Page 1

February 2017

2017—2018

California Cattlemen’s Association President

Dave Daley


Teixeira Cattle Co. ualPerformance n n A 16 th

Plus Bull Sale

President’s Day • Monday, Feb. 20 1 p.m. • Terrebonne, OR Over 100 Fall & Spring Yearling BullS Sell alSO Selling a Select grOup OF Bred FemaleS! TEX Playbook 5437

tex plaYBOOk 5437 • 3 halF BrOtherS Sell! REG NO.: 18414912 CED BW WW YW SC MB RE FAT $W +10

+.4

$B

+70 +120 +1.32 +.89 +.87 +.058 +85.47 +177.45

TOP 1% OF THE BREED FOR $W & $B!

SEMEN NOW AVAILABLE ON THIS HIGH PROFILE HERDSIRE! SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR VIDEO

BaSin paYweight 1682 • 6 SOnS Sell! REG NO.: 17038724

AT TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO., WE WORK HARD TO RAISE THE KIND OF BULLS COMMERCIAL CATTLEMEN NEED. TEX PLAYBOOK (PICTURED ABOVE), A SON OF BASIN PAYWEIGHT 1682, WAS RAISED BY TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO., AND RANKS AMONG SOME OF THE BEST YOUNG BULLS IN THE ANGUS BREED. TO FIND MORE LIKE HIM, JOIN US ON FEB. 20 AT THE RANCH IN TERREBONNE. WITH TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO., YOU AREN’T JUST BUYING A BULL, YOU BECOME PART OF OUR PROGRAM! OUR SUCCESS DEPENDS ON YOUR SUCCESS!

ALL BULLS GENESEEK TESTED!

BID ONLINE!

ALSO WATCH FOR BULLS SELLING FROM TEIXERIA CATTLE CO. IN RED BLUFF JAN. 28! JOHN TEIXEIRA (805) 448-3859 ALLAN TEIXEIRA (805) 310-3353 TOM HILL (541) 990-5479 WWW.TEIXEIRACATTLECO.COM CATTLE@THOUSANDHILLSRANCH.COM

PSALMS 50:10

Sale Managed by:

Larry Cotton (517) 294-0777 Ryan Cotton (806) 206-8361


28TH annual

WinnemuccA R HR

Ranch Hand Rodeo Weekend Mark your calendars for our 28th annual event

March 1 - March 5, 2017 Winnemucca Events Complex

Join us at the Winnemucca Events Complex to experience Nevada’s largest & most exciting Ranch Hand Rodeo and Horse Sale! Over 30 teams compete for prizes and bragging rights!

Tentative Schedule

Wednesday & Thursday, March 1-2, 2017 Winnemucca Cow Dog Trial and Finals

Friday, March 3, 2017 Stock Horse Challenge & Horse Sale Preview Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash

5 Full D

ays of

Saturday, March 4, 2017 Ranch Hand Rodeo Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash Ranch, Rope & Performance Horse Sale

Exciteme nt

!

Sunday, March 5, 2017 Ranch Hand Rodeo

Ranch, Rope & Performance

Horse Sale

Real Cowboys

Top Ten Average ~ $10,440 High Selling Horse Not Smart Smokin~ $17,500

Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash

Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash Open 4D, Youth, and Senior Races ADDED MONEY!!

March 3-5, 2017 Winnemucca Events Complex

For More Information Call (775) 623-2220

Real Life

Real Excitement

This premier sale will feature top quality ranch, rope, and performance horses, both finished and started prospects. The Winnemucca Horse Sale has become well known for quality horses and an efficient crew year after year! 2016 Winning Team - TL Ranch February 2017 California Cattleman 3

For More Information: (775) 623-5071 or www.RanchRodeoNV.com


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

PRESIDENT David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Pat Kirby, Wilton Mike Miller, San Jose Mike Williams, Acton TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Jenna Chandler

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

4

Looking Forward & Adapting to Change by CCA Second Vice President Pat Kirby As we turn the page to 2017, we just experienced one of the best starts to the grass season for most of California. While the precipitation has proved to be excessive in many areas of the State – we are on our way to ending the lingering drought of the past 5 years. As a recent addition to the officer roster to the CCA, I was asked to introduce myself to the membership. I’ve been involved in the cattle business since an early age, my father managed cattle operations in Sacramento, Madera and San Benito counties. I currently live in Sacramento County with my wife DeDe and we run a cow/calf operation in Sacramento and Amador counties along with some summer grazing in Plumas and Sierra counties. I was raised in the Central Valley of California and graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo in 1976 with a degree in Agricultural Business Management Upon graduation I went to work for Continental Grain Company and moved to Chicago. Nothing short of a culture shock for a ranch kid from California. I spent 22 years in various grain merchandising and management positions in the Midwest, Pacific Northwest and California. It was opportunity that provided invaluable experience. The last 18 years I have worked for AL Gilbert in Oakdale, a family owned dairy feed manufacturer. I have been primarily purchasing commodities and providing risk management for our grain program. I have served on trade organization boards including the California Grain and Feed, as well as the California Wheat Commission. I currently serve on the board of the Amador/El Dorado/Sacramento

Cattlemen’s Association and the Sacramento County Farm Bureau. I know we all are busy trying to manage our own operation ,but I have found we also need to invest time in protecting and promoting our industry and Agriculture as a whole. I was honored to be asked to serve as an officer in the CCA. The business climate in California has not gotten any easier in the last few years for any of us. The regulatory actions we face today in California often times sets the bar for the rest of the U.S. The immediate issues facing our industry today include water diversion and reporting requirements thru SB88, ground water management and public land controls. These are just a few that are on everybody’s radar. Some of these are not new, just ongoing. However, the CCA has consistently played a role in defending the cattle industry on these challenges by making sure we had a seat at the table to protect your interests. The association also needs your input and support at county and state levels. We all have something we can bring to the to the table to assist in solving many of these issues. Your membership entitles you to not only have a voice but to also play an active role in protecting our industry. As you may be aware, CCA is celebrating it’s 100th anniversary in 2017 and certainly showcased the exceptional cattlemen and cattlewomen who make up our organization. The CCA has been providing guidance and support for our industry for a long time but its real success has come from the membership. I look forward to seeing you in the coming year and getting to know many of you.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Bakersfield, CA and additional mailing offices. Publication # 8-3600

National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman February 2017 California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE THECOVER COVER The February cover photo features newly-elected California Cattlemen’s Association President David Daley, a lifelong rancher from Oroville. The photo was taken by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead. To learn more about Daley, his background and aspirations for the next two years at the helm of CCA, see the feature article on page 14.

FEBRUARY 2017 Volume 100, Issue 2

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

UPCOMING CCA SPRING TOUREVENTS

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN A new face

4

UPCOMING CCA MEETINGS & EVENTS

BUNKHOUSE CCA financials over a century

6

Feb. 1 - 4

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA opposes bay/delta plan

8

Feb. 8

Santa Barbara County Cattlemen’s Meeting Santa Maria

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD U.S. beef in Mexico

24

Feb. 23

San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Meeting Paso Robles

HERD HEALTH CHECK Remembering best managment practices at weaning

28

Feb. 24

Monterey County Cattlemen’s Meeting San Lucas

FUTURE FOCUS 2017 YCC leadership team

40

Feb. 24

Butte County Cattlemen’s Meeting Oroville

Feb. 25

Humboldt-Del Norte Cattlemen’s Dinner Dance Ferndale

March 1

San Joaquin-Stanislaus Cattlemen’s Meeting Waterloo

SPECIAL FEATURES

Dave Daley takes reins of 100-year-old CCA Cattle rangeland makes home for rare rat Fencing ‘em in for your good and theirs CCA’s early years DeForest family finds love in land and livestock Breeders retaining share of beefmaster feeders

READER SERVICES Buyers’ Guide Obituaries Advertisers Index

16 32 36 46 50 54

58 64 66

Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show Nashville, Tenn.

March 13

Contra Costa-Alameda Cattlemen’s Meeting Livermore

March 21

CCA Executive Meeting Sacramento

March 22

CCA Steak & Eggs Legislative Breakfast & Lobby Day Sacramento

March 28-30

NCBA Legislative Conference Washington, D.C.

May 24 & 25

CA/AZ Feeder Meeting San Diego

June 21-23

CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting Coalinga

February 2017 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE Financial Matters

CCA membership as crucial to bottomline as ever by CCA Director of Finance Lisa Pherigo Much of 2016 was spent preparing, researching and planning for the California Cattlemen’s Association’s centennial convention and the ensuing yearlong celebration of the association’s 100-year anniversary. CCA staff spent countless hours sorting through thousands of pictures and documents from the last 100 years, and the amount of our association’s history at our fingertips was remarkable to say the least. While I had a great time looking through the ten decades of pictures from CCA’s history, I was particularly excited to find the annual meeting reports from the earlier years of CCA’s existence. These reports included the state of the association during any given year, issues facing the industry, along with membership breakdowns, financials reports and even audited financials. In the CCA’s first year, 1917, $2,480.97 was collected from 113 members. As the association continued growing and gaining traction in the early 1920s, dues revenue increased. By 1921, the association recognized more than three times the dues collected during its first year. The 1920s were also the decade that the association introduced non-dues revenue to help offset increasing expenses. I was shocked to discover that the rent during the 20s in San Francisco on Montgomery Street was $635 for a full year. It’s difficult to get a hotel room for one night for that price these days. Unfortunately, the expenses in the early years were in excess of the revenues collected, resulting in the association having more liabilities than assets, which meant the association was in debt. The debt of the association was very short

lived. At the 1924 annual meeting the following was reported: “Last year at our annual meeting, the report was made to you that our association was out of debt. For many points of view, the support given to the association during the past year has been remarkable and certainly most gratifying. We have had a smaller percentage of delinquent members in the association this year than at any previous time. The total income of the association for 1924 was $3,294.58 greater than for 1923, and the excess of income for expenditures for the year 1924 has been $2,858.09.” The early 20s were the last years that CCA was operating with any debt. With no lack of regulatory and legislative issues impacting the cattle business and ranchers needing someone fighting on their behalf more than ever, over the next 30 years the association recognized tremendous growth in membership and by the late 1960s, CCA collected over $100,000 in annual revenue and most of those years recognized an excess of revenue over expenditures. Over the last 40 years, you, the CCA member, have continued to find value in your CCA membership, though increases in dues revenue have slowed from the first 60 years of the association, a period at the end of

LISA PHERIGO which annual dues revenue had become 100 times as great as it was at the association’s inception, our dues revenue is currently three and half times what it was in the 70s. With the addition of many of our non-dues revenue programs, CCA’s gross revenue is budgeted at just over 1.7 million dollars. We certainly have come a long way as an association! 100 years later, one of the most interesting details that I found is that many of our expenses are today the same percentage of revenue that they were in each previous decade. After looking through 100 years of documents, one thing is very clear, and has not changed, your membership is crucial to the success of CCA. We would not be here today without the support of our members, and without you, staff could not continue to fight for the ranching community in Sacramento every day.

Initially a marketing cooperative, this check is the first CCA issued to amember in payment for cattle sold. 6 California Cattleman February 2017


11th Annual

Bull Sale

SUNDAY, FEB. 19, 2017 1 p.m. at the Ranch

2016 g in r p S ly r a E – 5 1 0 2 Early Fall Ranch Ready Bulls!

Gardnerville, Nevada GUEST CONSIGNORS: Rancho Casino • Dal Porto Livestock

Angus • Salers • Salers Optimizer Composites

Casino H64 Aberdeen K70

Purebred Angus 17712894 His first sons sell!

Casino Aberdeen H64 x SydGen CC&7 x SS Objective T510 0T26

Producing Bulls That Meet the Demands of the Industry Catalogs mailed on request… e-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com… voice/text: (775) 790-6148

EPDS: CED 9, BW 0.0, WW 51, YW 86, MILK 34, MARB .51, RE .69, $B 116.82

DPL Right Answer P69 Purebred Angus 17863227 His first sons sell!

Connealy Right Answer x Sitz Upward 307R x Mytty In Focus

/

Ward Ranches

GARY WARD & FAMILY Gary Ward (775) 790-6148

Katie Ward (916) 990-4818 P. O. Box 1404, Gardnerville, NV 89410 E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com Ranch: 1155 Foothill Rd., Gardnerville

“Y OU R

Western GENET I C SO URC E”

EPDS: CED –1, BW 3.9, WW 56, YW 100, MILK 32, MARB .69, RE .11, $B 110.84

Ward A336 Relic 30R

Polled 80% Salers P696899 His sons sell!

MAC Relic 30R x MAC F1 Rainstar 15R Ranks below the Salers breed average for BW EPD and above breed average for CED, WW and YW.

February 2017 California Cattleman 7


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA OPPOSES NEW UNIMPAIRED FLOW STANDARDS FOR BAY/DELTA PLAN At December’s Annual CCA Convention in Reno, CCA membership passed a new resolution opposing any regulation which would curtail water rights diversions for the benefit of fisheries to the detriment of agriculture. It wasn’t long after that CCA staff had an opportunity to put the new policy to work. On Jan. 3, CCA staff appeared before the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in Sacramento to oppose a Substitute Environmental Document (SED), issued Sept. 15, 2016, which outlines potential changes to the Water Quality Control Plan for the San Francisco Bay/SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta Estuary (Bay/Delta Plan). The most significant proposed change within the SED is a proposal to increase unimpaired flows on the San Joaquin River and three tributaries—the Merced, Stanislaus and Tuolumne Rivers—to within a range of 30 to 50 percent, with a starting point of 40 percent unimpaired flow from February to June. According to the SWRCB, this level of unimpaired flow is necessary for “the survival of fish like salmon and…to protect many endangered and threatened species, as well as species relied upon by the commercial fisheries.” There are a number of significant flaws with the SED’s proposed changes for the Bay/Delta Plan. For instance, there is considerable question whether the unimpaired flow standard is even a viable approach for improving salmon survival, as that approach overlooks significant threats to fish survival, including widespread predation by predatory fish species and losses in habitat. Perhaps the most alarming aspect of the SED’s proposed changes, however, would be the detrimental impacts of the plan on Central Valley agriculture and local economies. According to “Worth Your Fight,” a collaboration of the Modesto and Turlock Irrigation Districts, had 40 percent unimpaired flow been required on the Tuolumne River in 2015, the economic impact would have been $1.6 billion in economic output loss, $167 million in farm-gate revenue loss, $330 million in labor income loss and 6,576 jobs would have been lost. Additionally, the 40 percent unimpaired flow requirement would have resulted in the Turlock Irrigation District making zero acre feet of water available to growers in both 2014 and 2015. While the SED addresses impacts to agriculture generally, it focuses very little on the potential impacts to the area’s cattlemen specifically. In fact, between its 119-page chapter

8 California Cattleman February 2017

on agricultural resources and its 105-page appendix on agricultural economic effects, the SED only devotes 5 paragraphs to examining the plan’s potential impacts upon the beef community. CCA’s Jan. 3 statement to the SWRCB focused on emphasizing the economic impacts that a 40 percent unimpaired flow requirement would have upon beef producing families in the plan’s area. CCA emphasized that decreased agricultural water diversions could make pasture for grazing more scarce, forcing ranchers to reduce herd sizes; with herds already scaled back as a result of the drought, further reductions could imperil ranch viability. CCA also pointed out the significant costs of securing and transporting alternative feed and the loss in agricultural lands’ property values that would attend a reduction of water supply reliability and the increase in water supply costs. Finally, CCA took issue with the SWRCB’s determination that impacts upon grazing are “less than significant” because grazing land is unlikely to be converted to other crops of nonagricultural uses. Conversion of rangeland is far from the only relevant threat, and the SWRCB’s analysis failed to consider whether pasture could continue to support ranchers’ livelihood if new unimpaired flow provisions are implemented. Compounding these economic fears is the fact that in developing the SED, the SWRCB completely overlooked the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) in its development of the proposed unimpaired flow standards. The SED assumes that agricultural users can compensate for reduced surface water availability by turning to groundwater. However, in doing so, the SED overlooks SGMA’s requirement that groundwater be managed sustainably, meaning that overdraft conditions will not be permitted to continue. By ignoring SGMA in its analysis, the SED vastly underestimated the agricultural water supply shortages (and attendant economic impacts) that would attend implementation of the proposed unimpaired flow standards. CCA will continue to work with other stakeholders to oppose the unimpaired flow provisions of the Bay/ Delta Plan amendments, including filing extensive written comments before the SWRCB’s March 17 deadline and review of the final SED, which the SWRCB expects to release in July. Ranchers looking to lend their voice to the opposition can join Worth Your Fight’s petition to the SWRCB at www.worthyourfight.org.


