Page 1

JULY/AUGUST 2019

CCA L ore

Guide Gi G Guide de de 2019 sound feet and legs who’s representing you on the cattle council? More on fake meat Returning to the ranch ...and much more

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 1


t a s u n i Jo coming p u e thes ales... s WE HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE! LITTLE AMERICA HOTEL • CHEYENNE, WYOMING CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: JULY 25

HAYTHORN LAND & CATTLE • OGALLALA, NEBRASKA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: AUGUST 22

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy.

2 California Cattleman July • August 2019


45th Annual

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2019 1 pm PDT • Tehama Angus Ranch, Gerber, California

Reputation Angus Genetics in Volume! 140 Spring and Fall Yearling Angus Bulls ese powerful bulls sell…

G204

G007

AAA 19448947

AAA 19449546

Tehama Advancement E766 5 Tehama Tahoe B767

Baldridge Command C036 5 Tehama Tahoe B767

CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B +10 –0.1 +84 +139 I+0.5 +28 I+.57 I+.61 +75 +95 +126

CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B +9 –0.7 +72 +127 I+0.2 +33 I+.71 I+.70 +75 +86 +148

G239

G066

AAA 19439442

AAA 19449545

Tehama Advancement E766 5 Tehama Titleist A203

Baldridge Command C036 5 JMB Traction 292

CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B +5 +3.1 +83 +143 I+0.4 +28 I+.52 I+.51 +61 +83 +130

CED BW WW YW YH Milk Marb RE $M $W $B –1 +2.0 +74 +133 I+0.3 +30 I+.52 I+.83 +58 +77 +147

Let the Tehama Angus Ranch program work for you. Call or email today to request your catalog!

TEHAMA ANGUS Ranch 23820 Tehama Ave., Gerber, CA 96035

tehamaranch@gmail.com • www.tehamaangus.com

Ranch (530) 385-1570 Bryce Borror (530) 526-9404

Videos of bulls available on our website

“DRIVEN BY PERFORMANCE SINCE 1943” July • August 2019 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Tony Toso, Hornitos SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita Greg Kuck, Montague Cindy Tews, Fresno TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Brendlen DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Jenna Chandler DIRECTOR OF OUTREACH AND CREATIVE CONTENT Katie Roberti

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

End of an Era, Continuation of a Legacy from CCA President Mark Lacey

Since the news has been widely reported, everyone probably knows by now that Harris Feeding Co. (HFC) and Harris Ranch Beef Co. (HRBC) have been sold to Central Valley Meat. This marks the first time in more than 70 years that HFC and HRBC are not controlled by the Harris family. I couldn’t let an event of this significance pass without some acknowledgement of what Harris Ranch has meant to the livestock and beef business in California. Harris Ranch was a pioneer when it came to branding beef products. I remember when the Harris Beef packaging started showing up on the Central Coast in Scolaris and Williams Bros. markets in the very early 1980s. At that time only Mel Coleman and a few others were putting their name on their product. The practice of branding product affected many different areas of the beef sector. It led to being more consumer focused to gain brand loyalty, changed the relationship between packers and retailers and paved the way for the premium programs we see now (e.g. Certified Angus Beef®). The Harris logo is now recognized across the nation. HFC as a buyer of calves and feeder cattle is extremely important to California producers because of the volume of cattle required to maintain occupancy in the feedyard and supply HRBC. HFC sources cattle via private treaty sales, video auctions, and auction yards with a significant percentage of those cattle being raised in California. As producers way out west we are at a competitive disadvantage so to have a California based company competing our cattle and buying volume is crucial. Harris Ranch has also done a tremendous service to livestock production from an animal wellbeing standpoint. Harris has instituted important standards in animal handlin, in their transportation fleet, the feedyard with shades and sprinklers for dust and temperature control, and at the beef plant by modernizing the receiving facilities. By taking these steps Harris has helped the reputation of livestock

production across the board. I cannot overstate the importance of their efforts. Another important contribution that HRBC has made is in the food safety category. Many years ago HRBC instituted stringent Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) protocols in pre and posts harvest handling of the animals and the product. In addition several years ago HRBC completed a state of the art remodel of the beef plant that has allowed HRBC to improve the safety and quality of the product even more. The fact that HRBC hasn’t had a recall as far as I know for at least twenty years should be applauded, because if an illness is traced back to beef it hurts our relationship with the consumers. I would like to think CCA’s relationship with Harris Ranch has been mutually beneficial, but it’s probably been a little one sided. John Harris and Dave Wood have been generous supporters of CCA activities, including the CCA Feeder Council Meeting, midyear meeting, and other CCA special events. For many years Harris and Wood have hosted, and with the help of a large supporting cast from HFC totally coordinated the Cattle-PAC event at Harris Ranch Inn that is the single largest fundraiser for Cattle-PAC that has generated north of one million dollars. So to John Harris, Dave Wood and to everyone at HFC and HRBC: Thank you for all the ways you have helped CCA and the livestock business in California. On a final note there is a silver lining in that the new owner of HFC and HRBC is another long established California company owned and operated by Brian Coelho and family. Brian, on behalf of CCA and our members, I would like to wish you great success with your new venture and we stand ready to work with you in whatever way needed to accomplished CCA’s mission to “Enhance and promote a more favorable business environment for California producers.”

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, Mo. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

JULY • AUGUST 2019 Volume 102, Issue 7

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Fake meat becomes buzz term

BUNKHOUSE Importance of agriculture alliances

8 12

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 14 Keeping an eye on “for hire” regulations

The cover of this year’s Bull Buyer’s Guide features a photograph taken by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen at Tim and Jill Curran’s Circle Ranch in Ione. Throughout this issue you will see advertisements from reputable purebred beef producers who can provide genetics that will propel your cowherd into the future. As you consider adding to your bull battery this fall, outstanding breeders from across the state can supply you with the traits you are seeking.

VET VIEWS Breeding preparation tips

28

PUBLIC LANDS PLC Executive weighs in on top issues

34

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Big news in the Pacific Rim PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER BIF builds research database

36

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Honoring an ally

50

RANGELAND TRUST TALK A true conservationist

68

CHIMES CCW membership at midyer mark

78

July 29 - Aug. 1

108

Sept. 28

CERTIFICATES OF ACHIEVEMENT CCA recognizes future industry leaders

42

SPECIAL FEATURES

From the ground up: sound legs and feet 22 Who’s on the California Cattle Council 30 Fake meat from someone in the know 32 Hereford marketing summit 40 San Luis Obispo Count Cattlemen celebrate 75 years 54 Niche markets key to some consumers 58 Keep weather from hurting your herd 64 LMA names new world champion 90 Bull buying 101 72 Back to the ranch for some young professionals 82 Young ag enthusiast digs her roots 86 2019 California and Arizona feeder meeting 88 Beef Council annual report 102

READER SERVICE

Buyers’ Guide 110 Wedding Bells and New Arrivals 115 Obituaries 116 Advertisers Index 118

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS

Sept. 25-29

Dec. 4-6

NCBA Summer Business Meeting Denver, Colo. Farm- to-Fork Festival Sacramento Public Lands Council Annual Meeting Great Falls, Mont.

103rd CCA & CCW Convention The Peppermill Resort & Casino, Reno, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!


[ [

FEATURED SIRES

P A R T N E R S FOR W E D N E S D AY PERFORMANCE S E P T . B U L L S A L E 4, 2019 MARB +0.71 REA +0.68

JINDRA ACCLAIM aaa: 17972810

CED +9

BW +0.5

WW +77 3%

YW +154 1%

MILK +29 20%

CEM +12 15%

FAT -0.040 3% $W +75 10% $F +152 1% $G +63 15% $B +215 1%

sydgen enhance aaa: 18170041

CED +13 10%

BW +0.2

WW +72 10%

YW +141 2%

MILK +33 10%

CEM +11

MARB +1.15 4% REA +0.85 10% FAT +0.004

MARB +0.96 10% REA +1.17 1% FAT -0.006

$W +84 3% $F +146 1% $G +82 2% $B +227 1%

$W +85 3% $F +163 1% $G +78 3% $B +241 1%

byergo black magic 3348 aaa: 17803074

CED +1

BW +4.5

WW +102 1%

YW +187 1%

MILK +26

CEM +5

MARB +1.17 3% REA +0.67 FAT +0.018

AVERAGES OF THE ENTIRE OFFERING WITHIN THE ANGUS BREED

WW TOP 25% YW TOP 25% MARB TOP 20% REA TOP 20%

$W TOP 30% $F TOP 20% $G TOP 15% $B TOP 10%

spur prosperity 1036 aaa: 17004477

CED +7

BW +1.8

WW +63

YW +111

MILK +36 3%

CEM +8

$W +77 10% $F +96 20% $G +79 3% $B +175 4%

G A R STORM aaa: 18459815

CED +15 3%

BW -0.7 15%

WW +77 3%

YW +135 4%

MILK +18

CEM +16 1%

MARB +0.99 10% REA +1.02 3% FAT -0.020 15% $W +71 20% $F +124 2% $G +79 3% $B +203 1%

W W W . S I L V E I R A B R O S . C O M

• DNA EVALUATED • FULLY GUARANTEED • • PERFORMANCE TESTED • LARGE SELECTION OF CALVING EASE BULLS •

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P A R T N E R S FOR PERFORMANCE FEMALE S ALE

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OCT. 12, 2019

k n c cabin creek sandy 804

EXG SARAS DREAM S609 R3

aaa: 16107852

aaa: 15368244

PROGENY DY N A M I C D O N O R S OF THESE

SELL 10.12.19 SILVEIRAS SARAS DREAM 1339 aaa: 16987763

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F OOD + R E FR E SHMEN T S 2PM PDT • S ALE S TAR T S 3PM PDT

ONLINE BIDDING:

M3 M ARK E T ING M AT T M ACFAR L ANE (916) 803-3113 - P HONE W W W.M3C AT TLEMARKE TING.COM

CONTACT

US:

RICK BLANCHARD // (559) 217-1502 GARRETT BLANCHARD // (559) 978-2778 • MATT LEO // (209) 587-5838 KELSEY SCHOTT // (760) 877-8135 • CAROLE SILVEIRA // (559) 240-6004 GUEST BREEDER, TRI-T FARM/TOLEDO RANCHES - JOHN TOLEDO // (559) 972-8991 July • August 2019 California Cattleman 7


CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN say no to faux

industry sees favorable movement on fake meat issue by CCA Treasurer Rob von der Lieth In the future, there could be a changing era in technological food production. Protein may be created from thin air, meat may be created in bioreactors with blockchain tracking and all. As a result, livestock may be relics of the past. Perhaps all food will be local, sustainable and identified as a plant or meat product. In November 2018, a company in Finland announced it began production of protein using predominantly air and electricity. Upon regulatory approval, the company will produce approximately 50 million meals per year. Production begins by electrolyzing water to create hydrogen, combining the hydrogen with carbon dioxide and some minerals to feed microbes which create protein. The microbes are heat treated to make protein powder. The goal of the company is to develop a high-quality product whose environmental impact will be 10 to 100 times smaller than those meat products or substitutes currently on the market. The process does not depend on weather, land or natural resources and is a low cost way to make protein. It sounds amazing and futuristic. How about taste, flavor and texture? The closest reference to a food product is the “protein powder” which could be added to bread or pasta. The fake meat sector is growing. There are a number of companies working on fake meat products. Some of the products are grown in the lab and some products formulated out of plants. Several of the fake meat Products

8 California Cattleman July • August 2019

are being marketed through the fast food restaurant chain. Hardees is selling fake burgers (Beyond Meat brand) and sales are reported to have exceeded expectations. The fake meat business is not going away. It appears there is a market and if a market exists someone will fill it. For example, there is a product called the Impossible Burger 2.0 which is soybean based. It has taste, texture and flavor which is indistinguishable from a real burger. Tyson and Cargill are Fake Meat investors as they feel the market will be significant. The fake meat Products need to be regulated and accurately labeled in order to inform and assure the consumer the product is safe for consumption. Ultimately, fake meat products may be competitive. However, there will still be a plethora of consumers globally who want real meat. In 2018 consumer consumption reached a record 222.2 pounds per capita of red meat and poultry. It is anticipated the world population of 9 billion consumers will be eating food in 2050, 2 million more than the current population will desire red meat. Worldwide demand for U.S. red meat will continue to increase despite the fake meat; exports will continue to grow. The meat market will continue to be global. The impact on livestock prices will be influenced by competing proteins, such as fake meat. Market price will continue to be influenced by supply and demand, tariffs, trade deals, currency fluctuations and animal disease outbreaks. Due to large volatile market price movements, in both directions, management of downside risk and maintaining upside market price potential is essential as price movement in both directions will occur. It may appear to be a brave new world or more of the same.


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH “Carcass Maker” Bull Sale Data Preview PRODUCING SIRES WITH “MULTI-TRAIT” EXCELLENCE

September 5, 2019 • La Grange, CA

TATTOO 8044

Reg. No. 19042036

Sire Playbook

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8070

19037131

Colonel

CED BW WW 13 -0.2 79 9%

8

1.2

4

1.2

3

2

6

1.1

4

1.6

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8114

19037116

Colonel

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8151

19037100

Colonel

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8206

19070319

Citation

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8214

19069430

Colonel

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8239

19069431

Colonel

4

1.4

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8253

19069432

Colonel

9

0.7

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8291

19062260

Rubicon

8

1.6

5

2

3

2.3

0

2.6

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8346

19079631

Heritage

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8347

19082623

Titan

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8397

19103742

Heritage

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8433

19192716

Enhance

10

2.2

10

1.8

10

1.1

7

1.9

15

-0.2

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8448

19192599

Epic

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8477

19192724

Enhance

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8478

19302184

Rock

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8490

19192690

Enhance

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8537

19268337

Acclaim

3%

8

1.4

12

0.8

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8565

19225121

Commander

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

8577

19309255

Enhance

9%

6

1.6

Breed Ranking 9% or Better 8586

19302192

Legend

Breed Ranking 9% or Better

13 9%

0.9

YW 139

2%

1%

88

154

1%

1%

85

145

1%

1%

84

148

SC 1.05

4%

1%

27

71

0.99

28

1.18

22

0.96

19

1.32

22

1%

69 9% 87

139 1% 152

1%

1%

83

151

1.58

1%

1%

9%

23

140

1.56

1%

9%

71

130

-0.34

3%

22

1%

1%

1%

109.59

185.02

3%

9%

4%

1%

2%

2%

75

0.73

0.98

77.41

124.88

196.47

4%

2%

1%

1%

62 4% 79

1.26 2% 1.02

1.07 2% 1.19

57.38

117.55 1% 118.08

194.62 1% 198.74

1%

9%

1%

2%

1%

1%

75

0.85

1.07

73.22

123.3

195.58

2%

4%

1%

1%

0.94

68.57

111.79

186.17

5%

9%

2%

1%

0.80

1.41

70.4

106.64

204.5

1%

9%

2%

1%

0.67

0.99

79.28

134.6

196.22

4%

2%

1%

1%

0.70

0.92 9% 0.88

76.88 2% 75.63

129.61 1% 137.62

196 1% 207.9

67

0.83

74

5%

1%

1.75

34

71

4%

1%

27

1.08

22

81 1% 76

1%

1%

84

153

4%

9%

3%

1%

1%

83

0.73

1.14

78.17

147.05

218.71

1%

2%

1%

1%

0.53

0.94

70.93

139.61

191.23

5%

5%

1%

1%

1.01

1.00

80.31

118.59

205.52

1%

4%

84

150

0.84

21

1.29

32

69

2%

1%

1%

79

146

1%

9%

2%

9%

4%

1%

1%

1%

1.39

22

70

1.09

0.60

72.7

121.77

189.46

4%

1%

1%

2.02

30

85.24

130.06

206.72

1%

2%

81

151

0.02

1%

67

130

9%

3%

72

129

5%

4%

81

142

1%

1%

66 2%

2% 1%

1.11

78.81

1%

1%

149

190.52

85.55

5%

80

123.26

5%

0.42

3%

2%

86.12

0.98

1%

1%

2%

0.96

9%

33

27

$B 185.31

0.99

151 1% 156

135

1%

0.98

2%

1.81

$F 113.77

64

82 1% 88

74

$W 96.1

1%

1%

1%

RE 0.66

1%

75

148

MARB 0.66

1%

3%

80

CW 70

1.08

1%

5%

MILK 34

1%

5%

76

0.89

1.12 2%

1%

1%

1%

0.87

0.77

86.47

142.04

209.51

1%

1%

1%

0.91

1.13

61.3

105.44

190.45

1%

9%

3%

1%

61

0.98

0.90

76.31

107.76

194.52

5%

9%

9%

2%

2%

1%

63

0.73

0.78

74.91

126.02

192.85

3%

1%

1%

1%

35

73

3%

1%

0.32

25

63

0.77

30

4%

1.34

24

4%

V A R Power Play 7018

V A R Legend 5019

V A R Heritage 5038

V A R Commander 4152

VAR will offer the largest volume of high quality bulls on the West Coast. Whether you buy one bull or a truck load, the quality runs deep.

NEW SIRE GROUPS FOR 2019: BALDRIDGE COLONEL SYDGEN ENHANCE KCF BENNETT THE ROCK JINDRA ACCLAIM TEX PLAYBOOK KCF BENNETT CITATION BALDRIDGE TITAN

V A R Discovery 2240

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

V A R Generation 2100


CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Zone 2 - Peach

Zone 1 - Yellow

1 2

Humboldt-Del Norte Mendocino-Lake Sonoma-Marin Napa-Solano

Siskiyou Modoc Lassen Fall River-Big Valley

Zone 3 - Light Blue Shasta-Trinity Plumas-Sierra Tehama Butte Glenn-Colusa Yuba-Sutter Tahoe (Placer-Nevada) Yolo

3

Zone 4 - Pink

Zone 5 - Green

Zone 6 - Purple

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Calaveras

Merced-Mariposa Madera Fresno-Kings

San Joaquin-Stanislaus

Tuolumne

Zone 7 - Tan

5 4

CCA committee leadership

San Mateo-San Francisco Santa Cruz Santa Clara Contra Costa-Alameda

POLICY COMMITTEES

Zone 8 - Turquoise

Monterey San Benito San Luis Obispo

Santa Barbara Tulare Kern Inyo-Mono-Alpine High Desert

AG & FOOD POLICY Chair: Ramsay Wood Vice Chair: Rick Roberti

Zone 9 - Orange Southern California San Diego-Imperial Ventura

6 7

CATTLE HEALTH & WELL BEING Chair: Tom Talbot, DVM Vice Chair: A.E. “Bud” Sloan, DVM

8

CATTLE MARKETING Chair: Holly Foster Vice Chair: Sam Avila

FEDERAL LANDS

Chair: Mike Byrne Vice Chair: Eric Hafenfeld

9

PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Chair: Clayton Koopmann Vice Chair: Seth Scribner

TAX & CREDIT

2019 CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Mark Lacey

mjlacey1@icloud.com • (760) 784-1309

Zone Director 5 Bob Brennan bsbrennan@mlode.com • (209) 661-6419

First Vice President Tony Toso

Zone Director 6 VACANT

Second Vice President Steve Arnold

claudeloftus@yahoo.com • 805-441-1231

cottoncrk@aol.com • (209)988-4468 pozovalley@aol.com • (805) 235-7840

Second Vice President Greg Kuck

gregkuck54@gmail.com • (530) 905-2076

Zone Director 7 Claude Loftus

hamdawg66@gmail.com • (559) 623-1538

Zone Director 9 Bud Sloan

beefnmore@aol.com • (559) 970-6892

Asloan5119@aol.com • (805) 340-0693

Treasurer Rob von der Lieth

Feeder Council Member Paul Cameron

Feeder Council Chairman Trevor Freitas

trevor@mendescalfranch.com • (559) 805-5431

Feeder Council Vice Chair Jesse Larios lariosjess1@gmail.com • (760) 455-3888 Zone Director 1 Ramsey Wood

pcmesquitecattle@sbcglobal.net •(760) 427-6906

Feeder Council Member VACANT At Large Appointee Myron Openshaw openshaw4@gmail.com •(530) 521-0099

At Large Appointee Mark Nelson

ramseywood83@gmail.com • (530) 680-8985

kmarknelson@gmail.com •(916) 849-5558

Zone Director 2 Hugo Klopper

At Large Appointee Rob Frost

hugoklopper@frontier.com • (707) 498-7810

rbmaf@juno.com •(805) 377-2231

Zone Director 3 Wally Roney

At Large Appointee Darrel Sweet

bjr@billieweb.com •(530) 519-3608

dsweet@cattlemen.net • (209) 601-4074

Zone Director 4 Mike Bettencourt

At Large Appointee Lawrence Dwight

mbteamroper@aol.com • (209) 499-0794

ox_bar@hotmail.com • (707) 845-4400

10 California Cattleman July • August 2019

For more information about CCA’s Executive Board or committees, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

CCA affiliate leadership

Zone Director 8 John Hammon

Second Vice President Cindy Tews

rvdlieth@aol.com • (916) 769-1153

Chair: Jack Lavers Vice Chair: Jill Heely

ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL vacant

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION President: Rita McPhee Vice President: Ryan Nelson Secretary: Celeste Settrini

CALIFORNIA CATTLEWOMEN, INC. President: Callie Borror 1st Vice President: Debbie Hay 2nd Vice President – 1 year: Julie Barnett 2nd Vice President – 2 year: Cheryl Beckwith 2nd Vice President – 3 year: Jill Bright Secretary: Tara Porterfield Treasurer: Heidy Carver


CCA BENEFITS & PRIORITIES The California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) prides itself on being the only organization in the state exclusively dedicated to protecting and preserving the legacy of ranching families in California. Everyday CCA is working on behalf of its members and below are few examples of what ranchers can gain from a CCA membership.

CCA GIVES YOU A VOICE FROM COAST TO COAST

CCA PRESERVES AND PROTECTS PRIVATE PROPERTY RIGHTS

Being a CCA member gives you a voice in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. by developing and monitoring legislation to benefit California’s ranchers.

CCA is committed to protecting the private property rights enshrined in state and federal constitutions. CCA policy seeks to ensure that there is “no net loss of privatelyowned lands or water rights.”

CCA PROTECTS THE

CCA INVESTS IN THE FUTURE OF ANIMAL HEALTH & RESEARCH

38 MILLION

ACRES OF RANGELAND IN CALIFORNIA FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS Through the work of CCA members, private and public rangelands are protected and preserved to keep ranchers and the ranching way of life viable in California.

CCA protects the health of California’s cattle herd by supporting research and monitoring animal health threats.

CCA KEEPS MEMBERS INFORMED DAILY

CCA HOSTS PRODUCER EDUCATION SEMINARS

Through weekly email updates, a monthly newsletter, and a monthly magazine, CCA makes it a priority to keep members informed of all industry issues.

CCA holds programs such as Beef Quality Assurance trainings and Cattlemen’s College seminars to enhance producer education opportunities on raising high quality beef cattle and increasing profits.

CCA WORKS TO LOWER TAXES CCA works to reduce the burden of taxation, including working to permanently eliminate the estate tax. Recently, CCA successfully defeated efforts in the State Capitol to bring a ballot initiative to voters that would have reinstated a California estate tax.

CCA SUPPORTS STUDENTS IN AGRICULTURE The Association provides scholarships to help prepare the next generation of California ranchers.

$40,000

in Over scholarships were awarded to students studying agriculture in 2018.

CCA PROVIDES MEMBER ONLY COST-SAVINGS BENEFITS • Insurance packages • Selenium boluses from Pacific Trace Minerals • Anaplasmosis vaccine • Registration at the CCA & CCW Annual Convention Tradeshow and the CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting

To keep up with what CCA is working on visit calcattlemen.org, follow us on social media or call the office at (916)444-0845. July • August 2019 California Cattleman 11


BUNKHOUSE

an important alliance for promoting and defending livestock production by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin The California Cattlemen’s Association is the only organization in California solely focused on representing ranchers on legislative and regulatory issues. Given that CCA’s Government Affairs team is often the lone voice on many issues affecting ranchers, it’s important that we capitalize on every opportunity to strengthen our voice. One way we amplify our voice is through coalitions. No coalition is stronger than the one we share with Western United Dairymen (WUD). While CCA has worked with the state’s leading dairy organization for many years, in recent years we have been much more deliberate in building a collective voice focused on cattle. It’s easy for ranchers and dairy producers to identify the differences between beef production and dairy production, but it’s not as easy for the public. As a result, we get lumped together on many issues. There’s no clearer example than climate change. When people talk about livestock’s impact on climate change, rarely, if ever, do they distinguish between beef and dairy production. Working together, CCA and WUD have started to collectively push back on the egregious claims made by activist groups. Late last year, CCA and WUD organized a twoday livestock education forum that provided eight legislators the opportunity to hear from experts like Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., Ken Tate, Ph.D., and Dr. Lynn Huntsinger, Ph.D., about livestock’s true impact on the environment. Not only did these legislators learn the truth about livestock’s contribution to climate change, they also heard about the many ecological benefits that grazing provides. These presentations were so well-received that these eight legislators have insisted on helping us get our message to more legislators. Earlier this year, Mitloehner had the opportunity to educate over 30 additional legislators on the same topic at CCA’s Legislative Steak and Eggs Breakfast. In August, he’ll be sharing that same message with dozens of legislative staff. This outreach is having a major impact on how

12 California Cattleman July • August 2019

legislators view livestock production, and its success is a direct result of our partnership with WUD. Another issue that we have successfully worked together on is promoting the BILLY GATLIN nutritional benefits of animal protein. Currently, vegan activist groups are attempting to limit students’ access to meat and dairy products at our public schools. Fortunately, we were able to defeat legislation this year that would have made it easier for activist groups throughout the state to eliminate beef and dairy from the school lunch menu. Again, I don’t believe that we would have had this level of success if our organizations were working independently from one another. We have seen the power of our collective voice, and both CCA and WUD are committed to building on this partnership by creating and finding new opportunities to work together. The recently-formed California Cattle Council is one example that will provide even greater opportunity for ranchers and dairy producers to work together. We are also working on holding each organization’s annual convention at the same time and location, so we can build a tradeshow that brings together ranchers and dairy producers. Imagine a tradeshow that brings together ranchers and dairy producers from throughout the state and provides us the opportunity to not only grow our businesses, but to learn from each other. I have seen how powerful our partnership with WUD can be and I am eager to grow it because I know it will have a profound impact on our ability to successfully defend and promote livestock production in our state.


Tuesday, September 3

Performance Plus Bull Sale AT THE RANCH, EAST OF MADERA

Selling Bulls Out of These Leading Sires:

SAV PLATINUM • PVF INSIGHT • MOGCK BULLSEYE • VAR GENERATION SAV PLATINUM • PVF INSIGHT • MOGCK BULLSEYE • VAR GENERATION SAV RESOURCE • SAV UNIVERSAL • VAR RANGER • CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE SAV RESOURCE • SAV UNIVERSAL • VAR RANGER • CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE

S A V Real Tank 4736 X Sitz Game Day 11371

BW +3.9

WW +66

YW +125

MK +29

RE +.66

MB +.43

$B +153

DOB: 2/14/18 ID: 8343 WW +62

V A R Ranger 3008 X Connealy Final Product

BW +3.0

WW +75

YW +138

MK +17

RE +.63

MB +.57

$B +159

YW +109

MK +33

RE +.84

MB +.69

$B +137

KG Solution 5041 X Sitz Upward 307R

BW +3.1

WW +77

S A V Resource 1441 X Bear Mtn Owyhee 5012 BW +1.9

WW +58

YW +117

MK +24

RE +.85

MB +.10

$B +135

DOB: 12/29/17 ID: 7331

DOB: 1/18/18 ID: 8264

Sitz TR Top Game 316B X Bear Mtn Owyhee 5012 BW +.2

DOB: 12/31/2017 ID: 7344

DOB: 12/22/2017 ID: 7302

DOB: 1/24/2018 ID: 8289

YW MK RE MB +137 +27 +. 91 +.48

$B +156

S A V Universal 4038 X Connealy Final Product BW +3.9

WW +70

YW +132

MK RE MB +15 +1.03 +.32

$B +152

O’NEAL RANCH BULLS OFFER THE COMPLETE PACKAGE GROWTH • PERFORMANCE • ADAPTABILITY • CARCASS

ALL SALE BULLS ARE: Anaplas Vaccinated Trich & Semen Tested First Breeding Season HD 50k Tested Guaranteed Tested PI Negative for BVD Take advantage of our bull pick-up rebate!

