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Introducing in this special convention issue...

2019-2020 CCA President

Mark Lacey January 2019 California Cattleman 1


2 California Cattleman January 2019


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WYNDHAM HOTEL, VISALIA, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE MARCH 25

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Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy.

January 2019 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Mark Lacey, Independence FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

Anthony Toso, Hornitos SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita Greg Kuck, Montague Cindy Tews, Fresno

2019 CCA OFFICERS CCA PRESIDENT Mark Lacey mjlacey1@me.com (760) 878-2550

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Anthony Toso (209) 988-4468 cottoncrk@aol.com

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Steve Arnold Pozovalley@aol.com (805) 235-7840

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Greg Kuck gregkuck@yahoo.com (530) 459-3656

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Cindy Tews beefnmore@aol.com (559) 970-6892

TREASURER Rob von der Lieth rvdlieth@aol.com (916) 769-1153

TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Brendlen

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Jenna Chandler

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Katie Roberti

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com magazine@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane mobile: (916) 803-3113 office: (916) 434-5970 M3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

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SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher.

Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, Mo. Publication # 8-3600 National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 California Cattleman January 2019


ON THE COVER This month’s cover photo, taken by Cain Madrigal, Smith Valley, Nev., was shot in Bridgeport and features newlyelected CCA President Mark Lacey, a lifelong rancher from Independence who will serve the association through 2020.

JANUARY 2019 Volume 102, Issue 1

PERSPECTIVES CATTLE COUNCIL REFERENDUM get educated on how you should vote

6

BUNKHOUSE 8 New year and CCA priorities in Sacramento

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

10

VET VIEWS

18

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD

58

2018 policy resolutions and directives Breaking down Brucellosis Big year for beef

SPECIAL FEATURES

Getting to know the new CCA President Business and pleasure at the 102nd Convention California CattleWomen mentions and awards Schene Enterprises gets commercial producer award Pacific Legal representing CCA on key issues Hereford breeders raise money for Camp Fire victims CCA & CCW Photo Contest winners 2018-2019 CCA Scholarship Winners Study on animal traceability opinions

READER SERVICES Obituaries Buyer’s guide New Arrivals Ad Index

14 22 30 36 38 48 54 56 60 70 72 77 78

UPCOMING INDUSTRY EVENTS JAN. 5

TEHAMA COUNTY CATTLEMEN WINTER DINNER Red Bluff

JAN. 22-26

RED BLULL BULL & GELDING SALE Red Bluff

JAN. 30 TO FEB. 1

CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION & NCBA TRADE SHOW New Orleans, La.

JAN. 31-FEB. 3 FEB. 15

KLAMATH FALLS BULL SALE Klamath Falls WORLD AG EXPO Tulare

MARCH 16-17

CCW SPRING MEETING Visalia

To list your group’s events here, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0844 or e-mail magazine@calcattlemen.org.

January 2019 California Cattleman 5


CALIFORNIA CATTLE COUNCIL REFERENDUM

THE CHANCE TO DEFEND OUR WAY OF LIFE I am excited to share with you that in 2019 cattle ranchers will have a historic opportunity to create the California Cattle Council. Early this year, the California Department of Food and Agriculture will call an election to establish the California Cattle Council with ranchers having the final say on its outcome. Why is this important to us? Simply stated, establishing the Cattle Council will put power back into the hands of ranchers who for too long have had their hands tied behind their backs while facing relentless attacks by activists and front groups who want to drive us out of business and destroy our way of life. Fortunately, establishing the Cattle Council through a majority vote of California cattle producers will allow us to defend our business and protect our future. To do that, I’m asking you to join me, our Steering Committee and our regional leadership to spread the word on the importance of a “yes” vote when the election is called. In short, the Cattle Council Referendum will help us establish the California Cattle Council, the sole purpose of which will be to strengthen our cattle industry and ensure our ranching heritage remains in our hands. Together with Mark Lacey, Tony Toso and Sheila Bowen, I ask for your help in securing this historic opportunity. To that end, you’ll be hearing from me as well as other ranchers from across California who are working to establish the Cattle Council and to provide us the opportunity to defend against radical front groups. Your support in establishing the California Cattle Council won’t make cattle ranching any easier but it will give us a historic opportunity to defend our ranching heritage. Once the California Department of Food and Agriculture sets the date for the election, we will begin to provide you with more information about this historic opportunity and how you can help. In the meantime, if you have any questions about the referendum or want to become involved with our campaign, please give me a call. My cell is (530) 521-3826.

DAVE DALEY,

Chairman, Cattle Council Referendum Steering Committee

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STEERING COMMITTEE

Dave Daley, Mark Lacey, Tony Toso, Sheila Bowen

OUTREACH COMMITTEE

Siskiyou, Modoc, Lassen, Fall River-Big Valley: Greg Kuck Humboldt-Del Norte, Mendocino, Sonoma-Marin, Napa-Solano: Walt Giacominni Shasta, Plumas-Sierra, Tehama, Butte, Glenn-Colusa, Yuba-Sutter, Tahoe, Yolo: Dave Daley Santa Clara, Contra Costa-Alameda: Tim Koopmann Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento, Calaveras, San Joaquin-Stanislaus, Tuolumne: Pat Kirby Merced-Mariposa, Madera, Fresno-Kings: Tony Toso Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo: Claude Loftus Tulare, Kern, Inyo-Mono-Alpine: Tom Talbot San Diego-Imperial, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles: Mike Williams Feeder Council Representatives: Trevor Freitas & Jesse Larios

WW

STILL HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE CALIFORNIA CATTLE COUNCIL REFERENDUM? PLEASE VISIT CALCATTLECOUNCIL.ORG OR CALL (916) 444-0845

WHAT WILL THE CALIFORNIA CATTLE COUNCIL DO?

#1

Allows Cattle Ranchers to Defend Our Way of Life

#2

Provides Local Control: Establishes a Board Made Up of Cattle Producers

If approved, the California Cattle Council will fund research, education and promotion that will focus on issues facing ranchers and live cattle production. Most importantly, we will have the ability to defend against the baseless attacks launched by those who seek to put us out of business. Under the current framework governing the California Beef Council, cattle producers have no ability to work on issues related to live cattle production—upon passage of the Cattle Council, we will.

This Board will not only direct the activities of the Council, it will also ensure that the Council is not subject to the federal beef checkoff program or be influenced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. The Council will be responsive to the unique needs and issues facing live cattle production exclusively in California.

#3

Guarantees Refund Provision for Ranchers Who Do Not Want to Participate With the establishment of the California Cattle Council comes an ironclad guarantee that if you don’t want your money to go to the Cattle Council, you will be refunded in full.

January 2019 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE Turning the page CCA staff looks ahead to 2019 by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur As the calendar flips from 2018 to 2019, CCA embraces new leadership, new opportunities and new challenges.As we greet a new year, CCA also greets a new officer team. Each CCA president brings his own priorities to the office, and I’m excited to see what issues Mark Lacey, Independence, highlights for us over the next two years. One of Mark’s signature issues is already clear: reducing the risk and impact of wildfires which have become increasingly devastating, a goal CCA staff is eager to advance as the 2019-20 legislative session gets underway. I also look forward to getting to know First Vice President Tony Toso, Hornitos, as we travel the state in the spring and fall touring local associations. And while I’m well-acquainted with Second Vice Presidents Greg Kuck, Montague, and Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita, from my travels to Siskiyou and San Luis Obispo counties, respectively, I look forward to hearing their insights and perspectives on statewide issues over the coming years. I urge each of you to make it out to your local association meetings as CCA’s new officer team tours the state this coming spring and fall. In addition to getting to know CCA’s leadership team, these “tour meetings” present you with the opportunity to highlight your most pressing local concerns to your state officers—who will encourage the staff in Sacramento to do everything we can to provide assistance. (Of course, welcoming new officers requires saying goodbye to the “old” ones. It’s been my pleasure getting to know former Second Vice Presidents Pat Kirby, Wilton, and Mike Miller, San Jose, since 2016, and I appreciate everything that immediate past president Dave Daley, Oroville, has done for the Association—from the Strategic Plan to revitalizing CalPLC to acting as the chief advocate for the California Cattle Council—and all he continues to do on behalf of CCA, PLC and NCBA.)

8 California Cattleman January 2019

2019 also brings with it opportunities for the California beef industry. Perhaps chief among those opportunities is the upcoming referendum on whether to establish the California Cattle Council. Should the Council be formed, it will help fund research, education and promotion of livecattle issues, helping consumers understand the benefits of grazing and cattle production and aiding the industry in defending against attacks from environmental activists. In his staff column at this time last year, CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin emphasized the importance of the 2018 elections in furthering CCA’s mission (which is to “enhance and promote a more favorable business environment for California producers”). Though there’s no midterm or general election in 2019, the Cattle Council referendum presents another excellent opportunity for the state’s cattle ranchers to vote to enhance and promote a more favorable business environment for California beef. Of course, 2019 will not be without its challenges. Right at the outset of the year, the State Water Resources Control Board is likely to direct its attention to an expansive Waters of the State regulation. At the federal level, a Democratically-controlled House of Representatives may stymie legislative efforts to promote a favorable climate for farmers and ranchers. As a new administration takes power in California and new legislative sessions begin in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., however, it remains to be seen exactly what challenges will face the ranching community in the coming year. Regardless, your CCA team in Sacramento stands ready for the fight. As we close the book on 2018, I am optimistic about the coming year at CCA. I look forward to another year of getting to know California’s cattlemen, better understanding the issues beef producers confront every day and advocating for the best membership in the state.


TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO. PRESENTS

Performance Plus Bull Sale February 18, 2019 • 1:00PM • Terrebonne , OR

Family Owned and Operated

130 BULLS BEING SOLD

TEX Cavalry 8042 | Reg: 19085171

• Son out of Rita 1C43 • Half brother of TEX Playbook

TEX Payweight 7447 | Reg: 18959107 • Full sibiling to TEX Playbook

TEX Playbook 5437 continues to be one of the hottest bulls in the industry. He consistently sires quality, high performing calves. Don’t miss the opportunity to own siblings and/or progeny!

TEX Playbook 8056 | Reg: 19103054

• Sired by TEX Playbook out of a full sister to TEX Demand • This TEX Playbook son has a $B of 200

Dear Friends,

Rita 1C43 continues to be a top producer of impressive progeny for the Teixeira Cattle Co. program. Eight sons offered in the sale. Don’t miss the opportunity to own progeny of this striking dam!

Our family would like to invite you to our annual premier bull sale in beautiful Terrebonne, OR. For more than six generations, our family has been in the agriculture industry – a tradition we do not take lightly. Every year we are committed to expanding and bettering our program. God continues to bless us and family is what has made this successful – allowing us to offer quality cattle every year. We are excited to be offering such an incredible group of bulls.

The Teixeira Family

John, Heather, Nathan, Joseph and Ben Teixeira John’s Cell: 805-448-3859

Allan and Cee Teixeira Allan’s Cell: 805-310-3353

BE SURE TO ASK ABOUT OUR TCC IGENITY DNA PROGRAM.

3475 NW Lower Bridge Way Terrebonne, OR 97760 | 805-595-1420 | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com | www.teixeiracattleco.com


DUES DOLLARS AT WORK Members move the policy process forward

CCA RELEASES GRASS ROOTS POLICY FROM CONVENTION From November 28-30, CCA members gathered at the 102nd Annual CCA & CCW Convention to set policy directing CCA staff on a number of issues facing the California cattle industry. Below is a brief overview of the policies and staff directives that were adopted by the membership at this year’s Convention.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that CCA seek or support legislation to increase the statutory fee to reflect the proposed fee increase approved by the Advisory Board on November 20, 2018. COORDINATE DROUGHT MONITOR REPORTING—Staff Directive

Please note that the “WHEREAS” clauses have been omitted for brevity. This list does not include the many BE IT DIRECTED, that CCA staff assist the University resolutions and staff directives that were set to expire but of California to develop a survey system that will enable were readopted or amended by CCA membership. To see the members and local associations to submit information to the full CCA policy book, click “CCA Policy” under the “About U.S. Drought Monitor when drought impacts their areas, and CCA” tab at www.calcattlemen.org BE IT FURTHER DIRECTED, that survey information Ag & Food Policy be sent to the U.S. Drought Monitor through CCA so that information can be organized and centrally reported. BRAND INSPECTION FEES SPLIT SPEED LIMIT—Staff Directive BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Cattlemen’s BE IT DIRECTED, that CCA support efforts to Association (CCA) support the fee increase proposed by eliminate the split speed limit for single vehicles and vehicles the Bureau of Livestock Identification and approved by towing a trailer so that all vehicles, regardless if they are the Advisory Board on November 20, 2018 to reflect the towing a trailer, can travel the speed limit established for a following change: single vehicle. · Hide Inspection $1.70 to $2.00, Cattle Health & Well Being · Registered Feedlots; CA Ranch to Feedlot Inspection $0.64 to $0.75, SUPPORT FOR BRUCELLOSIS ERADICATION · Registered Feedlots; Salesyard and Out of State Cattle AND PREVENTION $0.43 to $0.50, · Ranch Inspection – Change of Ownership $1.25 to BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Cattlemen’s $1.50, Association (CCA) support surveillance programs to prevent · Out of State – Sale $1.25 to $1.50, the introduction and reintroduction of Brucellosis into our · Out of State – Pasture Movement $1.25 to $1.50, livestock herds, and · Out of Modified Point of Origin Area $1.25 to $1.50, · Salesyard $1.25 to $1.50, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that CCA strongly · Slaughter $1.25 to $1.50; and ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

10 California Cattleman January 2019


Modoc Bull Sale

February 15, 2019 Alturas, CA POLLED & HORNED HEREFORD BULLS WITH BREED-LEADING GENETICS! WITH 19 FALL 2017 ANGUS BULLS FROM GUEST CONSIGNOR

BAR KD RANCH

pre sale viewing all day: Modoc Auction Yard CA-299, Alturas, CA

4 p.m. Sale & Dinner:

Niles Hotel 304 South Main St. Alturas, CA

AUCTIONEER: COL. ERIC DUARTE

Also, watch for top bulls from both of these programs to sell in Red Bluff Jan. 26!

CALL US FOR A CATALOG OR VISIT US ONLINE

LAMBERTRANCHHEREFORDS.COM BAr KD Ranch Kenny & Dianne Read Ranch: 541.546.2547 Cell: 541.480.9340 culver, OR

www.barkdranch.com

The Lambert Family Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 Oroville • Chester •Alturas•

slambert@digitalpath.net

lambertranchherefords.com January 2019 California Cattleman 11


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 encourage all California ranchers to vaccinate beef heifers that will be added to the breeding herd and support voluntary interstate and intrastate calf-hood vaccination programs specifically for intact females of beef breeds to prevent Brucellosis in our livestock herds, and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that CCA support efforts in other states for the complete eradication and prevention of Brucellosis, including eradication in the cattle and wildlife herds in the greater Yellowstone area and elsewhere, and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that CCA support the lawful use of the RB51 vaccine in California for mature vaccination in instances where calf-hood vaccination was not utilized and mature vaccination will not jeopardize California’s “Brucellosis Free” status, and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that CCA support the development and implementation of other science-based regulations to aid in control of Brucellosis and to provide economic benefits to producers. Property Rights & Environmental Management WOLF POLICY SUBCOMMITTEE BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Cattlemen’s

Association create a subcommittee appointed by the CCA President to address the presence of wolves in California. The subcommittee shall be comprised of individuals who have been involved with the wolf issue and shall focus on working with appropriate agencies and associations to deal with wolf presence, pursue legal procedures to remove animals that pose a clear and present danger to humans and/or domestic animals, and to control predation by feral dogs, wolf-dog hybrids, and domestically-raised wolves, which are not protected under Federal or State law. Staff shall keep the subcommittee informed about agency actions and shall consult with the subcommittee relative to interaction with outside organizations related to wolves. SINGLE SPECIES MANAGEMENT BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Cattlemen’s Association support state and federal policies that recognizes the complex interrelationships among public trust resources, including water and wildlife, at the local, state and federal levels. AIR QUALITY BURN PERMIT FEES—Staff Directive BE IT DIRECTED, that California Cattlemen’s Association staff seek to reduce or eliminate local fees collected to process permits that authorize the use of prescribed fire whether legislatively or through negotiations with local air quality management districts.

SQUEEZE CHUTES HEAD GATES CATTLE WORKING SYSTEMS CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

Contact Conlin Supply about Special Sale Pricing at the Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale and the World Ag Expo!

Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products...

576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • 12 California Cattleman January 2019


Check us out on FaceBook at: January 2019 California Cattleman Klamath Bull and Horse Sale

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FOR THE LOVE LEGACY, LIFESTYLE & LIVELIHOOD

©Madcan photos

14 California Cattleman January 2019


Second Generation President at the CCA Helm in 2019-2020 by CCA Communications Director Jenna Chandler When fourth generation rancher, Mark Lacey’s, family settled not far from Independence, in 1867, they couldn’t have known the impact that their family would have on the Golden State’s cattle industry. But when you talk to the incoming, second generation CCA President, he’s humble and seems ready to roll up his sleeves and get down to work for the industry he loves in his new leadership role. And it’s the classic work hard, get down to business attitude that also marks his upbringing and that Lacey hopes marks his presidency as well. Lacey’s early days were spent on his family’s ranch in Mono County, a typical cow/calf operation of the time. Always trying to stay one step ahead of the next best business opportunity, in the 70s the family’s patriarch and cattle industry legend, John Lacey, Paso Robles, bought a ranch in Montana and moved the family there. While the land was beautiful and they managed the cold winters just fine, it was clear, Lacey said, that soon after they arrived in Montana, haying an integral part of the operation there, just wasn’t for the family. “We were just never farmers. If there was grass we figured the cows ought to be cutting it,” he laughed. But by that time, the elder Lacey’s financial investment had paid off. The land had appreciated, the opportunity to get out presented itself and the family headed back to California.

