that actually cost you enough calories and nutrients that it doesn’t pay off?” Bradford wonders. “Or does preventing disease have that benefit, enough benefit, to pay for the extra immune-system cost?” It probably depends on the

You don’t need it, but should still support the California Cattlemen’s Association

YES

environment they’re in, he suggests. “The low hanging fruit is nutritional support of sick animals,” Bradford said. “Obviously if you’ve got cows out on a thousand acres, you know it’s not that easy to go give one

YES

some supplement that’s specifically for her.” But preventing illness for the whole herd might be an option in the future. Take a feedlot for simpler example. “If you’re pulling cattle to treat for respiratory disease, it wouldn’t be

Do they graze in areas where Anaplasmosis is a problem?

(Consult your local veterinarian to find out)

Do you want to prevent the effects of the disease including severe anemia, weakness, fever lack of appetite, depression, constipation, decreased milk production, jaundice, abortion and possibly death?

ORDER TODAY BY CALLING (916) 444-0845! Available in 10 or 50 dose bottles 10-40 doses: $8.50 per dose 50+ doses: $7.50 per dose *10 dose minimum and $10 flat rate shipping

SOLD ONLY TO CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBERS

that hard to have a pen where you keep them for a while and maybe feed 82 California Cattleman September 2019

NO

NO You don’t need to order it


ANGUS CONVENTION IS HEADED WEST Learn from the industry’s best and brightest leaders in innovative technology, genetics, cattle handling, and more. Tour Bently Ranch, a cutting-edge beef operation in the high desert during the National Angus Tour on Nov. 1. Connect with like-minded cattlemen and women focused on setting the bar for high-quality genetics. Dance the night away to Flatland Cavalry’s heart-felt ballads and classic renditions.

CONVENTION

NOVEMBER 2 - 4, 2019

Reno-Sparks Convention Center | Reno, Nevada REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - ANGUSCONVENTION.COM September 2019 California Cattleman 83


Tackling the Economics of Young Calf Respiratory Disease from Zoetis Protecting calves from respiratory disease can be a positive for animal well-being and bottom lines. Calving season is approaching in fall calving areas and getting those calves off to a healthy start is top of mind for cattle producers. Preventing respiratory disease is not only best for overall animal health and productivity, but recent studies demonstrate there can be an economic benefit for the cow/calf operation. The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) recently published a study based on a survey of cow/calf producers in multiple states. The study evaluated and compared the costs of vaccines and vaccine administration to calves for disease protection with the medication and labor costs of treating a calf with respiratory disease. The JAVMA study showed, in many cases, the costs associated with prevention — vaccine costs plus the labor cost to administer vaccines — were considerably less than the medication and labor costs to treat disease. Median vaccine cost per calf in the surveyed herds was $6.25, while labor costs were $5 for administering vaccine to calves. Medicine cost to treat a sick calf averaged $11, while treatment labor costs were $15 per calf.1 This study reveals that the cost per calf to treat respiratory disease is more than twice the cost of preventing respiratory disease. A proven approach to the young calf ’s immune system A young calf ’s immune system is unique in how it responds to viral and bacterial challenges. Calfhood vaccinations can complement what the dam provides through colostrum and help give a calf every chance to be healthy and perform to its potential. Timing and type of

84 California Cattleman September 2019

vaccine administration play key roles in managing the young calf ’s immune response. A Montana study looked at the impact of timing and sequence of vaccination on the immune response in nursing calves. The study demonstrated that the intranasal vaccine works with the calf ’s immune system to prevent respiratory disease caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and helps prevent respiratory disease caused by infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and parainfluenza 3 (PI3) virus. “The Montana study and research out of North Dakota demonstrated that vaccination at birth can improve future responses to vaccination, while helping provide protection against respiratory diseases from birth to weaning,” said Victor Cortese, DVM, PhD, director of immunology and biologicals with Zoetis. The Montana study helps support the Zoetis recommendation to use INFORCE 3® at birth followed by a second dose of INFORCE 3 and One Shot® BVD to protect against BRSV, IBR, PI3, bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) Types 1 and 2 and Mannheimia haemolytica, before heading to pasture. Cortese concluded with three things a cow/calf producer will see from implementing young calf respiratory vaccinations: · Lower pneumonia rates · Lower death loss · Greater weight gains To develop a vaccination protocol for your young nursing calves, visit with your local veterinarian, or visit CompleteCalfProtection.com to learn more about solutions from Zoetis.


