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September 2016

Inside This Month... Making Genetic Impact through IVF Young Cattlemen Ace the test September 2016 California Cattleman 1


2 California Cattleman September 2016


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Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy. bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

September 2016 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Billy Flournoy, Likely FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Mark Lacey, Independence Jack Lavers, Glennville

Mike Williams, Acton

TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Malorie Bankhead

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jenna Chandler

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com magazine@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane mobile: (916) 803-3113 office: (916) 434-5970 M3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

4 California

TOO SOCIAL

by CCA Second Vice President Mark Lacey

I’m not only a consumer of the most current technology, but I’m also an advocate of its use for efficiency and convenience even in cattle ranching, which is rooted in traditional forms of information sharing and communication. Even my father, who once famously stated, “I’ll take a yellow pad and No. 2 pencil over a computer anytime,” is very impressed with what Seth Scribner can do with his smart phone. It is undeniable that technology has provided innumerable benefits, but there have also been unintended consequences. Earlier I stated that I am an advocate for the use of technology, specifically the use of electronic media by organizations like the California Cattlemen’s Association and California Beef Council as an efficient way to convey information to members and consumers. However, I am not a fan of Facebook for a couple of reasons. The first being that I come from an era when we were taught to mind our own business. As a matter of fact, when I was a kid in Montana we had a party line and everyone use to complain that there were nosey neighbors that listened in on the conversations so your business was not confidential. In contrast, now we put everything on Facebook so everyone knows our business. So while it is a convenient way of sharing with family, it is also an incredible selfinflicted invasion of privacy. The second reason I have concerns about Facebook is that now we all have phones with cameras which have resulted in some fantastic pictures of scenery and cattle work, but they have also captured moments in time that to the untrained eye or animal rights folks could be a little hard to explain. I’m not talking about something extraordinary, just like say photos of the branding corral, but you know the saying, “a picture is worth a thousand words,” …well a picture on Facebook without context is a story waiting to be written. So, we ask our employees and spouses to be careful what they post.

A couple of other negative issues, particularly the use of phones is that the younger generation seem to have their phones immediately at hand when there is a break in the work, or worse yet when things slowdown, or get boring while working cattle. This can lead to a loss in efficiency, or potentially cause a hazard to other employees or cattle due to the distraction. On our operations, we have a rule that there are no phones while we are working cattle. The no phone rule is not zero tolerance, but there is always a reminder at all safety meetings in regards to phone use while working, texting while driving and other potential issues related to use of electronics. Fortunately our employees have been very compliant. As employers this is a significant issue given that insurance companies have issued guidance for accidents related to cell phone use. There is no doubt that cell phones and computers have created enormous gains in convenience and productivity. The word processing and electronic spreadsheet applications, as well as email that we take for granted now have made our lives so much easier and productive. I would like to leave you with some food for thought related to efficiency versus productivity. If you take notice while you are in a restaurant, on a construction site or just generally where work is in progress and see the amount of time being spent on smart phones by workers, the question is, are the gains in efficiency due to improvements in technology actually decreasing productivity because of the indiscriminant use of technology? As fall is now upon us, I look forward to attending our CCA Fall Tour meetings and seeing you all out to hear the latest from CCA and our local associations.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher.

National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 Cattleman September 2016


ON THE COVER

This month’s cover photo was taken by Lindsay Tulloch, of LT Cattle Company, near Bakersfield. The Tulloch Family roots run deep in the California cow business. Learn more about them and other century-old ranches in the California Cattlemen’s Association 100-year coffee table book, which will be available at the 100th Annual CCA & CCW Convention, Dec. 1-3 in Sparks, Nev. To learn more about this year’s convention, see page 42.

SEPTEMBER 2016 Volume 99, Issue 8

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN The good and bad of new age-technology

4

BUNKHOUSE Foothill abortion field trials continue

8

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 10 CCA works to keep public lands working for you

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS

VET VIEWS 14 Precondition to stay in the game

SEPT. 9

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER CBCIA sponsors student to attend BIF

23

SEPT. 13

HUMBOLDT-DEL NORTE CATTLEMEN’S DINNER Bear River Casino Resort, Loleta

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Building beef demand overseas

40

SEPT. 13

RANGELAND TRUST TALK 66 Preserving rangeland one ranch at a time

MENDOCINO-LAKE CATTLEMEN’S DINNER Broiler Steak House, Redwood Valley

SEPT. 24

SACRAMENTO FARM-TO-FORK FESTIVAL Downtown Sacramento

SPECIAL FEATURES

OCT. 7

SONOMA-MARIN CATTLEMEN’S DINNER Respini Ranch, Sebastopol

Is in vitro fertilization right for your operation? Chico State students step up in competition NCBA Summer Conference Make plans today for 100th annual convention Scenes from July Western Video Market Sale Executive board member serving you

READER SERVICES

Buyers’ Guide Obituaries and Wedding Bells Advertisers Index

20 28 34 42 56 72

DEC. 1 TO 3

NAPA-SOLANO CATTLEMEN’S MEETING Emigh Ranch, Dixon

100-YEAR CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

74 80 82

September 2016 California Cattleman 5


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For more on upcoming sales and market reports, visit www.clmgalt.com. (209) 745-1515 Office (209) 745-1582 Fax 12495 Stockton Blvd. galt, California 95632 6 California Cattleman September 2016

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BUNKHOUSE FOOTHILL ABORTION FIELD TRIALS CONTINUE UP AND DOWN GOLDEN STATE by CCA Office Administrator Jenna Chandler It’s bull sale season and many producers are turning their thoughts, once again, to profitability (although we know that it is really always in mind). Producers know the impact of weaning the maximum number of calves on that profitability, and the consequences of one disease have been wreaking havoc on it in certain regions of the state for decades; Epizootic Bovine Abortion (EBA), more commonly known as Foothill Abortion Disease, but there may be a solution on the horizon. California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) Livestock Memorial Research Fund, in conjunction with researchers at the University of California, Davis, have long been working on a vaccine for the disease, and for the last few months, I have been CCA’s boots on the ground for the project, traveling and working with the researchers as the field trials continue. In the second year of the project’s expanded field trials, 2016 alone has seen the vaccination of thousands of head of cattle across California, Oregon and Nevada. The project has taken me all over our state, even into some others, and has given me the opportunity to see different operations first hand, and the impact that this disease has had through the generations that call these regions home. Some of the ranchers we visited have told stories about how these incredible losses have always just been accepted as part of the territory. Parents, grandparents, and great-great grandparents, all just had to suck it up and take the hit, doing their best to work the razor-thin profit margins while losing valuable calves to EBA.

The promise of this vaccine, though, could change the game for those producers and producers all across the western states. Although not yet commercially available, the excitement in the ranching community is palpable. The possibilities and early results are promising, but the trial isn’t just as simple as the typical vaccine purchase yet. Once a ranch is accepted into the study, the permitting process for an experimental vaccine is complicated and lengthy – and that’s just to get the product to the ranch to do the vaccinating in the first place. With the vaccine still in its experimental stage, after the ranch has been permitted both federally and by the state, the researchers travel to the location and vaccinate most of the cattle themselves. That means scheduling the time to do so. Because the vaccine must be given, at minimum, 60 days before breeding occurs, and operations turn bulls out at widely varying times, the vaccination schedule can get a bit hectic. But the trips get planned, we explore every corner of California and the cattle get vaccinated. Vaccination day is a whirlwind of moving animals, staggering amounts of paperwork, identification numbers, bottle logging in and out, checking, rechecking and then checking everything again. It’s odd to think of a processing chute in the middle of nowhere as a scientific laboratory, but to ensure reliable data and usable results at the end of the study, technically it is, and that requires all of the care and consideration you would need in the real lab. After vaccination, the cattle are closely monitored, and it’s this

8 California Cattleman September 2016

JENNA CHANDLER tracking that really is the heart of the project. Information such as vaccine site reactions, illness, mortality, and of course, whether or not vaccinated animals eventually calved as expected, is vital to the research and ensuring that when, and if, a product does come to market, it is safe and effective. And, when all that’s done, off we go to another ranch to do it all again. The project is groundbreaking in so many ways, and I am incredibly grateful to be even a small part of it. Through this project I have gotten to know so many more of our members and their operations at a truly exciting time when such a long-sought-after solution to one of the California cattle industry’s most devastating problems may be just around the corner. Want to get in on the ground floor? If you have any questions or are interested in being a part of the trial, give me a call in the CCA office! It can be a long and tedious process at times, but those healthy calves on the ground and the return on your investment will most definitely be worth it.


Sunday, September 4 • 1 p.m.