O’NEAL RANCH Since 1878

Gary & Betsy Cardoza PO Box 40 • O’Neals, CA 93645 (559) 999-9510

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 13


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA KEEPING WATCH ON FOR-HIRE TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield Since starting at CCA in 2007, it seems a week does not go by without receiving a question about the proper license and permits necessary to operate vehicles and trailers commonly used in agriculture. This is for good reason. If there is one section of California law that I think deserves recognition for being the most convoluted and difficult to digest at first glance, it’s the California Vehicle Code (CVC). Although transportation is not the primary venture for most agricultural businesses in California, regulations and laws that govern the movement of agricultural products impact us all. Whether you are a fleet owner, independent trucker, contract with others to fulfill your transportation needs or use a pickup and gooseneck on a regular basis, understanding the laws and regulations that govern the registration, licensing and permitting requirements for vehicles that travel on our state’s roadways is extremely important. The question I receive the most is “do I need a commercial driver’s license (CDL) or California Class A to tow my trailer”? In general, any person operating a single vehicle with two axles having a gross vehicle weight of less than 26,000 pounds or pulling a trailer with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of less than 10,000 pounds can drive with a noncommercial Class C driver’s license. Even if your tow vehicle is a pickup, once a trailer exceeds a GVWR of 10,000 pounds, a driver must have a Class A CDL, with limited exceptions. The good news here is that farmers and ranchers are held to a different standard. Rather than base the weight off the GVWR of the trailer, a vehicle used solely in the conduct of agricultural operations can be driven with a noncommercial Class C license as the Gross Combined Weight Rating (GVWR of the tow vehicle + the GVWR of the trailer) is less than 26,000 pounds so as long as: • The vehicle is operated by a farmer, rancher or an employee; • The vehicle combination is used exclusively in the conduct of agricultural operations; • The vehicle is not operated in a forhire capacity. The release of a memo by the California Highway Patrol earlier this year clarifying licensing requirements for those 14 California Cattleman July • August 2019

hauling horse trailers has caused some confusion. CHP reiterated that those hauling livestock trailers with a GVWR greater than 10,000pounds would generally be required to have a Class A CDL or obtain a restricted Class A that allows an individual to haul a trailer that doesn’t exceed a GVWR of 15,000 pounds and only within 150 air miles of the registered location of the vehicle. This seems inconsistent with the 26,000 pounds Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) exemption afforded to farmers and ranchers mentioned above. The key to understanding the difference is to recognize in order to utilize the 26,000 pounds GCWR exemption found in CVC §12804.9, the vehicle or vehicle combination must be used “…exclusively in the conduct of agricultural operations.” CHP does not consider horse trailers leaving a horse show to be “agriculture” and thus eligible for the 26,000 pounds GCWR exemption. This memo was circulated across Facebook and other social media platforms causing many to immediately question the need to obtain a Class A CDL due to a change in the law. Simply put, the law has not changed and farmers and ranchers meeting the criteria outlined above can continue to use their noncommercial Class C license to transport livestock, farm equipment and engage in other agricultural activities. The Legislative Counsel of California issued an opinion in 2012 at the request of CCA affirming that operating ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


Western Video Market’s Brad Peek and Tom Schene counting a draft of Tom’s record-setting yearlings on shipping day.

2018 CBCIA Commercial Producer of the Year Tom Schene with his management team at the THD 2018 Byrd Cattle Company Bull Sale. ©

Congratulations Schene Family & Crew

2018 California Beef Cattle Improvement Association commercial Producer of the year As their longtime exclusive bull supplier, all of us at BCC were elated when Schene Enterprises was selected as the CBCIA’s 2018 Commercial Producer of the Year. Tom has built a tremendous following for his consistent, highly feed-efficient cattle with the bred-in ability to repeatedly grade high Choice and Prime. At Byrd Cattle Company, we’re always honored when Tom’s yearlings dominate their weight class at Western Video Market sales – in terms of total gross dollars returned, nothing usually comes close. Just like with all customers who buy bulls exclusively from BCC, Dan spends hours on the phone promoting Tom’s cattle to our vast network of feeders, marketing cooperatives and other breeders from coast to coast and border to border who are willing to pay a substantial premium for cattle with BCC-blood behind them. If you want to maximize your net income, buy your bulls from BCC and get help selling your calves for top $$$. We work tirelessly with reps for video, Internet and auction markets, and again in 2019 have placed a significant portion of our loyal customers’ calves. At BCC, you don’t just buy a bull, you buy a part of our program and the added value and buyer confidence we have worked hard to establish for over 30 years.

19th Annual Byrd Cattle Company Angus bull sale Friday, September 6: 3:30 p.m. At the ranch, los molinos, ca

For the 13th consecutive year, all bulls will be tested for feed efficiency. We see feed efficiency as the ‘Final Frontier’ of the beef industry one of the last genetic traits that hasn’t been improved – yet it accounts for over one-half of the profitability equation! Cattle that eat less and gain more are the money-making kind, and you can’t identify them if you don’t test. Before you buy bulls anywhere else, ask if they’ve been tested for feed efficiency – if not, you could be wasting thousands oF dollars!

Look for the return of CharoLais BuLLs in 2019

selling a great set of feed efficiency-tested bulls from romans ranches, Westfall, or.

Byrd cattle company, LLC Post office Box 713 • Red Bluff, cAlifoRniA 96080 dAn 530-736-8470 • ty 530-200-4054 ByRdcAttleco@hotmAil.com • www.ByRdcAttleco.com

E-mail byrdcattleco@hotmail.com or call 530-527-9036 to be added to the mailing list .

THD ©


...CONTINUED FROM 14 “in a for-hire capacity” means being paid to perform the service of transporting a commodity, livestock, farm equipment, etc. This was reinforced with a bulletin issued by the CHP to their field command informing officers that ranchers hauling their own cattle to market, for example, are not operating in a for-hire capacity. Under this example, ranchers are arguably operating in commerce, however being compensated when selling one’s own product is different than being paid to haul that product. For those that fall outside the noncommercial Class C exemption due to the GCWR of their truck and trailer, are operating for-hire or simply want the reassurance of having a Class A CDL, there is no better time to apply than right now. Recent changes to federal law, and ultimately state law to ensure CDL conformity, requires that new CDL applicants attend a federally recognized truck school and in California, complete at least 15 hours of training behind the wheel. SB 1236 by Senator Bill Monning (D-Carmel) directs the Department of Motor Vehicles to adopt regulations commensurate with federal law no later than June 5, 2020. This new federal requirement will be in addition to the requirement to pass several written tests and a vehicle inspection, basic skills and driving test. I began the process to obtain my Class A CDL earlier this year in order to haul a 26,000 lbs. dump trailer we

have on the farm. I’ve passed the written tests, completed and submitted my medical evaluation and am awaiting my vehicle inspection, basic skills and driving test in July. Aside from the numerous trips I’ve had to make to the DMV, I’m glad I’m doing this now. In addition to being grandfathered in to the program beyond June 5, 2020, it’s also an excellent opportunity to obtain a California REAL ID which will be required for those using a drivers license as a form of identification for air travel beginning October 1, 2020. Federal law also does not provide broad flexibility to the states to increase the 26,000 lbs. threshold required for a driver to obtain a CDL. Limited changes can be made including allowing farmers and ranchers to operate a vehicle of combination of vehicles with a GCWR of 26,000 lbs. or more, however travel is limited to 150 air miles from the farm. As soon as travel occurs outside the 150 air mile radius, a Class A CDL is required. States have discretion to implement these limited exceptions, however California has not acted to establish a “farm plate” or unique vehicle identification program which is the first step in order to provide an enforcement mechanism. Proper licensing for a driver is only one component to the lawful operation of a vehicle. Depending on the weight, configuration or overall length, additional permit and registration requirements may need to be met in order to comply with federal and state law. Those topics will be covered in a future article. Please stay tuned for further information or contact Justin Oldfield in the CCA office.

COMMON SENSE

C

attle breeding is really not that difficult if you just use some good, old common sense. It has been proven over time that the functional ability of livestock is tied very closely to how they are designed from a phenotypic stand point. In our herds, the cattle must have an adequate amount of body depth or volume, an adequate degree of muscle, and they must be structurally sound. If they don’t meet these basic criteria, they are culled regardless of how good they are in terms of their EPD or genomic profile.

A SPECIAL THANK YOU

We would like to extend a special thank you to all of the buyers and bidders in our annual Internet-based Private Treaty Bull Sale as well as the other ranches and individuals who have supported our program during the past year.

FRESNO STATE AGRICULTURAL FOUNDATION 16 California Cattleman July • August 2019

We also place emphasis on the basic traits of eyes, udder, feet and disposition. These traits are described by many as “convenience traits” and again if our cattle are not problem free in these areas, we limit their genetic influence in our herds. Our opinion is that the most profitable beef cattle in any production system are those that can function with very little need for additional labor or supplemental feeding. Our ultimate goal is to create a small framed, low maintenance cow that can wean a big stout calf and do it without any other inputs from us. That goal is the same in both our Charolais and Angus herds.

2018-2019 STUDENT ASSISTANTS Trevor Autry Chase Cianfichi Harrison Conlan Jacob Crosslin

Justin Davis Kaitlyn DeMott Blake Gobeli Austin Hefner

Sam Looper Cole Montgomery Steven Pozzi Brady Schmidt

RANDY PERRY (559) 278-4793 ELLIOT ELKINS – COMMERCIAL CATTLE – 559.430.6210 WWW.FRESNOSTATE.EDU/JCAST/BEEF


THD ©

CLM RepResentatives Jake Parnell ..................916-662-1298 George Gookin ..........209-482-1648 Rex Whittle..................209-996-6994 Mark Fischer ...............209-768-6522 Kris Gudel .................... 916-208-7258 Steve Bianchi .............707-484-3903 Joe Gates .....................707-694-3063 Jason Dailey ................916-439-7761 wednesday saLe sCHedULe Butcher Cows ...................................... 8:30 a.m. Cow-Calf Pairs/Bred Cows ........11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle ...........................................12 p.m.

aUCtion MaRket Address .. 12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office.......................................... 209-745-1515 Fax ...............................................209-745-1582 Website/Market Report www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ........ www.lmaauctions.com

CattLeMen’s speCiaL feedeR saLes

Wednesday, July 17, 12 p.m. Wednesday, August 14, 12 p.m.

PLUS Large Runs of Calves & Yearlings Every Wednesday

CattLeMen’s speCiaL bRed Cow & paiR saLe Saturday, July 27, 11 a.m.

Featuring 750 Bred Heifers & Cows eaRLy ConsiGnMents 50 2nd Calf, Foothill-run Cows from Arno Road Cattle Company 45 Young, Bred Cows from Luke Stevens 80 Bred Cows from Seco Cattle Company 140 Bred Foothill-run Cows from J-2 Cattle 100 Cows from Duane Martin Jr. 60 Cows from Jess Painter Plus Many More Consignments Sale Day Visit www.clmgalt.com for an Updated List

faLL bULL saLes at CLM September 16: Thomas Angus Ranch Bull Sale September 21: Arellano Bravo/Diablo Angus Bull Sale November 2: 51st Annual ‘World of Bulls’ Sale

web bRoadCast

www.lmaauctions.com Call now to Consign to these UpComing western video market sales August 12-13 • September 10 July • August 2019 California Cattleman 17


Angus RAnch

selling 175 bulls sat., september 7

EZAR PAychEck 8226

Sire: Basin Paycheck 5249 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 This bull offers powerful growth ranking in the top 15% for WW and 10% for YW with a $Value Index in the top 5% $Beef and top 4% $Combined. The granddam of Paycheck is a full sister to Sitz Upward 307R. CeD 6

BW WW -3.5 68

eZ angus' tejas ranch • Farmington, Ca lunch: 11:30 a.m. • sale: 12:30 p.m. Join us at the Tejas Ranch located at 22950 Milton Road, 11 miles west of Farmington, CA. We will be selling 175 performance-tested bulls with complete DNA evaluation. Bulls are vaccinated for anaplas and tested PI-negative for BVD. We offer FREE DELIVERY to California and surrouding states. Every bull selling is backed by the EZ Angus Breeding Guarantee! These bulls feature breed-leading genetics. The portion of this year’s offering RANkING IN ThE ELITE 25% oF ThE ANGus BREED INCLuDE: • 40% Calving-Ease Direct • 59% Weaning Weight EPD • 61% Yearling Weight EPD • 51% Residual Avg. Daily Gain • 57% Calving-Ease Maternal SAle BrOADCAST On

• 54% Carcass Wt. EPD • 72% Marbling EPD • 40% Ribeye EPD • 72% Beef Value ($B) • 68% Combined Value ($C)

YW Milk 122 32

CW 55

MA .61

re .91

$M 67

$B 170

$C 287

EZAR bonus 8213

Sire: Basin Bonus 4345 MGS: AAr Discovery 2240 This bull has excellent spread with negative birth, ranking in the top 15% for WW and 10% for YW. His dam is a maternal sister to the $60,000 VAR Heritage 5038. CeD 7

BW WW -0.2 66

YW Milk 121 33

CW 53

MA .63

re .59

$M 72

$B 147

$C 263

sAlE book And VidEo links:

THD ©

www.ezangusranch.com • www.parnelldickinson.com

.

Tim & Marilyn Callison ........................................................ Owners Chad Davis ............................................................559 333-0362 Travis Coy .............................................................559 392-8772 Justin Schmidt ......................................................209 585-6533 18 California Cattleman July • August 2019 Website ......................................................www.ezangusranch.com

sAlE mAnAgEmEnt

John Dickinson ........... 916 806-1919 Jake Parnell ............... 916 662-1298


EZAR PAywEight 8169

SIRE: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 CED 5

BW WW 2.1 73

YW Milk 134 32

CW MA 48 1.03

RE .55

$M $46

$B 145

$C 278

EZAR DiscovERy 8142

SIRE: V A R Discovery 2240 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 CED 0

BW WW 3.8 79

YW Milk 146 24

CW 65

MA .87

RE .71

$M 46

$B 171

$C 268

EZAR PAywEight 8249

SIRE: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 CED CED 10 10

BW WW WW YW YW Milk Milk BW 2.3 69 69 123 123 36 36 2.3

CW CW 50 50

MA MA .84 .84

RE RE .61 .61

$M $B $B $C $C $M $74 74 $143 143 $259 259

EZAR PAywEight 8139

SIRE: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 CED 2

BW WW 1.9 75

YW Milk 128 36

CW 52

MA .80

RE .50

$M 68

$B 135

$C 243

EZAR MonuMEntAl 8176

SIRE: EXAR Monumental 6056B MGS: Riverbend None Better Y095 CED 11

BW WW .8 71

YW Milk 125 24

CW 51

MA .94

RE .38

$M 32

$B 162

$C 242

EZAR PAywEight 8275 BW WW 2.8 77

YW Milk 121 21

CW 49

MA .37

RE .58

$M 74

$B 123

CED 10

BW WW .1 63

YW Milk 120 19

CW 62

MA .99

RE .46

$M 46

$B 186

$C 287

EZAR MonuMEntAl 8006

SIRE: EXAR Monumental 6056B MGS: V A R Index 3282 CED 11

BW WW -1.5 67

YW Milk 125 34

CW 57

MA .86

RE .77

$M 29

$B 166

$C 244

EZAR PAywEight 8251

SIRE: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: EXAR EZX 3772B CED 3

EZAR stuD 8236

SIRE: EXAR Stud 4658B MGS: Basin Payweight 006S

SIRE: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 $C 234

CED 11

BW WW .8 59

YW Milk 102 39

CW 41

MA .81

RE .43

$M 84

$B 133

$C 257

these August stAndouts from our lArge selection of yeArlings Also sell TATTOO 8439 8381 8378 8436 8415 8441

NAME OF BULL EZAR Enhance 8439 EZAR Enhance 8381 EZAR Monumental 8378 EZAR Epic 8436 EZAR Monumental 8415 EZAR Gold Rush 8441

SIRE x DAM’S SIRE CED BW WW YW MILK CW MA RE $M $B $C SydGen Enhance x Basin Advance 3134 11 0.8 73 132 34 79 1.01 .96 71 211 345 SydGen Enhance x VAR Discovery 2240 4 2.6 74 138 35 71 .94 .80 60 208 330 EXAR Monumental 6056B x Basin Advance 3134 6 0.8 83 134 33 79 1.38 .32 34 204 299 3F Epic 4631 x Summitcrest Complete 1P55 2 3.1 100 182 34 96 .48 .84 49 199 307 EXAR Monumental 6056B x VAR Generation 2100 3 2.8 83 142 25 72 1.04 1.04 59 198 316 EZAR Gold Rush 6001 x EXAR Denver 2002B 2 1.4 79 144 32 70 .99 .90 69 198 326

AnnuAl Angus fEMAlE sAlE MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 PORTERVILLE, CA

Brunch 10 a.m. • sale 11 a.m.

Follow us on Facebook For sale details

Angus 21984 Avenue 160

RAnch

July • August 2019 California Cattleman Porterville, CA 9325719


Cost Effective Protein Supplementation The most cost effective forage a cow can consume is the forage she can harvest herself. However, protein often times becomes the most limiting nutrient for cattle grazing crop residues and dormant grass pastures. In these situations protein supplementation is required to efficiently harvest energy from these protein deficient forage-based diets.

Contact Conlin Supply to learn more about SmartLic® protein tubs! Craig Edling 209.531.7037

Inquire about full truckload pricing and ranch deliveries.

LOCATIONS 576 Warnerville Road, Oakdale 717 East Childs Avenue, Merced 118 Albers Road, Modesto New Generation Supplements Contact Anna Bavor 650.575.5612 annab@newgensupplements.com www.smartlic.com SmartLic® is a registered trademark of Animal Feed Supplement, Inc. dba New Generation Supplements. © 2019 New Generation Supplements

20 California Cattleman July • August 2019


join us at Five Star Land & Livestock, wilton, ca Heritage Bulls are designed with the commercial bull buyer in mind. We select for balanced traits of calving-ease with rapid growth to weaning and optimum carcass merit, but we do this without sacrificing the convenience traits of structural soundness, docility and maternal strength. Our genetics are validated through DNA-testing and our commitment to performance has produced top bulls that have gone on to make an impact in both commercial and seedstock herds alike. Watch for these standouts pictured below and more selling!

Featuring Sons of These Breed Leaders... • • • • •

SALE MANAGEMENT

LD Capitalist 316 X A A r Ten X 7008 S A

CED BW WW

+9

YW

MILK MARB

+.6 +62 +106 +29

RE

$M

$B

$C

+.70 +.50 +60 +144 +247

BAr r pAywEiGhT 8003

Basin payweight 1682 X Sitz Upward 307r

CED BW WW

YW

MILK MARB

+7 +1.0 +78 +140 +33

RE

$M

$B

$C

+.88 +.88 +64 +182 +300

FivE STAr 3002 CiTATioN 8008 K C F Bennett Citation X EXAr Upshot 0562B

CED BW WW

YW

+10 +.7 +52 +93

MILK MARB

+28

RE

$M

$B

$C

+.73 +.82 +53 +131 +223

BAr r iNDEX 8008

YW

MILK MARB

+2 +2.7 +80 +137 +26

RE

$M

$B

FivE STAr 2037 CiTATioN 8017

K C F Bennett Citation X Connealy right Answer 746

CED BW WW

YW

+10 +.6 +56 +98

MILK MARB

+26

RE

$M

$B

$C

+.88 +.59 +51 +132 +222

BAr r 0016 CoLoNEL 8038

v A r index 3282 X A A r Ten X 7008 S A

CED BW WW

V A R Index 3282 Connealy Absolute Power Baldridge Xpand x743 V A R Diversity 5042 Vintage Generation 4403

John Dickinson ..............916-806-1919 Jake Parnell ...................916-662-1298 Luke Parnell ................. 805-431-1267

Sunday, September 8 FivE STAr 5015 CApiTAL 8001

• • • • •

G A R Ashland LD Capitalist 316 K C F Bennett Citation Baldridge Colonel C251 KM Broken Bow 002

Baldridge Colonel C251 X S A v Bismarck 5682

$C

+.42 +1.02 +67 +165 +281

CED BW WW

+9

YW

MILK MARB

+.5 +63 +114 +26

RE

$M

$B

$C

+.60 +.84 +74 +150 +269

Bull Videos & Sale Book Links: www.ParnellDickinson.com • Sale Book Requests: sales@parnelldickinson.com

5II I

I

I

Bar r angus

Five Star Land & LiveStock

J/V ANGUS

12211 Pear Lane, Wilton, CA 95693

Home 530-795-2161 Cell 530-304-2811 jvangus@att.net 844 Walnut • Winters, CA 95694

Craig & J.J. reinhardt

Mark & abbie nelson & Family

916-712-3696 • 916-803-2685

Abbie: 916-804-4990, abbiernelson@gmail.com Ryan, Hailey, Jhett, Cort & Nash: 916-804-6861 Hilario Gomez, Ranch Operations: 916-804-8136

jj@barrangus.com 6925 Bisbee Dr., Sloughhouse, CA 95683

Bill & Marie Traylor

THD ©

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 21


BEST FOOT

FORWARD EXPERTS WEIGH IN ON IMPORTANCE OF FEET AND LEGS IN BULL SELECTION by CCA Director of Outreach and Creative Content Katie Roberti It’s that time of year again where bull sales will quickly be filling up the days on the calendar, and cow-calf producers will be out on the road looking to buy quality bulls to add to their herds from California’s premier seedstock producers. No matter what type of bulls you may be in the market for this year, the importance of selecting breeding stock with structurally sound feet and legs is only becoming more talked about and more of a topic of discussion every day on the ranch as well as within the industry. Before you hit the bull sale trail, we want to give you an inside look at how foot structure has been improved and will continue to be an area for improvement, as well as tips on what to look for to make sure the bulls you buy are structurally sound, especially when it comes to feet and legs We asked a few experts on the topic from the American Simmental Association, the American Hereford Association, and the American Angus Association for input on the subject. Here are some of their answers and advice to guide you to make sure you go home with bulls that are balanced, full of longevity and functional from the ground up this bull sale season. LANE GIESS Director of Commercial & Nontraditional Data Programs for the American Simmental Association Q. How has the American Simmental Association made improvements to foot structure in the breed over the last few years? Recently the American Simmental Association has made significant efforts toward developing and providing a genetic tool for 22 California Cattleman July • August 2019

members to select for improved feet and leg structure in the breed and downstream commercial customers. In 2015 the ASA Board of Trustees helped fund a project through Kansas State University to gather feet and leg phenotypes and develop genetic parameter estimates for the traits gathered. This preliminary research will help build direction for the ASA staff to recommend guidelines for data collection to membership. The ultimate goal is to integrate feet and leg traits into our suite of genetic tools at the American Simmental Association. Q. How does bull development by seedstock producers come in to play on this issue? Bull development can make a contribution to why a young bull may develop poor feet and leg conformation. The environmental impact on feet and leg structure is still largely unknown from a research standpoint. It’s likely that nutrition, soil type, moisture, and even weight could be catalysts for feet and leg issues. The last thing a commercial buyer wants is to purchase a young bull and within a year, realize his feet are degrading rapidly and causing immobility. This also negatively impacts the seedstock producers’ bottom line when they issue credits or reimbursements for unsound bulls. Q. Is there anything buyers should look for this sale season to protect themselves from bulls with structural problems, especially when it comes to feet and legs? Absolutely use a genetic tool if it is available, the reason why we purchase an animal is for what they will pass on to its progeny. The best metric to gauge genetic merit is through EPD’s. However, we are still in the early stages of national feet and leg genetic evaluation, so it’s unlikely most breeds will have an EPD available. It’s still important to observe the animal prior to purchase and even more important to ask about the dam and any sisters and how their feet and legs perform. For those buyers purchasing sight-unseen or over


a video auction, pay attention to how the animal moves in the video, but also have a trusted person on-site to describe the foot and leg conformation, hoof quality, and soundness. It is recommended to only purchase animals from a seedstock source with a guarantee that includes feet and leg issues. Q. What work is the American Simmental Association continuing to do to improve foot structure in the breed, as well as make sure commercial cattlemen are equipped to select Simmental bulls that are sound to the ground? The American Simmental Association is developing scoring guidelines and educational material for its membership to start collecting feet and leg phenotypes. A visual rubric, along with guidelines recommended by the Beef Improvement Federation, will be issued in the future. Integration of member-submitted data into the IGS genetic evaluation will help establish genetic parameters for feet and leg traits in the Simmental breed population. Feet and legs are an indicator trait for the more economically relevant trait of longevity or productive life. The best metric to select for a longer lifetime in a herd is still Stayability EPD. The goal is to use feet and leg scores to build additional knowledge and accuracy for Stayability EPD. Commercial producers can rely on the genetic evaluation to help identify the breed improvers for feet and leg traits by way of Stayability EPD. Q. How do you expect foot structure in bulls to improve for commercial cattlemen in the next few years? Heritability ranges for feet and leg traits fall in the 0.20 - 0.30 range depending on breed population. This means progress can be made for feet and leg structure over time. Seedstock breeders who pay attention to the genetics of their herd and make selection decisions for improved feet and leg traits in the animals they supply the commercial industry will bring added value to commercial bull buyers who experience issues with soundness. As an industry we need to move toward directional change in claw shape with a more even and uniform hoof devoid of curvature or divergence, a hoof angle with plenty of depth of heel and flexibility, and a hock angle that supplies mobility without straightness or overflexion of the hock joint.

SHANE BEDWELL Chief Operating Officer and Director of Breed Improvement for the American Hereford Association Q. How has the American Hereford Association made improvements to foot structure in the breed over the last few years? The Hereford breed has always been known for its longevity which directly plays into the breed as a whole being functionally sound in terms of feet and leg structure. Q. How does bull development by seedstock producers come in to play on this issue? Bull development is critical in several aspects of longevity; avoiding a high concentrate ration through this period is critical for the future success of the bull. Q. Is there anything buyers should look for this sale season to protect themselves from bulls with structural problems, especially when it comes to feet and legs? Feet and leg structure needs to be part of the selection process; taking time to evaluate the bulls visually is essential. Beyond the overall length of stride, bulls should be free of any swelling on the hocks, foot shape, and toe size should be uniform and not curled, as well depth of heel should be evaluated to ensure the hoof wears correctly and the toes do not grow too long. Q. What work is the American Hereford Association continuing to do to improve foot structure in the breed, as well as make sure commercial cattlemen are equipped to select Hereford bulls that are sound to the ground? The American Hereford Association, through their Whole Herd Total Performance Reporting (TPR) program, which is the ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 23


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

structure. However, it is encouraged producers go and evaluate bulls in person to understand the soundness of the herd sire prospects at hand.

core of the Association’s genetic evaluation, prides itself on complete calf crop reporting. Along with this, members are responsible for reporting diligent culling codes, when an animal exits the herd. Saying this, when evaluating the data in the last 15 years, less than one percent of the animals culled within the AHA database have been culled due to structural problems. Bottom-line, AHA members are doing a great job keeping their genetics sound. Q. How do you expect foot structure in bulls to improve for commercial cattlemen in the next few years? As long as we don’t forget that cattle breeding and selection is about a balance of phenotypic soundness and genetic excellence, then I feel we will achieve great progress. After all, we should all practice stockmanship. KELLI RETALLICK Genetic Service Director for Angus Genetics Inc. Q. How has the American Angus Association made improvements to foot structure in the breed over the last few years? The majority of the improvement in foot structure over the years has been left up to the breeders themselves making independent culling decisions. Identifying animals that can work and travel in their different environments to succeed. Then in 2014, the American Angus Association was the first beef breed association in the US to adopt a foot scoring system in order to start down a path to a genetic selection tool for soundness. Since that time, extensive research has taken place and over 20,000 phenotypic records for two separate traits, claw set and foot angle, have been collected.

Q. What work is the American Angus Association continuing to do to improve foot structure in the breed, as well as make sure commercial cattlemen are equipped to select Angus bulls that are sound to the ground? The Association published two EPDs for foot structure on May 31. These two EPDs include Foot Angle (Angle) and Claw Set (Claw) both of which have a breed average EPD of 0.50. For both traits when comparing two bulls a lower EPD is more favorable as those bulls should produce animals with more ideal claw set – toes that are symmetrical and point forward and foot angle – 45 degree angle from the pastern to the ground with appropriate heel depth. In addition, these two foot score EPDs are included in the Angus Association’s new Maternal Weaned Calf index ($M) which aims to increase profitability from conception to weaning in the cow/calf sector. This aids improving foot structure in the breed because even if individual producers do not place a lot of selection pressure on foot structure directly by selecting on the $M index they will subsequently improve these foot traits in doing so. Q. How do you expect foot structure in bulls to improve for commercial cattlemen in the next few years? With the use of EPDs and knowing how sophisticated seedstock producers and commercial cattlemen are at evaluating individual cattle, I would expect that issues that beef cattle will start to resolve themselves. This will allow both males and females to increase their longevity and functionality in the coming years.