Seeking somewhere a little more paved than Independence while the kids went to school, the Lacey family headed to the Central Coast where Mark attended elementary, middle and high school before attending California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo for college. When Mark Lacey speaks of what his upbringing was like and of his past, it sounds like something straight out of any Louis L’Amour novel. The summers of most of his early days he spent in cow camps on the edge of the Mojave Desert, on Department of Defense land that the family ran cows on. Moving cows to different meadows, moving salt and chopping wood all became his annual ritual. From 1977 to 1993 he was in the camps, almost always by himself, from June to October. He would come back one day before school started, to knock the dirt off, shower and get ready for civilization again. For years, he says, he was the only one on the mountain, wit no roads, no electricity and everything was packed in on mules. The most modern comfort he had was a Coleman propane burner, just to get the coffee going in the morning, and at just under 9,000 feet elevation , you need all the help you can get to get ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

January 2019 California Cattleman 15


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 that water boiling. Times changedn though, unfortunately, and according to Lacey, pressures from environmental groups, the encroachment of the Pacific Coast Trail and efforts to protect the Golden trout resulted in the land not being realistically usable for grazing any longer. But, as ranchers usually do, the family and operation adapted and new leases and ranches were attained. Into the 80s, Lacey Livestock leased a few ranches in Colorado as well and Mark spent a considerable amount of time going back and forth between California and the Centennial State. If he had not had so many commitments here, he says, he may have just ended up staying there altogether, but he decided to come back, changing both his future and that of the California cattle industry. About that time he married his wife, Brenda, whom he met in college and says is the quintessential Ventura beach girl who makes sure he lets her see the ocean at least once a year. But don’t let that beach girl fool you, she’s no stranger to agriculture and is a high school

agriculture teacher herself. Mark’s two daughters, Molly and Katie joined the family in 1995 and 1998, respectively, and it’s clear when you speak with Lace, that they are among his most treasured inspirations and a major driver of the work he puts in to preserving the beef cattle industry in California. “I want my kids to have it, I want their kids to have the opportunity if they want it, and everyone else’s kids, too,” Lacey says of life in the beef business. And it’s evident when he talks about his plans for his next two years as president of CCA that he’s committed to making that happen, and has some big ideas on how to make it so. Membership, according to Lacey, is going to be one of the keys. “I have heard people say that we don’t represent all of the cattlemen in California. While all of the cattlemen in California may not be members, when someone in a [regulatory] agency or in the legislature needs information, they don’t call these other organizations, they call us; they call CCA. So, while you may not be members, practically, you are represented by us.”

We were just never farmers. If there was grass we figured the cows ought to be cutting it.

– Mark Lacey

CCA President

16 California Cattleman January 2019


And it’s that message, he says, that he wants to get out to cattlemen across the state who may not be members yet to encourage them to get engaged and come into the fold. “I don’t have a problem with people disagreeing with me or disagreeing with what we do at CCA, but if you’re not going to be a member you aren’t even part of the debate,” Lacey said. Adding value to membership by exploring other sources of non-dues revenue is also how he hopes to increase membership value and to woo those non-members. “It shouldn’t always come off the backs of our membership, I want to get creative about revenue streams,” he says. Fire is another issue he hopes to use to gain political capital with legislators that haven’t always been on cattle ranching’s side, using the recent blazes to further demonstrate the need for livestock grazing on California’s open landscape. “Fire is going to continue to be an issue in California. We need to offer solutions. We need to be involved in that conversation because we manage so much of California’s open space. Because there is going to be a lot of focus on it, maybe there is a way to codify, to put into law, the California cattle business and how important we are to grazing and fuel reduction,” Lacey says. Recognizing the temperature of the current political climate, taking advantage of the California cattle industry’s diversity is also high on the priority list to stack the deck in favor of ranching. “California is a diverse state and so is the cattle industry and we need to highlight that [to legislators and regulators]. I am disappointed that we haven’t had a woman as a president of the association, it’s way past time. Not as a token, not as a figurehead. It’s a big tent and the door is open. “There are so many strong cattle producers in the state, if we aren’t utilizing them, especially with the current women’s movement the way that it is, we are missing out, and I don’t want to miss out. “I also want to keep the youth movement going. There are a lot of promising young producers that I see in the [CCA Leadership Series] that I want to get and keep engaged sooner. I know it’s hard, they’re young, raising their families and growing their operations, but I want to get them involved earlier,” Lacey said. Lacey says he does feel lucky, though, to

be the age that he is and that his particular age and upbringing give him a unique perspective for leading CCA, straddling eras, comfortable with both the old ways and new. “I’m old enough where you weren’t going to be on the cowboy crew if you couldn’t shoe your own horses and when I was in college you had to pay someone to type your term paper on a typewriter, but I’ve seen a lot of changes – cultural, social and technological – in the beef business,” indicating a receptiveness to the openminded ideas and strategies often required when dealing with California’s legislature and political state. But as open as he may be to the new, it’s clear that his heart, his philosophy and outlook on life and business are rooted in the old principles and classic traditions of the cattle industry. “Our philosophy is tradition as far as the cattle thing goes. We believe in horses and cattle and dogs and that’s a big part of our operation and how I’ve always been.” And for the next president of the California Cattlemen’s Association, moving toward the future while carrying the light of the past, there’s probably not much better to believe in.

Mark and John Lacey January 2019 California Cattleman 17


VET VIEWS Breaking Down Brucellosis

why we bangs vaccinate and what’s at stake from the California Department of Food and Agriculture Brucellosis, also known as contagious abortion or Bang’s disease, is a contagious disease of livestock that also affects humans. In humans, it is known as undulant fever because of the intermittent fever that may accompany infection. It is one of the most serious diseases of livestock due to its ability to spread rapidly and cause significant reproductive losses in animals, and its zoonotic potential. Cause The disease is caused by a group of bacteria of the genus Brucella. Within this group there are several species of concern in livestock: Brucella suis, which predominately affects swine and reindeer, but can also affect cattle and bison; Brucella melitensis, the most important species in small ruminants, is not present in the United States (U.S.) but is common in Mexico; Brucella ovis affects sheep, and can cause infertility in rams; and Brucella abortus, which is the most common cause of brucellosis and mainly affects cattle. In cattle, the disease usually localizes in the reproductive organs and the udder. Bacteria are shed in milk or leave the body with the aborted fetus, placenta, or with any discharges from the reproductive tract of an infected animal. Brucellosis is commonly transmitted by direct contact, but can also be transmitted to animals that come into contact with a contaminated environment. Aborted fetuses, placental membranes and/or fluids, and the vaginal discharge that persists for several weeks after an animal has aborted all carry the bacteria. A herd owner buying replacement cattle that have been infected or exposed prior to purchase can transmit the disease between herds. A national eradication program has left most of the U.S. free of bovine brucellosis; however, a reservoir remains in the Greater Yellowstone Area, particularly in elk and bison, and spillover transmission does occur to domestic cattle herds. Incubation The incubation period in cattle is quite variable, with abortions and stillbirths occurring two weeks to five months after infection. Cattle may be infected as calves but not show any signs of infection until they abort. Infected animals usually develop a positive reaction to the test within 30-60 days after infection, although some may 18 California Cattleman January 2019

not develop a positive reaction for several months. Symptoms There is no sure way to detect infected cattle by their appearance. The most obvious signs in female cattle are abortion, birth of weak or stillborn calves, and vaginal discharge. Not all infected cows abort, but those that do usually abort between the fifth and seventh month of pregnancy. Even though their calves may appear healthy, infected cows can continue to harbor and discharge infectious organisms. Other signs include an apparent lowering of fertility with poor conception rates, retained placenta with resulting uterine infection and decreased lactation. Surveillance Three surveillance procedures are used to detect infection in cattle: Market Cattle Identification (MCI) program blood samples at slaughter, Brucellosis Ring Test (BRT) performed on milk samples, and brucellosis blood testing done on animals for movement or change of ownership by private practitioners. The primary surveillance method is a blood test from a sample of cattle more than two-years-old at slaughter (MCI program). Numbered tags or backtags are placed on ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 20


SHAW CATTLE CO.

Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, February 20, 2019

450 Angus, Hereford & Red Angus Bulls • 12 noon

MST,

at the ranch, Caldwell, ID

H E L P I N G C U S TO M E R S BU I L D C OW H E R D S F O R OV E R 7 0 Y E A R S !

Hereford AI sires include: BoomTown, Dynasty, Integrity, Peerless 55000, Trust 167 & Revolution 66128.

Angus AI sires include: Payweight, Resource, Powerball, Response, Command, Aviator & Rampage.

Red Angus AI sires include: Merlin, Fusion, Oscar & Nightcalver.

 Our cow herd is built on cow families. Many half, three quarter and full siblings are included.  All bulls sell with genomic-enhanced EPDs.  Data driven performance—accuracy your cow herd can depend on.  Cattle that calve easy with gain and performance through finish.  Actual Birth, Weaning and Yearling Weight data, EPDs and genomic testing, but most importantly…Cow Sense! REQUEST YOUR CATALOG NOW. VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

SHAW CATTLE CO. Since 1946

22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 greg@shawcattle.com www.shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

 First Breeding Season Guarantee  Sight-unseen Purchases Fully Guaranteed  Family Owned & Operated for over 70 Years January 2019 California Cattleman 19


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 the shoulders of all cattle being marketed. Blood samples are collected at packing plants according to the National Brucellosis Surveillance Plan. If a sample reacts to the test, it is traced by the backtag number to the owner of the herd from which the animal originated. The owner is contacted by a state or federal animal health official to arrange for an investigation that may involve testing the entire herd. The key to the MCI program is proper identification of all animals so they can be traced to their herds of origin. Backtags and other man-made identification devices are collected and sent to a diagnostic laboratory along with matching blood samples to aid in identifying ownership of reactors. A second surveillance method is a screening milk test called the BRT. If there is suspicion from a live animal or slaughter sample test, a small sample obtained from the creamery or farm milk tank can be tested for evidence of brucellosis. Milk from each cow in the herd is included in the sample taken for testing. All positive herds are investigated. The final surveillance method is a blood sample taken from a live animal by an accredited veterinarian for the purpose of private sales, change of ownership, interstate movement, herd certification or show, at the expense of the owner. Brucellosis testing must be done at a CDFA or USDA approved laboratory. Prevention Currently, there is a cooperative state-federal brucellosis eradication program to eliminate the disease from the U.S. livestock population. Like other animal disease eradication efforts, success of the program depends on the participation of livestock producers. The program’s Uniform Methods and Rules (2003) set forth the minimum standards for states to achieve eradication. States are designated brucellosis free when no cattle or bison are found to be infected for 12 consecutive months. California has been brucellosis free since 1997. Human Health Brucellosis in humans, also known as undulant fever, is a serious disease. It can present as a nonspecific, flu-like illness lasting two to four weeks. Some symptoms persist or reoccur over longer periods of time, and may never go away. Other signs can include fatigue and headaches, followed by high fever, chills, drenching sweats, joint pain, backache and loss of weight and appetite. Death does not often occur, but the complications from the disease can be severe. Rarely, if ever, does a human contract the disease from another human. Only 115 cases of human brucellosis were reported in the U.S. in 2010 (CDC Brucellosis Surveillance). California had the highest number of reported cases that year (26). Primary sources of human infection are occupational exposure (farmers, ranches, veterinarians, packing plant workers, etc.) and consumption of imported unpasteurized dairy products; people also may become infected during travel to countries where disease is more prevalent. There is no danger from 20 California Cattleman January 2019

eating cooked meat or properly pasteurized dairy products because normal cooking temperatures kill the diseasecausing bacteria. Consuming only pasteurized dairy products can reduce the likelihood of infection. People handling or exposed to livestock can prevent infection and spread by disinfecting areas likely to become contaminated and keeping them clean (e.g. animal maternity pens and equipment), wearing appropriate personal protective equipment such as sturdy rubber or plastic gloves when assisting cows calving or animals that abort, and scrubbing well with soap and water after all contact with animals. Practices to prevent cuts and contamination of cuts and eyes with bodily fluids of animals are recommended. Exercise care in handling and disposing of placenta, discharges or aborted fetuses and avoid contact with tissues that could be infected. Visit the CDC website for more information on brucellosis in people. www.cdc.gov/brucellosis/ For Veterinarians California has a mandatory calfhood vaccination program – all dairy heifers above 4 months of age, and all beef heifers above 12 months of age, must be vaccinated for any change of ownership or can only be sold directly for slaughter or to a registered feedlot for feeding to slaughter. Spayed heifers, steers, and bulls are exempt from this regulation. Veterinarians must be licensed and accredited and have a valid contract with CDFA to vaccinate calves against brucellosis in California. To become a contract veterinarian, please contact your district office.

Did you Know? Bangs was the last name of the Danish veterinarian who first isolated Brucella abortus as the causative agent of Brucellosis back in 1897. Once a vaccine was formulated to immunize cattle against Brucella abortus it took on the name “Bangs vaccine.” Bangs vaccination can only be done by a licensed and accredited veterinarian who applies an official USDA orange metal tag and tattoo to the right ear at the time of vaccination. Orange metal ear tags are reserved for Brucellosis vaccines by APHIS under the Animal Disease Traceability Framework, Official Ear Tag Criteria report.

In 1934, the first year of the eradication program, about 15 percent of the cattle in the United States were infected with the disease. In 1942, the USDA declared Brucellosis to be the worst bacterial zoonotic disease (disease transferred from animals to humans) present at the time.


BUCHANAN ANGUS RANCH ANNUAL BULL SALE

With Guest Consignors

A TRUE Performance Program Where performance doesn’t START at the feed Bunk

80 BULLS sell NOON on SUNDAY February 24, 2019 at the Klamath County Fairgrounds

PICTURES WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

LOT: 5 “Algoma Golden Payoff B108” Reg#19241139 who weaned off his 11 yr old dam on 10/22/18 at 1040# He is a son of ‘Basin Payweight 1682”

LOT: 20

LOT: 20

LOT: 39

B

A

LOT: 1

Buchanan Angus

Cattle Business our ONLY Business “Algoma Final Confidence B139 Reg#19241151 who weaned off his dam on 10/22/18 at #1000. He is a son of ‘Connealy Confidence Plus”

Selling sons of:

Connealy Black Granite Connealy Confidence Plus Basin Payweight 1682 Hoover Elation Jindra Double Vision SAV Ten Speed ICC Pay Raise 4886 MAR Innovation and others

Robert and Kathleen “Algoma Golden Windfall B174” Reg#19241966 who weaned off his dam on 10/22/18 at #960 He is a calving-ease son of “ ICC Pay Raise 4886” Broadcast live on: LiveAuctions.TV

816-392-9241 ● ● ● ●

Many Calving-Ease Bulls sell 1st year breeding season guarantee Free delivery for the first 500 miles We can feed the bulls until turnout

Buchanan and family 13490 Algoma RD Klamath Falls, OR 97601

Ranch……..541 883-8471 Bob’s Cell…541 281-3557 Call today for your Sale Book or check our Website for information

www.buchananangus.com January 2019 California Cattleman 21


Coming Together

POLICY, PROGRESS AND PRODUCER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES IN RENO by CCA Communications Director Jenna Chandler Neither sleet nor snow nor gloom of night kept California’s cattlemen and women from Sparks, Nev., this year and the 102nd California Cattlemen’s and California Cattlewomen, Inc. Annual Convention and Allied Industry Trade Show November 27-30, 2018. The event brought a record 600 plus to Nevada’s biggest little city, even in spite of a snow storm that followed attendees to Reno as well. Business kicked off Tuesday afternoon with scholarship interviews of 20 of the brightest rising stars in the beef cattle industry. With over $40,000 awarded, these scholarships are integral to supporting those who will soon support and become the California cattle industry. Spirits were high following the Western Video Market sale on Wednesday, also at the Nugget, and prices were too, likely spurred by the incoming rains and the promise of good winter feed. After the sale, the Allied Industry Trade Show opened to a line out the door, welcoming convention guests to the event. Convention attendees also got down to business with various group and organization meetings, before gathering together for the Opening General Session. Here, CCA President Dave Daley, Oroville, gave a presentation on the projects and events of the past year, things that were completed, things that need more work and where CCA is headed for 2019. The California Cattle Council and the upcoming producer vote were also on the docket for discussion. Daley discussed the need for the council in live cattle and ranching promotion and education, as well as the limitations and producer protections written into the legislation. “Really we are trying to focus

on areas that the [California] Beef audience. Council can’t work in but that we Serious topics took a backseat really need help in… live cattle issues,” after the general session though, as Daley said. everyone headed over to the Allied A very special guest also joined Industry Trade Show Welcome Party, the opening session, Timothy generously sponsored by AT&T. It Williams, Deputy Director for the was a toss-up as to whether the food, Office of External Affairs of the U.S. Department of the Interior. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24 An avid sportsman and hunter himself, Williams discussed the commitment of the Trump administration to removing onerous regulatory burdens on producers, federal reorganization and the importance of well managed public lands, with grazing being one of the primary tools. “The President has tasked us with delivering CCA President Dave Daley speaks at the opening regulatory relief to hard session of the convention. working Americans, so we are reorganizing the Department of the Interior as part of President Trump’s Federal Government Reorganization,” Williams reported to the delight of the ranchers in attendance. Up next was a familiar face: NCBA President and past CCA President Kevin Kester, Parkfield. He gave an update on the National Cattlemen’s Incoming President Mark Lacey takes the mic at the Beef Association, before he awards banquet after his installation as president. and NCBA’s Danielle Beck discussed a topic on everyone’s mind recently, fake meat, and gave an update on the current status of labeling and confirmed that the industry is committed to protecting real, ranch grown beef. “It has been a sort of domino effect. We have been driving this debate from day one and we will continue until this issue is solved,” Beck said, NCBA President Kevin Kester spoke on issues in garnering applause from the

22 California Cattleman January 2019

Washington, D.C. and around the country.


Pictured (l to r): Trevor Freitas, World Perspectives, CDFA, and Tom Talbot, DVM, speak on animal identification.

Tim Williams with the Department of the Interior and NCBA’s Danielle Beck were warmly welcomed by attendees

Endovac’s Kaitlin Heely and AHI’s Ashley Hagen catch up with incoming CCA President Mark Lacey during the trade show.

Public Lands Council’s Ethan Lane with Mike Byrne and Kirk Wilbur prior to the Federal Lands Committee Meeting.

Northwest Farm Credit’s Megan Huber and Trevor Fiock with CCW President Cheryl Foster.

President Dave Daley thanks Pat Kirby for his service to CCA as a second vice president.

Top Hand Winner Jill Heely and third place winner Adam Cline with Mark Lacey.

Tim Koopmann presented the Excellence in Range Ventura County Cattlemen’s Association members Bud and Kim Sloan, Bonnie Atmore, Beverly Management award to Tom & Kathy DeForest. Bigger and Mike Williams at the CCA& CCW Award Banquet.

Butte, Plumas and Sierra County Cooperative Extension Advisor Tracy Schohr and son Colton Imbach with Plumas County ranchers Rick and Weston Roberti and Brian Kingdon.

Rod Wesselman, Col. John Rodgers and Matt Macfarlane in the trade show.

January 2019 California Cattleman 23


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

In addition to the various policy meetings, discussing and amending CCA’s policy on issues ranging the gamut from mandatory brucellosis vaccination to predatory animal management (see page 10 for updates to the CCA policy book made at Convention), Cattlemen’s College sessions brought new ideas and research to California’s beef producers.