Five Star Land & Livestock • wilton, California

60 Angus bulls sell Performance-tested, ultrasounded and Zoetis hd50K tested The Offering Features These Standouts and More by Leading Sires... bAr r ten x 5007

A A r ten x 7008 s A x sitz upward 307r

2-16-2015

bAr r 5603 Absolute Pwr 5059 Connealy Absolute Power x Connealy impression

7-27-2015

BW +0 WW +61

RANK 25% RANK 10%

YW +117

five stAr 2009 grAnite 5030

BW -.1 WW +68

RANK 20% RANK 1%

RANK 2%

YW +109

RANK 10%

MILK

RANK

MILK

RANK

+27

+24

MARB +.83 RE +.68 $W +61.54

20% RANK 20% RANK 30% RANK 10%

MARB +.34 RE +.81 $W +72.84

45% RANK 85% RANK 20% RANK 1%

$B

RANK

+167.79

1%

BW +.8 WW +55

RANK 40% RANK 25%

YW +102

Connealy black granite x s A v brilliance 8077

7-23-2015

$B

RANK

+105.32

55%

BW +1.3 WW +62

RANK 50% RANK 10%

RANK 15%

YW +103

RANK 15%

MILK

RANK

MILK

+32

+25

RANK 35%

MARB +.64

4% RANK 40%

RE

RANK

+.77 $W +69.16

20% RANK 2%

$B

RANK

+121.71

30%

five stAr 8088 grAnite 5035 Connealy black granite x tC total 410

8-17-2015

MARB +.53 RE +.89 $W +68.53

RANK 60% RANK

$B

RANK

+111.85

45%

15% RANK 2%

Also selling sons of ConneAly Absolute Power And A & b Consensus 3096

Bar r angus Craig & J.J. reinhardt

Cell 916-712-3696 • 916-354-2962 Email: barr6925@sbcglobal.net Website: www.barrangus.com 6925 Bisbee Drive • Sloughhouse, CA 95683

5I I I

I

wAtCh And bid live www.liveAuctions.tv AuCtioneer John rodgers 559-730-3311

I

Bull Videos & Sale Book Posted Online

Five Star Land & LiveStock Matt Macfarlane Marketing

(916) 803-3113

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

Mark & abbie nelson & Family aBBie: 916-804-4990, abbiernelson@gmail.com

ryan, Hailey, Jhett & cort nelson: 916-804-6861

Hilario Gomez, ranch operations: ~ 916-804-8136 se habla espanol

THD

12211 Pear Lane, Wilton, california © September 2016 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA TACKLES FOREST PLAN REVISIONS FOR INYO, SEQUOIA AND SIERRA NATIONAL FORESTS On May 26, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) released its Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) and Draft Forest Plans for the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra National Forests, three “early adopters” of the agency’s 2012 Forest Planning Rule. (As of press time, the comment deadline for the DEIS was August 25, though numerous stakeholders have pressed USFS for additional time for comment on the more-than-700-page document.) The Forests Plans, once finalized, are expected to guide forest management on the three National Forests for the next ten to fifteen years. Given the importance of these Forest Plan revisions—in addition to guiding management of the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra for the next fifteen years, the three “early adopter” revisions will likely set the tone for Forest Plan Revisions in the other National Forests throughout California—CCA has been heavily

engaged in the planning process since USFS opened the scoping period for the plan revisions in August of 2014. In the past two years, CCA has gone on the record on six occasions in an effort to shape the Forest Plan Revisions for the three early adopter forests. In September 2014, CCA’s initial scoping comments focused on correcting the record regarding grazing’s perceived impact on at-risk species (such as the Yosemite toad, Yellow-legged frog and Sage grouse) and on pushing USFS to employ grazing as a management tool to reduce fire fuels and invasive species. That same month, CCA strenuously opposed USFS’s recommendation to designate 1,971,928 acres of land within the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra National Forests as wilderness, because federal management of wilderness areas historically results in significant curtailments of federal grazing permits. CCA renewed our opposition

10 California Cattleman September 2016

to proposed wilderness designations in December 2015 and December 2016 in response to USFS’s continued efforts to recommend wilderness designations in the three forests. In July of 2015, USFS released proposed lists of “species of conservation concern” for each of the three forests. In developing such lists, USFS must consider any species which is listed as either endangered or threatened by the state or federal government or which has a positive “90-day finding” on a petition to list as endangered or threatened, among other criteria. However, while many species were thus required to be included in these lists, CCA lobbied USFS to minimize species management’s impact upon grazing where the best available science demonstrates there is no significant harm to species from grazing. Specifically, CCA sought ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


Join Us For Our

21st Annual bull sale

Thursday september

8

Colusa Fairgrounds

Colusa, California

selling 130 angus long-yearlings and yearlings Bulls sell with a 110% satisfaction guarantee, plus a complete a performance, fertility, health and ultrasound evaluation. They are Anaplas vaccinated and tested PI negative for BVD.

We are your source for a large selection of heifer bulls.

featured ai sires • Connealy Black Granite

‘C194’ DOB: 7/28/15 • Sire: Baldridge Atlas A266 Dam’s Sire: Connealy Capitalist 028

• A A R Ten X 7008 SA

CED +8

• J M B Traction 292 • Baldridge Atlas A266 • G A R Prophet • Baldridge Waylon W34 • Baldridge Download Z013

BW -.4

30%

WW +74

YW +128

1%

1%

15%

SC +1.89

MILK +26

2%

30%

‘5833’ DOB: 8/22/15 • Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 Dam’s Sire: Mytty In Focus CED +21

BW -4.0

1%

CW +51

MARB +.59

RE +.91

$W +81.77

$F +98.79

$G +42.15

$B +155.83

10%

50%

10%

1%

1%

20%

3%

1%

WW +57

YW +104

SC +1.66

MILK +28

20%

15%

5%

15%

CW +55

MARB +.55

RE +.93

$W +65.69

5%

55%

10%

3%

$F +70.05

$G +38.16

$B +157.31

30%

3%

10%

• Boyd Signature 1014 • V D A R Really Windy 4097 • V D A R Black Cedar 8380 • DFA Hero 6017 • Sitz Upward 307R • Deer Valley All In • EXAR Denver 2002B • Plattemere Weigh Up K360 • V A R Reserve 1111 • Baldridge Willie Y34 • Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • RB Tour of Duty 177 ‘C230’ DOB: 8/1/15 • Sire: Bladridge Waylon W34 Dam’s Sire: MCC Daybreak

Auctioneer

CED +5

rick machado, 805-501-3210

Watch & Bid Live

BW +1.6

55%

WW +66

60%

YW +122

2%

1%

SC +.43

MILK +25

75%

35%

‘535’ DOB: 8/22/15 • Sire: Boyd Signature 1014 Dam’s Sire: S A V New Worth 4200 CED +3

BW +2.4

70%

CW +55

MARB +.77

RE +1.14

$W +61.65

$F +88.86

$G +51.29

$B +165.79

5%

25%

2%

10%

1%

4%

1%

80%

WW +58

YW +105

SC +.29

MILK +27

15%

10%

80%

20%

CW +31

MARB +.55

RE +.78

$W +61.37

55%

55%

20%

10%

$F +71.20 10%

$G +38.85

$B +118.65

30%

35%

Wulff BROTHERS

L I V E S T O C K

DonAti rAnCH

tom & rocky Donati > oroVille, CA 530-693-1634 > donatiranch.com THD ©

Wulff Bros.

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o’Connell ranch

dan & Barbara o’Connell > colusa, ca 530-632-4491 > oConnellrAnCH.Com

sAle mAnAger: mAtt mACfArlAne > 916-803-3113 > m3CAttlemArketing.Com

September 2016 California Cattleman 11


CCA

Affiliate leadership ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL

OFFICERS Chair: Heston Nunes, Cargill Beef

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS President: Cheryl Lafranchi, Calistoga Vice President: Rita McPhee, Lodi Secretary: Karen Sweet, Livermore Trearurer: Carole Silveira, Firebaugh CBCIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Tim Curran, Ione Tracy Schohr, Gridley Kasey Deatley, Ph.D., Chico Lana Trotter, Porterville Carissa Koopmann Rivers, Winters Ryan Nelson, Herald CBCIA ADVISORS Keela Retallick, Ph.D., Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Aaron Lazanoff, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Anthony Estep, Cal Poly, Pomona Randy Perry, Ph.D., CSU, Fresno Dave Daley, Ph.D., CSU, Chico Jim Oltjen, Ph.D., UC Davis Dan Sehnert, UC Davis Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., CSU, Chico Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., UC Davis Ken Tate, Ph.D., UC Cooperative Extension

...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 favorable grazing management within habitat of the Sierra Nevada red fox, the California spotted owl, the tricolored blackbird and a wide array of amphibians (including the yellow-legged frog). Finally, in December 2015 CCA filed comments objecting to the proposed classification of 897 miles of river in the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra as wild and scenic because such designations may be used as the basis for government condemnation of land, may result in increased risk of litigation by environmental groups and may result in curtailments of grazing on nearby land. Many of these objectionable elements remained in the DEIS and draft forest plans released by USFS on May 26. While CCA had not filed comments on the DEIS and draft forest plans as of press time, CCA’s response has been robust since the drafts were released, and comments will be formally filed in advance of the deadline. Many CCA members, including Second Vice President Jack Lavers, Glennville, attended public meetings in June and August to provide feedback on the draft forest plans. Even members outside of the three impacted forests provided input to USFS regarding the plan revisions, recognizing the potential future impact of these “early adopter” plans on forthcoming forest plan revisions for other Region 5 forests.