BANGUS ORRANCH GE S

Q. How does bull development by seedstock producers come in to play on this issue? Since the inception of the foot scoring system by American Angus in 2014, we have found with initial research projects that foot structure is approximately 25% heritable. Therefore, roughly 25% of the variation in foot score is controlled by genetics, and 75% is controlled by the environment, including things like nutrition and development.

staying on top by putting our program to the test

9 BULLS ON TEST AT CAL POLY AND OTHER SALE BULLS FEED EFFICIENCY TESTED AT SNYDER LIVESTOCK.

2019 offering includes sons of... Tex Playbook KM Broken Bow VAR Legend Black Granite VAR Diversity O’Connell All In

Q. Is there anything buyers should look for this sale season to protect themselves from bulls with structural problems, especially when it comes to WATCH FOR OUR CONSIGNMENTS AT CAL POLY AND WORLD OF BULLS! feet and legs? ALSO SELLING TOP QUALITY ANGUS BULLS OFF THE RANCH. The Association has just published EPDs for both foot angle and claw set with a lower Borges Angus Ranch Contact us to learn EPD being more favorable when comparing more about this year’s JOE & PATRICIA BORGES two sires. These EPDs will give an indication bull sale and private 3130 BYER ROAD, BYRON CA on how these animals will perform as parents treaty offering! (925) 634-3072 • (209) 456-0632 in passing down genetics prone to better foot 24 California Cattleman July • August 2019


SONOMA MOUNTAIN HEREFORDS Bulls Available Private Treaty

Horned and Polled Hereford Bulls available at the ranch in Bodega, CA 45 head of 2-year-olds and long yearlings Raised in the mountains and ready to go to work for you! Calves out of industry trait leaders:

Hometown 10Y • Cl 1 Domino 215Z

TH 512X 145Y El Dorado 49B • H5 Domino 2185 ...and our newest herd sire /S Peerless 55000 ET

Come by and take a look at this year’s offering! For more information or to request performance data on the bulls, contact: Jim, Marcia and Jamie Mickelson (707) 481-3440 (707) 396-7365 JMMick@sonic.net Bobby and Heidi Mickelson (707) 396-7364 P.O. Box 26589 Petaluma, CA 94953 sonomamountainherefords.com

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 25


THE PUREBRED BREEDERS’ CONNECTION TO THE COMMERCIAL CATTLE INDUSTRY.

Eric Duarte World Livestock Auctioneer Finalist International Livestock Auctioneer Finalist

541-891-7863 Auctioneering | Marketing | Promotion

DRYLAND & IRRIGATED PASTURE MIXES COVER CROPS

IT’S NEVER TOO EARLY TO START THINKING ABOUT YOUR FALL GRAINS

26 California Cattleman July • August 2019


$M +67

$W +86 2%

$F

+66

$G

+61

165 BuLLS SELL In ouR 24 th AnnuAL BuLL SALE

T h U R S D Ay

september

12

COLUSA FAIRGROUNDS Colusa, California

20%

$B

D R bronc F002 1-29-2018

+126

Baldridge Bronc x Baldridge Atlas A266 CED BW

WW

+15 +1.7

+65

2%

5%

20%

YW

SC MILK CW

+115 +1.02 +35 +39 3%

20%

MB

5%

$M +83 5%

sale book/ www.blackgoldbullsale.com bull videos www.m3cattlemarketing.com

$W +88 2%

BUlls sell BY THese leAdING sIRes: • Baldridge Colonel C251 ....................... 28 sons • Connealy Legendary 644L .................... 22 sons • MGR Treasure ..................................... 22 sons • Baldridge 38 Special............................ 15 sons • Spring Cove Reno 4021 ......................... 8 sons • VDAR Wulffs Altitude 423 ...................... 8 sons • KM Broken Bow 002 .............................. 7 sons • Diablo Deluxe 1104 ............................... 7 sons • Basin Paycheck 5249 ............................ 6 sons • Basin Payweight 1682 ........................... 6 sons • D R Advance D141 ................................. 6 sons • S S Niagara Z29 .................................... 5 sons • 3F Epic 4631......................................... 5 sons • Baldridge Denali D744 ........................... 5 sons

$F

+77

$G

+61

20%

$B

D R Colonel F003 2-1-2018

+138

Baldridge Colonel C251 x G A R Prophet CED BW

WW

+12

+68

10%

+.1

25%

15%

YW

SC MILK CW

+117 +1.25 +33 +49 15%

20%

10%

25%

MB RE +.66 +.1.10 2%

$M +63

Also selling sons of Baldridge Atlas A266, G A R Drive, Jindra Acclaim, KCF Bennett Absolute & Vintage Upshot 4046!

In 2018, 70% of the Black Gold Bulls brought less than $5,500.

48 bulls

$W +91 1%

2018 blaCk gOlD bull sale Results

37

20

$5,400-$5,500

+107

bulls

10%

14

bulls

$2,200-$3,400 $3,500-$4,500

$F

31

bulls

bulls

$5,600-$6,500

$G

$6,500+

DOnati RanCh

tom & Rocky Donati • oroville, CA

530-693-1634

www.donatiranch.com

wulFF bROs. livestOCk

+50

O’COnnell Payweight 8103 3-6-2018

Basin Payweight 1682 x Plattemere Weigh Up K360 CED BW +8 +1.5

WW +76

YW SC MILK CW +136 +1.76 +32 +64

Matt MaCFaRlane MaRketing

Dan & Barbara O’Connell • Colusa, CA

530-632-4491

www.oconnellranch.com

10%

4%

MB RE +.61 +.59

www.wulffbrotherslivestock.com

O’COnnell RanCh

5%

15%

3%

916-417-4199

3%

$B

+157

Carl & Heidi Wulff • Woodland, CA

SALE MANAGER

BlACK Gold BUlls ARe AffoRdABle!

RE

+.69 +.98

Matt Macfarlane • 916-803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

AuCtIonEER Rick Machado, 805-501-3210

THD ©

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 27


VET VIEWS

BREEDING SEASON PREP

FOCUS ON BULL HEALTH AND NUTRITION from Vitaferm Breeding season is just around the corner, you’ve got your cows on a good supplement program and they are in great shape ready for breeding. But what about your bulls? Are they ready to service multiple females during the next few months while contributing 50% of your next calf crop’s genetic material? For optimal performance, you should start preparing a bull for turnout as soon as he is pulled from the cows the previous breeding season. “Bull nutritional management is hard when he is on cows because he is usually limited to whatever the cows’ plane of nutrition is, so you need to assess condition as soon as they come off cows,” said Lindsey Grimes, BioZyme Area Sales Manager. “Keep in mind young bulls that come off thin will take longer to put the weight back on.” About 30-60 days before turning out, producers should assess animal condition to make sure bulls aren’t too thin or too fat going into the breeding season. Bulls should have a moderate Body Condition Score (BCS) around 6. If they are too thin, increase their energy gradually. Stepping up energy too fast can induce digestive upsets. Conversely, if a bull is too fat, slowly transition them to a less energy-dense ration. This can usually be achieved by adding more forage to the diet. For yearling bulls, that are still growing and developing, make sure that their diets are not more than 60% grainbased, easing the transition to a purely forage-based diet. Yearling bulls that are still growing need 13.5-14% protein, while mature bulls can thrive on 12% protein. Bull diets need to be balanced for nutrients, and they need to have a good water source readily available. Not only are you ensuring animal protein and energy requirements are met that are essential for optimal performance, but adequate vitamin and mineral supplementation are critical for peak reproductive performance. Research has shown that feeding zinc at 60 ppm of the diet is beneficial to fertility. VitaFerm Concept•Aid mineral supplements offer proteinated copper, zinc, and manganese and high levels of Vitamin E. All are research-proven to benefit fertility and conception. In 28 California Cattleman July • August 2019

addition, they include Amaferm, which will aid in forage digestibility and nutrient absorption. Conduct a breeding soundness exam (BSE) 30-60 days prior to turnout, regardless of your bull’s age, to confirm if your bull has the ability to cover cows and get them bred. Research has shown that bulls with scores greater than 71 have a dramatically higher conception rate than those scoring 70 or less. When compared to the cost of using a sterile or sub-standard bull, the money invested in a BSE is well spent. Promoting exercise can also play a role in reproductive success. Be sure to position feed and water sources to encourage movement and improve an animal’s physical fitness. Provide protection from extreme environmental elements. Bulls should be protected from severe cold and heat prior to turn out as these factors can impact semen production and quality. Providing bedding during winter and spring storms will also protect the scrotum from frostbite. Finally, it’s essential to have a herd health protocol established with your vet to determine when to administer vaccines, help with parasite control, and test for Trichomoniasis for herd biosecurity. Preparing your bull for breeding season happens yearround, but as turnout approaches be sure your bull is in proper condition, has sound feet and legs, has passed a BSE and is ready from a nutritional standpoint. Following a few simple steps will help ensure reproductively sound bulls that are ready to help produce your next calf crop.


SUCCESS IS REASON ENOUGH

“Using A.I. has really tightened up our calving season and made our calf crop more uniform. When it was time to wean last year’s calves, they were 900 lbs. and as consistent a bunch as we’ve ever had. In fact, we bred 300 heifers last year and calved in 251…all within a 60‐day calving window. I can’t say enough about the calving interval. When you can have everything on the ground in a short period, your calf management is just so much more consistent.” Fields Livestock, Russ Fields, Galt, California

P.O. Box 1803, Turlock, CA 95381 • 1-800-426-2697 contact@allwestselectsires.com www.allwestselectsires.com

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 29


California Department of Food & Agriculture (CDFA) Secretary Karen Ross has appointed the initial board for the California Cattle Council (Council). The Council was implemented by CDFA at the industry’s request on April 8, 2019, following a vote of industry members. The Council is authorized to carry out research on cattle production and beef nutrition, and to develop consumer or other educational programs. Program activities are to be funded by a $1 refundable assessment per head of cattle, paid by cattle producers. The board is made up of eleven members and eleven alternates, with each group consisting of three range cattle producers, three cattle feeders, three dairy producers, one processor, and one public member (open). The appointees were selected from nominations made by the cattle industry over a six-week nomination period and represent the diversity of cattle producers around the state, as required by the California Cattle Council Law. The first meeting of the board is scheduled for July 16, 2019 in Sacramento. The agenda is being prepared and will be posted to the CDFA website at www.cdfa.ca.gov/go/cattle by July 6, as required. The board roster and background information on the origins of the program are also available on the site. Text above reprinted from CDFA Press Release #19-044

30 California Cattleman July • August 2019


The Board Members SARA MORA

Processor • 2022

year represents end of term represents an alternate member in county

CODY NICHOLSON-STRATTON

HUMBOLDT

Dairy Producer • 2022

DAVE DALEY

BUTTE

JENNIFER BERETTA

SONOMA

SACRAMENTO

Dairy Producer • 2021

Range Cattle Producer • 2022

JAKE PARNELL

Range Cattle Producer • 2021

MIKE SMITH

FRESNO

JULIE MORRIS

Range Cattle Producer • 2020

Cattle Feeder • 2021

SAN BENITO TULARE

WILLIAM BRANDENBERG Cattle Feeder • 2020

TYLER RIBEIRO

Dairy Producer • 2020

IMPERIAL

JESSE LARIOS

Cattle Feeder • 2022

Alternate Members CATTLE FEEDERS Roger Guess, 2022 Brad Peek, 2021 Julie Belezzuoli-Hathaway, 2020

RANGE CATTLE PRODUCERS Shelia Bowen, 2022 Beverly Bigger, 2021 Sam Avila, 2020

PROCESSOR Brian Coelho, 2022

PUBLIC SEAT Both the member and alternate member for the public seat will be selected by the board.

DAIRY PRODUCERS Xavier Avila, 2022 Lauren Reid-Acevedo, 2021 Brad Scott, 2020

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 31


WILL FAKE MEAT SAVE US? CONTINUING FIGHT TO KEEP REAL PROTEIN ON CONSUMERS’ GROCERY LISTS by NCBA President Jennifer Houston By now, you have probably heard that fake meat is the answer to society’s woes. From antibiotic resistance to climate change, the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs supposedly cracked the code of our most complex problems. Simply replace real beef with the new alternatives and watch the threat of global catastrophes melt away. The New York Times summed up the view perfectly in a recent headline: “Fake Meat Will Save Us,” it declared. Personally, I am skeptical when salvation comes with a price tag. And in the case of fake meat, the activists defining the problems stand to make a lot of money if their preferred solution is adopted. In that sense, fake meat is more of a marketing pitch than a public service. But if you have been following the media coverage over the last few months, you would not know it. The good news is that many see right through the fake meat hype. Journalists and dieticians are pointing out that highly-processed fake meat is not healthier than beef. Food service operators are making clear that fake meat is an additional menu choice, not a replacement. And consumers are still spending a tiny fraction of their dollars on meat alternatives. In 2018, fake meat amounted to just 0.1% of protein pounds sold. Regulators and lawmakers around the country are also in no rush to give fake meat producers special treatment. Following the lead of NCBA and our affiliates, they are seeking to implement a fair regulatory framework that puts all protein products on an even playing field. Much of the action is coming at the state level. Last year, Missouri became the first state to draw up clear rules against the false and deceptive marketing of fake meat. Since then, 11 more states have passed laws designed to ensure that fake meat cannot trade on real beef ’s good name. Several other states are considering similar measures. NCBA continues to urge the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to take federal enforcement action against misbranded plant-based protein products. Thus far the agency has failed to move forward. All options for pressing the FDA into action are being considered. Unfortunately, as dairy producers know, getting the FDA to 32 California Cattleman July • August 2019

enforce food labeling laws is no easy feat. Thankfully, the federal government has taken decisive action on labgrown fake meat. NCBA asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to lead oversight of lab-grown products, and the Trump Administration answered the call. An agreement reached with the FDA last year puts USDA firmly in charge of food production and labeling, ensuring that the health and well-being of consumers will be protected. The arrangement secured the support of Congress and a range of stakeholders, but much work remains before any lab-grown products come to market. The USDA has not even had a chance to evaluate samples of lab-grown fake meat, let alone develop comprehensive regulations to govern its production and sale. NCBA will remain actively engaged in the federal government’s fake meat efforts. For now, the more immediate task for cattle producers is to push back against the wild claims of fake meat activists. One CEO of a fake meat company has gone as far as saying that plant-based fake meat will help revitalize rural economies by spurring demand for “higher-value protein crops.” Comments like these demonstrate the fundamental lack of agricultural literacy that exists in the fake meat community. Ironically, fake meat marketers effectively exploit the same lack of understanding among consumers. They disparage cattle production because many people do not know enough to call their bluff. The truth is consumers who enjoy delicious, nutritious beef do not need saving. They can feel good about eating a high-quality product that is responsibly raised. It is up to all of us to make sure they know it.


r e v i l e D s ll u B y e ll Mid Va AT THE SCALES FRIDAy, SEPTEMBER 20

LUNCH: 12 P.M. SALE: 1 P.M.

Modesto Jr. College Ag Pavilion • Modesto, CA The 2019 Schafer and Amador offering features a large group of bulls that excel for $Weaned Calf Value with the added value of Certified Angus Beef® and Top Dollar Angus premiums. If you sell your calves by the pound, these bulls are a perfect fit for your program! More than 70% of the Mid Valley bulls rank in the top 30% of the Angus breed for $W. The offering includes a large selection of calving-ease long-yearlings and yearlings.

MID VALLEy BULLS ARE BACKED By: >> PI-Negative Test for BVD >> Genomic Enhanced EPDs >> DNA Sire Identified >> Top Dollar Angus Seedstock Partnership >> First Breeding Season Guarantee

Sale Bulls on Display Prior to the Live Internet Broadcast

75 ANGUS BULLS SELL By THESE SIRES & MORE

Register at www.bidonwvmcattle.com

LMI©

CALL TO BE ADDED TO THE MAILING LIST

AmAdor Angus

Ed, Carlene, Joshua & Jessica Amador Ed (209) 595-3056 • Josh (209) 499-9182 • Ranch (209) 538-4597 • AmadorFarms@msn.com 5136 Laird Road • Modesto, California 95358

Greg and Louise Schafer

Cell 209-988-6599 • Home 530-865-3706 6986 County Road 6, Orland, CA 95963

>> Connealy Legendary 644L >> Baldridge Colonel C251 >> MGR Treasure >> Jindra Acclaim >> Quaker Hill Rampage A036 >> Styles Cash R400 >> KCF Bennett Fortress >> Baldridge Titan A139 >> Plattemere Weigh Up K360 >> Baldridge Bronc >> Barstow Bankroll B73 >> KM Broken Bow 002 >> Deer Valley Old Hickory >> Quaker Hill Manning 4EX9 >> Hoffman Big Ten 4056 >> Bruin Framework 3225 >> SS Niagara Z29 >> PA Full Power 1208 >> 3F Epic 4631

THD ©

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 33


PUBLIC LANDS

WASHINGTON PUBLIC LANDS WATCH PLC BUSY AT CAPITOL AND BEYOND by Public Lands Council Executive Director Ethan Lane Washington is a town famous for gridlock – and in a split Congress, the opportunities for progress are even fewer and farther between. Despite the bickering on Capitol Hill, your Public Lands Council (PLC) staff in D.C. are hard at work assisting the Trump Administration in cutting red tape and easing regulatory burden for farmers and ranchers in the United States. Over the next couple months, we expect to see a lot of headway being made on issues like the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), BLM grazing regulations, and more. Here are just a few things to keep an eye on this summer:

by texting “DELIST” to 52886 or by visiting policy.ncba.org.

National Environmental Policy Act The White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) is expected to issue rules in the coming weeks which will greatly streamline the NEPA process across the entire federal government. We expect those rules to increase the availability and use of Categorical Exclusions (CX), as well as clarify that a CX should be used in circumstances where it is authorized, but often disregarded for an Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) out of an abundance of caution (i.e. trailing permits, certain permit renewals, etc.). According to a report issued by CEQ Endangered Species Act last December, the average EIS takes the Bureau of Land The ESA has not been substantively amended in decades, Management (BLM) and Forest Service over four years to and while an Act of Congress is needed to make major complete. CEQ wants to streamline that as much as possible. changes to the law, there are several ways agencies can You can stay up to speed with the latest on NEPA, and other improve the way they implement the ESA. Last summer, federal lands ranching issues, by subscribing to PLC’s Daily the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Roundup (publiclandscouncil.org/subscribe). Marine Fisheries Service opened up three rules for public comment, which would drastically change the way the Grazing Regulations & Administration agencies implement Sections 4, 4(d), and 7 of the ESA. Earlier this year, the Department of the Interior Section 4 deals with listing and critical habitat, Section 4(d) identified grazing as a top priority for the agency in 2019. concerns protections for species listed as “threatened,” and To that end, they have begun the process of amending the Section 7 governs the interagency consultation process (our BLM Grazing Regulations famously put in place by thenwebsite breaks these down if you are interested in digging in Secretary Bruce Babbitt during Range Reform ’94. PLC further). leadership, including California PLC Chairman Mike Byrne, Little needs to be said about the gray wolf OR-7’s played an integral part in providing feedback on behalf of famous trek into the Golden State, and how the species the industry to the BLM for this project and we expect to see has since established a presence in northern California, rulemakings before the summer is out. The Forest Service is particularly in Siskiyou and Lassen Counties. Thankfully, also re-evaluating their handbook for grazing administration however, FWS has finally proposed to remove federal and PLC’s Forest Service Committee, chaired by Dave Daley, protections for gray wolves in the Lower 48, citing scientific is making sure that the rancher’s voice is heard throughout data that has concluded the predators have been recovered the process. range-wide since the early 2000s. This is a significant Even in light of the partisan divide that seems to step in the right direction for ranchers to work with local dominate the headlines these days, PLC’s top policy priorities wildlife managers to more effectively mitigate conflicts with are still advancing in our nation’s capital, thanks largely to livestock. Our team attended the nation’s only public hearing the dedication of this industry. The support and feedback on the delisting in Brainerd, Minn. where we supported the we get from folks on the ground make us more effective at making your job easier. Please do not hesitate to contact our rule. If you have not submitted comments in favor of the office with any questions or concerns you may have. federal delisting, you can (and should) do so before July 15

34 California Cattleman July • August 2019


PErformAnCE-TEsTED, AnGus Bulls sEll sAT., sEPTEmBEr 21 • Clm, GAlT, CA ArEllAno BrAvo

Spring Yearlings

&

Diablo Valley Angus

saturday, september 21 cAttLEMEN’S LivEStock MArkEt Galt, California • 12 Noon

BrAvo 38 sPECiAl 8063 4-14-2018

DiABlo vAllEy

Fall Yearlings

DiABlo CommAnD 4219 7-17-2018

Baldridge 38 special x s A v net Worth 4200

Baldridge Command C036 x EXAr upshot 0562B

cED BW WW YW MiLk MArB rE +5 +2.5 +71 +122 +27 +.72 +.49

cED BW WW YW MiLk MArB rE +11 +.6 +74 +137 +27 +.76 +.79

$M $B $c +57 +141 +240

BrAvo ArsEnAl 8409 4-2-2018

Connealy Arsenal 2174 x lD Kaboom 652 cED BW WW YW +13 +.3 +48 +94

MiLk MArB rE +25 +.57 +.32

$M $B $c +61 +126 +224

$M $B $c +48 +167 +265

DiABlo roCK 4202 7-8-2018

K C f Bennett Therock A473 x A A r Ten X 7008 s A cED BW WW YW MiLk MArB rE $M $B $c +8 +1.6 +71 +129 +15 +1.39 +.76 +60 +176 +288

Also Selling

registered Angus Fall Pairs & registered Fall Yearling Heifers

Sale Books

www.parnelldickinson.com sales@parnelldickinson.com

BrAvo TEn X 8411 4-7-2018

A A r Ten X 7008 s A x Connealy Timeline cED BW WW YW +6 +.9 +54 +99

MiLk MArB rE +26 +.82 +.45

$M $B $c +55 +159 261

SALE MANAGED BY

John Dickinson 916-806-1919 Jake Parnell 916-662-1298

Adhemar Arellano: 916-996-9855 10365 Gilliam Drive, Elk Grove, CA

DiABlo DisCovEry 4278 8-5-2018 v A r Discovery 2240 x Wr Journey-1X74

cED BW WW YW MiLk MArB rE $M $B $c +12 -0.6 +76 +137 +24 +.65 +.91 +52 +168 +270

Diablo Valley Angus

Dennis lopez: 209-814-2440 10000 Armstrong rd., Byron, CA

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 35

THD ©


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD EXPANDED ACCESS COULD FURTHER BOOST U.S. BEEF EXPORTS TO JAPAN from the U.S. Meat Export Federation Japan recently completed a achieve success with Japanese buyers regulatory proceeding that is likely to include short plate, chuckeye rolls, provide a boost for U.S. beef exports. short ribs, middle meats, clods and In late May, Japan’s Ministry of briskets – especially when these cuts Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) are derived from cattle in qualityremoved the 30-month cattle age assured programs. Beef variety meat restriction on beef imports from the items most likely to be in demand United States, Canada and Ireland. include outside skirts, hanging This essentially gives U.S. beef tenders, mountain chain tripe, full access to the Japanese market, tongues, abomasum and intestines. with only a few specific product The ability to use beef from over-30restrictions remaining. The U.S. Meat month cattle may also lower costs for Export Federation (USMEF) had some companies exporting processed been preparing for this opportunity beef products to Japan. for some time. Halstrom emphasized, however, “The vast majority of the U.S. that for the U.S. beef industry to fully beef shipped internationally, even to capitalize on this growth opportunity, countries where we enjoy full access, tariff relief is sorely needed. All is from fed cattle less than 30 months eyes in the U.S. beef industry are of age,” explained USMEF President on the U.S.-Japan trade agreement and CEO Dan Halstrom. “But Japan negotiations that opened in midis such an enormous market that the April, and with good reason. These opportunities for over-30-month negotiations took on a heightened beef cuts and beef variety meat are sense of urgency when Japan significant. Japanese buyers from the extended more favorable access terms pre-BSE era are very familiar with to U.S. beef ’s major competitors these opportunities, but USMEF has through the Comprehensive and been educating many others who Progressive Agreement for Transentered the industry over the past 15 Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). For to 20 years.” Australian, Canadian, New Zealand Japan is already the leading and Mexican beef entering Japan, international destination for U.S. beef, with exports last year exceeding $2 billion – almost one-fourth of the record $8.33 billion exported worldwide. USMEF estimates that removal of the 30-month cattle age restriction will increase exports to Japan by 7 to 10 percent, or $150 million to $200 million per year. “At first glance this may not seem like a large bump in what is already a $2 billion market,” Halstrom said. “But there are international markets where it can take decades to reach $150 million in exports, yet in Japan we can add this new business in a very short period of time.” Beef muscle cuts from over-30month cattle that are most likely to 36 California Cattleman July • August 2019

CPTPP entered into force at the end of 2018. A second round of tariff rate reductions came on April 1, the beginning of the Japanese fiscal year. Japan’s duty rate on beef muscle cuts from CPTPP countries is 26.6% - significantly lower than the 38.5% rate that applies to U.S. beef cuts. For variety meat items the CPTPP rate is 5.7% - less than half the U.S. rate of 12.8%. These tariff rate gaps will continue to widen each year until the U.S. reaches a similar agreement with Japan. “As with all U.S. red meat products, our over-30-month beef cuts and offals need to be on a level playing field in Japan,” he said. “That will allow the U.S. industry to effectively defend our market share and further broaden our Japanese customer base.” Halstrom noted that in addition to the immediate commercial opportunities, Japan’s removal of the 30-month cattle age restriction is also an important regulatory milestone. “This is one more step toward putting BSE in the rear view mirror when it comes to global beef trade,” he said.


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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 37


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125 ANGUS AND ANGUS X COWS FALL CALVING COWS FOR PINEROCK RANCH - 1ST TO 5TH CALF - COMPLETE DISPERSION.

20 FANCY ANGUS FALL CALVING BRED HEIFERS FROM LAWRENCE GINOCHIO, FOOTHILL AND ANAPLAZ EXPOSED.

60 ANGUS - BLACK AND BLACK BALDY - TOP QUALITY FALL BRED HEIFERS FROM IRONHOUSE.

40 SIMANGUS FALL CALVING BRED HEIFERS AND 250 2ND TO 4TH CALF SIMANGUS BRED COWS FROM RON GILLILAND, FOOTHILL AND ANAPLAZ EXPOSED.

30 FANCY ANGUS FALL CALVING BRED HEIFERS FROM JOHN GINOCHIO, FOOTHILL AND ANAPLAZ EXPOSED.

25 2ND CALF CALVING ANGUS COWS - BLACK AND BLACK BALDY - FROM BILLY GRISSOM,

OCTOBER 5

FALL CALVING FEMALE SALE & CALIFORNIA BREEDERS BULL SALE

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 39


THE BRAND

Hereford promoters attend marketing summit from the American Hereford Association More than 200 Hereford enthusiasts traveled to Kansas City, Mo., June 3 and 4, for two days jam-packed with sessions featuring some of the best marketers in the business. With presentations from professionals representing all sectors of the cattle industry, attendees at “The Brand” Marketing Summit gleaned insight on using traditional and digital platforms to better market their programs and to be advocates for the Hereford breed and the beef industry. This first-of-its-kind event hosted by the American Hereford Association and Vermeer Corporation allowed attendees to sharpen their marketing skills while developing effective tactics to reach current and potential customers. Lori Lucero and Mariano Aragon, Mora, N.M., who started their operation, Los Amantes, just over a year ago describe how the event helped them learn more about the breed they invested in and how to grow their new operation. “Here at the Brand, I was really exposed at how united the Hereford organization is and how supportive everybody is about what we’re all doing — we’re all in this together,” Mariano says. “I’m so glad we came to The Brand Marketing Summit,” adds Lori. “We have learned a lot of information that we are able to take back and implement into our operation and we met a lot of great people from all over. This has been very beneficial.” Events were underway Monday afternoon with a welcome by AHA President Pete Atkins and Mark Core, Vermeer executive vice president and chief marketing officer, followed by presentations covering the growth and efficiency trends within the breed, consumer preferences and purchasing decisions regarding meat products, and establishing a directional compass to shape a business model. Afterward, participants enjoyed a social at the AHA headquarters where they recorded brief promotional videos to upload to their social media platforms. The evening festivities continued at Howl at the Moon in downtown Kansas City, which featured a live auction that generated

40 California Cattleman July • August 2019

nearly $50,000 for the Hereford Youth Foundation of America (HYFA) and the Hereford Research Foundation (HRF). Kicking off Tuesday morning was the Voice of the Kansas City Chiefs, Mitch Holthus. The 26-year National Football League broadcaster shared a motivational message about applying his agricultural background to unite the Chiefs organization and fan base. He discussed his “5 C’s for Success” — cooperation, creative, courage, confidence and conduit — and how producers can apply those principles in marketing and growing their operations. Participants spent the remainder of the day learning from marketing professionals about social media marketing, video storytelling and overcoming saletime challenges. As well, AHA staff announced the soft launch of Herefords On Demand, a digital catalog resource featuring the most current data on a searchable and user-friendly platform. Hereford breeders walked away from the summit with an arsenal of tools to better their marketing strategies. Bob Harrell Jr., Baker City, Ore., says he and his family are going to utilize more videos, especially footage captured with drone technology, and social media to showcase their operation. “[Marketing] is about building relationships,” Harrell says. “We want to sell our image and what we stand for to the consumer and to our bull customers. We have a lot of customers that have been with us since we started and we are constantly getting new customers, so we are looking for all kinds of avenues to tell our story to them. This has been a great summit for that.” Atkins notes it was great to see such a large and diverse group, comprised of both big and small breeders, work together to learn and to collaborate on a common a goal — promoting the Hereford breed and the beef industry. “I was proud to see so many people participate in this event,” Atkins says. “It shows there are truly dedicated breeders who want to learn and work hard to push their operations and the breed to even higher levels. I think it is a testament to the values and quality of the people in our breed.”