Herd health and nutrient requirements dominated the first two sessions, before Oklahoma State University’s Derrell Peel, Ph.D., took to discussing commodities and the effects consumer preference and market demand have on the average cow/calf producer.

dancing, music by Locked and Loaded or the networking with trade show exhibitors was the best part of the evening, but something everyone could agree on was that it was a great time. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 It wasn’t just fun and games though, as business started bright and early on Thursday morning. The day began early with beef burritos for breakfast in the trade show. Cattlewomen also gathered for the President’s Breakfast with leadership training following. The Thursday morning General Session featured distinguished guest, Michael Lairmore, DVM, dean of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Dean Lairmore stressed the importance of open dialogue and committed to more outreach to beef UC Davis’ Veterinary School Dean Michael Lairmore, DVM and Caroline Lobdell spoke about the producers to better assess what it is legal issues facing public lands Extension Veterinarian Gaby Maier, DVM spoke. ranchers. that they need from the university and livestock veterinarians. Following the dean’s remarks, the general session got down to the meat of the program with a panel of experts and stakeholders discussing the hot button issue of livestock identification and traceability. Matt Herrington, director of commodity analysis and client development at World Perspectives, Inc., CCA Feeder Council Chair Vintage Angus’ Mike Hall in the trade show Select Sires’ Morgan Johnsrud with Cherry Trevor Mendes of Tipton, Rececca with Brooke Rianda and Clay Avila. Glen Beefmasters’ Sue Pierson in the trade show. Campagna, DVM, from the California Department of Food and Agriculture and past CCA president, producer and veterinarian, Tom Talbot, DVM, of Bishop, all took to the stage to weight in. It was clear from all involved, that while the panel was informative, the issue of livestock identification will be an ongoing one. Following the panel, Aubrey Bettencourt, appointed by President Trump’s administration last year as Ramsey Wood caught up with Billy and Michelle and Scott Murphy with Chet and Kara the new state executive director for Athena Flournoy at the convention. Porterfield during the President’s Reception. the USDA Farm Service Agency, addressed the group and closed the session, echoing the unique concerns and challenges faced by California ranchers and farmers, especially when it comes to water. CattleWomen met with a packed house poolside for their annual sold out CowBelle Luncheon. Units presented their Cowbelles and CattleWomen of the Year awards, Multimin, USA’s Cortney Blasingame Derrell Peel, Ph.D., spoke about commodities other yearly awards and discussed introduces speaker Jeff Hall, DVM at a during the final Cattlemen’s College session. plans and events for 2019. Cattlemen’s College session. 24 California Cattleman January 2019


Director of Breed Improvement. With more Angus influenced cattle qualifying for the Certified Angus Beef ® brand than ever before, it’s clear that the Angus bull has become America’s bull. He sires calving ease, growth and superior marbling. He works well in any environment, and on any cow, regardless of breed. Make sure that America’s bull serves as your Director of Breed Improvement. Angus. America’s breed. Go to www.Angus.org/businessbreed to learn more.

January 2019 California Cattleman 25


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 After a full day of policy, education and discussion, it was clear that attendees were ready to kick up their heels, celebrate and have a good time. Luckily, that was just what was in store at the CCA and CCW Awards Banquet, graciously sponsored by Laird Manufacturing. With runway photos on vintage style polaroid cameras for guests to enjoy on the outside and a stunning ice sculpture greeting them as they entered, it was clear banquet guests were in for a great time. June Kester, Parkfield, was graciously provide the

Thank You

invocation and everyone was introduced to CCA staff, officers and committee chairs and vice chairs. Attendees then toasted outgoing CCA President Dave Daley and welcomed the new 2019-2020 CCA President, Mark Lacey, Independence. They also enthusiastically thanked outgoing CCA Second Vice Presidents Pat Kirby, Wilton, and Mike Miller, San Jose. It isn’t called the Awards Banquet for nothing, as various members were awarded honors throughout the evening. CCW presented their new officer team with Callie Borror, Winters, taking the helm as CCW President. The California Beef Cattle Improvement Association also introduced Tom Schene, Dixon, of Schene enterprises at the Commercial Producer of the Year and the Society for Rangeland Management presented DeForest Livestock, Adin, with the 2018 Excellence in Range Management Award. Fresno State student, YCC member and CCA Convention Intern Wyatt Campbell, Fresno State student, got the surprise of the night after winning the Photo Contest People’s Choice Award with his stunning photo “Bull on the Beach.” Top Hand Award winners were also congratulated, with San Luis Obispo’s Jill Heely taking home first place. It also wouldn’t have been a CCA Awards Banquet without recognizing the Tri State Livestock California Livestock Man of the Year. While not always given to a CCA member, or even a cattleman, when it is, the occasion is worth celebrating. Sunol rancher Tim Koopmann was honored as 2018 Livestock Man of the Year and if the applause was any indication, his peers certainly felt he deserved it. Friday morning was a frosty one in Sparks with another incoming snowstorm bearing down, but the talk was of hot markets in the CattleFax Breakfast featuring CattleFax General Manager Duane Lenz. Lenz was positive about the outlook for the coming year, and encouraged producers to take advantage of value added premiums as a way to maximize profits. After breakfast, convention wrapped up in the usual fashion with CCA and CCW board meetings rounding out the three-day event. Policy was confirmed, new officers were voted in, guidelines were set for the coming year and cattlemen and women set the tone for a great 2019 in the California cattle business. And we couldn’t be looking more forward to it! CCA would like to extend its sincerest gratitude to all speakers, sponsors and attendees. The event wouldn’t have been a success without your support!

Convention Sponsors

26 California Cattleman January 2019


13th Annual Bull Sale

SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2019 1 p.m. at the ranch near

Gardnerville, Nevada

Angus • Salers • Salers Optimizer Composites

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/

Connealy Black Granite His sons & grandsons sell March 16th

Baldridge Titan A139 His sons sell

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Ward Chisum C535 High selling bull in our 2017 sale

Ward Ranches

GARY WARD & FAMILY Gary Ward (775) 790-6148

Katie Ward (916) 990-4818 P. O. Box 1404, Gardnerville, NV 89410 E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com Ranch: 1155 Foothill Rd., Gardnerville

PRODUCING BULLS THAT MEET THE DEMANDS OF THE INDUSTRY January 2019 California Cattleman 27


“Just Quality” Bull Sale February 19 • 1 p.m. • Nyssa, Oregon V-A-L bulls will put meat on your calves and more money in your pocket.

V-A-L LEDGER 4120 P

52 years of beef industry excellence

28 California Cattleman January 2019


110 total Charolais Bulls including 40 Red-Factor bulls Char-cross calves are bringing a premium for commercial cattlemen across the nation. 4 of the top 10 steers at the 2018 Malheur County Fair were V-A-L bred, including the grand champion and carcass winners!

SALE OFFERING ALSO INCLUDES TOP QUALITY ANGUS AND BRANGUS BULLS FROM ROMANS ANGUS & BRANGUS!

ROMANS ANGUS & BRANGUS (541) 473-3822• (541) 212-1790

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January 2019 California Cattleman 29


The Extra M ile

Saluting beef promoter efforts at annual convention by California CattleWomen, Inc. President Callie Borror

It was another great CCA & CCW Convention. This year’s speakers drew a crowd. Suzanne Menges, California CattleWomen came out in strong numbers for Ph.D., and Stacy Emm taught an enthusiastic Beef the CowBelle of the Year Luncheon and the CCW Awards Promotion and Advocacy Course. Make sure you are Breakfast. finding your voice and telling your story. It is best to keep The California Beef Council has sponsored the Walt your topic to three reasons, as you want to be remembered. Rodman Beef Promotion Contest since 1982. The contest The elected officials will hear more from a true personal started as a challenge for Cattlewomen to develop creative story as they will be able to see the impact that it has on ways to promote beef. The California CattleWomen the direct producers. Branding is critical, as it goes back Units membership numbers determine their competition to these three essential elements: traceability, a story and group. The first place winners were Calaveras-Tuolumne quality control. Menges also discussed how we all need to Cattlewomen with “A Fair to Remember With Beef,” Tulare be prepared when we are contacted for an interview. It County Cattlewomen with “Boots and Shoots” event, San is critical to see if you can get back to the reporter if you Benito County with “Beef Bag Giveaway.” The second are not prepared to speak in preparation for the interview place winners were San Diego County CowBelles with rely on your contacts that can get you the latest research San Diego County Fair, Santa Clara County Cattlewomen information. Prepare your story and how the issue would with “Mushroom Mardi Gras,” Lassen County with “a directly affect you the producer. Taste of Beef, A Sip of Wine,” and Alameda County “A Gary Olsen is currently a regional vice president for Cheeseburger is a Balance Meal.” Thank you to all of the Farm Credit West. Gary’s discussion was on the current participants: Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento, Madera presence of banking and agriculture lending. He gave County CattleWomen, Napa-Solano, CattleWomen, insight into how families need to make sure that the Placer-Nevada CattleWomen, San Joaquin-Stanislaus succession planning in place. Gary also gave insight as to CattleWomen, San Luis Obispo CattleWomen, Santa ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 32 Barbara CattleWomen, Siskiyou County CattleWomen, Tehama County CattleWomen. In all, 22 counties submitted their Beef Promotion Reports this year, with an increase of three more from last year. The counties impacted 344,238 people by your events. The top three units with events submitted include Tehama, Siskiyou and Mid-Valley. The annual Powder River Raffle was a great success for the counties and the California CattleWomen. The winner of the Powder River Raffle was Frank Imhof. The ticket sales continue to increase as the fundraiser grows each year. A big thank you goes to Cody Hayes, Matt Johnson and the Powder River team. An extended thank you goes to the following dealers: JSC; Evan’s Feed & Livestock Inc.: CattleWomen officers at the CCA & CCW Awards Banquet (L to R): Callie Higby’s Country Feed; Hawes Ranch & Farm Borror, President; Debbie Hay; First Vice President; Julie Barnett, Second Vice President; Tara Porterfield, Secretary; Christine Snyder, Southern Director; Supply, Inc. – Red Bluff; and Conlin Supply. 30 California Cattleman January 2019

Sharon Erickson, Northern District Director.


January 2019 California Cattleman 31


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30 the direct that ag lending is going in the future. Dave Daley, California Cattlemen President spoke at the CowBelle Luncheon. He thanked the ladies for all the work that we do. Daley spoke about the California Cattle Council and took sign ups from the ladies, for our members to go out and speak to the public about the California Cattle Council. California had the honor of hosting American National CattleWomen President Gwen Geis who spoke at the Awards Breakfast. Gwen gave an ANCW update and spoke on Little Brown Towns. Gwen had the honor of doing the installation for the 2019-2020 officers and standing committee chairs. Spring meeting is scheduled for March 16-17, in Visalia. The Executive Board will meet on Friday, March 15. This spring meeting will be a joint meeting with the California Women for Agriculture. The joint educational meeting will take place on Saturday, March 16, with Jill Scofield and Celeste Settrini speaking about beef nutrition and the latest tools that the Beef Council has which will assist our membership in their education outreach. We have the honor of having Damon McCune, director of food and nutrition outreach with the California Beef Council joining us as well. Damon

ANCW President Gwen Geis, pictured with Callie Borror addressed CCW members.

will be presenting information on the meeting theme of “Wellness Through the Lens of Agriculture.” The afternoon may be filled with a tour hopefully at Cargill in Fresno. The ladies will enjoy a joint reception and dinner on Saturday evening. Many thanks to everyone who contributed to our convention or attended the meetings. All of your hard work throughout the year is greatly appreciated in all that you do promoting beef in California. As we start over in 2019 with new priorities and items on our agenda, I want to thank all you cattlewomen for your efforts and wish everyone a Happy New Year!

Cheryl Foster at the CCA & CCW Awards Banquet.

Dana Hunt, Sharon Avrit, Darcy Hanson at the CCA & CCW Awards Banquet.

32 California Cattleman January 2019

Incoming CCW President Callie Borror presented Cheryl Foster with an outgoing president’s belt buckle.


2018 CCW AWARDS

BEEF PROMOTION & EDUCATION BOOKS. The 2018 Bayer Animal Health Beef Promotion & Educational Book Contest winners were announced by Brett Davis, Bayer Healthcare, and Marsha Stevens, chairman Member Entries: 1st Place Fake Meat – Pat Shepherd Publicity Tools: Newsletter 1st Place for 100+ Members Siskiyou County CattleWomen Unit Mini: 1st Place Placer Nevada CattleWomen; 2nd Place Plumas Sierra Cattlewomen, 3rd Place Placer Nevada Cattlewomen; 4th Place Placer Nevada CattleWomen Unit Overall – Under 50 Members 1st Place San Diego County CowBelles Unit Overall – Under 51-100 Members 1st Place Alameda County CattleWomen, 2nd Place Mid Valley CowBelles & Tehama County CattleWomen 3rd Place San Joaquin-Stanislaus CattleWomen; 4th Place Lassen County CattleWomen; 5th Place Humboldt County CattleWomen; 6th Place Glenn-Colusa CattleWomen; 7th Place Placer Nevada CattleWomen Unit Overall – 100+ Members 1st Place Siskiyou County CattleWomen; 2nd Place Kern County CattleWomen & Santa Barbara County CattleWomen; 3rd Place San Luis Obispo County CattleWomen

COWBELLES OF THE YEAR

2018 California CowBelles of the Year were recognized at the California CattleWomen’s Luncheon during the CCACCW Convention, Sparks, Nev. Several honorees were unable to be present and they were represented by family members. Winners are listed below. Pam Jones, Alameda; Pam Howard, Amador/El Dorado/Sacramento; Paula Holden, Butte; Gwen Harris, Calaveras/Tuolumne; Kris Weber, Fresno/ Kings; Ann Butler, Glenn/Colusa; Carolyn Hunt, Humboldt; Laurel Ybarra, Intermountain; Erin Rogers, Kern; Ann Fahey, Madera; Johnna Kiernan, Mid Valley; Laura Snell, Modoc; Laura Barhydt, Placer Nevada; Laural Colberg, Plumas Sierra; Heather Callens, San Benito; Kathleen Cauzza, San Diego; Cindy Enos, San Joaquin-Stanislaus; Margaret Avilla; San Luis Obispo; Sharla Branquinho, Santa Barbara; Salene Duarte, Santa Clara; Teala Magee, Shasta; Heidy Carver, Siskiyou; Patti Baxman, Sonoma Marin; Linda Borror, Tehama; and Marla Barron, Tulare.

WALT RODMAN AWARD

Winners: 1-49 members: For the first time in Walt Rodman history, the Calaveras-Tuolumne CattleWomen won for “A Fair to Remember With Beef.” 50-69 members: Tulare County CattleWomen, Boots and Shoots Event 70+ members: San Benito County: Beef Bag Giveaway

Runners Up: 1-49 members: TIE between San Diego County CowBelles (San Diego County Fair) and Santa Clara County CattleWomen (Mushroom Mardi Gras) 50-69 members: Lassen County, “A Taste of Beef, A Sip of Wine” 70+ members: Alameda County, “A Cheeseburger is a Balanced Meal”

January 2019 California Cattleman 33


California CattleWomen Heritage Foundation Memorial Scholarship

The CCW offers five, $1,000 scholarships a year. One per university will be offered to students attending the following universities: California State University, Chico; University of California, Davis; California State University, Fresno; and California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. The open, fifth scholarship will be offered to students attending a junior college, going into their junior year, or an out of state college/university. Likewise, they may be be seniors or graduate students with a major in the field of agriculture. Students applying for this scholarship must be graduates from a California high school, and must have completed one year of college upon receiving this scholarship, and be pursuing an agricultural related course of study. Additionally, applicants must meet all of the criteria defined by the application that is found on the CCW website, https://cattlewomen.org/support/memorial-scholarships/ and with the scholarship counselor at the specific colleges/ universities. Selections of recipients will be chosen by a committee made up of up of five CattleWomen from each of the previously mentioned college locations. By awarding these scholarships, we hope to assist our fellow young men and women in their pursuit of an agricultural degree in a field that is in the heart and soul of every member of the California CattleWomen, and to honor the person’s memory in which the donations were made to The Heritage Foundation’s Memorial.

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1/11/2018 1:35:26 PM


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January 2019 California Cattleman 35


Commercial Producer AWARD CBCIA

SCHENE ENTERPRISES, DIXON, CALIFORNIA from the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association

Each year the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association awards a beef operation who has made great strides while honoring the purpose of CBCIA. That purpose fosters beef cattle improvement and economic production based on information and education by encouraging various approaches including scientific breeding, herd management, nutrition and ethical and humane practices by providing diverse producer information and education programs. This year we were very proud to award Tom Schene of Schene Enterprises with the 2018 Commercial Producer of the Year. The Schenes started in the livestock business with Grandpa Schene working for Washburn and Condon in Los Angeles around 1915, he then moved to San Francisco after he married and continued with the firm. Tom’s father along with his uncles started Schene Livestock Commission Firm in San Francisco and eventually moved to Stockton, opening the Stockton Livestock Market. In the late 1960s the Stockton Market was closed and the family moved to Dixon where they opened the Dixon Livestock Market. Over the years land was leased in the Farmington area for clover ,which maintained feeder cows and feeder lambs from throughout the US. In 1975 these pastures were closed and the operation was moved to Dixon where they have been for the past 42 years. The family has never owned property but has leased numerous ranches of irrigated pasture and native grasses to sustain cattle and sheep. For the past 18 years Tom has worked hard

to create a very reputable cow herd calving both in the fall and spring with 1,200 cows respectively in each season. The Schenes keep a bull inventory averaging 55-65 head. The bulls are tested two times per year and are on a four year rotation. Bulls are selected for growth, feed efficiency on dry feed intake and residual feed intake basis. The switch to an all Byrd Cattle Co basis began about 8 years ago as they found that these bulls fit what they wish to strive for and that is carcass and feed efficiency in the end product that they sell. All bulls follow the Snyder Livestock Gro – Safe Program. Setting measurable goals and improving upon what has already been achieved has been an important part of the Schene philosophy. The short term goal of Schene Enterprises is to produce a product that will work for every segment of the industry chain from feedlot to consumer, all the while making a profit. The longterm goals will be to continue to improve upon what they have already created. The Schenes believe that they are at a level where they want to be, as with anything they believe that there is always room for improvement. Their selection process is a well thought out plan. Because of their herd size (app. 2400 cows) they usually carry an inventory of 55-65 bulls,

36 California Cattleman January 2019

purchasing 10-15 per year. Take into account that the bulls are used twice a year, spring and fall. The bulls are checked twice a year for semen and soundness. Normally they keep the bulls 4-5 years. For selection process they go through the bull catalog looking at BW, CED, YM, MARB,


$W(wean calf value), DMI(dry matter intake), and RADG(residual ave. daily gain). Tom will then make a spreadsheet that lists all the information for each individual bull that fits his criteria plus birth date of the bull and sire name. In the Byrd sale last year the list consisted of 60 bulls. Tom and his wife Carol physically look at the bulls the day before the sale looking at size, stretch, and soundness to determine which ones they like. Tom keeps a list of all the bulls they purchase so they can keep track of the ones that they will cull and the reason why they were culled. Calves are weaned at 6 months of age. The calves are in the corral for approximately 5 days and then are turned out to irrigated pasture until the time of shipment. Fall calves are weaned in May and sold in November, the Spring calves are weaned in September and sold in July through Western Video Market. Calves are GAP certified, NHTC certified, Age and Source, Verified Natural, Non GMO, Verified Grassfed. They have found that enrolling their calves in these special programs brings a premium at sale time. Environmental stewardship is an

important part of the ranch program. The Schenes have maintained long term leases on numerous pastures throughout California. The family cares for and maintains these ranches as if they were their very own. Their goal is to use the land and water responsibly to produce a high quality product. The Schene Family believes that being sustainable Presenting the 2018 CBCIA Commercial and caring for the land Producer Award is CBCIA Board Member Celeste means raising cattle in an Settrini with award winner Tom Schene of Schene environmentally sound, Enterprises, Dixon. economically viable and responsible way. make deliveries that work for myself Terry Beller of Beller Feedyards and the trucking firm I work with. in Nebraska sums it up. “Running “Tom Schene is a true gentleman a feedlot in Nebraska and being over 1500 miles away, a “must” is to and I appreciate that he is honest have healthy and docile cattle that and concerned if I do well with my can overcome that first stress of cattle purchases. I feel that Tom has environment and feed changes. that same deep passion for Angus We’ve had very good luck cattle that I have, providing people with the Schene cattle. The calves across our great nation with an respond well and adapt to pretty excellent eating experience.” severe changes in weather that Congratulations Tom Schene Nebraska can have. To get carcass and Family on your outstanding cattle that “do it all” is quite a tribute and the Schene cattle do just contribution to the California Beef that. Tom goes out of his way to Industry. Well deserved! January 2019 California Cattleman 37