YOUNG CATTLEMEN’S COMMITTEE

OFFICERS Chair: Crystal Avila, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Vice Chair: Alise Azevedo, CSU, Chico Secretary: Katie McDougald, CSU, Fresno Publicity Chair: Rebecca Swanson, CSU, Chico

For more information on any of these groups or to contact any of their leadership, visit the CCA website at www.calcattlemen.org/affiliates 12 California Cattleman September 2016

CCA has also partnered with a coalition consisting of the California Farm Bureau Federation, timber interests and the Western Resources Legal Center, which has represented CCA in a number of legal matters, including wild horse litigation on the Modoc National Forest, to develop formal comments on the draft forest plans. Should the coalition’s concerns not be adequately addressed in the final forest plans, this coalition will be well-situated to file formal objections, and if necessary, litigate, based on the legal arguments presented with the assistance of WRLC. Additionally, CCA and the California Farm Bureau Federation will file thorough comments focused solely on the draft forest plans’ impacts to grazing. The importance of the forest plan revisions cannot be overstated—not just for the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra, but for every forest within Region 5. For this reason, CCA has zealously advocated CCA policy in objecting to unfavorable elements of the forest plan revisions at every available opportunity over the last two years, and will continue to do so well into the future. For more information on the forest plan revisions for the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra National Forests, or regarding CCA’s efforts on this and other federal lands issues, contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.

CDFA REMINDS OF TRICHomonosis IDENTIFICATION REGULATION As of Jan. 1, 2017 bulls, when trichomonosis tested, will require both official individual identification AND a “Trichomonosis approved color-coded tag.” This tamper evident California trichomonosis tag will be available to California trichomonosis approved veterinarians on Aug. 1, 2016 from the MWI Veterinary Supply Company (1-800-824-3703). The California trichomonosis tag program will follow the same year (September 1 to August 31) and color schedule (white for 201617, then cycling through orange, blue, yellow, green) as used by neighboring states. The tags are required to be removed and replaced with current year tags during the trichomonosis testing process.


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VET VIEWS

PRECONDITIONING FOR THE WIN

Set Your Calves Up For Success This Fall from Elanco Animal Health Now is the time to prepare your cattle for successful preconditioning this fall. Preconditioning calves before entering the feedlot improves their health and well-being while enhancing the profitability for the cow/calf and feedlot owner. “When we go from the cow/calf to the feedlot, animals are experiencing a new and different environment,” said W. Mark Hilton, DVM, DABVP and Elanco technical consultant. “It benefits everyone to have a healthy animal, so it’s important we do everything we can to start the animal off right.” Hilton suggests that cow/calf producers focus on their calves having a successful transition to the feedlot and try to reduce disease to nearly non-existent. “Minimizing disease is beneficial for all parties — cow/calf and feedlot producers — and helps us provide a healthy protein source for consumers,” said Hilton. The basics of building a preconditioning program A successful transition is impacted by several factors, including vaccination, nutrition, environment and genetics. “One small issue won’t cause a disaster, but those small issues can add up quickly and turn into a disaster. So, it’s critical we do everything we can to be successful,” said Hilton.

14 California Cattleman September 2016

From a nutritional standpoint, Hilton recommends that someone on your team — a feed supplier, nutritionist or veterinarian — help you manage cattle nutrition. The industry continues to learn more about the importance of nutrition in overall health. For instance, starting off with proper nutrition will likely lead to a better vaccine response. “From a health perspective, you need to help the immune system be ready to face diseases it’s likely to encounter,” said Hilton. “Work with your veterinarian to decide what those important vaccines are, starting with a product that covers IBR and BVD, and making sure you cover any other diseases that typically impact your region.” Timing is critical “Setting up a health protocol — including vaccines — is critical because we should not be giving all vaccines at weaning time, as that puts more stress on the animals,” said Hilton. “We know that weaning and preconditioning for at least 45 days on the farm or ranch of origin is the most important factor in ensuring health at the feedlot.” Typical timing for vaccine protocols often include: • Branding (2 to 3 months old) — administer first ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


a sample oF the Quality oF perFormanCe-testeD, long-yearling angus Bulls selling sept. 10, at galt

Bravo ten x 5027

aar ten x 7008 sa x vermillion Dateline 7078 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +9 +1.3 +59 +105 +24 +.74 +.42 +53.50 +140.66

Bravo ten x 5050

aar ten x 7008 sa x n Bar emulation ext CED BW +6 -.3

WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +50 +92 +22 +.58 +.39 +46.72 +133.97

saturday, september 10 CAttLEMEN’S LIvEStoCK MARKEt Galt, California, 12:30 p.m.

Also Selling

Bravo Consensus 5060

Connealy Consensus 7229 x Baldridge Kaboom K243 KCF CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B -1 +2.8 +58 +97 +19 +.77 +.65 +52.36 +104.16

Registered Angus Fall Pairs & Registered Fall Yearling Heifers

GUESt

DiaBlo 10x 1054

aar ten x 7008 sa x Connealy Freightliner CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +1 +2.2 +57 +101 +24 +.63 +.38 +54.36 +124.35

Consignor

Diablo Valley Angus

Dennis lopez

Byron, California

209-814-2440

Sale Books

www.parnelldickinson.com sales@parnelldickinson.com

SALE MANAGED BY

Bravo thunDerBirD 5016

DiaBlo waylon 1071

s a v thunderbird 9061 x harB pendleton 765 J h

Baldridge waylon w34 x exar 263C

CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +5 +1.2 +56 +104 +23 +.56 +.49 +44.80 +123.31

CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B -6 +2.8 +59 +101 +31 +.89 +.49 +59.74 +142.28

Adhemar Arellano 916-996-9855

John Dickinson 916-806-1919 Jake Parnell 916-662-1298

10365 Gilliam Drive Elk Grove, CA 95757

THD ©

September 2016 California Cattleman 15


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 respiratory vaccine and return the animals to the environment they came from • Two to three weeks before weaning — consider other vaccines to cover regional diseases and, potentially, the second respiratory vaccine • Weaning — implement the second respiratory vaccine (if not completed pre-weaning) and parasite control “Once calves are weaned, you need to keep them on the farm or ranch of origin for at least 45 additional days before moving them to the feedlot. During those 45 days, calves tend to gain weight very well — around 2.5 to 3 lbs per day,” said Hilton. Profitability of preconditioning Though nearly every study shows that feedlot producers are financially rewarded for purchasing healthier calves, some cow/calf producers ask if they receive the same financial benefits.In an 11-year study, as average daily gain increased, profits continued to grow. The net return per calf from preconditioning was approximately $80 in a study from 1999-2009. “In all 11 years, cattle earned a profit when good preconditioning practices were followed. It’s not a guarantee that you’ll make money, but the odds of making money with a good preconditioning program are more likely than not,” said Hilton. “From a health standpoint,

16 California Cattleman September 2016

preconditioning is always positive for the calf and typically is financially rewarding for both cow/calf and feedlot producers. Be sure you’re stacking the deck in your favor so you can be as successful as possible.” “As margins tighten for the cow/calf producer, it makes sense to “own” the calf for a few extra weeks to improve its health and add dollars to your bottom line,” said Hilton. “With the feedlot owner receiving a healthier calf, preconditioning becomes a win-win-win situation.” Elanco now offers a full line of health management products — including Titanium®, Vira Shield® and Scour Bos® — to meet your herd’s needs for a successful preconditioning program. Visit Elanco.us to learn more. For more information regarding your fall preconditioning program or herd health needs, contact Janel Fisher at (916) 539-8516 or janel.fisher@elanco.com. The labels contain complete use information, including cautions and warnings. Always read, understand and follow the label and use directions.


TEHAMA ANGUS Ranch A program and the people committed to customer success

• RANCH-RAISED BULLS: Our bulls are developed on the ranch with a high roughage ration resulting in ADG’s of 3.5 lbs. per day. They are run in large 60 acre pens to exercise daily and ensure longevity. They are evaluated in large sire and contemporary groups to collect meaningful data. Bulls are sorted out at weaning as well as during the 120 day test for growth performance, feet and leg quality, and docility.