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41


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER BEEF IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION MAKES AVAILABLE VAST RESEARCH FOR BEEF PRODUCERS by Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., California State University, Chico Technology advances at ludicrous speed these days. I remember when we mailed cattle registrations, waited for the printed semen catalogs, and waited days for ‘snail’ mail responses. If you wanted research a topic, you had to go to a library, an actual brick and mortar building, and locate the card catalog, essentially a dresser full of index cards alphabetized by subject headings. On the card, you’d find the book title, author and book location (Dewey Decimal System) in the library that related to your search. Personally, I don’t miss those days. As an educator, it is nice to have today’s information at a touch of a button. Joining the trend in real-time, community-based, accessible, electronic resources, the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) unveiled their Wiki project at the most recent BIF Annual Meeting in Brookings, S.D. The Beef Improvement Federation’s (founded in 1968) mission is to coordinate all segments of the beef industry, connecting science and industry in the promotion of cattle genetic improvement. One of the first projects BIF tackled was standardizing cattle performance across cattle breeds. The result was the BIF Guidelines, which is now in its 9th edition. The current Wiki project is an extension of the guidelines and is an example of BIF’s continued efforts to bring together extension, research and industry partners to improve beef cattle production through improved genetics. Wiki pages were first created as early as 1995 and served as a community, collaborative composition system with a repository of information. Like me, many of you have heard of Wikipedia or come across Wikipedia information during online research. BIF’s Wiki effort is similar but with content oversight by a BIF committee to scrutinize the information posted. Authors from the industry were solicited to submit content and represent a wealth of 42 California Cattleman July • August 2019

cattle experience. The BIF Wiki pages provide an accessible, searchable, online tool that covers a multitude of beef cattle production, improvement, and economic topics. While the Wiki pages are still under construction, many are available. Check out the Wiki pages today. It is as easy as ‘point, click, and be informed’. The BIF Wiki page is available at www. guidelines.beefimprovement.org. Click on the ‘Table of Contents’ and you’ll find a listing of available topics. Each topic may have a comprehensive description while others have a brief description with links to a detailed article by industry professionals, educators and cattle producers. Here’s how to get there: 1. BIF Homepage: www.beefimprovment.org 2. BIF Wiki Project Page (Select ‘Table of Contents’): 3. Search a topic or select a topic of interest. There are approximately 140 pages of information currently available. The Beef Improvement Federation webpage is an excellent resource for cattle producers. In addition to the Guidelines, and now, Wiki pages, you’ll find videos of keynote speakers from the previous BIF conference and information for upcoming workshops and annual convention. Information is a valuable resource in today’s challenging production environment and cattle markets. BIF’s Wiki pages are another tool to add to your toolbox of success.


Baldy Builders

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Pedretti Ranches Gino Pedretti ����������������������������������������������������209/756-1609 Mark St� Pierre �������������������������������������������������209/233-1406 Gino Pedretti Jr� �����������������������������������������������209/756-2088 Gino Pedretti III������������������������������������������������209/756-1612 E-mail���������������������������GBL1domino@sbcglobal�net

1975 E ROOSEVELT RD • EL NIDO, CA 95317 July • August 2019 California Cattleman 43


Mccully selected to lead largest beef breed association conducted master’s The American Angus Association® announces Mark McCully as chief executive officer. McCully will start his research in ruminant role June 10. As CEO, he will lead the Association and nutrition and feedlot serve as the vice chairman for each of the Association’s management at Michigan entities: Angus Media, Certified Angus Beef LLC, Angus State University, where Genetics Inc., and the Angus Foundation. he studied under three “This truly is a proud day for the Association and Saddle and Sirloin Portrait the breed,” said John Pfeiffer, Association Board of Gallery inductees — Directors president. “Mark has grown up in the cattle Dr. Dave Hawkins, Dr. business and possesses unique insight into all segments Maynard Hogberg and Dr. of beef production, his knowledge and leadership have Harlan Ritchie. served CAB well, and he will help to continue to drive the McCully was raised on demand for Angus genetics globally.” a small family farm in central Illinois. As a youth, he was McCully brings 23 years of experience to the table, very involved in showing cattle, livestock judging, actively most recently serving as vice president of production for engaged in 4-H and FFA, and was awarded the FFA Star CAB. In his role, Mark drove supply chain innovation M Farmer of Illinois in 1989. McCully currentlyAresides IN m AD E cA for the brand and helped develop andADimplement best i si e E I N 1 2 n r 9 M e 1 c e ri two in Wooster, Ohio, with his wife, Gerry. They have e 19 c 21 A nc management practices with cattlemen increase brand Amsito children. Austin will be a junior at Case Western Reserve acceptance rates. In addition, Mark led global production University majoring in computer science and economics initiatives, streamlining processes for improved product with plans of attending law school. Maddy will be a senior quality, and served in many industry leadership positions. “I’m honored and truly thrilled to serve this incredible in high school and is in the process of making her college selection to pursue a degree in neuroscience. breed and its membership,” McCully said. “The For more information about the American Angus Association has such a rich and successful heritage. That Association and the new CEO, please visit angus.org. history, coupled with breeders always striving to produce the best Angus cattle in the world, and an incredibly bright and talented staff, I have nothing but optimism and excitement for our future.” McCully started at CAB in 2000 as director of packing before developing and coordinating a regional sales team, and in 2005, he transitioned to supply development and production. Prior to joining CAB, he worked for Southern States Cooperative where he managed the beef improvement program and value-added feeder cattle marketing programs for cattlemen within a 22-state region. He also served as an intercollegiate Ritchie water is livestock judging team coach, taught smart water. livestock evaluation classes and Provide fresh water for your animals, and coordinated the animal science have more left for other things in your life. department undergraduate internship See what owning a Ritchie automatic waterer can do for you at www.ritchiefount.com. program at Michigan State University before joining Southern States. Partner to the American Cattleman since 1921. He graduated with his Associate’s AmMAD IN E cA E Proud to be a sponsor of: AD i 1 Degree from Lake Land College, sincee1r9 icIN M er 192 ce 21 A Amsin Bachelor of Science degree from Western Illinois University and

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ANGUS CONVENTION IS HEADED WEST Learn from the industry’s best and brightest leaders in innovative technology, genetics, cattle handling, and more. Tour Bently Ranch, a cutting-edge beef operation in the high desert during the National Angus Tour on Nov. 1. Connect with like-minded cattlemen and women focused on setting the bar for high-quality genetics. Dance the night away to Flatland Cavalry’s heart-felt ballads and classic renditions.

CONVENTION

NOVEMBER 2 - 4, 2019

Reno-Sparks Convention Center | Reno, Nevada REGISTRATION NOW OPEN - ANGUSCONVENTION.COM July • August 2019 California Cattleman 45


THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM Computer model considers world with flat demand for Certified Angus Beef

by Steve Suther, senior editor of producer communications, Certified Angus Beef Imagine an alternate American history line over the past 16 years, with just an incidental supply of “Angus” beef. There’s a Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand but it began to coast in 2002 and scaled back to maintain flat demand. The 30 other Angus programs at that time struggled to compete with commodity beef; most folded. CattleFax analyst Lance Zimmerman visited that dimension through a computer model this spring, adapting one he and Kansas State University economist Ted Schroeder created in 2008. First, he updated the CAB chart based on the adjusted model to show a 2018 CAB demand index of 193, up 25 points in a year, all on a 2002 base of 100 and compared to Choice at 160 (see chart). It marked a 10th consecutive year of record increases in per-capita world demand for the brand. “That was no surprise,” Zimmerman says. “But what if demand for the brand had remained flat since 2002?” Laying aside the impossibility of that in our real world, where each year’s CAB marketing plan aims to bring on enough new demand to support the long-term growth in supply, the exercise scores a few points and stimulates discussion. “Flat demand over all those years would mean a CAB cutout value of just $115 per hundredweight (cwt.) last year instead of the actual $222,” Zimmerman says. Commodity Choice would fare better at $133/cwt., still weakened by lower demand for its premium share. “That all seems crazy, but remember, you’re selling nearly twice as much CAB product on a global per-capita basis now. Merely steady 2002 demand would wreck CAB market value.” Zimmerman did use the word “crazy,” but examine the alternative to appreciate the importance of cultivating demand for the brand. “Simply multiplying the $221.60/cwt. CAB cutout last year times the 1.2 billion pounds sold worldwide gives us $2.8 billion in industry value at the wholesale level,” he says. “Without the steady increases in CAB demand, the $115/ cwt. cutout on the same volume would come to just $1.4 billion—only half of the value CAB actually contributed by building robust demand.” What does that mean to cattle producers? “All else being equal, that increase in demand for qualifying Angus cattle is worth roughly $57/cwt. at the fed cattle level,” Zimmerman says. “That’s $775/head according to this model, but we have to make a lot of assumptions in modeling, and the beef industry doesn’t work in a vacuum.” A few of the impossibles include today’s growth in premium beef supply with only flat demand. It would not have happened, the analyst admits, because that 46 California Cattleman July • August 2019

transformation was incentivized by demand signals paid on value-based grids. But it’s more than just an interesting model. “Every day since at least 2008, the brand was going through a real-world test of economic theory,” Zimmerman says. “Every year the industry produced more for the brand and each year your network of licensees raised the bar higher.”

Wholesale demand for the Certified Angus Beef ® brand compared to USDA Choice expressed as an index where 2002 = 100. Note nine years of consecutive demand growth for the brand.

Schroeder says computer modeling must “make a lot of assumptions to collapse the entire demand story into a single number, but Lance didn’t make any crazy assumptions. CAB simply has a remarkable demand story.” It’s one that has to be seen in the context of first steps, 40 years ago. “Early on, CAB realized the demand potential was there, if the supply could be developed,” the economist says. The “cage-free egg” market started out with a similar faith, but now finds itself faced with a ceiling the likes of which CAB could avoid. “If you increased cage-free egg supplies at the rate CAB has grown, you couldn’t sustain premium demand,” Schroeder says. Most product markets can be “swamped,” but he’s not sure that can happen in this particular branded beef case.

Scattergram of CAB Demand Since 2002: Volume in per-capita global pounds sold across the bottom and deflated to 1995 cutout value up the left side. Movement up and/or to the right for more than a decade indicates an upward trend in demand.

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 48


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 46

retailer in Texas, La Michoacana.” The latest numbers confirm flat demand for this brand is only an absurd concept we can use to see a world where the American beef industry would have been $1.4 billion poorer.

“CAB marketing didn’t start at consumer level, but by co-branding with large customers who featured the premium beef brand and found it lifted both brands,” he notes. Strategic marketing plans evolved to personal business-to-business relationships with thousands of licensees: “Who else does that?” The cage-free egg is a perception-based market, while CAB started with bundled attributes (specifications) to deliver taste and leveraged that to develop positive perceptions. “CAB has the quality, repeatability and ‘trustability’—all absolutely critical,” Schroeder says. “But it also has equity value. You could chip away at that if “For 30 years, we’ve used Leachman bulls. you relaxed quality standards, but you never did, and the industry figured out The bulls are good – the people are the genetics, management and other technology to produce more.” great – we’re perfectly pleased.” Zimmerman and Schroeder note the increase in Prime grade beef production, ~ Tim Erickson approaching 10% of all steers and heifers some weeks. The Prime premium La Junta, CO has flagged a bit, but the volume-timesprice movement blew the doors off their demand model, nominally at an index of 4,000 in 1998. That can happen when past assumptions are no longer valid, but Schroeder says “demand modeling is just one metric of many” to indicate the strong position of premium beef in the market. Steve Ringle, CAB director of business development and analysis, notes leading growth in the brand’s Prime extension. “That category is up more than 45% in the first half of our fiscal year, and 56% through April in the calendar year, where it represents 24% of total growth.” The brand’s director of packing, Clint Walenciak points to an internal Leachman Topline California Sale Leachman East Coast Stabilizer Sale measure called carcass utilization, the Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019 Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019 share of each available one sold as 101 Livestock, Aromas, CA East Carolina Ag & Education Ctr., Rocky Mount, NC branded product. That number is up 10 pounds per head so far in 2019. Leachman Fall Ozark Sale Leachman High Altitude Sale “We are seeing strong demand in the Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019 Saturday, Dec. 7, 2019 foodservice sector,” Ringle adds, but I-40 Livestock Auction, Ozark, AR WSCLA, Loma, CO the retail division really stands out for Leachman Red & White Sale Leachman Lone Star Stabilizer Bull Sale having “doubled year-over-year sales of Friday, Nov. 8, 2019 Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019 Certified Angus Beef brand Prime.” Leachman Cattle of Colorado, Fort Collins, CO West Auction Inc., West, TX From a volume standpoint, foodservice, retail and international all Lee Leachman, Managing Partner show the kind of growth that seems Jerrod Watson, Bull Customer Service on track for more records to come, (303) 827-1156 he says. “We are experiencing growth 2056 West County Road 70 • Fort Collins, CO (970) 568-3983 • www.leachman.com with our core retailers, as well as a great amount in our newly licensed Hispanic 48 California Cattleman July • August 2019

Over 1,000 Leachman Bulls will sell this fall.


28th Annual

& DAL PORTO LIVESTOCK Bull Sale

RANCHO CASINO

Thursday, September 19 • Denair, CA Same Time - Same Place - Same Date Same Quality You Can Count On!

Selling the first breeding age sons of Casino Bomber N33 and DPL Developer T18! DPL Black Onyx W63

Casino Ballast R40

Reg No: 19280991 • Sire: Baldridge Bronc • MGS: Casino More Value F03

Reg No: 19387666 • Sire: Connealy Rock 277P • MGS: BA Sterling 2001

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

CW

MARB

RE

$W

$F

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

CW

MARB

RE

$W

$F

$B

+17

-1.8

+74

+126

+27

+43

+.34

+.64

+85

+67

+108

+15

+.2

+73

+140

+32

+70

+.84

+.94

+83

+117

+183

Also offering 25 Hereford Bulls from Hoffman Ranch.

Join us for an open house to view the bulls Friday August 23 at O’Banion Feedlot in Dos Palos Watch for details to come!

David & Jeanene Dal Porto

5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561 (925) 634-0933 • mobile: 925-250-5304 www.dalportolivestock.com

David & Carol Medeiros

2800 Hall Rd • Denair, CA 95316 • (209) 632-6015 David mobile: 209 765 0508 • Matt Angell (559) 217-9064 www.ranchocasinoangus.com

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 49


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Checking In On Your Beef Checkoff

Showing off the industry from pasture to plate by California Beef Council Director of Producer Relations Jill Scofield CBC Honors Frank Mitloehner With George Strathearn Memorial Award For the first time in 25 years, the California Beef Council (CBC) has bestowed a researcher with the George Strathearn Memorial Research Award. Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., of the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) was presented with the award on June 6 at the CBC’s summer meeting, in recognition of his groundbreaking research on the environmental management of domestic livestock. Mitloehner is an internationally-renowned authority on agricultural air quality, animal-environmental interactions, and environmental engineering. He is a professor and Air Quality Extension Specialist at UC Davis, and has generated and published research that is rapidly changing how livestock facilities in California and throughout the U.S. are regulated. His work includes the development and evaluation of cost-effective methods to mitigate harmful emissions. He has authored more than 70 peer reviewed journals, and obtained approximately $15 million in extramural research grants. One of his most notable research papers, “Clearing the Air: Livestock’s Contributions to Climate Change,” published in 2009, disproved the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization’s (UN FAO) report titled “Livestock’s Long Shadow,” that claimed livestock production accounted for 18 percent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In presenting the award, CBC Executive Director Bill Dale noted Mitloehner’s extensive research coupled with his strong advocacy efforts as reasons why the council wanted to honor him with this award. “The California beef industry certainly owes Dr. Mitloehner a debt of gratitude, not just for his FRANK MITLOEHNER, PH.D. 50 California Cattleman July • August 2019

impressive and important body of research, but also his willingness to share his knowledge across the country with audiences large and small. The California Beef Council and industry as a whole are proud to be able to offer this welldeserved recognition.” The George Strathearn Memorial Award was established in 1983 to recognize researchers who have made a significant and positive contribution to California’s beef industry. It was named in honor of George Strathearn, one of the first leaders of the California Beef Council and a previous Chief Deputy Director of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Results Are In: Update on Latest CBC Campaign This April and May, the CBC completed its latest integrated marketing campaign. This campaign, “Tacos, Tequila y Más,” was one of the most successful to date in terms of consumer engagement and action. As in previous integrated marketing campaigns, Tacos, Tequila y Más allowed the CBC to combine the expertise of retail marketing and consumer marketing, incorporate additional brand partners which helps lead to positive associations between beef and popular brands and products, and importantly, maximize the spending power of your checkoff dollars. For this campaign, brand partners included E&J Gallo (specifically its Camarena Tequila label) and Mission Foods. The campaign launched in early April and ran a total of seven weeks, and included a variety of elements designed to reach and engage consumers, including 15-second broadcast spots airing on the Total Weather Network, digital display ads, video pre-roll, streaming audio and mobile geo-fencing. The campaign was also promoted through social media and the CBC web site as well. An additional unique element created for this campaign


TABLE I: Results from the latest CBC Ibotta campaign versus a traditional on-pack IRC from a previous CBC campaign.

was a 60-second recipe video done in partnership with food blogger and influencer Whitney Bond. The Tasty-style recipe video offers quick instructions for chipotle-lime carne asada tacos, and was perfect for social sharing and online engagement. In terms of additional retailer engagement, in-store point-of-sale displays were placed in select California retailers, featuring logos of all three partners. What’s more, an online portal was established to allow meat, marketing,

advertising and digital contacts to download the campaign assets for use on their own websites and social media outreach, helping extend the program even further through the retail channel. Tacos, Tequila y Más was the latest campaign to also include a cash-back rebate on the popular retail mobile app Ibotta. The $3 rebate on one pound or more of select beef cuts was available at any participating California retailer. This campaign continued to highlight the value of working with the Ibotta app to provide cash-back rebates, versus past campaigns which would typically offer an on-pack instant redeemable coupon (IRC) for cost savings on beef products. As you can see from the table above, the results in terms of reach and engagement with Ibotta are significant. What’s more, it was difficult to track metrics such as brand impressions or redemption demographic information with on-pack IRCs.

smoked tri-tip street tacos INGREDIENTS

1 BEEF TRI-TIP ROAST, APPROXIMATELY 1 TO 1 1/2 POUNDS 1 TABLESPOON OLIVE OIL 1 LARGE SWEET ONION, SLICED 2 LARGE POBLANO CHILE PEPPERS, TRIMMED, SEEDED, SLICED THIN 4 CLOVES GARLIC, MINCED 1/2 TO 1 TEASPOON ANCHO CHILE POWDER JUICE OF ONE LIME (ABOUT 2 TABLESPOONS) 12 SMALL CORN TORTILLAS (6-INCH)

INSTRUCTIONS

• PREHEAT SMOKER TO 225°F. • ADD BEEF TO SMOKER. SET TIMER FOR 45 MINUTES. • MEANWHILE HEAT OIL IN LARGE SKILLET OVER MEDIUM HEAT UNTIL HOT. ADD ONION, POBLANO PEPPERS AND GARLIC; COOK 8 MINUTES, STIRRING OCCASIONALLY, UNTIL SOFTENED. ADD ANCHO CHILI POWDER, AND SALT AND PEPPER AS DESIRED STIRRING OCCASIONALLY UNTIL HEATED THROUGH, ABOUT 5 TO 6 MINUTES. TAKE OFF HEAT, ADD IN LIME JUICE AND STIR UNTIL COMBINED. • WHEN BEEF IS DONE SMOKING, CAREFULLY REMOVE BEEF FROM SMOKER AND FINISH ON MEDIUM GRILL OR IN 350°F OVEN UNTIL ROAST REACHES 145°F DONENESS, APPROXIMATELY 8 TO 10 MINUTES. TENT WITH FOIL TO KEEP WARM. • ADD CHILE AND ONION MIXTURE TO WARMED TORTILLAS. TOP WITH BEEF SLICES. GARNISH WITH TOPPINGS, AS DESIRED.

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 51


USDA RESEARCH DRIVING TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released its annual Technology Transfer Report in late June, which highlights innovations from scientists and researchers that are solving problems for farmers, ranchers, foresters, and producers; and creating opportunities for American businesses to thrive. Yesterday, Secretary Perdue discussed the release of the Technology Transfer Report at the Forbes AgTech Summit held in Salinas, during a fireside chat with Mike Federle, the CEO of Forbes. USDA’s Technology Transfer Report revealed 320 new inventions from USDA laboratories in fiscal year 2018, along with 471 licenses, 120 patent applications and 67 actual patents. Discoveries include a repellent made from coconut oil to ward off blood-sucking insects that cost the cattle industry more than $2.4 billion annually, technology that keeps almond crops from being lost to heavy rains, and a treatment for peanut allergies. “Long before anyone ever coined the modern-day phrase of ‘technology transfer,’ it was part of the culture at USDA to deliver solutions to the people of America,” Secretary Perdue said. “Today, USDA is still helping to drive technological innovation – both on the farm and off. Studies show that every dollar invested in agricultural research returns $20 to our economy. Innovations produced by USDA scientists and through public-private partnerships add value to American agriculture and the U.S. economy, create jobs, and help

American producers compete in the global marketplace.” Some innovation highlights mentioned in the report include: A new bio-based insect repellent that uses fatty acids derived from coconut oil to ward off blood-sucking insects that cost the cattle industry more than $2.4 billion annually. Energy-saving new technology using sequential infrared heat and hot air to simultaneously dry and decontaminate wet whole almonds, a crop worth $5.33 billion a year in California. A system for removing nitrate from contaminated water and recycling it for re-use as fertilizer. A treatment for peanut allergy. A test strip for major foodborne pathogens that reduces testing time from 24-72 hours to about 30 minutes, allowing food to be tested more often at less expense. A vaccine against Streptococcus suis that may markedly improve the health and welfare of pigs while reducing the use of antibiotics. The discovery of a hormone – asprosin – that controls the desire to eat, making it a potential tool for the prevention and treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. A set of time-series maps that can help forest resource managers plan strategically for how changing climate might affect the geographic distribution of wildfires in the Pacific Northwest.

CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

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Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products... 576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • 52 California Cattleman July • August 2019


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ASA: 3498798

API - 136.4 TI - 77.3

API - 152.6 TI - 86.4

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EGL 50/50 F473

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EAGLE PASS RANCH AJ MUNGER 605/521-4468 ANDY LEDOUX 785/527-3188

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 53


STILL SETTING THE STANDARD SAN LUIS COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION CELEBRATES DIAMOND ANNIVERSARY OF GOLD STANDARD ADVOCACY by CCA Communications Director Jenna Chandler Gas was $0.21 per gallon, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was President of the United States and beef pot roast was $0.27 per pound when 52 local cattlemen got together and realized they were stronger in numbers. Since those original 52 in 1944, over the last 75 years the San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association has been harnessing that member power to get some pretty impressive things done for central coast ranchers and beyond. While the exact issues those first ranchers felt the need to assemble and address are not known, they knew they had to get engaged to protect their way of life, even as early as the 40s. “They felt the need to have a voice in Sacramento, I know that. Claude [Loftus]’s grandfather, my uncle, was one of the founding members and was on the county board of supervisors so he had knowledge on the political front and didn’t like the way things were going, even way back then,” SLOCC Secretary and familiar face of the central coast ranching community, Jo Ann Switzer said. And political advocacy is one of the primary aspects of what SLOCC does today, 75 years later. Although an article all its own could be written on the various policies that SLOCC has influenced over the years (including yellow star thistle control, grading and runoff management, agricultural water management and the Williamson Act) one of the main ways that they have influenced policy over the years is through their Political Action Committee (PAC). Similar to what CCA’s CattlePAC does on the state level, SLOCC’s PAC supports ag-friendly candidates on the local level. When it first began, the Jim Parson’s Feeder Sale (named for a long time SLOCC member and brand inspector who sadly lost his life in a car accident), held at Templeton Livestock Market was the main funding mechanism for the PAC. Today, the sale held in mid-June at Visalia Livestock Market makes sure PAC coffers are full and the priorities of ranchers are kept in the minds of local policymakers. The political arena isn’t the only focus of SLOCC though, with the dozens of outreach, support, promotional and fundraising programs they’ve added since their 1944 inception. In fact, there are very few on the central coast who aren’t touched in some way by one 54 California Cattleman July • August 2019

of their programs. San Luis Obispo County is a diverse one, from premier vineyards and wine tasting to the beach, it isn’t the same exclusively farming community that it once was. Recognizing their unique position to influence consumers, SLOCC has capitalized on that outreach opportunity. Under fair board member Jo Ann Switzer’s suggestion and with support from fair board member and long-time SLOCC member Dick Nock, Cattlemen and Farmer’s Day at the Fair began in 1987. It has since grown to be one of the biggest ag days in California, bringing BBQs, local working cow dog and ranch horse classes, an industrial arts auction, tri tip sandwich lunch, Cattlemen, Cattlewomen and Agriculturist of the Year awards and other events to exhibit ranch and farm life to both those involved in it, ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 56

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY CATTLMEN’S MOTTO

The San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association works to ensure a more favorable business environment for the cattle producers of the county and the beef cattle industry. This goal is accomplished by cattle producers working in collaboration with the Board to influence regulatory, legislative, judicial and other local initiatives to allow them to conduct their business in a manner free of unnecessary and burdensome restrictions and expenses. The San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association also works to enhance public image and perception of the beef cattle industry and improve consumer demand for beef.


You can have it ALL at McPhee Red Angus!

ALL the calving ease you will need! ALL the growth you will need! ALL the carcass quality needed for added premiums! ALL born and bred on one family ranch! but best of ALL , in one package! The McPhee family program is passionate about raising Red Angus cattle with a vision of profitability to our commercial bull customers’ needs. For over 48 years we have been dedicated in producing cattle for the real world cattleman. McPhee Red Angus cattle have generations of bred-in ability for calving ease, feed-efficiency, growth, maternal excellence, docility, and leading carcass quality. We encourage you to buy with confidence; we stand behind every animal we sell.

M C P HEE T ROPHY 36 REG #1597069

This set of bulls averaged just 79lbs at birth and a whopping 794lbs at weaning off the cow! Two dominate standout bulls that will be leading off the sale this year. Both bulls

B ULL AND F EMALE S ALE S EPTEMBER 2 8 , 2 0 1 9 • F EMALE S

have plenty of shape, style and muscle with the data to back it up!

Royces Iron Man 86 reg #4037498 HB GM CED BW WW YW ADG DMI

10: 30 A M • L UNC H AT N OO N • • B ULLS SEL L AT 1: 00 PM •

SE LL AT

S ELLING

• Bu lls • Sp ri n g and Fall Year lings

+192 +54 +11 -1.8 +71 +124 +.33 +.99

Milk HPG CEM STAY Marb YG CW REA

+25 +12 +7 +16 +.57 +.18 +24 +.05

Royces Trophy Too 88 reg #4037508 HB GM CED BW WW YW ADG DMI

• Females • Op en Year ling Heifer s

** Full brother to McPhee Trophy 36, the breedleading performance sire!

+214 Milk +28 HPG +13 +51 CEM +5 +11 STAY +21 -1.7 Marb +.78 +63 YG +.16 +105 CW +31 +.26 +1.43 REA +.13 To p 2 5 % o r b e t t e r i n t h e b r e e d .

Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95240 Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 info@mcpheeredangus.com

A s g o o d a s t h e b e s t , b e t t e rJulyt h• August a n t 2019 h e rCalifornia est! Cattleman

55


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 and the public at large. In addition to the fair, outreach to consumers (and future consumers) is achieved through the yearly Paso Robles Ag Business tour, SLOCC’s deep involvement in the Ag in the Classroom outreach program and even through local media! “Recently I got involved with talking about sustainability, not because I wanted to, but because we had to defend ourselves in a newspaper article where we were getting the blame for greenhouse gas emissions. From this point forward, it has been critical that we do more to educate the public. We have received great feedback from the outreach we have provided so far, we just need to keep doing it,” said SLOCC President, Anthony Stornetta. “It is amazing what people don’t know about our industry, once it is explained to them, they realize that we are good stewards of the land and we want to produce the safest, most nutritious product for consumption” And while their public outreach is clearly important, it’s their service to the local beef community itself that sets them apart. The Midstate Fair is one of the big events every year for SLOCC. In 1974, with help from the association, the Replacement Heifer Show and Sale for 4-H and FFA members was formed. Beginning as members bringing home raised and local heifers from their herds to the sale, it has turned into a major event where producers go to pick up quality replacements for their operations. This year alone over 100 heifers were entered in the project. Just three years ago, SLOCC expanded their involvement of the fair even more. Under the direction of past president Claude Loftus, an award was introduced labeled the SLO County Cattlemen’s Choice Replacement Heifer Award. Recognizing the differences often present between show cattle and those meant for commercial production, the contest is judged by commercial cattlemen and awards animals they would want as replacements for their own herds and the explanations as to why. The fair isn’t the only place SLOCC supports youth though. Much of SLOCC’s focus is all about the next generation. From the beginning the organization has heavily supported Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, encouraging agriculture students to attend monthly meetings by sponsoring their dinners. SLOCC is also involved in the annual Cal Poly Bull Test and Sale, barbecuing for the fundraiser the night before the sale as well as the day of event. 4-H and FFA students also benefit from their generosity with yearly sponsorships for the travel costs associated with national competitions. So, with all the focus on the future, what is in store for the next 75 years of SLOCC? When asked about the future of the San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association, Jo Ann Switzer’s thoughts turned to those next in line. “I guess we’ll just keep plugging along and keep the wolves away from the door and that’s a full-time job. But really, it’s to the next generation, it’s their turn to take over.” And if the amount SLOCC has invested in both the programs of the days of old and the ones for the next generation is any indication, they’ll do a pretty fine job of it! Congratulations SLOCC on 75 years of beef industry excellence! 56 California Cattleman July • August 2019

San Luis Obispo Cattlemen’s “Brand the Bar” Membership Drive helps make them one of the largest CCA affiliate local associations in the state.