Pacific Legal Representing CCA in Key Litigation by Tony Francois, Pacific Legal Foundation Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF) has a lot of irons in the fire for the California Cattlemen’s Association right now, as well as a number of other cases that will benefit CCA members. Here is a quick overview and status update: Yellow Legged Frog lawsuit. PLF is representing CCA in a challenge to the federal designation of 1.8 million acres of critical habitat in 16 Sierra Nevada counties for the Yellow Legged Frog and Yosemite Toad. The lawsuit is based on the Fish and Wildlife Service’s failure to consider the economic impacts of the designation on small businesses as required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act. A hearing on CCA’s summary judgment motion was held December 19 in Washington, D.C., (prior to press time). California Gray Wolf lawsuit. PLF is representing CCA in a challenge to California’s designation of the gray wolf as endangered under the state’s Endangered Species Act. The challenge is based on the state Fish and Game Commission’s illegal determination that a lone wolf which wandered in from Oregon, OR-7, is native to California. The briefing in the case is almost complete, and a hearing is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2019 in San Diego. Navigable Waters Lawsuit. PLF is representing CCA in a challenge to the US Environmental Protection Agency’s 2015 rule broadly defining “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act to include many drainages and seasonal ponds on farms and ranches (also known as the “WOTUS Rule”). After a couple of years of procedural wrangling and several regulatory actions by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) this past year, the lawsuit will be refiled in January along with a request that the 2015 definition be enjoined in California. And here is an update on some other important cases PLF is litigating for other clients that will benefit CCA and its members: Gopher Frog Critical Habitat. On Nov. 27, 2018 the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in favor of

38 California Cattleman January 2019

PLF’s client, Ed Poitevent, that in order for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to designate critical habitat under the Endangered Species act (ESA), the agency has to demonstrate that the designated area is, in fact, habitat. While this seems obvious, the government argued that it could designate 1,500 acres of Poitevent’s family property as critical habitat for the Dusky Gopher Frog even though the land cannot sustain the frog, lacking two of the three necessary elements for minimally-adequate habitat. This ruling will be very helpful in cases where the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service tries to designate property as habitat in hopes of forcing the property owners to modify it in order to make it habitable for a species. CCA filed an amicus brief in support of PLF’s clients in the case. Montana Veteran seeks Supreme Court review of wetlands convictions. PLF is representing elderly Navy vet Joe Robertson, who was tried and convicted under the Clean Water Act and sentenced to 18 months in prison and $130,000 in restitution for building firefighting ponds in the path of a foot-wide, foot-deep channel in the woods, forty miles from the nearest navigable river. Mr. Robertson has asked the Supreme Court to review his case and clarify that marginal and distant features like this are not regulated by the Clean Water Act. A victory in this case would also benefit farmers and ranchers in California and nationwide by limiting the authority of EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to assert control over private property. Pacific Legal Foundation enjoys a great partnership with CCA. It is an honor to represent California’s ranchers in their effort to defend their property from the overreach of environmental regulators, and PLF’s pro bono public interest environmental litigation program provides many direct and indirect benefits to CCA and its members. For more information about PLF or about these lawsuits specifically, visit www.pacificlegal.org.


January 2019 California Cattleman 39


LASSEN PACK PERPERTRATES SIXTH CONFIRMED LIVESTOCK DEPREDATION On the morning of November 27, a rancher on private land in western Lassen County discovered a dead calf that he suspected had been killed by wolves, and reported the incident to USDA Wildlife Services and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). Because GPS-collar data showed that the breeding female of the Lassen Pack had been in the immediate vicinity two days earlier and because “the nature and location of the bite marks and associated hemorrhaging were consistent with how wolves typically attack cattle,” CDFW confirmed that the 70-pound calf had been killed by wolves. The incident is the sixth confirmed livestock depredation by the Lassen Pack. To date, CDFW has investigated 26 suspected depredations in Lassen and Plumas

counties. Of the 20 not confirmed as wolf kills, two have been deemed “probable” depredations by wolves, seven have been labeled “possible/ unknown” wolf kills, and the remainder have been labeled as “other.” The classification categories used by CDFW (and Wildlife Services) in investigating suspected depredations has changed as of December 3, however, with CDFW’s issuance of “Considerations for Classification of Reported Wolf Depredation Incidents.” While CDFW may still label certain kills “confirmed” or “probable” wolf depredations, it has now separated “possible” and “unknown” into two distinct categories, and has replaced the nebulous “other” category with a “non-wolf depredation” category for livestock kills attributable to other

40 California Cattleman January 2019

predators and a “non-depredation” category for cases where livestock mortality is not attributable to a predator. CCA has some concerns about the new “Considerations for Classification”—for instance, evidence to be considered in classifying a depredation as “confirmed” appears to be narrower than under the prior Wildlife Services protocols—and will press CDFW for further improvements to its investigation protocols. To view the new Considerations for Classification document, visit https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/ conservation/mammals/gray-wolf. For more information on CCA’s efforts relating to gray wolves, contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.


Jerry Baker: 208.739.3449 Samuel Mahler: 208.739.0475

2175 Bench Rd., Vale, OR 97918 Email: baker.baker@fmtc.com

Genetic Excellence Sale Sat., February 23 • At the Ranch, Vale, Oregon • 1 p.m. SELLiNG 150 AGE ADVANTAGE FALL YEARLiNG BuLLS

plus new this year SELLiNG A SELECT GROuP OF SiMANGuS HALF-BLOOD BuLLS

EF AuTHENTiC 0829

G A R New Design 5050 x S S Objective T510 cED +13

BW WW YW Milk MARB RE $W $B -.6 +67 +128 +39 +.85 +.94 +74.28 +145.15

S chiSuM 6175

S Whitlock 179

MR NLC uPGRADE u8676

cED BW WW YW Milk MARB RE $W $B +9 +1.0 +74 +136 +25 +.33 +.62 +70.01 +158.81

CED BW WW YW MiLK MARB RE APi Ti +11 +2.7 +90 +137 +20 +.12 +1.26 +123.3 +83.4

S chisum 6175 x R&S Expedition 1404

BASin BonuS 4345

Ellingson Legacy M229 x GLS Mojo M38

kg Solution 0018

S Alliance 3313 x S Eclipse 169

Basin Payweight 1682 x Connealy Consensus 7229

Mogck SuRE Shot x KG Onward 6221

cED BW WW YW Milk MARB RE $W $B +2 +2.8 +66 +112 +21 +.30 +.87 +82.15 +151.40

cED BW WW YW Milk MARB RE $W $B +7 +1.2 +73 +126 +41 +1.08 +.43 +84.05 +160.83

cED BW WW YW Milk MARB RE $W $B +13 -1.9 +65 +120 +23 +.39 +.63 +75.48 +131.13

ADDitionAl AnguS SiRES: WR Journey • SF Speedway A187 • Raven Power Hitter Werner Flat Top 4136 • Jindra Double Vision • WMR Timeless 458 • K C F Bennett Diverse ADDitionAl SiMMEntAl SiRES: Hook’s Yellowstone 97Y • TSN Protege Z896

SalE ManaGEr Matt Macfarlane: 916.803.3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

Auctioneer: Rick Machado, 805.301.3210

livE SalE broadcaSt with onlinE biddinG

GuESt conSiGnor Mahler Cattle Co., Vale, Oregon

January 2019 California Cattleman 41

THD ©


January 22 - 26, 2019

Tehama District Fairgrounds • Red Bluff, California Tuesday, January 22 7:30 a.m. 9 a.m.

Kick-Off Breakfast, Merck Animal Health, Don Smith Pavilion Sifting & Grading of all Range Ready Calving-Ease and Range Ready Bulls, Don Smith Pavilion

Wednesday, January 23 9 a.m. 12 p.m. 1 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Sifting & Grading of all Halter Calving-Ease and Halter Bulls, Don Smith Pavilion Trade Showopens - closes at 7 p.m. Working Stock Dogs - All dogs work outside Buyer & Consignor Dinner - $20/person. Cocktails 5:30 p.m., Dinner at 6:30 p.m. B.S. Casino 7-10 p.m. and auction of bull riders, Tyler Jelly Building

7:30 a.m. 9 a.m. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. 3 p.m. 5:45-7 p.m. 7 p.m.

Geldings shown at halter, in age order, youngest to oldest. Pauline Davis Pavilion Trade Show opens - closes at 7 p.m. Western Video Market Internet Feeder/Female Sale presented by Boehringer Ingelheim, Don Smith Pavilion Geldings - Dry, Trail and Cattle Works, Pauline Davis Pavilion Geldings - Calf Branding, presented by Skinner Livestock Transportation, Pauline Davis Pavilion Clinic/Deomonstration, presented by Zoetis, Pauline Davis Pavilion Geldings - Conformation Horse Selected, presented by Triple Ciown Animal Nutrition, Followed by working cows dogs, Pauline Davis Pavilion

8 a.m.

Geldings - Cutting, Snaffle Bit/Hackamore, Stock Horse and Team Roping contests followed by selection of the Craig Owens Ideal Ranch Horse, Pauline Davis Pavilion Trade Show opens. Closes at 9 p.m. Seminar presented by Zoetis. Don Smith Pavilion Final working of stock dogs, presented by Loyall - work outside Sale of stock dogs, presented by Loyall, Don Smith Pavilion Doors open for Gelding Sale, Pauline Davis Pavilion Ag Social Sponsored by Chico State College of Agriculture, Fairgrounds Cafeteria Information: Sarah DeForest (530) 898-3737 or Shelley Macdonald (530) 527-1941 Vic Woolery’s Famous Tri-Tip BBQ before & during the gelding sale. $10/person. Pauline Davis Pavilion Youth Activities Fund Raffle, Pauline Davis Pavilion Sale of Quarter Horses and Paint Geldings, presented by Rolling Hills Casino. Pauline Davis Pavilion. Admission is $10/person. Tickets available at door, or call office

Thursday, January 24

Friday, January 25 9 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 4-7 p.m.  4 p.m. 5 p.m. 6 p.m.

Saturday, January 26 9 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 7 p.m.

Trade Show opens - Closes at 7 p.m. Sale of all bulls, presented by Zoetis, Don Smith Pavilion Red Bluff’s Buckin’ Best Bull Riding, presented by Cinch Jeans, featuring top cowboys going head-to-head with the rankest bucking bulls & broncs in rodeo! Party & Dance immediately following Pre-Sale General admission: $20/person, $25 at door; Arena Floor Seating Pre-Sale $30/person, $35 at door:; V.I.P. Premier Seating, Parking, Reception, Appetizers: Pre-Sale $75 or $80 at door

for more information, visit www.redbluffbullsale.com 42 California Cattleman January 2019


2019 Gelding & Stock Dog Consignors Geldings

CONSIGNOR(S)........................................... CITY, STATE

Anderson, Berry & Cathy........................................... Princeton, OR Aspin, Rick................................................................ San Diego, CA Azevedo, Dana............................................. American Canyon, CA Balzhiser, David..........................................................Clements, CA Bar X Ranch................................................................... Asotin, WA Buckingham, Tom & Carmen.........................................Bruneau, ID Cantleberry, Cynthia...............................................Palo Robles, CA Chavez, Carlos................................................................. Likely, CA Christensen, Stephen................................................... Windsor, CA Clarke Butte Ranch.......................................................... Bend, OR Davis, Peggy.......................................................Klamath Falls, OR Day, Dave..................................................................... Durham, CA Elser, Corinne.................................................................. Burns, OR Ferriera, James.................................................................. Galt, CA Flournoy, Robin.......................................................... Roseville, CA Funk, Bob................................................................... Red Bluff, CA Gallagher, Will.................................................................Merrill, OR Gallaway, Helen............................................................Bayfield, CO Hammack, Melissa.................................................... Chiloquin, OR Hawk, Dave.................................................................... Charlo, MT Hays, Taren.....................................................................Fields, OR Holland, Chanel......................................................Cottonwood, CA Jacobs, Brian....................................................Rancho Murieta, CA Jacobson, Faith............................................................. Marsing, ID Jantz, Caleb.................................................................... Nyssa, OR Jones, Shawn......................................................... Eagle Point, OR Keegan, Bob.................................................................Williams, CA Macedo, Dan................................................................. Sonora, CA McFann, Kylee................................................................ Orland, CA Merkley, Jessica.......................................................... Flournoy, CA Millin, Chance Nikki............................................. Summerlake, OR Montarbo, Richard.............................................. Paynes Creek, CA Mora, Gabriel............................................................San Martin, CA Mueller, Phil..............................................................Franktown, CO Neubert, Bryan & Patricia...............................................Alturas, CA Neubert, Jim & Summer......................................Klamath Falls, OR Northern Cross Land Cattle.......................................Woodland, CA Owens, Mahlon........................................................... Red Bluff, CA Owens, Nathan........................................................... Red Bluff, CA Peacock, Betsy.........................................................Travis AFB, CA Pena, Hector...............................................................Mtn Home, ID Pressley, Michael........................................................... Merced, CA Robertson Ranches.................................................... Plymouth, CA Russell, Charlie........................................................Toppenish, WA Schock, Jasmine....................................................... Chiloquin, OR Shidle, Phyllis......................................................Klamath Falls, OR Shulz, Zeph................................................................. Coalville, UT Silva, Carlos.............................................................. Stevinson, CA Spitz, Brie & Bailey.................................................Cottonwood, CA Spoon, Troy........................................................ Valley Springs, CA

Sullivan, Walter................................................... San Francisco, CA Sutfin, Jonathon.......................................................... Red Bluff, CA Swensen, Clint......................................................... Palo Cedro, CA Taylor, Tracy............................................................... Yuba City, Ca Vogt Ranches............................................................ Elk Creek, CA Wiggins, Luke...................................................................Dillon, MT Edsall, Clayton..............................................................Oakdale, CA Vaughn, Beverly..........................................................Durango, CO Wright, Craig................................................................... Orland, CA 2-YEAR-OLDS Buckingham, Tom & Carmen.........................................Bruneau, ID Grimsman, Wade & Britt................................................. Orland, CA Holzum, Tyler & Jennifer..............................................Oakdale, CA Jacobs, Brian....................................................Rancho Murieta, CA Montarbo, Richard.............................................. Paynes Creek, CA Wright, Craig................................................................... Orland, CA

Stock Dogs

CONSIGNOR(S)........................................................Lot #

Bill Boyd..........................................................................................8 Robin Brown................................................................................. 11 Rocky Brown................................................................................12 Jake Christensen............................................................................9 Jeff Clausen....................................................................................3 Craig Eddins.................................................................................14 Jaime Gonzalez............................................................................13 Brian Jacobs...................................................................................6 Boe & Jennifer Kottwitz..................................................................4 Bryan Neubert..............................................................................10 Edgar Ortega................................................................................16 Mandi Post....................................................................................15 Sheri Jo Prose................................................................................5 Dewey Smuin...............................................................................20 Troy Spoon...................................................................................18 Alan Voortman................................................................................7 Mason Winebarger.........................................................................2 Kirk Winebarger............................................................................17 Paige Winebarger...........................................................................1 Ryggin Zollman.............................................................................19

78 Years of being the Best in the WEst! January 2019 California Cattleman 43


2019 Bull Consignors Angus

Charolais

CONSIGNOR..................... CITY, STATE Avila Cattle Co............................. Clements, CA 3N Livestock............................. Healdsburg, CA Avila Cattle Co............................. Clements, CA Bar KD Ranch...................................Culver, OR Bar-N-Bar Angus............................. Burney, CA Barry Ranches................................Madras, OR Charron Ranch..............................Paicines, CA Cooper Cattle Co........................... Oakdale, CA Cosumnes River Cattle......................Wilton, CA Double D Cattle........................Terrebonne, OR England Ranch.......................Powell Butte, OR England/VX Livestock.............Powell Butte, OR Ford Cattle Co. ................................. Sutter, CA HAVE Angus......................................Wilton, CA Hideaway Cattle Co.....................Elk Grove, CA Jackson Mtn. Angus...............Winnemucca, NV K Bar D....................................... Redmond, OR Lancaster Ranch............................ Oroville, CA Lax Cattle Co....................................Adrian, OR Lequieu, Scott...................................Culver, OR Little Shasta Ranch.....................Montague, CA Longoria Angus.......................... Terra Bella, CA Newton’s Angus...........................Montague, CA Oak Ridge Angus..........................Calistoga, CA Owings Cattle.........................Powell Butte, OR Roadrunner Angus...........................Turlock, CA Rocking PH Ranch.........American Canyon, CA Sammis Ranch..................................Dorris, CA Scheck, Calista........................... Placerville, CA Simmie Ranch..........................Santa Rosa, CA Spencer Cattle Co. ........... Rancho Murieta, CA Strickler Livestock.............................Orland, CA Sunbright Angus...........................Red Bluff, CA T and S Livestock.............................Gerber, CA The Bull Mart.....................................Burns. OR The England Ranch................Powell Butte, OR Thorenfeldt Land & Cattle........Hillsborough, CA TJ Stroing Cattle ..........................Red Bluff, CA Traynham Ranches..................Eagle Point, OR Twinpine Angus................................... Adin, CA Wulff Brothers Livestock............. Woodland, CA Y Cross Herefords........................Bonanza, OR Zanolini Cattle Co..................... Healdsburg, CA

Balancer Cardey Ranches..............................Turlock, CA Louie’s Cattle Service........................Burns, OR

Bianchi Ranches................................ Gilroy, CA Broken Box Ranch......................... Williams, CA Cardey Ranches..............................Turlock, CA Cedar Creek Charolais............Myrtle Point, OR Macfarlane Livestock............... Cottonwood, CA Quinn Cattle Co...........................Elk Grove, CA Rafter DN Charolais...............Powell Butte, OR Romans Ranches Charolais............ Harper, OR Lauryn Brown............................Strathmore, CA

Hereford

Apache Herefords................ Catheys Valley, CA Barry Ranches................................Madras, OR Bianchi Ranches................................ Gilroy, CA Bright Farms..................................LeGrand, CA CX Ranch.....................................Pomeroy, WA England Ranch.......................Powell Butte, OR Genoa Livestock, LLC.....................Minden, NV Gohr Cattle.....................................Madras, OR Harfst Herefords......................Jacksonville, OR High Desert Cattle Co..............Canyon City, OR Hufford’s Herefords.................... Fort Rock, OR KKC Ranch................................. Yerrington, NV Kudlac Herefords.................... Grants Pass, OR Lambert Ranch............................... Oroville, CA Macfarlane Livestock............... Cottonwood, CA Morrell Ranches............................. Willows, CA Oak Knoll Herefords......................Flournoy, CA Rocking K Herefords........................Salem, OR Sonoma Mtn. Herefords...........Santa Rosa, CA The England Ranch................Powell Butte, OR Y Cross Herefords........................Bonanza, OR

Maine Anjou

Potter Ranch Herefords................... Winton, NV Sonoma Mtn. Herefords...........Santa Rosa, CA Weimer Cattle Co....................... Susanville, CA

Red Angus Bianchi Ranches................................ Gilroy, CA Eldred’s Red Angus......................Ferndale, WA England Ranch.......................Powell Butte, OR Lazy J Red Angus........................ Prineville, OR Macfarlane Cattle Co. .................. McArthur, CA Owings Cattle.........................Powell Butte, OR

Simmental

Double D Cattle ................................ Terrebonne, OR Hinton Ranch..................................Klamath Falls, OR Hinton Ranch Simmentals................... Montague, CA

Shorthorn

Cardey, Don & Diana....................... Turlock, CA

SimAngus

Bar-N-Bar Angus...................................Burney, CA Double D Cattle.............................Terrebonne, OR England/VX Livestock.................Powell Butte, OR EV Show Cattle......................................Wilton, CA Imhof, Frank....................................Pleasanton, CA Little Shasta Ranch..........................Montague, CA Strickler Livestock..................................Orland, CA T and S Livestock..................................Gerber, CA Traynham Ranches......................... Redmond, OR

Join us Jan. 26!