• DATA: We gather and publish all “real world” data for our customers to sort through. This includes calving ease, birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weights, as well as genomically enhanced epd's using Zoetis 50K on each and every bull. Their sisters and dams are measured for size, udder scores, feet, and maternal ability to raise a worthy calf each and every year. All the cows that do not fit this criteria leave the breeding herd. • MATERNAL BACKING: The most recent Pathfinder® report published by the American Angus Association shows 42 active Pathfinder® dams currently working in the Tehama Angus program - the largest Pathfinder® herd in California. Tehama Angus continues to select on production, not on the current trend of the year. • HISTORY: Tehama Angus has over 70 years of breeding behind almost every bull in the sale! Continually improving our cowherd has created a foundation to breed consistency.

Please Join us for our 42nd Annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale

Highlights Featuring 100 Fall Yearlings 40 Spring Long-Yearlings

Also selling 20 commercial heifers

September 9, 2016 Gerber, California

Call or write today for a sale catalog Kevin and Linda Borror (530) 385-1570

Driven by Performance Since 1943

Bryce and Erin Borror (530) 526-9404 www.TehamaAngus.com tehamaranch@gmail.com September 2016 California Cattleman 17


18 California Cattleman September 2016


September 2016 California Cattleman 19


Utilizing conventional embryo and in vitro technology to maximize genetic impact by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

A

s cattle reproductive services mature, producers are working with animal health practitioners to find newer and better ways to quickly and more efficiently move the genetic improvement of cattle ahead. For more than 20 years, beef producers have been familiarizing themselves with the concept of embryo transfer (ET), which for many, has become an integral part of their breeding programs, especially on large scale seedstock operations. But now, cattlemen and women, whether purebred or commercial are using a range of reproductive sciences to multiply quality traits in their herds more quickly.

Lusk explains that conventional ET involves specific hormonal treatment of donor cows and heifers to cause multiple follicles to ovulate. He says donor cows are bred using artificial insemination (AI) following this superovulation regimen and estrus or standing heat. Then, approximately seven days after insemination, embryos are non-surgically collected or “flushed” from the donor’s uterus and transferred fresh into synchronous recipients who will serve as surrogate mothers who then carry the embryos to term and raise the calves as their own, though the DNA is 100 percent that of the donor cow and a selected AI sire. BACK TO BASICS: EMBRYO TRANSFER Over time, Lusk says the technology has rapidly evolved. ET is an advanced reproductive technology and a Having worked in the field of embryonics since 1977, he has progressive tool that can help beef producers produce more seen literally every aspect of the science change drastically. offspring from an elite cow and can extend the impact of “When ET technology first came about, there was no outstanding cattle genetics. Well-established ET providers way to sync a cow’s heat cycle, so we had to work with their generally offer the option of performing services in-center natural heat cycle,” Lusk said. “Donor cows had to be sent or on-site at a breeder’s ranch. to a center to be flushed. All flushes were surgically invasive Galen Lusk, DVM, a large animal practitioner and and all embryo work was done on fresh eggs. At that point in longtime embryologist, based in Sugar City, Idaho, works time, nothing was frozen. When those few things changed, it with beef producers throughout the Intermountain West. turned the industry upside down.” Today, embryos may also be cryopreserved or frozen to be transferred at a later point in time. Similar to AI semen, the frozen embryos are maintained in liquid nitrogen storage tanks until they are thawed and transferred to recipient cattle. Frozen embryos are washed and labeled according to the International Embryo Transfer Societies protocol. This allows them to be shipped domestically or exported internationally. An ET collection can be performed on a donor female every 28 to 60 days. The average number of transferrable embryos per collection is 5 to 6, but a wide range of results are common. Some donor collections result in zero viable embryos, while other donor collections may yield more than 20 viable embryos. Through technology like embryo transfer or in vitro fertilization, an embryo with elite Just as science in any field genetics can be implanted into a surrogate “recipient” cow who raises the calf as her own. gradually evolves, cattle producers This practice has become widely used as a way to maximize the genetic impact of superior and large animal veterinarians breeding stock 20 California Cattleman September 2016


have taken ET work a step further in recent years. While embryo transfer is done “in vivo,” or inside of a living animal “in vitro” options – outside of the animal – also exist in beef production and are being more widely used.

but in all cattle production sectors.” That is not to say there are not risks. While ET and IVF are not as invasive as they once were, Lusk warns that both can cause scar tissue and hinder a cow’s ability to breed or flush conventionally. “It’s also important to note that IVF embryos are not A GAME CHANGER: IN VITRO FERTILIZATION as likely to take as conventional embryos,” Lusk said. “With With in vitro fertilization, embryos are created from regular embryos we see a 60 percent oocytes (unfertilized egg cells) by success rate compared to a 45 percent fertilizing them with semen in a Petri success rate in IVF embryos. But it is dish. Oocytes are first collected from improving every day and getting better the ovaries of donors by ultrasound“For someone like me and better.” guided follicular aspiration. They it may not make sense He also says there is a slightly are then matured in a Petri dish and higher rate of abortion with IVF to purchase a high fertilized 20 to 24 hours later. embryos compared to conventional Through this method a variety dollar cow for my small embryos. But the fact that IVF can of semen types can be used. be preformed on donors while they operation. ET and IVF Conventional, sexed, frozen or are pregnant is an added advantage as reverse-sorted semen (sexed before make it possible for me well. fertilization but after it has been “We can preform IVF on cows to obtain genetics that previously frozen) may be used from 30 days after they calve until they for fertilization. Oocytes are then will help progress my are as far along as 120 in gestation,” developed in an incubator for seven Lusk said. herd quality without days, at which point, Lusk explains, He advises that all producers weigh breaking the bank.” that the resulting viable embryos are the pros and cons of implementing transferred into recipient cows. the technology on a case-by-case basis. —Shane Strickler To say IVF technology has taken Modesto-based Vintage Angus off would be an understatement. Ranch (VAR) is an elite Angus Lusk said at the American Embryo seedstock operation that has sold Transfer Association meeting three or four years ago very genetics into nearly every state in the country. VAR is known few licensed embryologists were practicing IVF and at the for always being on the leading edge of science and what it meeting last year over 350 were utilizing the technology in has to offer the beef industry. the livestock industry. VAR could be considered a pioneer in ET and IVF in Similarly, Lusk said the proportion of breeders using ET the beef business as ET has been used for more than 20 and IVF has dramatically changed. years and IVF for 12 years. “Initially, only the top premier programs were using AI VAR Manager Doug Worthington said VAR performed and ET,” Lusk said. “Today, I’d say virtually all seedstock its first IVF in 2004 on their famed cow Leachman Lass. programs utilize AI, nearly all have implemented ET at Worthington says IVF can be a great way to utilize an some level and more are using IVF. Year after year we see animal that because of injury or age can not be flushed in a conception rates improving and learning more about how ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 this technology can be implemented, not just in beef herds

September 2016 California Cattleman 21


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 normal fashion. Additionally, he says IVF can work well in a case where the semen to be used is very rare, as one straw of semen can fertilize the ova from many cows. “Through the years, we have used IVF sparingly as I believe there are risks that should be evaluated before using this or any new technology, for that matter,” Worthington said. Worthington notes that IVF can be valuable to breeders with programs geared to a show market. “In the show arena, breeders are using the technology to produce more sexed embryos. For example, a breeder may want more female embryos as they find it difficult to sell males. In circumstances like this, IVF could make their program more efficient,” Worthington said. While VAR is a large-scale, nationally-recognized operation, even smaller breeders are now implementing ET and IVF as a way to more quickly emphasize the traits of a high-quality donor cow in their herd in a way that the cow can’t do on her own through conventional breeding. Shane Strickler, a club calf and SimAngus breeder in Orland also uses ET extensively on his smaller scale operation and serves as a cooperative facility for other beef producers. As a cooperative, Strickler provides resources for other breeders who may not have the time or means to care for donor and/or recipient cattle. “From small beef producers without a lot of space to raise their own calves, to club calf operators looking for a good mama cow to raise an exceptional show animal to a rodeo stock contractor who sells young bucking stock, there are a wide variety of folks who rely on reproductive technology to fill a void they might have somewhere on their operation,” Strickler explains. “For someone like me, it may not make sense to purchase a high dollar cow for my small operation. ET and IVF make it possible for me to obtain genetics that will help progress my herd quality without breaking the bank,” Strickler said. Strickler said he has followed the technology for many years and while it was once used by only elite operations with high cattle numbers, the accuracy and availability of ET and IVF resources has made it more affordable for smaller producers. “I’ve been using ET for the past 15 years and IVF for the past three years and while there are still some kinks to work out, the strides I have seen made are incredible,” Strickler said. “Year after year, I see better conception rates. Now that we have IVF, the technology seems to be moving at an even faster rate. We can preform IVF on pregnant cows without taking them out of production and can now get progeny out of heifers that aren’t yet old enough to breed. Overall, I think what is most impressive is how fast you can improve your herd by using genetics that once were unattainable to the majority of producers.” As reproductive sciences continue to evolve and are refined, it is likely that beef producers both small and large will have access to possibilities that the past generation of cattlemen may have never even dreamed of. 22 California Cattleman September 2016