A family business selling bulls under one iron for 58 years

ANNUAL

BULL SALE

175

Bulls Sell 110 Yearling & Fall Yearling Red Angus 20 Yearling Red SimAngus 15 Yearling & Fall Yearling Balancers 30 Black SimAngus Coming 2 Year Olds 10 Elite Registered Heifers Featuring 40 Feed Efficiency Tested Bulls by Legend, Redemption, & Hunter

Feb. 23, 2017 at MADRAS, OREGON

Elite Herd Bull Prospects ID

REG

YW

MARB

REA

6906 6908 6904

3546025 LEGEND CONQUEST 197 55 15 -6.2 64 108 3546031 LEGEND CONQUEST 196 55 13 -6 64 107 3546033 LEGEND CONQUEST 162 54 11 -3.8 73 125 Three of the most exciting Full Brother Herd Bulls we’ve ever offered- Numbers, Looks, and Efficient!

SIRE

1.1 1.24 0.85

0.22 0.1 0.23

6215

3572772 IRON ORE B571 Outcross Genetics with lots of eye appeal

0.72

0.31

6909

3546050 REDEMPTION EXPECTATION 174 56 12 -5.3 73 124 1.13 Top Redemption son of the offering - Maternal Sib to Lorenzen Top Dollar our $20,000 2016 Sale topper

0.05

6991

3526979

NEW DIRECTION

MGS

HB

131

BIG SKY

GM

52

66

51

CE

10

4

BW

-3.3

WW

59

102

-1.7

58

92

0.75

0.23

MARB

REA

Sampling of our Calving Ease bulls

Top 25 Calving Ease bulls rank in the top 5% for CED and 10% for BW ID

REG

SIRE

MGS

6033 6058 6901 6902 6992 6993

3543365 3543344 3546061 3546064 3540132 3540133

LORENZEN PAVER LORENZEN PAVER FUSION FUSION REDEMPTION REDEMPTION

JOSHUA JERICHO REDEMPTION REDEMPTION CONQUEST IMPRESSIVE

HB

GM

CE

BW

WW

YW

158 142 156 133 155 152

53 52 54 52 53 52

13 10 13 15 12 11

-4.8 -4.2 -4 -3.1 -3.7 -4.7

61 74 61 57 65 59

96 112 102 100 109 97

HB

GM

CE

BW

WW

YW

MARB

REA

144 132 162 129 120

52 52 54 52 51

6 1 8 5 5

-0.8 0.1 -2.6 -0.2 -0.5

87 80 81 80 78

133 127 125 122 120

0.62 0.81 0.96 0.75 0.69

0.4 0.36 0.32 0.31 0.14

0.81 0.34 0.49 0.49 1.08 -0.06 0.64 -0.04 0.69 0.15 0.63 0.12

Red Angus Growth Bulls Top 25 rank in the top 5% for WW, YW, MARB

BROWN LEGEND

ID

REG

SIRE

MGS

6046 6003 6007 6045 6055

3543342 3543350 3543362 3543339 3543360

LORENZEN PAVER LEGEND LORENZEN PAVER LORENZEN PAVER BIEBER FUSION

LEADING EDGE DROID JOSHUA PACIFIC PRIDE JOSHUA

Lorenzen HybRed Bulls

Stout offering of Calving Ease and Growth Bulls- Whole offering Ranks in top 1% for REA and 5% for YG & CW

BROWN REDEMPTION Offering Sons of New Outcross Genetics Takeback, Bieber Fusion & Prophet

ID

REG

SIRE

MGS

6912 6048 6057 6024 6883

3546049 3543329 3543336 3543374 3566512

REDEMPTION LEGEND HUNTER HOOKS TRINITY JUST RIGHT

PELTON JAYHAWK LORENZEN JULIAN PRIME CUT CANNON BALL CARTWRIGHT

BW

WW

YW

MARB

YG

CW

REA

-4.1 -3.3 -1.2 -0.5 -2

64 52 77 77 67

105 91 117 110 96

0.71 0.71 0.43 0.52 0.05

0.04 0.06 -0.18 -0.22 -0.22

27 20 38 34 24

0.21 0.25 0.84 0.84 0.12

TI

CE

BRTH

WEAN

YEAR

MRB

88.5 18.5 90.8 18.2 87.9 19.6 78.9 13.5 79.3 16.5

-2.7 -3 -3.3 1.6 -1.5

62.3 62.5 58.7 73.4 64.3

BREEDS

7/8 RA 1/8 SIM 7/8 RA 1/8 SIM 5/8 RA 3/8 SIM 1/2 RA 1/2 SIM 1/2 RA 1/2 GV

Lorenzen Black SimAngus Bulls Entire Offering Ranks in top 2% for API and 10% for TI

GAR PROPHET LORENZEN RANCHES 22575 Skyview Lane • Bend, OR 97702 Larry Lorenzen 541.969.8034 Sam Lorenzen 541.215.2687 www.lorenzenranches.com

ASA

SEX

TATT

NAME

BR207-C OR627-C OR774-C BU870-C BU874-C

(2990916) (2960214) (2960266) (2973995) (2973996)

GAR PROPHET GAR PROPHET ALL PURPOSE BAR CK BREES HRI SHEAR FORCE

PREDESTINED PREDESTINED PREDESTINED GW LUCKY CHARM MYTTY INFOCUS

API

176.7 176.8 187.1 141.2 153.4

REA

BRDS

107.6 0.99 0.53 3/4 AN 1/4 SIM 103.3 1.08 0.53 5/8 AN 3/8 SIM 92.4 0.9 0.86 1/2 AN 1/2 SIM 114.2 0.62 0.48 3/4 AN 1/4 SIM 102.4 0.68 0.55 5/8 AN 3/8 SIM

Lorenzen Elite Heifers ANIMALID

RAAA#

SIRE

MGS

1607 670 606 621 632

3546042 3565273 3565259 3565262 3565295

LEGEND LEGEND NEW DIRECTION PREPONENT HUNTER

CONQUEST COMMITMENT PAR DUDE PAR DUDE GENERAL LEE

HB

GM

CE

BW

WW

YW

HPG

191 54 15 -5.9 62 102 14 127 53 2 -2.1 68 111 12 81 52 4 -0.1 81 131 10 140 52 7 -1.7 78 125 12 39 February 51 5 2017 -1.9 California 63 99 8

STAY MARB

REA

17 0.92 0.11 13 1.05 0.2 7 0.73 0.32 13 0.68 0.19 Cattleman 3 0.35 1.02 9


IT’S A WIN-WIN

To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0B48084

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com Lic #0124869

Dan VanVuren 209.484.5578

danv@garibaldiins.com Lic #0E44519

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, ( Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you!

Jerry Baker • 208.739.3449 Samuel Mahler • 208.739.0475

2175 Bench Rd. Vale, OR 97918 baker.baker@fmtc.com

Genetic excellence sale Saturday, February 25, 1 p.m. • Vale, Oregon Selling 150 FAll lOng-YeARling bullS – All HD50K TeSTeD

Featuring the Largest Set of Bruiser and Resource Sons to Sell in the Northwest!

DOB: 9-19-2015

BakeR BRuiSeR 4260

S a V Bruiser 9164 x tc aberdeen 759 CeD bW WW YW MilK MARb Re $W $F $g $b +12 +.2 +56 +102 +21 +.54 +.92 +49.73 +66.55 +40.20 +114.89

sale ManaGer MATT MACFARlAne MARKeTing Matt Macfarlane: 916.803.3113 www.m3cattlemarketing.com

10 California Cattleman February 2017

DOb: 10-21-2015

DOB: 8-26-2015

BakeR ReSOuRce 4379

BakeR exciteMent 4131

CeD bW WW YW MilK MARb Re $W $F $g $b -1 +2.9 +62 +112 +27 +.28 +.86 +49.47 +77.93 +18.19 +139.15

CeD bW WW YW MilK MARb Re $W $F $g $b +9 +.1 +60 +104 +26 +.49 +.51 +56.15 +64.23 +29.02 +129.39

S a V Resource 1441 x S a V Pioneer 7301

watch and bid live

Basin excitement x tc Vance 011

Guest consiGnor

Mahler Cattle Co., Vale, OR Rick Machado, Auctioneer 805.301.3210

THD ©


“Best of the Best” 254 Head Sell

142 Hereford Bulls • 78 Angus Bulls 20 Hereford Heifers

37th Annual Production Sale

BULLS INCLUDE TWO YEAR OLDS, JUNIOR & SENIOR BULLS COMPLETE PERFORMANCE DATA INCLUDING EPDS, SCROTAL MEASUREMENT, ULTRASOUND & CARCASS DATA

Monday, February 27, 2017 At the Ranch • Bruneau, Idaho

Special Attraction: Selling the right to flush your pick of our entire first calf heifers. Numerous daughters of Miles McKee, Stockman, 88X, Trust, Hometown 10Y will be available to flush to the bull of your choice!

Catalog Available at www.hereford.com

Live internet Bidding at

LOT 12 - C 105Y CATAPULT 6046

LOT 29 - C 1311 5280 LAD 6077 ET

LOT 54 - C 1311 5280 LAD 6121 ET

these lots were in Colyer’s 2015 string of pen bulls at Denver! BW

1.2 WW

66

YW 99

MK 39

IMF -.03 URE .45

Top herd bull prospect by the popular Catapult and one of the top young donor cows. We could write a book on all positives this bull has going for him. Birthweight 80 pounds combined with the 2nd heaviest weaning calves and a WWR of 123%. All females on the bottom side have been donors for us. Top 10% Calving ease YEPD and $CHB, top 15% BEPD, top 2% WEPD and top 1% Milk.

BW

LOT 58 - C 1311 5280 LAD 6128 ET

BW

2.7 WW

57

YW 83

MK 34

IMF .08

2.7 WW

57

YW 83

MK 34

IMF .08

URE .48

These kind of herd bulls are rare and they don’t come along often. We feel that lot 29 is a herd changing sire that we will use in our program. He is smooth, correct and hard to fault. Extremely tight sheath, lots of forerib and rear body depth in a powerful muscular package. Terms to be announced sale day.

BW

LOT 74 - C R111 WILDCAT 6166 ET

URE .48

BW

4.2 WW

57

YW 98

MK 26

IMF .24

URE .52

2.7 WW

57

YW 83

MK 34

IMF .08

URE .48

This brother has been one of the favorites all along and will be a member of our pen of 3 bulls in Denver. He is enjoyable to look at with extra extension thru his front end. Not many can match his muscle shape especially his upper hip and width of pins.

LOT 76 - C 1008X REGAL 6170

BW

4.3 WW

64

YW 101 MK 29

IMF .07

URE .65

This one has been a favorite all summer and as time goes on he keeps getting even better. He will be a member of our pen of 3 bulls in Denver. He is striking in his look with dark color and short marking but what is most impressive about this one is his structure. This bull will see heavy use this spring in our program.

This is one of the more anticipated well thought of matings in the sale. All of them are long bodied, straight lined and have extra color and pigment. This is the first crop of “Wildcat” calves and this flush by the proven “R111” donor will be a popular choice.

Polled Herd sire prospect and one of the massive and performance oriented bulls in the entire offering. Top 3% for WEPD, Top 10% for YEPD, Milk and Ribeye and top 5% for CHB. He is the natural raised son of 1008X that is dam of 2 National Champion females.

LOT 96 - C CURRENCY NOTE 6251 ET

LOT 179 - CCC COURAGE 6033

LOT 198 - CCC BLACK GRANITE 6067

BW

3.4 WW

60

YW 91

MK 28

IMF -.05 URE .65

Here is a herd bull prospect and has as much style and balance as any in the sale. He is a full brother to the Foundation heifer that brought $120,000 in Denver and is a role model female at GKB. Top 10% for WEPD, top 20% YEPD, top 15% Milk, top 5% Ribeye and top 35% $CHB.

Guy, Sherry & Katie Colyer (208) 845-2313 Kyle & Bobby Jean Colyer (208) 845-2098

GUY CELL (208) 599-0340 • GUY@HEREFORD.COM KYLE CELL (208) 250-3924

BW

1.1 WW

72

YW 111 MK 31

MB

.30

REA .95

Top herd bull prospect by Courage. He may be the highest performing bull we have ever raised and with a tremendous amount of muscle. Dam is a great young cow with an AWWR of 116 and AYWR of 105. Top 10% CED, top 1% WEPD, top 4% YEPD, top 10% Milk and Ribeye while still maintaining a breed average for Mature cow weight.

31058 Colyer Road Bruneau, ID 83604 Fax: (208) 845-2314

BW

0.8 WW

57

YW 92

MK 22

MB

.76

REA 1.01

A Black Granite son with extra style and eye appeal. He combines that with some of the best numbers you can find. Top 10% CED, top 15% WEPD, top 35% YEPD and CWT, top 25% Marbling, top 5% Ribeye and top 20% $B. Dam has AWWR of 104 and AYWR of 101 on 4 head.

February 2017 California Cattleman 11


Tobin Named Tehama County Cattlemen’s “Man” of the year Though it hasn’t happened often, members of the Tehama County Cattlemen’s Association (TCCA) have been known to bestow their prestigious Cattleman of the Year Award upon women who have made exceptional contributions to the association. This year, on Jan. 7, at the 65th annual Tehama County Cattlemen’s Winter dinner and scholarship fundraiser, Cathy Tobin, Flournoy, was honored as the 2016 Tehama County Cattlemen’s Man of the Year. Tobin, who is a Hereford breeder, owning and operating Oak Knoll Herefords in western Tehama County has been active in the group for many years, helping facilitate local meetings, fundraisers and public outreach events. In addition to being an active member of the cattlemen’s organization, she has been an active member and past leader of the local Tehama County CattleWomen’s unit, as well. Perhaps her most notable contribution to the organizations have also been a labor of love toward the local youth. Tobin has served on the local cattlemen’s scholarship committee and tirelessly worked to raise thousands of dollard to aid local college students in their scholastic and career pursuits. At this year’s dinner and fundraiser, which about 400 agriculture enthusiasts attended, area lawmaker Sen. Jim Nielsen (R-Biggs)

was on hand with past honoree and TCCA past president Jerry Hemsted, Cottonwood, to honor Tobin for her efforts on behalf of the community’s ranchers. In addition to Tobin’s honor, Tehama County CattleWomen’s member Irene Fuller was honored as TCCW CowBelle of the Year and outgoing president Chad Amen,

GL

Cottonwood, was recognized for his service to the assocaition over the past year. The evening was the 14th year the winter dinner has served to help benefit local agriculture youth with their education as well as recognize those who have been selected for scholarships.

PERFORMANCE HEREFORD GENETICS,

IT’S A PROGRAM.

Genoa Livestock From the days when we began building our herd, our genetic selection has been focused on the needs of our commercial cattlemen – maternally bred bulls with calving ease, growth and carcass merit. We produce cattle that are phenotypically correct with genetics to carry producers forward for generations to come. Our balanced approach toward EPD data behind our cattle has resulted in our herd being above breed average in 14 of 15 measured traits for the last 6 years! As the year moves on, we reflect on the support we have received from our customers, fellow cattlemen and friends – and extend a sincere

Thank You!

Visitors Always Welcome! F OR

M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N , G O T O

WWW. G ENOAL IVESTOCK. COM

OWENS ©

Pictured (L to R): Jerry Hemsted, Sen. Jim Nielsen and Tehama County Cattlemen’s Man of the Year Cathy Tobin. 12 California Cattleman February 2017

GL

G ENOA

L IVESTOCK

640 Genoa Lane • Minden, NV 89423 Office 775-782-3336 • Bob Coker 916-539-1987 Jared Patterson 208-312-2386 info@genoalivestock.com


SHAW CATTLE CO.

ANNUAL BULL SALE Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Bu

sines s

450 Hereford, Angus & Red Angus Bulls • at the ranch near Caldwell, ID

Th eB

ull

Angus AI sires include Payweight 1682, Black Granite, Innovation, Reserve, Substantial, Dominance and Denver.

Hereford AI sires include Hometown, York, On Target 936, Peerless, Tested and Wonder.

• First Breeding Season

SHAW CATTLE CO. IS HONORED TO BE THE 2016 BEEF IMPROVEMENT FEDERATION (BIF) SEEDSTOCK PRODUCER OF THE YEAR!

Since 1946

Guarantee • Sight-unseen Purchases Fully Guaranteed • Family Owned and Operated for 70 Years

Red Angus AI sires include Redemption, Pinnacle and Conquest.