Brocco Show Cattle....................... Sonoma, CA Macfarlane Cattle Co.................... McArthur, CA

Polled Hereford

Apache Herefords................ Catheys Valley, CA Barry Ranches................................Madras, OR Bright Farms..................................LeGrand, CA Front Pasture Farm....................... Oakdale, CA Genoa Livestock, LLC.....................Minden, NV Hannan Family Farm.......................Molalla, OR Lambert Ranch............................... Oroville, CA Macfarlane Livestock............... Cottonwood, CA Morrell Ranches............................. Willows, CA

Offering more greats like these 2018 champions!

44 California Cattleman January 2019


BAR KD RANCH

We’ve Got Your Cows Covered!

HERDSIRE PROSPECTS • CALVING EASE • GROWTH • CARCASS COMPLETE PERFORMANCE AND ULTRASOUND DATA

WATCH FOR OUR STAND-OUT OFFERING OF ANGUS BULLS IN RED BLUFF JAN. 26!

KENNY & DIANNE READ • NICOLE JORGENSEN

1485 SW King Lane, Culver OR 97734 Ranch: 541.546.2547 • Cell: 541.480.9340 • www.barkdranch.com

Winners at

ADD A LOT OF POWER FROM LITTLE SHASTA RANCH! 7 Powerfully Constructed & Powerfully Numbered SimAngus 2 Stout, deep & functional Angus with added calving ease POTTER DISCOVERY C209

SIMANGUS BULLS • 2 HALTER BULLS, 5 RANGE BULLS REG # 3488533 3288535 3488532 3488537 3488538 3488534 3488531

SIRE Potter Discovery C209 Potter Discovery C209 Potter Discovery C209 Potter Discovery C209 OHL Steel 1776B Potter Discovery C209 OHL Steel 1776B

BW +0.4 +0.9 +1.2 +1.1 +1.6 +0.5 +1.2

WW +66 +64 +71 +68 +65 +69 +71

YW +108 +98 +108 +108 +102 +112 +108

MILK +23 +25 +20 +22 +16 +22 +20

MARB +.52 +.42 +.37 +.54 +.20 +.54 +.37

RE +.35 +.45 +.42 +.34 +.44 +.34 +.42

FAT -.042 -.042 -.055 -.039 -.034 -.039 -.055

ANGUS BULLS • BOTH HALTER AND CALVING EASE! REG # 19257929 19257930

SIRE SAV Thunderbird 9061 SAV Thunderbird 9061

CED +9 +10

BW -.3 -.2

WW YW +51 +95 +56 +94

MILK +24 +25

VAR DISCOVER 2240 X NICHOLS REAL QUIET W195 ASA REG # BW WW YW MILK MARB RE 3046777 +0.6 +76 +125 +21.8 +.67 +.042

FAT -.050

API 152.2

TI 84.7

THIS POWERFUL DEEP HERD SIRE HAS A WW IN THE TOP 15%, YW IN THE TOP 5%, MARK IN THE TOP 3%, API IN THE TOP 5% AND TI IN THE TOP 3%!

530-842-3950

January 2019 California Cattleman 45


4 Hereford Halter Bulls from

MACFARLANE LIVESTOCK

Polled Reserve Champion Intermediate Yearling Bull at the 2018 Western States Hereford Show Sells!

He Sells!

He Sells! Owned with Dewar Farms

Lot 361 ML DF Y12 JR E47

Sire: ML Smokey Mountain Too Y12 • MGS: Remitall Online 122L

Lot 362 DF ML 10Y KINGDOM A8 E17 ET

Sire: MJW 73S W18 Hometown 10Y ET • MGS: Remitall Online 122L

BW

WW

YW

MILK

REA

FAT

BW

WW

YW

MILK

REA

FAT

+3.69

+51

+84

+20

+.44

-.005

+3.0

+57

+96

+27

+..46

+.025

Also selling a Polled GB L1 Domino 177R out of a Ribeye 88X Daughter and a horned son of CL1 DOMINO 216Z 1ET.

Bringing the same kind and quality that topped the 2018 Shasta Bull Sale!

CALVING EASE IN VOLUME FROM SAMMIS RANCH

ML

B.J. & Melissa Macfarlane, 530-518-1024 Bob Macfarlane, 530-355-8340 19760 Amen Lane Cottonwood, CA 96022

CX CHAMPIONS SELL OFFERING 2 OF THE 3 BULLS FROM OUR 2018 HEREFORD RENO CHAMPION PEN OF BULLS!

OFFERING 7 QUALITY CALVING-EASE ANGUS SPRING YEARLING BULLS! WATCH FOR THIS POWERFUL SET LOADED WITH MATERNAL VALUE, POWER AND THE LOW BIRTH WEIGHTS WE ARE KNOWN TO PRODUCE!

O’CONNELL CONSENSUS 2705 LOT 276 & 277 WERE MEMBERS OF THE CHAMPION PEN. 3 SONS SELL!

OWNED BY SAMMIS RANCH & O’CONNELL RANCH CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

+8

+.2

+52

+85

+28

+.77

+.30

LOT

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

FAT

275 276 277 278 279

+6.0 +.5 +3.3 +2.7 +4.5

+2.2 +4.7 +3.4 +3.5 +2.3

+52 +62 +64 +58 +51

+78 +103 +103 +96 +81

+21 +27 +28 +34 +30

+.39 +.10 +.104 +.11 +.11

+.53 +.49 +.49 +.51 +.43

+.105 +.045 +.055 +.085 +.035

ALL HALTER BULLS! CONTACT TODAY FOR DETAILS!

BILL COX

CELL: 509-566-7050 • POMEROY, WA 99347

46 California Cattleman January 2019

CX

RANCH


January 2019 California Cattleman 47


HEREFORD BREEDERS TURN OUT FOR CAMP FIRE VICTIMS from the American Hereford Association A California-based group of Hereford breeders raised the G5 Syndicate could help raise funds to support the $40,800 to donate to cattlemen affected by the California wildfire victims. Camp Fire, Dec. 1, 2018, at the Western States National “The hardest decision was deciding which heifer we Hereford Sale in Reno, Nev. The money was raised would donate,” says Madison Dewar, Dewar Farms and through the sale of Hereford heifer DF 0245 EMMA 907 current California-Nevada Junior Hereford Queen. “It’s 741 ET. helped us realize that it’s not just about us, it’s about the The Camp Fire in Northern California has been Hereford Family as a whole and coming together to help the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California someone we don’t even know in their time of need.” history. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Hereford breeders and other cattlemen who donated Protection reported the fire was contained within 153,336 to the cause are Mark and Stacy Holt, Jill Jess, Alto acres, and nearly 19,000 buildings and homes were Livestock, Downing Cattle Co., GKB Cattle, Morrell destroyed. At least 85 individuals lost their lives, making Cattle, Wooden Shoe Farms, Potter Ranch Herefords, this the nation’s deadliest blaze in a century. Bar One Ranch, Hildebrand Hay & Cattle, Blackhills As a result of the destruction from the Camp Fire, Herefords, Scott Holt, Mrnak Herefords, Genoa the G5 Syndicate, made up of Dewar Farms, Bakersfield; Livestock, Red River Farms, Morrell Ranches, Logan Lambert Ranch, Oroville; Macfarlane Livestock, and Stevie Ipsen, Sierra Ranches, Colyer Herefords, Cottonwood; Schneider – Brown Ranch, Sloughhouse; Sticks & Stones Ranch, Barber Ranch, Barry Ranch, and Wunschel Ranch, Plymouth, , offered the heifer, Hoffman Ranch, Sonoma Mountain Herefords, raised by Dewar Farms, for sale in the annual Western Pedretti Ranches, Brumley Farms, Wheeler Cattle, States National Hereford Sale, with all proceeds going Hacklin Herefords, CX Ranch, Allison Hay & Herefords, directly to those affected by the fire. 4M Livestock, AES (Amador/El Dorado/Sacremento) The G5 Syndicate was formed in 2016 at the Cattlemen’s Association, Murray Hay & Cattle, Snedden Hereford Youth Foundation of America’s (HYFA) The Ranch, McDonald Farms, K Bar D Angus, Harfst Ranch Harvest event in Sonoma, and raises funds to provide and Wunschel Ranch. scholarships, education and leadership for Hereford youth. After the syndicate purchased embryos at The Harvest’s live auction, they remained in contact with one another and began pooling funds to donate to various causes. Emma sold as the first lot in the 2018 Western States National Hereford Sale for just over $11,000. She was donated back and sold two more times. More than $40,800 was raised when the gavel finally fell silent, with GKB Cattle, Waxahachie, Texas, placing the final bid and giving half interest on the heifer to Dewar Farms so the Dewar’s could retain interest on and continue to show the heifer throughout the year. “It was very heartwarming to see all those Hereford breeders give whatever they could,” says Andrea Dewar of Dewar Farms. “We never Hereford Heifer DF 0245 Emma 907 741 ET brought in expected to raise that much money, it’s amazing how $40,800 for Camp Fire victims at the Western States an ag community can come together.” Hereford Sale in Reno, Nev., Dec. 1. The Dewar family agreed to donate the heifer if 48 California Cattleman January 2019


- 285 LOTS SELL - 285 SELL - - - LOTS 285 LOTS SELL

Females Sunday evening, February 24th Females sellsell Sunday evening, February 24th sell Sunday February 25Females Open Hereford Heifers | evening, 19 Open Angus Heifers 24th 25 Open25Hereford Heifers |Heifers 19 Open Open5 Hereford | 19Angus OpenHeifers Angus Heifers Sexed Female Pregnancies 5 Sexed Female 5 SexedPregnancies Female Pregnancies

Bulls sell Monday, February 25th Bulls sell Monday, February 25th Bulls sell Monday, February 150 Hereford Bulls | 87 Angus Bulls 25th 150 Hereford Bulls | 87 Angus 150 Hereford Bulls | 87Bulls Angus Bulls

AHA 43889924 AHA AHA 43889924 BW 0.8 43889924 WW 53 BW 0.8 BW 0.8 WW 53YW 89 WW 53 YW 89MM 39 YW 89 MM 39REA 0.6 REA MARB 0.6 0.17MM 39 REA 0.6 MARB 0.17 MARB 0.17

AHA P43892523 AHA AHA P43892523 BW 3.1 P43892523 WW 57 BW 3.1 BW 3.1 WW 57YW 89 WW 57 YW 89MM 31 YW 89 MM 31REA 0.48 REA MARB 0.48 0.21MM 31 REA 0.48 MARB 0.21 MARB 0.21

AHA 43889973 AHA AHA 43889973 BW 0.8 43889973 WW 53 BW 0.8 BW 0.8 WW 53YW 89 WW 53 YW 89MM 39 YW 89 MM 39REA 0.6 REA MARB 0.6 0.17MM 39 REA 0.6 MARB 0.17 MARB 0.17

AHA P43890016 AHA AHA P43890016 BW 2.2 P43890016 WW 52 BW 2.2 BW 2.2 WW 52YW 85 WW 52 YW 85MM 28 YW 85 MM 28REA 0.6 REA MARB 0.6 0.21MM 28 REA 0.6 MARB 0.21 MARB 0.21

AHA P43890045 AHA AHA P43890045 BW 2.4 P43890045 WW 67 BW 2.4 BW 2.4 WW 67YW 95 WW 67 YW 95MM 35 YW 95 MM 35REA 0.65 REA MARB 0.65 0.11MM 35 REA 0.65 MARB 0.11 MARB 0.11

AHA P43871964 AHA AHA P43871964 BW 3.5 P43871964 WW 61 BW 3.5 BW 3.5 WW 61YW 102 MM 30 WW 61 YW 102 YW 102 MM 30REA 0.57 REA MARB 0.57 0.06MM 30 REA 0.57 MARB 0.06 MARB 0.06

AHA 43871943 AHA AHA 43871943 BW 3.6 43871943 WW 64 BW 3.6 BW 3.6 WW 64YW 88 WW 64 YW 88MM 33 YW 88 MM 33REA 0.73 REA MARB 0.73 0.2 MM 33 REA 0.73 MARB 0.2 MARB 0.2

AHA P43871950 AHA AHA P43871950 BW 1.7 P43871950 WW 63 BW 1.7 BW 1.7 WW 63YW 102 MM 35 WW 63 YW 102 YW 102 MM 35REA 0.65 REA MARB 0.65 0.04MM 35 REA 0.65 MARB 0.04 MARB 0.04

AHA P43871947 AHA AHA P43871947 BW 3.6 P43871947 WW 62 BW 3.6 BW 3.6 WW 62YW 87 WW 62 YW 87MM 31 YW 87 MM 31REA 0.69 REA MARB 0.69 -0.01MM 31 REA 0.69 MARB -0.01 MARB -0.01

LOT 23 - C 4038 Bell Air 8057 ET LOT 37 - C 2052 Heavy Duty 8087 ET LOT 47 - C 4038 Bell Air 8108 ET LOT 23 - CLOT 403823Bell 8057 LOT 37 - C 205237Heavy Duty 8087 Duty ET 8087 ET LOT 47 - CLOT 403847Bell 8108 ET 8108 ET CAir 4038 BellET Air of8057 - C 2052 - CAir 4038 Bell Powerful big topped son- of Belle Air out the ET Huge middledLOT and a soggy made Heavy son of 72C out of Big time heifer bull candidate and one thatAircould be used Powerful toppeddam son of Belle Air out of the Huge middled and a soggy made son of 72C out of Big time heifer bull candidate and one that could used $97,000bigPowerful donor 4038 owned with Bowling one of our most popular donors 2052. Lots of IMF on lots of commercial heifer breeding projects. He has asbe used big topped son of Belle Air out of the Huge middled and a soggy made son of 72C out of Big time heifer bull candidate and onebethat could $97,000 donor damdonor 4038Low owned with Bowling one ofand oursuperior most donors 2052. Lots of IMFLots of IMFon lots of commercial heiferput breeding has Ranch in Oklahoma. birth genetics with great maternal traits in this pedigree. much red as you onheifer oneprojects. and is outHeof oneasof the $97,000 dam 4038 owned with Bowling one ofpopular our most popular donors 2052. on lots of could commercial breeding projects. He has as Ranchmarkings in Oklahoma. Low birthtraits. genetics with great and superiorand maternal traits in thistraits pedigree. muchbest red donors asmuch you could one and iswill out ofand one and inbigOklahoma. carcass full brothers we inoncould 4038. He on add maternal Ranch LowThree birth genetics with great superior maternal in this pedigree. redhave asput you put one isofouttheoftraits one of the markings and big carcass traits. Three full brothers best donors we have in 4038. He will add maternal traits also sell.markings and big carcass traits. Three full brothers with carcass and superior markings. best donors we have in 4038. He will add maternal traits also sell. also sell. with carcass with and superior markings. carcass and superior markings.

LOT 65 - C CJC 4264 Bell Air 8153 ET LOT 78 - C Double Your Miles 8185 LOT 121 - C 105Y Canada 7369 LOT 65 - C CJC65 4264CBell Air 8153 LOT 78 - CLOT Double Your Miles Your 8185Miles 8185 LOT 121 - C 105Y Canada 7369 CJCuse 4264 BellET Air 8153 78 -prospect C Double - C 105Y 7369 This herd sireLOT will see- heavy in our program in ET This is an exciting young who is made perfect in This is a unique herdLOT bull121 prospect with Canada tons of fleshing Thisthe herd sire will see heavy use in our program in This is an exciting young prospect who is made perfect in This is a unique herd bull prospect with tons fleshing yearsThis to come. thesee polled fullusebrother the structure, body depth andprospect muscle shape. is out bodyisdepth. He isherd a natural calf outofofwith a toptons daughherd He sireiswill heavy in ourtoprogram in terms ofThis is an exciting young who is He made perfectease in and This a unique bull prospect of fleshing the years come. Hethat the polled topurchased the termsofofastructure, depth and amuscle shape. He iswhen out she easeis and body depth. He isdepth. a natural top daughBelletoHeir Knox Brothers recently first calfofbody heifer who was no doubt donor ter of Miles McKee. He hasHe thecalf ofof aa herd bullofwith the bull years tois come. He isfull thebrother polled full brother to the terms structure, body depth and muscle shape. He out ease and body islook a out natural calf out a topadaughBelle aHeir bull thatHeir Knox Brothers recently purchased of a first calfofGreat heifer who a no doubt when sheof his ter ofshe Milessetter McKee. Hepredictions. has the look of atheherd bull with half-interest in. bull Great andBrothers incredible pedigree calved. all the way through sides great ofofgenetic bull calf in with a Belle thatlook Knox recently purchased a firstudders calf was heifer who was adonor no both doubt donor when Miles McKee. HeSenior has look ofchampion a herda bull a half-interest in. Great look incredible calved. Greatcalved. udders allgrandmother the way through both sides ofboth his set of genetic Senior bull calf champion and performance. pedigree with his 4208 who sets thesides bargreat Reno. a half-interest in. and Great look andpedigree incredible pedigree Great udders all being the way through of his great setpredictions. of genetic predictions. Senior bull calfinchampion in and performance. pedigree withpedigree his grandmother being 4208 who thewho bar setsReno. for udder quality. and performance. with his grandmother beingsets 4208 the bar Reno. for udder quality. for udder quality.

