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NOVEMBER 2019

Inside this month...

END OF SESSIOn legislative recap PLC in billings convention preview

November 2019 California Cattleman 1


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

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2 California Cattleman November 2019

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November 2019 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS

PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Tony Toso, Hornitos SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita Greg Kuck, Montague Cindy Tews, Fresno TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Brendlen DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Jenna Chandler DIRECTOR OF OUTREACH AND CREATIVE CONTENT Katie Roberti ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Morgan Lyman

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

REFOCUSING ON POLITICAL ACTION by CCA President Mark Lacey

Ordinarily, this being an odd year, we would be reporting to you that CCA had participated in another highly-successful Cattle-PAC event at Harris Ranch Inn. This year, however, due to the pending sale of Harris Feeding and Harris Ranch Beef Company, and because the execution of the event was almost entirely dependent on the efforts of the folks at those two companies, setting a date for the event was delayed. Once a decision was made to move forward, the prime dates that were available were in November, which is a busy month for CCA. More important than the date was the question of whether or not we could carry off the event without the massive support of the Harris Ranch staff, and produce a successful event that equaled the high standards we have come to expect. After much discussion we felt that it was more prudent to cancel the event this year. The cancellation of the Harris Cattle-PAC event, while prudent, has left Cattle-PAC with a large deficit going into the 2020 election year. Obviously this is not an ideal situation, so the PAC committee strategy meeting at the annual convention will be extremely important. Over many years our aggressive PAC has paid dividends for our members. Some victories have been big, some small; many of the benefits of a strong PAC go unnoticed, but are no less important. Our job at CCA is advocacy for our members both in the regulatory and legislative arenas. In order for us to have a chance to make a difference in a highlyregulated state like California with a very active and activist legislature, we have to have access, and like it or not that means contributing to campaigns. We have heard all the comments like “We pay these people to represent us, we shouldn’t have to give them more.” or “We don’t

want to donate to Democrats.” I sympathize with those frustrations with the political system, and have my own issues with it. However, as a CCA officer (and this goes for the rest of the officer and legislative teams) we agreed to work in Sacramento on behalf of our members to achieve the best results we can. That is why we must work with both parties, and because the Democrats have a super majority they receive more attention. Certainly we appreciate the help and support of our Republican legislators, and hope they can find candidates that can take back some districts because one party rule isn’t healthy for California. No matter the party we have to have access, and I can’t emphasize enough how important the PAC is for access and effectiveness. Moving forward, the PAC committee will be discussing new fundraising opportunities and funding sources to improve our financial position. One PAC event is already being planned for the 2020 Midyear Meeting in San Luis Obispo County where our goal is to get a record attendance. Also, it is my sincere hope that we will return to Harris Ranch in 2021 with an all new event. In the short term, though, as you are renewing your memberships I ask you to consider joining PAC 200, or, if you have already renewed, just join separately. I know we ask you to donate in so many ways, but Cattle-PAC really is a priority so that CCA can continue representing all of you at the high level to which you’ve become accustom. So we have our work cut out for us with CCA Cattle-PAC, but I am optimistic for our future success. I hope to see all of you in Reno for the annual convention.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (#8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, MO. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


NOVEMBER 2019 Volume 102, Issue 10 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

ON THE COVER

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN PAC moving forward

4

BUNKHOUSE Experienced staff moves on from CCA

6

This month's cover photo was taken by Katharina Notarianni near Napa. If you have a photo that you think would look good on the cover of this publication, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or e-mail magazine@calcattlemen.org.

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 8 2019 legislative summary COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Big beef summit

20

HERD HEALTH Tackling big industry culprit

24

SPECIAL FEATURES

Public Lands Council meeting Getting to know the WSR team CAB sees continued growth

READER SERVICES

14 26 32

Cattlemen's Report 34 Buyers’ Guide 36 Obituaries 41 Wedding Bells 41 Advertisers Index 42

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS NOV. 7

SAN BENITO CATTLEMEN'S MEETING 101 Livestock Market, Aromas

NOV. 8

MADERA COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S DINNER MEETING VFW Hall, Madera

NOV. 9

TAHOE CATTLMEN'S MEETING Mt. Pleasant Farm Bureau Hall, Lincoln

NOV. 9 MERCED-MARIPOSA CATTLEMEN'S DINNER MEETING Merced Co. Fairgrounds, Merced DEC. 4-6 DEC. 5

103RD CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Peppermill Resort, Reno, Nev. ANIMAL DISEASE TRACEABILITY WORKSHOP The Peppermill Resort, Reno, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!


BUNKHOUSE

STILL WORKING FOR YOU

12-YEAR EMPLOYEE TAKES ON NEW INDUSTRY ROLE by Former CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield It is with both excitement and regret that I write this column, as it will be my last as a CCA employee. Many of you know that I was recently offered the position of executive director for the California Cattle Council, which I accepted in September. My last 12 years at CCA serving you and this incredible industry have been the best of my professional life. I can honestly say that the commitment of our members and your dedicated staff make this organization very influential and respected in Sacramento. Although I will be officially leaving the association, I will not be leaving the industry and my service to cattle producers, both beef and dairy, will continue. I am looking forward to this new challenge and great opportunity for me to grow professionally, helping kick start the Cattle Council as it begins its valuable work for you in the near future. I was fortunate enough to be granted the opportunity to participate in a very thorough, comprehensive and transparent executive director search committee process. As I write this article, I’ve not officially transitioned to my new role, but I will be doing so soon. Many producers want to know the status of the Cattle Council, and for good reason, since the successful referendum was announced April 5 of this year with 68.5 percent of producers voting in favor of its formation and the associated $1 assessment on the sale of cattle and calves. Since April, Secretary of Food and Agriculture Karen Ross has appointed 20 qualified board members and alternates to lead the organization, including ranchers, cattle feeders, dairy producers and processors. The board of directors has met several times since, assuming their roles and steadily working towards full implementation, which will be occurring soon. Producers will first be notified by mail prior to the commencement of collections. Beef and dairy producers in California are facing new threats to our industry and our way of life every year. More resources, not fewer, are needed to meet these challenges. The Cattle Council brings a unique opportunity for the industry to collectively provide the resources necessary to meet these challenges head on. All funds contributed will remain in California to address our issues, not those of other

6 California Cattleman November 2019

states. The Cattle Council is a producer-governed organization that will work for producers and target resources to the projects that serve to provide the most impact. This will all be done with the commitment to run a lean-and-mean machine, ensureing your dollars are spent responsibly. JUSTIN OLDFIELD The Cattle Council law, of course, provides an iron-clad refund guarantee for those producers who do not want to participate and that seek to recollect their assessment. The board is working to establish not only a fair and transparent refund process that will ensure producers receive their refund quickly and accurately as required, but also a system that protects the integrity of the refund process and its confidentiality, all while deterring fraud. Although a significant amount of time has been spent to get the refund process right, the Cattle Council expects to work hard to demonstrate value and build your trust with the hope that the Council spends its time working for you, rather than processing refunds. From renewed attacks by animal rights activists, those promoting a vegan agenda based on bad climate science and environmental activists seeking to end animal agriculture by increasing the regulatory burdens ranchers and dairy producers face, the time to stand together is now. Ignoring these problems, deciding not to respond or seeking to destabilize the weapons we have to push back is not the way forward. We all have a vested interest in working to ensure our industry’s success. The resources brought forth to this fight by the California Cattle Council have the opportunity to be a game-changer for the industry, so let’s work together to ensure its success!


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November 2019 California Cattleman 7 Farm Credit West


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

END OF YEAR BILL RUNDOWN

LAUNDRY LIST OF BILLS KEPT CCA ON ALERT IN 2019 The end of the 2019 Legislative Session came at nearly 3 a.m on the morning of Sept. 14. Nearly every major issue facing the legislature was deliberated the last week of the legislative session. Overall, CCA had a positive year lobbying on your behalf in Sacramento. 2019 was the first year of a two-year legislative session that comprised a new legislature and a new Administration. The year did not end without hiccups, as almost any legislative year inevitably does in Sacramento. That said, there is good reason to remain positive and be proud of the victories that were achieved for livestock producers across the state. Below is the status of several bills that rose to the forefront of CCA’s advocacy efforts throughout the year. This list is not inclusive of every bill that CCA engaged on given the legislature debated just over 3,000 bills this year alone. SB 1 (Atkins) – California Environmental, Public Health, and Workers Defense Act of 2019 CCA-Opposed VETOED BY GOVERNOR

the author at the request of CCA included: • Limit the fee authority provided to ARB through comprehensive legislative oversight • Require a pilot program prior to implementation and a report to the legislature • Sunset the Periodic Smoke Inspection Program, with limited exceptions • Ensure opportunities are made available outside California for compliance to ensure out-of-state trucks have all paperwork on hand before entering the state • Prohibit CHP or law enforcement from placing a vehicle out of service that has a MIL displayed • Allow additional time for a vehicle operating in agriculture to correct a violation and prohibit ARB or CHP from placing the vehicle out of service during that window. CCA was successful in securing 75 days rather than the 45-day window provided to non-agricultural vehicles.

SSB 1 sought to require state agencies to meet or exceed federal environmental standards in place as of January 19, 2017. Specific to the federal Endangered Species Act, any species that is delisted after January 19, 2017 would have immediately been eligible for listing under the California Endangered Species Act.