CONTACT US TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK

SHAW CATTLE CO. 22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 greg@shawcattle.com www.shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

February 2017 California Cattleman 13


Make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association and mail to: California Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: 100 Year Coffee Table Book 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

< No refunds will be granted >

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

WILD Doug Winnett

800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

14 California Cattleman February 2017

License 0208825


Thomas Angus Ranch Spring Bull Sale

Noon • March 7, 2017

at the ranch, Baker City, Oregon

Selling:

200 BULLS & 75 FALL BRED HEIFERS safe to Firestorm 3PT1 Bulls sired by: AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Plattemere Weigh Up K360, Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36, Quaker Hill Firestorm 3PT1, GAR Prophet, Baldridge Waylon W34, Connealy Black Granite,

Also Join Us: March

6, 2017 • Baker City, Oregon

Harrell Hereford Ranch Bull Sale at the Western Genetic Event SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

Thomas Angus Ranch • 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561

www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com February 2017 California Cattleman 15


THE OPTIMISTIC

COWMAN Dave Daley, CCA’s 48 President th

by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead

Y

ou might liken fifth generation rancher and newly-elected president of the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) Dave Daley’s work ethic to that of the energizer bunny, just going and going and going and going. Simply stated, a person would be hard pressed to find Daley with any down time, because he enjoys staying active, particularly in the beef cattle industry. And these days, he says, 3 a.m. is the best time of day to get paperwork done anyway. As a full-time rancher, Daley still finds time to serve as an educator and an advocate for the cattle industry. He grew up in Butte County on the same ranch his family settled in 1850 as gold miners, east of Oroville in a timber mountain area as the fourth of five siblings with three older sisters and one younger brother. He attended California State University, Chico (Chico State), and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in animal science, going on to earn his Master of Science degree and Doctorate from Colorado State University (Colorado State), Fort Collins, Colo. in animal science with a focus in beef cattle systems. Daley currently runs a commercial cow-calf operation and a purebred Angus herd, as well as some stocker cattle occasionally, in a traditional foothill management system in the winter and grazes in the mountains during the summer. His oldest son, Kyle, after graduating from Chico State, and has returned home working on the ranch full-time while expanding his own cowherd. Daley’s daughter, Kate, is studying to become a veterinarian at Colorado State, and Daley’s youngest, Rob, recently graduated from basic training of the United States Army. In an ideal day in the life of Dave Daley, he says without question he likes to stay busy and work. “It’s not work if you’re doing something you really love,” said Daley. “When it comes down to it, my hobby is my work, and I’m ok with that.” Daley says he’d rather be working cattle any day of the week and you probably won’t find him on a golf course any time soon. In fact, his kids give him a hard time by implying that he mixes up cattle on purpose just so he can sort them again. 16 California Cattleman February 2017

Daley has come up the ranks of the CCA officer team to CCA President, serving as second vice president and first vice president, as well. He has also previously served as Butte County Cattlemen’s President and as an advisor to the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association for many years. In addition to these leadership roles within the beef community, Daley also travels to speak about beef production and beef systems in California, nationally as well as internationally. In conjunction with other animal science programs, Daley helped develop the California Young Cattlemen’s Association program and has advised Chico’s chapter for many years. “It was by accident I came in as CCA President during the 100th year,” Daley said. “But, I’ve always been a history buff, and there’s something to be said about the way the association grows and changes but with same core values of the past 100 years.” CCA has changed and progressed, but fundamentally the association has stayed true to the same objectives, according to Daley, and he says that’s not typical for other associations. “You can look back through old notes, meeting minutes and magazine issues to find that we’ve always had problems in the beef industry,” Daley said. “It’s always been challenging and we think ours is the worst, when it may not be the case.” If you study history, the beef cattle business is not an easy one. Daley says beef producers must choose to weather the storm or it wouldn’t be possible to continue on. “Sure, now we have technology like email and Twitter, but I think fundamentally we are a conservative but forward


thinking association,” Daley said. “We don’t just change for change’s sake; we appreciate traditions of the past and move ahead.” Daley is a current member of Butte County Farm Bureau and gets involved in issues that have some overlap in the farming and ranching communities that CCA and the California Farm Bureau generally work together on like land use issues and the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act. He’s also very active in federal and public lands issues with the Public Lands Council and hopes to get involved more in that arena in his new capacity as CCA President. He is also active in the Beef Improvement Federation and has keynoted several of their meetings. Based on his high level of involvement in the ranching business and countless industry experiences, many believe he is well suited to take the reins of the association. “As a fifth generation rancher, Dave has a deep love for ranching and is passionate about ensuring its viability for future generations,” said CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin. “His connection to ranchers through out the state and his professional training make him well equipped to successfully engage the issues confronting ranchers.” Ranching has been a life-long endeavor for Daley, and he knew he always wanted to stay in California. He recalls various times in graduate school when he had opportunities to go to other states and do other things, but he always wanted to come home to California, more specifically Butte County. It is said that home is where the heart is, and Daley’s source of every day inspiration comes from his mom and dad. “My dad was a really good cattleman, and also a good person,” Daley said. “I learned a lot from him about how to treat people because of how kind he was. He didn’t do something to get things, he just did them to be kind.” Daley says he has noticed from his dad that if you’re really good with people, good things come back to you, like a chance to lease some ground or a good deal on cattle. Interestingly enough, the exact lessons Daley says he learned from his dad, Daley’s kids say they’ve learned from him. “A phrase we grew up hearing is, ‘You catch more flies with honey,’” said Kate and Kyle Daley. They said one thing about growing up in the cattle industry is you have a lot of neighbors. Their dad often repeats this saying after dropping off a box of home-grown tomatoes or a literal box of honey to a neighbor who called about cattle being on their property or something else that may have come up. Kate and Kyle say the neighbors may have been irritated about the cows, but they always remembered the honey and the kind gesture, and then the cows were soon forgotten. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

I want our association to continue welcoming younger leadership. I hope I can continue the tradition of those who have led the association in the past before me.

— Dave Daley

February 2017 California Cattleman 17


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 “Dad taught us to always be kind to people, because it will take you further in life,” said Kyle. It is the people Daley has watched and admired from afar like one of his mentors, John Lacey, Paso Robles, who he says bring integrity and trust to the business and he tries to always emulate what those people have been willing to do for the industry. The best lessons can be learned from family, and Daley always refers back to a moment he shared with his dad when things seem to get all doom and gloom. “Our business is a tough business, and we tend to get pretty negative about it sometimes,” Daley said. “We think the world’s coming down on us and we tend to get pretty pessimistic, but it’s good to take a step back and gain perspective sometimes.” When Daley is speaking to various industry groups, he likes to share the story of when his dad took a sales slip out of his jacket pocket to prove that nothing is ever “that tough.” The receipt was from 1933 and was marked 3.5 cents per pound for his steers for 1.5 cents per pound for his cows. It was then that Daley realized ranchers sometimes only think they have it difficult. He says it’s good to take a step back. “We’re pretty lucky to work in this business, and when I get frustrated, I think about this,” Daley said. “If you’re worried California is getting too big, remember they all have to eat somehow, so take a deep breath.” Well-known for speaking at various industry events about various topics like practical crossbreeding, industry issues and recently, sustainability, Daley says of the long list of groups and places he has spoken to, he says his favorite trip he took to Australia for 12 days to speak to groups of ranchers all over the continent about genetics and beef cattle breeding program. “I’ve learned a lot from my travel,” Daley said. “As much as I love it, Oroville is not the center of the universe, so it’s good to get out to see everywhere.” He has spoken to the groups like the World Hereford Conference in Calgary, the Beef Improvement Federation, the International Animal Welfare Conference, the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and more. Even as this list continues to get longer, Daley says the type of people he runs into are virtually the same no matter if he’s in Modoc County, the Imperial Valley or another country. Cattle people all seem to share the same down-to-earth practical and genuine attitudes, according to Daley. Serving as an industry spokesperson was a natural evolution for Daley. He always considered himself an advocate for agriculture. “It’s gradual,” Daley said. “One day you don’t wake up and say ‘Ok, I want to speak out,’ but from my experiences with FFA, college and livestock judging, I got active in public speaking it just happened; it wasn’t a plan.” Daley grew up in a generation made up of miners, loggers, cattlemen and teachers. He says he couldn’t decide between a livehood as a cattleman or a career as a teacher, so he became both. He took his first teaching job at Fresno State and then several years later continued his teaching career at Chico 18 California Cattleman February 2017

State, where he teaches and serves as an associate dean of the College of Agriculture today. “In my case, being a rancher has made me a much better teacher,” Daley said. “It allows me to be practical and use real life experience as examples in the classroom.” Daley says students keep you young and they keep you thinking. He asks himself often, “Am I really delivering them what they need?” Teaching forces you to stay current, Daley says. “In my head, I’m a rancher first,” Daley says. “And that’s how it will always be.” However, Daley enjoys seeing his former students along the way, noting they have almost all stayed connected to the industry either in allied industry, communications, beef production or other areas of agriculture. “To see my students out there doing well is fun,” Daley said. “I just wish some of them wouldn’t assume they haven’t changed in the last 20 years.” There are many things that light Daley up, but helping to develop the next generation of ranchers lies at the core of his goals. Encouraging young people to get involved and helping them transition in leadership roles from their Young Cattlemen’s Associations to roles within CCA will help sustain CCA membership, Daley says. Daley believes participating in any level of leadership is meaningful and can be shown at all different levels. A person doesn’t need to strive to serve as a state president, Daley says. Getting involved locally is important too. “We have a history of servant leadership in the beef cattle community,” Daley said. “So many cattlemen are so busy, because they also serve on the board of supervisors or in their church or rotary groups. We have lots of good people out there who serve their community, and I really believe a lot of the best leadership starts locally.” Daley says, however, that CCA can assist in providing connections to local communities, and it is these connections to each other and to the state association that make them individually stronger. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

Rob, Kate, Kyle and Dave Daley


Modoc Sale

HORNED AHA# 43663586 DOB: 4/6/15

HORNED AHA# 43664543 DOB: 4/16/15

POLLED AHA# P43663653 DOB: 4/20/15

POLLED AHA# P43663582 DOB: 4/1/15

POLLED & HORNED HEREFORD BULLS WITH BREED-LEADING GENETICS! CALL US FOR A CATALOG OR VISIT US ONLINE LAMBERTRANCHHEREFORDS.COM BulL Preview

Modoc Auction Yard CA-299, Alturas, CA

Sale & Dinner:

Niles Hotel 304 South Main St. Alturas, CA

AUCTIONEER: COL. ERIC DUARTE Post sale dinner sponsored by New Generation Feeds and Elanco

The Lambert Family Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 slambert@digitalpath.net

Oroville • Chester •Alturas• lambertranchherefords.com February 2017 California Cattleman 19


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 As an association, Daley says the number one question to ask is, “How can we help our membership wherever possible with over burdensome regulations?” No matter the issue, Daley says, the central core of one regulation by itself is probably manageable, but many CCA members feel like one more burden is death by 1,000 cuts. The weight of the regulations the ranching community faces sometimes brings members to the point of complete frustration, which is where CCA steps in. “I’m not suggesting it will be simple, but our staff and previous leadership have done a remarkable job in pushing back on regulations that sometimes our members don’t even know are proposed,” Daley said. “We’ve been successful some of the time and we’ve lost some battles, but that’s part of life. Slowing down the train that seems so out of control is important to our members, and CCA is critical in helping to accomplish that.” While CCA is always working on a myriad of issues, Daley is interested in public lands issues, both state and federal, and how more grazing lands can be made available to producers in California and to expand CCA’s ability to reach public lands users in California, including those who are not CCA members. For new members looking to get involved, Daley invites you to jump into the grass roots organization and make your voice heard. “It’s a very interesting organization as it is member driven rather than so structured that you can’t get your voice heard,” Daley said. “If you show up to speak, you may not win the argument you came to present, but you’ll be listened to.” Daley’s call to action for those thinking about joining the association is, “We need you!” It is really essential if you want your voice to be a part of CCA, whether it’s in transportation, wolf or water issues, and Daley says current members must also attempt to recruit other members to help grow the association. From his perspective, small incremental changes are most impactful, and from which a legacy will then determine itself. As CCA President, he hopes he’s optimistic and approachable. “I want our association to continue welcoming younger leadership,” Daley said. “And I hope I can continue the tradition of those who have led the association in the past before me.” Daley wants to be known as a rancher who really cares about doing the right thing as a good person and someone who supports the community. He wants to continue to grow and expand his family’s ranch, and aims to be like the early ranchers he respects who were here before him. If you’re looking to get in touch with Daley over the course of his presidency, feel free to send him an email or give him a call. If he’s feeding cattle, up in the mountains, jetting between the halls of Chico State and the university farm, or on an airplane or a car headed to or from a speaking event, he’ll get back to you as soon as he can.

20 California Cattleman February 2017


BUCHANAN ANGUS RANCH ANNUAL BULL SALE

With Guest Consignors

A TRUE Performance Program With guest consignors Where performance doesn’t START at the feed bunk. Buchanan bulls averaged 942# on 10/22/16 at weaning.

For more than 50 years, the ALGOMA CATTLE have been defining performance with Practical Efficiency

90 BULLS sell at

PICTURES WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS.

NOON on SUNDAY F ebruary 26, 2017 at the Klamath County Fairgrounds

LOT: 36

LOT: 36“Algoma Gold Medal 867B Reg#18580199 who weaned off his 2yr old dam on 10/22/16 at 1020# He is a son of “Basin Excitement”

Buchanan Angus

A

B

LOT: 23 1 LOT:

LOT: 23 “Algoma Black Friday MJ1 Reg#18580223 who weaned off his 2 yr old dam on 10/22/16 at 920# He is a son of “Basin Payweight 1682”

Selling sons of:

Connealy Black Granite Basin Payweight 1682 Basin Excitement A A R Ten X 7008 S A Jindra Double Vision PA Full Power KG Solution 0018 and others

Cattle Business our ONLY Business LOT: 45

LOT: 45“Algoma Golden Payweight Reg#18580208 who weaned off his 3yr old dam on 10/22/16 at 900# He is a son of “Basin Payweight 1682”

Broadcast live on Live Auctions TV

816-392-9241

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Many Calving-Ease Bulls sell 1st year breeding season guarantee Free delivery for the first 500 miles We can feed the bulls until turnout.

www.buchananangus.com

Robert and Kathleen Buchanan & family 13490 Algoma RD Klamath Falls, OR

541-883-8471 Call today for your Sale Book or check our Website for information

buchananangus@hughes.net

February 2017 California Cattleman 21


22 California Cattleman February 2017


February 2017 California Cattleman 23


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD

U.S. BEEF SEMINARS OFFER FRESH IDEAS FOR CUSTOMERS IN MEXICO from the staff of the U.S. Meat Export Federation Over the past year, the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) conducted a series of U.S. beef cutting and cooking seminars in key Mexican markets. Funded by the Beef Checkoff Program, the seminars offered participants an opportunity to learn preparation techniques for economically priced beef cuts. The most recent seminar was held in Tijuana for clients of La Canasta, a major U.S. beef importer. This session showcased U.S. beef top sirloin, brisket and inside and outside skirt, and featured detailed instructions on how to get quality cuts from the top sirloin. “The strategy was to demonstrate the cuts they sell to their customers in Tijuana and to show them how to maximize profits by adding value, increasing the number of cuts and decreasing waste,” explained Lorenzo Elizalde, USMEF trade manager in Mexico. “Another objective was to share information about alternatives – high-quality cuts at surprisingly affordable prices. The idea was to show participants that there are other alternative beef cuts that are not very common in the market, but which could be of interest to their customers.” The seminar included cutting demonstrations by instructor Luis Pachuca, who presented a program on U.S. beef primal top sirloin. To complement Pachuca’s session, USMEF Corporative Chef German Navarrete offered cooking suggestions for each of the cuts. Navarrete also described the

characteristics of a U.S. beef brisket cut, for which he detailed various uses. He grilled steaks, prepared and cooked top sirloin cap – also known as picanha – and served attendees a brisket that was slow-cooked overnight in a convection oven. Tastings of each of the U.S. beef dishes followed Navarrete’s session. Elizalde said the series of U.S. beef seminars set the tone for more work to promote U.S. beef in Mexico in 2017. “This type of activity, which involves clients of top beef importers, not only helps USMEF develop long-term relationships with key players in the market but also

directly impacts sales of U.S beef,” he said. Despite the persistent weakness of the Mexican peso, demand for U.S. beef held up well in Mexico in 2016. Through November, exports increased 8 percent year-over-year in volume to 217,790 metric tons, while export value fell 10 percent to $891.1 million.