LOT 122 - C Special Edition 7348 LOT 123 - C 4038 Mr Canada 7355 ET LOT 124 - C 5280 1311 Lad 7352 ET LOT 122 - C Special 7348 LOT 123 - LOT C 4038 7355 ET LOT 124 - C 5280 1311 Lad 7352 ET 122 has -Edition C been Special Edition all 7348 123Mr- CCanada 4038 Mr Canada - C 5280 1311 Lad 7352looked ET This son of SpecialLOT Edition a standout Unique outcross genetic combination which7355 blendsETMr. If you rememberLOT back124 to what “Double Your Miles” Thisalong. son ofHe Special Edition has been a standout all Unique outcross genetic combination which blends Mr. If you remember back to what “Double Your Miles” looked hasson always been aEdition visitor favorite his all Canada with oneoutcross of our very best donors 4038. His individlike when he remember was namedback National in Denver This of Special has beenwith a standout Unique genetic combination which blends Mr. If you to whatChampion “Double Your Miles” looked along.extra He has always been a visitor favorite his calfwith his Canada one our very best donors His with individwhen named National in Denver look andHe bold and been hip. He is with a natural ualwith scanCanada dataofsets him apart from the4038. restdonors and his His extralike 2017 he this one is like looking inChampion aNational mirror. Big bodied and along. hastop always a visitor favorite with one of our very best 4038. individlikewas when he was named Champion in Denver extra out lookofand bold topand andbold hip.top Heand isshould a hip. natural calf ual scan sets himdata apart from rest andpopular withrest hischoices extrawithsalehis 2017 this one is like in adark mirror. bodied and aextra Stockman daughter and be the calf lookdata and structure hesets will bethe one offrom the huge hipped withlooking thatissame colorinBig pattern andBig scanned look Heone is aofnatural ual scan him apart the and extra 2017 this one like looking a mirror. bodied and out ofpopular a Stockman anddaughter should be of thebe one of the look and he structure will be one thebepopular choices sale choices hugesale hipped withhipped that same pattern andtopattern scanned sires the market. day. structure with a huge ribeye. His brothers have proven be bigand timescanned out of on adaughter Stockman andone should look and heofwill one of the popular withdark thatcolor same dark color popular sirespopular on the market. day. with aherd hugesires ribeye. His havebrothers to beproven big time and this brothers one willHis do theproven same.have sires on the market. day. with a huge ribeye. to be big time herd sires and thissires oneand willthis do the herd onesame. will do the same.

Guy, Sherry and Katie Colyer, 208.845.2313 Guy, Sherry andSherry Katie and Colyer, Guy, Katie208.845.2313 Colyer, 208.845.2313 Kyle and Bobby Jean, 208.845.2098 KyleGUY and Bobby Jean, 208.845.2098 Kyle and Bobby Jean, 208.845.2098 cell: 208.599.0340 • email: January guy@hereford.com 2019 California Cattleman 49 www.hereford.com GUYKYLE cell:GUY 208.599.0340 • email: guy@hereford.com www.hereford.com cell: 208.599.0340 • email: guy@hereford.com cell: 208.250.3924 • FAX: 208.845.2314 www.hereford.com KYLE cell: 208.250.3924 • FAX: KYLE cell: 208.250.3924208.845.2314 • FAX: 208.845.2314


BRINGING THE HEAT FIRE AS A MANGEMENT TOOL FOR CALIFORNIA’S PRIVATE LANDS by Lenya Quinn-Davidson and Jeffery Stackhouse, University of California Cooperative Extension

We both grew up in rural northern California, and if you talk to old timers in our communities, you’ll hear stories of the deep connections between people and fire: of Native Americans lighting off of trails as they hiked out of their hunting grounds in the fall, and ranchers burning their fields to improve range and keep things open. Unfortunately, across much of California, these stories have become mere folklore—wistful anecdotes from a time with less regulation and more landowner autonomy. In most parts of the state, landowners aren’t using fire anymore; the fear of liability, the perceived complexity of permits and regulations, and the generational and cultural gaps in fire experience have virtually eliminated fire from the toolbox for most landowners. But that’s about to change. For many years, we at University of California Cooperative Extension have fielded questions from landowners about using fire as a tool. Ranchers and forestland owners here in Humboldt County have voiced interest in using fire to improve range resources, enhance wildlife habitat, reduce fuels, and beat back the trees and shrubs that are quickly engulfing their prairies and woodlands, but we have struggled to provide them with good options. In recent history, CAL FIRE has been the leader in private lands burning. In the 1980s, their Vegetation Management Program (VMP) was responsible for 30,000-65,000 acres of prescribed burning every year, but in recent decades, those numbers have consistently fallen short of 10,000 acres a year—a drop in the bucket given the habitat and fuels issues that we face in California. CAL FIRE is currently revamping the VMP, which is great news, but it’s become clear that other pathways are needed for landowners to reclaim fire as the important tool that it is. In 2016, we started looking into prescribed fire models from other parts of the country. We know that other regions have impressive burn programs that blow California out of the water, and in most of those places, they’ve been successful because landowners are doing the burning themselves—something that’s almost unheard of in modern-day California. One of the most promising models of landowner-

50 California Cattleman January 2019

led burning is the prescribed burn association (PBA) model, through which landowners and other interested partners can work together to burn each other’s properties. In many regions, these PBAs are spearheaded by the ranching community, in collaboration with conservation organizations like the National Wild Turkey Federation, Pheasants Forever, and others that see direct benefits for wildlife. In 2015, there were 62 PBAs, almost all of which were in the Great Plains and Texas. The PBA model has successfully spread into parts of the Southeast, too, but these types of efforts have been noticeably absent in the West. In March 2017, we traveled to Nebraska to burn with, and learn from, two well-established PBAs. In both cases, the PBAs have local leaders who are not traditional fire practitioners; rather, they are local landowners—one a corn farmer and the other a cattle rancher—who have ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 52


Friday February 22nd, 2019 1 pm Green Spot Arena, Madras Oregon RANCH BRONC to follow 6 PM Offering 130 Charolais Bulls: 100-15 month old Fall Yearling Bulls 10 of Which are Charolais, Red Angus Composite “Range Fire Bulls� 30 Spring Coming 2 Year Old Charolais Bulls

January 2019 California Cattleman 51


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 50 a vested interest in healthy rangelands and habitats. Throughout the year, these PBA leaders work with other local landowners to develop burn plans and prep units, and when optimal weather windows present themselves, the group gets together and conducts the burns. The PBA is mostly volunteer, and members contribute tools and equipment to help make the burns happen. PBA members typically volunteer on two or more burns before their projects make it onto the group’s priority list. In this way, there is clear incentive to help each other out, and everyone benefits in the long term. Because of PBAs, burning has become a viable and effective treatment—one that provides unprecedented training opportunities to landowners, encourages communitywide collaboration, and is reversing trends of habitat and rangeland losses throughout the middle of the country. So why aren’t we doing this in California? Finally, we are! We returned home from Nebraska last year and started planning some burns. By the end of 2017, we had burned approximately 200 acres on four different ranches, and by March 2018, we’d officially formed the Humboldt County Prescribed Burn Association (HCPBA)—the first PBA in the West. In 2018, we accomplished another six burns totaling more than 500 acres, and we have a long list of projects to tackle in the coming months and years. In less than a year, the HCPBA has more than 60 paying members, a mailing list of 250 people, and has raised more than $300,000 in grants for training, staffing, and equipment. The momentum has been impressive. The California political climate is also ripe for this kind of work. The 2017 fire season spurred important legislative movement around fire, and this fall, the Governor signed three new bills that directly relate to prescribed fire: 1) SB901, which includes $200 million per year for the next five years to fund forest health and fire prevention work, including prescribed fire; 2) SB1260, which is focused primarily on prescribed fire and includes pieces on liability and training; and 3) AB2091, which mandates the development of new insurance options for prescribed fire. 52 California Cattleman January 2019

The tragic 2018 fire season has reinforced the dire need for this work throughout California, and the critical role community members and landowners need to play. It would have been easy for us to think that we couldn’t do this in California—that the PBA model could only work somewhere like the Great Plains. But we’ve shown that this is doable, even in a county with some of the most expensive air quality permits in the state and some of the narrowest burn windows! It’s time to put fire back in California’s toolbox. For more information and to get involved, send us an email: Lenya Quinn-Davidson, Area Fire Advisor, UCCE, lquinndavidson@ucanr.edu, and Jeffery Stackhouse, Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor, UCCE, jwstackhouse@ucanr.edu. EDITOR’S NOTE: Lenya Quinn-Davidson served as a guest speaker at the CCA & CCW Convention. CCA thanks her for her time and for educating members on this topic.


This is the kind we will sell in volume on Tuesday, February 12th, 2019. This bull calf is a 3/4 Simmental 1/4 Angus son of our 2017 Top Seller, W/C Bankroll.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12TH 12:00 NOON AT THE RANCH 27262 424th Avenue Emery, South Dakota 57332 When selecting the next genetics for your herd, make sure you’re on the right side of the fence!

SELLING 300 HEAD!

Remington Lock N Load 54U

SIMMENTAL, SIMANGUS™ & ANGUS

200 PERFORMANCE BULLS 160 YEARLING BULLS 40 STRONG AGED BULLS 100 REGISTERED BRED HEIFERS SEMEN & EMBRYOS

Selling 90 Progeny & Grandprogeny A standard setter for putting explosive muscle in a functional package for the commercial cowman to utilize.

OFFICE 605-825-4024 DALE 605-661-3625 SCOTT 605-682-9610 JARED 605-933-1661 27262 424th Avenue, Emery, SD www.werningcattle.com

W/C United 956Y

Eberspacher Enterprises Inc. Val & Lori Eberspacher 507-532-6694 Val Eberspacher Cell 612-805-7405 Email: sales@ebersale.com Like us on Facebook for all sale updates! 2904 County Road 6, Marshall, MN 56258

www.ebersale.com

W/C HOC HCC Red Answer 33B

Offering another impressive set of red and red blaze faced bulls in 2019!

Selling 70 Progeny & Grandprogeny • Trait leader and Top 1% for WW, YW, ADG & TI Top SimAngus™ bull in America for registrations! This bull continues to make a huge impact in the commercial beef business!

January 2019 California Cattleman 53


2018 CCA & CCW

Photo Contest

This year’s contest included nearly 200 photo entries which were evaluated by the judges by category. The judging criteria included clarity and relevance to the California beef industry. After the preliminary scoring and category placements, these ribbon winners were displayed at the CCA & CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev., where meeting attendees could vote on the “People’s Choice” Award. This year’s People Choice Award Winner was Fresno State student Wyatt Campbell of Orange Cove with his photo “Bull on the Beach.”

2018 Judges

Heidi Anderson,Kansas

Heidi Anderson has been a professional photographer for over twenty years. Along with her husband Charles owns Legacy Livestock Imaging in Topeka Kansas. Specializing in agriculture and ranch photography including corporate and family and is the official photographer at many of the nations top stock shows. Besides winning numerous award for her images many are also featured in national ad campaigns for her clients. In her free time she is an active member of the National and Kansas Professional Photographers of America as well as enjoys going to activities for their five children.

Carey Brown, Kentucky

Carey Brown is the Director of Communications for the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association, managing their monthly newspaper, Cow Country News, as well as all communications and social media in the office. She also manages the Livestock Advertising Network, an advertising sales company representing 18 cattle publications. She enjoys donating her time to the Livestock Publications Council, serving as the 2018-2019 President. She loves to spend time with her three kids, cross-stitching and running.

54 California Cattleman January 2019


1st

2nd

"ROUND UP TIME" JOHN ALVES, GARDNERVILLE, NEV.

1st

Rural Life 3rd

"RIDING OUT TO BRAND" JOHN ALVES, GARDNERVILLE, NEV.

"GAGE" ROGER FREEBURG, SAN RAFAEL

People

2nd

"RANCH WIFE LIFE" LYDIA KYLE, ADIN

"NEXT GENERATION" LYDIA KYLE, ADIN

3rd

"FOUNDING FATHER" LYDIA KYLE, ADIN

California Landscapes 1st

"BULL ON THE BEACH" WYATT CAMPELL, ORANGE COVE

2nd

3rd

"TWIN LAKE MORNING" KATIE LACEY, INDEPENDENCE

"WALKING THE LINE" LELA HOLLAND, BROOKS

Animals &Wildlife 1st

2nd

"PUPPY LOVE" HANNAH GILL, EXETER

"GOT MY FUZZY WINTER COAT ON" STACEY JACKSON, MONTAGUE

"THE REMUDA" KATIE LACEY, INDEPENDENCE

1st

"BRINGING THEM HOME" KAYLA DELBAR, POTTER VALLEY

3rd

Cell Phone Photos 2nd

3rd

"SPECTACULAR MORNING TO MAKE AN ENTRANCE" BRIAN HEFFERNAN, FT. JONES

"STORM’S A BREWING" KACIE MARIN, BECKWOURTH

January 2019 California Cattleman 55


Funding our Future

At the 102nd annual CCA & CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev., representatives of CCA’s affiliate groups had the distinct responsibility of interviewing this year’s CCA scholarship finalists, which came from a large pool of impressive applicants from throughout California with unique beef industry interest and experience. In total, $40,000 was contributed, making it the biggest scholarship year for CCA’s affiliate groups. The groups represented on the scholarship panel include: Allflex, USA; the CCA Allied Industry Council; the CCA Feeder Council; the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA), representing the Hank Stone Memorial Scholarship; the Livestock Memorial Research Fund (LMRF); and a representative for

Sarah Klopatek

Animal Science Doctorate Student University of California, Davis $10,000 • Livestock Memorial Research Fund

Megan Banwarth

Animal Science California State University, Chico $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

Nathan Yerian

Veterinary Student University of California, Davis $10,000 - Livestock Memorial Research Fund

Selby Boerman

Animal Science Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo $1,000 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Bailey Morrell

Agriculture Education Colorado State University $1,000 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

56 California Cattleman January 2019

the Tom Grimmius Memorial Scholarship. To qualify for a scholarship, students must be members of CCA’s Young Cattlemen’s Committee and have either graduated from a California high school or be currently attending a California college or university, majoring in a beef industry-related field. This year, not only were the candidate’s applications impressive, but the group also represented both in-state and out-of-state students ranging from the community college level to veterinary and graduate school students. Recipients of the 2018-2019 CCA scholarships are pictured here. To learn more about how to apply for a CCA scholarship, contact Lisa Brendlen in the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or lisa@ calcattlemen.org

Macy Perry

Meat Science Graduate Student Oklahoma State University $2,500 • Hank Stone Memorial/CBCIA

Dawson Dal Porto

Agricultural Science Iowa State University $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

Kyle Prock

Agricultural Business California State Univeristy, Fresno $1,000 • Tom Grimmius Memorial

Kelley Duggan

Animal Science California State University, Chico $1,000 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Mason Tarr

Animal Nutrition Reedley College $1,000 • Tom Grimmius Memorial


2018-2019 SCHOLARSHIPS PRESENTED BY...

the family of the late tom grimmius

Feeder Council

Grace Woodmansee

Horiculture/Agronomy Graduate Student University of California, Davis $2,500 • Hank Stone Memorial/CBCIA

Chloe Fowler

Agricultural Communications Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo $1,000 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

LMRF Emiliy Andreini

Animal Biology Graduate Student University of California, Davis $1,500 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Heather Foxworthy

Animal Science Graduate Student Colorado State University $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

Kenneth Watkins

Agricultural Business Oklahoma State University $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

Sheyenne Augestein

Animal Science Graduate Student University of California, Davis $1,000 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Grace Guthrie

Agriculture Business Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo $1,000 • Tom Grimmius Memorial

Valley Urricelqui

Agriculture Education & Scienc California State University, Chico $1,000 • Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Katie Lacey

Animal Science Oklahoma State University $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Serena Schontanus

plans to study pre-vet at Cornell University Central Valley Christian High School $750 • Tom Grimmius Memorial

January 2019 California Cattleman 57


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD

U.S. BEEF EXPORTS STAY RED HOT THOUGH 2018 from the U.S. Meat Export Federation U.S. beef exports remained on a record-shattering value pace in October 2018, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). October beef exports totaled 117,838 metric tons (mt), up 6 percent from a year ago, valued at $727.4 million – up 10 percent and the second-highest monthly total on record. Exports accounted for 13 percent of total beef production in October, which was steady with last year, and 11.6 percent for muscle cuts only (down slightly). For January through October, exports accounted for 13.5 percent of total production and 11.1 percent for muscle cuts – up from 12.8 percent and 10.2 percent, respectively, last year. Beef export value equated to $317.53 per head of fed slaughter in October, up 5 percent from a year ago. For January through October, the per-head average was up 15 percent to $320.50. Dan Halstrom, USMEF president and CEO. said that upcoming trade negotiations with Japan are critical for the U.S. pork and beef industries, as all major competitors in the Japanese market will soon benefit from significant tariff reductions. USMEF, along with producers, exporters and other industry organizations submitted comments to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) underscoring the importance and urgency of these negotiations and conveyed these points again in USTR’s Dec. 10 public hearing. New value records for U.S. beef in Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines Beef exports to South Korea, which had already set a new annual value record through September, remained on a torrid pace as October exports reached 20,171 mt (up 17 percent from a year ago) valued at $153.1 million (up 25 percent). January-October exports were up 35 percent in volume (200,666 mt) and 47 percent in value ($1.44 billion). These results included a 21 percent increase in chilled beef exports to 44,440 mt, valued at $431 million (up 31 percent). While Korea’s imports from Australia and New Zealand have also edged higher in 2018, U.S. beef ’s market share has increased sharply, jumping from 49 to 53 percent. October beef exports to leading market Japan were up 12 percent from a year ago in volume (26,954 mt) and 13 percent higher in value ($166.8 million). For January through October, exports to Japan were up 7 percent from a year ago in volume (279,825 mt) while value increased 10 percent to $1.76 billion. Chilled beef exports to Japan were down 1 percent to 123,712 mt, but value increased 8 percent to $990 million. For January through October, other highlights for U.S. beef exports include: • Beef exports to Taiwan were up 34 percent from a year ago in volume (49,135 mt), while value reached $455.3 million – up 36 percent and already easily 58 California Cattleman January 2019

surpassing last year’s annual record of $409.7 million. Chilled exports to Taiwan were up 30 percent in volume (19,878 mt) and 35 percent in value ($249 million), as the United States captured more than 75 percent of Taiwan’s chilled beef market – the highest market share of any Asian destination. Exports to the Philippines soared 29 percent in volume to 14,751 mt and reached $72.4 million in value – up 35 percent and setting a new annual record. Solid growth in Vietnam also helped push beef exports to the ASEAN region 14 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (39,719 mt) and 26 percent higher in value ($218.1 million). Exports to Mexico were up 1 percent from a year ago in volume (199,003 mt) and 8 percent higher in value ($879.2 million). Beef muscle cut exports to Mexico have shown particularly strong momentum in 2018, increasing 8 percent in volume (118,177 mt) and 11 percent in value ($691.6 million). Although October volume trended lower, JanuaryOctober exports to China/Hong Kong were still 4 percent ahead of last year’s pace in volume (102,545 mt) and 24 percent higher in value ($823.5 million). This included exports to China of 5,677 mt valued at $48.6 million. Growth in the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and the Bahamas contributed to a 9 percent increase in the Caribbean region as exports reached 21,455 mt. Value was up 4 percent to $135.4 million. Led by strong growth in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Panama, El Salvador and Nicaragua, beef exports to Central America increased 18 percent year-over-year in volume (11,923 mt) and 14 percent in value ($64.6 million).