Longtime association directors Dick Nock and Aaron Lazanoff.

JoAnn Switzer, long time director, treasurer and secretary of the with member Jessica Arnold.

CELESTE SETTRINI PHOTOS

Ryan Pascoe and Misty Tartaglia at the annual Cattlemen’s Playday.


bull sale

Monday

OctOber 7

SonS of TheSe Top SireS Sell 10-7 1 p.m. at the ranch FOrt Klamath, Or

100 Long-YearLings

angus, simangus & Herefords BuLLs seLL: • Semen, Trich and HD50K-Tested • Genomic Enhanced EPDs • Complete Herd Health Program • Wintering Available

HA cOwbOy up 5405

Sire: HA Outside 3008 Dam’s Sire: Sitz Upward 307R BW +2.5 • WW +75 • YW +136 • MILK +9 MARB +.23 • RE +.51 • $W +49 • $B +132

pVF InSIgHt 0129

Sire: S A V Brilliance 8077 Dam’s Sire: P V F New Horizon 001 BW +2.0 • WW +62 • YW +108 • MILK +24 MARB +.18 • RE +1.45 • $W +67 • $B +150

Also selling FAncy, commerciAl Angus FemAles – spring Bred Heifers & 1st calf Heifer Pairs sell following the Bulls

your DoLLAr MATTErS

2018 Angus, Hereford & SimAngus Sale Bulls: 59% Sold for Less Than $5,000 Each

37.2% $5,000$6,499

cHurcHILL SenSAtIOn 028X

Sire: UPS Domino 3027 Dam’s Sire: GH Rambo 279R BW -2.6 • WW +49 • YW +68 • MILK +49 • M&G +73 RE +.51 • MARB +.34 • $BMI +392 • $CHB +107

cHurcHILL rAncHer 592r

42.3%

$3,750 -$4,999

3.8%

$6,500+ Sire: MH Dakota 0230 Dam’s Sire: HH Advance 767G 1ET BW +4.7 • WW +59 • YW +98 • MILK +27 • M&G +56 RE +.32 • MARB +.27 • $BMI +242 • $CHB +111

16.7%

$2,750 -$3,749

REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS

BrAD & BuCKLEy Cox EAGLE PoinT, orEGon

w/c LOADeD up 1119y

Sire: Remington Lok N Load54U Dam’s Sire: 3C Macho M450 BZ BW +1.4 • WW +61 • YW +88 • MILK +24 MARB -.08 • RE +1.05 • API +128 • TI +64

www.traynhamranch.com info@traynhamranch.com 541-840-5797 Brad 541-840-8788 Buckley

Female Sale Sun., OctOber 6, 2019

Angus, Herefords, Simmentals & Composites • Fort Klamath, OR • 2 p.m. • LiveAuctions.tv

ForT roCK, orEGon www.huffordsherefords.com Ken & Leslie Hufford 541-576-2431 541-403-1044 Cell ijhufford@yahoo.com Jesse: 541-576-3541 541-810-2460 Cell

FOllOw us On FacebOOK

THD ©

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 57


NICHE OR NOT HOW SPECIALIZED PRODUCTION BENEFITS SOME CALIFORNIA RANCHERS by Devin Griffith for the California Cattleman

Picture this: A parent walks through the aisles of their local grocery store, preparing to feed a family. The parent mindlessly bags a parcel of broccoli, reaches for a sack of red potatoes and then heads to the meat and fish section to finish off the trip and complete the meal. For a few minutes, the parent mulls over the many options of beef the meat case offers and after a while starts considering, “Why are there so many different options when it comes to the same cut of beef ?” It is clear there are a variety of selections of beef in our supermarkets. But what do most consumers buy when it comes to beef ? Typically, what’s selected in the store is “conventional” or “grain-fed.” Conventional cattle are fed a balanced diet, including different forages and grain to assure growth, development and marbling. However, certain production methods of beef are tailored to the different wants of customers. These products are labeled for consumers to quickly identify the type of beef they want when they arrive at their grocery store. Examples of these labels and production types are organic, grass-fed, and locally-grown, to name a few. These types of specific production methods and branding programs are known as “niches” or niche markets, concentrating all marketing efforts of a product on a small, but specific and well-defined segment of the population. But why would a consumer spend more than a split second deciding between protein options, especially for one protein, such as beef ? What is the difference between how one rancher raises his cattle and how another might? When it comes to buying food, in today’s day and age, Americans are taking an interest in four main categories; politics, environment, social and health. According to a Ranch TV report, these four factors combine unconsciously in a consumer’s mind to help them select a meal of choice 58 California Cattleman July • August 2019

for their family. But this isn’t just one parent in a local suburb. According to the online publication The Conversation, in an article titled “Americans are confused about food and unsure where to turn for answers,” half of American shoppers say they are more concerned about food quality and safety than they were five years ago, leading them to select food options they believe to be safer and healthier. Cattle ranchers, however, have been working tirelessly for decades to guarantee high-quality beef. Celeste Settrini and the Settrini Ranch are just one example. Settrini and her brother operate the Settrini Ranch in Salinas, where they run commercial Red Angus cattle. While their operation has been running for 105 years, about 25 years ago they made the switch to specialize in Red Angus cattle. The Settrini Ranch uses a value-added program by also marketing cattle as natural, no antibiotic, and no hormones added. Typically, they sell their cattle through Western Video Market, an outlet many ranchers in the West utilize and make it a priority to check in with customers once or twice, asking how they can improve the quality of the cattle, ensuring that they are satisfied. While the Settrini Ranch sells their cattle to cattle buyers, other operations have different approaches when it comes to selling. For instance, Hearst Ranch’s approach to selling their beef is direct to storefronts such as Whole Foods. Ben Higgins, director of agricultural operations for Hearst Corporation, says Hearst Ranch, based in San Simeon, on the Central Coast, focuses on highlighting their specialty products to match customers’ wants. In Hearst Ranch’s case, it’s their grass-fed-to-finished Hearst Ranch Beef. With a total of 156,000 acres between their San Simeon and Jack Ranch properties, their operation runs approximately 1,400 cows, and Hearst Ranch Beef can be


found in 43 Southern California locations as well in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara venues. Cattle spend their entire lives on the Hearst Ranch operations, focusing on their 100 percent grass-fed, hormone and antibiotic-free practices, Higgins says. “Ranches are still wild places, and cattle here live their natural lives,” Higgins explains. “This isn’t an intensive cattle production environment.” Another core value of Hearst Ranch Beef is maintaining humane handling towards their cattle, showcased by their third party certification. “It’s important to understand why or why not consumers purchase Hearst Ranch Beef,” Higgins says. “We want to know what consumers want in the meat retail case.” How does Hearst Ranch know what consumers look for in their meat retail case? By effectively staying in communication with Whole Foods as well as their customers. Hearst Ranch not only provides a niche product that consumers are searching for, but they also stay tapped into the ever-changing demands their customers are asking for. Another way to stay in tune with what consumers are asking for is to sell to them directly. This ensures that producers are in the “know” when it comes to their customers’ demands. Five Marys Farm has honed in on this strategy, allowing their operation to succeed in a different way than most. Five Marys Farms is owned and operated by Brian and Mary Heffernan, alongside their daughters. When they purchased their ranch in 2013, the Heffernan family prepared for their new adventure and packed up their bags to move from the Silicon Valley to the far northern reaches of the state in Fort Jones. Five Marys Farms raises a variety of livestock, from swine and lambs to cattle. Along with their ranch, the

“Customers are looking for three things: The story, a really good quality product, and a product that can get to them easily.”

— Brian Heffernan Five Marys Farms

Heffernan family also operates Camp Five Marys Farm, as well as M5 Burgerhouse Bar and Grill. But amongst all, what is niche about Five Marys Farm is they sell directly to consumers, and when they say directly, they mean it. Ranging from tri-tips to filet mignons and what they have entitled, “Cow Shares” that offer a multitude of cuts of beef, Five Marys Farm provides a variety of products to customers. These products are raised, slaughtered and shipped weekly, directly out of Fort Jones, allowing the ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 60

Steve Hearst proudly displays product from Brian and Mary Heffernan have come to learn that an integral part of marketing their Heart Ranch. product to consumers is telling their story of livestock production and why their family does what they do. July • August 2019 California Cattleman 59


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 59

beef and conventional beef rely on each other to defend and educate consumers about the overarching beef industry. Higgins, Settrini and Heffernan have proven that whatever route ranchers pursue, the belief that communication between their operations and consumers is imperative to not only build trust between their customers but to also improve the quality of their cattle as well. “We’re all beef.” Settrini elaborates. “It’s important to share our story, not just for Settrini Ranches, but on behalf of our fellow ranchers, as well.”

Heffernan family to handle their livestock at all phases. “Customers are looking for three things,” Brian Heffernan, the patriarch of the family and co-owner of Five Marys Farm, says, “The story, a really good quality product, and a product that can get to them easily.” It’s these qualities that Five Marys Farm focuses on through their vertical integration. It also presents them with the opportunity to share their story with their consumers from start to finish. Using social media is one way they reach their customers and tell their story, allowing customers to observe the life cycle of their livestock. Their Instagram platform reaches 104,000 followers daily, giving Five Marys Farm the ability to shed light on what truly goes about on a ranching operation to thousands. “We have the opportunity to help consumers know the challenges ranchers face.” Heffernan describes. “It’s an opportunity to share the story of what ranchers do.” Aaron Tattersall Jim Vann Three operations, three 303.854.7016 530.218.3379 aaron.tattersall@cropins.net jimv@wsrins.com different, and valued ways to Lic #0H15694 Lic #0B48084 conduct business. Which way is right? An answer that seems simple enough; there is no right and wrong. California’s ranching families are looking for ways to feed Americans healthy, tasty and affordable protein, while also Matt Griffith Dan VanVuren 530.570.3333 209.484.5578 trying to feed their own families matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com dan@dvvins.com Lic #0124869 as well. Leading to the fact that Lic #0E44519 ranchers are asked to shift and When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), grow with their consumers to there’s no one better! stay relevant in this day and age. Whether that be through specialty markets or traditional conventional means, that is only up to ranchers and cattle producers to decide. No matter which route ranchers choose, it is evident that both niche marketed 60 California Cattleman July • August 2019

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WEATHER WOES AVOIDING WEATHER-RELATED MINERAL DEFICIENCIES ALL YEAR ROUND by Gilda V. Bryant for Multimin, USA

In 2019, severe spring weather included blizzards, floods and twisters that created serious management concerns for beef producers. Cattle reduced their mineral consumption because free choice minerals likely washed away, lost effectiveness due to leaching or were not provided consistently. Some producers concentrated only on moving animals to higher ground. Weather caused delays in working cattle, further disrupting supplementation and vaccination schedules. Operators also faced the challenges of locating quality, carryover hay supplies. Some provided old hay bales that had lost nutrients to UV light and inclement weather. Harsh environmental conditions potentially stress cattle, causing them to deplete essential trace minerals. Severe weather events such as these created a weather-induced mineral crisis. Roberto A. Palomares, DVM, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the University of Georgia, and Director of Group for Reproduction in Animals, Vaccinology and Infectious Diseases (GRAVID), has studied the effects of injectable trace minerals (ITMs) on cattle immunity for five years. ITMs include copper, zinc, selenium, and manganese. In a recent trial, Palomares immunized 48 one-month old dairy calves with an intranasal modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine. Half of the animals received Multimin®90 ITMs, while the remaining half received saline solution. Sixty days later, calves were assigned to four groups of 12 calves each: • One set received intranasal MLV vaccine and another dose of ITM, • One set received subcutaneous (subq) MLV vaccine and ITM, • One set received intranasal vaccine and saline solution, and • One set, subq vaccine and saline. Twelve calves served as a control group, receiving neither vaccines nor ITMs. “After 49 days, we challenged them with Bovine 64 California Cattleman July • August 2019

Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Virus (IBR),” Palomares recalls. “Finally, we placed an endoscope into the upper respiratory tract to determine disease protection by determining the levels of inflammation and tissue damage.” Since endoscopes are not routinely used in cattle, Palomares created a scoring system reflecting symptoms in sinus and nasal cavities, the nature of excretions, and the appearance of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi. The control group, also challenged with BVDV and IBR, displayed significant inflammation, respiratory tract ulceration, and soft tissue nodules. BVDV commonly suppresses immunity, allowing highly infectious bacteria, such as Pasteurella multocida or Mycoplasma bovis to cause secondary infections. “The two groups receiving vaccines plus ITMs had significantly lower endoscopic respiratory clinical scores,” Palomares reveals. “Although those receiving vaccine only were protected from infection compared to unprotected animals. Animals receiving ITMs with vaccine had the highest positive statistical difference, suggesting that ITMs decreased inflammation and tissue damage caused by BVDV and IBR.” Stress from inclement weather, weaning, shipping, or vaccinations may result in excessive oxidant or free radical production. These compounds damage cell DNA, nuclei, and cell membranes. Both leukocytes (white blood cells) and neutrophils (specialized white blood cells) fight infection and are especially susceptible to oxidant damage. Trace minerals, particularly copper, selenium and zinc, boost enzymes that neutralize free radicals. Zinc is also crucial for the growth of cells involved in DNA replication, such as white blood cells. Selenium also moves neutrophils to infection sites. Manganese converts cholesterol to estrogen and testosterone, which is necessary ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 66


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 64 for reproduction. Trace minerals also have specific cell functions that optimize immune systems after vaccination. One injection of Multimin®90 reduces deficiencies within one to eight hours, providing immediate benefits. “Provide injections of Multimin®90 at critical times, such as weaning and vaccinations,” Palomares concludes. “Identify those procedures in your operation when stress will be higher. Using ITMs at those times is a good option.” L.D. Barker, DVM, has a large animal practice in Newcastle, Oklahoma. He says trace minerals promote immunity levels, maintain animal health, and production performance. “We’ve seen an increase in disease during harsh weather; trace mineral deficiencies are occurring earlier in these animals,” Barker reports. “We encourage producers to vaccinate at three months instead of four months and to use ITMs each time. This protects animals from marginal and severe deficiencies, and producers readily get their animals on the same page. If animals are trace mineral deficient, operators cannot maximize the return on their investment.” Barker believes the failure of many vaccination programs is due to inadequate trace minerals. Animals cannot eat trace minerals fast enough to help the immune system respond effectively to the protective components in the vaccine. The Texas Panhandle, home to five million feedyard cattle, regularly receives shipments of stressed stockers. John Richeson, Ph.D., Feedyard Researcher at West Texas A&M University, says ITMs such as Multimin®90 given to stocker and feedyard calves concurrently with modifiedlive virus respiratory vaccines generate greater antibody responses to the antigens in the vaccine. “Whether health and performance are improved depends on the trace mineral status of individual animals and therefore the population,” Richeson explains. “Some research shows improved production outcomes when giving Multimin®90 at initial stocker or feedlot processing or within 30 to 45 days of initial processing. ITMs stimulate cattle immune systems because trace minerals like zinc and copper are critical for several components of the immune response. “ 66 California Cattleman July • August 2019

Once in the feedlot, animals receive balanced diets with trace minerals included in the feed supplement, but that may not help trace mineral deficient calves catch up. Restoring trace minerals solely through the diet is difficult because newly received feedyard animals display low and erratic consumption. It takes longer to restore trace mineral levels solely through dietary means versus adding ITMs. As a result, trace mineral deficient animals cannot reach their full potential for health and performance. Richeson advises feedyard managers to prepare their staff members to receive weather-stressed cattle. “Don’t overwhelm your system if you plan to receive many of these cattle in the fall. Injecting Multimin®90 if they’re nutritionally stressed and deficient in trace minerals at initial processing can be helpful.” Producers can avoid a weather-induced mineral crisis in their herds when they manage stress, provide good feedstuffs, and make sure a complete mineral is available at all times. By giving ITMs concurrently with vaccination and booster shots, producers can ensure improved immunity and performance. For more information, contact your veterinarian or visit www.multiminusa.com.


July • August 2019 California Cattleman 67


RANGELAND TRUST TALK A VOICE FOR GRAZING

TIM KOOPMANN’S LONGTIME LOVE OF CONSRVATION by Mary Bondar for the California Rangeland Trust From Tim Koopmann’s ranch in Alameda County, he has watched the city grow. A shadow encroaching on the green hills, urban expansion has scratched at his horizon as long as he can remember. His small stretch of land is 50 miles from San Francisco, between Livermore and Fremont, right smack in the middle of one of the state’s most rapidlydeveloping regions. He’s been fighting for these open spaces all his life, battling pressure from developers, declining cattle prices, drought, enormous tax penalties triggered by the deaths of his father and grandfather, and negative public opinions against grazing. Modern Ranching Predicaments

“Most ranchers don’t want to make themselves a public figure,” he says. “They don’t want to talk, they just want to get their work done and have people leave them alone. I ended up kind of breaking the mold because I feel so strongly about the value of grazing.” Tim graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno and worked as an agriculture and industrial arts teacher in the small reservation town of McDermitt on the Oregon border. As his father’s health declined, he looked for a job closer to home. After three years as an agriculture teacher at Arroyo Grande High School in San Luis Obispo County, followed by 10 years as an ag lender with the Farm Credit system, he was offered the role of Rangeland Resource Manager by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). Around this time, a shift in public opinion challenged the time-honored practice of grazing the 40,000-acre watershed Tim was hired to manage. “The most important thing we did was field trips,” Tim recalls. “We took people out and showed them what we were doing. Groups like the Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club in San Francisco were against grazing and fearful it would contaminate water sources and cause illness in their communities. Through scientific programs we put together, we brought the facts to the table and were able to show them that grazing was safe. They ended up signing on in support.” Without this work, California could look very different today. “Los Angeles Power & Water has hundreds of thousands of acres leased out for grazing. If we had removed grazing from our watershed, it would have had a domino effect on every other major water purveyor in California.” Tim reflects on those 25 years at SFPUC. “I’m proud of the work we did there,” he says. “We had a large number of endangered species throughout the watershed and we took pride in trying to take care of them just as we took care of the land and our grazing tenants.” But there was little time to enjoy the victory. In 1991, the Koopmann ranch faced a new threat following the unexpected death of Tim’s father. In the midst of their 68 California Cattleman July • August 2019

Tim Koopmann roping on his ranch in Sunol.

The Koopmann Ranch provides habit for endangered species like the California tiger salamander.

grief, the family was forced to reckon with a sudden tax bill of $750,000. “I was working for wages and had two kids. My parents had $75,000 in the bank and that was pretty well eroded by the state of California and a down payment to the IRS.” The Koopmann Ranch provides habit for endangered species like the California tiger salamander. Creating a Conservation Solution By and For Ranchers

The family explored every possible avenue to save the ranch, from cell towers to selling off parcels. In the end, they realized the answer had been on the ranch the whole time. Tim spotted a small breeding pond where the endangered California tiger salamander thrived. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 70


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ALSO SELLING SONS OF: SS Niagara LD Emblazon 999 Tex Playbook MAR Innovation Coleman Charlo 3212 SAV Resource 1441

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140

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AARON AND REBECCA BORROR

www.9peaksranch.com July • August 2019 California Cattleman 69


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 68 “Those little short-legged critters are the most lucrative livestock we ever raised,” he chuckles. In total, three mitigation easements held by California Rangeland Trust were purchased by developers and placed on the ranch. Finalized between 2003 and 2015, these easements offset Bay Area development in Pleasanton and San Jose and protected the habitats of two sensitive species—the California tiger salamander and the callippe silverspot butterfly. Funds from these easements saved the Koopmann family ranch. “The Rangeland Trust started off thinking they could help a few ranchers; now they’re at over 330,000 acres plus an active project list,” Tim says. To him, the help from the Rangeland Trust proved that people do care about the work ranchers are doing. “I can’t say enough good things about the California Rangeland Trust.” Tim’s background in range science enabled him to show government agencies that the management practices used on the ranch for decades, which had allowed these species to thrive, should go on uninterrupted. With the Rangeland Trust monitoring the easements, the Koopmanns have been able to manage the ranch as before. Tim Koopmann shares his passion about the importance of cattle grazing with visitors on his ranch. Leading the Way to a Greener Future for California

Tim is a naturalist who hears every heartbeat on his land. When the city of Pleasanton opened a golf course near his land, he noticed some interesting differences between his side of the fence and the 61-acre “wild lands” section of the golf course. “I brought the golf club managers out to see it,” he

recalls. “On my side of the fence, there were a variety of wildflower species. On their side were just the skeletal remains of weeds and black thatch. What was missing? Management.” Now, Koopmann cattle graze that part of the Pleasanton golf course. Tim loves explaining how grazing is necessary for the habitats of ground-nesting birds, tiger salamanders, and native wildflowers. For each of the last 15 years, he has hosted the range science class from UC Berkeley on his land. This year they’ll also be hosting students from CSU Chico. He helped found the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition, where organizations with widely divergent beliefs and interests come together with a common goal of conserving the state’s open spaces. “Anytime we can show them, we’ll do it, because we’ve got to have good outreach,” Tim says. Over the last 20 years, he has seen tremendous headway in public understanding of the need for vegetation management. “The best way for anyone to manage land is through grazing. We’ve got the scientific community and even former anti-grazing organizations who now support us tremendously.” In an era of endless commentary and debate, ranchers have largely remained silent figures who walk the walk, quietly protecting the public resources we all require: Fresh water, healthy protein, clean air, rich soil, wildflowers, wild animals. They are America’s silent stewards, ensuring a more resilient climate by offsetting development. Ranching has always been a tough job; one that requires adaptation. For Tim Koopmann, he had to adapt to speaking publicly about the value of grazing and land management in order to save the land in his care. The state of California is better and safer because he did. Tim Koopmann is passionate about educating the next generation of ranchers and agriculturalists.

The Koopmann Ranch provides habit for endangered species like the California tiger salamander.

70 California Cattleman July • August 2019


180 Bulls | Volume DIscounts | Free Delivery Wilks Ranches sale facility | 809 Co Rd 313 Eastland, TX 76448 Aaron kiser | seed stock Manager | aaron.kiser@wilksranch.com Joel judge | commercial sales contact | 805-234-7191 FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM @wilksranches FORM | FUNCTION | BALANCE

10.17.19

WWW.WILKSRANCHES.COM July • August 2019 California Cattleman 71


BULL BUYING BREAKDOWN

A GUIDE TO BUYING BULLS THIS FALL by Travis Meteer, University of Illinois, Beef Extension Educator Are you sifting through stacks of bull sale catalogs looking for your next bull? While bull selection can be a daunting task, your choice will impact your herd for years to come. Thus, taking some time to think about what you need from your next herd sire is important. Here are some points to emphasize when it comes to bull selection. Know your market. Understand what traits are valueadded traits for your market. One of the best parts about the cattle industry is the different ways producers achieve their goals. While selling calves at weaning into the commodity market is the majority, some cattlemen are marketing in very creative ways. Local freezer beef, retained ownership, alliances, branded beef programs, video sales, or fitting the production environment to a consumer demanded practice are all ways farmers are adding value to their calves. Your bull selection should be based on traits that are profitable in your market. Don’t sacrifice functional traits or adaptability to your production environment. It is really easy to get caught up in the data, but remember these critters need to be sound and function in the pasture. Good feet and legs, a strong libido, and docility are all imperative. Masculinity, big testicles, and a tight sheath are good phenotypic indicators of the right

kind. Buying bulls that are raised in similar conditions to your farm is preferred. You can buy someone else’s genetics, but you can’t buy their management. Require a passed BSE (Breeding Soundness Exam) and farm herd health protocols. I also suggest a quarantine period for new purchases. A minimum of two weeks will allow time for potential pathagens to break without exposing your herd. Lots of times cattle coming from a sale have experienced elevated stress. It is important to keep them on good feed, in a clean pen, and allow the quarantine period to run its course. Identify and understand Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) and phenotypes that signify value added traits you are seeking. Calving ease (CE) is an important and valuable trait. Sometimes when talking to producers I hear them stressing CE and birth weight (BW). BW is an indicator trait for CE, but you don’t get paid for light birth weight calves. You get paid by not having to invest time and labor in pulling calves. So, avoid putting too much downward pressure on BW, especially if the bull will breed cows. Another mistake I see is purchasing low BW bulls for cows. This is not necessary. Many times you can purchase a bull with average or better calving ease for cows at a discount to “heifer bulls” with comparable growth. Smooth, flat shouldered bulls with decent CE EPDs are good value bulls for breeding mature cows. If you sell your calves at weaning through the salebarn and keep your own replacements, traits of priority should be CE, heifer pregnancy, stayability, and weaning weight. Selecting for more yearling weight, too much milk or too little milk, or cacarss traits are much less important in this scenerio. If you retain ownership in you cattle through the feedlot and market to the packer, then yearling weight and carcass traits become more relevant to your bottom line. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 74

72 California Cattleman July • August 2019


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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 73


....CONTINUED FROM PAGE 72 Your ultimate goal should be to produce the most profitable product, thus seek traits that add value without increasing cost of production over the value of the trait. Utilize appropriate multiple trait selection indexes. Find the sweet spot/profitable window in milk, YW, and carcass EPDs. Avoid putting too much emphasis on one trait. Nearly all breeds now have dollar index values that help put economics to trait selection. These can be extremely effective tools if the index scenario matches your operation. Weaned Calf Value ($W) is a dollar value used by the Angus breed. It is an index that is designed for cattlemen that primarily sell calves at weaning. This index also assumes that replacement heifers are retained. EPDs for birth weight, weaning weight, milk, and mature cow size are focused on. Lower birth weights, heavier weaning weights, and lower mature cow size are desirable. Milk production is weighted both positively and negatively as it directly impacts calf weaning weights, but also increases cow maintenance requirements. A more detailed description of economic selection indexes is available on my blog Don’t be fooled by index names. Beef Value ($B) is a terminal index. It is a great tool for cattlemen that are not keeping replacements. This index will increase profitability of cattle in the feedlot and on the grid. Unfortunately, I have heard $B referred to as a comprehensive EPD several times which it is not. It is vital to understand that $B is a terminal index. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. The breeder or an extension specialist will be able to help explain the numbers. Demand higher accuracy for traits. Technologies are available for seedstock producers to increase the accuracy of EPDs on yearling bulls. Genomic-enhanced EPDs result in less risk, less change and more predictability in how a yearling bull will sire. A bull buyer can feel more confident now than ever in EPDs when they are backed by genomic testing. Heterosis. Crossbreeding systems are hard to deploy and maintain in small herds. However, leaving hybrid vigor on the table in a commercial herd is a big loss. Otherwise lowly heritable traits like reproduction, health, and cow longevity are best improved by crossbreeding. Crossbred cows and maternal heterosis is a key to profitability on commercial cow/calf operations. Studies have shown net profit per cow is increased by $75/cow/year as a result of maternal heterosis. 74 California Cattleman July • August 2019

Buy the right size, type, and demand quality. I would compare this to buying a car or truck. If you have little money for gas (feed), then don’t buy a gas (feed) guzzler. Buy a bull that fits your cow herd. Your cows will tell you the right size and milk production for your management. If they come up open… they are not the right size. Now, you also want a bull that is the right type. You don’t buy a fancy sports car for a work vehicle do you? So why buy a fancy, sexy bull to produce working kind cattle? To me there is a difference in fancy and quality. I suggest you demand quality. Select a product that will last and hold value. Look for signs that the breeder stands behind their product. That is a good sign of quality. Seek value when buying a bull. The lowest priced bull is seldom the best valued. If you find a bull that has the traits you are looking for…buy him. Set a budget, but understand it is often hard to find everything you are looking for. Bulls with the traits you are seeking can add value to your cattle in a hurry. They can add far more value than a cow. The bull you buy this year will impact your herd for the next 5 years with his calves, but his daughters will impact your herd for the next 20 years. Make a good investment. Buy a bull that adds value to your calves and your cowherd.