180 Bulls | Volume DIscounts | Free Delivery Wilks Ranches sale facility | 809 Co Rd 313 Eastland, TX 76448 Aaron kiser | seed stock Manager | aaron.kiser@wilksranch.com Joel judge | commercial sales contact | 805-234-7191 FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM @wilksranches FORM | FUNCTION | BALANCE

10.17.19

WWW.WILKSRANCHES.COM September 2019 California Cattleman 85


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

SEPTEMBER 20

M i d Va l l e y

9th Annual

Join us Friday, Sept. 6 at the ranch in Los Molinos for the annual “It’s All About The Genetics” Bull Sale!

THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Look for our “Distinctly Different” Angus Bulls at the 2019 Red Bluff & Modoc Bull Sales

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340

BULLS, FEMALES, EMBRYOS AND SEMEN FOR SALE AT THE RANCH IN LOS MOLINOS

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner (530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

86 California Cattleman September 2019

September 12, 2019


SEPTEMBER 20

Angus

RAnch

M i d Va l l e y

Annual BullSept. Sale:7Sat., 1, 2018 Join us andSeptember Oct. 14 for our Inaugural Female Sale: October 15, 2018 elite annual bullMon., and female sales!

9th Annual

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

We hope to see you in Firebaugh Sept. 4 for our annual bull sale and Oct. 12 for our female sale! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2019.

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

Gerber, CA

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES!

Save the Date Sept. 13 for our annual bull sale in Gerber!

O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

(530) 385-1570

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

September 2019 California Cattleman 87


Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

A FAMILY TRADITION

Join us in October for our fall production sale!

Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

CHAROLAIS ANNUAL BULL SALE SEPT. 5 IN LA GRANGE!

Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199 Jared Patterson Western Region Field Manager (208) 312-2386 THURSDAY, SEPT. 12, 2019

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

Call AHA today for assistance or information on buying or marketing of Hereford cattle! 11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS

88 California Cattleman September 2019

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

THANK YOU TO OUR BUTTE AND MODOC BULL SALE BUYERS! Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

3L

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988


Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

JoinususOct for15, our2018 annual production sale iu Modesto! Join for our annual production sale!

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

Bulls and females available private treaty!

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

THE DOIRON FAMILY (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

September 2019 California Cattleman 89


SALE MANAGMENT

Full Service JMM GENETICS A.I. Technician

M3 MARKETING SALE MANAGEMENT & MARKETING PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY ORDER BUYING PRIVATE TREATY SALES PRODUCTION SALE RING SERVICE ADVERTISING

M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM (916) 803-3113

& Semen Distributor

Over 30 years of excellence in ag fencing & animal handling design-build

Christopher L. Hanneken 800-84-FENCE

www.southwestfenceandsupply.com

Ranch Fencing Materials and Accessories & Ranch Supplies

www.runningMgroup.com Monique Hanneken 805-635-4940

• A.I, CIDR & heat synchronization • Extensive experience • Willing to Travel • Well-versed in dairy & beef pedigrees

JORGE MENDOZA • (530) 519-2678 jmmawss@gmail.com 15880 Sexton Road, Escalon, CA

FARM EQUIPMENT

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

BALE WAGONS

New Holland self propelled and pull-type models/parts/tires

sell/buy/deliver/can finance

(208) 880-2889

3300 Longmire Drive• College Station, TX 77845 (800) 768-4066 • (979) 693-0388 fax: (979) 693-7994 e-mail: info@bovine-elite.com

www.balewagon.com Jim Wilhite, Caldwell, ID 35 Years in the Bale Wagon Business!

REAL ESTATE

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

Payette River Ranch

1,103 acres, with 900± irrigated. Ranch, farm, develop, or use for tax credits via conservation easements. $15,000,000 Lostine, Oregon - Price Reduced 9,810 acres east of Enterprise. Timber/grazing/recreation land. Was $9,810,000. Now $9,319,000 New Meadows, Idaho Ranch 420± acre ranch with timber. Minutes to McCall, Idaho. $3,131,000

208-345-3163 knipeland.com

CLASSIFIED

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

(530) 949-2285

EVENT MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITY The Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale is seeking General Manager to direct and manage all aspects of the annual event including, but not limited to; operational, administrative, financial, marketing and sales. For more information and application contact Tehama Job Training Center at 530-529-7000 or visit www.jobtrainingcenter.org/

90 California Cattleman September 2019

YOUR BUSINESS AD COULD BE LISTED HERE!