A U.S. beef cutting and cooking seminar in Tijuana, Mexico, included sampling of U.S. beef dishes by clients of a major U.S. beef importer.

24 California Cattleman February 2017


February 2017 California Cattleman 25


CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

SQUEEZE CHUTES HEAD GATES CATTLE WORKING SYSTEMS

Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products... 576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM •

50 Yearling & Two Year Old Angus Bulls

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Sires: RB Tour of Duty 177 Ÿ Deer Valley All In RB Active Duty 010 Ÿ Connealy Irish Ÿ PVF Insight 0129 FAF QP New Vision 1705 Ÿ Corsair Talon 4031

Internet Auction w/ Live Close

Sale Location: Route 74 Restaurant, Ione, OR

Tri-Tip Lunch at Noon Ÿ Sale Starts at 1PM

Corsair Angus Ranch Steve & Jan Puntenney 66062 Hwy 74 Ione, Oregon 97843 Phone: (503) 784-8691 www.corsairangus.com Selling Top Flight Angus Bulls & Heifers Since 2001

26 California Cattleman February 2017

140 Yearling Bulls & Long Yearling Bulls Available Spring 2017 Bred Females For Sale • Private Treaty Sales RANDY & KATE NOAH 208.257.3727

NATHAN & MELISSA NOAH 208.257.3686


P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Company

SELLING TOP HEREFORD BULLS PRIVATE TREATY OFF THE RANCH BW WW YW MK REA MB

GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 15015

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.1 58 94 24 .55 .19 31

SIRE: R NEW YORK 4593 • MGS: R VISION 4921 Reg # 43631563 • DOB: 10/12/15

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SIRE: R VISION 4290 • MGS: R WIDELOAD 2987 Reg # 43604929 • DOB: 5/6/15

1.3 WW 50 YW 83 MK 34 REA .31 MB .20 $CHB 30

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2.7 WW 60 YW 94 MK 33 REA .50 MB .19 $CHB 31 BW

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\

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THESE AND OTHER STANDOUT HEREFORD BULLS NOW FOR SALE CALL TODAY OR VISIT US AT PWGCATTLE.COM

DWIGHT JOOS, RANCH MANAGER

Count On!

PWGCattle.com• (805) 428-9781 Simi Valley, CA

February 2017 California Cattleman 27


HERD HEALTH CHECK WEANING & FEEDING key time to remember best management practices by Twig Marston, technical sales field manager, Biozyme, Inc. When it comes to weaning and feeding calves, there are several best management practices (BMPs) you don’t want to stop. When focusing on BMPs you can create an effective management system and improve calf health and productivity. Tying nutrition, vaccination and management programs together minimizes problems, builds value and pays dividends in the long run. Using an effective vaccination program involves using the proper vaccine, administration methods and timing. There are many choices of vaccines and all have been designed to build immunity and provide protection against serious diseases. The importance of protection against deadly diseases such as blackleg, bovine respiratory disease and other known pathogens should never be taken for granted. Comparing the cost of a vaccine to the potential loss of animal performance and/or life makes vaccinating a sound economic decision. The reality is we should all strive to give the proper vaccine in cattle so there is time for an immune response to build prior to the pathogen challenge. Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) practices are the industry standard and should be included in everyone’s BMPs. Application in the neck, with vaccines that have been properly handled and stored, at the correct dosage and used with the preferred route of administration are key factors in making sure the products provide the best possible protection. Little things, like sanitation and proper handling, when overlooked have devastating consequences. By having a solid veterinarian-client-patient relationship, not only will your veterinarian be able to give advice on suitable vaccinations, but can also train you and your employees on proper handing, administration and timing so maximum results are achieved. Timing is also critical to maximize returns and reduce

28 California Cattleman February 2017

complications with management decisions like castration and dehorning. University trials have shown delaying castration past 90 days of age can dramatically decrease future weight gains and increase stress, making calves more susceptible to sickness and death. Research reports constantly show losses of 20 or more pounds of body weight from delayed castration. Studies have also shown bull calves that are castrated later can have lower feedlot feed conversion (10 percent or more) and depressed carcass quality grades (up to 20 percent fewer USDA Choice carcasses). When some producers were asked why they delayed or dismissed castrating calves, the answers often centered on not having the facilities, time or expertise to carry out the practice. The economic rewards from every sale barn price recovery study have shown a positive return on investment for proper castration and dehorning practices. From both an animal health/well-being and an economic stand point, there appears no reason what-so-ever why producers should delay castration of feeder cattle past 90 to 100 days of age. Nutrition also plays a key role in implementing BMPs that influence health and wellness. Feeding the correct amounts of protein, energy, minerals, trace minerals and vitamins increases the ability of the calf ’s body to build immunity and fight disease challenges. BioZyme® Inc. is dedicated to providing cattle producers with products that compliment and fortify cow herd and growing cattle diets for a wide variety of situations and needs. Preparing calves for the market requires a systematic approach focused on health, well-being, nutrition and performance. As producers develop their BMPs emphasis should be placed on doing things right. Right products. Right time. Right way. That will ensure the system works and the cattle will respond as desired.


Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits

Cattleman's Classic Spring Sale March 4, 2017 • 1 PM PST

Dry Creek Ranch sale facility • Terrebonne, Oregon A sampling of the tremendous group of bulls we’re offering in our Spring Sale Calving Ease Prospects: Sure shot sleep all night bulls Reg #

DUNN ACQUISITION B506 Reg # 1686395

ID

HB

3557816 3557818 3557825 3557829 3557848 3557858 3557864 3557874

D104 D106 D113 D118 D141 D159 D166 D178

127 121 108 138 126 127 126 175

Reg #

ID

HB

%

15% 20% 33% 10% 15% 15% 15% 1%

GM

50 51 52 51 51 52 51 52

%

23% 13% 7% 19% 16% 6% 16% 5%

CED

10 11 8 9 9 8 9 15

BW

-2.9 -4.3 -2 -2.2 -2.5 -2.1 -2.5 -5.3

WW

57 54 67 70 61 77 61 59

YW

89 86 104 107 92 116 92 97

Milk

25 31 24 19 20 18 20 23

ME HPG CEM Stay Marb

-2 2 0 1 0 -1 0 0

11 11 11 11 11 10 11 13

6 6 5 9 8 9 8 8

12 10 9 12 11 10 11 15

YG

CW

YG

CW

0.59 0.03 0.61 -0.02 0.8 0.01 0.49 0.04 0.74 0.01 0.81 0.07 0.74 0.01 0.58 0

19 15 29 30 21 35 21 20

RE

0.32 0.36 0.34 0.31 0.27 0.25 0.27 0.07

BF

0.04 0.03 0.02 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.02 -0.01

HerdBuilder Prospects: Bulls that will build your cow herd 3557816 3557829 3557834 3557848 3557858 3557874 3557876

D104 D118 D125 D141 D159 D178 D180

Reg #

ID

127 138 161 126 127 175 118

%

15% 10% 3% 15% 15% 1% 22%

GM

50 51 52 51 52 52 52

%

23% 19% 5% 16% 6% 5% 7%

CED

10 9 10 9 8 15 7

BW

-2.9 -2.2 -2.5 -2.5 -2.1 -5.3 -1.9

WW

57 70 70 61 77 59 79

YW

89 107 114 92 116 97 119

Milk

25 19 19 20 18 23 21

ME HPG CEM Stay Marb

-2 1 -2 0 -1 0 0

11 11 13 11 10 13 10

6 9 7 8 9 8 6

12 12 14 11 10 15 10

0.59 0.03 0.49 0.04 0.62 -0.02 0.74 0.01 0.81 0.07 0.58 0 0.73 0.07

19 30 35 21 35 20 38

RE

0.32 0.31 0.3 0.27 0.25 0.07 0.35

BF

0.04 0.03 -0.01 0.02 0.02 -0.01 0.03

GridMaster Prospects: Bulls that will yield you dollars in the feedyard FEDDES SILVER BOW B226 Reg # 1687147

BROWN INCREDABULL Z7277 Reg # 1550654

3557814 3557822 3557825 3557827 3557832 3557834 3557842 3557846 3557858 3557861 3557868 3557873 3557874 3557876

D102 D110 D113 D116 D121 D125 D135 D139 D159 D162 D172 D177 D178 D180

HB

134 117 108 122 137 161 110 120 127 121 141 115 175 118

%

11% 23% 33% 19% 10% 3% 31% 20% 15% 19% 8% 26% 1% 22%

GM

52 53 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52

%

5% 4% 7% 6% 7% 5% 5% 7% 6% 9% 9% 6% 5% 7%

CED

8 10 8 7 8 10 6 8 8 5 9 8 15 7

BW

-4 -4 -2 -1.6 -1.1 -2.5 -0.5 -2.3 -2.1 -1.9 -1.4 -2.9 -5.3 -1.9

WW

65 65 67 59 81 70 83 74 77 73 81 58 59 79

Everett Flikkema: 406.580.2186

YW

100 103 104 96 126 114 129 111 116 109 126 93 97 119

Milk

24 21 24 24 23 19 20 17 18 20 26 22 23 21

ME HPG CEM Stay Marb

5 1 0 -1 2 -2 4 0 -1 6 -1 3 0 0

13 11 11 13 12 13 11 12 10 13 13 13 13 10

6 8 5 7 5 7 7 9 9 6 6 8 8 6

11 9 9 10 13 14 9 9 10 11 12 9 15 10

0.72 0.73 0.8 0.89 0.58 0.62 0.75 0.78 0.81 0.82 0.47 0.83 0.58 0.73

YG

-0.05 -0.01 0.01 -0.02 0.04 -0.02 0.04 0.03 0.07 0.08 0.01 -0.02 0 0.07

CW

23 25 29 25 43 35 45 32 35 31 43 21 20 38

RE

0.25 0.51 0.34 0.43 0.41 0.3 0.51 0.41 0.25 0.2 0.38 0.46 0.07 0.35

BF

-0.01 0.04 0.02 0.02 0.01 -0.00 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.00 0.03 -0.01 0.03

Jack Vollstedt: 818.535.4034 February 2017 California Cattleman 29 Terrebonne, Oregon • vfredangus.com


Cattlemen Support Gov. Perdue to Lead USDA Tracy Brunner, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, released the following statement Jan. 18 in support of President-elect Trump’s nomination of former Gov. Sonny Perdue to be Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture: “Governor Perdue’s an excellent pick to head the Agriculture Department. As a lifelong agri-businessman and veterinarian, as well as the two-term governor of a state where agriculture’s the largest industry, Gov. Perdue has a unique and expert understanding of both the business and scientific sides of agriculture. In a time of increasing regulations and a growing governmental footprint, we have no doubt that Gov. Perdue will step in and stand up for rural America so that we can continue to do what we do best – provide the safest and most abundant food supply in the world.” In addition, Kyle Gillooly, a seedstock

cattle farmer in Wadley, Ga., and president of the Georgia Cattlemen’s Association, released the following statement: “The Georgia Cattlemen’s Association is excited to hear the selection of Gov. Sonny Perdue to lead the USDA. Governor Perdue has always been a strong supporter of agriculture. His background in agribusiness and as a veterinarian will bring a wealth of knowledge and real-world common sense to a department that is vitally important to the success of our nation. As a graduate of the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, he understands the issues we face in the livestock industry and he is a true believer in the land grant university system, their mission, and how they impact the cattle industry across the nation. His experience leading the State of Georgia, with its large agriculture heritage, will be invaluable to the administration.”

NCBA Urges Senate Confirmation of EPA & Interior Nominees

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association sent a letter to the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works on Jan. 17 expressing strong support for the nomination of Scott Pruitt to be Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and called for his swift confirmation. “As Oklahoma’s Attorney General, Mr. Pruitt led the fight to bring common sense back to environmental regulation and he was an unrivaled defender of private property rights,” NCBA’s President, Tracy Brunner, wrote in the letter. “In fact, in 2015 the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association honored Mr. Pruitt with its Distinguished Service Award for his dedication to those principles.” Decisions made by EPA impact America’s hundreds of thousands of cattle producers every day. NCBA’s top priority at EPA is stopping its “waters of the United States” rule, which the group says is so broad that it would give federal agencies jurisdiction over all types of features, including dry features, including ditches, swales, gullies and mudflats. NCBA has sued EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to block the rule, and is calling on Congress and the incoming Administration to kill the

regulation. NCBA last Friday hailed the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to grant a cert petition for the industry coalition lawsuit challenging EPA on the rule. Similarly, NCBA and the Public Land’s Council urged the confirmation of Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-MT) as Interior Secretary under the Trump Administration. “During his tenure in the U.S. House of Representatives, Rep. Zinke has consistently advocated for our western communities, economies, and ranchers,” said Brunner. “He has demanded transparency and the inclusion of stakeholders when it comes to land management decisions, and has a strong understanding of the challenges that come with stewarding the West.” Western ranchers own approximately 120 million acres of the most productive private land in the West and manage nearly 250 million acres of public land. Ranchers who hold grazing permits on public land do vital work that benefits public land including the improvement of water sources, improvement of wildlife habitat, and maintaining the open space that Americans enjoy, yet are often targeted by outside interest groups.

30 California Cattleman February 2017

ANADA 200-495, Approved by FDA

® Enroflox 100 (enrofloxacin) 100 mg/mL Antimicrobial Injectable Solution

For Subcutaneous Use in Beef Cattle, Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle and Swine Only. Not for Use in Female Dairy Cattle 20 Months of Age or Older Or In Calves To Be Processed For Veal. Brief Summary: Before using Enroflox® 100, consult the product insert, a summary of which follows. CAUTION: Federal (U.S.A.) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal (U.S.A.) law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: Each mL of Enroflox 100 contains 100 mg of enrofloxacin. Excipients are L-arginine base 200 mg, n-butyl alcohol 30 mg, benzyl alcohol (as a preservative) 20 mg and water for injection q.s. INDICATIONS: Cattle - Single-Dose Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle; and for the control of BRD in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M. haemolytica, P. multocida, H. somni and M. bovis. Cattle - Multiple-Day Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. Swine: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment and control of swine respiratory disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis and Streptococcus suis. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Cattle: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Swine: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 5 days of receiving a single-injection dose. HUMAN WARNINGS: For use in animals only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes. In case of dermal contact, wash skin with soap and water. Consult a physician if irritation persists following ocular or dermal exposures. Individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to quinolones should avoid this product. In humans, there is a risk of user photosensitization within a few hours after excessive exposure to quinolones. If excessive accidental exposure occurs, avoid direct sunlight. For customer service, to obtain a copy of the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) or to report adverse reactions, call Norbrook at 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: The effects of enrofloxacin on cattle or swine reproductive performance, pregnancy and lactation have not been adequately determined. The long-term effects on articular joint cartilage have not been determined in pigs above market weight. Subcutaneous injection can cause a transient local tissue reaction that may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Enroflox 100 contains different excipients than other enrofloxacin products. The safety and efficacy of this formulation in species other than cattle and swine have not been determined. Quinolone-class drugs should be used with caution in animals with known or suspected Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. In such animals, quinolones have, in rare instances, been associated with CNS stimulation which may lead to convulsive seizures. Quinolone-class drugs have been shown to produce erosions of cartilage of weight-bearing joints and other signs of arthropathy in immature animals of various species. See Animal Safety section for additional information. ADVERSE REACTIONS: No adverse reactions were observed during clinical trials. ANIMAL SAFETY: In cattle safety studies, clinical signs of depression, incoordination and muscle fasciculation were observed in calves when doses of 15 or 25 mg/kg were administered for 10 to 15 days. Clinical signs of depression, inappetance and incoordination were observed when a dose of 50 mg/kg was administered for 3 days. An injection site study conducted in feeder calves demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue and underlying muscle. In swine safety studies, incidental lameness of short duration was observed in all groups, including the saline-treated controls. Musculoskeletal stiffness was observed following the 15 and 25 mg/kg treatments with clinical signs appearing during the second week of treatment. Clinical signs of lameness improved after treatment ceased and most animals were clinically normal at necropsy. An injection site study conducted in pigs demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue. Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland I02 September 2016 The Norbrook logos and Enroflox® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


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www.norbrookinc.com Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. Cattle intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Use with caution in animals with known or suspected CNS disorders. Observe label directions and withdrawal times. See product labeling for full product information. The Norbrook logos and Enroflox are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Baytril is a registered trademark of Bayer Animal Health. 1216-495-I02D

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February 2017 California Cattleman 31


WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

Rangeland provides safe haven for elusive species from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