SB 224 (Grove) – Rural Crime CCA-Supported SIGNED INTO LAW

SB 62 (Dodd) – California Endangered Species Act CCA-Supported SIGNED INTO LAW

SB 253 (Dodd) – Environmental Farming Incentive Program – Assembly Agriculture Committee CCA-Supported HELD IN THE ASSEMBLY

SB 62 will reauthorize accidental take protections for farmers and ranchers conducting routine agricultural activities. The bill does require any accidental take of a threatened or endangered species listed under CESA to be reported to the Department of Fish & Wildlife within 10 days. SB 210 (Leyva) – Heavy Duty Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance Program CCA-Opposed Unless Amended SIGNED INTO LAW SB 210 proposed to establish a heavy duty vehicle inspection and maintenance program to be administered by the California Air Resources Board (ARB) for diesel vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 14,000 lbs. The inspection and maintenance program will require an annual inspection of the vehicle similar to the smog check program for diesel vehicles prior to the vehicle being registered with the Department of Motor Vehicles. In addition, the bill will prohibit a vehicle with its malfunction indicator light (MIL) displayed from operating on public roadways. ARB was likely to develop this program without legislation, so it was beneficial to utilize SB 210 to set legislative parameters on the program. Amendments taken by 8 California Cattleman November 2019

SB 224 would authorize fines imposed on those convicted for grand theft of agricultural property to be allocated by the legislature to a Rural Crime Prevention Program rather than remaining in the General Fund.

SB 253, sponsored by the Nature Conservancy, would have established a voluntary financial assistance program for farmers and ranchers to implement management practices that improve wildlife habitat and operational efficiencies. The intent is to establish an EQIP-like program at the state level to fund practices not eligible for coverage under the national program or provide further financial assistance for those that are covered but require a cost share. SB 378 (Wiener) – Estate Taxes CCA-Opposed HELD IN THE SENATE SB 378 proposed to place an initiative on the 2020 ballot asking California voters to approve a California-only estate tax. Specifically, the initiative proposed an exemption of $3.5 million per person ($7 million per couple) that cannot be adjusted for inflation, with a 40% rate paid on estates that exceed the value of the exemption. The value of estates that exceed the current federal exemption of $11.4 million ($22.8 million per couple) would be required to pay both state and federal estate taxes, however state estate taxes would not be assessed for the value of an estate exceeding the federal exemption.


SB 632 (Galgiani) – Vegetation Treatment Program CCA-Supported SIGNED INTO LAW SB 632 requires the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection to complete a draft Environmental Impact Report for the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection’s (CALFIRE) Vegetation Treatment Program (VTP) no later than June 30, 2020. The VTP is intended to serve as a programmatic CEQA document to streamline environmental permitting for fuel load reduction projects and prescribed fire. CALFIRE issued a Notice of Intent to prepare a programmatic CEQA document on Jan. 30, 2019. SCA 3 (Hill) – Property Taxation No CCA Position HELD IN THE SENATE Current law allows an individual to inherit property and retain Proposition 13 protections without undergoing a reassessment of the property based on its current value. SCA 3 would require a county to reassess a property based on its current value at the time of inheritance unless the property is used as a primary residence. CCA worked with the author’s office to clarify that agricultural lands, including those with residences, are not subject to the bill. AB 128 (Gloria) – Horses No CCA Position ENROLLED & WAITING GOVERNOR’S ACTION AB 128 would require public auctions selling horses to display “The sale of horses in California for slaughter for human consumption is prohibited by law” pursuant to Proposition 6, which outlawed horse slaughter in California in 1998. The bill would also require a buyer to sign an affidavit when purchasing a horse at auction acknowledging the

prohibition on the slaughter of horses in California. CCA’s early engagement in the bill ensured provisions related to the transportation of horses were not included and the mandate to set a minimum floor price for a horse was left to the discretion of the seller. AB 273 (Gonzalez) – Fur Bearing & Nongame Mammals – Senate Appropriations Committee No CCA Position SIGNED INTO LAW AB 273 would eliminate the DFW’s trapping license program and prohibit an individual from trapping, with the intent to sell or for sport, a fur bearing or nongame mammal. AB 273 would not prohibit an individual from trapping a fur bearing or nongame mammal to prevent property damage or depredation. Similar legislation, AB 44 (Friedman), would prohibit an individual from selling or offering for sale a fur product, with the exclusion of cow hides, lambskin or sheepskin hides or hides from a lawfully taken game animal. AB 454 (Kalra) – Migratory Bird Treaty Act – Senate Natural Resources & Water Committee CCA Neutral SIGNED INTO LAW Federal law prohibits the taking of a migratory bird except for those birds taken under rules and regulations promulgated by the Secretary of the Interior. This includes the issuance of programmatic depredation permits. AB 454 prohibits an individual from taking any migratory bird that is designated under the federal act as of Jan. 1, 2017 except for birds taken pursuant to rules or regulations adopted by the Department of Interior after Jan. 1, 2017. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

November 2019 California Cattleman 9


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

take of a bobcat under a depredation permit would continue to be authorized under California law. The bill requires the Department of Fish & Wildlife to prepare a statewide management plan by Jan. 1, 2024 and would authorize the Fish & Game Commission to resume hunting of bobcats after Jan.1, 2025.

TAKING ACTION

AB 448 (Garcia) – Stockponds CCA-Sponsored HELD IN THE ASSEMBLY

AB 448 sought to provide a streamlined and costeffective pathway for ranchers to obtain a water right for currentlyconstructed stock ponds with a capacity of no more than 10 acre feet built prior to January 1, 2019. The bill would renew a certificate program that was established in 1974 and expired in 1997 that enabled ranchers to obtain a certificate with the filing of an application and the payment of a onetime fee.

AB 1801 (Committee on Agriculture) – Brucellosis CCA-Sponsored SIGNED INTO LAW AB 1801 will remove the requirement in California law that an intact female of a beef breed older than 12 months of age must demonstrate evidence of calf-hood vaccination against brucellosis to be sold for breeding. Current law requires all dairy calves to be vaccinated against brucellosis and intact females of beef breeds older than 12 months of age to be sold solely for slaughter unless there is evidence that the heifer has been vaccinated. The bill will maintain the dairy mandate at the dairy industry’s request. AB 1801 is consistent with CCA policy and will also require a regulatory change by the Department of Food & Agriculture.

AB 479 (Nazarian) – School Lunch Program CCA Neutral HELD IN THE ASSEMBLY AB 479 sought to promote the serving of plant-based lunch options for California students. Under AB 479, local school districts would have had the opportunity to seek a reimbursement from the state for serving plant-based entrees and plant-derived “milk” products. At the direction of the CCA Executive Committee, CCA, working with our partners at Western United Dairymen, was successful in securing favorable amendments that allowed a neutral position.

AB 1810 (Committee on Transportation) – Transportation Omnibus Bill CCA-Supported SIGNED INTO LAW Provisions contained in AB 1810 at the request of CCA include the authorization for counties to utilize Highway Use Transportation Account funds (gas tax revenue) to repair, maintain and remove cattle guards on public roadways. Current law allows counties to utilize local revenue for this purpose but the law is not clear on the use of monies allocated to local jurisdictions by the state.

Craig Edling | 209.531.7037 Inquire about full truckload pricing and ranch deliveries.

NEW GENERATION SUPPLEMENTS Anna Bavor 650.575.5612 annab@newgensupplements.com www.smartlic.com

10 California Cattleman November 2019

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60

90 80

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FlaxLic different from Control, P < 0.01

Control

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Normal Sperm Normal Sperm, %

Sperm Motility, %

Sperm Motility 90

Kansas State University Bull Study

AB 1254 would prohibit the hunting of bobcats in California until Jan. 1, 2025 with limited exceptions. The

8.5 8.0 7.5 7.0 6.5 6.0 5.5

FlaxLic different from Control, P < 0.01

Improved 7%

Control

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}

Kansas State University Heifer Study

AB 1254 (Kamlager-Dove) – Bobcats – Senate Natural Resources & Water Committee No CCA Position ENROLLED & WAITING GOVERNOR’s ACTION


CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Zone 2 - Peach

Zone 1 - Yellow

1 2

Humboldt-Del Norte Mendocino-Lake Sonoma-Marin Napa-Solano

Siskiyou Modoc Lassen Fall River-Big Valley

Zone 3 - Light Blue Shasta-Trinity Plumas-Sierra Tehama Butte Glenn-Colusa Yuba-Sutter Tahoe (Placer-Nevada) Yolo

3

Zone 4 - Pink

Zone 5 - Green

Zone 6 - Purple

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Calaveras

Merced-Mariposa Madera Fresno-Kings

San Joaquin-Stanislaus

Tuolumne

Zone 7 - Tan

5 4

CCA committee leadership

San Mateo-San Francisco Santa Cruz Santa Clara Contra Costa-Alameda

POLICY COMMITTEES

Zone 8 - Turquoise

Monterey San Benito San Luis Obispo

Santa Barbara Tulare Kern Inyo-Mono-Alpine High Desert

AG & FOOD POLICY Chair: Ramsay Wood Vice Chair: Rick Roberti

Zone 9 - Orange Southern California San Diego-Imperial Ventura

6 7

CATTLE HEALTH & WELL BEING Chair: Tom Talbot, DVM Vice Chair: A.E. “Bud” Sloan, DVM

8

CATTLE MARKETING Chair: Holly Foster Vice Chair: Sam Avila

FEDERAL LANDS

Chair: Mike Byrne Vice Chair: Eric Hafenfeld

9

PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Chair: Clayton Koopmann Vice Chair: Seth Scribner