FOR AS LITTLE AS $400 PER YEAR!


September 2019 California Cattleman 91


IN MEMORY BARBARA COWLEY Barbara Cowley, 88 years of age, passed away on July 31, 2019 at her home in Montague. Barbara was born on March 31, 1931 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was married to Irvin Jack Cowley, M.D. She is survived by her husband and seven children and their spouses (Kathryn, Cindy, Dave & Colleen, Steve & Val, Brian & Diane, Gordon, Brent & Debbie.) She has 24 grandchildren including their spouses and seven great grandchildren. There are 43 surviving descendants. As a young adult, Barbara went to the University of Utah, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Education. While a student at the University of Utah, she was yearbook editor, on the debate team and President of Alpha Chi Omega Sorority. She married Jack Cowley and they moved to Washington, D.C., while he attended George Washington University Medical School. After his graduation, they moved to Los Angeles where he completed his residency and specialization in Ophthalmology. Barbara taught night school and raised her children during this time. After the completion of Jack’s residency, they moved to Sacramento. During their time in Sacramento, both Jack and Barbara developed a passion for ranching. Barbara and Jack moved to Siskiyou County in 1988 where Barbara immediately immersed herself in a variety of community services, including the 4-H organization, the CattleWomen’s organization and Beef Ambassadors where she served in a

variety of leadership roles locally, regionally and nationally. She was also involved teaching thousands of hours of “Ag in the Classroom” throughout California. She was instrumental in the educational program of “Create-aCow” for the Siskiyou County Fair for several years. She also volunteered at Fairchild Medical Center in Yreka. In addition, she served in a variety of volunteer roles for many non-profit organizations. Barbara professed her love for her Savior Jesus Christ and valued her family above all else. Barbara loved working and serving in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She served in several callings including the Primary, Young Women’s Organization and the Relief Society. Barbara loved spending time with family, riding horses, serving and encouraging others and promoting agricultural education. She was an optimist, enthusiast and an inspiration to many. She was a loving and caring person, devoted wife, mother, grandmother and friend; always thinking of others first. “To know her was to love her.” Services were held on August 5, 2019 with graveside services held at the Little Shasta Cemetery.

CCA WANTS TO SHARE YOUR FAMLY NEWS TO PLACE OBITUARIES, BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS OR WEDDING NEWS, CONTACT THE CCA OFFICE AT (916) 444-0845 OR EMAIL MAGAZINE @ CALCATTLEMEN.ORG.

PACIFIC TRACE MINERALS INC. SE 365

SELENIUM BOLUSES AVAILABLE IN BOXES OF 60 BOLUSES OR CANS OF 120 BOLUSES

65% of California cattle are at risk of selenium deficiency which can cause problems such as: White Muscle Disease, abortions, retained placenta, infertility & others. One Se 365 Selenium bolus per animal prevents selenium deficiency for one year.

CCA MEMBER PRICES *

SHIPPING COSTS

1-19 boxes: $240 per box 20+ boxes: $216 per box Bolus guns: $84 per gun

First box: $10 Additional boxes: $7 per box Bolus guns: $10 per gun

*CCA Member prices are ONLY valid for those with a producer membership.

TO O R D E R O R L E A R N M O R E CA L L T H E CCA O F F I C E AT ( 9 1 6 ) 4 4 4 - 0 8 4 5 O R VI S I T CA LCAT T L E M E N .O R G .