W

ith over 14,000 acres of habitat supporting Pacific Southwest Regional Director Paul Souza, “this hundreds of animal and plant species, there collaboration demonstrates the power of conservation is no such thing as a “typical day” on Bitter partnerships—which is a priority for the Service. Both of Creek National Wildlife Refuge (Bitter Creek)—but some our programs are benefitting from the close coordination days stand out more than others. That was certainly the and our shared goal to ensure threatened and endangered case on Sept. 30, 2016 when a giant kangaroo rat was species have suitable habitat where they can thrive.” discovered in the north-western portion of the refuge. The presence of giant kangaroo rats on the refuge— “It’s nice to get the documentation that it’s on the and other small mammals—is an indication of a healthy refuge,” said California State University (CSU), Stanislaus ecosystem. The north-western portion of the refuge Research Technician Larry Saslaw. borders the Carrizo Plain National Monument (managed He set the live trap that caught the giant kangaroo rat by the Bureau of Land Management) and it is not and thinks Bitter Creek can be the link connecting several uncommon for species from the Carrizo Plain to cross neighboring areas that already serve as habitat to the over into Bitter Creek. species, thereby broadening its range. In fact, there are occasional sightings of San Joaquin This brief encounter with the elusive giant kangaroo kit fox and pronghorn (i.e., American antelope)—but the rat did not happen by chance, it was the result of years September capture of the giant kangaroo rat marks the of planning and a couple of strategic partnerships. Bitter first-ever sighting of the species on Bitter Creek. Creek is part of the National Wildlife Refuge System—a “I think it’s important because it demonstrates that our network of lands and waters the U.S. government designated for conservation, management, and in some ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 34 cases restoration of fish, wildlife, and plant resources and their habitats. So, it comes as no surprise that Bitter Creek staff have been working on conservation planning as part of the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Hopper Mountain). In 2013, Hopper Mountain released a comprehensive conservation plan that called for grazing on the very portion of Bitter Creek where the giant kangaroo rat was found. The conservation plan also enabled the refuge to establish the Small Mammal Monitoring Project, allowing for adaptive management, as well as effective and efficient use of resources to support a healthy ecosystem. Saslaw is part of CSU Stanislaus’ Endangered Species Recovery Program. Bitter Creek established the partnership with the university three years ago to enhance the refuges’ small mammal monitoring efforts. The Endangered Species Recovery Program helped Bitter Creek set up their monitoring program and is actively working with staff to build capacity. According Kangaroo rats found on the Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuge. to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) 32 California Cattleman February 2017


February 2017 California Cattleman 33


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 32 goals for Bitter Creek are achievable,” said project leader for Hopper Mountain Refuge Complex, Michael Brady. The habitat enhancements target giant kangaroo rat and San Joaquin kit fox populations—providing an area outside the Carrizo Plain that offers suitable habitat. “We’re very proud of the work that we’ve done since the conservation plan was completed and the partnerships we’ve developed. We’re looking to do more for these species in the future.” Another critical partnership in this effort was with Eureka Livestock, LLC. Nick Etcheverry is a partner in the family-owned business, who has worked closely with Bitter Creek for the three years his organic natural/grass-fed SimAngus cattle have been grazing designated portions of the refuge. Both the San Joaquin kit fox and the giant kangaroo rat prefer grasslands with low vegetation. Bitter Creek has used grazing as a tool to create the ideal habitat for these species—which offers a win-win for Etcheverry and the endangered species. “My dad and I, were very excited when we heard about the sighting of the giant kangaroo rat on the fields that we had grazed last season. We know that all the work that the refuge has put in, the work that we put in, it actually paid off. We’ve been grazing on endangered species habitat for the last 40 years. We do care about it—it’s not just all for us and the benefit of my cows. I want the elk and kit fox and kangaroo rat, I want everybody out there,” said Etcheverry. “Working with Bitter Creek, we both have

the same goals, we want to promote endangered species habitat along with good habitat where that more species of plants can grow.” Grazing promotes plant species diversity that will increase over time. According to Etcheverry, in the years to come, this diversity will be even more beneficial to his grazing cattle. The giant kangaroo rat has been federally listed as endangered since 1987 and the Service released a recovery plan shortly after that summarizes a variety of recovery strategies for this species and 33 others in the San Joaquin Valley. The giant kangaroo rat has a diet that primarily includes seeds, but when compared to the other 20 species in its genus, it is the largest—with an adult weighing between 4.6 and 6.4 ounces and 12.2 to 13.7 inches long. It is mostly active between sunset and sunrise— spending non-foraging hours in complex burrows that can have five or more openings. It is the keystone species of the desert ecosystem. Its burrows serve as home to federally listed blunt-nosed leopard lizards and other species and it is prey for larger animals, such as the San Joaquin kit fox. While there have not been any sightings of the giant kangaroo rat since September, Brady explained that, “it was probably moving through looking for a home, but we’re looking for evidence to determine whether or not the species has colonized the refuge yet and made it a permanent home.” Nevertheless, he seems confident that both the giant kangaroo rat and San Joaquin kit fox will either become regular visitors or make Bitter Creek their new home in the near future.

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February 2017 California Cattleman 35


LIVESTOCK FENCING LIABILITY How can ranchers protect their rights? by Mike Hall for the California Cattlemen’ s Association HALL ©

I

t is 2 a.m. and you get a phone call from the highway dispatch center, saying that there is an animal loose on the highway or worse yet, there has been an accident. Not knowing if it is one of your cows, you jump out of bed and call others to help. Often times, it is someone else’s animal. Nevertheless, this is a “wakeup” call that you never like or can afford. Accidents involving livestock occur all throughout the country and often cause severe injury and sometimes death to motorists. Fencing laws date back to 1850 in California, where the Estray Act of 1915 repealed the so-called “fencing out” laws in the state and restored the common law rule, except in six northernmost counties. The rule of common law dates back to England and the British Isles where livestock owners had to confine their animals or face liability. In 1920, it became settled law in California that the common law applied were excepted from operation of the Fence Law of 1850. Originally, these laws were established more to protect the damage of planted crops by cattle trespassing on their neighbor’s property. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1941 ruled that an animal owner had a duty to use reasonable care to prevent his animals from roaming freely. A few years, later the California Court of Appeals held that a cattle owner who negligently fails to keep his cattle from straying onto highways

can be held civilly liable for damages arising from a collision with cattle even in unfenced “open range” country (Jackson v. Hardy, 1945). Only a few counties are left in California that are considered “open range” and are designated usually by a vote of the county supervisors. “Open range” laws reverse the duty to fence in livestock and allow livestock to roam in certain remote parts of California. Obviously, these areas are getting fewer in the state as the population grows and infringes more on rural areas. According to Bill Thomas, Ione, cattleman and legal counsel who has represented California Cattlemen Association on various business interests, “open range doesn’t completely remove one’s liability when an accident occurs. One good example relating to this exposure was when the court sided with the plaintiff offered evidence of a history of animal-car collisions in the area and recommendations of keeping the animals fenced-in” (Shively v Dye Creek Cattle, 1994, 3rd Dist. 29 Cal App 4th 1620, 35 Cal Rptr). In most cases today, negligence must be proved on the livestock owners’ part for the court to side with the plaintiff and/or accident victim. Obviously, livestock owners do not want to cause an accident nor lose an animal from a collision with a motorist. Highways are dangerous enough today without having to worry about an

36 California Cattleman February 2017

animal being loose on the highway. Most accidents occur in the evening hours and many just as the sun sets. If the animal is black, that only adds to the risk. “Often the court is going to look at previous history of animals being out and/or hit on highways,” says Thomas. “The operator has a good chance to fight a lawsuit if he has a clean record of animals escaping.” He also recommends ranchers have a good maintenance and checking schedule of fences. The old saying, “good fences make for good neighbors” would certainly spill over to safer highways. California ag law specifies that a legal fence is one that is a minimum of four feet high, with three tightly stretched wires and one that prevents the ingress or egress of livestock. Chris Hannekan of Southwest Fence Company, who has been in the business since 1985, admits that these laws are quite old and outdated. Hanneken recommends a 52 to 54-inch, 6 wire fence for highways. Southwest’s patented “suspension” high-tension fence has proven to be accident friendly when hit by a motorist by bending rather than breaking, according to Hannekan. “There are times when a car hits a fence and no one notifies the owner causing a huge risk for the land owner,” says Hannekan. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 38


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February 2017 California Cattleman 37


...CONTiNUED FROM PAGE 36 CCA First Vice President Mark Lacey, Independence, of Lacey Livestock who has to deal with fencing on both sides of the Sierras and in many counties under many different types of elements. “Snow breaking down fencing where animals can easily walk out creates another hazard for livestock owners,” said Lacey, who works with many neighbors. “Cattlemen that don’t keep an eye on their cattle or fences are not good for the industry and create a hazard for the public.” Lacey said he carries a $4 million to $5 million liability insurance on his ranching operations. “Sometimes when an animal causes an accident, you must get your lawyer to fight for the case rather than settle,” Lacey admits. Both Lacey and Thomas agree that it is frustrating that many times the defense attorney does not like to fight the case. “There have been numerous incidences that the defense lawyer has never gone out to the accident scene or visited the ranch,” Thomas shares. “But cattlemen need to protect their rights.” Often times when these kinds of cases are settled by the insurance company and a settlement is given to the plaintiff, the rancher’s policy is often dropped which only adds to financial hardship in the future. Lacey Livestock takes pride in their fencing and management. “I like to take regular photos of my fences with my phone and save them in my files,” Lacey said. “There was one time that this helped us win a case when a group of bulls tore down a brand-new 8-wire fence and an accident happened.” According to Hannekan, lease properties sometimes create the biggest hazard for cattle producers. “Some of these owners are heirs of former ranchers and they don’t want to put any money into fences which can affect the lessor. Newly constructed fences do take years to depreciate and often leases change hands frequently. These types of operations create a real hazard.” Good fencing is the best insurance you can get both Lacey and Hannekan profess. All leases should have a contract that states who is responsible for the care and the maintenance of fences, they advise.Something else to consider is that any spot can be a weak

spot in any fence if a gate is left open. A combination of cattle guard and gate is sometimes recommended for high traveled and high exposure areas near freeways. The use of locks is also a wise investment on boundary gates, Lacey recommends. Courts can find the ranchers negligent if all prudent practices are not followed which can prevent an animal from escaping and causing an accident. Another line of defense helping ranchers are the highway patrol and local sheriff ’s department. They patrol our state highways and county roads. Captain Michael Bueno, commander at the San Luis Area Highway Patrol, works closely with local ranchers to help identify loose animals on state and local roads. He suggests that all ranchers need to contact their local highway patrol office to have their names included in their local “cattle book.” These are books developed and kept at the local office so when a call comes in of animal loose on the highway, the rancher in the area can be called to assist. “Many officers do not have the expertise nor the equipment to wrangle with a critter on the road,” says Bueno, who referenced this situation like a “neighborhood watch” to help each other prevent accidents. The San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association annually offers a workshop each year to local officers of the highway patrol and sheriff ’s office. Cattlemen help to inform officers how they can best handle loose cattle by using good stockmanship on

38 California Cattleman February 2017

roadways before help shows up. Bueno cites an example of an animal loose on a local roadway when a rancher driving by with his dogs in the truck bed stopped to ask if he could help. “The officer quickly said yes and with the help of two great dogs, the animal was quickly placed through a gate in the fence and the imminent danger was avoided,” Bueno shared. Bueno said having a phone number on no trespassing signs is a good method for point of contact. “We like to resolve these situations at the lowest level and do not like to cite a rancher,” says Bueno. “Having distinguishable identification such as an eartag with the ranch name on the animal besides a brand is also very helpful to the officer on the scene.” Accidents do happen. A phone call in the middle of the night is never a good one for a rancher. With the help of good fences that are frequently maintained, ranchers can help protect the safety of our highways and roads and help reduce accidents caused by livestock. Since no fence is perfect and accidents are common, adequate liability insurance is always recommended. About the Author: Mike Hall, Cal Poly Professor Emeritus, was the Beef Specialist at Cal Poly until his retirement in 2012. Hall has served as an expert witness in livestock/car accidents numerous times for the past 20 years. Presently, Mike is the Commercial Bull Marketing Representative for Vintage Angus, Modesto.

HALL ©


February 2017 California Cattleman 39


FUTURE FOCUS

NEW LEADERSHIP INTRODUCING THE 2017 YCC OFFICER TEAM by YCC Publicity Chair Melissa Hardy It is a pleasure to announce that the 2017 California state Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) officer team was elected at the 100th Annual CCA & CCW Convention in Reno, Nev., in December. These passionate and accomplished individuals will be serving YCC members in the coming year throughout the state. Rebecca Swanson, the 2017 YCC Chair, is currently a senior at California State University, Chico (Chico State) where she majors in both animal science and agricultural business. She is a research associate at the Chico State University Farm Beef Unit. Following the completion of her degrees, she plans to attend graduate school where she will study reproductive physiology. Swanson’s passion for the beef industry has given her the drive to ensure her generation is prepared to step into their roles as the future of the industry. This drive, and her experience on last year’s officer team, fueled Swanson to run for positions at both the local and state level for a second year. Swanson’s goal for this year’s YCC officer team is to strengthen and grow the organization at the local and state level by creating opportunities for YCC members to further their involvement in the beef industry. She also has a goal of strengthening YCC’s fundraising efforts to expand involvement within the organization and allow for higher YCC attendance at industry events. Swanson is enthusiastic about leading such passionate and ambitious individuals and looks forward to their success as a team. She finds great value in YCC and all it offers her generation and believes this team has what it takes to ensure its continued growth and success. State YCC Vice Chair Steven Pozzi is currently a second year agricultural business major at California State University, Fresno (Fresno State). He is very involved throughout the Jordan School of Agriculture. He is on the FFA Field Day Committee, Meats Judging Team and works at the sheep and beef units. Pozzi is a fifth generation rancher in Tomales, hoping to come back to the family farm after experiencing other operations and opportunities. He is extremely excited to be serving as vice chair of the YCC. Pozzi has been a member of YCC for two years and is grateful for all of the experiences it has provided him as well as the great people he has met along the way. His goal for this year is to make more connections and reach out to county cattlemen’s associations across the state to thank them for 40 California Cattleman February 2017

their support. Pozzi can’t wait to get this year rolling with a great team in an organization filled with connections and passionate individuals. Rebecca Barnett is a fourth year student at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). She is majoring in sustainable agriculture and food systems with an emphasis in economics and policy. Barnett is the fifth generation to grow up in Modoc County. She has shown her strong passion of agriculture by taking on various leadership roles through the UC Davis Young Cattlemen’s Association and at the various animal science livestock facilities. Barnett’s current internship at the California State Assembly has helped her learn more about agriculture policy and its implementations on the agricultural industry. As a member of the 2017 YCC state officer team, Barnett intends to be an advocate for small rural ranching communities. She hopes to achieve this goal by increasing membership and public outreach. My name is Melissa Hardy and I am a third year animal science student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly). I have been a YCC member for three years. She grew up in a farming family in the Central Valley and was heavily involved in 4-H, FFA, raising and showing livestock and riding horses. Outside of YCC, I am a manager of the Mustang Enterprise and enjoy caring for and training Cal Poly’s live Mustang mascots. I also enjoy welding projects, anything that involves a tractor and working on trucks. After college, I plan to stay involved in the farming and ranching industry and would like to run my own ranch in the future. As a member of the 2017 state officer team, I hope to strengthen the communication between the state YCC and local YCC’s in order to increase participation at industry events, as well as work together as a team to utilize technology to become more involved in local YCA chapters. I am passionate about the farming and ranching industry and am thankful for the opportunity to serve on the state YCC officer team with such outstanding individuals. The 2017 state officer team is excited for the year to come as we celebrate the 25-year anniversary of the YCC! We look forward to the upcoming events and hope to meet you throughout the year! If you have any questions regarding YCC please don’t hesitate to reach out to any of us or our state advisor Malorie Bankhead in the CCA office.