TAX & CREDIT

2019 CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Mark Lacey

mjlacey1@icloud.com • (760) 784-1309

First Vice President Tony Toso

Chair: Jack Lavers Vice Chair: Jill Heely

Zone Director 5 Bob Brennan bsbrennan@mlode.com • (209) 661-6419

cottoncrk@aol.com • (209)988-4468

Zone Director 6 VACANT

Second Vice President Steve Arnold

Zone Director 7 Anthony Stornetta

pozovalley@aol.com • (805) 235-7840

anthony.stornetta@sbcfire.com • (805) 391-0044

Second Vice President Greg Kuck

Zone Director 8 John Hammon

gregkuck54@gmail.com • (530) 905-2076

hamdawg66@gmail.com • (559) 623-1538

Second Vice President Cindy Tews

Zone Director 9 Bud Sloan

beefnmore@aol.com • (559) 970-6892

Treasurer Rob von der Lieth

rvdlieth@aol.com • (916) 769-1153

Feeder Council Chairman Trevor Freitas

trevor@mendescalfranch.com • (559) 805-5431

Feeder Council Vice Chair Jesse Larios lariosjess1@gmail.com • (760) 455-3888 Zone Director 1 Ramsey Wood

Asloan5119@aol.com • (805) 340-0693

Feeder Council Member Paul Cameron pcmesquitecattle@sbcglobal.net •(760) 427-6906

Feeder Council Member VACANT openshaw4@gmail.com •(530) 521-0099

Zone Director 2 Hugo Klopper

At Large Appointee Rob Frost

hugoklopper@frontier.com • (707) 498-7810

rbmaf@juno.com •(805) 377-2231

Zone Director 3 Wally Roney

At Large Appointee Darrel Sweet

bjr@billieweb.com •(530) 519-3608

dsweet@cattlemen.net • (209) 601-4074

Zone Director 4 Mike Bettencourt

At Large Appointee Lawrence Dwight

mbteamroper@aol.com • (209) 499-0794

ox_bar@hotmail.com • (707) 845-4400

ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL vacant

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

CALIFORNIA CATTLEWOMEN, INC.

At Large Appointee Mark Nelson kmarknelson@gmail.com •(916) 849-5558

CCA affiliate leadership

President: Rita McPhee Vice President: Ryan Nelson Secretary: Celeste Settrini

At Large Appointee Myron Openshaw

ramseywood83@gmail.com • (530) 680-8985

For more information about CCA’s Executive Board or committees, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

President: Callie Borror 1st Vice President: Debbie Hay 2nd Vice President – 1 year: Julie Barnett 2nd Vice President – 2 year: Cheryl Beckwith 2nd Vice President – 3 year: Jill Bright Secretary: Tara Porterfield Treasurer: Heidy Carver

November 2019 California Cattleman 11


Fresno-Kings honors 2019 cattlemen and cowboy of the year On Sept. 27 at the grounds of the Big Fresno Fair, members of the Fresno-Kings County Cattlemen's Association gathered in long-standing tradition to name their annual award winners. As the FKCCA's largest event of the year, local cattlemen and women flock to the Big Fresno Fair to enjoy camaraderie, drinks and good food, courtesy of Randy Perry and the Fresno State Young Cattlemen. But perhaps the most treasured part of the annual dinner event is paying tribute to the leaders in the local cattle community. Recognized by one of California's most notable industry innovators, Dave Wood, the 2019 FKCCA Cattleman of the Year was announced as Bob Martin, who spent his career at Harris Ranch alongside Wood. Martin retired this year after 50 years with the well-known beef company and feedlot. Martin was noticibly humbled as his longtime co-worker announced him as the award recipient. The FKCCA venue at the Big Fresno Fair includes a beef exhibit that was underwritten by John Harris, Wood and Kim Oviatt. Each year, the Cattleman of the Year receives the honor of burning their brand into one of the walls in the exhibit. Martin eagerly placed his brand alongside many other well-respected cattlemen and women from the area. Another local cattleman, Ronnie Cox was announced as this year's recipient of the FKCCA Cowboy of the Year Award. He was honored by Mark Thompson. Also deserving recognition that took place at the annual event was Sandra Witte who was honored as a Friend of the Cattleman. Witte is the retired dean of the College of Agriculture at Fresno State and has often displayed her dedication to the local agriculture community during her tenure at the university. Congratulations to each of the night's award winners! “Everything Fertilizer Crop Protection Seed

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12 California Cattleman November 2019

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Thomas angus Ranch Female Sale November 21 • 11 a.m. • Baker City, Oregon Thomas Ester 4764 18040305

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam’s Sire: SAV Net Worth 4200 CED +14; BW -1.1; WW +55; YW +96; Milk +20; MRB +.72; RE +.47 $M +55 ; $W +59 ; $F +83; $G +51; $B +133; $C +228 Due 2/2/2020 to Thomas Navigator 5771.

Thomas Swan 8129 19160347

Sire: EF Commando 1366 • Dam’s Sire: Sitz Upward 307R CED +2; BW +3.5; WW +66; YW +115; Milk +35; MRB +.98; RE +.54 $M +70 ; $W +71 ; $F +71; $G +67; $B +138; $C +249 Due 1/24/2020 to Thomas Absolution 6568.

Thomas Elsa 0502 16698162

Sire: Thomas Grade Up 6849 • Dam’s Sire: GAR US Premium Beef CED +5; BW +1.6; WW +46; YW +88; Milk +26; MRB +1.16; RE +.66 $M +31 ; $W +42 ; $F +93; $G +79; $B +172; $C +254 Sells open. Has a 8/19/19 bull calf at side by Thomas Big Data 7435.

Eisa 0502 is the dam of Thomas Xpansion 5810.

Thomas Blackbird 3746 17739357

Sire: EXAR Upshot 0562B • Dam’s Sire: SAV Net Worth 4200 CED +7; BW +1.0; WW +66; YW +110; Milk +21; MRB +.67; RE +.92 $M +59 ; $W +69 ; $F +88; $G +60; $B +148 Due 3/13/2020 to Basin Payweight 1682.

Selling 350 Spring Calving Cows • 100 Fall Calving Pairs 100 2019 Spring-born Heifers

Sale Managed by:

&

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42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Clint Brightwell, Customer Relations Manager: (417) 359-6893 Cole Owens, Marketing Specialist & Cooperative Manager: (918) 418-7349 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

November 2019 California Cattleman 13


Meeting Under

the Big Sky Public Lands Council gets down to business in Great Falls by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur With my laptop safely stowed as my flight descended into Denver International Airport for a brief layover, I sought out any distraction I could find to divert my attention from the gentleman in the window seat behind me loudly droning on about the dastardly deeds of the Freemasons. I opened United Airline’s Hemispheres magazine and began thumbing through the issue. To my surprise, the magazine’s monthly “Dossier” section for September featured my ultimate destination: Montana, where I was set to join the 51st Annual Meeting of the Public Lands Council Wednesday, Sept. 25 through Saturday, Sept. 28. Doing some last-minute cramming, I learned that the site of PLC’s Annual Meeting—Great Falls—is the thirdlargest city in the state, and was “originally founded as a hydroelectric and commercial center around the Missouri River.” The magazine even showcased the site which would host PLC’s Thursday night “Walking Cocktail Hour & Art Viewing,” the C.M. Russell Museum, the namesake of which “lived the life he captured on canvas, creating a breathtaking historical record of Western cultures, landscapes, and wildlife,” earning him the title of

14 California Cattleman November 2019

“America’s Cowboy Artist.” When I finally arrived in Great Falls, I headed over to the Celtic Cowboy, a bar and restaurant in downtown Great Falls that played host to PLC's Welcome Barbeque and Block Party, sponsored by Farm Credit. There I met up with California’s representatives to the Public Lands Council: CCA Federal Lands Chair Mike Byrne, Tulelake, CCA Federal Lands Vice Chair Eric Hafenfeld, Weldon, California Public Lands Council Chair Dave Daley, Oroville, and Josh Davy, Cottonwood (Billy Flournoy, Likely, joined the festivities the following day). The Welcome Barbeque was an excellent opportunity for public lands ranchers from throughout 13 western states to catch up and mingle over beef and lamb sliders. It was also an opportunity to congratulate and celebrate PLC Executive Director Ethan Lane, who just days earlier had been announced as the new Vice President of Government Affairs at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. The celebration and conversation lasted well into the night, with ranchers transitioning to the “PLC SpeakEasy” hosted in the basement of the Hotel Arvon or to the local Sip ‘n Dip Lounge. The next morning the business of the Annual Meeting


began in earnest after a hearty welcome from Great Falls Mayor Bob Kelly and Great Falls Chamber of Commerce CEO Shane Etzwiler. PLC Manager of Government Affairs Tanner Beymer kicked off the informational portion of the meeting, providing the PLC issues update. Beymer reported on PLC’s success in securing Endangered Species Act reform, with a regulation finalized this year which requires the US Fish & Wildlife Service to prioritize occupied habitat when designating critical habitat (as opposed to suitable or potential habitat) and which removes the “blanket 4(d) rule,” which previously extended endangered species protections to all threatened species, among other provisions. Unfortunately, environmental groups have filed suit in the Northern District of California seeking to reverse this regulatory reform. Beymer also reported on PLC’s efforts to reform the National Environmental Policy Act and a recent agreement with groups like the Humane Society of the U.S., ASPCA, and Return to Freedom which would allow for increased gathers and population control for feral horses on Bureau of Land Management lands—an agreement slammed by some radical environmental groups despite the compromise nature of the deal. After agency updates from the Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, and Department of the Interior, the meeting showcased a panel discussion, “The Business of Grazing: Protecting Ranchers’ Rights.” The discussion largely centered on the American Prairie Reserve, which seeks to “Create in the northern plains of Montana the largest nature reserve in the continental United States, a refuge for people and wildlife,” particularly “a large population of bison.” Ranchers are concerned about the American Prairie Reserve for a number of reasons. For one, APR seeks to expand its reserve by buying up private ranches and securing federal grazing permits and then transitioning from grazing domestic livestock such as cattle to grazing bison instead. Ranchers are concerned that removing cattle ranching destroys the economic base of their rural agricultural communities. Additionally, ranchers are concerned about the management of APR’s bison,