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman LambertRanchHerefords.com

75


BEEF, DAIRY COLLABORATION LAUNCHES HOLSIMTM PROGRAM

The American Simmental Association (ASA) and Holstein Association USA (HAUSA) have announced the formation of the HOLSimTM branded program. The program identifies elite SimAngusTM bulls with specific production attributes as mating solutions for dairy producers who breed some of their herd to beef. The program’s objective is threefold: to provide additional revenue to dairy producers through the production of value-added terminal calves; to offer new marketing avenues for progressive beef seedstock operations; and to offer a consistent supply of high-quality calves better situated to capture market premiums. “Holstein producers now have the opportunity to easily participate by simply selecting from the list of HOLSim bulls carried by their semen provider,” says Chip Kemp, ASA Director of Commercial and Industry Operations. “Through the International Genetic Solutions platform, we took a breed agnostic look at what type of beef bulls make the most sense to complement a Holstein female to add the most profitability to the terminal calf.” Qualifying for the sire list is not easy, and bulls that do so represent an elite group of beef genetics. All bulls in the program will be required to include the HOLSim logo in all marketing and promotional material. “The bulls must be homozygous black, homozygous polled, have a minimum birth weight accuracy of .4, and meet a minimum threshold in the HOLSim Index,” Kemp explains. The HOLSim Index uses the IGS Feeder Profit CalculatorTM (FPC), the industry leader in feeder cattle evaluation, as the foundation for this effort. The results from the FPC are then adjusted for the unique economic situations relevant to Holstein cattle, namely, the need for added calving ease, muscle conformation, grading ability and sensitivity to carcass length. John Meyer, CEO of Holstein Association USA, says the HOLSim program has the potential to change the beef-on-dairy dynamic. “Instead of just breeding Holsteins to a black beef bull, now dairy farmers can breed to a SimAngus bull that ranks high on the HOLSim index. By doing that, they can raise more profitable offspring coveted by both the feedlot and the consumer,” Meyer says. The program is underpinned by HAUSA’s industryleading animal identification program, something that will add increasing value in the marketplace as consumers require more information about where their food comes from. Because dairy operations calve year-round, a continuous and steady supply of highquality beef will be available to distributors, retailers and 76 California Cattleman July • August 2019

restaurateurs that have struggled historically with seasonal fluctuations of supplies. To qualify for the program, all animals must have a Registered Holstein® dam, and be bred to SimAngus bulls identified through the IGS Feeder Profit Calculator. The HOLSim program is the first of its kind and offers dairy farmers a unique opportunity to build new profit centers. “To my knowledge, this is the first time that a beef and a dairy breed association have collaborated to have a specific program to benefit both organizations and their respective members and industries,” Meyer says. Those wanting to learn more can visit simmental.org or holsteinusa.com, or contact Darin Johnson at 802.451.4048, djohnson@holstein.com. Founded in 1968, the American Simmental Association is headquartered in Bozeman, MT. ASA is committed to leveraging technology, education, and collaboration to accelerate genetic profitability for the beef industry. In keeping with its commitment, ASA, along with its partners, formed International Genetic Solutions — the world’s largest genetic evaluation of beef cattle. Learn more at www. simmental.org.

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 77


CHIMES CALIFORNIA CATTLEWOMEN HOST REGIONAL ANCW MEETING by CCW First Vice President Callie Borror media. There is currently a lack of The California CattleWomen presence of producers, so it makes met for their midyear meetings on consumers more likely to see a Tuesday, June 18 and Wednesday, June 19. Tuesday afternoon was a full negative post about agriculture than afternoon of workshops speakers and a positive post. The users want to see what producers are doing and two of the four on the State Beef Ambassador team gave presentations. like to put a face and contact to their food. This then turns into an Wyatt Wolfe the Central Senior Beef avenue for the consumers to learn Ambassador spoke on “Fake News: and ask questions about the industry. The Effects on The Beef Industry.” It is best to share a picture followed Wyatt started off his presentation by a description behind the picture. with an explanation of fake news, Following Miranda’s presentation which according to Cambridge on Instagram, the ladies had the University is, “false stories that opportunity to hear from Mary appear to be news, spread on the Heffernan of Five Mary’s. Mary internet or using othermedia, usually created to influence political views or started off her presentation stating that she was taken aback by the as a joke.” It was related to the beef invitation when asked to speak at industry as it then came be anything that claims to animal cruelty, overuse our meeting. Mary and her husband Bryan made the choice five years ago of antibiotics, to cattle are the main to make a lifestyle change moving causes of climate change. Wyatt from the Silicon Valley to Fort also addressed how does it affect Jones. Prior to leaving the Silicon you? The main impact fake news Valley, they had opened up small has on the beef industry is affecting how the consumer perceives the beef brick and mortar restaurants. Mary shared how before the moved to industry. If consumers perceive the the ranch they spent a great amount industry in a negative light, they may of time sourcing really good quality decide not to purchase beef which ingredients for their menu. They will then affect everyone’s bottom wanted to make sure that they did the line. Wyatt highlighted that the best research with their chefs so that they thing that we can do is to tell your story and the truth. It needs to be the knew exactly what they wanted for their customers. They wanted three message out there to the consumer, things: 1) We want superior quality with an underlying message of truth beef with a great story behind it. 2) including that no matter what cut of We wanted a grass-fed lifestyle with a beef you choose, that beef is safe, barley finish and a 28-day dry-age. 3) wholesome, nutritious and delicious. We wanted to know the animals were The Northern Senior Beef raised right and harvested humanely. Ambassador Miranda Iverson, spoke After doing lots of research, and they on “Bridging the Gap between couldn’t find anyone who could do Producers and Consumers: Using this on a large scale, they made the Instagram.” Miranda started off choice to do it themselves. her presentation with a definition Bryan and Mary moved to the of Instagram. Miranda went over Sharps Gulch Ranch in 2013 with why we should use Instagram, as it their four daughters and every is the younger generations that are always on social media. This is where daughter helps out on the ranch today. Both of them had dreamed of many of the users get their news, moving to the country to ranch and information, and facts on social 78 California Cattleman July • August 2019

raise their girls. The first step that Bryan and Mary went through was to buy cattle to start their own herd. They purchased from various cattle herds including: Herb Holzapel, Tehama Angus Ranch and others. Mary shared that they started selling the meat and personally delivering to their customers in a “farm stand” atmosphere. The farm stand served as a starting point for selling their meat as they quickly learned that they couldn’t be on the road all the time, and they preferred to be at home on the ranch. Mary has presence on Instagram sharing their story and selling their products. In the last four years, they have grown to reach over 8,000 customers all over the country and ship over 10,000 pounds of meat every month from their ranch in rural California. They ship out beef boxes, pork boxes and lamb boxes. All their meat is grown on their ranch in Fort Jones. Mary has discovered that in sharing their story as the times are changing; the consumers want to know exactly where their food comes from, they care about the quality and that they will receive a great product consistently. Convenience is key as it is easy to order online. More and more consumers order their groceries online in the urban setting. Lastly, they want a connection – the story, that personal connection. The second speaker was Bill Krycia who spoke on Cal/OSHA updates and preparing for an OSHA visit. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 80


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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 79


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 78

for Beef Educator of the Year. The annual convention plan was discussed as well. It was decided that we will have the Executive Board meeting on Wednesday, December 4 prior to opening General Session so that our members can attend General Session. Thursday morning, we will have the WIRED Committee Meeting, Heritage Meeting, a meet and greet with Committee Chairs, CowBelle of the Year Luncheon, followed by the Board of Directors Meeting. A reception will take place in the President’s Suite prior to the Awards Banquet. The Awards Breakfast will take place on Friday, Dec. 6.

Bill shared that California is a “State Plan” state for occupation safety and health, jurisdiction covers all non -federal worksites. California can, and does, write and enforce its own standards on heat, injury and illness prevention program and others. Employers have the following rights to restrict access, right to contest investigation finding and citations. Cattle ranchers and farming are listed on the high hazard list. It was shared that in California’s enforcement and activity in 2018 that 660 inspections took place, more than 956 citations and over $2,853,285 in penalties. The third speaker was Alfredo Aguirre from Zenith and he spoke on wildfire prevention. Alfredo shared that this basically goes back to the continuous mismanagement of forest land. he hazard is going to continue to be there if the trees and fuel are not being thinned out. The preventative measures need to be looked at. He shared a lengthy list of all of the fires that have burned in California and how they started. It was only some of the fires that started by lightening. On Wednesday, June 19, we held the Board of Directors meeting. An update on the California Ranch Raised Kids book was given. We currently are at 21 ranches and the authors have started to schedule their visits with the nominees. The books are for sale for $35.00 each, and will be available at Convention in 2020 for pick-up. California’s nominees for ANCW CattleWomen of the Katherine Doverspike, Five Mary’s Farms, Mary Heffernan, Sandy Year is Melanie Fowle, and ANCW Beef Promoter of the Fiack, Zenith Insurance and CCW President Callie Borror at the Year is Maxine DaCosta. No nominee was brought forward Midyear Meeting Dinner at the Murietta Inn in Rancho Murieta.

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80 California Cattleman July • August 2019

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FULL CIRCLE Ranch raised professionals head back to beef business by CCA Communications Director Jenna Chandler

The ranching world can sometimes be a predictable one. Spring, summer, fall, winter. Breeding, calving, branding, weaning. This pasture, that pasture, to the mountains and back…and then all over again. Even the ranchers themselves end up in the business in one of a few usual ways. The beef cattle industry in California and beyond often prides itself on being a generational business. Producers boast about the number of generations that have raised cattle on the very same piece of land. Parents painstakingly work to pass the operation onto the next generation. Kids grow up from the day they are born, knowing what their career and life will look like. For many, there is never any question about future days beginning and ending on the ranch. But increasingly, it’s not just ranch kids that end up as producers too. As millennials get more in touch with where their food comes from, there is a resurgence in new producers from non-agriculture backgrounds. Urbanites with no ties to agriculture at all are, in greater and greater numbers, breaking free of the city and planting their new roots in food production. What about the third category, though? For one reason or another, lots of farm kids born onto beef cattle operations end up leaving the ranch to pursue other career and lifestyle choices. Maybe another sibling is taking over the ranch or maybe some other industry calls to them. Whatever the reason, some ranch kids venture out and take on other professions. But life happens. Things change, people change, perspectives change and sometimes even the best laid 82 California Cattleman July • August 2019

plans don’t end up working out. And sometimes, those ranch kids that have ventured out, end up back on the ranch after all, bringing their outside experiences, perspectives…and challenges…with them. CCA caught up with two of them, Garrett Rasmussen of Rasmussen Ranch in Dixon and Guido Frossini of Conlan Ranches True Grass Farms in Valley Ford to see what brought them back to the ranch and what the transition was like. Garrett Rasmussen grew up on his family’s cattle ranch east of Dixon, California, running stockers and some cows on irrigated pasture. He grew up the way most ranch kids do but soon discovered his passion for numbers and had different ideas of where the future might take him. After graduating from high school, Garrett attended CalPoly, SLO for college. While initially accepted as an Ag Business major, Rasmussen quickly changed his focus to BioResources and Agricultural Engineering. Throughout college, it was clear his concentration was on civil engineering. He obtained an internship working for an engineering firm doing irrigation design and had the goal of becoming a professional civil engineer. But what happens if your dreams come true but it’s not quite like you planned? “I realized I just wasn’t passionate about engineering and the lifestyle that goes with that job,” Rasmussen said. “ I was spending a lot of hours behind a computer screen and it was not a great fit for me. I had some job offers but decided to come back to the ranch.” And come back to the ranch he did, now working


for his father and grandfather and managing a herd of his own. And while he is certainly enjoying the change, he admits that it is definitely different than being an engineer. These days, work starts a little earlier and ends a little later, capped on both ends with irrigating. “It’s a heck of a lot harder to take a vacation as a cattle rancher than an engineer,” he joked. “I’m basically on-call at all times […] There are times when cattle get out, water pipes get busted, cattle get shipped here in the middle of the night, irrigation water needs to be switched, etc. I really don’t have a set schedule.” It wasn’t just the schedule that took some adjusting

to though. Rasmussen says that although he grew up on the ranch, coming back and helping to run it was a bit different. “Even though I had been helping my dad and grandpa for most of my life out on the ranch, there definitely was a learning curve. In fact, I’m still learning a lot about the business after working here for a few years. It takes time and experience to understand how to operate efficiently on the ground we run our cattle on.” His experiences off the ranch haven’t all been unusable for the operation though, especially on the business and finance side. “Being an engineering student, I’m a numbers guy. So I like to constantly run the numbers and see how certain aspects of the business are doing.” So how about “running the numbers” on his life and his career back in the beef business? For Rasmussen, going back to the “9 to 5” life isn’t even a thought and when asked about the future of his operation, plans are big. “I don’t even think about going back anymore. This takes up all my time and I’m happy doing it. I’m going to continue growing my personal cow herd and stocker herds and also start selling our beef direct to the consumer,” Rasmussen said. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 84

Guido Frossini hosts a ranch tour at True Grass Farms in Valley Ford.

“I don’t even think about going back anymore. This takes up all my time and I’m happy doing it. I’m going to continue growing my personal cow herd and stocker herds and also start selling our beef direct to the consumer.” – GARRETT RASMUSSEN

Rasmussen Ranch, Dixon July • August 2019 California Cattleman 83


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 83 And if his past history and clear ability to adapt to change to get the job done is any indication, he certainly will! For Marin county producer, Guido Frossini, the path was similar, but marked by a slightly larger change in locale. While he actually grew up in Italy, as a child Guido visited the family’s Conlan Ranches in Valley Ford, often, spending many vacations and lots of time helping his aunt there. When it came time for college, he headed stateside full time, attending the University of San Francisco to study Political Science, just an hour and a half south of where the ranch sits. While there, he began to spend more and more days on the ranch, mentored by his great aunt and longtime CCA member, Ione Conlan, and his priorities shifted. “I realized that at the end of the day agriculture was quite political anyway,” Frosini said. “I’ve always learned more by doing and my aunt Ione gave me an incredible introduction [...] The first time seeing something born. Realizing how complex this system is and the beauty of the profession. Both spiritual and the day to day. From the grass growing to the soil to

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the community, you fall in love with it.” But it hasn’t always been easy and like Rasmussen, the learning curve was steep Frosini admits. Now especially, with the passing of his aunt and the running of the quickly expanding operation lying on his shoulders alone, the challenges are certainly great. “There was definitely a generation gap as my father wasn’t around, it was just my great aunt and that was a struggle. It makes it really hard when you don’t have all generations involved, in addition to the other regular things: land access, capital investments, inflation of land prices. It’s hard to compete and there are a lot of people just like me, millennials especially, that aren’t making it.” But make it he has, as well as a name for himself in high quality, grass finished beef and sustainable agriculture. In addition to the cow/calf operation, consisting of primarily wagyu/angus crosses and finishers, he has also ventured into raising sheep and pastured hogs and marketing direct-to-consumer meats. These days, life is a bit different though, than it was when he was involved in politics. “I work for myself, up at 4am, fixing water, wearing many different hats, marketing, figuring out the next step and of course, self-care […] To become a master, it’s a journey.” And when asked about how he himself is different now from when he first came back to the ranch, Frosini laughed. “Well, I’m still with my thoughts, but I’m much tanner, I have a much stronger community. In the last 12 years I think probably the biggest thing is that I’m a much more humble person than I was back then, realizing how hard it is to produce food.” But Frosini also agrees with Rasmussen. As hard as it is to produce food and as hard of a business as the beef cattle industry is, while he’s considered going back, there really isn’t another life he’d rather have. “I’ve been told a few times that I’m poor by average standards, but we grow our own vegetables, have some of the best beef in the bay area, I’m in shape, physically active and I can’t ask for more.” And really, it’s that lifestyle, according to Guido Frossini and Garret Rasmussen, that drew them back to the ranch after venturing out into the world at large. The work is hard and the days are long, certainly harder and longer than sitting behind a computer or strolling the halls of the legislature. But cattle producers know, its not a job, it’s a way of life and sometimes, no matter how hard you try to steer away from it, life comes full circle and you end up right back on the ranch!


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Dig Your Roots FFA demonstrates importance of agriculture education beyond classroom by Devin Griffith for the California Cattleman on the road and approximately 260 Heart racing. Pulse pounding. Tears welling. I remember it all like it days in our official dress. We attend was yesterday. Standing in the huddle, numerous conferences, facilitate 115 surrounded by my fellow Northern chapter visit workshops and at the California students, affectionately end of the year lead the California known as members of the Superior FFA State Leadership Conference; Region FFA; here, we were waiting all focused on developing students for the election results. And then in agriculture education courses. As the moment came. California FFA’s an officer I found myself pushing 2017-2018 State Treasurer Armando students to believe in their own Nevarez sprinted onto stage, holding abilities, future and what they are an envelope that may hold the key to rooted in. Sometimes, this included changing my future. And it did; he agriculture, but many times it did not. called my name! I became the 2018As a young adult, it is disheartening 2019 California FFA State Treasurer. to see how many of my peers are I sprinted on stage, and leaped veering away from the agriculture into the arms of two of my new teammates, the first step in our new journey. Flash forward twelve months and I’m sitting here in a little office down on H street in Sacramento, known as the California Cattlemen’s Association office. This summer, I am incredibly blessed in order to learn from a talented (and unquestionably fun) staff as their Creative Media Intern. This is a position I find myself naturally comfortable in. As an agriculture communications major who has always had a passion for the cattle industry and a knack for anything media related, I am more than excited to be here in Sacramento. But something I have developed an even deeper passion for is educating my peers about the importance and value of agriculture. Serving as a state officer is a phenomenal opportunity because of the influence we are granted to push students. Out of 365 days, my teammates and I spend 300 of those Devin Griffith (third from right) and the 2018-2019 California State FFA Officer Team. 86 California Cattleman July • August 2019


industry and into other career fields. While it is true, youth should be encouraged to follow their passions, it is just as true that the agriculture industry will be entirely dependent on these same people. A well-known statistic is that the average age of a farmer is increasing, now reaching approximately 57 years of age, according to Food Dialogues. This statistic has been promoted to the point where it has tarnished and has lost its shock. But the reason why it is so commonly advertised is the fact that this is an apparent issue that our industry is going to have to address in the near future. And what’s even more frightening is that the average age of today’s cattlemen is 60, says Small Business Trends; this being even higher than the average age of farmers. As a progressive youth in our industry, it is clear to see that a change is glaringly necessary. However, there is a silver lining; young adults are fascinated by the cattle industry. For example, take my teammate, Orrin Jones from Gridley, Calif. After a long day of traveling together from visiting our teammates, Orrin agreed to stay at my house in Williams before heading back to Gridley the next day. I let him know that the next day my family would be processing cattle and that he was more than welcome to join, and to my great joy, he agreed to come. Orrin previously had no experience working cattle, his mother a teacher at the local elementary school in Gridley and his father ran equipment for T&P Farms in Colusa County. However, he hopped in our Dodge pick up eagerly the next morning, and we drove exactly seven minutes to the ranch where we would process heifers and cows. We handed Orrin a sorting paddle and had him push cattle from the tub into the alley then on into the chute in order to safely vaccinate. Orrin’s work ethic and interest in what our family considered a simple and necessary work day was refreshing. He asked intelligent questions, quickly responded whenever we asked something of him and loaded up supplies when we finished. After finishing five hours later, I was sure that Orrin would have at least one complaint (I sure knew I did), but instead, he thanked me and told me he has always wanted to work cattle. He simply never had the opportunity. Orrin had no complaints after we finished working, so why should I? I viewed processing cattle as a chore, which yes, it is. But he viewed it as joy; an opportunity to learn and be apart of an industry he previously had never experienced. Orrin reminded me to be grateful for

Orrin Jones of Gridley tries his hand at cattle sorting.

Austin Thompson of the Clovis FFA Chapter showcased his cattle herd as San Joaquin’s Regional STAR Farmer Winner.

the lifestyle I was raised in; whether he did it on purpose or not. One thing I encourage you to do, no matter if you are 18 or 81; dig your roots. Embrace this lifestyle that is as old as time. As California farmers and ranchers, we are more than fortunate to be involved in an industry that values integrity, earnest work, and the immaculately beautiful tradition that is agriculture. A lifestyle that many, like Orrin Jones, are genuinely curious about and interested in. A lifestyle that should not be exclusive to simply those who are raised in it. This is the first step. While it may be a small one, we should be expected to extend an invitation to allow others to taste this lifestyle. Who knows? Maybe you will be the person who encourages someone to be the future of this industry. July • August 2019 California Cattleman 87


FEEDING THE FACTS Speakers urge Feeder Meeting attendees to share the positive facts of the cattle business by CCA Director of Outreach and Creative Content Katie Roberti

With spring fading into summer, another California and Arizona Feeders Meeting has come and gone. This year’s annual meeting held in Coronado, May 22-24, was once again packed full of education, business, and plenty of opportunities for catching up with those in the cattle feeding industry. “This meeting is a good way to get everyone together to discuss current issues and trends in our industry; it is primarily an educational meeting other than the business portion of the meeting on Friday,” Trevor Freitas, chair of the California Cattlemen’s Association’s Feeder Council said. “We use the meeting to discuss what’s coming down the road and try to provide attendees with as much information as possible.” The 2019 meeting kicked off with the first pitch of the San Diego Padres and Arizona Diamondbacks game at Petco Park on Wednesday afternoon. With cowboy boots and hats filling-up multiple suites in the Western Metals Building at the ballpark, the fun-filled afternoon gave attendees the chance to catch up with friends in the feeder business and allied industries while enjoying a baseball game, before diving into a packed agenda of guest speakers and industry updates the next day. “The social on Wednesday gives attendees a chance to catch up with colleagues that we may not get to see all that often,” Freitas said. “It’s nice to get together in a lighter environment and enjoy everyone’s company before we get down to business on Thursday.” Early Thursday morning, the business commenced with Freitas calling the meeting to order and setting the stage for a day of conversation on many of the emerging topics facing the industry. From getting up to speed on markets and technology to further diving into issues such as fake meat and traceability, the lineup of speakers was set to encourage attendees to leave Coronado having more knowledge of the hot topics in the feeder business than when they arrived. “We provide attendees with a lot of information to take home and digest; you could easily take that information and use it as a tool to do outreach and education across social media or just have a conversation with someone who may have questions about the cattle industry,” Freitas said. Duane Lenz, manager of operations and analyst services for CattleFax, was first up to present. Lenz provided an overview and outlook of what prices and trends the industry can expect going into the second half of 2019 and into next year. As Lenz often does with presentations at cattle industry 88 California Cattleman July • August 2019

meetings throughout the year, he left producers in the room with a well-explained forecast, something James English, an attendee from Arizona and representative from Merck Animal Health says he appreciates hearing each year at this annual meeting. “The California and Arizona Feeders Meeting is a great opportunity to get in front of a large number of cattle producers and number of cattle in Arizona and California, and also learn about industry trends and topics,” English said. Following Lenz, Danielle Beck, senior director of government affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) brought the group up to speed on what the regulatory landscape of fake meat is looking like in Washington, D.C., as of now, and how NCBA policy will continue to direct their efforts on the issue. After giving an overview of what NCBA has learned about the products, Beck explained why the regulation of both lab-grown fake meat and plant-based fake meat matters, and why so much time has been spent working on establishing the regulatory framework of this issue. The differences in the way the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the United States Department of Food and Agriculture (USDA) regulate products is a fundamental reason why the regulatory framework matters for fake meat. FDA and USDA have different requirements for managing product inspections, pre-approval of labels, and more. Beck explained and NCBA states on the policy section of their website that, “the FDA has the power to take action against products that use misleading labels to confuse consumers about the true nature of their product. Unfortunately, the FDA has a track record of lax enforcement on food labeling issues.” It’s because of the FDA’s lack of enforcement on misleading labels that NCBA believes USDA should be the primary regulators of both lab-grown and plant-based fake meat products. Furthermore, NCBA views USDA’s oversight of these products critical to giving beef the best shot at maintaining an equal playing field with current and future fake meat products that enter the market. While the conversation surrounding the status of the regulatory issues when it comes to fake meat probably could have filled the day’s agenda, the meeting continued with presentations from industry experts on other trending topics currently in agriculture.


Deborah Wilson, senior vice president of BIXso Inc. & Viewtrak technologies, spoke on the increasingly important subject of traceability, and the significant opportunities and challenges that will come with more data through blockchain technology. Scott Horsfall, chief executive officer of the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement and Dan Sutton, chairman of the board of the Pismo Ocean Vegetable Exchange, spoke on food safety metrics, and wrapping up the day Colin Woodall, senior vice president of government affairs for NCBA, gave an update on trade. Although speakers spoke on a variety of topics throughout the day, a reoccurring theme of the meeting was: sharing the positive messages NCBA’s Danielle Beck and UC Davis’ Frank Mitloehner, surrounding cattle production. Whether it is sharing statistics about beef ’s Ph.D., were among some of the meetings presenters. sustainability or talking about the facts of fake meat, speakers pushed attendees to understand that those involved in the industry must be part of the conversations customers are having. Sara Place, Ph.D., senior director of sustainable beef production research for NCBA, highlighted many facts about beef ’s sustainability and promoted the power and efficiency of cattle’s ability to contribute to a sustainable food system – a story that will only need be told more as alternative proteins continue to expand and come in to the market. “Approximately 90 percent of what grain-finished beef cattle eat, is not in competition with the human food supply,” Place shared. “Upcycling is California Feeder Council Chair Trevor Freitas the fundamental value beef brings to a sustainable food supply.” (right) with Vice Chair Jesse Larios. The last slide of Place’s presentation left attendees with an important fact to take home: “The beef community uses a technology that produces high-quality protein from solar energy locked within inedible human plants. The technology produces a natural organic fertilizer and is mobile without using fossil fuels. The technology self-replicates. The technology is cattle. Beef is the original plant-based meat.” Keeping with the theme of looking towards the facts, Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., a professor from the University of California, Davis, shifted gears to talk about what others are saying and doing about animal agriculture. As Mitloehner shared statistics with the group about reducing global food waste, eating our way out of climate change, and understanding Jack Hoekstra and John Silva with CCA First Vice greenhouse gas emissions, he encouraged producers to seriously listen to President Tony Toso. what customers are saying about our industry and be part of talking with consumers about our industry. According to the numbers from the Environmental Protection Agency, beef cattle production makes up 3.3 percent of all greenhouse gases. It is statistics such as this that Mitloehner urged everyone in attendance to memorize and start sharing. To wrap up the meeting and the theme of having a role in telling agriculture’s story, Megan Kuhn, advisor of digital and social media Communications for Elanco, presented on “Social Media & Your Operation: Why It Matters.” “Being as transparent as possible with our operations is what really stuck with me from Megan Kuhn’s presentation,” Cain Madrigal, The crew from Boehringer Ingelheim at event attendee and general manager of Smith Valley Cattle Feeders the baseball game said. “Consumers these days enjoy listening and watching the stories of individual feedlots, ranches and farms.” Madrigal, an active user of social media, uses his photography and large social media following to help people better understand what he does on the feedlot. “Social media is an incredible outlet to give a huge audience the inside look to your day-to-day activities; it builds a virtual friendship,” Madrigal said. “I’ve had a positive impact on individuals who were unaware of what it really took to get the beef to their table.” Walking away from the day with plenty to think about, Thursday ended with a final chance for catching up and networking with a dinner at the San Diego Zoo, and the event officially came to a close with business meetings on Friday morning. Smith Valley Feeders’ Cain Madrigal, Immvac’s Next year’s meeting will be held, May 20-22 in San Diego, at the Kaitlin Heely and Animal Health International’s Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina. Ashley Hagens. July • August 2019 California Cattleman 89


WINNING THE WORLD AUCTIONEER WORLD CHAMPION NAMED AT TULARE EVENT by the Livestock Marketing Association

Russele Sleep of Bedford, Iowa was named the 2019 together North America’s top livestock auctioneers World Livestock Auctioneer Champion (WLAC) at the in a competition that showcases professionalism and 56th annual competition held at Tulare Sales Yard, Tulare, promotes the auction method of selling livestock.” and presented by the Livestock Marketing Association As a part of the champion’s role, Sleep will (LMA). spend the next year traveling the country, sharing his “It was a dream come true,” Sleep says. “I started auctioneering skills with other livestock auction markets coming to the WLAC competitions in 2009, and it goes and acting as a spokesperson on behalf of the livestock to show hard work, dedication and a love for the livestock marketing industry and the LMA. auction business pays off in the end.” “The auctioneer championship showcases the Sleep, a nine-time top ten qualifier of the WLAC importance of the local livestock markets and the role the and 2016 Reserve Champion Auctioneer, earned his spot auctioneer plays in true-price discovery and I’m looking to this year’s competition by winning the LMA’s Midwest forward to promoting that this year,” Sleep says. Qualifying Event. Twenty-nine other semi-finalists Sleep, a Missouri Auction School graduate, works also qualified through three regional qualifying events. as a contract auctioneer for Knoxville Regional Livestock The additional semi-finalist was the 2019 International Market, Fort Scott Livestock Market, Inc., Southeast Auctioneer Champion, which is given an automatic “bye” Kansas Stockyards LLC, Clarinda Livestock Auction, to compete. Inc., Russell Livestock Market and Green City Livestock Chuck Bradley from Rockford, Ala., earned Reserve Marketing LLC. He lives in Bedford, Iowa with his wife Champion honors, and Will Epperly from Dunlap, Iowa, Lacey and three children. was named Runner-Up Champion. A one-hour highlight show from the 2019 Other top ten finalists were Eric Drees, Nampa, competition will air on RFD-TV June 24 beginning at Idaho; Dean Edge, Rimbey, Alberta; Steven Goedert, 7 p.m. (CST). WLAC fans can mark their calendars for Dillion, Mont.; Brennin Jack, Prince Albert, Sask; Ryan the 2020 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship, Konynenbelt, Ft. Macleod, Alberta; Wade Leist, Boyne which will be hed next June 3–6 at the Dickson Regional City, Mich.; Jacob Massey, Petersburg, Tenn. Livestock Center, in Dickson, Tenn. Additional semi-finalists were Neil Bouray, Webber, Kan.; Colton Brantley, Modesto.; Darren Carter, Ninety Six, S.C.; Dakota Davis, Caldwell, Kan.; Brandon Frey, Creston, Iowa; Philip Gilstrap, Pendleton, S.C.; Shane Hatch, Kirtland, N.M.; Jim Hertzog, Butler, Mo.; Garrett Jones, Los Banos.; Lynn Langvardt, Chapman, Kan.; Justin Mebane, Bakersfield; Jeremy Miller, Fairland, Okla.; Daniel Mitchell, Cumberland, Ohio; Christopher Pinard, Swainsboro, Ga.; Jay Romine, Mt. Washington, Ky.; Jim Settle, Arroyo Grande.; Dustin Smith, Jay, Okla.; Curtis Wetovick, Fullerton, Neb.; Tim Yoder, Montezuma, Ga.; Vern Yoder, Dundee, Ohio and Zack Zumstein, Marsing, Idaho. Kristen Parman, LMA VP of Russele Sleep of Bedford Iowa Claimed the 2019 World Membership Services, says, “LMA is livestock Auctioneer Championship in Tulare in early June. proud to sponsor an event that brings 90 California Cattleman July • August 2019


with cattle mortality insurance from Livestock Marketing Insurance Agency.