REBECCA SWANSON

STEVEN POZZI

REBECCA BARNETT

MELISSA HARDY


Genetic Edge Bull Sale Join us at the ranch near Idaho Falls, Idaho Saturday

March 11, 2017 RIVERBEND WAYLON C1218

18233506 Birthdate: 7/28/15

Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 • Dam: Riverbend Blackcap X1395 MGS: SQ Creedence 67S

RIVERBEND TEN X A024

RIVERBEND TRACTION C1005

17896606 Birthdate: 9/6/2015

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam: Ankony Miss Primrose 2424C MGS: Emulation 31

RIVERBEND RESERVE C1257

18235390 Birthdate: 7/15/2015

Sire: JMB Traction 292 • Dam: Riverbend Forever Lady A1036 MGS: EF Complement 8088

RIVERBEND TOP GAME C1244

18235306 Birthdate: 7/28/2015

Sire: VAR Reserve 1111 • Dam: Riverbend Can Do Y1407 MGS: Riverbend Can Do W832

18233533 Birthdate: 7/29/2015

Sire: Sitz Top Game 561X • Dam: Riverbend Elba Y1189 MGS: Connealy Consensus 7229

2880 N 55 W • Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 • 208-528-6635

SALE MANAGED BY:

Dale Meek, Purebred Operations Manager • 208-681-9840 Chris Howell, Director of Customer Service • 208-681-9821

517-546-6374

www.riverbendranch.us

CALL 208-528-6635 OR E-MAIL BULLS@RIVERBENDRANCH.US TO BE PLACED ON OUR MAILING LIST February 2017 California Cattleman 41


Perform looking for the best bulls the west has to offer? No matter your environment, bulls developed at Snyder Livestock will get the job done. Lucy Rechel and her team strive to produce the best bulls the industry has to offer. Trends may come and go, but the bulls that come off test and sell through Snyder's annual sale hold up and perform under diverse conditions and environments, due in part to the complete bull test format. Founded in 1999, the annual bull test draws seedstock producers to the high desert climate of Yerington, Nev., to put their bulls up against the best in the West.

weekend event schedule The best-ever Bull Buyers’ Seminar, starting with a complimentary lunch at 11:30 a.m., will be held Sat., March 11, at Snyder Livestock. The keynote address, “Advanced Genetic Technologies,” will be presented by genomics expert Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D. TAKING THE BULL OUT OF GENETICS • Genetics 101 • Economics of Genetic Selection • Genetics of Disease Resistance • Feed Efficiency EPDs The Annual Bull Buyers’ Social will begin at 4:30 p.m., at the Pioneer Crossing Convention Center in Yerington, with the introduction of consignors and award presentations.

THD ©

42 California Cattleman February 2017

Seminar, Social & Sale

March 11a12, 2017 Snyder LiveStock FeedLot yerington, nevada

Full event Schedule and Sale Book available online: www.slcnv.com

Snyder LiveStock co., inc.

Lucy Rechel/Eddie Snyder • Office 775-463-2677 Lucy’s Cell 775-790-0801 • Website: www.slcnv.com Post Office Box 550 • Yerington, Nevada 89447 Funded in part By grantS FroM the city oF yerington & Lyon county rooM tax BoardS


FEATURING SONS OF SAV RESOURCE 1441 AND CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE

CED -4

BW 3.6

WW 70

YW 132

CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE

S A V RESOURCE 1441

SC 1.51

MK 23

MB .23

RE 1.36

FAT $B .041 170.26

CED 14

BW 0

WW 58

YW 98

SC 1.11

MK 22

MB .52

RE 1.36

FAT $B .056 139.69

FROM CARCASS TO CALVING-EASE, WE HAVE A BULL FOR EVERY CATTLEMAN’S NEEDS INCLUDING THREE TOP SIMANGUS BULLS! VIDEOS AVAILABLE OF ALL SALE BULLS EARLY MARCH WWW.GUDELCATTLECOMPANY.COM

KRIS, CASEY, GENTRY & KADE GUDEL

FREE DELIVERY OF BULLS IN CALIFORNIA & NEVADA!

LEADING LINEUP 10 Angus Bulls with Breed-Leading Genetics Including a half brother to lasT year’s Angus Champion, a son of Deer Valley All In

PO BOX 591, WILTON CA 95693 • (916) 208-7258 KRISGUDEL@GMAIL.COM WWW.GUDELCATTLECOMPANY.COM

4 Red Angus Bulls From Phillips Ranch Loaded with calving ease, maternal marbling and longevity ID # 527 531 526 664

Deer Valley All IN LOT # 7021 7022 7023 7024 7025 7026 7027 7028 7029 7030

Sire

Deer Valley All In RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359 RJR Echo Consensus 359

BW WW -.6 2.6 2.3 2.4 3.3 0 -.4 .3 -.1 2.9

FLYING RJ RANCH

58 54 44 39 50 48 41 45 44 44

YW 102 90 70 72 90 82 67 77 78 73

SC

1.68 .37 .73 .40 .13 .64 .52 1.86 .34 .82

MK 21 28 20 22 21 24 41 24 24 .22

MB .92 .29 .23 .28 .83 .25 .57 .48 .47 .55

$B

140.02 104.11 53.24 64.55 110.49 66.69 63.13 74.83 82.35 75.83

Rick & Jerrie Libby Live Oak, CA

530-218-1841 • rlibby@syix.com

CE 3 8 4 1

BW -2.4 -6.9 -3.2 82

MM 19 21 17 21

HPG 9 14 14 14

MARB .55 .05 .39 .18

RE -.37 -.27 .06 -.59

Known for reliable, low-birthweight carcass bulls Don’t miss out on this year’s exceptional offering!

Phillps Ranch Red Angus

Cecil Felkins • (209) 274-4338 550 Buena Vista Rd. Ione, CA 95640 February 2017 California Cattleman 43


REPUTATION

BUILT ON QUALITY YEAR AFTER YEAR! 6 GROWTH & POWER — 2 CALVING EASE RED ANGUS BULLS SELL

MARCH 12 • YERINGTON, NV TROTTERS TIME 526

YOUR 21ST

CENTURY SOURCE

FOR CHAROLAIS BULLS FROM A

PROVEN PROGRAM!

This past top-seller and 21st Century Graduate is standing at Select Sires and we have 14 bulls on test from the same great cowherd, including brothers to this exciting young sire!

REG. # 3527385

HE SELLS MARCH 12!

CED

6

BW

-2.3

WW

Top 1%

YW

Top 1 %

MARB

Top 9%

Selling sons of past Champion and Genex Bull, TROTTERS STRONGHOLD 156. As well as sons of: AHL About Time 113y Trotters Citadel II 161 LJT Citadel 812 Trotters Tony 248

RED ANGUS

CE BW WW YW MK REA FAT MB

RIBEYE Top 1%

TROTTERS TIME 526

TROTTER

FTJ CASCADE 1508

ALSO SELLING SONS OF:

ALL BULLS RA50K TESTED!

LANA TROTTER

(661) 548-6652 • (661) 330-4617 lanaj548@gmail.com RT 4 Box 206A • Porterville, CA 93257

Big Time Bulls from

BAR LR

BJR HANK 984• LT LEDGER 0332• LT BLUE VALUE 7903 ET VPI FREE LUNCH 708T • RAILE SOVEREIGN J827 Y064 DR REVELATION 467 • M6 FRESH AIR 8165 P ET

Jorgensen 530.FRED & TONI JORGENSEN 865.7102 • 209.602.8130 Ranch 25884 MOLLER AVE. • ORLAND, CA 95963

YOUR NEVADA SOURCE for

BAR LR BULLS ARE PERFORMING: • Average daily gain of our 12 bulls for December 2016 was 5.03 lbs/day • • #623 a GAR Composure son was the top gainer at 5.96 lbs/day• Selling 4 GAR Composure sons, 4 WR Journey sons, 2 AAR Ten X sons, 1 VAR Index son and 1 Quaker Hill Rampage son

HEREFORDS WITH A HISTORY! 60 years in the Hereford breed! 16 bulls on test, including sons of CRR 4037 DURANGO 118

Reg #P43186322 Calved: 2/20/11 Owned with: Coyote Ridge Ranch BW WW YW MK FAT REA MB

G A R COMPOSURE CED +15

6.3 -.8 39 70 13 .17 .028 .21

ALSO OFFERING SONS OF:

REG #:16496980

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

$B

-1.2

+62

+111

+38

+.96

+.81

+135.07

KCF BENNETT ENCORE Z311 ET - BOYD WORLDWIDE 9050 ET SCHU-LAR RED BULL 18X - CRR 719 TULO 928 - CRR 100W TRUST 370 ET

BAR LR Robin and Linda Richey

(520) 975-2833 PO Box 1120, Benson, AZ 85602

44 California Cattleman February 2017

1.4 55 86 23 -.026 .37 -.01

Like us on Facebook at Bell Ranch Herefords

Lilla & Woodie Bell • Dan Bell Dan & Theresa Bell (775) 578-3536 PO Box 48, Paradise, NV 89426 bellranches@gmail.com


THORENFELDT LAND & CATTLE CO.

18 OF OUR BEST ON TEST!

FEATURING SONS OF THESE LEADING SIRES! #1 $BEEF BULL IN THE BREED CED

BW

WW

YW

CW

MB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

+9

+1.7

+81

+139

+85

+.43

+1.73

-.030

81.87

114.49

39.11

192.02

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

4 SONS SELL!

QUAKER HILL RAMPAGE 0A36

PROVEN POWER & PERFORMANCE CED

BW

WW

YW

CW

MB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

-7

+5.1

+71

+118

+60

+.36

+.64

-.030

57.87

84.07

15.50

141.40

2%

3%

4%

4%

15%

10%

2 SONS SELL!

S A V INTERNATIONAL 2020

CALVING EASE & PERFORMANCE LEADER

A & B SPOTLITE 3065

CED

BW

WW

YW

CW

MB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

+17

-3.0

+64

+119

+53

+1.20

+.31

+.054

73.96

99.93

38.26

164.41

2%

2%

10%

3%

10%

2%

3%

1%

2%

1 SON SELLS!

Thorenfeldt Land & Cattle Co. 40639 Hwy 20 East • Burns, OR 97730

David Holden • (530) 736-0727 e-mail: wstwind@hotmail.com

Bo Thorenfeldt • 650-333-0594 e-mail: bothorenfeldt@gmail.com

February 2017 California Cattleman 45


1917-1927 SURVIVAL IN WAR TIME

California producers’ vitality tested in earliest era by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

I

n a time when it seems fewer and fewer Californians appreciate where their food comes from and who raises it, it may be refreshing to find that there was once a time when cattlemen were like kings and being a rancher was valued not just by those who lived the lifestyle but also by those who didn’t. Though the California Cattlemen’s Association that officially began in 1917 wasn’t technically the first California Cattlemen’s Association – another existed briefly a few years earlier – 1917 wasn’t an ideal time for ranchers to start a new organization. Or maybe it was. Often times the best time to join forces is when the going has gotten tough. In 1917, the world was approaching the end of World War I, but times were tough for everyone in the U.S. and cattlemen were no exception. At its inception, CCA actually aimed to be a marketing cooperative, helping cattlemen bring top dollar for their stock. Shortly after the organization was off and running, its leaders realized there was a great need to protect beef producers on many fronts. Marketing was just one piece of the puzzle. Just like in 1917, today CCA works to protect beef production interests on a variety of playing fields. Like cogs in a clock, beef production is at its best when when all of the segments are running efficiently. While it may seem impossible for all beef segments to thrive at the same time, that is CCA’s goal. CCA works around the clock to protect beef production interests in every segment of the production chain, from the cow-calf ranches to feed yards and every point in between. Following nearly three years after the onset of World War I, America’s allies in Europe were facing starvation. Farms had become battlefields or had been left to languish as agricultural workers went to war Additionally, disruptions in transportation made the distribution of imported food challenging. On Aug. 10, 1917, shortly after the United States entered the war, the U.S. Food Administration was established to manage the wartime supply, conservation, distribution and transportation of food. Appointed head of the administration by President Woodrow Wilson, future-President Herbert Hoover developed a voluntary program that relied on Americans’ compassion and sense of patriotism to support the larger war effort. In order to provide U.S. troops and allies with the sustenance required to maintain their strength, posters urging citizens to reduce their personal consumption of meat, wheat, fats and sugar were plastered throughout 46 California Cattleman February 2017

communities. Slogans such as “Food will win the war” compelled people to avoid wasting groceries and encouraged them to eat fresh fruits and vegetables, which were too difficult to transport overseas. Likewise, promotions such as “Meatless Tuesdays” and “Wheatless Wednesdays” implored Americans to voluntarily modify their eating habits in order to increase shipments to the soldiers defending our freedom. To help families prepare meals without these former staples, local food boards were established to offer guidance, canning demonstrations and recipes with suitable replacements for the provisions that had become limited. As a result of the conservation efforts, food shipped to Europe doubled within a year, while consumption in America was reduced 15 percent between 1918 and 1919. Even after the war had ended, Hoover continued to organize shipments of food to the millions of people starving in central Europe as head of the American Relief Administration, earning him the nickname the “Great Humanitarian.” While Americans in general were impacted by the global food situation, food producers in the country were also directly affected. According to the 1918 annual report from the director of the National Park Service, the California Cattlemen’s Association got involved to help beef producers utilize Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks as rangeland during the food shortage. With the continuation of war conditions and the accompanying demand for intensive conservation of food products, the question of the utilization of national park lands for grazing purposes became a subject of discussion between the National Park Service and the grazing interests during the latter part of the winter of 1917-1918, the report noted. It was eventually decided to authorize the grazing of cattle only on the same areas opened to grazing during the previous year. In the argument that the government should enjoy a reasonable share of the profits accruing through the privileges granted to the stockmen, a rate of $1.50 per year was fixed as the proper fee to be charged. On this basis, permits for approximately 5,000 head of cattle were granted. The report continues, “As there was still a strong demand for grazing privileges, strong representations were made by the California Cattlemen’s Association urging the opening of additional areas and the reduction of the fee. The service of course willingly gave consideration to these requests but placed itself squarely on the policy that, since the beginning of the war, grazing privileges had been authorized only as a war measure, there should be some guarantee. In the case of further extension of such privileges, that the cattle


interests would in no way consider the rights granted during the war as extending beyond that period and that they would recognize the part for park purposes only after the emergency had passed, thereby leaving the service free to fix its after-war grazing policy without interference by them.” According to the 1918 report, after several conferences with representatives of the Food Administration and CCA, additional grazing areas were opened, bringing the total up to about 70 percent of the entire park area and permits for approximately 4,000 additional head of cattle were granted at the rate of $.60 per head. Thereby bringing the total number of cattle for which permits were issued up to about 9,000. An interesting point of the deal struck between the newly-formed CCA and the park service is that CCA was authorized by the park service to select the permittees who would utilize the parks’ resources and no permits were issued except upon the sanction of that organization. This action was taken on the strength of the assurances contained in a resolution passed by the CCA at an annual meeting held in Davis on June 28, 1918, which said CCA would issue the grazing permits to the producers most needing it. It was also agreed that after the war emergency was over CCA would not work to continue grazing on the park lands and that the parks would be recognized for park purposes only. The first decade of CCA’s existence certainly proved to be an interesting one. Not just for CCA but for the entire union. Just as in 2017, cattlemen and women proved themselves to be tough as nails when put to the test. On May 13, 1927, 10 years after today’s CCA was organized, then-CCA President Hubbard Russell wrote and article which was published by the Madera Tribune. His article applauded cattlemen for their resilience in surviving the war amid other issues plaguing the industry. An except of his article is below: “From all indications cattlemen in the west, and particularly in California, are about to reap some reward for their persistence in carrying on through the lean times that have followed the World war. Few people realize the distress in which the cattle industry suddenly found itself following the year 1919. Markets vanished into thin air, drouthy conditions existed in large areas, prices collapsed and foreclosures and bankruptcy were on every hand. Footand-mouth disease in California during 1924 only added to an already bad condition.” “The cattle industry is only now beginning to recoup some of its losses, and the outlook for this year is the brightest since 1919. A good year is certainly well earned and deserved. This year cattlemen have more things than usual in their favor. Feed and water conditions in California are excellent, and are above normal in the adjoining states. Markets are good and there is every indication that they will remain good throughout the season. “Barring any serious weather conditions, there appears to be no reason why fat cattle prices should not remain steady throughout the season. We are not oversupplied with cattle, half fat cattle will be conspicuous by their absence, and there is a strong out-of-state movement because of late seasons to the north and no oversupply of cattle to the east. Then, too, cattlemen have come to realize the importance of moving cattle before a market declines. They have now adopted the system of topping out their herds and spreading

the marketing of their cattle over a longer period, thus, avoiding an oversupply at any one time. “Statistics show that dumping cattle on to the market results only in breaking the market. It does not increase the amount of beef consumed and only serves as a means of reducing the income of the producer. “Conditions this year are such that a decline would have to be forced, as every factor in the cattle business is favorable to steady prices. Cattlemen are making a special effort to keep informed on market conditions and on cattle supplies, as they realize the seriousness of selling against each other. They are practicing orderly marketing to an extent never before experienced in the history of the west. “The fact that there is a good demand for cattle to the north and east of California, and that cattle are moving freely at steady prices to markets in these sections, is the best evidence in the world that California markets should remain steady and that the cattlemen can, if they will, go through the next year it has been their privilege to enjoy for over a decade.” Though this principle illustrated by Russell is not unique to the ranching way of life, it does hold true for beef producers in today’s business climate. Often times struggles have to occur before good times can be enjoyed. Perhaps that is the overarching purpose of CCA – in 1917 and today: to help ranchers withstand the forces against them to continue a lifestyle they hold dear.