92 California Cattleman September 2019


JOHN MCARTHUR On August 1, 2019, John R. McArthur, aka JR, passed away at the age of 96. Born May 14, 1923, John was third generation of the founding family of the town of McArthur California. John’s grandfather, John McArthur Jr. immigrated from Scotland and came to the Fall River Valley in the 1860’s. He established the community, as well as a farming and ranching operation that continues today through 5 generations John’s father was Roderick McArthur, the youngest of John McArthur Jr.’s 11 children. Of those 11 children, only one, Frank McArthur, donator of McArthur Burney Falls, has heirs who continue to live on today in other parts of California. Roderick lived and worked in San Francisco until 1909, when a runaway team resulted in the death of his brother Arch. Arch was the president of the John McArthur Company and managed the family’s farming and ranch holding in the Fall River Valley and Big Valley. Based on a family decision, Roderick moved back home and took over the operation at the age of 24. On September 21, 1921, Roderick married Anna Vera Albaugh in Pittville and moved his new bride to the family home in McArthur (now the residence of Craig and Marlene McArthur, JR’s nephew). John R. was the first born of Roderick and Anna’s three children, with younger sister Annabel (deceased) and younger brother Kenneth. Kenneth and his son Craig own and operate the “home ranch” McArthur Ranch Inc., located on the south side of the Pit River from the town of McArthur. Like his dad Roderick, John R. returned to the Fall River Valley after tragedy. At 60, Roderick died of a heart attack. 21 years old at the time, John had just left Cal Poly and was frustrated that his father had not let him enlist to serve in the military. Anna, his widowed mother, was considered one of the most gracious ladies of her day and like most wives, did not know the business’ operations. In 1944 at age 21, John took his place as head of the farming and ranch operations as well as head of the household, caring for his mother and younger siblings. Nothing was easy during those years, as the farms and ranches needed to provide food for our country and its soldiers, while lacking resources and labor. On Sept. 27, 1952, John married his wife of 66 years, Shirley Neuerburg. Together they have four children, Roderick McArthur, Patricia McArthur Rue, George McArthur and Vicky McArthur (deceased). In addition to their own children, they raised several other kids who knew John as a second father and Shirley’s dinner table as home. John actively farmed and ranched in the Fall River Valley and Big Valley, owning cattle up until last year. In 1963 John and Shirley started a farm supply business out of the green barn next to their house, with a meal ticket to Shirley’s table a much-appreciated invite. In 1979 they passed the business on to their children as McArthur Farm Supply, which is still owned and operated by their son George and George’s wife Christine.

At 96, John has outlived most of his boyhood friends. He told Shirley years ago that if something happened, he didn’t want a service because Andy Lakey and Floyd Bidwell would tell too many stories. Despite the passing of most of his childhood friends, John had the unique ability to make new friends of all ages and backgrounds. Today’s “John” stories are as numerous and diverse as the many, many people he knew and who’s lives he touched. Generous and gregarious, John could not function without an operating horn as he greeted everyone with the twirling wave or blowing a kiss. He was also well known for growling at small children while handing them bubblegum. A favorite story happened when the preschool was still located next to John and Shirley’s house. Making a habit of growling at the kids, the kids learned to growl back as they ran to the fence laughing. One day while moving cattle through town his ritual backfired as the kids ran to the fence growling when they saw John, scattering cattle throughout the town. John gave all the kids bubblegum. The family is following John’s wishes and there will not be a public memorial service. At 96, John lived a life that spanned a time in our history that will never be matched. He showed cattle at the World’s Fair in 1939 on Treasure Island, showed shorthorn cattle for years with his brother Kenneth at the Cow Palace and watched the population of the state of California grow from 4 million in 1923 to 40 million in 2019. He grew up knowing horses as the main mode of transportation in the valley, driving cattle over Big Valley Mountain horseback to summer pasture. And last year, he watched the last of his cattle loaded on a Carpenter Truck, weighing 48,000 pounds or more. One thing that never changed was a steer wasn’t finished unless he weighed 1,000 pounds. John was instrumental in starting many of the local events that we have come to take for granted in the Fall River Valley. The McArthur Volunteer Fire Dept., the Firemen’s Carnival, the Fall River Big Valley Cattlemen’s Association and the Junior Livestock Sale exist today largely because of his efforts. John and his brother Kenneth provided the first 10 acres of strawberry ground that started an industry in our valley that has prospered for over 50 years. He was in FFA as a kid and was twice honorary chapter farmer as well as twice Cattlemen of the Year. And recently, he received his Masonic 75-year pin from the Fort Crook Lodge. We hope those of you that shared time with John-JR can get a “note” and enjoy telling a story or two with a glass of Old Crow or whatever sparks your fancy. He was clear thinking until the end, wondering what the cattle sold for at the Winnemucca sale. In his passing, John was surrounded by wonderful caregivers, a family who loved him very much, and the love of his life Shirley. John is survived by wife, Shirley McArthur; children Rod and Karen McArthur, Patricia and Michael Rue and George and Christine McArthur; grandchildren Callie McArthur, Abby (Dominic) Krepski, Angie Bosworth, Michael (Suzanne) Bosworth, John E. (Ashley) McArthur and Scott (Sarah) McArthur; as well as five great grandchildren. September 2019 California Cattleman 93