which could cause ecological damage or roam onto adjacent properties, causing property damage and risking transmission of diseases such as brucellosis. The afternoon saw breakout sessions for PLC’s relatively-new committees—the BLM Committee, Forest Service Committee, Wildlife Committee and Communications Committee. The BLM Committee was largely concerned with issues of wild horse management. The Forest Service Committee, chaired by California’s own Dave Daley, also included a small update on wild horses, with Caroline Lobdell of the Western Resources Legal Center providing an update on recent efforts to gather excess wild horses on the Modoc National Forest in California. Daley’s committee also approved two resolutions that would ultimately be passed by PLC’s delegates: one seeking to ensure that the federal Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program “recognizes the contribution of grazing to fuels management and fire risk reduction” and another seeking to ensure that the Forest Service applies ownership and branding rules to all permitted animals, including bison. Thursday’s agenda culminated with a “walking tour” of the C.M. Russell Museum, during which attendees chatted over cocktails while viewing the museum’s summer “Return to Calgary” exhibit and its fall “O.C. Seltzer’s West” exhibit, as well as the museum’s permanent collection of Charles M. Russell’s western artwork. After the walking tour, PLC staff, current and former officers and other PLC members met at the PLC SpeakEasy to gently roast outgoing Executive Director Ethan Lane, reminiscing over his four years at the organization’s helm. Friday morning kicked off with remarks from NCBA President Jennifer Houston, who addressed Ethan Lane’s promotion, telling the assembled crowd that “we didn’t steal your leader, we just expanded his sphere of influence!” Friday was the real business of the PLC Annual Meeting, with both the Board of Directors meeting and the General Business Meeting. Unfortunately, the Business ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

November 2019 California Cattleman 15


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 Meeting was somewhat sparsely attended—with an earlyseason blizzard forecast for the following morning, many attendees left the meeting early to ensure that they could make it home unobstructed. California’s representative on PLC’s Board of Directors, Mike Byrne, stayed behind to carry California’s votes and provide California updates to the Council. During the meeting’s state affiliate updates, Byrne updated PLC members on California fire policy, the numerous lawsuits facing the state’s livestock producers and efforts to list Southern California and Central Coast mountain lions as a state-threatened species, among other issues facing Golden State ranchers. At the General Business Meeting, delegates also approved the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program and bison branding policies discussed above, and ratified interim policies regarding wildlife migration corridors and chronic wasting disease. The major draw of this year’s PLC event, however, was at the cocktail hour and banquet, which this year was attended by Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt.

Addressing the room full of ranchers, Bernhardt said “I'm honored to be in Montana to discuss how the Department of the Interior can be a good neighbor to the ranching community. President Trump knows the importance and value of our conservation stewardship efforts—and most importantly the impact your industry has to the American economy.” Secretary Bernhardt remained on-hand at the banquet and chatted with PLC members in attendance. The next morning attendees had been slated to set out on a “predator tour” in the nearby towns of Valier and Dupuyer to assess impacts of predators such as grizzlies, gray wolves and others. Unfortunately, due to road closures in anticipation of the oncoming snow storm, by Friday morning the tour had been called off—leaving Secretary Bernhardt’s visit a fitting bookend to the 51st Annual PLC Meeting. (The PLC Annual Meeting ended just in time; over the next two days, Great Falls would be blanketed in 19.3 inches of snow.) Next year’s PLC Annual Meeting will be held in Oregon to celebrate PLC President Bob Skinner, whose presidential term will be coming to a close. Stay tuned to the California Cattleman for details on date and location.

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November 2019 California Cattleman 17


imperial valley's brandenberg named farmer of the year At the Imperial County Farm Bureau’s annual dinner last month, in front of a room of over 350 farmers, ranchers, business owners, sponsors and elected officials, on the occasion of his 69th birthday, El Centro cattleman Bill Brandenberg was named the 2019 Jim Kuhn Memorial Farmer of the Year. Presided over by Imperial County Farm Bureau President Tom Brudy, the evening included a silent auction and dinner with the theme for this year’s banquet “Growing Forward” so it was fitting that Brandengerg would be the one bestowed with the highest honor honor. An innovator in his field, he is credited as being as one of the driving forces in the development and construction of the former Brawley Beef packing plant, the most advanced and ground breaking of its time when it opened in 2001, with the capability of processing 1800 head per day. That’s not the only thing this retired 3rd generation cattleman has done for his industry though. Brandenberg has been a pillar of the beef industry over the decades, filling integral roles on both the state and national level. The long-time California Cattlemen’s Association member has served as both Vice Chair and Chair of the CCA Feeder Council several times in addition to serving as Co-Chair on the Long-Range Planning Committee from 2000-2002. He has also served as Chair of the California Beef Council and as a member of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board representing California. Brandenberg has also filled various

roles within the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association including, most recently, chairman of the Ag Policy Committee and on NCBA’s Governance Task Force. Even after selling his iconic Meloland Cattle Company in 2015, he isn’t anywhere near stopping yet. Most recently, he has joined the newly appointed California Cattle Council, tasked with the education about, and promotion of, live cattle issues in the Golden State. The honor of being named Imperial County’s Farmer of the year just adds to a long list of accolades bestowed upon Brandenberg though. In 2010 he was named the California Livestock Man of the Year at the Grand National Stock Show and Rodeo at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. In addition, last month’s honor not only included certificates and recognition from the Farm Bureau, but also from from the Imperial County Board of Supervisors, Sen. Ben Hueso and Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia. “Over the years, Bill has given so much of [himself] to this industry and organizations such as CCA. His knowledge and willingness to share that knowledge has been invaluable to cattle production, not just in this sate but across the country,” Bishop rancher and veterinarian, Tom Talbot has said of the man. “[He’s] given so much of himself in order for his way of life to progress.” CCA is proud to call Bill Brandenberg one of our own and extends the most heartfelt congratulations on receiving this great honor. Congrats Bill!

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November 2019 California Cattleman 19


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR California Beef Council Hosts 3rd Annual Beef Leadership Summit by Jill Scofield, California Beef Council Director of Producer Communications On a September morning inside Cal Poly San Luis the CBC's George Strathearn Memorial Research Award in Obispo’s J and G Lau Family Meat Processing Center, June, in recognition of his groundbreaking research on the nearly two dozen leaders and influencers from California’s environmental management of domestic livestock – helped retail and foodservice industries stood in rapt attention the audience understand just how little livestock production as they watched Kari Underly break down a side of beef. contributes to methane emissions, and provided a greater Underly, a renowned author, master butcher and recent context of the many other factors contributing to air judge on the popular television show “Chopped,” was pollution. sharing tips and tricks of beef carcass fabrication with the Following Dr. Mitloehner's presentation, the group crowd. enjoyed a custom menu of unique beef dishes featuring “Many foodservice operators, cooks, chefs and even innovative cuts, aiming to inspire the foodservice and butchers do not understand where the final cuts come retail professionals with ideas on ways to incorporate new from,” said Underly. “It seems they ‘just come out of a beef dishes or cuts in their operations. A number of local box.’ This lack of knowledge takes away from the ability to area producers also participated in this kick-off evening, properly merchandise meat and help the consumer enjoy it.” providing an even greater introduction of the ranching Underly’s precise fabricating was part of the 2019 Beef community to the attendees. Leadership Summit (BLS), an annual event produced by the In addition to Underly’s demonstration, the group’s visit California Beef Council that brings together top-tier retail to Cal Poly included a tour of the Meat Processing Center and foodservice professionals for a three-day educational provided by manager Jim Douglass, as well as an update on immersion experience. This year’s BLS, held Sept. 18some of the activities of the university’s beef unit from 20, focused on beef carcass innovation, sustainability, artificial intelligence, beef blockchain and traceability, beef ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 production, antibiotic stewardship and consumer beef insights. The event location changes from year to year, allowing participation from a variety of different tour host sites throughout California and bringing attendees into contact with different people and places in the beef supply chain. For the attendees, the information and behind-the-scenes look they get during this immersion experience gives them more confidence when they respond to consumer questions about beef. “This program was started as an extension of our popular ‘Pasture to Plate Beef Tour,’” said Christie Van Egmond, the CBC’s Director of Retail & Foodservice Marketing. “We found that a number of our Pasture to Plate retail and foodservice attendees wanted a deeper dive into beef production, innovations in beef cuts, insights into consumer concerns and questions and other detailed aspects of the beef sector of our food supply.” This year’s event was held on California’s beautiful Central Coast, and kicked off with a powerful presentation by Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., of UC Davis, who shared his research on agricultural emissions, helping to clear the air on Nearly two dozen leaders from the retail and foodservice industries joined some of the negative misperceptions that exist on beef producers for the CBC’s 2019 Beef Leadership Summit. this topic. Dr. Mitloehner – who was presented with 20 California Cattleman November 2019


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November 2019 California Cattleman 21


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 Zach Macfarlane, Ph.D., and Aaron Lazanoff. The attendees also got to visit Hearst Ranch in San Simeon, where Director of Ag Operations Ben Higgins shared both the unique history of the ranch, as well as information about the day-to-day cattle operation. Topics included low-stress cattle handling with a stock dog demonstration provided by cowboy Ryan Pascoe, grazing considerations and the importance of grazing on fire mitigation, the impacts of drought on beef production in California and much more. To cap off the event, the CBC brought in a number of notable experts to discuss various aspects of the beef industry and its correlation to the business of attendees in the audience, with topics including artificial intelligence, the role of consumer demand and how consumer perceptions influence agriculture, emerging research on consumer preferences, beef blockchain and traceability and an update on the cattle industry and market. In addition to the retail and foodservice attendees who were part of the tour, CBC chairman Wayne Lamb and local area producer and beef advocate Kiah Twisselman joined the group to help answer questions about beef production along the way. Representatives from the Kansas and Nebraska beef councils also joined the CBC for the tour, including Harry Moser – a seedstock producer from Wheaton, Kansas, who serves on the Kansas Beef Council as well as the Kansas Livestock Association – and his wife Lisa, as well as Buck and Sandy Wehrbein of Nebraska. Buck is a feedyard operator who has served in many roles for the beef industry, including serving as the current chair of the Nebraska Beef Council, as well as the vice chairman of the NCBA Federation Division. “The California Beef Council has enjoyed a long partnership with the Kansas and Nebraska Beef Councils, which have provided funding for our registered dietitian staff position for a number of years,” said CBC Executive Director Bill Dale. “We wanted them to join us for one of our premier events to offer a closer look at the impact checkoff investments have in California thanks to programs such as this. All producers who were part of the tour, including those in our California family and the Mosers and Wehrbeins, were exceptional representatives of our industry during this event.” For more on the Beef Leadership Summit and other CBC initiatives, visit www.calbeef.org.