EDITOR’S NOTE: As the California Cattlemen’s Association celebrates its centennial year in 2017, this article is the first in a year-long series addressing each of CCA’s 10 decades.

February 2017 California Cattleman 47


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CW+63 Marb+.78 Rib+1.0 $W+67.91 $F+115.64 $B+180

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Emergency Services Available (530)347-3711

48 California Cattleman February 2017


2 0.89

& 36th Annual Bull and Female Sale Monday, March 13th, 2017

at Spring Cove Ranch, Bliss, Idaho 1:00 pm MDT

Selling 160 Angus Bulls & 75 Angus heifers 40 Hereford bulls & 10 Red Angus Bulls 26 Open & Bred Hereford Heifers

Angus since 1919

Selling Sons and Daughters by these breed leading sires:

Spring Cove Reno 4021 reg 17926446

Selling 5 Reno ET sons out of a Whiskey daughter

CED+10 BEPD-.1 WEPD+65 YEPD+114 SC+1.10 MEPD+29 CW+46 Marb+.81 Rib+.59 $W+73.48 $F+91.82 $B+164.42

Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 reg 16925771 “20 high performing Rampage sons sell”

CED+9 BEPD+1.5 WEPD+81 YEPD+140 SC+1.32 MEPD+36 CW+84 Marb+.37 Rib+1.69 $W+83.94 $F+118.63 $B+190.78

JBB/AL Herefords James & Dawn Anderson/ Bev Bryan 208-280-1505 208-934-5378 1998 S 1500 E Gooding, Idaho 83330 jbbalherefords@hotmail.com Find us on Facebook

Basin Bonus 4345 reg 17904142

Sire: Basin Payweight 1682

Sitz Longevity 566Z reg 17179073

15 sons sell

“Longevity daughters are model Angus cows”

CED+9 BEPD-.8 WEPD+75 YEPD+129 SC+.63 MEPD+30 CW+67 Marb+.92 Rib+.93 $W+85.30 $F+109.36 $B+179.84

CED+5 BEPD-.1 WEPD+62 YEPD+107 SC+.90 MEPD+40 CW+24 Marb+.75 Rib+.48 $W+79.69 $F+66.21 $B+94.73

Schu-Lar Red Bull 18X reg 43084009

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February 2017 California Cattleman 49


The DeForest Family A Legacy of Quality Care and Love for the Hereford Breed by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead Living a life-long dream, Northern California ranchers Tom and Kathy DeForest, Round Valley, raise a herd of commercial cattle alongside a herd of purebred Hereford cattle, as well as a few Quarter Horse ranch horses close to Adin. The couple also provides care for another rancher’s cattle on the Modoc National Forest in the summer time, but their love for the cattle industry runs generations deep. The DeForest family history goes back to the middle 1800s when Tom’s great-great grandfather, Clinton DeForest traveled with John C. Fremont and settled in Lassen County. Kathy’s great-great grandfather, a German sea captain, married a Spanish land grant widow and settled in Monterey County, and the rest, as they say, is history. Though they grew up fairly close to one another, Tom and Kathy met at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, when they went off to college. In 2016, they celebrated 45 years of marriage. Their passion for the beef cattle industry thrives in their daughters, as well. Sarah DeForest, a life-long beef industry advocate, works as California State University, Chico, College of Agriculture’s Director of External Affairs. Becky Hanson lives in Minden, Nev., with her children Ruby and Hayden and works in public relations and marketing for Carson Valley Medical Center in Gardnerville, Nev. Before making their home in Ash Valley, near Adin, Tom and Kathy spent 19 years in Lakeview, Ore., working for places like the Lynch Brothers Ranch, and Jack and Bev Sparrowk, Clements, for 10 of those years full-time; all the while caring for other cattle and built their own herd simultaneously. The two worked for Guss Steffan out of Galt in the 70s, and before working for Steffan, they worked for John Spencer and his wife Carolyn in Scott Valley on a commercial cow and Quarter Horse operation. Over the years, they worked for many different ranchers, but they always wanted to have a place of their own. Together, in 1997, the couple fulfilled their lifelong dream of owning a ranch when one of Tom’s uncles offered to sell them his ranch upon his retirement. However, like any family operation, they come with ebbs and flows and some time later, several family deaths and a tough financial situation required the difficult decision to break up the ranch and sell pieces of it. They attribute that resolution as the hardest decision of their lives. However, fortunately, they were able to keep most of the ranch in the family as Tom’s brother, Paul DeForest, and his wife, Karin, Adin, purchased part of the family ranch. A lot of people may have walked away, but we established 50 California Cattleman February 2017

ourselves in a different situation on a smaller place near Adin,” Tom said. “We started out with nothing, but we had worked for other ranchers, and we had built up our cowherd, so we had the faith to keep going.” Paul and Karin DeForest, along with their children Tamsen, Summer and Thad, raised registered Hereford cattle and were very proud to sell their Hereford bulls. They bred Angus bulls to their red cattle on their U.S. Forest Service permit and Hereford bulls to their black cattle on their Bureau of Land Management permit, producing black baldy calves that proved valuable to their high mountain grazing geography. Sadly, Paul lost his battle to cancer in 2016, yet Karin still lives and works on the ranch with the help of their youngest son, Thad, and his wife Amanda, who are the fifth generation to work on the ranch. Paul continues to be an enduring source of inspiration for the family. When the DeForests pause to look around, they find much inspiration all around them in the beef industry. Their parents, and the ranching heritage of previous generations, have served as a great inspiration to them. In addition, they feel fortunate to have worked for so many people in the beef industry, and they are grateful for friends and neighbors in the ranching community who have taught them and helped them achieve what they have today. “Some of the people who inspire me most are those who work every day in agriculture,” Kathy said. “The irrigators and truck drivers and people who work in the packing plants – people who really keep the industry going.” Over the years in building their herd together, Kathy points out the true value in the black white face cow. Tom has appreciated Hereford cattle because of his family’s heritage around the breed and the value the breed provides his herd. Kathy also appreciates the great mothers black white faced and Hereford cows are to their calves. “What we see in our commercial cattle right now when we go to wean or ship is the heavy end seems to be Hereford or black white face cattle,” Tom said. “The growth and vigor of these cattle has us sold.” When it comes to the Hereford breed, Tom’s dad, Ches, and mom, Grace, worked for Tom Richard, Sr., in Oregon House where Tom grew up. They showed Hereford cattle in the 60s, and Tom’s parents always had a love for Hereford cattle. In fact, Tom and Kathy said they can recall Tom’s grandfather on his mother’s side, Thad Bath, buying Herefords from the Crowe family, in Shasta County. To help plant the passion for the Hereford breed at an


early age, upon each grandchild’s birth, Ches gifted them a Hereford heifer, and watched it blossom from there. Tom’s sister, Beverly Tipton, Marysville, attributes her love of Hereford cattle to the passion her grandfather and father had for the breed, and inevitably passed it onto her children, as well. “Our favorite part of ranching is taking good care of our cattle,” Tipton said. “It’s something we love doing and we take it very seriously.” Beverly and her husband Bo raise predominantly Hereford cattle in Marysville, and their daughter Megan showed Hereford cattle in her youth as a member of the Junior Hereford Association. “We’ve shown cattle a little bit here and there,” Kathy said. “But we’ve had some really nice heifers that we were able to sell as show heifers to some junior livestock exhibitors.” The DeForests also raise their own Hereford bulls and sell some to commercial breeders, as well. Tom and Kathy have been members of the California Cattlemen’s Association since 1998. Kathy has become more involved with CCA’s Property Rights and Environmental Management committee and has worked extensively on wolf issues in California. She believes that keeping communication open with everyone on both sides to try to learn and not close doors is key. Tom and Kathy both agree that taking care of their animals is their number one priority. They also enjoy opening their ranch gates to others who might not have the widest knowledge base about ranching or cattle. About two years ago, the DeForests hosted a gathering of wolf advocates and ranchers for a tour; another issue Kathy has been very active in with CCA. Kathy said her favorite moment during that tour was when a particularly interested woman had an “ah-ha” moment that ranchers do in fact care for their animals. When Kathy showed her the water in certain ponds that normal dry up each year, but because of Kathy and Tom’s attention to environmental stewardship, they don’t dry up anymore, the woman said it was a complete eye opener to her. Tom and Kathy aim to improve their year-round resource management on their ranch by pasture and range monitoring, fencing, water, stock pond development and renting outside pasture. Their ability to invite this group to their ranch helped increase understanding of the hard work ranchers put into their livelihoods. “There’s a perception that ranchers are just in it for the money, but that’s not at all true,” Kathy said. “We raise cattle because we want to give our cattle the best quality care we possibly can. That’s part of being a good cowman and cowboy: doing the best you can to take care of your animals.” On the ranch, Tom and Kathy aim to improve environmental impacts as well. They’ve worked on offstream water projects and a couple of creeks that go through their property. Thanks to their hard work and attention to details and the hard work of many other ranchers, biologists, agency folks and others, the Modoc Sucker was delisted from the endangered species list in 2015. According to Kathy, this is just one example of the benefits of ranchers’ great, on-the-ground work on behalf of the environment. “It’s exciting to see how we are making progress,” ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 52 February 2017 California Cattleman 51


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 Tom said. “There’s always more work to be done, but to see how the ranch has improved in the 12 years we’ve been here is motivation to continue doing what we’re doing.” When thinking of advice they have received that helps make them better ranchers, Tom and Kathy remember never to fight Mother Nature, you just have to learn to live with her. One of their mentors Gus Steffan once told them, “If I take care of my cows, my cows will take care of me,” which they still believe and practice that today. All in all, the cattle industry is their lifeblood. All of Tom and Kathy’s siblings also have a deep love of the cattle industry and according to Kathy, that says so much, because the cattle industry is something that has run generations deep in the DeForest family and on Kathy’s side too. For the DeForests, working together and having their kids and grandkids come home allows them to enjoy what matters most to them: family. “Our passion for the cattle industry is something that we all have, even in various situations,” Kathy said. “We may be doing something different, but it’s our love and desire and appreciation for cattle in California that has kept us going all of this time.” Tom and Kathy hope to leave the legacy of their care, perseverance and tenacity, and they hope people will remember them as good stewards. When it comes down to it, facing challenges head-on and never giving up have benefitted Tom and Kathy the most in ranching. They talk about how much they’ve put into their life-long goals and revel in the fact it has been a blessing from God. “We were blessed to do this and to have this operation,” Kathy said. And for that, they will remain forever grateful. EDITOR’S NOTE: As CCA celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2017, watch for additional features on other 100-year ranch operations in each issue. Find more about the DeForest family history in CCA’s commemorative coffee table book Since 1917: A Century of Family Legacies in the California Cattlemen’s Association. 52 California Cattleman February 2017

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February 2017 California Cattleman 53


RETAINING

OWNERSHIP PRODUCERS KEEPING INTEREST IN BEEFMASTER FEEDER CATTLE by Beefmaster Breeders United Executive Vice President Bill Pendergrass

Beefmaster females have long been recognized as the industry gold standard for productivity and maternal excellence. However, many ranchers fail to recognize the feedyard and carcass attributes of Beefmaster sired steers. Roaring Springs Ranch of Frenchglen, Ore., has been utilizing Beefmaster bulls on their crossbred cow herd in the high desert country of eastern Oregon. The ranch’s main emphasis has been on replacement female production, but the steers they produce must also perform on the range and on the rail, as a part of their demanding Country Natural Beef Program. This beef program is one of the beef industry’s most respected branded beef product lines. With the first harvest group of Roaring Springs Ranch Beefmaster sired steers, it became evident that Beefmasters were way more than just a maternal breed. This is not a surprise, since the early 2000s several Beefmaster breeders have been involved with nationally-known branded beef programs, where collecting data and improving carcass value are keys to their success. The first turn of Roaring Springs Ranch Beefmaster sired steers posted the following impressive statistics shared in Table 1. Based on industry grid marketing standards, 45 percent of the Beefmaster sired carcasses earned premiums based on quality grade, indicating their ability to marble. Additionally, another 40 percent earned yield grade premiums, which

indicates the cattle were heavy muscled reviewing feedyard closeouts on a and lean in their body composition. sample of the data submitted to BBU, By analyzing the average component the following observations were made carcass traits for the group, it is from standard feedyard close out data, evident that these cattle were very shown in Table 2. consistent in their muscularity and As noted by the information in marbling. These are the kind of cattle the table, performance and feed that earn premiums for the retained efficiency can go hand in hand. Given ownership or investment feeder, and the number of feedyards in different satisfy the consumer’s demand for environments and solid performance high quality beef. of Beefmaster genetics, it is obvious The Beefmaster breed is serious that Beefmasters excel in feed about improving performance efficiency. Cost of gain is the second and carcass merit. In May 2016, Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 56 released Genomic-Enhanced EPDs TABLE 1 to allow bull buyers to confidently select younger animals with greater accuracy values, therefore significantly improving the rate of genetic improvement for a wide variety of traits. In July 2016, BBU released the Beefmaster breed’s first selection indices: Terminal Index ($T) and Maternal Index ($M). For the first time ever Beefmaster bull buyers have high accuracy selection tools to fold into their crossbreeding programs to maximize heterosis and profitability. While carcass traits and related carcass value is straight forward and easy to track, there is another area that is as important to profitability as carcass merit: feed efficiency. TABLE 2 Beefmasters have a great reputation for being among the most efficient convertors in the beef industry. Over the years, several Beefmaster breeders have retained ownership of their genetics to track feedyard performance and carcass merit. In

54 California Cattleman February 2017


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 largest expense, behind purchase cost, for any cattle feeding enterprise. Feed efficient cattle significantly lower cost of gain, allowing more profit opportunity. Other profit drivers that are seldom discussed include; animal health, immune system, dressing percentage and disposition. The unique genetic makeup of the Beefmaster breed has led to several advantages including a very strong immune system, which results in fewer feedyard deaths and health related pulls in the feedyard. These attributes result in stronger bids from buyers who regularly run purchase breakeven calculations at lower death loss percentages when they know the calves are Beefmaster sired. Most cattle today are sold on grids, where cattle can earn premiums for higher quality and higher yielding carcasses. However, many ranchers overlook the fact that even grids are based on hot carcass weight. Cattle that have higher dressing percentages have a hot yield advantage in the plant bringing more pounds of carcass to the scale. It is not uncommon for higher dressing cattle to gross more per carcass than higher quality grading cattle. Many feeders find Beefmasters an attractive grid marketing option due to hot yield advantages provided by the Beefmaster body composition. Cattle must be able to dress, grade and yield in order to maximize any grid, and Beefmaster sired steers check off all three. Profitability comes in many packages and smart operators are quick to find alternate routes to a desirable end point. While the industry generalizes profitability with high marbling carcasses, the truth is there are other data points that affect profitability more than just marbling. In today’s marketplace, ranchers must consider all of their options and chances are that efficiency and performance will impact the long term profitability of their operation more than marbling will. Beefmasters are a central part of a planned crossbreeding program that will help cattlemen balance carcass merit, efficiency, performance, fertility and maternal excellence. 56 California Cattleman February 2017

Officers and Directors of the

Western States Beefmaster Breeders Association PRESIDENT Sue Pierson Vacaville, CA • (707) 718-4199 piersons@castles.com

BOARD MEMBER Brian Moules Herald, CA • (209) 712-6023 walkingmcattle@live.com

VICE PRESIDENT Matt Toste Coalinga, CA • (559) 707-5338 mthgc@inreach.com

BOARD MEMBER Virgil Tucker Caldwell, ID • (208) 340-9833 VTCattle@hotmail.com

SECRETARY Lathele Gravance Laton, CA • (559) 737-0779 lathele@msn.com

BOARD MEMBER John Semas Elk Grove, CA • (916) 479-3883 jsemas@Frontier.com

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Beefmaster Selection Indices Developed to Increase Profitability Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) announced the development and release of their Terminal ($T) and Maternal ($M) Indices. Commercial cattlemen now have the most powerful Beefmaster selection tools at their fingertips. The release of $T Terminal Index and $M Maternal Index now allows commercial cattlemen to target their bull selections to achieve specific production goals. These indices were developed by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, specifically working with Associate Professor Matt Spangler, Ph.D., and Animal Breeding and Genetics graduate student Katie Ochsner. “These two economic indices allow users of Beefmaster genetics to select seedstock based on their genetic potential for profit and alleviate the cumbersome nature of sorting through scores of individual EPDs,” said Spangler. “Producers should clearly define their production goals and use the index that best fits them. Use of the incorrect index could lead to undesired responses given the two objectives (terminal vs maternal) emphasize different traits.” The $T index is designed to assist buyers in selecting range bulls that will

excel in live performance, feedyard and value adding, grid driving carcass traits. $T is the ideal tool for the retained ownership rancher or commercial cow herds that are aligned with supply chains that demand added performance, efficiency and carcass merit. The $M index goes to the heart of what every commercial cattleman demands in today’s market. The Beefmaster maternal index is best explained as the dollar profit per cow exposed due to calf weaning weight accounting for costs associated with cow maintenance. The beef industry has realized the value of Beefmaster influenced heterosis and $M is another tool that will help ranchers leverage heterosis to produce more productive replacement females. It is important for ranchers to know the difference between these two indices. $T will help cattlemen select for high performing, fast growing genetics that by their very nature tend to be large, faster growing animals. $M should be used if a rancher is producing replacement females and is concerned with fertility, cow maintenance and associated costs, while adding weaning weight to the calf crop.