For coverage details or rates contact Forrest Mangan at (816) 674-0062. Cattle mortality insurance is a product of Livestock Marketing Insurance Agency, underwritten by Berkley Equine and Cattle. Cattle mortality insurance is an annual policy on your cattle that covers death as a result of any accident, illness or disease including theft.

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 91

This material does not amend, or otherwise effect, the provisions or coverage of any insurance policy issued by StarNet Insurance Company. It is not a representation that coverage does or does not exist for any claim or loss under any such policy. Coverage depends on facts and circumstances involved in the claim or loss, all applicable policy provisions and any applicable law. Availability of coverage referenced depends on underwriting qualifications and state regulations. All rights reserved.


MIDYEAR MEETING Rancho Murieta provides backdrop for well-attended event

by CCA Director of Communications Jenna Chandler The weather was sunny and the locale’s distinctly western ambiance made attendees feel right at home as the beautiful Murieta Inn and Spa welcomed guests to the 2019 CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting in the heart of Rancho Murieta. Cattlemen and women from all over the state flocked to the little town just east of Sacramento to tune in to engaging speakers, catch up with colleagues from out of town and, most importantly, get down to the business of the organizations. Cattlewomen kicked off the event with their CCW Workshop and Executive Meeting on Tuesday as CCW President Callie Borror, Winters, welcomed the group to the picturesque inn. While different than usual, this change in schedule and early CCW start time made it so that California’s cattlewomen didn’t have to miss a thing! Many attended CCW events first then joined CCA for the general session, guest speakers and networking while others took advantage of the hotel’s spa for a relaxing treatment after business meetings. There was no leisurely segue into the “meat and potatoes” of the conference, though, as board and executive meetings started early Wednesday, getting important business underway. In the afternoon, the CCA general session saw a packed house with Erin Borror of the U.S. Meat Export Federation discussing global markets. Attendees sat rapt as Borror discussed the popularity of U.S. beef in global markets such as China. Jim Vann and Matt Griffith of WSR discussed insurance and disaster preparedness for protecting the bottom line, and with everyone watching this year’s Midwest weather and subsequent market fallouts on bated breath, it was a poignant topic for California producers. California Beef Cattle Improvement Association, Finance and Membership and Cattle-PAC meetings were also held to give updates and to set the priorities and direction of the next six months. After a busy first day, cattlemen and women headed for the Fireside Terrace for a welcome reception graciously hosted by the Amador/El Dorado/Sacramento Cattlemen and Cattlewomen. After mingling and catching up, appetites were big, and it was a good thing too because the poolside dinner was packed with delightful fare, complete with plenty of tasty beef and the bar hosted by longtime CCA partner Laird Manufacturing. The next morning started bright and early with attendees snagging a quick “grab ‘n go” breakfast sandwich as they headed off to various meetings. Chair of the Cattle Health Committee, Tom Talbot, DVM, Bishop, opened his committee meeting in the usual way, with a call to order and review of previous meeting minutes before inviting up guest speakers to address various hot topics in animal 92 California Cattleman July • August 2019

health. Along with Dr. John Adaska, co-director of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory who gave an update on the Turlock Lab (currently being redesigned to accommodate testing and research for both avian and mammalian species), Kent Fowler, DVM, from the California Department of Food and Agriculture also stopped by to give an update on traceability. He reminded producers that as of Jan. 1, 2023 RFID ear tags will be required for beef and dairy cattle (as well as bison) moving interstate that meet a set of specified requirements. Animals tagged with metal tags will have to be retagged with RFID tags in order to move interstate. For further information regarding official RFID requirements, you can visit http://www.aphis. usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/traceability. It was also noted that feeder cattle and animals moving directly to slaughter are not subject to RFID requirements. The Property Rights and Environmental Management Committee (PREM) meeting was one of the more popular hot spots and saw record attendance as chair, Clayton Koopmann, Sunol, called the meeting to order. CCA’s Justin Oldfield gave a brief update on the estate tax in California. USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services representatives, including Mark Ono, assistant California state director, were also on hand to discuss the development of a Statewide Environmental Impact Report for Wildlife Services activities in California. Ono spoke about how individual counties are doing their own Environmental Impact Reports and are currently being challenged by the state. While legal assistance for those counties is available, the situation is ever evolving. CCA First Vice President Tony Toso, Hornitos, was up next and gave an update on the newly formed CCA Fire Subcommittee. Kirk Wilbur also spoke and touched upon hotly debated topic of compensation for ranchers whose cattle are victims of wolf kills. While CCA policy is currently neutral, other states’ compensation policies were looked at, including Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming, and the benefits and weaknesses of the programs were discussed, leaving committee members to ruminate on the topic and be ready for the actual adoption of policy at convention in December. After PREM, the line for lunch was the place to be as attendees grabbed their roast beef sandwiches with heirloom tomatoes and headed out to the terrace to network and catch up. Extra horseradish was, of course, on hand! While only a brief break from meetings, the weather—and the beef— couldn’t have been better. During lunch and in the time between meetings, attendees noticed something new this year: CCA’s Katie

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 94


July • August 2019 California Cattleman 93


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 92 Roberti and CCA intern Devin Griffith asking guests to participate in a brief video interview. Clips from these segments will be used for future membership videos, so stay tuned! After lunch and a few more meetings, including a gathering of Leadership Series participants and Allied Industry members, the combined meeting of the Ag & Food Policy, Tax & Credit and Cattle Marketing committees was a busy one. Erin Borror of the Meat Export Federation spoke again, this time offering an update on trade, with the situation of Australian cattle being one of the large influences of the global market currently. UC Davis’ Tina Satione, Ph.D., also dropped by to present recent data about the impacts of specialized programs on sale prices in recent Western Video Market sales. Taking into account years of various market sales, the take home from her research? Source verification, vaccination and specialized programs among uniform lots of animals pay dividends for ranchers wanting to help out their bottom line. Joining the group to touch on tax issues, Sen. Ted Gaines (Ret.) of the California Board of Equalization’s District 1 also stopped by. While he echoed rancher concerns about the heavy tax burden faced by Californians, he did say there was a at least one small way to fight back. Senator Gaines told attendees that in addition to helping hold local tax assessors responsible for lawfully interpreting tax codes, the Board of

Equalization also served to help them on an individual basis when needed. Encouraging your local assessor to reach out the board could lead to more uniform, and fair, levying of some taxes. The 2019 CCA and CCW Midyear Meeting wrapped up on Thursday with the CCA board meeting. Reports from each committee meeting were presented to the board and a very special project was assigned. CCA President Mark Lacey, Independence, tasked Jack Lavers, Glennville, and Rich Ross, Lincoln, with reviewing the CCA policy book and recommending technical cleanups of outdated, wordy or unnecessary language. A clearer policy book leads to clearer instructions for CCA staff and clearer instructions lead to more effective representation of rancher priorities in the halls of the state capitol and beyond. And with that, the close of the board meeting signaled the close of the midyear meeting, and another successful event, furthering CCA and CCW policy and priorities until the next time. CCA knows how hard it can be to break away from the ranch, especially for multiple days in a row and especially this time of year. But it’s through the engagement of producers that critical CCA policy is set and the direction of the association is set in motion. A sincere thank you to each and every CCA and CCW member who made it out to the event! Couldn’t make it this time around? Don’t miss the next meeting! Mark your calendars for the CCA & CCW Annual Convention, Dec. 4-6, at a new location this year, the Peppermill Spa Resort Casino in Reno, Nev.!

Brian Coehlo of Central Valley Meats spoke of the acquistion of Harris Ranch Feeding Co.

Zoetis’ Natalie Koopmann with Jamie Hafenfeld, Weldon.

Merck’s Bret Davis with Debbie Torres, Fallbrook and John Hammond, Exeter.

Erin Borror with USMEF spoke about global meat exports.

Jeffery Stott, Ph.D., with former CCA president Tom Talbot, DVM.

Col. Jake Parnell, Sacramento, with Lassen County’s Ramsey Wood.

CCA First Vice President Tony Toso, Hornitos Central Coast CCA members (L to R): Chuck and Fran Pritchard, Suze and Dale Evenson, with CCA President Mark Lacey, Independence. and Kathryn McGinnis-French. 94 California Cattleman July • August 2019


Highlighting Proven Riverbend Donors

GENETIC EDGE FEMALE SALE

S AT U R D A Y • N O O N

AUGUST 24, 2019

TEX RITA 5446 18414913

Featuring a heifer pregnancy and two daughters of Rita 5446, the $135,000 valued full sister to Playbook 5437 and headliner of the Riverbend Ranch and Spruce Mountain Ranch joint embryo programs sired by the $B sire, Acclaim, the recordselling Colonel C251 and the Discovery son, Legend 5019.

RIVERBEND MISS RITA 6013 18443470

Miss Rita 6013 comes from the heart of the Riverbend Ranch donor program and she blends the proven Pathfinder Sire, Ten X with the $350,000 valued Ankony Angus and Magnum Angus donor, Rita 12J2. Miss Rita 6013 sells due 11/2/19 to VAR Delivery 7007 and with a powerful bred heifer by the phenotype sire, Cowboy Up.

I D A H O FA L L S , I D A H O

Selling 120 head from the heart of the Riverbend Ranch ‘program

2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821

Sale Managed by:

OTTON & associates

517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

www.riverbendranch.us July • August 2019 California Cattleman 95


Recognizing Value

AND PAYING FOR IT

by J. Neil Orth, executive vice president, American-International Charolais Association

Leave it to a young, curious graduate student writing her thesis to present a com- prehensive marketing analysis with lots of relevant information to digest. Esther McCabe, the fourth generation of McCabes to make beef industry contributions, recently published her master’s thesis research, deep diving into how cattle are marketed and what in uences pricing in the U.S. Her research largely analyzed data obtained from Superior Livestock Auction from 1995 through 2016. The Superior data was supported by other research from public auctions and those sources cited. It’s important, as we digest any research, to objectively review data. From there, we can see other in uences we may not have considered previously. One segment of McCabe’s study definitely indicates favorable pricing for Charolais-sired calves. As iconic Paul Harvey used to say, “and now for the rest of the story.” The research looks at beef cattle marketing across commercial production. In some cases, the data looks at decades, considers economic pressures, the implementation of science and technology and documents the market pricing reflected by those influencers. As in all, research and the conclusions typically drawn by lay persons or consumers, the devil is in the details. An interesting takeaway is the evolution of price discovery based on management and the implementation of better health and known genetics. In other words, in the early days, preconditioning and vaccination as a marketing component didn’t add any value. Producers were not willing to pay for those improvements. Third party verification began to add confidence. “In 1995, 44.7 percent of the lots were not vaccinated for respiratory diseases prior to marketing. In 2005, only 3.9 percent of the lots sold were not vaccinated against respiratory diseases.” Over 11 years, the average premium paid for VAC 34 calves ranged from $0.99/cwt to $3.47/cwt. VAC 45 calves earned an average premium of $2.47/cwt to $7.91/cwt during the same 11 year period. More traditional factors— horns, implants, lot size, uniformity of weight, sex, frame, body condition and geographic location also contributed to pricing differences. Since Certified Angus Beef began in the 1970s, more than 125 branded beef programs have been launched, almost 96 California Cattleman July • August 2019

all favoring black-hided cattle and requiring a quality grade benchmark for certi cation. Consumer driven niche markets such as natural, non-hormone treated (NHTC) and grass fed minimally in uenced market pricing, at least for now. For any commercial beef producer that navigates the market recognizes, size matters. The study recognizes that 175,000 beef operations have been lost in the last 25 years. More than 81 percent of the losses have come from 1-49 head cow herds. The Superior data indicates the average cow herd size of a Superior customer selling cattle is approximately 200 head, which enables the seller to market load lots, again a marketing advantage. Digging deep into the study indicates many positive nuggets for Charolais and Charolais-influenced producers. From 2010 through 2017, some breeds experienced a decline in the number of lots of calves sold from single-sire breeds, while Charolais documented an overall increase. In many ways, the study con rms what we anecdotally knew. We know, because our breeders report on behalf of their commercial customers, Charolais and Char-cross feeder cattle almost always sell at the top of the market for the day. The study con rms that 490 lots of Charolais-sired calves, average weight of 580 pounds, sold for $1.23/cwt higher than the next high selling Red Angus lots. Marketing data is difficult to analyze. Esther McCabe’s research is a fusion of multiple research and represents, arguably, one of the most extensive looks at marketing across the entire spectrum of com-mercial beef production. All research is a look back. Looking forward requires us to arm ourselves with historical information, understand the pricing signals and be proactive to implement new and improved management tools. Every breed association competes for members and members compete for cow- calf producers. We want to own larger industry market shares, sell more bulls, increase our footprint in the commercial cow-calf sector, record more data and increase our memberships. At the end of the day, our commercial customers determine our success or failure based on the price they receive for their cattle, regardless of end point. Data indicates the beef industry recognizes the value of Charolais and is willing to pay for it!


WESTERN

AVILAMikeCATTLE CO. & Char Avila

Charolais

PO Box 398, Clements, CA 95227 (530) 347-1478 • (530) 941-5025 cavila1956@att.net

BREEDERS

POUNDS=PROFIT

Bulls sell at World of Bulls, the Shasta Bull Sale and the Red Bluff Bull Sale. Select females for sale private treaty.

BAR 6JimCHAROLAIS Ansbach

43861 Burnt Ranch Rd. Mitchell, OR 97750 (541) 462-3083 Annual Bull Sale • February 2019 • Madras, OR

BIANCHI RANCHES Robert, Chris & Erica Bianchi

6810 Canada Rd. Gilroy, CA (408) 842-5855 • (408) 804-3153 Erica’s cell (408) 804-3133 Robert’s cell Bianchiranches@aol.com • www.bianchiranches.com California Girls Online Heifer Sale this October, watch for details. Bulls for sale private treaty and at leading bull sales. Call early for best selection.

BROKEN BOX RANCH Jerry and Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760, Williams, CA (530) 681-5046 Cell • (530) 473-2830 Office BBR@citlink.net • www.brokenboxranch.com Bulls available at Red Bluff, Fallon and off the ranch.

FRESNO STATE AGRICULTURE FOUNDATION California State University, Fresno 2415 E. San Ramon, Fresno, CA Randy Perry (559) 278-4793 http://fresnostate.edu/jcast/beef Bulls available private treaty

W

e believe strongly in the value of crossbreeding and the benefits of heterosis or hybrid vigor. Crossbred calves are more vigorous at birth, they are more resistant to disease and they have increased performance levels or weight gain. In addition, crossbred beef cows have higher fertility levels, they are also more disease resistant and they are superior in terms of longevity, an often overlooked but very economically important trait in a beef herd. These combined factors result in the generation of more total pounds of beef being produced from a commercial cowherd when crossbreeding is utilized. We believe that Charolais bulls are the logical and best choice to use on the Angus-dominated commerical beef cowherd that currently exists in this country. They will infuse the benefits of heterosis and produce the “smokies” and “buckskins” that have been popular with cattle feeders and packers for decades. Look for these Charolais breeders from throughout the West as your . or at leading source for Charolais genetics available off the ranch California, Oregon and Nevada sales.

JORGENSEN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen 25884 Mollier, Ave, Orland, CA (530) 865-7102

Top quality bulls available at the ranch and through Snyder Livestock’s ‘Bulls for the 21st Century’

NICHOLAS LIVESTOCK CO.

Nicoli Nicholas 6522 Vernon Rd., Nicolaus, CA • (916) 455-2384 Breeding Charolais cattle for 57 years, 150 bulls available private treaty in 2019.

ROMANS RANCHES

Bill & Cindy Romans • (541) 538-2921 Jeff & Julie Romans • (541) 358-2905 romansranches@hotmail.com www.romanscharolais.com Annual Production Sale • March 2020 • Westfall, OR

July • August 2019 California Cattleman 97


IMPLANT PROFIT

ROUTINE CHECKS AND PROPER ADMINISTRATION MATTER from Zoetis It’s nearly impossible to get the most out of an implant if it isn’t administered correctly. When factoring in labor costs and lost gain potential, feedlots can say goodbye to approximately $100 per head1* for every incorrectly administered implant. That’s why it’s important to conduct routine implant checks and subsequent trainings. Remember: Employees may know the purchase price of an implant, but they may not know that incorrect administration could equal up to an $11 loss per head with a 10% error rate, which when multiplied can add up to a $10,000 loss per 1,000 head on feed. Implant checks can be conducted 30 to 60 days after administration. If a random check isn’t feasible, it can be done when cattle are reworked. Either way, the opportunity to assess performance and learn from previous administration techniques that worked — or didn’t work — is valuable. When doing an implant check, feel the implant site and evaluate: • Location — Is the implant in the middle third or “top shelf ” of the ear? Is the implant a finger’s width away from any ear tags or holes? Is the pellet under the skin and clear of the ear cartilage? • Orientation — Are the pellets lined up in a straight line? Or are the

pellets bunched or crushed? • Defects — Are abscesses present or is the implant walled-off so the pellet can’t be effective? Inattention to detail and moving too quickly often influence the quality of implant administration. If issues occur, small adjustments in technique and environment can provide a drastic improvement. That will optimize implant success, which means more dollars. A few implant administration reminders: ·• Sanitation — A clean ear, needle and environment are extremely important. Each dirty or wet ear should be cleaned prior to implanting. Dirt and debris should be brushed off the ear in one consistent direction to avoid driving dirt further into the ear. Disinfecting solutions and sponges should be changed regularly as well to avoid contamination. Always wear rubber gloves to prevent any additional dirt from entering the implant site. • Cattle handling — Low-stress cattle handling during implanting is important. Properly restrain animals and use Beef Quality Assurance best practices to help keep animals quiet and reduce unexpected movements. • Employee training — Because labor can turn over quickly, doing routine implant checks provides an opportunity for real-time

98 California Cattleman July • August 2019

evaluation and additional training opportunities. Training on specific implanting equipment, such as the SX10 Precision Applicator for SYNOVEX® implants, can help improve success and effectiveness. Additionally, Zoetis sales representatives can be a resource for conducting implant checks and trainings through the Implant Quality (IQ) program. From setting goals to developing a quality assurance program, training on proper techniques and monitoring results, the Zoetis Field Force supports producers to help get the most out of their implant investment. “We’re here to help producers get each implant administered correctly so they can realize more gain,” said Douglas Hilbig, DVM, Beef Technical Services veterinarian with Zoetis. “Conducting implant checks often provides a learning opportunity for employees and can help protect the investment and profit potential implants provide.” In addition to the IQ program, Zoetis offers SYNOVEX ONE GRASS and SYNOVEX ONE FEEDLOT, which provide up to 200 days of uninterrupted performance. This extended duration helps reduce the risk of losses due to abscesses and ruptures by eliminating the need to re-implant.


July • August 2019 California Cattleman 99


CAL POLY STUDENTS NAMED NATIONAL AG QUADRATHALON CHAMPS In early July, four animal science students from California Polytechnic State University traveled to the American Society of Animal Science’s national meeting in Austin, Texas, to compete in the national Academic Quadrathalon, a competition held at the local, regional and national levels. The all-female undergraduate team, coached by Cal Poly professor Zach Mcfarlane returned as national champions after winning the gueling contest, which featured teams from other notable agriculture programs Penn State, North Dakota State and Texas Tech. Members of the Cal Poly team were: Sarah Dreyer, Exeter; Selby Boerman, Montague; Hannah Neer, Bishop; and Kaitlyn McFarlan, Exeter. During the quadrathalon, teams participate in four events: Laboratory Sarah Dreyer, Exeter; Selby Boerman, Montague; Hannah Neer, Bishop; and Practicum, Written Exam, Oral Kaitlyn McFarlan, Exeter, with Cal Poly Professor Zach Mcfarlane. Presentation, and Quiz Bowl. Cal Poly won the lab and written exam portions, leading them to the overall title. INVEST IN DEPENDABLE GENETICS FROM In the Laboratory Practicum, teams demonstrates its ability to perform physical skills. Work at each station lasts 15 to 20 minutes and involves the entire team. The work at each station usually involves a 7 STOUT SPRING YEARLING ANGUS BULLS species such as beef or swine or a disciplinary area such as nutrition or meats. calving ease • maternal • performance The Written Exam has a 60-minute time limit. WITH SUPERIOR CARCASS VALUE The questions may involve any area related to animal production and products. Each team works on one SELLING SONS OF THESE TOP A.I SIRES! exam, dividing the questions as they wish. Connealy Comrade JMB Traction In the Oral Presentation, the students may choose Plattmere Weigh Up SS Niagara from a list of topics related to animal agriculture. They Deer Valley All In Deer Valley Old Hickory have 60 minutes to prepare the presentation. They will be provided with transparency sheets and markers. During the presentation, they may use an overhead projector to share information. This is an exercise in cooperative problem solving. OFFERING BULLS AT: In the Quiz Bowl, questions may be on any Turlock Livestock’s California Breeders Bull Sale topic that relates to animal agriculture and that are Oct. 5, 2019 answerable in a short period of time. Each round is World of Bulls, Visalia Bull Sale made up of “toss up” questions. After a series of Nov. 2, 2019 “toss up” questions, teams can earn the chance to get extra points on a “bonus” question. Toss up questions L & N ANGUS -NANCY POTTS must be answered individually. For bonus question, (209) 931-2307 • nlp519@aol.com 11551 E Tokay Colony Rd. individuals may confer with their team. Quiz games will Lodi, CA 95240 be organized as double elimination tournament. CCA wishes to congratulate these students and their coach on a well-deserved accomplishment. 100 California Cattleman July • August 2019

L & N ANGUS


California JulyCattleman • August 2015 101 July • August 2019Cattleman California 101


2018

California Beef Council Annual Report Building beef demand by inspiring, unifying and supporting an effective state and national checkoff partnership.

Dear fellow California beef and dairy producers, As 2018 Chair of the California Beef Council (CBC), I am pleased to share with you some of the great work that has been done thanks to our beef checkoff investment. One of the many things I appreciate about the beef checkoff and the CBC is the spirit of collaboration among all segments of the industry. Every sector is represented, from cow-calf ranchers, dairy producers, feedyard and packing plant operators, to any of the steps in between. We all benefit from continued growth in beef demand, and that’s what the mission of the checkoff and CBC is all about. In 2018, the CBC’s innovative programs and efforts focused on three strategic priorities that were established by its producer-led board of directors. Those priorities included growing consumer trust in beef and beef products, promoting and strengthening beef’s value proposition, and sharing beef’s sustainability story. Working toward these priorities comes in many forms, from reaching consumers, educating influencers, engaging with leadership in industries key to our livelihood, and providing producers with tools and resources to help further amplify our messages. This annual report of CBC activities is intended to provide you with a better glimpse into what your $1 beef checkoff investment does in California to enhance beef demand. I know many of you will be pleasantly surprised with just how much is accomplished for our industry every year. Sincerely, Jack Hoekstra 2018 Chair, California Beef Council Hoekstra Dairy, Oakdale

Growing Consumer Trust in Beef and Beef Products

tips and tutorials from renowned food and lifestyle bloggers and cooking experts.

For the past several years, the CBC has deployed a series of integrated marketing campaigns that involve various digital and broadcast advertising elements, cost-sharing partnerships with complementary brands, in-store signage and promotions, and cash-back rebates on beef through the popular mobile shopping app Ibotta. In 2018 alone, the CBC’s campaigns resulted in over 30 million impressions, over 40,000 redemptions of Ibotta rebates on beef cuts and products, and over 160,000 brand engagements through Ibotta.

Feed Me! was produced in partnership with iHeartMedia San Francisco and is hosted by popular radio morning show host Marcus D., an on-air personality who can also be heard on San Francisco iHeart radio station Star 101.3. In just its first few episodes, Feed Me! rose to be one of the top original podcasts in the San Francisco media market.

Each year, the CBC also works to evolve and adapt its methods of reaching California consumers through innovative ways. For example, in 2018, the CBC produced an all-new branded podcast called Feed Me! – providing

The first season of the series featured conversations with food blogger and cookbook author Whitney Bond about the best “One Pot Wonders” for the summer, tips from


Emmy-nominated blogger and food and lifestyle expert Parker Wallace about cooking with what’s in season, how to tailgate like a pro with NFL Hall of Fame running back Eric Dickerson, and more. Each episode incorporated some element of beef, from fun facts to easy and delicious recipe hacks. Learn more at www.calbeef.org/podcast. Another key link to building consumer trust in beef is through producers themselves. In 2018, the CBC provided a number of learning opportunities for producers, including a California Top of the Class workshop which provided beef advocates and Masters of Beef Advocacy graduates with additional spokesperson and outreach training. Additionally, the CBC partnered with other industry groups to provide a number of Beef Quality Assurance workshops to help continue bolstering consumer trust in the care and handling of cattle. To learn more about BQA certification, visit www.bqa.org.

Promoting and Strengthening Beef’s Value Proposition Continuing to promote beef’s value proposition to multiple audiences and influencers is yet another priority for the CBC. First, by capitalizing on new media technologies, the CBC has been able to provide content and information on beef’s quality, safety and nutritional value directly to consumers and influencers through two mobile apps: BEEFabulous for consumers and BEEFlexible for foodservice professionals. These audience-specific apps provide all the information consumers and foodservice leaders might need about beef, right in the palm of their hands. Reaching and collaborating with health and nutrition influencers is another avenue through which this strategic priority is achieved. In 2018 alone, the CBC engaged with nearly 5,000 dietitians, health and nutrition professionals, and strength and fitness professionals at a variety of events with messaging about beef’s role in a healthy diet. As one example of this outreach, the CBC conducted a series of media workshops for Dietetic Internship (DI) students at various California universities. These workshops provided DI students – who are in the final stages of their education before becoming Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists – with extensive training on beef nutrition, production practices, and research and data that support beef in a variety of diets and lifestyles. The goal is to help these future health and nutrition professionals better understand beef’s full nutritional profile so they can provide accurate dietary advice as they embark on their careers.

Sharing Beef’s Sustainability Story Over the course of each year, the CBC holds a series of events designed to bring leaders and influencers from multiple industries to the beef community for educational and immersive experiences. In addition to learning about how beef is produced in California, these events increasingly share information about beef’s sustainability and environmental footprint to help clear up misconceptions these audiences might have.

In 2018, leaders representing nearly 9,400 restaurants and 4,700 retail markets participated in the CBC’s annual Pasture to Plate Beef Tour and Beef Leadership Summit. These events provided attendees with an immersive dive into the beef industry, supplying information on all aspects of beef production, information about hot topics such as beef’s environmental footprint and nutrition profile, and more. At the 2018 Beef Leadership Summit, attendees also got to hear from renowned animal handling expert Dr. Temple Grandin and learn the truth behind meat substitutes as they compare to beef. Retail and foodservice operators have a direct and increasing influence on consumers, so engaging with leaders in these industries is an important way for the CBC to ensure beef remains center-of-the-plate in restaurants, retail chains and foodservice companies throughout California. In terms of reaching consumer audiences with beef’s sustainability story, the CBC has produced online content featuring California ranchers sharing information about their production practices and operation history, with a focus on sustainability efforts. To learn more, visit www.calbeef.org.