COMMON QUESTIONS

TransOva Genetics is a national and international firm specializing in embryo transfer and in vitro fertilization. Below are some common questions producers have that TransOva has addressed regarding IVF technology. Question: What results can be expected on each IVF cycle? Answer: Results vary with each donor, but we typically expect to collect ~18 oocytes per aspiration. On average, 30 percent of these oocytes will develop into a viable embryo. Thus, we expect about five transferrable (Grade 1 & 2) embryos per IVF cycle on average. Donors that produce greater numbers of oocytes and oocytes of higher quality may see larger numbers of embryos produced, whereas donors with compromised reproductive conditions may have lower results. Development rate will also vary greatly depending on the sire used. Question: What results can be expected with different semen types? Answer: On a given sire, the development rate between conventional and reverse-sorted semen is generally very similar. However, we do see a significant decrease in development rate with pre-sexed frozen semen compared to reverse-sorted semen with many bulls. Thus, our recommendation for clients wanting to produce sexed embryos is to use reverse-sorted semen. Question: What donor females are candidates for the IVF program? Answer: While reproductively sound donors are most likely to achieve success in IVF, we have worked with donors with a variety of reproductive conditions, including those unable to achieve success in conventional ET. Donors that tend to make unfertilized or degenerate embryos are a common type with which we have had success. Many clients also appreciate the ability to create embryos from pregnant donors and younger heifers with IVF. Question: Can a donor cow be flushed while pregnant? Is there added risk? Answer: One aspect of IVF that is surprising to many producers is that it can be performed while the donor cow is pregnant without taking her out of production. Between 40 and 100 days of pregnancy, oocytes can be aspirated from the donor and embryos can then be created, giving a donor a natural or AI calf and multiple IVF offspring at the same time. While the procedure is quite safe, clients should be aware that there is an increased risk of pregnancy loss and added risk to the recipient cow as the technology becomes more refined. Question: How often can oocytes be collected? Answer: Oocytes can be collected every other week as long as the attending veterinarian believes this is best for the donor. This fact makes it possible to create a significant number of pregnancies in a given period of time. Question: What are the pregnancy rates when IVF embryos are transferred fresh? Answer: On average, we expect fresh IVF embryos to achieve about a 45 to 50 percent pregnancy rate. This will vary somewhat depending on the time of year, type of recipient, and recipient management. Qustion: Can IVF embryos be frozen? Answer: Good-quality IVF embryos may be frozen with very acceptable results. Pregnancy rates from frozen IVF embryos in recipient cows have averaged 4550 percent. If clients would like to freeze IVF embryos, it is important to be very selective on the quality of embryos that are frozen. Embryos that do not qualify for freezing should be transferred fresh or discarded. IVF embryos will be frozen with one of two methods: 10 percent glycerol or direct-thaw. Data indicates that clients can expect very similar results with both freezing methods.


37 Annual Bull Sale th

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2016 Selling 75 Angus Bulls at the Ranch Near Calistoga Quality like this sells September 11!

OAK RIDGE CAPITALIST 1654

OAK RIDGE TRACTION 205 SIRE: JMB Traction 292

SIRE: Connealy Capitalist 028

MGS: Five Star 645 Ambush 1034

MGS: Leachman Boom Time

BW

69

BW

71

205

776

205

753

365

1283

365

1257

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

+1.7

58

96

+32

+.70

+.91

-.002

66.14

61.24

34.80

138.46

+2.6

60

97

+23

+.38

+.28

+.003

63.15

57.44

24.16

94.15

OAK RIDGE GRANITE 485

OAK RIDGE CONSENSUS 545 SIRE: A & B Consensus 3096

BW

MGS: TC Total 410

SIRE: Connealy Black Granite MGS: SydGen Liberty GA 8627

BW

70

70

205

820

205

819

365

1295

365

1360

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

+1.2

66

113

+27

+.79

+.48

+.051

62.93

80.98

37.40

119.19

+.8

64

113

30

+.40

+.90

+.020

75.69

88.54

31.51

137.24

For Sale Book, Contact:

THE LA FRANCHI FAMILY

Cheryl and Frank: (707) 292-1013 13250 Hwy. 128 • Calistoga, CA 94515

September 2016 California Cattleman 23


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE

WHAT THE INDUSTRY LOOKS LIKE 20 YEARS DOWN THE ROAD by Lindsay Upperman, animal science graduate student, University of California, Davis This past June, at the 2016 Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Conference in Manhattan, Kan., the future was on everyone’s mind. As Marty Ropp, chief executive officer of Allied Genetic Resources and the new president of BIF, started off the Wednesday morning session, he took us 20 years into the future saying,“What we do today will affect our cow herds 20 years down the road.” Accoring to Ropp, the bull calves born this year will be next year’s yearling bulls, who will then be the next AI sires. They will be used on the cow herds for three to five years, which will then produce the heifer calves who will be in our cow herds for another six to ten years. Thus, not only do our selection and mating decisions affect what we do next year, it ultimately will affect how our cow herds look and perform 20 years down the road. Subsequently, the question on a lot of producer’s minds after Ropp’s outlook was what exactly will the world look like 20 years from now? Glynn Tonsor, Ph.D., and Ted Schroeder, Ph.D., showed us what we might expect from the U.S. beef market. For starters, the world trusts the U.S. with their production of beef, and as Tonsor stated, “They will pay a premium for it.”

This is a great starting point for our producers, as we know that if we keep our product to the quality standard we strive for, it will be a demanded product around the world. Our grain-finished feed system allows U.S. to make a consistent, high quality beef product to sell to these consumers. Along with this, the genetic progress producers have made in carcass traits will only continue to make beef a highly valuable product. In addition to a grain-finished feed system and a high quality beef product, the United States has a few other comparative advantages. Sound and effective are two words Tonsor used to describe our infrastructure. Along with our grain-finished feed base as mentioned above, he also referred to our processing, safety and transportation procedures as benefits over our other competitors. Furthermore, in my mind one of the biggest advantages the United States has is within its research and outreach education. There is no doubt we have some of the best minds working constantly to create the next best technology or method to help producers make the most of every mating or selection decision within their cow herds. However, there are still comparative disadvantages that the United States could improve on.

24 California Cattleman September 2016

Some of these include: price per pound of beef, communication, traceability and focusing on both foreign and domestic consumer demands. Of course, when it comes to price per pound of beef, our product is not the cheapest on the list. As producers, we take pride in our quality product and realize that the price is worth the value. In regards to other countries though, they can produce a much cheaper product with their grass-fed feed base. Tonsor made sure to urge producers in the audience to keep this disadvantage at the forefront of their minds, for with added research opportunities, we could potentially lower our price per pound of beef. As Schroeder took over the conversation, he said, “Our entire ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 26


r

r ou o f s u in

Jo

SEMI-ANNUAL

HEALTH & HANDLING SALE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5TH Oakdale Location Only

Complimentary BBQ Lunch! 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Catered by:

Cookies provided by:

Copper Spur Bar-B-Que Moss Rose Bakery Also, attendees can enter to win raffle prizes of products, gift cards, and other goodies!

Shop our comprehensive selection of animal health and handling equipment featuring products and services by these industry-leading manufacturers and more...

576 Warnerville Rd. Oakdale, CA

576 Warnerville Rd. • Oakdale, CA • (209) 847-8977 M-F: 7:30-5:30 • Sat. 8-5 • Sun. 10-4

(209) 847-8977 www.conlinsupply.com

September 2016 California Cattleman 25


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 industry rests with our consumers.” As we consider all consumers, both foreign and domestic, different priorities take place, he explained. Focusing on the consumers closer to home, he made clear we need to refine what they want out of their beef products. Looking into the cultural differences from the 1950s to the 2000s, the Hispanic culture has more than doubled, making sure our cuts of beef, or even flavors that we use in our value-added products. We should try to cater to these increasing cultural demands. In addition, looking at the lifestyle changes in the home over the past 50 years, food preparation and cooking preferences could be improved, helping beef to be more accessible and readily used within the households. Now, turning to the foreign

consumers there are a few more issues to consider. As many of us have heard, the expected population growth of the world is meant to significantly increase, and with this, increasing income growth of many countries will take place as well. The result will mean many countries will be looking for higher quality protein sources, thus increasing demand for beef. With this said, trade deals and global competitors need to be evaluated more closely. For example, trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is an area the U.S. can utilize for market growth. This agreement would allow U.S. economic growth to 11 countries, which would then expand potential demand for U.S. agricultural products to about 500 million consumers outside the U.S. As Schroeder and Tonsor wrapped up their presentation, Tonsor gave an important outlook into the future.