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February 2017 California Cattleman 57


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58 California Cattleman February 2017


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February 2017 California Cattleman 61


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IN MEMORY Bill Mosher William Merwin Mosher, IV passed away January 6, 2017 at the age of 64. He was born January 2, 1953 in Sacramento, California to William G., Sr. and Melba Mosher. After a life-long battle and suffering with Rheumatoid Arthritis, he’s finally able to rest peacefully. He is survived by his loving wife Kay of 39 years; daughter Melanie Mosher Baiz (Sean) and grandchildren Madelyn and William. He is also survived by his mother, Melba Mosher; two sisters Faye Krull (Robert); Ouida Garms (Herb) and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his father William G. Mosher, Sr., grandparents Lester and Fay Ledbetter,

Tom Ferro Tom Ferro passed away peacefully on Dec. 31 while surrounded by his family. He was 90 years old. Tom was born in Oakland in 1926. He moved with his family to Piedmont, the Napa valley, and back to Oakland before settling in Yolo County in 1954. Tom attended Piedmont and Napa high schools, where he made many life-long friends. After graduation from Napa high, he received an AA degree from Napa Jr. College, where he was student body president and played on the football team. Tom also attended UC Berkeley. For over 40 years, Tom ran cattle with his brother, Don, on

grandparents William & Rosalyn Mosher, great aunt Alva Barton, Uncle William Ledbetter and aunt Madelyn Valensin. He was a graduate of Elk Grove High School and California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. He was a fourth generation cattleman in Sloughhouse, and South Lake Tahoe.. During his childhood he went on many trips and visited many countries with his grandparents. Mosher was the owner and operator of the WM Cattle Co. Heran cattle from the Barton Ranch to their summer range on family property in South Lake Tahoe. With his easy going personality he had the same cattle crew for many years. While serving as president of the Amador El Dorado Sacramento County Cattlemen’s Association, he organized the Cattlemen’s Jackpot Show which he continued for over 30 years.

ranges in western Yolo county and operated a feedlot near Madison. He ran cattle into his 70s and he always had a project in the works. Even after health issues forced him to slow down, he continued to make improvements to his ranch and plan for the future. Tom was active in the Yolo County Cattlemen’s and Woolgrower’s Association, where he served at least one term as president, and the California Cattlemen’s Association. He also served as a director of the Yolo County Farm Bureau. Tom had a passion for ag-related issues, including landowner rights, farm taxation, water rights, and flood control. He never lost his passion for these topics. Tom was also active in the Elks Club and Carlton Club in Woodland. He and his brother, Don were well-known for their receipe for Italian sausage that was served at both clubs at yearly dinners. Much of

64 California Cattleman February 2017

He also served on the Sloughhouse RCD Board and the last several years as chairman. He hosted many events including the Sheriff ’s Ride and Elk Grove’s Project Ride at the Barton Ranch. He spent many years helping with Elk Grove’s Western Festival Days. Bill was a 45 year member of Elk Grove Parlor #41 Native Sons of the Golden West. He had a love for agriculture, was an avid reader and loved his family. A very special thank you to the medical staff at Mercy San Juan Hospital for their excellent care and consideration for Bill and his family during this difficult time. Bill was the anchor of the family and will be deeply missed by all. Funeral mass was held Jan. 14, in Ranch Murieta. Memorial contributions may be made to Project Ride, 8840 Southside Avenue, Elk Grove, CA 95624.

the success of the Carlton Club booth at the Yolo County fair was owed to Tom’s efforts. Tom had extended family all over the San Francisco Bay area. As family was very important to him, he started the tradition of yearly family reunions that went on for many years. Tom is survived by Helen, his wife of 60 years; his children, Tom (Karen) and Rich (January); his brother, Don (Geraldine); and his grandchildren, Ryan, Jeffrey, Roman, Stephanie, Christopher and Renee. Tom was preceded in death by his parents, Tom and Mary Ferro and his sister, Norma. He will be laid to rest at the Woodland Cemetery in a family service followed by a private reception. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Tom’s memory to the donor’s favorite charity.


Col. Peter Belezzouli, Jr. Peter Vincent Belezzuoli was born on Aug. 22, 1955 in Tulare, to Pete and Louise Belezzuoli. He passed away on Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 at the age of 61 at his home of a heart attack. Peter graduated from St. Rose-McCarthy Catholic School in 1969, Hanford High in 1973, attended College of the Sequoias and graduated from the Missouri Auction School as a Colonel in 1974. Peter showed beef cattle in 4-H and FFA and played basketball for Hanford High School. After being born in Tulare, Peter lived in Pumpkin Center, until the age of four. In 1959 his family moved to Hanford, when his father, Pete Belezzuoli and Hoke Evetts bought Overland Stockyard. From that moment on Peter found his passion for Overland Stockyard. He picked up the art of auctioneering from his dad’s partner, Hoke Evetts. With time and practice Peter became an outstanding auctioneer. When Peter’s dad died suddenly at the age of 66 in 1983, Peter stepped up and took the place of his father at

Kathy Ackley

Kathleen Jean Ackley, a resident of Newell, died Nov. 18, 2016, at the age of 69. There was a private family service with Mike Voight officiating. A celebration of life service was held Dec. 3, 2016, at the Tulelake High School gym. Kathy was born on Dec. 15, 1946, in Klamath Falls, Ore. She attended several schools growing up, including in Tulelake, Redding and Horsefly, British Columbia, Canada, and then graduated high school back at Tulelake. She married Ray Ackley III in Tulelake, a few days after her 18th birthday in 1964. After high school, she worked a few jobs at the Catholic church and movie theater in Tulelake before beginning her life-long career as a ranch wife and mother. Kathy was very active in helping children grow to be good citizens. She was a 4-H leader and a coordinator and sponsor for the PeeWee Showmanship at the Tulelake-Butte Valley Fair. She and her husband, Ray, were also active in hosting foreign exchange students. Kathy was a very musical person, and taught herself to play piano,

Overland Stockyard. Peter continued his dad’s legacy with enthusiasm and hard work. Peter was successful in starting the monthly cattle video sale in 2010. He did many dispersal dairy sales with respectand compassion for the sellers. Peter was a friend to all and was always willing to talk and share his knowledge of the cattle industry. Peter was a member of the Rancheros Visitadores which is a social club that meets the first week of May on the ranch land in the Santa Ynez Valley and embarks northward on a 20 mile trek across the countryside after receiving a blessing at the Santa Ynez Mission. He loved having his family come watch the parade of 800 cowboys on horseback riding through Solvang before the trek. Peter gave his auctioneer skills to many charity group auctions. He loved auctioning the Kings County Fair Dairy and Livestock Sales and the Fresno Fair Dairy Sale. Peter was a lifelong member of St. Brigid Catholic Church in Hanford. Peter loved spending time on the deck of his Shell Beach home

accordion and organ. She also enjoyed photography, hunting, bowling, country dancing, was an avid NASCAR fan and shooting squirrels. Kathy is survived by her husband of 52 years, Ray Ackley III; children and their spouses, Rhonda and Joe Hemphill of Tulelake, Diane Patterson of Klamath Falls, Robin and Craig Huntsman of Klamath Falls, Lucky and Jennifer Ackley of Tulelake; grandchildren, Jessica Hemphill, Kendra Cloudt and husband Tyrel, Kyle Patterson and fiance Shaylee McGuire, Shelby Patterson, Ashley Gallagher and husband Jimmy, Chelsea Brosterhous and husband Ryan, Alex Huntsman, Maggie Ackley, Lottie Ackley; one great-grandchild, Kaylee Cloudt; brother, James Anderson of Tulelake; step-mother, Jan Anderson of Tulelake; step-siblings, Shelley Cannady, and Chris Burbick, and numerous aunts, uncles and extended family members. Contributions in memory of Kathy Ackley may be made to the Kathy Ackley Memorial Pee-Wee Showmanship Fund at Umpqua Bank.

watching the sunset. He so enjoyed riding around Shaver Lake in his pontoon boat. Barbecuing for his family and friends was his special skill. His greatest joy came from his family. Peter and his wife, Lisa, were blessed with three grandsons in 2016. Bryson and Korban put a sparkle in Peter’s eye. Sadly, Peter passed away three days before grandson Vincent was born. Peter was preceded in death by his parents Pete and Louise Belezzuoli. Peter is survived by his wife of 35 years Lisa, daughter Julie Hathaway and husband Kyle of Hermosa Beach, son Daniel Belezzuoli and wife Kelsi of Hanford; son Douglas Belezzuoli and wife Sara of Hanford; sister Gloria Pettigrew and her husband Melvin of Hanford;. Visitation was held Dec. 28, 2016 Remembrances in Peter Belezzuoli’s memory may be made to the American Heart Association, 7425 N. Palm Bluffs Ave., Suite 101, Fresno, CA 93711.

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February 2017 California Cattleman 65


Teixeira Cattle Company ........................................ 2, 59 All West/Select Sires .................................................... 65 Amador Angus............................................................. 58 American Hereford Association ................................ 60 Andreini & Co. ............................................................ 14 Baker Angus ................................................................. 10 Bar LR Ranch ............................................................... 44 Bar R Angus ................................................................. 58 Bar T Bar Ranches ....................................................... 55 Beefmaster Breeders United....................................... 57 Bell Ranch..................................................................... 44 BMW Angus ................................................................ 58 Bovine Elite, LLC ......................................................... 63 Broken Arrow Angus .................................................. 58 Broken Box Ranch ....................................................... 62 Buchanan Angus Ranch .......................................21, 58 Byrd Cattle Co.............................................................. 58 California Custom ....................................................... 62 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc................................. 62 Charron Ranch ............................................................ 58 Cherry Glen Beefmasters ........................................... 60 Colyer Herefords and Angus ..................................... 11 Conlin Supply Co. ....................................................... 26 Corsair Angus Ranch ............................................26, 58 Cottonwood Veterinary Clinic .................................. 48 CSU Chico College of Ag ........................................... 61 Dal Porto Livestock ..................................................... 59 Diamond Back Ranch ................................................. 62 Donati Ranch ............................................................... 58 Edwards, Lien, Toso, Inc............................................. 62 Five Star Land Company ............................................ 62 Flying RJ Ranch ........................................................... 43 Freitas Rangeland Improvements .............................. 34 Fresno State Ag Foundation ....................................... 61

Furtado Angus ............................................................. 59 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ................................... 63 Genoa Livestock ....................................................12, 60 Gonsalves Ranch ......................................................... 59 Gudel Cattle Company ............................................... 43 Harrell Hereford Ranch .............................................. 25 HAVE Angus ................................................................ 59 Hoffman Ranch............................................................ 23 Hogan Ranch ............................................................... 60 Hone Ranch.................................................................. 60 Hudson Pines Farms ................................................... 39 Hufford’s Herefords ..................................................... 61 J-H Feed Inc. ................................................................ 62 J/V Angus ..................................................................... 59 JBB/AL Herefords........................................................ 49 Jorgensen Ranch .......................................................... 44 Lambert Ranch ......................................................19, 60 Lander Veterinary Clinic ............................................ 63 Little Shasta Ranch ...................................................... 61 Lorenzen Ranch ............................................................. 9 McPhee Red Angus ..................................................... 61 Mrnak Herefords West ............................................... 52 Noahs Angus Ranch ..............................................26, 59 Norbrook Animal Health .....................................30, 31 O’Connell Ranch ......................................................... 59 ORIgen...........................................................................63 Orvis Cattle Company ................................................ 61 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Company ............................... 27 Pacific Trace Minerals ...........................................34, 62 Pedretti Ranches .......................................................... 53 Perfromance Plus Angus Bull Sale ............................ 33 Phillips Ranch Red Angus .......................................... 43 Pitchfork Cattle Co. ..................................................... 61 Ray-Mar Ranches ........................................................ 59

66 California Cattleman February 2017

Razzari Auto Centers .................................................. 67 Riverbend Ranch ......................................................... 41 Romans Ranches.......................................................... 35 Sammis Ranch ............................................................. 59 San Juan Ranch ............................................................ 60 Schafer Ranch .............................................................. 59 Schohr Herefords......................................................... 61 Shaw Cattle Co. ............................................................ 13 Sierra Ranches.............................................................. 61 Silveira Bros.................................................................. 60 Silveus Rangeland Insurance...................................... 10 Skinner Livestock Transportation ............................. 62 Snyder Livestock Co., Inc. .......................................... 42 Sonoma Mountain Herefords ..............................52, 61 Southwest Fence & Supply, Inc. ................................. 62 Spanish Ranch.............................................................. 60 Spring Cove Ranch ...................................................... 49 Tehama Angus Ranch ................................................. 60 The Cattlemen Connection Bull Sale ........................ 49 The Cowman’s Kind Bull Sale .................................... 37 Thomas Angus Ranch ................................................. 15 Thorenfeldt Cattle Co.................................................. 45 Trotter Red Angus ....................................................... 44 Tumbleweed Ranch ..................................................... 60 Universal Semen Sales ................................................ 63 Veterinary Service, Inc................................................ 62 VF Red Angus ........................................................29, 61 Vintage Angus Ranch ...........................................60, 68 Ward Ranches ................................................................ 7 Western Fence & Construction, Inc.......................... 62 Winnemucca Ranch Rodeo Weekend ........................ 2 Wulff Brothers Livestock ............................................ 59


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VAR

HERITAGE

5038

V A R HERITAGE 5038 AAA REG: 18066052

SIRE: V A R GENERATION 2100 MGS: SUMMITCREST COMPLETE 1P55

DOMINANT MATING FOR MULTI-TRAIT EXCELLENCE

• V A R Heritage brings multi-trait excellence to a new level with 14 traits and indexes in the top 10% of the breed. Ten of these 14 are top 1% or 2% rankings. These high rankings are no accident. His sire has 12 traits in the top 10% and his famous dam has 18 traits in the top 10% with 9 in the top 1%. • V A R Heritage combines two of the most proven cow families in the breed today. His sire is out of the $3 million producer, Sandpoint Blackbird 8809, the dam of herd sires. The dam of Heritage is out of DRMCTR 1I1 Rita 6108, the most proven carcass cow in the breed. • The dam of Heritage is one of the dominant young cows in the breed today with progeny ratios of 127 WW, 121 YW, 101 IMF and 102 RE. Nine daughters of 1564 sold in 2016 for $1,145,000 to average $127,500 each.

EPDS

TRAIT

+7 +.9 +67 +116 +.29 +1.58 +30 +43 +43 +.97 +1.19

CED BW WW YW RADG SC DOC Milk CW Marb RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B

-.022

+81.68 +87.17 +55.29 +41.63 +13.66 +160.18

Semen: $30

VINTAGE RITA 4417- The $440,000

maternal sister to Heritage.

VINTAGE RITA 5012 - The $30,000

flush sister to Heritage.

SJH COMPLETE 1564 - The dam of

Heritage who produced over $1 million in progeny sales in 2016 alone.

BREED RANKINGS 2% 2% 5% 10% 2% 1% 10% 2% 15% 1% 2% 2% 10% 2% 2%

Certificates: $40

OWNED WITH:EZ ANGUS RANCH, CA CRAZY K RANCH, TN

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 VINTAGE RITA 6079 - The $95,000 maternal sister to Heritage.

VINTAGE RITA 5383 - The $380,000 valued maternal sister to Heritage.

DRMCTR 1I1 RITA 6108 - The famous grandam of Heritage and dominant carcass cow in the breed..

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

February 2017 California Cattleman  
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