Hearst Ranch Director of Ag Operations Ben Higgins (on foot) and Heart Ranch cowboy Ryan Pascoe (horseback) talk about the ranch’s cattle operation, with a focus on low-stress animal handling.

Jim Douglass, Manager of the J and G Lau Family Meat Processing Center, provides a tour of Cal Poly’s state-of-the-art processing facility during the Beef Leadership Summit.

Save the Date

Learn More About Your Beef Checkoff Interested in learning more about the California Beef Council and Beef Checkoff efforts to promote beef ? Join us for a special producer webinar on Thursday, December 12 for a look at what’s been accomplished in 2019 for California’s beef industry, a preview of plans for 2020 and a special update on the issue of meat alternatives. The webinar will take place from 3:30 to 5 p.m. To learn more or get registered, contact Jill Scofield at the California Beef Council at jill@calbeef.org, or 916.925.2333. California Beef Council Producer Webinar Thursday, December 12 3:30 to 5 p.m. E-mail jill@calbeef.org for details. 22 California Cattleman November 2019

Nearly two dozen leaders from the retail and foodservice industries joined beef producers for the CBC’s 2019 Beef Leadership Summit.


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• Moderating feed intake so you can run more cows on the same land.

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Buying high growth, high carcass, purebred bulls that have been selected for maximum output will not build a low cost, high profit cowherd.

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November 2019 California Cattleman 23


HERD HEALTH

TACKLING DEADLY BACTERIA THAT COSTS PRODUCERS BIG EACH YEAR THROUGH BRD from Zoetis From 2011 to 2015, bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in nursing calves cost the beef industry approximately $165 million each year. Of the bacterial causes of BRD, M. haemolytica is the most predominant and concerning of the group. Animals with an M. haemolytica infection can go from seemingly healthy to deceased in a day’s time. Prevention starts with understanding how pathogens act M. haemolytica is found naturally in the respiratory tract of cattle. Dust, stress or viral infections make it easier for the bacteria to travel from the respiratory tract to the lungs. Because of multiple virulence factors, M. haemolytica is an expert at avoiding the animal’s immune defenses and remains tough to clear once an infection occurs. “M. haemolytica typically causes more sudden or acute pneumonia and other BRD bacterial pathogens are commonly secondary invaders causing more chronic pneumonia,” said Jeffrey Sarchet, DVM, Beef Technical Services veterinarian with Zoetis. M. haemolytica produces leukotoxin, which kills white blood cells and leads to severe lung damage. Enzymatic proteins from the affected white blood cells destroy lung cells, causing lung lesions that produce irreversible, and potentially fatal, damage to cattle. Cattle have an extremely low ratio of lung volume to body size, so any lung damage is detrimental to an animal’s overall health and performance. “Other bacterial pathogens, like Pasteurella multocida, don’t produce leukotoxin, so they don’t cause the severe acute lung damage that M. haemolytica does,” Dr. Sarchet said. Protecting against M. haemolytica M. haemolytica is opportunistic and often strikes when a viral infection has weakened the animal’s immune defenses. Effective control requires vaccines providing viral protection, along with anti-leukotoxin antibodies that help block the effect of leukotoxins and capsular antibodies to increase the ability of white blood cells to engulf and destroy the bacteria. “One Shot has proven efficacy for stimulating protection against M. haemolytica and reducing lung lesions,” Dr. Sarchet said. “Unfortunately, vaccines available for other BRD bacterial pathogens, like Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somnus, have not demonstrated the same efficacy of One Shot based on research from University of Minnesota. Because

24 California Cattleman November 2019

Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somnus are also Gramnegative bacteria, adding vaccines to protect against these pathogens can add stress and increase the risk of adverse reactions, so the cost/benefit should be carefully considered.” Dr. Sarchet explains that Gram-negative bacteria have endotoxins in the cell wall, which are very potent toxins that cause a stress response in cattle resulting in increased heart and respiratory rate, decreased rumen and intestinal action, fever, vascular shock and possibly death. “A general rule is to not give an animal more than two or three Gram-negative vaccines at the same time,” Dr. Sarchet said. “Even though blackleg (seven- or eight-way clostridial) vaccines are Gram-positive, we count them as one-half a Gram-negative vaccine. So, for example, if we give One Shot with a seven- or eight-way clostridial vaccine at the same time, it would count as 1½ Gram-negative vaccines. If we add a vaccine to protect against Pasteurella multocida or Histophilus somnus at the same time, it would push the protocol to 2½ to 3½ Gram-negative vaccines, which is a higher risk for the animal.” Research has shown vaccines with leukotoxoid, like what is found in the One Shot® line of vaccines, can help stimulate effective anti-leukotoxin antibodies against M. haemolytica. Surface antigens in One Shot have been proven to stimulate production of antibodies which increase the ability of white blood cells to engulf and destroy M. haemolytica bacteria before it can cause lung damage. One Shot has also been shown to decrease the amount and severity of lung lesions in cattle infected with M. haemolytica in organized studies because the adjuvanted leukotoxoid from One Shot helps ensure production of predictably higher antibody levels and more effective M. haemolytica protection. A comparative study of Zoetis products showed that after 21 days of M. haemolytica exposure, One Shot mitigated 74.5-79.6 percent of lesions and prevented 89.4 percent of mortality within the treatment group. “Choosing the right vaccine for the right pathogen is key in helping reduce respiratory disease,” Dr. Sarchet said. “Your herd veterinarian is a great resource to develop a protocol that will prevent problems from Mannheimia haemolytica.”


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2019 angus days sale committee J.J. reinhardt – John Dickinson – Jim Vietheer

November 2019 California Cattleman 25


GETTING TO KNOW THE TEAM AT WSR INSURANCE

WSR Insurance is excited to expand its partnership with the California Cattlemen's Association (CCA) as their exclusive agent. Over the last eight years, WSR has helped hundreds of CCA members with their Pasture, Range, Forage (PRF) insurance needs. WSR is now partnering with CCA to assist their members with all their insurance coverage needs such as Farm Packages, Auto, Workers Compensation, Group Medical, Dental & Vision and more. With over a century of experience we have developed relationships with a wide variety of insurance company partners that are geared at protecting many areas of agri-business activities which helps us deliver a full line of insurance products and services to our clients. Our knowledgeable staff of insurance professionals tailor these programs, giving you superior protection at a price that makes bottom-line sense while facing and understanding the unique challenges and threats stemming from the changing seasons, labor force, and government regulations. Our team of highly qualified insurance professionals that will work with you will be led by Kevin Hoppin; 16 year veteran of the industry with all that time spent at WSR Insurance. Kevin was raised in Woodland, CA and the grandson of a farmer Kevin has grown up surrounded by the agriculture community and knows the importance of understanding a clients’ requirements, guiding them through product selection, updating/changing policies, and addressing all other requests as they arise. We like to think we “spoil” our clients by offering customized solutions and personal attention. It’s our goal to exceed all expectations. We look forward to continued growth with the CCA and with every account written we are excited to financially support CCA members right back to thank them for their great partnership over the years. We’d love the opportunity to serve you, your friends, relatives and business associates. If there is anything we can do to assist you please don’t hesitate to reach out.

Kevin Hoppin kevinh@wsrins.com (530) 662-9181

FAMILIAR FACES

Jim Vann

From hosting booths in the tradeshow to speaking at midyear and convention meetings, Jim Vann and Matt Griffith are no strangers to many CCA members.

Jim currently serves as a Sales Manager and Vice President of Crop Insurance. He has been with the agency since 2003. Jim also holds an Agribusiness and Farm Insurance Specialist certification. With clients located in 11 western states, Jim serves businesses from ranches and agriculture to manufacturing and wholesale and retail.

Matt Griffith Matt has an extensive agriculture-based background and helps provide farmers and ranchers with knowledgeable risk management and insurance products. He is a 4th generation farmer/rancher from Williams, Calif. Along with working at WSR, he is the owner of Griffith Livestock, LLC and raises Angus cattle.

26 California Cattleman November 2019


Th a n k You !

To all our customers, employees, family and friends for making our 25th Annual Sale By The Sea a huge success. We couldn’t do this without our loyal customers and our hard working support team! Our family invites you to join us in beautiful Terrebonne, Oregon at our Performace Plus Bull Sale on President’s Day 2020.

- The Teixeira Family

J o h n , H e a t h e r, N a t h a n , J o s e p h & B e n Te i x e i r a J o h n ’s C e l l : 8 0 5 - 4 4 8 - 3 8 5 9

A l l a n & C e e Te i x e i r a A l l a n ’s C e l l : 8 0 5 - 3 1 0 - 3 3 5 3

S e r v i n g C a l i f o r n i a a n d O r e g o n | w w w. t e i x e i r a c a t t l e c o . c o m | c a t t l e @ t h o u s a n d h i l l s r a n c h . c o m


103RD ANNUAL CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S & CATTLEWOMEN, INC.