He said beef operations in the U.S. will significantly decrease in number as well as the number of animals maintained on these operations. Yet, even with less animals and operations, those operations will be more efficient and produce more beef overall. However, with the numerous areas that the United States can improve on in the future, this can’t be done without two key factors: communication and information flow. More specifically, making sure the flow of information happens between the sectors will be the most crucial challenge our industry needs to address in the years to come. The beef industry will continue to meet challenges in the future, yet we have the resources and opportunities to overcome these issues with help from the producers and cattlemen who make up this industry. As Ropp expressed, the future starts today.

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26 California Cattleman September 2016


WEDNESDAY

SEPT. 14TH

1:00 PM SALE • MODESTO, CALIFORNIA GONSALVES RANCH BULL DEVELOPMENT CENTER

ANGUS

DMND OAK SPOT LITE 36-15

ANGUS

GONSALVES RESERVE 509B

Sired by Connealy In Focus 4925 BW +1.4 WW +68 YW +115 Marb +.60 RE +.58 $B 153.11

Sired by VAR Reserve 111 BW +1.2 WW +48 YW +82 Marb +.63 RE +.73 $B 96.57

SIMANGUS

GRS PREMIUM BEEF C505

Sired by GW Premium Beef 02TS Powerhouse SimAngus Bulls like these will sell on September 14th.

ANGUS

GONSALVES REGIS 504A Sired by Coleman Regis 904 BW +2.0 WW +54 YW +80

Selling 105 Bulls... 65 18-Month & Yearling Angus 40 18-Month & Yearling SimAngusâ„¢

ANGUS

DMND OAK POWER OF TEN 286-15 Sired by AAR Ten X 7008 SA BW +0 WW +66 YW +126 Marb +.76 RE +.43 $B 133.67

SIMANGUS

Selling 50 Females...

GRS BLACK RAMPAGE C521

40 Fall Open Commercial &10 Elite Registered Spring Bred Angus & Simmental

Sired by Tess Black Rampage

Steve & Jean Obad 209-383-4373 or Cell 209-777-1551 1232 W Tahoe St, Merced, CA 95348 œiÞÊEÊÀˆÃÌÞÊÓ䙇ÇÈx‡££{ÓÊUʈŽiÊEÊ-Ì>VÞÊÓ䙇xΣ‡{n™Î Joe & Debbie 209-523-5826

DOUBLE M RANCH Greg Mauchley & Sons 435-830-7233 11375 N. 10800 W, Bothwell, UT 84337

Sale Management:

Roger & Andy Flood 530-534-7211 636 Flag Creek Rd, Oroville, CA 95965

Office 507-532-6694 Val Cell 612-805-7405 Kelly Cell 406-599-2395 www.ebersale.com

September 2016 California Cattleman 27


BRINGING THE HEAT CHICO STATE ANIMAL SCIENCE TEAM PLACES FIRST IN NATIONAL COMPETITION by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead The California State University, Chico (Chico State) Academic Quadrathlon (AQ) team brought home more than they bargained for from their road trip to Utah in July. The team earned the national title from the National AQ Competition at the American Society of Animal Science meeting in Logan, Utah up against national contenders Texas A & M, Purdue University and University of Rhode Island. This is the first time a non-land grant or research-driven institution has earned the national title in this competition. The competition consists of four areas including a hands on practicum, an exam, a quiz bowl and an oral presentation. In addition to the overall win, the team also earned first place in the practicum division, first place in the exam division, second place in the quiz bowl division and third place in the oral presentation division. The team consists of four animal science upper-classmen, Joel Wisniewski, Heather Foxworthy, Julie Allen and Kenzie Wattenburger, who have been preparing for this contest since early spring. Within some other universities, institutional competitions garner student interest to build their team, but becaue the program is fairly new at Chico State they select upper-division animal science students with a vested interest in the competition. The Chico State team won the Western Sectional contest, which they hosted, and earned themselves a place to compete in the national contest. Coaches Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., assistant professor at Chico State,

and Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., professor and program coordinator at Chico State, said they divided up tasks a little differently this year than in years previous. Since Chico State hosted the sectional contest, DeAtley took the lead organizing that portion while Doyle took the lead as team coach. The dynamic duo coached together at the national level, however, when they could both dedicate their time solely to the team. DeAtley began the AQ program at Chico State about four years ago because of her experiences as a graduate student at New Mexico State University. “I helped plan the contest for the New Mexico State institutional competition and helped coach that

28 California Cattleman September 2016

team,” DeAtley said. “It’s a contest that is unique in that students must be able to speak in public, write and communicate and know the science. It is diversified, and I knew Chico State would do well.” The opportunity to work with the students and see them answer the challenges that they are presented with is why Doyle made the decision to help coach the team. “Watching the students working together to solve problems was my favorite part of coaching, and this team really worked well together,” Doyle said, “Every one of them brought a specific set of skills to the table, and it worked! Plus, we had lots of fun along the way.” Doyle would like to stay competitive in future contests and

Pictured (L to R) team members: Kenzi Wattenburger, Heather Foxworthy, Joel Wisniewski and Julie Allen.


represent all that Chico State’s agriculture program has to offer. “All I ask is that they do their best.” Doyle said. “To quote Yoda, ‘Do. Or do not. There is no try.’” This group of students reminded Doyle why he comes to work every day, and why he became an educator in the first place. The Animal Science Program at Chico State is top notch, according to Doyle, and now a lot of other folks around the country in the animal science profession are in on this discovery, too. Doyle says without DeAtley’s support and leadership, the Chico State AQ program would not be where it is today. “We’ve been blessed with great teams, and each year I learn something new,” Doyle said. “For example, I spent 10 hours in a van with this year’s team on the way to Logan. They spent the entire time prepping, going over just about every conceivable question they’d be asked or skill the practicum might include.” DeAtley says it’s not that one team was better than the other, it’s that Chico State students and the animal science program is delivering quality educational experiences just like the land grant universities who compete as well. “We have a lot more hands-on opportunities in our programs than other larger, research specific schools do,” DeAtley said. “And it’s important to realize that our students lined up well against their peers in the bigger picture.” Kenzi Wattenburger, who will be going into her fifth year at Chico State as a senior, will finish up her final semester of her undergraduate career with an animal science major and chemistry minor. She said part of the reason she wanted to join the AQ team was due to her competitive nature, but she also enjoyed representing her university and working with teammates who have the same passion for animal science and the future of agriculture as she does. “The best part of the journey to the national competition was not only working with my three teammates, but also working with multiple students from Chico State who helped us prepare, as well,” Wattenburger said. “There is also no better feeling than making your coaches and advisors, as well as the rest of your professors from your university, proud.” The most challenging part of this experience for Wattenburger was calming her nerves during the oral presentation. No matter how many times the team practiced this part of the competition, it’s difficult to get used to only having one hour to prepare an oral presentation, she said. Looking ahead, Wattenburger is applying to veterinary school and hopes to begin in the fall of 2017. She intends to pursue food animal medicine. “This whole journey through the western section competition and the national competition was a learning experience and quite humbling, at that,” Wattenburger said. “The main thing I learned, and was reminded of, was how important hands-on learning is to my future as well as to all of the coming generations. Throughout the entire competition, my teammates and I had our knowledge, not just from textbooks, but we had the practical experience as well, and there is nothing more important than that.” Heather Foxworthy is starting her last year at Chico State and will graduate with ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 30 September 2016 California Cattleman 29


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

programs. “This has been an amazing experience that I feel very honored to have been a part of,” Allen said. “This experience confirmed my beliefs that I received a quality education from Chico State.” Joel Wisniewski graduated with a bachelor’s degree in animal science this spring. His brother was on the AQ team at Utah State University a couple of years ago and told him about the contest. Wisniewski, recognizing his naturally competitive nature, made the decision to join the Chico State AQ team. He said by applying himself in animal science classes and different jobs relating to animals, like herdsman of beef unit at Chico State, he gained not only scientific animal knowledge but practical knowledge as well. “This competition gave me a good perspective on the quality of the agriculture program at Chico State,” Wisniewski said. “We were competing against big agriculture schools, and it is an honor to have been on the first team that Chico State sent to the national competition, and it’s an honor to have

won the entire contest, as well.” Wisniewski went to work for Select Sires, who recently hired him as a reproductive specialist technician. In addition to the AQ competition, Chico State students showcased their research projects in the poster competition and brought home first, second, third and fourth top prizes in that division as well. “They are well-balanced students and they worked so hard,” DeAtley said. “They wanted it, and they earned it.” For now, DeAtley, Doyle and their students can bask in the massive bragging rights they earned for Chico State, and most importantly, proudly add this accolade to the Chico State College of Agriculture’s list of achievements, knowing full-well their program can go toe-to-toe with the big dogs at the dance with large researchbased schools. Next up, the team has been invited to compete in the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Quiz Bowl at the Annual Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in Nashville, Tenn. next year.