California Beef Council Financial Report For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018 PROGRAMS Consumer Information ............................................................... $889,324 Promotion ...................................................................................... $567,229 Producer Communications ........................................................$196,902 General Program Development.................................................. $27,897 National Program Investment...................................................... $31,600 Industry Information .........................................................................$8,265 Total Programs ............................................................................. $1,721,217 GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE Administration ...............................................................................$186,926 Collections .......................................................................................$45,534 USDA Oversight ............................................................................. $22,585 Total Supporting Services .........................................................$255,045 TOTAL EXPENSES .....................................................................$1,976,262


Dear Fellow Producers: Surveys show beef consumers are interested in knowing more about the beef they eat. They still want it to be tasty, tender, convenient and provide value, of course. But today they also want to know that the animal was raised with care and in an environment that is wholesome and environmentally sound. That desire led the Beef Checkoff Program to include a “Rethink the Ranch” element to its Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. relaunch. The component gives consumers – the majority of whom have very little connection to agriculture, let alone the beef they buy – a chance to see how beef producers are combining good husbandry and production practices with new technology to assure the best possible results in terms of care and products. The promotion’s added direction compliments the broader messages within the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand and campaign. Those messages highlight the most critical aspects of what consumers expect from the beef they buy, taste being the most important. Recipes, nutrition and cut information and more is available on the industry’s upgraded website and is being broadly promoted digitally. Let’s face it: Beef will always be among the preferred meats because it tastes so good. The relaunched national campaign features opportunities for state beef councils to join in outreach and messaging to consumers and marketers at the state level. This creates a state/national team with which our industry is having a real impact on demand for our products. You can read all about it in this report. Thanks for your support and engagement in continuing to make beef what’s for dinner. Yours truly,

Dawn Caldwell Edgar, Nebraska Chairman, Federation of State Beef Councils

Rethinking the Ranch In October 2017 the Beef Checkoff Program relaunched its iconic Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. campaign, with exceptional results. The campaign sought to drive more consumers to the checkoff ’s BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com website, where information on all things beef could be obtained. Created 25 years ago, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. was introduced with promotion that included television and print advertising that captured the imagination and taste buds of consumers. Times change, however, and while the concept is still strong, the ways consumers get their information is different than it was in the early 1990s. Social and digital media have become the key ways information is delivered to consumers today. Through the refocused and strengthened campaign, visitors to the website over the past year have totaled more than 8 million – compared to about 3 million the year before. The primary purpose for visiting for many consumers are the recipes, cut information and nutrition advise found on the site. Increasingly, however, consumers want to know even more about how the beef they eat is raised. A new feature of the campaign called Rethink the Ranch is giving consumers an up-close-and-personal look at the people who make beef possible. The campaign features real ranchers and farmers and their real stories about how they produce beef. Last summer a camera crew traveled 3,800 miles across the United States, visiting six different cattle operations in four states. They captured more than 100 hours of video, as well as

104 California Cattleman July • August 2019

images and stories about the people who raise beef animals. The images and video they developed have become a big part of the checkoff ’s new consumer outreach. Nationally, the videos have generated more than 765,000 video views, and reached more than 3.5 million consumers. State beef councils have downloaded Rethink the Ranch content for use on their own social media properties and other consumer and thought leader outreach. It’s the first time BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com has promoted both the product and the people who produce it, a story focused on promoting beef’s greatest strengths: unbeatable taste, variety and ease of cooking, nutritional attributes that can’t be matched and the people that make it all possible, caring for the animals and environment with appreciation and respect. State beef councils are also extending the campaign, exciting their states’ consumers about beef’s many benefits. Of special interest has been the campaign’s Rethink the Ranch anthem video and related video spots showcasing real farmers and ranchers from around the country.


It’s important consumers understand how committed producers are to serving as faithful stewards of the valuable natural resources that have been entrusted to them. That’s part of the Rethink the Ranch message. It’s why the website provides consumer-friendly, easy-tounderstand information on how beef producers are being effective stewards of the land and resources, from drones to help observe and manage cattle to solar technology to generate power and help operate water systems, cattle producers are using technology responsibly.

Good and Getting Better Of course, cattle producers have always prided themselves in their dedication to animal welfare, beef quality, sustainability and community involvement. Recent research shows they are getting better in all four of these areas. The checkoff-funded Cattlemen’s Stewardship Review gathered data from an independent 2017 telephone survey of beef producers to deliver a comprehensive profile of the U.S. beef community today. The research showed improvements in all four areas, compared to a 2010 checkoff-funded benchmark survey. It found that the well-being of cattle is the top priority for 95 percent of producers, that 97 percent of cattle farmers and ranchers believe producing safe beef is crucial to the future of the industry, and that 95 percent of producers believe conservation of land is extremely important to them. Results of the research were shared with key national media.

More Foundation from Research Checkoff-funded research providing answers to complex questions about beef production is helping create clarity to issues such as beef sustainability. The checkoff-funded sustainability research program has developed a series of 19 fact sheets that explain many benefits of U.S. beef production, such as how the global impact of beef production could likely be dramatically reduced if other countries could achieve the same productivity as U.S. beef – the most efficient beef production system in the world. To see these fact sheets, go to www.beefresearch.org.

BQA Certifications Add to Evidence Further strengthening the case that cattle producers recognize their societal role is the fact that online certifications in the beef checkofffunded Beef Quality Assurance program have surpassed 20,000. First available in early 2017, online BQA certifications join those conducted at in-person training events offered by state beef councils, cattlemen’s affiliates, extension programs and other local efforts. Both in-person and online certifications show how common-sense husbandry techniques can be coupled with accepted scientific knowledge to raise cattle under optimum management and environmental conditions, helping beef producers capture additional value from their market cattle and reflecting a positive public image for the beef industry.

Producers Telling Their Stories The Raising Beef section of the new Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. website has featured several graduates of the checkoff-funded Masters of Beef Advocacy program. MBA graduates – who now

number nearly 11,500 – are helping people rethink the ranch by sharing their personal stories on the site. The collaboration between programs is an example of how the beef checkoff-funded Beef Advocacy Training and Engagement program works to help members of the beef community leverage their advocacy and spokesperson skills, benefiting many checkoff programs.

Expanding International Beef Demand Thanks in part to beef checkoff-funded efforts to promote to and educate our international customers, global beef demand was up in 2018, with markets outside of the United States buying a larger share of U.S. beef production at higher prices. According to USDA data compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation, through June, U.S. beef and beef variety meat exports set a record pace in both volume (662,875 metric tons) and value ($4.03 billion). In previous years, export value had never topped the $4 billion mark before August. The same data suggests the U.S. has exported 13.5 percent of its total 2018 beef production, up from 12.8 percent last year. Export value per fed steer or heifer slaughtered averaged $317 – up 18 percent from a year ago. Noteworthy export markets in 2018’s first half included Japan ($1.02 billion – up 12 percent from last year’s pace), South Korea ($802.1 million, up 52 percent), China/Hong Kong ($510.8 million, up 43 percent) and Taiwan ($249.7 million, up 39 percent). Also showing strong demand for U.S. beef were Mexico ($506.7 million, up 10 percent), Central America ($38.8 million, up 26 percent) and South America ($63.9 million, up 20 percent).

Cattlemen’s Beef Board Fiscal Year 2018 Expenditures Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,225,692 Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,042,093 Consumer Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,345,798 Industry Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,560,607 Foreign Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,640,567 Producer Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,179,898 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$230,795 Program Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $295,075 USDA Oversight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $601,681 Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,811,956 TOTAL EXPENSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,934,162 Unaudited Numbers

An independent survey of beef producers has found 74 percent continue to approve of the Beef Checkoff Program. That’s 5 percent higher than it was a year earlier. The survey found that the more producers know about the program, the more supportive they are. Seventy eight percent said the checkoff has value, even when the economy is weak, and 71 percent say the checkoff represents their interests. The survey was conducted from December 2017 to mid-January, 2018.


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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 107


Well Done

2019 ag grads get cattlemen’s nod of approval As college graduates make their way across their respective stages to claim their hard-earned degrees and navigate new paths in life, the California Cattlemen’s Association pays tribute to those graduates from across the state who have excelled in educational programs at California’s four-year agriculture colleges. In addition to accomplishing their goals within the classroom, each of the CCA Achievement Award recipients must also be involved in extracurricular activities pertaining to agriculture, demonstrate superior leadership abilities and have personal and/or professional goals to stay involved in the beef industry. This year, CCA is recognizing graduates from

COLTON CAMPBELL AUSTIN HEFNER Klamath Falls, Ore. Springville

ANIMAL SCIENCE ANIMAL SCIENCE LIVESTOCK BUSINESS LIVESTOCK BUSINESS MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT Return to family livestock and Will return hoem to manage farming business the family cattle business.

agriculture programs at California State University, Fresno; California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo; and the University of California, Davis. The following students were nominated and selected by their university professors for their standout performances during their undergraduate career. With future plans to make a positive impact on the beef industy, this year’s class of graduates has set their sights high and CCA members should be pleased to see the future looking so bright. CCA extends congratulations to the entire class of 2019! Good luck as you find your way in this world. May the future of agriculture be brighter as a result of your efforts.

MIKENZI MEYERS Clovis

AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS Currently employed in the feeds industry.

108 California Cattleman July • August 2019

STEVEN POZZI Petaluma AGRICULTUR BUSINESS

JOSIE WOODCOCK Clovis

ANIMAL SCIENCE MEAT TECHNOLOGY

Is returning to family l Wants to pursue a career in ivestock and hay business the meat industry.


AMY BROWN McArthur

SARAH DREYER Exeter

AGRICULTURE ANIMAL SCIENCE COMMMUNICATIONS Plans to work in beef cattle

BROOKE MARTIN Galt AGRICULTURE BUSINESS

ANNA SACKMAN Brooks AGRICULTURE SCIENCE

Plans to become an elementary nutrition with focus on how Plans to help on family’s cattle Plans to run a cow-calf school teacher as well as have a it relates to carcass quality operation while expanding her operation, raise hay and small beefherd. own herd. and cattle performance horses and rodeo when he has time.

MEGAN CANEL Santa Clarita

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Will be attending UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in the Fall.

SELBY BOERMAN Montague

ANIMAL SCIENCE & RANGE MANGEMENT

Will with UC Cooperative Extension in Modoc Co. then plan to improve grazing management on cattle ranches.

ALLIE CARMICKLE Placerville

KELSIE KENNICUTT Wilton

Plans to continue her edicuation in the fieldo ofanimal genetics.

Will be applying to veterinary school and working as a veterinary technician.

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 109


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110 California Cattleman July • August 2019

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 111


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112 California Cattleman July • August 2019

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Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

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h

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July • August 2019 California Cattleman 113


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(530) 949-2285 114 California Cattleman July • August 2019

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WEdding Bells BOWEN & NIESEN Alicia Bowen and Justin Niesen wed in a ceremony surrounding by family and friends at the family’s Carver Bowen Ranch in Glennville on June 29. The bride is the daughter of Jeff and Sheila Bowen and the groom is the son of Walt Niesen, Willits, and Lori Niesen of Williams. The couple has made their first home in Corning. ROGERS & MANCINO Kealie Rogers, DVM and Joseph Mancino, DVM, were married June 8, 2019 in a ceremony in. The bride is the daughter of Larry Rogers and Melissa Porter of Altoona, Iowa. The groom is the son of George and Candice Mancino of Hollister. Joey and Kealie met at Iowa State School of Veterinarian Medicine They will be beginning their new life together in Des Moines, Iowa where they will each be practicing veterinary medicine.

NEW Arrival LANE MCDONALD Bill and Danielle McDonald, Woodland, welcomed their first child - a son - on July 3, 2019. Lane William McDonald entered the world weighing 5 pounds, 13 ounces. Grandparents are Dennis and JoEllen Wood of Susanville and Billy and Aileen McDonald of Galt. AVERY WOOD Trevor and Jennifer Wood, Susanville, welcomed a daughter to their family on May 20, 2019. Avery Malyn Wood was born weighing 7 pounds, 15 ounces. She is the granddaughter of Dennis and JoEllen Wood and Rob and Julie Williams, all of Susanville.

2019 Categories include:

California Landscapes People Rural Life Animals Plus a special category for cell phone photos!

$500 GRAND PRIZE plus cash prizes for all categories

Plus have the chance to see your photo on the cover of this magazine!

DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 1, 2019

all entries must be submitted by email

Give it your best shot.. COMPLETE RULES AND ENTRY DETAILS AT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG E-MAIL MAGAZINE@CALCATTLEMEN.ORG FOR QUESTIONS AND PHOTO ENTRY July • August 2019 California Cattleman 115


In Memory TERRY BENGARD

Terry Bengard, age 78, passed away peacefully on July 2, 2019, following a long and courageous battle with blood cancer. She spent her last days on the ranch in Salinas where she grew up and raised her family with her husband, Tom. While at home, Terry was surrounded by her loving family and friend, Joanne Tregenza. Born on Feb. 4, 1941 to Arthur and Marie Sconberg in Salinas, Terry and her brother Bruce grew up on Lorimer Street, and it was there that she made numerous lifelong friends. The family spent weekends and summers riding horses, hunting and enjoying the outdoors on her grandfather James Bardin’s ranch just outside of town. She looked back on her childhood fondly and had many wonderful stories to tell. Terry was active in 4-H, where she raised and showed livestock, and a member of the Monterey County Junior Horsemen. She loved the California Rodeo and she never missed a performance. Terry attended Roosevelt Elementary, Washington Junior High and graduated from Salinas Union High School in 1958. She started UC Davis that fall, where she met her partner in life, Tom Bengard. Tom and Terry were married on March 5, 1959. Terry was a wonderful wife and a faithful companion to Tom for over 60 years. The two spent their life building a large and diversified agricultural operation that included row crops, orchards and cattle. The Bengards acquired many ranches throughout the west to farm and run cattle on. Everywhere they went, they became part of the community and supported local causes. Terry had a deep appreciation for the land and respect for animals. Her true passion in life was animal husbandry, first raising sheep and later beef cattle. She became an expert in animal health and genetics. Terry had a very active role in running their cattle business and she was well known and respected in the cattle industry. Nearly every ranch that the Bengards acquired came with an old house that was in need of repair. Terry immersed herself in these remodeling projects, lovingly restoring and decorating each home with unique and special antique store finds. She was proud of her ranch houses in Quincy, Red Bluff, Cottonwood, Burney, Taylorsville and Klamath Falls. She and Tom would travel from place to place throughout the year, catching up with employees, checking on their cattle and visiting with the many friends that they made along the way. Terry most enjoyed spending time with her children and grandchildren at these special places where so many cherished memories were made. Cooking and entertaining were among Terry’s many talents. Upon entering her home, Terry’s kindness and generosity could be felt by all. She and Tom hosted numerous fundraisers and charitable events at the Hartnell Ranch in Salinas. The parties that the Bengards had during the rodeo and after brandings were especially memorable. She was very fond of the western 116 California Cattleman July • August 2019

way of life, and the hospitality that she extended to her guests was legendary. In turn, she never passed up an invitation to a costume party, loving to get herself and Tom all dressed up and joke around with their friends. Terry loved the holidays most of all. This is when she went all-out decorating her home and preparing delicious meals for her family and friends to enjoy. The memories and traditions that she passed down will be with her family forever. Terry’s family was always the center of her life. She and Tom have three children, Bardin, Tracy and Tom. She instilled her love of farming and ranching in each of them from an early age, and enjoyed having her kids involved in the family business so she could spend more time with them and their children. To her 10 grandchildren Terry was their most devoted fan, attending countless fairs, rodeos, horse shows, music recitals, graduations, baseball, football, basketball, lacrosse and soccer games. Terry has been involved in many organizations throughout her life. She was a member of the Cattlewomen’s Associations in Tehama, Shasta, and San Benito, as well as Monterey County, where she served on the board for many years. She was a member of California Women for Agriculture and the California Wool Growers Association. Terry served on the Board of the Monterey County SPCA and was a founding member of P.A.W.S. In 2007, Bengard Ranch was chosen as CBCIA’s Commercial Producer of the Year and she was the Monterey County Cattlewoman of the Year in 2012. In 2018, she and Tom were honored at the Valley of the World event for their life-long contributions to their community. Terry would be the first to tell you that she had a wonderful life. She grew up during a great time in history and the opportunities were endless. She married a man who shared her passion for agriculture and supported her dreams. She had three children that she was proud of. She made countless friends throughout her lifetime and kept them close. She and Tom had many employees over the years that were like family to her and she was grateful for their help and service. Terry loved her animals, especially her dogs and her horses, and she had many good ones over the years. Widely described as a “classy lady,” Terry will be missed by her family, friends, employees, pets and everyone that had the pleasure of knowing her. Terry was preceded in death by her father and mother, Arthur and Marie Sconberg and her brother, Bruce Sconberg. She is survived by her husband Tom and her three children, Bardin (Pam) Bengard, Tracy (Paul) Pezzini and Tom (Louise) Bengard, all of Salinas. She is also survived by her 10 grandchildren, Bridget (Chris) Rotticci, Bardin (Stephanie) Bengard, Sarah Bengard, Christian Bengard, Haley Pezzini, Wesley Pezzini, Michael Bengard, Jamie Bengard, Owen Bengard and Nick Bengard, and four great grand-children, Blair and Walter Rotticci and Penelope and Daphne Bengard. A private family service will be held at the ranch. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you make a donation in Terry’s memory to your favorite charity supporting youth in agriculture, providing for the welfare of pets, or promoting agriculture in the State of California.


MITCH LASGOITY

John M. “Mitch” Lasgoity passed away on June 26, 2019 surrounded by family. Mitch was born on April 11, 1930 in Madera to Jean Lasgoity and Jennie Ospital Lasgoity and has made his home here ever since. Mitch was raised on the family 40 acre ranch south of the town of Madera with his parents, maternal grandmother and two bachelor uncles who spoke to him in Basque. Thus, he grew up bi-lingual with two mother-tongues. Under the tutelage of his parents and uncles, Mitch learned and never lost his love for farming and animal husbandry. Mitch attended Alpha School, Madera High School and Santa Clara University from which he graduated with a degree in business in 1952. Upon graduation, he became partners with his father in their sheep business and took over the farming of their 40 acres. Eventually, Mitch bought the sheep from his father and became self-employed at the age of 27. He married Rosemary Mastrofini in 1957 and together they expanded their farming interests, grew their sheep business and began to run cattle in Madera County. Through his commitment to work, his intelligence and curiosity, Mitch developed and enjoyed many close relationships and had many friends. Mitch was a member of St. Joachim’s Catholic Church, Knight’s of Columbus, Rotary, Fresno Basque Club and Rancheros Visitadores. He served as Camp Captain of Campo Seco and as a Board Director for Rancheros Visitadores. Mitch was honored as Madera County Cattleman of the Year in 2006 and Senior Farmer of the Year in 2017. Mitch was preceded in death by his parents, Jean and Jennie Lasgoity. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Rosemary and his children, daughter Michele Lasgoity and husband, Mark Peters, daughter Monica Lasgoity and husband, Jeff LeFors, son John E. Lasgoity and wife, Alyson, and son, James Lasgoity. He is also survived by his grandchildren, Christine and Eric Peters, Julia, Claire, Paul and Elise Lasgoity and brother-in-law and sister-in-law, Roger and Laurel Mastrofini Belden. Visitation was July 4, at Jay Chapel with Recitation of the Rosary following at Mass of Christian and Burial on July 5 at St. Joachim Catholic Church, interment was at Calvary Cemetery. Donations in Mitch’s memory may be made to St. Joachim’s School, San Joaquin Memorial High School or the donor’s favorite charity.

FRED DAVID LAVERS II Fred David Lavers II, 65, of Glennville, died Tuesday, June 25, 2019 at home surrounded by his loving family. He was born to the late Captain Jack Webster Lavers and Willai Elizabeth (George), on February 15, 1954, in Bakersfield. He graduated from North High School in 1972 and from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, with a BS degree in Agricultural Business in 1976. He met his wife, Mary Cynthia A. (Sanchez), at Cal Poly and they married June 17, 1978. They had just celebrated 41 years of marriage at the time of his passing. David was a fifth-generation cattle rancher with roots in the Glennville community since 1858. After the passing of his father Jack, David took over the day-to-day operations of Lavers Ranch at the age of 16. Driving home from Cal Poly almost every weekend to work the ranch and to check in on his mother “Betty.” After graduating from Cal Poly, David had many jobs including a bookkeeper for Three Brands Feedlot and as a Brakeman for Southern Pacific Railroad until he had saved enough money to purchase the business from his mother. David was very active in the community serving on committees for the Kern County Board of Supervisors, a school board member and with the CCA, KCCA and others. He continued his education with a Juris Doctorate from the California Pacific School of Law. David was the third generation of Lavers to serve as a state director for the California Cattleman’s Association and as president of the Kern County Cattleman’s Association. In 2005, David became the third generation of Lavers to be honored as Kern County “Cattleman of the Year.” While always busy, David made all of his son’s football, baseball and rugby games as well as making sure to attend all of his granddaughter’s events. He lived on the Lavers Ranch and was an active cattle producer and very family oriented until his death. David is survived by his wife Cyndy and his son Jack, daughter in law Jennifer, grandchildren Reagan and John. He is also survived by his sister Jodi (Brawley) and her husband, Mike Cox, as well as other Sanchez and Lavers family relatives. Graveside service were held on July 13 in Glennville followed by a celebration of life reception at the Veterans Hall at the Glennville Rodeo Grounds. July • August 2019 California Cattleman 117


Advertisers’ Index

9 Peaks Ranch.......................................................... 69 All West/Select Sires................................................ 29 Amador Angus................................................31, 110 American AgCredit................................................. 85 American Angus Association................................ 45 American Hereford Association..........................112 Animal Health International...............................114 Arellano Bravo......................................................... 35 Avila Cattle Co......................................................... 97 Baldy Maker Bull Sale............................................. 57 Bar KD Ranch........................................................110 Bar R Angus.....................................................21, 110 Beef Solutions Bull Sale.......................................... 61 Bianchi Ranches...................................................... 97 Black Gold Bull Sale................................................ 27 Borges Angus Ranch............................................... 24 Bovine Elite LLC....................................................114 Broken Box Ranch...........................................97, 112 Bruin Ranch............................................................. 61 Buchanan Angus Ranch.......................................110 Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale..................................... 37 Byrd Cattle Co..................................................15, 110 Cal Poly Bull Test..................................................... 65 California Breeders Bull Sale................................. 38 Cardey Ranches.....................................................106 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market................................ 17 Charron Ranch......................................................110 Chico State Ag Foundation..................................113 Circle AK Ranch...................................................... 84 Circle Ranch............................................................. 61 CoBank..................................................................... 85 Conlin Supply Co., Inc............................................ 52 Dal Porto Livestock.........................................49, 110 Diable Valley Angus................................................ 35 Diamond Oak Cattle............................................... 37 Doanti Ranch...................................................27, 110 Double M Ranch..................................................... 37 Duarte Sale............................................................... 26 Eagle Pass Ranch..................................................... 53 EZ Angus Ranch........................................18, 19, 111 Farm Credit Alliance.......................................85, 111

Farm Credit West.................................................... 85 Five Star Land and Livestock................................. 21 Flood Brothers Cattle.............................................. 37 Freitas Rangeland Management............................ 66 Fresno State Ag Foundation...........................16, 113 Fresno State Ag Foundation..........................97, 113 Furtado Angus......................................................... 81 Furtado Livestock Enterprises.............................114 Genoa Livestock.............................................41, 112 Gonsalves Cattle Co................................................ 37 HAVE Angus .........................................................111 Heritage Bull Sale.................................................... 21 Hogan Ranch.........................................................111 Hone Ranch............................................................113 HP Fencing............................................................... 20 Hufford’s Herefords.........................................57, 112 J-H Feed Inc...........................................................114 J/V Angus................................................................. 21 James Wilhite Bale Wagons..................................114 JMM Genetics........................................................114 Jorgensen Ranch...................................................... 97 Knipe Land Co.......................................................114 L&N Angus............................................................100 Lambert Ranch..................................................75, 12 Leachman Cattle of Colorado................................ 48 Little Shasta Ranch................................................113 Livestock Marketing Association.......................... 91 Lorenzen Ranches................................................... 63 M3 Marketing........................................................114 Maple Leaf Seed Co................................................. 26 McPhee Red Angus.........................................55, 112 MidValley Bull Sale................................................. 31 Morell Ranches......................................................112 Mrnak Herefords West.........................................106 Multimin, USA........................................................ 67 New Generation Feeds............................................ 20 Nicholas Livestock Co............................................ 97 Noahs Angus..........................................................111 Nobmann Cattle/Dixie Valley Angus.........110, 119 O’Connell Ranch.............................................27, 110 O’Neal Ranch........................................................... 13

118 California Cattleman July • August 2019

P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co.....................................113 Pacific Trace Minerals...........................................114 Pedretti Ranches...................................................... 43 Phillips Ranch.......................................................... 74 Pitchfork Cattle Co................................................113 Rancho Casino Angus............................................ 49 Red Bluff Bull Sale................................................... 99 Red River Farms....................................................111 Ritchie Manufacturing............................................ 44 Riverbend Ranches.................................................. 94 Rollin Rock Genetic Partners................................ 79 Romans Ranches..................................................... 97 Running M Group.................................................114 Sammis Ranch.......................................................111 Scales Northwest...................................................... 76 Schafer Ranch..................................................31, 111 Schohr Herefords...................................................113 Sierra Ranches..................................................93, 113 Silveira Bros....................................................6, 7, 111 Silveus Rangeland Insurance................................ 60 Snyder Livestock Company, Inc............................ 77 Sonoma Mountain Herefords........................25, 113 Southwest Fence & Supply...................................114 Spanish Ranch.................................................80, 113 Step Asside Farms..................................................111 Superior Livestock.................................................101 Tehama Angus Ranch.......................................3, 111 Teixeira Cattle Co............................................73, 112 Thomas Angus Ranch............................................. 62 Tri TFarmes/Toledo Ranches................................... 7 Traynham Ranches.................................................. 57 Tumbleweed Ranch...............................................113 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard......................38, 39 Vintage Angus Ranch...............................9, 120, 112 Western Charolais Breeders................................... 97 Western Stockman’s Market................................... 47 Western Video Market.............................................. 2 Wilks Ranch............................................................. 71 Wraith, Scarlett and Randolph Insurance..........107 Wulff Brothers Livestock................................27, 112


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BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

+9

+.5

+75

+143

+32

+.86

+.58

211

+6

+1.2

+88

+160

+26

+1.06

-.006

195

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CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

+11

-.3

+74

+139

+30

+.78

+.91

183

+2

+1.7

+65

+121

+17

+.69

+1.02

160

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(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com July • August 2019 California Cattleman 119


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Thursday, September 5, 2019 26th Annual “Carcass Maker” Bull Sale

Selling 200+ “Multi-Trait Excellence” Bulls • LaGrange, CA • 12 Noon SIRE • PLAYBOOK

8020 CED 14 • BW -.01 • WW 69 • YW 124

SIRE • TREASURE VAR COLONEL 8053

VAR HERITAGE 8032 CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

DOC

CW

MAR

RE

$M

$W

$F

$B

$C

CED

10 0.1 70 138 1.89 29 60 .85 1.04 56 79 120 187 298 20% 25% 10% 2% 3% 4% 10% 20% 3% 75% 10% 2% 1% 2%

BW

WW

YW

SC

DOC

CW

MAR

RE

$M

$W

$F

$B

$C

9 0.2 74 133 1.41 26 67 .89 .79 75 75 111 183 311 30% 25% 5% 4% 15% 10% 3% 15% 20% 20% 10% 4% 2% 1%

8293 CED 9 • BW 1.6 • WW 74 • YW 145

SIRE • LEGEND

8010 CED 11 • BW .03 • WW 75• YW 122

SIRE • PLAYBOOK

VAR COLONEL 8214 CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

DOC

CW

MAR

RE

$M

$W

$F

$B

VAR COLONEL 8070

$C

CED

3 1.7 88 154 1.31 21 60 1.03 1.18 53 84 120 205 319 75% 60% 1% 1% 20% 30% 10% 10% 1% 80% 3% 2% 1% 1%

8058 CED 12 • BW -1.8 • WW 76 • YW 129

WW

YW

SC

DOC

CW

MAR

RE

$M

$W

$F

$B

$C

7 1.2 88 155 1.09 28 70 .97 .96 72 92 104 181 307 45% 50% 1% 1% 30% 10% 2% 10% 10% 25% 1% 10% 2% 1%

Reg. No.

Sire

ID

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

Milk

CW

Marb

REA

$W

$F

$G

$B

19192706

Enhance

8428

10

0.9

76

136

1.57

30

70

1.09

1.23

89

118

87

205

352

1%

19192716

Enhance

8433

9

2.4

85

154

1.82

27

84

0.73

1.15

87

155

69

224

359

1%

$Combined

19192773

Colonel

8453

1

1

59

122

1.07

30

42

1.34

0.93

65

95

95

190

317

1%

19192585

Acclaim

8468

7

2.5

83

162

0.17

24

86

0.91

0.91

76

151

72

223

339

1%

19192724

Enhance

8477

9

1.3

74

135

1.29

31

69

1.00

1.00

87

123

79

201

342

1%

19302184

The Rock

8478

7

1.9

80

149

1.38

21

71

1.10

0.59

76

117

77

194

308

1%

19192690

Enhance

8490

15

-0.1

80

146

2.01

30

77

0.89

1.09

94

132

74

206

350

1%

19216115

Enhance

8533

12

0.8

71

129

1.65

33

61

0.98

0.67

87

104

74

178

314

1%

19268337

Acclaim

8537

7

1.4

80

150

0.03

35

72

0.86

0.79

90

138

73

210

332

1%

19309255

Enhance

8577

6

1.8

72

130

0.78

30

60

1.00

0.91

82

114

78

192

320

1%

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 • WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

BW

Join us Sept. 5 as we offer a real world set of bulls that will add thickness, volume and muscle • They are the rancher’s kind! CALL, E-MAIL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK!

Profile for California Cattleman

July/August 2019 California Cattleman magazine  

July/August 2019 California Cattleman magazine