Convention

R E G I S T E R T O D AY A T C A L C A T T L E M E N . O R G !

PEPPERMILL RESORT 2707 S. VIRGINIA ST., RENO, NEVADA

This year, the Peppermill Resort Reno welcomes the CCA & CCW Convention for the first time! To reserve your reservations and more information please visit calcattlemen.org/convention2019 or call (866) 821-9996. Be sure to mention “ACCA19” for the discounted group rate. Reservations must be made by November 3, 2019 to receive the convention group room rate.

28 California Cattleman November 2019


Opening General Session

DR. FRANK MITLOEHNER

UC DAVIS DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR & AIR QUALITY EXTENSION SPECIALIST

WELCOME PARTY WEDNESDAY 6:30-9:30PM

THURSDAY 7-8AM & NOON-1PM

@GHGGURU

4-5:30PM, DEC.4TH

Join us for the Opening General Session as the world-renowned climate change expert, Dr. Mitloehner, tackles the question of “can we eat our way out of climate change?”

CCA/CCW AWARDS BANQUET

BREAKFAST & LUNCH

WINE & CHEESE RECEPTION WEDNESDAY 5:30-6:30PM

w o h s Trade ESDAY N D E W URSDAY & TH

6:30-10PM DEC.5TH

General Session 1-2PM, DEC.5TH BLOODY MARY JOSEPH TICE BAR

& JAYDEEP BHATIA

TERRORISM ANALYSTS STATE THREAT ASSESSMENT CENTER GOVERNOR’S OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES

Come Thursday for an overview from two terrorism analysts on the domestic and international terrorist threats relevant to California’s food and agricultural industry today.

THURSDAY 7-10AM

BUCK FORD

WEDNESDAY 6:30-9:30PM

LMRF RAFFLE SPONSORED BY

November 2019 California Cattleman 29


UC DAVIS STUDY SHEDS LIGHT ON FUTURE OF GENOME EDITING For the past two years, researchers at the University of unintended genomic alterations in the calves, and all animals California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy remained healthy during the study period. Neither the bull bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. This nor the calves entered the food supply as per FDA guidance technology has been proposed as an alternative to dehorning, for genome-edited livestock. a common management practice performed to protect other cattle and human handlers from injuries. Why the need for hornless cows? UC Davis scientists have just published their findings Many dairy breeds naturally grow horns. But on dairy in the journal Nature Biotechnology. They report that none of farms, the horns are typically removed, or the calves the bull’s offspring developed horns, as expected, and blood “disbudded” at a young age. Animals that don’t have horns work and physical exams of the calves found they were all are less likely to harm animals or dairy workers and have healthy. The researchers also sequenced the genomes of fewer aggressive behaviors. The dehorning process is the calves and their parents and analyzed these genomic unpleasant and has implications for animal welfare. Van sequences, looking for any unexpected changes. Eenennaam said genome-editing offers a pain-free genetic All data were shared with the U.S. Food and Drug alternative to removing horns by introducing a naturally Administration. Analysis by FDA scientists revealed a occurring genetic variant, or allele, that is present in some fragment of bacterial DNA, used to deliver the hornless trait breeds of beef cattle such as Angus. to the bull, had integrated alongside one of the two hornless Other authors in the study include Amy Young, Tamer genetic variants, or alleles, that were generated by genome Mansour, Bret McNabb and C. Titus Brown, with the UC editing in the bull. UC Davis researchers further validated Davis School of Veterinary Medicine; and Joseph Owen, this finding. and Josephine Trott, with the UC Davis Department of “Our study found that two calves inherited the naturally Animal Science. This work was supported by Biotechnology occurring hornless allele and four calves additionally inherited a fragment of bacterial DNA, known as a plasmid,” Risk Assessment Grant Program from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to ALV, the Gordon and Betty Moore said corresponding author Alison Van Eenennaam, with the Foundation’s Data-Driven Discovery Initiative and the UC Davis Department of Animal Science. California Agricultural Experiment Station of the University Plasmid integration can be addressed by screening and of California, Davis. selection, in this case, selecting the two offspring of the genome-edited hornless bull that inherited only the naturally occurring allele. “This type of screening is routinely done in plant breeding where genome editing frequently involves a step that includes a plasmid integration,” said Van Eenennaam. Van Eenennaam said the plasmid does not harm the animals, but the integration technically made the genome-edited bull a GMO, because it contained foreign DNA from another species, in this case a bacterial plasmid. “We’ve demonstrated that healthy hornless calves with only the intended edit can be produced, and we provided data to help inform the process for evaluating genome-edited animals," said Van More Weight...More Profit. Eenennaam. “Our data indicates the need From dry conditions to an abundance of grass, self-fed delivery to screen for plasmid integration when of SWEETLIX® Rumensin® pressed blocks predictably increases they’re used in the editing process.” weight gain on pasture. Extensive research consistently Since the original work in 2013, confirms the advantages that Rumensin® delivery has on stocker initiated by the Minnesota-based performance and economic returns. To achieve the greatest returns, company Recombinetics, new methods SWEETLIX® Rumensin® pressed blocks are your only choice. have been developed that no longer use donor template plasmid or other extraneous DNA sequence to bring about www.sweetlix.com 1-87-SWEETLIX introgression of the hornless allele. Scientists did not observe any other 30 California Cattleman November 2019

Cover Your Grass


GET READY FOR FALL PLANTING

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Select offering from top programs throughout the West!

Schedule: Thursday, Dec. 5 9 a.m. – Junior Show

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9 a.m. – Pen Bull Show, Open Bull Show 2 p.m. – Sale Cattle Preview 4 p.m. – Hereford Reno Sale in Reno Livestock Events Center

GIVE US A CALL 435-283-1411

Ranchers Heifer Sale November 16, 2019

1:00 pm MST

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400 HEAD OF BRED HEIFERS

Lots sold to calve in Feb., March/April, & May Also Selling Mature Cows

Ethan Bentz (541) 881-6286 Linda Bentz (541) 216-3379

Online Bidding at www.LiveAuctions.tv

Saturday, Dec. 7

9 a.m. – Open Heifer Show 6:30 p.m. – Western Nugget Social at the Nugget Hotel and Casino Western States Reno Sale Committee PO Box 8126 Reno, NV 89507 Scott Holt, Sale Committee Chairman 208-850-1329 Brian Gallagher, Western States President 253-261-9968

www.HEREFORDRENO.com 42

| November 2019

www.RanchersHeiferSale.com November 2019 California Cattleman 31 Hereford.org


IN DEMAND

CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF GROWS FOR 15TH STRAIGHT YEAR by Certified Angus Beef 's Miranda Reiman Economic incentive is a powerful thing. It directs ranch-level decisions and points an industry in a specific direction. Financial reward kept cattlemen on the path toward higher quality, and led them to produce record amounts of Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand product in the 2019 fiscal year that ended September 30. For the 13th year in a row, the brand reported record sales, settling at 1.25 billion. It’s also the 15th consecutive year of sales growth. A global network of nearly 19,000 licensed processor, foodservice and retail partners marketed an additional 38 million pounds—or a 3.1 percent increase—over the previous yea CAB president John Stika credits “an entire community of Angus farmers, ranchers and feeders being extremely intentional over several years in the way they breed, raise and care for their cattle with a focus on quality.” As a result, the CAB acceptance rate, or percentage of Angus-type cattle meeting the brand’s 10 carcass specifications, rose to a record 35 percent this year. Those 5.65 million certified carcasses came to 471,000 more than last year’s tally. “We basically had a thirteenth month of supply this year. That was really a big part of what allowed this brand to grow its sales,” Stika says. “You can’t turn a ship that big on a dime. It was several years of focus. That increase is significant because it doesn’t happen by random chance.”

32 California Cattleman November 2019

Without the sales to move that product, it becomes too much a good thing. “It takes a great number of people filling different yet connected roles for this growth,” Stika says. “Fortunately, there is a lot of room at the brand’s table.”

MONTHLY SALES RECORDS AND CATEGORY GROWTH CAB set sales records in all but 3 months of fiscal 2019; 6 months ranked among the top 10 sales months in the brand’s 41-year history. Propelled by strong consumer demand and relatively steady market prices, sales records spanned product categories. Backed by traditionally strong demand, sales of middle meats grew by 3.8 percent. Sales of roasts and other end meats increased 3.4 percent, and ground beef sales, boosted by the better burger movement, grew by 2 million pounds. Sales of the Certified Angus Beef brand Prime product extension grew by 36.6 percent—an achievement made possible by historically high availability of the most highly marbled product. “We used to think of this almost exclusively as a product for elite steakhouses, but this year retailers from coast to coast saw the opportunity to add to the offerings in their meat case,” he says. The brand provided encouragement in the way of business analysis and marketing support.


DIVISIONAL SUCCESS Global sales reached an alltime high of 207.5 million pounds, demonstrating the universal appeal of highly marbled, grain-fed beef among diverse cultures and markets. Japan led the way for growth, followed by Taiwan, Colombia and the Dominican Republic. Representing 43 percent of the brand’s sales, the retail division’s 8.8 percent gain was its fourth consecutive year of growth to achieve an all-time record of 537.5 million pounds. In addition to Prime product driving sales, retailers increasingly chose to feature CAB over lowerpriced protein options on the front page of their circulars. The foodservice division achieved a 4.6 percent increase. Largely driven by the efforts of licensed distributors, restaurants that actively promoted the brand on their menus more than doubled that benchmark and increased sales 10 percent over the previous year. Also, for the 10th consecutive year, sales of branded value-added products set a record, exceeding 33 million pounds. Processors offered more high-quality convenience meals in both retail and foodservice. All of this growth is possible because of the new dollars that flow into the business from customers who want more of the best. In 1998, beef demand was at an all-time low, Stika says. Since then, the entire beef industry has benefitted from a $60 billion increase in annual consumer spending. “Quality improved, and demand followed suit,” he says. “Producers didn’t just do it because it was the right thing to do. It was, but the improvement is also a result of the economic signals that say produce more quality and we’ll reward you for it.” Today, 18 percent of all fed cattle qualify for the brand—that’s more than the number that grade Select. “Our partners have been a meaningful part of that success,” Stika says. “Through their commitment to quality, they’ve helped direct the entire industry, drawing it closer to the consumer. As they do so, they’re providing a more sustainable future for all."