WEBER REFORM 618

HB 194, GM 49, CED 13, BW -0.3, WW 68, YW 106, ADG 0.24, DMI 1.23, MK 25, ME 5, HPG 6, CEM 7, STAY 19, MB 0.39, YG 0.09, CW 14, REA 0.22, FAT 0.05

7th Annual

CATTLEMENS’ CLASSIC SALE

MARCH 2, 2019 • 1 PM PST • DRY CREEK RANCH SALE FACILITY • TERREBONNE, OREGON Featuring sons of Weber Reform 618

Weber Reform semen available at the

MILE HIGH CLASSIC SALE IN DENVER Sale featuring sons of these top sire groups

BROWN EPIPHANY B111

Reg # 1703649 HB 231, GM 52, CED 15, BW -3.6, WW 66, YW 106, ADG 0.25, DMI 1.20, MK 20, ME 1, HPG 10, CEM 7, STAY 21, MB 0.77, YG 0.11, CW 33, REA 0.31, FAT 0.04

BROWN INCREDABULL Z7277

Reg # 1550654 HB 220, GM 54, CED 14, BW -1.6, WW 75, YW 117, ADG 0.26, DMI 1.09, MK 18, ME -5, HPG 14, CEM 7, STAY 18, MB 0.84, YG 0.09, CW 32, REA 0.43, FAT 0.05

BIEBER GLADIATOR C386

Reg # 3474701 HB 186, GM 54, CED 19, BW -5.3, WW 72, YW 116, ADG 0.28, DMI 1.01, MK 16, ME 4, HPG 12, CEM 12, STAY 12, MB 0.79, YG 0.11, CW 37, REA 0.20, FAT 0.02

Everett Flikkema: 406.580.2186 Jack Vollstedt: 818.535.4034

Terrebonne, Oregon • vfredangus.com


REVISITING THE DISCUSSION Report Findings Continue Discussion on Beef Cattle Identiffication and Traceability by David Gregg, Consulting Projects Manager, World Perspectives, Inc. EDITOR’S NOTE: The following information from a report by World Perspectives, Inc. on behalf of the U.S. beef cattle industry was shared during the annual CCA & CCW Convention. Among U.S. beef industry stakeholders, the terms “traceability” or “animal identification” have often been met with a level of skepticism. This is understandable given the history of start-and-stop efforts to get the subject on the industry’s radar. When a collaborative working group included an emphasis on animal identification/traceability in the Beef Industry Long Range Plan (2016-2020) and a foundational study was commissioned by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), the goal of the study was immediately clear: the discussion needed to be reset. Any study that could be considered different from past efforts needed to provide a foundation for constructive discussion and, ideally, proactive steps for addressing this looming issue. Today, nearly one year after NCBA’s release of World Perspectives, Inc.’s (WPI) study, ongoing and evolving discussions among and between national and state-level industry associations, government agencies, private businesses, and non-profits are evidence that the study has helped restart serious discussion about how the beef industry can proactively address animal identification and traceability. Titled “Comprehensive Feasibility Study of U.S. Beef Cattle Identification and Traceability Systems: An Evaluation of Opportunities, Obstacles and Incentives Across the U.S. Beef Industry Value Chain” WPI’s report has been presented in-person and via webinar to over 20 different audience groups, among them state cattle associations such as the California Cattlemen’s Association. These presentations have been made possible thanks to support from the Cattlemen’s Education Series, a program supported by NCBA and the National Corn Growers Association. Importantly, these discussions have ensured that the conversation continues to evolve long after the study’s release at the 2018 NCBA Convention. Measurable progress has been made: recently, the Kansas Livestock Association (KLA) in partnership with a number of public and non-profit stakeholders announced that they would be running a pilot program called CattleTrace. Program participants include cow-calf ranches, feed yards, auction markets and processing plants, all collaborating to gather data necessary for animal disease traceability using ultra-high frequency ear tags. During a presentation at KLA’s recent convention in November 2018, CattleTrace spokespeople noted that the pilot program’s development and implementation borrowed heavily from the findings of the 60 California Cattleman January 2019

NCBA study. In September 2018, USDA’s Under Secretary for the USDA’s Marketing and Regulatory Programs, Greg Ibach (formerly Nebraska Director of Agriculture) outlined four USDA goals related to beef cattle identification and traceability: 1. Advance the electronic sharing of data – including basic animal disease traceability data with the federal animal health events repository (AHER) – among federal and state animal health officials, veterinarians and industry. 2. Use electronic ID tags for animals requiring individual identification in order to make the transmission of data more efficient. 3. Enhance the ability to track animals from birth to slaughter through a system that allows tracking data points to be connected. 4. Elevate the discussion with states and industry to work toward a system where animal health certificates are electronically transmitted from private veterinarians to state animal health officials. The feasibility study commissioned by NCBA explicitly offered a series of basic tenets that any successful animal identification and traceability system should possess. Collaboration was a key theme resonating among these basic tenets. The study also identified one of the industry’s greatest challenges – agreement among key sectors including cow-calf producers, feeders and packers – as its greatest opportunity. As productive discussions continue and momentum builds across the U.S., it is worth revisiting some of the study’s key findings. National significance is one of the key concepts that the study defines right up front: this concept relates primarily to the overall number of cattle represented in a traceability system(s). By considering the ideas of theoretical efficiency and diminishing marginal returns, the study notes that approximately 68 percent traceability for annual fed cattle slaughter and the national breeding cow herd would ensure that a system has national significance. Importantly, specific to the subject of animal disease control, USDA (2011) estimates that 70 percent of the animals in a specific species and/or sector would need to be identified and traceable to their premises of origin to achieve anticipated disease control benefits. The study’s estimate, derived independently, yielded a similar figure. In an effort to be foundational, the study included analysis of how countries around the world have addressed the issue of beef cattle identification and traceability in their own herds. Many systems are government mandated; some


TABLE 1. protect data from public access by entrusting it to a private third-party. Oversight bodies are common, and often feature both private industry and government representation. Most basically, global systems tend to capture information on premise identification, individual animal identification, and/ or group/lot identification. Table 1 to the right provides a quick snapshot of global systems: 1Group/lot identification in Argentina is voluntary; the system still functions at the group/lot level. It is estimated that 2The NLIS website reports that the NLIS is endorsed by major industry stakeholders; however, management is coordinated at the federal and state/ approximately 61 percent territory level. of global beef exports come 3Brazil’s premise and group/lot identification requirements apply only to cattle destined for export markets. from countries with nationally 4Premise identification (voluntary) is regulated at the Provincial level. significant traceability systems in place. Most of the remaining supply of global beef exports come from the FIGURE 1. U.S., Paraguay and Belarus. Among top exporting countries – excluding, primarily, the U.S. – nationally significant traceability systems are the norm. Narrowing down to the perspective of the U.S. industry, the study details an extensive series of surveys and interviews with beef industry stakeholders across the value chain. A 600-respondent survey targeting mainly producers yielded the following insights:

• As shown in Figure 1, 22 percent of producers are currently participating in a voluntary traceability/ animal identification system. Generally, the larger the herd size, the more likely a producer is participating in a voluntary program. • Support of integration with current systems with a larger, more nationally significant system(s) defines the colloquial term “on the fence” as shown in Figure 2 to the right. The study notes that the significant number of “Neutral” respondents provide a target audience for increased communication and outreach regarding the potential for system(s) integration.

FIGURE 2.

• Keeping in mind the common approaches taken by U.S. competitors across the globe, the study’s survey of producers rated the level of acceptance among respondents for ranch of origin identification system(s). Figure 3 on the following page details the strong level of support for this component. Taken together, the study’s survey results and qualitative discussion results point to an evolving discussion among the U.S. industry regarding animal identification and traceability. One issue that the study seeks to illuminate is opportunity cost. While there has been exhaustive discussion on the cost of a nationally significant animal identification system, the study claims that “…when considering the points covered, the potential for negative domestic and international market impacts

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 62 January 2019 California Cattleman 61


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 61 in the event of an animal disease outbreak – or the opportunity costs inherent in not adopting an expanded U.S. systems approach – seem to outweigh any general cost projections for an expanded approach.” After the December 2003 BSE outbreak, it took until 2010 before beef exports’ contribution to overall fed cattle prices was restored to normal levels. Over the past 15 years – excepting those 6 recovery years – the contribution of beef exports to the total fed cattle price has averaged about 10 percent. If that 10 percent average would have been maintained for the years 2004 through 2009, per-head value of cattle would have been higher by up to $92 in 2004, and $13.50 in 2009, as Figure 4 shows. Total out-of-pocket and lost potential opportunity costs totaled $10.7 billion over those years. Robust animal identification and traceability systems likely would not have completely prevented the closure of international markets that led to the reduction in export values detailed above. However, they could have mitigated the impact by speeding the recovery time for export market re-opening. If all the closed markets were recovered in half the time, total losses and opportunity costs would have been $6.3 billion, or in other words, total fed cattle value potentially would have been a cumulative $4.4 billion greater over the years 2007, 2008 and 2009. After discussion on key concepts, global comparisons, U.S. industry sentiments and opportunity costs, the study offers a list of obstacles and opportunities inherent in adopting of a nationally significant U.S. beef cattle traceability system(s). Obstacles differ among key sectors, but the most important obstacle is also an opportunity: collaboration among cow-calf producers, feeders and packers. Additional opportunities identified by the study include: • The opportunity for proactive industry leadership. • The opportunity to focus on best practices and design a hybrid approach. • The opportunity to mitigate impacts of animal disease outbreaks. • The opportunity to capture domestic and foreign market opportunities. • The opportunity to add another tool to maximize industry competitive advantage. • The opportunity to enhance operational management efficiencies. • The opportunity to adopt system(s) that are technology neutral. Finally, the study closes with a list of key tenets that, based on findings, should be considered as key to a 62 California Cattleman January 2019

FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 4.

successful approach in the U.S. The basic tenets of a system(s) are that it: 1. Is industry driven. 2. Is managed and overseen by an entity that includes both private and government interests. 3. Maintains data privacy. 4. Is equitable to all industry sectors. 5. Is compatible with common industry practices. 6. Operates at the speed of commerce. 7. Is credible in domestic and international markets. Hopefully, discussion will continue to evolve and the industry will move closer to addressing the longstanding issue of beef cattle identification and traceability. As California’s cattlemen and women continue to strive for excellence in quality, efficiency and sustainability – setting the national standard ever higher – NCBA’s study on traceability and the actions of key partners such as KLA can provide guidance on being proactive and taking advantage of this opportunity.


L

OR T F S L E

21ST

H

Sat. March 9, 2019 Dinner & Dance Sun. March 10, 2019 Bull Sale

BU

Snyder Livestock Company Presents

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Test & Sale P.O. Box 550 • 165 Osborne Ln. • Yerington, NV 89447 • Lucy (775) 790-0801 • Office (775) 463-2677 • www.slcnv.com

Funded in part by grants from the Yerington and Lyon County Room Tax Boards

Western Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. Annual Ag Scholarship Dinner & Dance

$30 Adult - $50 Couple $10 Child (price increase at the door)

Sat. March 9, 2019

For info call (775) 720-3106

Lance Pekus Cowboy Ninja

January 2019 California Cattleman 63


EPA and Corps Propose WOTUS Revision

On December 11, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) proposed to amend the definition of “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS) to interpret the term “navigable waters” under the Clean Water Act. CCA has been a vocal critic of the agencies’ 2015 definition of “Waters of the United States,” going so far as to sue the agencies over the expansive regulation of non-navigable tributaries and wetlands on private property. But as explained by Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF)—CCA’s legal counsel in challenging the regulation—the new regulatory proposal may not provide the relief CCA and other agricultural organizations had sought from the 2015 Rule. According to a PLF press release, “In February 2017, President Trump issued an executive order instructing the [EPA and Corps] to revise the overly broad definition of ‘navigable waters’ under the Waters of the United States rule. “The goal of Trump’s order was to protect ordinary Americans engaged in routine activities on their property from being treated like industrial polluters under the Clean Water Act. But today’s proposal fails to deliver on that promise. “The proposal takes the obvious step to clarify that roadside ditches are not federal commercial waterways. But it still regulates small, intermittent or seasonal drainages on private property, even when that property is far removed from navigable waters. It also regulates wetlands no matter how small or distant from actually navigable rivers and lakes. “‘While this is an improvement from EPA’s unreasonable and illegal 2015 definition of navigable waters, it still falls well outside the Supreme Court’s plurality opinion defining the limits of Clean Water Act jurisdiction,’ PLF Senior Attorney Tony Francois said. ‘Despite assurances that the new definition would clarify what is regulated, landowners will still face uncertainty, high consulting costs and aggressive assertions of jurisdiction from agency enforcers. [Corps] and EPA bureaucrats still have far too much power to regulate private property, and they will continue to abuse that power without meaningful reforms.’” As of press time, the proposed regulation has not been officially noticed in the Federal Register. Once the proposed rule is formally published, it will kick off a 60-day public comment period during which CCA, with assistance from our counsel at PLF, will provide detailed feedback regarding the proposal. 64 California Cattleman January 2019

Kessler Angus

2019 Bull Sale

Tuesday

Feb. 19

At the ranch in Umapine, OR

Selliing 110 Fall & Spring Yearling Bulls!

KESSLERS COWBOY UP 8029

Reg #: 19126021 • Sire: HA Cowboy Up CED BW WW YW CW MB RE $B 7 2.3 85 144 76 0.26 0.84 173.95

SELLING SONS OF: KR CASH 5212 KESSLERS COMRADE 6516 HA COWBOY UP

KESSLERS CASH FLOW 8104

Reg #: 19188391• Sire: KR Cash 5212 CED BW WW YW CW MB RE $B 9 0.4 46 89 32 0.52 0.41 108.82

S WHITLOCK BALDRIDGE BREAKTHROUGH SAV DROVER CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE

Request catalogs & more information at KESSLERANGUS.COM

RANDY KESSLER | (509) 520-3281 | REK52@LIVE.COM

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January 2019 California Cattleman 65


MACFARLANE TAKES REINS OF SHASTA DISTRICT FAIR The Shasta District Fair, based in Anderson has a new chief executive officer. The Shasta District Fair Board of Directors is pleased to announce the hiring of B.J. Macfarlane for the fair’s lead position. Most Recently the farm manager for Shasta College in Redding, B.J. is right at home in fair life as he was raisd in and around the beef show ring and has been actively involved in the fair industry most of his life B.J. is a graduate of California State University, Chico, with a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science. B.J. resides in Cottonwood with his wife Melissa and three daughters, Addison, Ellis and Maddox. His father, Bob, a previous fair manager himself, also resides on their ranch in Cottonwood. B.J.’s knowledge of the fair industry and his community involvement will be a benefit to the Shasta District Fair as he fills his new role. B.J. is excited to continue the success of the Shasta District Fair and Event Center. “I’m excited to begin a new chapter in my life that is such a big part of who I am,” Macfarlane said. “Shasta

County is where my family calls home and I am looking forward to helping our fair thrive for future generations in our county.” In addition to hosting a wide variety of public events throughout the year, the Shasta Distict Fair is held each June and boasts one of the largest attendance numbers in the northstate.

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

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When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! 66 California Cattleman January 2019


Genetic Edge Bull Sale Please Join us at the ranch near Idaho Falls, Idaho

Saturday •

March 9, 2019

• 11 a.m.

The Riverbend Ranch Advantage

OFFERING OVER 500 HEAD

BACKED BY THE BEST GUARANTEE IN THE BUSINESS!

Growth Bulls, Maternal Bulls, Carcass Merit Bulls,

Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed! If you’re not happy with your bull purchase at anytime for any reason, we’ll give you full credit.

Whatever your needs we have you covered! Calving-Ease Bulls or Multi-trait Bulls. 18-Month-Old Bulls are ready for heavy service in the big country. All Semen tested and ready for turn out.

WE INVEST IN OUR CUSTOMERS! Put our customer investment program to work for you. Over the last 7 years Riverbend has been putting millions back in your pockets.

REPEAT CUSTOMER DISCOUNTS! Customers who purchased Riverbend Bulls in the 2018 Sale will receive 5% off of their bull purchase in this sale. In addition all customers can also qualify for the volume discount.

2016 Certified Angus Beef Seedstock Producer of the Year

2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821

CALL 208-528-6635 OR E-MAIL BULLS@RIVERBENDRANCH.US TO BE PLACED ON OUR MAILING LIST SALE MANAGEMENT 517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

January 2019 California Cattleman 67

www.riverbendranch.us


California

Thank You THD ©

for A GreAT AnnuAl eVenT

Angus days Turlock, California

Thank You to the Sale Consignors, Bidders, Buyers and the Angus Days Sale Committee for a Great Heifer and Steer Sale! ConGrATulATionS To 2018 CAliforniA AnGuS HAll of fAme inDuCTee: longtime California Angus Association Treasurer Betsy Cardoza (second from right), madera, CA. Special Thanks to outgoing President Susan Henderson-Perry, outgoing Vice President Bill Traylor and outgoing Directors Jeanene Dal Porto, Jason Judge and Justin Schmidt.

THD ©

Congratulations to the Junior exhibitors in the Calcutta and CJlA Jackpot Shows. Pictured at right is the 2018 California Angus Days Calcutta Champion Heifer bought by mason Tarr (at the halter) and sold by Bobby and randie lax of lax Cattle Co., Adrian, or, and falleur Sisters, Gearhart, or. Thank You to all who helped put on the Annual event, as well as the Silent, live, Dessert and Calcutta Auction Donors and Buyers. A Thank You also goes out to our 2018 CAA Sponsors!