a degree in animal science. Academics are very important to Foxworthy, and a large part of why she wanted to be on the AQ team. She wanted to get involved in an activity where she could use what she’s learned over the years from 4-H, FFA, and Chico State’s Animal Science program to compete with other schools. Foxworthy enjoyed getting to know her teammates and learning new things from them and their areas of expertise. She also enjoyed showcasing Chico State’s outstanding Animal Science Program and the knowledge the professors helped them learn that got them to the national contest. “We have a great team,” Foxworthy said. “Each of our strengths and weaknesses meshed well together, where one teammate lacked in experience of a species another teammate made up for it. We used our own areas of knowledge to make sure the livestock species were covered when it came to practicums, written exam problems and quiz bowl questions.” After Foxworthy finishes at Chico State, she plans to go to graduate school to earn a master’s degree in animal breeding and genetics and then enter a career in that field in the beef cattle industry. “This experience exceeded my expectations,” Foxworthy said. “I have met new people from other universities and organizations, as well as strengthened friendships with other Famoso, Visalia (Cattleman’s Select), students and professors from Chico State.” Galt (CLM) and Red Bluff. Julie Allen graduated this spring BULLS ALSO AVAILABLE AT THE FARM WITH CENTRAL DELIVERY. with a bachelor’s degree in animal science. After Dr. DeAtley and Dr. SOME GROUP SIRES INCLUDE YARDLEY HIGH REGARD, Doyle explained the competition to her, REMINGTON LOCK N LOAD AND CONNEALY CONSENSUS. she thought it sounded challenging but also fun. Yardley High Regard Remington Lock n Load Connealy Consensus “The competition was very humbling,” Allen said. “The material was quite challenging and the teams we competed against were all very accomplished. The most challenging part of the competition for me was not 2 4 allowing myself to become affected Years 1 tions a c o L of AI by the intensity and pressure of the You! e B v r r e e e S d competition.” ing to Allen’s current plans are to Bob & Michael Mullion redriverfarms@gmail.com com pursue a position with the California 760-861-8366 Bob • 760-922-2617 Office • 760-464-3906 Michael Department of Food and Agriculture, 13625 West 10th Ave • Blythe, CA 92225 & 5400 Fern Valley Rd. • Medford, OR 97504 as well as look into various graduate 30 California Cattleman September 2016

Angus • Sim-Angus • Simmental

WE WILL BE OFFERING BULLS AT 4 SALES THIS YEAR IN CALIFORNIA


th

25 Annual

Bull Sale THESE BULLS AND OTHERS OF THIS KIND AND CALIBER WILL SELL! CASINO CONFIDENCE M16 • #18338674

CASINO TEN X M56 • #18338691

Sire: Connealy Confidence 0100 • MGS: Casino Aberdeen H64

Sire: A A R Ten X 7008 S A • MGS: S A V Bismarck 5682

DOB: 1/13/15

DOB: 2/4/15

$W

$W

+56.53

+62.90

$F

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+53.43

+110.49

$G

$G

+38.76

+48.83

$B

$B

+110.03

+162.64

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

RE

+12

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DPL ALL IN S93• #18506033

DPL YAHOO S96 • #18506013

Sire: Deer Valley All In • DPL Upward L70

Sire: Baldridge Yahoo Y58 • MGS: Sitz Upward 307R DOB: 8/30/15

DOB: 8/28/15

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+66.69

+66.21

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+38.53

+40.16

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CALL TO BE ADDED TO OUR MAILING LIST: (209) 632-6015

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694 Bartlett Ct • Brentwood, CA 94513 • (925) 634-0933

David & Carol Medeiros

2800 Half Rd • Denair, CA 95316 • (209) 632-6015 September 2016 California Cattleman 31


U.S. BEEF EXPORTS TO BRAZIL RESUME On Aug. 1, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reached an agreement with Brazil’s Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply to allow access for U.S. beef and beef products to the Brazilian market for the first time since 2003. Brazil’s action reflects the United States’ negligible risk classification for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and aligns Brazil’s regulations to the OIE’s scientific international animal health guidelines. “After many years of diligently working to regain access to the Brazilian market, the United States welcomes the news that Brazil has removed all barriers to U.S. beef and beef product exports,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “We are pleased that Brazil, a major agricultural producing and trading country, has aligned with science-based international standards, and we encourage other nations to do the same. Since last year alone, USDA has eliminated BSE-related restrictions in 16 countries, regaining market access for U.S. beef and pumping hundreds-of-millions of dollars into the American economy. “The Brazilian market offers excellent long-term potential for U.S. beef exporters. The United States looks forward to providing Brazil’s 200-million-plus consumers, and growing middle class, with high-quality American beef and beef products,” Vilsack said. Both countries will immediately begin updating their administrative procedures in order to allow trade to resume. U.S. companies will need to complete Brazil’s regular facilities registration process. In a separate decision, USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) also recently determined that Brazil’s food safety system governing meat products remains equivalent to that of the United States and that fresh (chilled or frozen) beef can be safely imported from Brazil. Following a multi-year science based review consistent with U.S. food safety regulations for countries that export meat, poultry and egg products to the U.S., FSIS is amending the list of eligible countries and products authorized for export to the United States to allow fresh (chilled or frozen) beef from Brazil. The Brazilian agreement is just the latest example of USDA’s ongoing efforts to knock down barriers to U.S. exports. In 2016 alone, these efforts have led to the reopening of the Saudi Arabian and Peruvian markets for U.S. beef, the South Korean market for U.S. poultry, and the South African market for U.S. poultry, pork and beef. In 2015, U.S. beef exports reached $6.3 billion thanks to aggressive efforts by USDA to eliminate BSE-related restrictions in 16 countries since January 2015, gaining additional market access for U.S. beef in Colombia, Costa Rica, Egypt, Guatemala, Iraq, Lebanon, Macau, New Zealand, Peru, Philippines, Saint Lucia, Singapore, South Africa, Ukraine, Vietnam and, now, Brazil. The past seven years have represented the strongest period in history for American agricultural exports, with international sales of U.S. farm and food products totaling $911.4 billion between fiscal years 2009 and 2015. 32 California Cattleman September 2016


S c hoh r

H e r ef o r d s 50 Hereford Bulls Sell!

September 13th, 2016 1 PM

Auctioneer: Rick Machado

Farmer’s Livestock Market Lunch 11:30 AM

Horned 15010

S 2015 Top Selling Bull Bulls like this one sired by UPS Domino 9525 will sell in 2016!

H

DOB: 2/23/2015 • BW: +0.2 WW: +54 YW: +85 MK: +31 RE: +0.44 MRB: +0.41 Sire: Churchill Sensation 028X

Horned 505

Horned 15030

S

H

DOB: 3/30/2015 • BW: +3.5 WW: +57 YW: +94 MK: +24 RE: +0.60 MRB: -0.03 Sire: UPS DOMINO 9525

Polled 15052

DOB: 3/27/2015 • BW: +3.3 WW: +58 YW: +98 MK: +24 RE: +0.48 MRB: +0.31 Sire: NJW 73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y ET

DOB: 3/22/2015 • BW: +1.1 WW: +50 YW: +84 MK: +24 RE: +0.39 MRB: +0.14 Sire: KJ TMG 236X TEBOW 646Z

Free Delivery in California! For more information & the catalog, visit:

www.cabullfest.com

View Bull Videos at: www.genoalivestock.com Bob Coker: 916/539/1987 Jared Patterson: 208/312/2386 Office: 775/782/3336 640 Genoa Lane, Minden, NV 89423

S c hoh r

H e r ef o r d s

Horned 515

S

H

DOB: 4/09/2015 • BW: +2.9 WW: +50 YW: +78 MK: +23 RE: +0.21 MRB: +0.30 Sire: UPS SENSATION 2241 ET

Horned 529

S

H

DOB: 6/03/2015 • BW: +1.9 WW: +52 YW: +86 MK: +30 RE: +0.34 MRB: +0.33 Sire: UPS SENSATION 2241 ET

Polled 15124

DOB: 5/10/2015 • BW: +1.8 WW: +59 YW: +97 MK: +21 RE: +0.40 MRB: +0.32 Sire: GENOA THM DURANGO 11070

www.schohrherefords.com

Carl & Susan Schohr: 530/846/4354 Steven, Amanda & Joe Schohr: 530/864/2855

ricencows@schohr.com•sschohr@gmail.com P.O.Box 391, Gridley, CA 95948

September 2016 California Cattleman 33


POLICY PRIORITIES

SUMMER CATTLE INDUSTRY CONFRENCE FOCUSES ON WHAT’S AHEAD FOR MARKETS AND TRADE from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Over 700 cattlemen and women attended the Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting in Denver, Colo., in July to discuss the policy priorities for the cattle industry. “It was a great week in Denver for the cattle industry,” said Tracy Brunner, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association president. “This week showcased how the industry comes together to tackle critical issues like market volatility, expanding international markets, and the increasing federal regulations we see out of Washington, D.C.” International trade remains a top priority for the cattle industry, including the necessary passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. “Trade is a critical component of the cattle industry’s profitability, and expanding exports through current and future trade agreements like TPP hold tremendous potential for our producers,” said Brunner. “TPP will immediately reduce tariffs and level the playing field for U.S. beef exports to these growing markets. TPP is a major win not only for the beef industry, but for all U.S. export products, growing the economy while supporting jobs and investments in agriculture and technology.” As market volatility continues to threaten the effectiveness of the futures markets, NCBA is committed to working directly with the CME group to find a solution. “Market volatility, driven by high frequency trading, has been a major concern for producers across the country,” said Brunner. “The NCBA CME working group had the

opportunity to meet in person this week to discuss these issues. While discussions continue, I am confident that through working with CME, we can resolve these issues to ensure the futures market is a viable tool for risk management.” NCBA also continues to work with state and federal governments to ensure multiple use on public grazing lands. Ranchers are closest to the land and the best stewards of our natural resources, ensuring productive use, maintaining open space, and mitigating fire hazards. NCBA will continue to ensure these uses are accounted for in future range management plans and wildlife habitat decisions. The membership reiterated their commitment to repealing EPA’s “waters of the U.S.” rule through litigation and legislation.