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Schedule your appointment today!

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Farm, Ranch, Recreational and all Rural Properties November 2019 California Cattleman 33


2019 FALL BULL & FEMALE SALE RESULTS & AVERAGES

SILVEIRA BROS. 'PARTNERS FOR PERFORMANCE' FEMALE SALE OCT. 12, FIREBAUGH, CA

EAGLE PASS RANCH BULL SALE

SEPT. 25, DOS PALOS, CA Col. Rick Machado 74 BALANCER AND SIMANGUS BULLS

$4,481

BEEF SOLUTIONS BULL SALE

$5,788

VINTAGE ANGUS ‘GENETIC GOLD’ PRODUCTION SALE

Bruin Ranch and Circle Ranch SEPT. 26, IONE, CA Col. Rick Machado & Col. John Rodgers 84 SIMANGUS BULLS 65 ANGUS BULLS

$5,035 $7,078

SIERRA RANCHES 'WESTERN TREASURES' SALE

SEPT. 27, MODESTO, CA Col. Rick Machado 30 HEREFORD BULLS 15 HEREFIRD FEMALES

Col. Rick Machado & Col. John Rodgers Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 78 FEMALE LOTS

$4,412 $5,053

OCT. 13, MODESTO, CA

$25,393

EZ ANGUS RANCH FEMALE SALE

OCT. 14, PORTERVILLE, CA Col. Steve Dorran 60 LOTS $23,254

THOMAS ANGUS RANCH BULL SALE

MCPHEE RED ANGUS PRODUCTION SALE SEPT. 28, LODI, CA

Col. Rick Machado 50 RED ANGUS BULLS 31 OPEN FEMALES

Col. Steve Dorran 84 LOTS AVERAGED

$4,369 $1,336

OCT. 17, BAKER CITY, OR Col. Rick Machado & Col. Trent Stewart 165 ANGUS BULLS

$5,230

TRAYNHAM RANCHES FEMALE SALE OCT. 1, FORT KLAMATH, OR

Col. Eric Duarte Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 53 ANGUS & SIMANGUS FEMALE LOTS $4,589 50 COMMERCIAL HEIFER PAIRS $1,980 35 COMMERCIAL BRED HEIFERS $1,568 7 PROJECT STEERS $2,857

BALDY MAKER BULL SALE

Traynham Ranches & Hufford Herefords OCT. 2, FORT KLAMATH, OR

Col. Eric Duarte Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 81 ANGUS HEREFORD AND SIMANGUS BULLS

$4,419

63RD ANNUAL CAL POLY BULL TEST SALE

OCT. 6, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers 76 ANGUS BULLS $3,861 2 RED ANGUS BULLS $2,800 2 SIMANGUS BULLS $5,000 1 HEREFORD BULL $2,000 18 POLLED HEREFORD BULLS $2,963

Supreme Champion Bull at the Turlock Livestock California Breeders Bull Sale was Greg Furtado of Furtado Angus, Turlock.

13TH ANNUAL 9 PEAKS RANCH ‘FIRST CHOICE’ BULL SALE

OCT. 8, FORT ROCK, OR Col. Eric Duarte 106 ANGUS BULLS $4,367

TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO. SALE BY THE SEA

OCT. 11, PISMO BEACH, CA Col. Rick Machado Managed by Cotton & Associates 57 ANGUS AND SIMANGUS BULL 7 FALL SIMANGUS HEIFERS

$5,098 $3,957

Greg Ramelli, center, was the free bull winner at the Beef Solutions Bull Sale in Ione. He is pictured with Jill Curran and Joe Fischer.

34 California Cattleman November 2019


invites you to a free workshop on

ANIMAL DISEASE TRACEABILITY UTILIZING VOLUNTARY TRACEABILITY TO ACCESS CURRENT & EMERGING MARKETS Understand economic factors impacting current and future export markets for U.S. beef Learn how to enroll and comply with third-party value added programs to improve the marketing potential of livestock See the value export markets provide for U.S. cattle producers Understand traceability & age-andsource verification requirements for value added programs Examine industry data to determine when best to invest in voluntary traceability and value added programs

DECEMBER 5, 2019 8:00-10:00 AM

PEPPERMILL RENO 2707 SOUTH VIRGINIA STREET RENO, NEVADA 89502

ERIN BORROR

U.S. Meat Export Federation

Beef export markets: An overview of the current economic situation & the projected forecast

JENNIFER & HERB HOLZAPFEL

Ranchers Connecting Ranchers

Maximizing the use of value added programs: A practical guide to voluntary third-party verified traceability programs

DR. TINA SAITONE

U.C. Davis Cooperative Extension

The value behind value added programs: “What’s the data say?”

LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT AND THE SCHEDULE OF SPEAKERS AT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG.

This material is based upon work supported by USDA/NIFA under Award Number 2018-70027-28587. November 2019 California Cattleman 35


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

SEPTEMBER 20

M i d Va l l e y

9th Annual

Thanks to all our buyers at the annual BCC Bull Sale!

THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Look for our “Distinctly Different” Angus Bulls at the 2020 Red Bluff & Modoc Bull Sales

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340

BULLS, FEMALES, EMBRYOS AND SEMEN FOR SALE AT THE RANCH IN LOS MOLINOS

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner (530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

36 California Cattleman November 2019

September 12, 2019


SEPTEMBER 20

Angus

RAnch

M i d Va l l e y

Annual Sale: September 1, 2018 Join usBull Oct. 14Sat., for our elite annual Inaugural Female Sale:female Mon., October bull and sales! 15, 2018

9th Annual

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

We hope to see you in Firebaugh Oct. 12 for our annual female sale! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2019.

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

Gerber, CA

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES!

Thank you for attending the annual TAR bull sale! Join us again in 2020!

O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

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Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

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Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

November 2019 California Cattleman 37


Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

A FAMILY TRADITION

Thank you to our 2019 production sale customers!

Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

CHAROLAIS THANK YOU TO ALL OUR 2019 BUYERS!

Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199 Call AHA today for assistance or information on buying or marketing of Hereford cattle!

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

THANK YOU TO OUR BUTTE AND MODOC BULL SALE BUYERS!

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12, 2019

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REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

38 California Cattleman November 2019

Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988


Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

JoinususOct for15, our2018 annual production sale iu Modesto! Join for our annual production sale!

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

Bulls and females available private treaty!

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

THE DOIRON FAMILY (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

November 2019 California Cattleman 39


SALE MANAGMENT

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Ranch Fencing Materials and Accessories & Ranch Supplies

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FARM EQUIPMENT BALE WAGONS

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sell/buy/deliver/can finance

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DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Monthly except July and August are combined

3. Filing Date

Oct. 21, 2019

_

8 3 6 0 0 5. Number of Issues Published Annually

6. Annual Subscription Price

11

$20

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

Agriculture/non-profit a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run) (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

Stevie Ipsen

208-996-4922

4550 Elgin Rd, New Plymouth, ID 83655 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

California Cattlemen's Association; 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

(2)

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®

Same as above 10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

5081

5321

4798

5010

1221 H Street, Sacramento CA 95814

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®)

c.  Total Paid Distribution [Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

(4)

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100) 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or None Other Securities. If none, check box

16. Electronic Copy Circulation

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

a. Paid Electronic Copies

0

0

b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

4798

5010

c.  Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

5071

5304

d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c Í 100)

94.61

94.41

I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price.

g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

Full Name

October 2019

17. Publication of Statement of Ownership

4798

5010

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail)

Stevie Ipsen; 4550 Elgin Rd, New Plymouth, ID 83655 Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

Calfornia Cattleman 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

Contact Person Telephone (Include area code)

1221 H Street, Sacramento CA 95814 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

California Cattlemen's Association

13. Publication Title

If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

Publication not required.

November 2019 in the ________________________ issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

10/21/19

273

296

273

296

5071

5306

10

15

5081

5321

94.61%

94.41%

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

* If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17 on page 3.

Complete Mailing Address

Pay for itself in first season!

(530) 949-2285

12.  Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931

40 California Cattleman November 2019

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 2 of 4)

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.