2019-2020

California Angus Board President ................................... mike Hall, Arroyo Grande Vice President .......................... matt Avila, Visalia Secretary................................... J.J. reinhardt, Sloughhouse Treasurer ................................... Betsy Cardoza, madera immediate Past President....... Susan Henderson-Perry, Prather CJAA Advisor ............................. Amanda leo, Snelling American Angus Treasurer...... David Dal Porto, oakley

68 Angus California Cattleman 2019 Pickering, Paso robles regional managerJanuary ......... Jake

THD ©

DireCTorS

Susan Henderson Perry, Prather Hadley Pitts, oakley Dave novelo, Placerville Bryce Borror, Gerber Susan levisay, Creston Joey Gonsalves, modesto Kelsey Schott, madera Shauna Strickler, orland Jolene Silveira, Denair rebecca franks, Grass Valley


January 2019 California Cattleman 69


in memory Alvin Marenco On Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018, Alvin Marenco, loving husband, father, and grandfather, passed away at home on his cattle ranch in Red Bluff, at the age of 85. Alvin was born Dec. 8, 1932 in Napa, to Eugene and Alvina (Kreuzer) Marenco. Al graduated from Napa High School and later Napa College with a Degree in Business; he was drafted into the Army in 1954 where he graduated basic training 6th Infantry and was transferred to the 101st Airborne Division where he completed his service and was honorably discharged. When Al returned home from the Army, he immediately pursued his love of riding, training horses, and raising cattle. Al was an accomplished horseman; he rode multiple disciplines from pleasure horses; to cutting horses to reined cow horses. He had a passion to ride snaffle bit horses, in rein cow horse aged events for many years, and he also was a carded AQHA and NRCHA judge as well. He was the SCCHA president and a director for the NCRCHA and NCQHA for many years; he loved to host horse show events at his arena on his ranch in Red Bluff. AL was active at all levels in the cattle industry, from being an Order buyer for Alpine meats, Fat-City feedlot, and other cattle companies, to a co-owner of Sonoma meat packing Company. Al fed cattle in several western state feedlots, and ran cows at his ranch on the Klamath Marsh in the summer and wintered his cows and feeders at his Red Bluff ranch. He hosted the Tehama County Cattlemen’s Field day three times on his ranch and was very active in the local cattlemen organization as well. He was the Tehama County Cattlemen’s President and later was awarded the Tehama County Cattlemen’s Man of the Year award. Al was preceded in death by his father, Eugene, and his mother, Alvina, and his sister Kathy Smith. He is survived by his wife Peggy, his son Chris (Amber), son Marc Marenco (Alejandra), daughter Cheri Duffee (Bill), daughter Julie Marenco, and grandchildren Colton, Christian, Neil, Kayla, Wade, John, Paul and Darya. A funeral service was held Saturday, December 15, 2018. from 12 to 3 p.m. If you wish a donation can be made to The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s ResearchP.O. Box 5014 Hagerstown, MD. 21741-5014, or a charity of your choice. 70 California Cattleman January 2019

dale Crump

Dale Chester Crump, 77, passed away in Elk Grove, CA on Saturday, November 3, 2018. Born November 18, 1940 to Chester Franklin Crump and Jessie Mae Derr, Dale was a lifelong resident of Elk Grove, CA. A cattleman through and through, Dale managed and ran the family-owned, 540-acre Crump Ranch from 1959 until 1985, when it became Cosumnes River Preserve. He then managed the family’s J.M. Derr Lumber Company until his retirement. He served as a director for the Florin Soil and Water Conservation District and was a member of the California Cattlemen’s Association and AmadorEl Dorado-Sacramento Cattlemen’s Associations, Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Elk Grove Elks Lodge Dale graduated from Elk Grove High School in 1959 and treasured his ‘57 Chevy. He was a devoted family man. He was married to Joyce Golden for 35 years and they have two children, Tal and Kelli. He enjoyed watching his children grow up and coaching their sports teams, including youth football and baseball. Dale never missed a 49ers game and was overjoyed when his San Francisco Giants won their championships. In 1996, he met his future wife, Sheila Massey. During their 23 years together, he was a loving soul mate and husband. Gregarious and quick to laugh, Dale brought joy to their household and cherished spending time with family and friends and reminiscing. He will be remembered as a generous person with a giant heart who was not just a friend to many, but a friend for life. A classic cattleman himself, he was a huge fan of John Wayne, Gunsmoke and a good steak. His is survived by his wife Sheila, son Tal and daughter-in-law Debbie and grandchildren Taylor and Mason, daughter Kelli and grandson Brady, sister Carole, many nephews and nieces, and his beloved cat Lovey. He was preceded in death by his parents and brother Richard Crump. A special thank you to Palm Valley Care in Elk Grove. Memorial donations in honor of Dale may be made to the Elk Grove Jr. Thundering Herd or Elk Grove Youth Baseball. Family and friends celebrated Dale’s life at the Herberger Family Elk Grove Funeral Chapel Nov. 17, 2018.


The same cowherd, raised on the same ranch by the same family for 100 years. March Selling

Angus Bulls and

in Bliss, Idaho Angus Females.

Spring Cove bulls are raised outside on dry range conditions, are genetically designed to provide meat, marbling and muscle and to perform in our western environment while enhancing the durability, fertility and longevity in your cowherd and in ours.

Spring Cove Reno 4021 Reg 17926446

Sired by: KM Broken Bow 002 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702

CED+10 BW-.3 WW+83 YW+137 SC+1.24 Milk+32 CW+54 Marb+.80 Rib+.63 $W+97.56 $F+105.75 $B+176.70 Reno sons and daughters sell March 11, 2019

Spring Cove Crossbow 4205 Reg 17924903

Sired by : KM Broken Bow 002 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702

CED+17 BW -1.6 WW+56 YW+106 SC+.39 Milk+20 CW+53 Marb+1.00 Rib+.56 $W+48.03 $F+69.66 $B+161.59 Crossbow sons and daughters sell March 11, 2019

Spring Cove Paygrade 5064 Reg 18251392 Sired by: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702

CED+11 BW-.6 WW+53 YW+91 SC+.99 Milk+26 CW+36 Marb+1.07 Rib+.23 $W+62.84 $F+48.44 $B+130.55 Paygrade sons and daughters sell March 11, 2019

S A V Resource 1411

Sitz Longevity 556Z Reg 17179073

Spring Cove TL Cat D13 Reg 18582235

Basin Bonus 4345 Reg 17904142

Sire: Connealy Final Product MGS: Woodhill Foresight

Sire: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Connealy Consensus 7229

Longevity sons and daughters sell March 11, 2019

Bonus sons and daughters sell March 11, 2019

CED+6 BEPD+.2 WEPD+60 YEPD+108 SC+1.00 Milk+30 CW+40 Marb+.80 Rib+.37 $W+67.63 $F+79.58 $B+142.71

For sale catalogs : Call: 208-352-4332 Email: info@springcoveranch.com www.springcoveranch.com

CED+7 BEPD+1.2 WEPD+72 YEPD+125 SC+.83 MEPD+36 CW+53 Marb+1.15 Rib+.54 $W+87.94 $F+98.06 $B+160.10

CED+9 BEPD+.4 WEPD+58 YEPD+103 SC+1.00 MEPD+27 CW+29 Marb+.70 Rib+.81 $W+58.45 $F+64.14 $B+119.21 D13 sons and daughters sell March 11, 2019

Spring Cove Ranch 269 Spring Cove Rd Bliss, Idaho 83314

Sire: Basin Bonus 4345 MGS: B/R Complete 4U75-257

For more information call:

Spring Cove Ranch office: 208-352-4332 Stacy Butler’s cell & text: 208-320-8803 Find us onCattleman Facebook January 2019 California 71


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs M i d Va l l e y

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

M i d Va l l e y

JOIN US AGAIN IN SEPTEMBER 2019 FOR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

M i d Va l l e y

THANK YOU TO OUR LOYAL CUSTOMERS FOR YOUR 2018 BULL PURCHASES!

THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Look for our “Distinctly Different” Angus Bulls at the 2019 Red Bluff & Modoc Bull Sales

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340

BULLS, FEMALES, EMBRYOS AND SEMEN FOR SALE AT THE RANCH IN LOS MOLINOS

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner (530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdranch.com

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! 2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

72 California Cattleman January 2019


6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

Angus

M i d Va l l e y

RAnch

Thank youSat., for aSeptember great 2018! Annual Bull Sale: 1, 2018 We hope to Sale: see you our annual Inaugural Female Mon.,atOctober 15, 2018

M i d Va l l e y

bull and female sales in 2019.

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

Thank you to all of our 2018 bull and female sale buyers! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2019.

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

Gerber, CA

SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

H

(530) 385-1570

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES! O’Connell Consensus 2705

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

Thank you to our buyers at the 43rd annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale.

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

JOIN US IN TEREBONNE OREGON PRESIDENT'S DAY 2019 FOR OUR PERFORMANCE PLUS BULL SALE!

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 January 2019 California Cattleman 73


ANNUAL BULL SALE SEPT. 6 IN LA GRANGE

Jared Patterson Western Region Field Manager (208) 312-2386 Call AHA today for assistance or information on buying or marketing of Hereford cattle! 11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

JOIN US FEB. 2019 IN ALTURAS FOR OUR MODOC BULL SALE Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 13, 2018

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females.

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Join us March 2 for our bull sale in Terrebonne, OR!

74 California Cattleman January 2019

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com


ourfor 2018 supporters! JoinThank us Octyou 15, to 2018 ourbuyers annualand production sale!

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

Bulls and females available private treaty!

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

Phone 707.718.4199

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

CHAROLAIS

Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

January 2019 California Cattleman 75


SALE MANAGEMENT M3 MARKETING

SALE MANAGEMENT & MARKETING PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY ORDER BUYING PRIVATE TREATY SALES PRODUCTION SALE RING SERVICE ADVERTISING

M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM (916) 803-3113

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

Over 30 years of excellence in ag fencing & animal handling design-build

Christopher L. Hanneken 800-84-FENCE

www.southwestfenceandsupply.com

Ranch Fencing Materials and Accessories & Ranch Supplies

www.runningMgroup.com Monique Hanneken 805-635-4940

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

3300 Longmire Drive• College Station, TX 77845 (800) 768-4066 • (979) 693-0388 fax: (979) 693-7994 e-mail: info@bovine-elite.com

76 California Cattleman January 2019

Your business could be listed here! Market directly to your target audience through one of the most reputable publications in the west and the only publication that puts your advertising dollars back to work for you!

the California Cattleman is sent monthly to subscribing cattle producers and members of the California Cattlemen’s Association who need your services!

$450 for the first 11 months $400 for each annual renewal To learn more about an annual advertisement in this buyer’s guide, contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113.


Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. This parasite infects the red blood cells and causes severe anemia, weakness, fever, lack of appetite, depression, constipation, decreased milk production, jaundice, abortion and sometimes death. This killed vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age from infection and requires a booster given 4-6 weeks after the initial vaccination.

10-40 doses: $8.50 per dose * 50 +: $7.50 per dose * 10 dose/$85 minimum

Flat rate shipping: $10 per order

NEw Arrivals

William Chance Koopmann

William “Chance’’ Koopmann was eagerly welcomed by parents Clayton and Natalie Koopmann, Sunol, on Nov. 23, 2018. Chance weighed in at 7 pounds and 1 ounce and was 20 and one half inches long. Chance’s grandparents are Tim and Melinda Koopmann, Sunol, and Karen Jensen, Sloughhouse and Lynn Jensen, Burbank.

SUCCESS is Reason Enough

Jaxon Reed Helsel

Reed and Brooke Helsel, Clovis, became a family of three on Dec. 21, 2018 when they were joined by Jaxon Reed Helsel, who was born weighing 7 pounds, 6 ounces. Grandparents are Steve and Betsy Behlen and David and Brenda Helsel, all of Clovis.

John Calvin Lavers

Reagan Riley Lavers, 6, Glennville, is pleased to announce the arrival of her brother, John Calvin Lavers on Dec. 3, 2018. He weighed 8 pounds, 1 ounce and was 20 and one half inches long. They represent the 7th generation on the Lavers Ranch and are the children of Jack and Jenny Lavers. Proud grandparents are Fred David Lavers II and Cynthia Sanchez Lavers, Glennville, and Jim and Tina Waller of Santa Clarita.

The The All All West West Beef Beef Team Team delivers delivers diverse diverse genetics genetics & & experienced experienced breeding breeding services services contact@allwestselectsires.com contact@allwestselectsires.com www.allwestselectsires.com www.allwestselectsires.com 1-800-426-2697 1-800-426-2697

January 2019 California Cattleman 77


Advertisers’ Index AirMedCare Network............................................... 79 All West/Select Sires.................................................. 77 Amado Angus............................................................ 72 American Angus Association.................................. 25 American Hereford Association.............................. 74 Angus Days................................................................ 69 Baker Angus Ranch................................................... 41 Bar 6 Charolais........................................................... 51 Bar KD Ranch................................................11, 45, 72 Bar R Angus............................................................... 72 Bovine Elite LLC........................................................ 76 Broken Box Ranch..................................................... 75 Buchanan Angus Ranch..................................... 17, 72 Byrd Cattle Co........................................................... 72 California Angus Association.................................. 69 Charron Ranch.......................................................... 72 Cherry Glen Beefmasters......................................... 75 Colyer Hereford & Angus........................................ 49 Conlin Supply Co, Inc............................................... 12 Crouthamel Cattle Co............................................... 47 CSU Chico College of Ag......................................... 75 CX Ranch................................................................... 46 Dal Porto Livestock................................................... 72 Dixie Valley Angus.................................................... 72 Donati Ranch............................................................. 72 EZ Angus Ranch........................................................ 73 Freitas Rangeland Management.............................. 52 Fresno State Ag Foundation..................................... 75 Furtado Angus........................................................... 73

Furtado Livestock Enterprises................................. 76 Genoa Livestock........................................................ 74 Harrell Hereford Ranch...................................... 39, 74 HAVE Angus ............................................................. 73 Hinton Ranch Simmentals....................................... 40 Hoffman Ranch......................................................... 31 Hogan Ranch............................................................. 73 Hone Ranch................................................................ 75 Hufford’s Herefords................................................... 74 J-H Feed Inc............................................................... 76 Kessler Angus............................................................. 64 Klamath Bull & Horse Sale....................................... 13 Lambert Ranch.................................................... 11, 74 Little Shasta Ranch.............................................. 45, 75 M3 Marketing............................................................ 76 Macfarlane Livestock................................................ 46 McPhee Red Angus................................................... 74 Morrell Ranches......................................................... 74 Noahs Angus.............................................................. 73 Nobmann Cattle........................................................ 72 O’Connell Ranch....................................................... 73 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co......................................... 74 Pacific Trace Minerals......................................... 76, 77 Pinenut Livestock Supply......................................... 64 Pitchfork Cattle Co.................................................... 74 Red Bluff Bull Sale.........................................42, 43, 44 Red River Farms........................................................ 73 Riverbend Ranch....................................................... 67 Romans Ranches Charolais..................................... 70

78 California Cattleman January 2019

Running M Group..................................................... 76 Sammis Ranch..................................................... 46, 73 Scales Northwest........................................................ 34 Schafer Ranch............................................................ 73 Schohr Herefords....................................................... 75 Shaw Cattle Co........................................................... 15 Sierra Ranches............................................................ 75 Silveira Bros................................................................ 73 Silveus Rangeland Insurance................................... 66 Snyder Livestock Company...................................... 63 Sonoma Mountain Herefords.................................. 75 Southwest Fence & Construction............................ 76 Spanish Ranch............................................................ 75 Spring Cove Ranch.................................................... 71 Tehama Angus Ranch............................................... 73 Teixeira Cattle Company ..................................... 9, 73 Thomas Angus Ranch............................................... 35 Trinity Farms.............................................................. 65 Tumbleweed Ranch................................................... 75 VAL Charolais...................................................... 28, 29 VF Red Angus...................................................... 59, 74 Vintage Angus Ranch......................................... 74, 80 Ward Ranches............................................................ 27 Werning Cattle Company......................................... 53 Western Video Market................................................ 3 Winnemucca Ranch Rodeo Weekend...................... 2 World Ag Expo.......................................................... 34 Wulff Borthers Livestock.......................................... 74


MEMBERSHIP

PROVIDING CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBERS WITH PEACE OF MIND

In a medical emergency, every second counts…especially when transporting patients that are far away from adequate medical treatment. The flight crews at CALSTAR / REACH, an emergency air ambulance providers with nearly three decades of experience, know this first hand.

AirMedCare Network (AMCN) is the membership provider for your local air ambulance provider CALSTAR / REACH. CALSTAR / REACH provides quality emergent care when you need it most. AMCN providers respond to scene calls, hospital-to-hospital transports, and assist with search and rescue, carrying seriously ill or injured patients to the nearest appropriate medical facility. One flight can cost thousands of dollars, and may not be covered in full by your insurance plan. As an AirMedCare Network member you are a part of the largest Air Ambulance Membership Network in the United States, providing you with reciprocity among more than 320 helicopter and airplane base locations coast-to-coast, across 38 states. AMCN network providers work cooperatively to provide the highest level of care for you, your family, and your community.

California Cattlemen’s Association Discounted Membership Annual Rate - $65 Membership covers your entire Household

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

No place is like home when it comes to recovering from a medical emergency. Evacuation and Repatriation Services

Should you become hospitalized as an inpatient more than 150 nautical miles (approximately 172.6 statute miles) from home, AMCN Fly-U-Home will provide you with air medical transportation bedside-to-bedside to the hospital of your choice near your home. Both sending and receiving hospitals must be in the Contiguous 48 States.

24/7 Medical Services Hotline

AMCN Fly-U-Home provides access to medical referrals, consultation, and prescription assistance. This program connects members 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to the resources of AMCN Fly-UHome. Members have access to AMCN Fly-U-Home’s Logistics Center for information about how and where to obtain medical care while at home or while traveling, including medical monitoring and coordination with local health care professionals.

Transport of Mortal Remains

In the unfortunate event of a member’s death when more than 150 nautical miles (approximately 172.6 statute miles) from the address listed on the member’s enrollment application, AirMed will make all necessary arrangements, at no additional cost, to return the mortal remains to a funeral facility in the city of the member’s primary residence as requested by the family.

Fly-U-Home Annual Rate - $134* Membership covers your entire Household

* Pricing availble only with AMCN Membership or for current Members

Tracy Shearer • 831-206-7447 or 805-350-9249 Tracy.Shearer@AirMedCareNetwork.com Enroll online: www.AMCNRep.com/Tracy-Shearer

January 2019 California Cattleman 79


V A R SIGNAL 7244

V A R SIGNAL 7244 AAA REG: 18748511

SIGNAL YOUR WAY AHEAD

• Signal is a deep bodied, heavy-muscled, super correct 1682 son. • Signal combines a top-of-the-breed data package, outstanidng phenotype and a prooven maternal side for multi-trait excellence. • Signal’s proven dam has produced over a million dollars in progeny sales at VAR. • Signal’s granddam is the multi-million producer, Sitz Henrietta Pride 643T working in the Express, Pollard and Deer Valley herds.

EPDS

TRAIT

+8 +1.4 +80 +144 +1.24 +14.5 +30 +22 +72 +.54 +.62 +70.30 +126.37 +190.40

CED BW WW YW SC H.P DOC Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $B

BREED RANKING

Top 35%

Top 1% Top 1% Top 25% Top 15% Top 3% Top 1%

Top 5% Top 1% Top 1%

OWNERS

WALLSTREET CATTLE CO, MO. VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH

SEMEN $40 • CERTIFICATES $40

VINTAGE HENRIETTA PRIDE 7043 - The $120,000 flush sister to V A R Signal 7244 purchased by Express Ranches and Pollard Farms.

VINTAGE HENRIETTA PRIDE 7246 - The $100,000-valued full sister of V A R Signal 7244 owned by EZ Angus and Vintage Angus.

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 OWNER, JIM COLEMAN MANAGER, DOUG WORTHINGTON

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

January 2019 California Cattleman  
January 2019 California Cattleman  
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