Advertisers Index 9 Peaks Ranch...................................................81 All West/Select Sires.........................................39 Amador Angus...........................................49, 86 American Ag Credit...........................................9 American Angus Association.........................83 Animal Health International..........................90 Arrellano Bravo................................................15 Baldy Maker Bull Sale......................................57 Bar KD Ranch.............................................73, 86 Bar R Angus......................................................86 Beef Solutions Bull Sale...................................47 Black Gold Bull Sale.........................................27 Bovine Elite, LLC..............................................90 Broken Box Ranch............................................88 Bruin Ranch......................................................47 Buchanan Angus Ranch..................................86 Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale..............................30 Byrd Cattle Co...................................................86 Cal Poly Bull Test..............................................69 Cal Poly Foundation........................................67 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market.........................11 Charron Ranch.................................................86 Circle AK Ranck...............................................78 Circle Ranch......................................................47 CoBank................................................................9 Conlin Supply Company, Inc..........................41 CSU Chico College of Ag................................89 Dal Porto Livestock....................................37, 86 Diablo Valley Angus.........................................15 Diamond Oak Cattle........................................30 Dixie Valley Angus.....................................86, 95 Donati Ranch..............................................27, 86 Double M Ranch..............................................30 Eagle Pass Ranch..............................................45 EZ Angus Ranch.......................................6, 7, 87 Farm Credit West...............................................9

Flood Bros. Cattle.............................................30 Freitas Rangeland Management.....................62 Fresno State Ag Foundation............................89 Furtado Angus..................................................87 GeneTrust..........................................................77 Genoa Livestock...............................................88 Gonsalves Ranch..............................................30 Grand National Rodeo.....................................91 Harrell Hereford Ranch...................................88 HAVE Angus.....................................................87 HeronHP Fencing............................................48 Hogan Ranch....................................................87 Hone Ranch.......................................................89 Hufford’s Herefords....................................57, 88 Humboldt Auction Yard..................................10 International Brangus Breeders Assn............79 J-H Feed Inc......................................................90 Jim Wilhite Bale Wagons.................................90 JMM Genetics...................................................90 Knipe Land Company......................................90 L&N Angus.......................................................78 Lambert Ranch...........................................73, 88 Leachman Cattle...............................................63 Little Shasta Ranch...........................................89 Lorenzen Ranches......................................18, 19 M3 Marketing...................................................90 Maple Leaf Seed................................................42 McPhee Red Angus....................................43, 88 MidValley Bull Sale..........................................49 Morrell Ranches................................................88 Mulitmin USA..................................................71 New Generation Supplements........................30 Noahs Angus Ranch.........................................87 O’Connell Ranch........................................27, 87 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co..........................65, 89 Pacific Trace Minerals................................90, 92

94 California Cattleman September 2019

Pedretti Ranches.................................................2 Performance Horse Sale..................................29 Pitchfork Cattle Co...........................................89 Rancho Casino Angus.....................................37 Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale.........................90 Red River Farms...............................................87 Rhoads Ranch...................................................67 Ritchie Manufacturing.....................................54 Running M Group............................................90 Sammis Ranch..................................................87 Schafer Ranch.............................................49, 87 Schohr Herefords..............................................89 Shasta Bull Sale.................................................59 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard........................17 Sierra Ranches.............................................55, 89 Silveira Bros.......................................................87 Silveus Rangeland Insurance..........................74 Sonoma Mountain Herefords...................53, 89 Southwest Fence and Construction...............90 Spanish Ranch...................................................89 Spencer Cattle Co.............................................66 Step Aside Farms..............................................87 Tehama Angus Ranch................................13, 87 Teixeira Cattle Co.......................................61, 88 Thomas Angus Ranch......................................75 Topline Cattle....................................................63 Trayham Ranches.......................................56, 57 Tumbleweed Ranch..........................................89 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard...............24, 25 VF Red Angus...................................................88 Vintage Angus Ranch................................96, 88 Western Stockman’s Market............................35 Western Video Market.......................................3 Wilks Ranch......................................................85 Wulff Brothers Livestock...........................27, 88


2019 CAL POLY BULL TEST CHAMPIONS 11 BULLS SELL SUNDAY, OCT. 6 IN SAN LUIS OBISPO, SIRED BY DIABLO DELUXE AND BALDRIDGE COLONEL, INCLUDING THESE LOW-BIRTH AND MULTI-TRAIT DIVISION CHAMPIONS CAL POLY CHAMPION ANGUS MULTI-TRAIT DIVISION BULL