In Memory

Wedding bells

GLENN ALDRIDGE

HEELEY & PICKERING

Glenn Walter Aldridge passed away on September 4, 2019 in Redding, California. Glenn was born on the family ranch in Inwood, California on May 10, 1932 to Martha Caroline Meyer Aldridge and Walter Boyer Aldridge. He lived his eighty-seven years on the family ranch near Shingletown. On December 4, 1954 he married the love of his life Zettie Mae McKenney of Redding, California. Then came along two daughters Cindy Lou and Anna Marie. In 1938 his father, Walter purchased 25 Hereford cows. That was Glenn’s first big cow drive when he was 6 years old, probably about 12 miles. In 1974 he and wife Zettie Mae bought the ranch and cattle. Gradually increased the cow herd and kept straight Herefords until 1993 he purchased the first Angus bulls. Always having nice fat calves at the sale yard each fall. In 2012, Glenn sold the ranch but was always there was knowledge and wisdom about which cow and calf matched as a pair on his trusty horse Shorty. Glenn really enjoyed hunting deer on the ranch in the fall with the gang. Many

will remember him as the manager for the Ogburn/Inwood Cemetery since 1970s. Glenn was very active in the community serving on the school board for the Black Butte School for 18 years and the Inwood Task Force, and the Mt. Lassen Historical Society now the Shingletown Historical Society as President last 5 years. He was a director and past president of the Shasta County Farm Bureau and the Shasta County Cattlemen, 63 year member of the Millville Oddfellows Lodge #141 and Millville Rebekah Lodge #3. In 1999 he received the Distinguished Service award from Shasta County Farm Bureau. He is survived by one sister Martha Mae ”Pat” Stewart of Palo Cedro,., his wife Zettie Mae, daughters Cindy Scott (Steve) of Shingletown, and Anna Joiner (Craig) of Lookout. Five grandchildren, six greatgrandchildren, soon to be seven in March 2020, and ten nieces and nephews. A celebration of life was held on Saturday, September 14.Memorial donations may be made to the Shingletown Historical Society at P.O. Box 291, Shingletown, CA. 96088.

in the

CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION & NCBA TRADE SHOW FEBRUARY 5 - 7, 2020 Henry B. González Convention Center

Kailin Heely and Jake Pickering were married alongside famly and friends in a ranch ceremony held Oct. 19 at the famous Santa Margarita Ranch in Santa

Margarita. The bride is the daughter of Robert and Jill Heely of Paso Robles. She is employed by for Westway Feed. The groom works as the Southwestern Regional Manager for the American Angus Association and is the son of Kevin and Tina Pickering, Oroville The couple has made their first home in Paso Robles. TO SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS, CONTACT THE CCA OFFICE AT (916) 444-0845 OR EMAIL IT TO MAGAZINE@ CALCATTLEMEN.ORG

in the

TEXAS

#CattleCon20

CONVENTION.NCBA.ORG

CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION & NCBA TRADE SHOW FEBRUARY 5 - 7, 2020 November 2019 California Cattleman 41 TEXAS


Advertisersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Index Amador Angus............................................................. 36 American Ag Credit....................................................... 7 American Hereford Association................................... 38 Animal Health International........................................ 40 Bar KD Ranch.............................................................. 36 Bar R Angus ................................................................ 36 Bovine Elite, LLC......................................................... 40 Broken Box Ranch....................................................... 38 Buchanan Angus Ranch............................................... 36 Byrd Cattle Co.............................................................. 36 California Angus Days................................................. 25 Cattle Industry Convention.......................................... 41 Charron Ranch............................................................ 36 Chico State College of Ag............................................. 39 CoBank.......................................................................... 7 Conlin Supply Company, Inc........................................ 16 Dal Porto Livesstock.................................................... 36 Dixie Valley Angus..................................................36, 43 Donati Ranch............................................................... 36 EZ Angus Ranch.......................................................... 37 Farm Credit West........................................................... 7 Fresno State Ag Foundatio........................................... 39 Furtado Angus............................................................. 37 Furtado Livestock Enterprises..................................... 40 Genex........................................................................... 19 Genoa Livestock........................................................... 38 Harrell Herefords......................................................... 38 HAVE Angus................................................................ 37 Hogan Ranch............................................................... 37 Hone Ranch................................................................. 39 Hufford's Herefords..................................................... 38 J-H Feed Inc................................................................. 40 Jim Wilhite Bale Wagons.............................................. 40 JMM Genetics.............................................................. 40 Knipe Land Company.................................................. 40 Lambert Ranch............................................................ 38 Leachman Topline Cattle............................................. 23 Little Shasta Ranch...................................................... 39 M3 Marketing.............................................................. 40

42 California Cattleman November 2019

Maple Leaf Seed Company........................................... 31 McPhee Red Angus...................................................... 38 Mike Helms Real Estate................................................ 33 Morrell Ranches........................................................... 38 New Generation Supplements...................................... 10 Noahs Angus Ranch..................................................... 37 O'Connell Ranch.......................................................... 37 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co.............................................. 39 Pacific Trace Minerals.................................................. 40 Pitchfork Cattle Co....................................................... 39 Ranchers Heifer Sale.................................................... 31 Red River Farms.......................................................... 37 Ritchie Manufacturing................................................. 33 Rollin Rock Genetic Partners....................................... 17 Running M Group........................................................ 40 Sammis Ranch............................................................. 37 Schafer Ranch.............................................................. 37 Schohr Herefords......................................................... 39 Shasta Farm Equipment............................................... 18 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard..................................... 21 Sierra Ranches............................................................. 39 Silveira Bros................................................................. 37 Sonoma Mountain Herefords....................................... 39 Soutwest Fence and Supply.......................................... 40 Spanish Ranch............................................................. 39 Stanislaus Farm Supply................................................ 12 Stepaside Farms........................................................... 37 Sweetlix....................................................................... 30 Tehama Angus Ranch................................................... 37 Teixeira Cattle Company.........................................27, 38 Thomas Angus Ranch.................................................. 13 Tumbleweed Ranch...................................................... 39 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard..................................... 2 VF Red Angus.............................................................. 38 Vintage Angus Ranch..............................................38, 44 Western Staes Hereford Show....................................... 31 Western Video Market................................................... 3 Wulff Brothers Livestock.............................................. 38


“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS”

$40/unit

$30/unit

JINDRA STONEWALL Owned with Nick Jindra

Sire: Jindra Acclaim • MGS: Jindra Double Vision

DIABLO DELUXE 110

Owned with Spruce Mountain Ranch & Judson & Denise Baldridge

Sire: V A R Discovery 2240 • MGS: GAR Prophet

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

+9

+.5

+75

+143

+32

+.86

+.58

211

+6

+1.2

+88

+160

+26

+1.06

-.006

195

$30/unit

$35/unit

STERLING ADVANTAGE 809

BALDRIDGE COLONEL C251

Sire: Connealy Confidence Plus • MGS:Connealy Consensus

Sire: Baldridge Xpand X743 • MGS: Styles Upgrade J59

Semen on this outstanding bull, born Jan. 2018 is now available!

Owned with Spruce Mountain Ranch & Mangell Inc

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

+11

-.3

+74

+139

+30

+.78

+.91

183

+2

+1.7

+65

+121

+17

+.69

+1.02

160

CONTACT US TODAY ABOUT PURCHASING SEMEN ON ANY OF THESE OUTSTANDING ANGUS A.I. SIRES!

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com


THE BULL SALE

VINTAGE ANGUS WOULD LIKE TO THANK OUR 2019 BULL BUYERS... 214 BULLS GROSSED $1,526,861

V A R BEST BUY 8577

2019 “CARCASS MAKER” BULL SALE CUSTOMERS

CED

BW

WW

YW

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$M

$W

$F

$G

$B

$Combined

5

1.7

75

134

28

64

0.97

0.93

69

81

117

77

194

321

A special Thank You to Edison Pines Angus, Leesville, S.C., for their selection of VAR Best Buy 8577 as the top-selling $90,000 half-interest bull of the 2019 VAR Bull Sale. Sired by Sydgen Enhance and out of VAR Dam VAR Blackcap 9319.

Thank you to our commercial cattlemen for a great sale from start to finish! 55

NUMBER OF BULLS

50 45 40

3 Brand Cattle Co., CA Alta Genetics, AB Aurignac, Paul, CA Avila Ranch, CA Bazarro Ranch, CA Bengard Ranch, CA Bently Ranches, NV Bettencourt Livestock, CA Booth Ranches, CA Boston Ranch, CA Jeff Bowen, CA Robert Brunker, CA Byrd Cattle Co., CA Centennial Livestock, CA Costa Land & Cattle, CA Robert Cree, CA Carl Daniel, CA JW Dell’Orto, CA Stan & Robin Dell’Orto, CA Echeverria Cattle Co., CA Edisto Pines Farm, SC Leisel Finley, CA Flying RJ Ranch, CA Flynn Cattle Company, CA Kelly Fogarty, CA William Fogarty, CA Jody Fuller, CA Garone Ranch, CA Grigory Ranch, CA Grimmius Cattle, CA Hoover Cattle Co., CA Paul Ichord, CA Indian Valley Cattle Co., CA Jim & Michelle Prewett, CA Justin Rhoades, CA Natalie Koopmann, CA Lone Oaks Springs, CA

Lone Pine Ranch, CA Mapes Ranch, CA Martin Land & Cattle, CA McDonald Properties, CA Mendoza Ranch, CA Joe Murray, CA Logan Nuttall, CA Paul Righetti Ranch Company, CA Jon Pedotti, CA Charles Perkins, CA Mary Piasecki, CA Paul Raggio, CA Rancheria Land & Livestock, CA Rancho San Julian Cattle, CA Redfern Ranch, CA Roy Richards, CA Rogers Cattle, CA Ruman Ranch, CA Rumsey Indian Rancheria, CA Dan Sachau, CA San Benito Cattle Co., CA Santa Margarita Cattle Co., CA David Scheller, CA Scribner Livestock, CA Shining C Ranch, CA SJR Cattle Co, CA Soaring Eagle Farms, MO Southern Fork Cattle Co, CA ST Genetics, TX Sun Up Enterprises, CA Tacherra, CA Jimmy Taylor, OK Thunder Creek Cattle, CA Unicor FPI, KY Williams Livestock, CA Greg Yates, CA

35 30 25 20 15 10 $10,000+ $8,000+ $7,000+ $6,000+ $5,000+ $4,000+ under $4,000

With over 200 bulls selling, we have quality at every price!

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805) 748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

Profile for California Cattleman

November 2019 California Cattleman  

November 2019 California Cattleman