CAL POLY CHAMPION ANGUS HEIFER BULL

LOT 50

LOT 51

Sale Index 120.17

Sale Index 145.28

STERLING DELUXE 873

STERLING COLONEL 880

AAA Reg No. 19211862 DOB: 8/18/2018 Sire: Diablo Deluxe 1104 • MGS: Baldridge Xpand x743

AAA Reg No. 19211858 DOB: 8/25/2018 Sire: Baldridge Colonel C251 • MGS: G A R Prophet ADG 4.48 • WDA 3.37 • Test Index 105.6 BW 89 • ADJ 766 • ADJ YW 1,225

ADG 4.22 • WDA 3.22 • Test Index 101.8 BW 66 • ADJ 762 • ADJ YW 1,174

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

+6

+.8

+85

+146

+25

+.99

+.72

165

+6

+.8

+85

+146

+25

+.99

+.72

165

ADDITIONAL CAL POLY BULL SALE BULLS

STANDOUTS IN LOW-BIRTH, MULITI-TRAIT AND GROWTH DIVISIONS LOT NO.

REG. NO.

SALE INDEX

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

41

19243145

125.41

+10

+1.0

+76

+140

+26

+.80

+.72

+156

42

19211864

112.45

+2

+2.9

+92

+166

+22

+.78

+.82

+166

44

19211857

110.16

+5

+1.8

+89

+162

+21

+.92

+.79

+165

45

19243147

126.19

+12

-.4

+72

+123

+32

+.69

+1.04

+156

49

19449253

96.93

+2

+3.0

69

+113

+38

+1.10

+.36

+162

LOT 42 Angus Growth division Lot 42 (above) finished with a Sale Index of 112.45

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN AVAILABLE ON ANY OF OUR BULLS

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com September 2019 California Cattleman 95


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Sunday, October 13, 2019 33rd Annual “Genetic Gold” Production Sale

Vintage Rita 8115 • Reg No: 19037145 BW

2.5

WW

60

YW

108

$W

55

$F

105

$B

188

$C

292

Sire: Baldridge Colonel C251 • MGS: SJH Complete of 6108 1564

Vintage First Lady 7414 • Reg No: 18916445 BW

2.0

WW

80

YW

143

$W

90

$F

136

$B

194

$C

311

Sire: TEX Playbook 5437 • MGS: Vintage First Lady 4389

Vintage Blackcap 8583 • Reg No: 19309257 Vintage Isabel 9356 • Reg No: 19403655 BW

2.2

WW

84

YW

151

$W

62

$F

89

$B

143

Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: VAR Blackcap 9319

$C

202

Vintage Blackbird 8476 • Reg No: 19192722 BW

1.5

WW

71

YW

134

$W

80

$F

120

$B

187

Sire: SydGen Enhance • Sandpoint Blackbird 8809

$C

322

BW

2.3

WW

99

YW

173

$W

99

$F

148

$B

221

$C

338

Sire: VAR Power Play 7018 • MGS: Baldridge Isabel C221

Vintage Henrietta Pride 9387 • Reg No: 19408670 BW

2.4

WW

86

YW

$W

155 105

$F

153

$B

215

$C

357

Sire: VAR Power Play 7018 • MGS: Vintage Henrietta Pride 6189

THE VINTAGE OFFERING 138 females as compared to the breed: $Combined...........sale average Top 3% $Beef...................sale average Top 3% $Wean.................sale average Top 3% $Food.................sale average Top 3% WW EPD..............sale average Top 3% YW EPD...............sale average Top 2% Vintage Rita 5045 • Reg No: 18066057 BW

5.0

WW

60

YW

108

$W

55

$F

105

$B

188

$C

292

Sire: VAR Generation 2100 • MGS: SJH Complete of 6108 1564

Vintage First Lady 8470 • Reg No: 19192698 BW

1.7

WW

73

YW

145

$W

79

$F

169

$B

222

$C

356

Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: Vintage First Lady 4389

SELLING:

Donors • Spring Pairs • Fall Pairs • Bred Heifers • Fall Yearlings • Spring Heifers

CALL, E-MAIL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK! CATALOG ALSO MAILS WITH SEPTEMBER ISSUE OF THE ANGUS JOURNAL!

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 • WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

Profile for California Cattleman

September 2019 California Cattleman  

September 2019 California Cattleman