“Cattlemen and women from across the country gathered for lively discussion, from government regulations to animal health and food safety,” said Brunner. “Both the annual Summer Business Meeting and the Cattle Industry Convention provide a forum to share knowledge and renergize our industry as we work together to address the challenges that lay ahead. We look forward to continuing these discussions in Nashville in February.”

BARTON ©

Pictured representing California CattleWomen at the 2016 Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting, in Denver, Colo., July 13-16, are (L to R): Cheryl Foster, Montague; Immediate Past American National CattleWomen President Melanie Fowle, Etna; CCW President Sheila Bowen, Glennville; Debbie Hay, Bakersfield:, Rebecca Been, Bakersfield; and Jean Barton, Red Bluff.

34 California Cattleman September 2016


Schafer Ranch • J/V Angus • Amador Angus SEPTEMBER 17

75 ANGUS BULLS

CATTLEMEN’S LIVESTOCK MARKET

GALT, CA

1 PM (PDT)

M i d Va l l e y

SPRING AND FALL YEARLINGS

CURVE-BENDING GENETICS!

Offering a large selection of calving ease, performance, and carcass sires!

s l l u b e s e h ! t ! 7 l l 1 t A ll Sep se

Large sire groups from the breed’s most proven curve benders!

Selling Sons of VAR Index, Prophet, Reserve, All In, Discovery, Intensity, and more!

Call today to get on our mailing list and get your sale catalog!

• All bulls are DNA tested with the

50K panel!

• All bulls have been performance tested! • All bulls have been fertility tested and are fully guaranteed! • A majority of the bulls are AI sired by breed-leading sires! • Selling a large percentage of calving-ease bulls!

for more information, contact any of these breeders

Greg and Louise Schafer 6986 County Rd 6 Orland, CA 95693 (h) 530-865-3706 (c) 209-988-6599 bigschaf@sbcglobal.net

Ed and Josh Amador 5136 Laird Rd Modesto, CA 95358 Ed Cell 209-595-3056 Josh Cell 209-499-9182 amadorfarms@msn.com

Bill and Marie Traylor 844 Walnut Ln Winters, CA 95694 (h) 530-795-2161 (c) 530-304-2811 jvangus@att.net

September 2016 California Cattleman 35


United States National Institute Department of Food of Agriculture and Agriculture This material is based upon work supported by USDA/NIFA under Award Number 2012-49200-20030.

Topic: Ranch Management Strategies for Drought Location: Redding, CA Date: February 2017

Topic: Ranching 101 Location: TBD Date April 2017

Topic: Leasing Public & Private Lands Location: Modesto, CA Date: March 2017

Topic: Livestock Transportation Location: Sacramento Date: June 2017

36 California Cattleman September 2016

Š C. Madrigal


51st famoso all-breeds bull sale 200 BUllS • 1,000 FEMAlES plus RANcH EqUIpMENT AUcTION

saturday, october 15 Western stockman's market RANcH EqUIpMENT AUcTION > 9 A.M.

Western Stockman‘s Market will be Selling Farm and Ranch Equipment Onsite including Tractors > Pickups > Cattle Chutes > Tack Cattle and Horse Panels > Antiques > And More

THD ©

All cONSIGNMENTS WElcOME. TURN YOUR EXcESS FARM AND RANcH EqUIpMENT IN TO cA$H.

ANNUAl BRED cOW SAlE > 10 A.M. FAMOSO All-BREEDS BUll SAlE > 1 p.M. Selling the Best the West has to Offer

This year’s event will feature the final dispersal of San Juan Ranch Gelbvieh, including 30 service-age bulls, 4 herdsires, 70 spring bred cows and 37 weaned calves. A total of 370 additional bred cows from local ranches will also be sold in our Annual Bred Cow Sale, including these early consignments: • 200 “fancy” Angus, 3- to 4-year-old, fall-calving cows and pairs. • From the Branquinho Ranch, 80 “fancy” black, fall-calving first-calf heifers bred to low-birth weight black bulls, plus 80 “fancy” open, ready-to-breed heifers. All foothill- and anaplas-exposed. FAMOSO • From the Lugo Family, 100 fancy black, first-calf heifers bred to Guess Cattle Co. low-birth weight Angus bulls and 100 fancy, open heifers ready to breed, all foothill-exposed and ran in the foothills of Kern County.

51

The 51st Annual Bull Sale will feature 200 all-breed bulls from some of the top breeders in the nation. For details, visit www.westernstockman’s market.com.

Your Southwest Livestock Market Leader

Western stockman’s market 31911 Highway 46, mcfarland, california

THD ©

DWIGHT MEBANE ........................................................ 661 979-9892 JUSTIN MEBANE ...........................................................661 979-9894 Frank Machado .......................................................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane.........................................................661 201-8169 Office ..................................................................................661 399-2981 WEBSITE .....................www.westernstockmansmarket.com September 2016 California Cattleman 37


2016 Leachman TopLine Bull Sale 200 $Profit Angus & Stabilizer Bulls Saturday, Oct. 22nd • 101 Livestock • Aromas, CA

Bulls that don’t melt! “We bought our first Leachman bulls in 2004. Now, we only buy high quality, $Profit Leachman Angus bulls! We cross them on British x Brahman cows. We like the daughters as well as our F1 cows. The bulls perform better than anything else we had used before. They work really hard, but their confirmation and muscle did not melt off in our rugged country.” ~ Murray Keeler Animas, NM

(SW corner of New Mexico on the AZ/Mexico line)

Bulls that produce heavy, market topping steers!

A 5 year old Leachman TopLine Angus bull in southwest New Mexico!

“These 700+ weaning weight calves are the heaviest we’ve ever had. I like this ‘eat less & grow more’ efficiency!” ~ John Pisturino Rancho Santa Maria Watsonville, CA An 8 month old heifer calf…

Go to www.leachman.com or call (970) 568-3983 to order a catalog today. 38 California Cattleman September 2016


$Profit bulls are changing the way we think about producing beef! “Today, more than ever, you need to make sure that every dollar you spend earns a return. When you buy a Leachman TopLine bull, the $Profit tells you what they are going to produce in your herd. It’s the best investment you can make when you buy a bull!” ~ Jim Warren Owner of 101 Livestock

Lee Leachman (970) 219-8519 ● Ryan Peterson (970) 672-6828 Ric Collins (707) 803-3334 Kevin Unger (785) 470-1131 ● Zech Browning (707) 295-6802 20572 Big Canyon Rd, Middletown CA 95461

September 2016 California Cattleman 39


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD CHARTING THE COURSE

EXPORT GROWTH COMMITTEE SETS PLANS FOR U.S. BEEF from the U.S. Meat Export Federation At the Cattle Industry Summer Business Meeting in Denver, the Checkoff Export Growth Committee met to review year-to-date results for U.S. beef exports and examine marketing opportunities and activities in the upcoming year. The committee is made up of cattle producers and other beef industry leaders from across the nation, representing the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and the Federation of State Beef Councils. Staff from the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program, made several presentations to the committee, covering market development activities, technical issues and barriers facing U.S exports and economic trends in key markets. “There are some really great things happening in markets like Japan, Korea and Taiwan, and this is a result of the commitment you folks have made through your checkoff investment,” Seng said. “Because of that commitment, it’s phenomenal how the U.S. beef industry is able to touch people all across the world. And I can tell you that the international buyers and consumers that you’ve touched worldwide have a deep appreciation for your product.” Dan Halstrom, USMEF senior vice president for marketing, and Greg Hanes, assistant vice president for international marketing and programs, briefed the committee on marketing activities and strategies in key destinations for U.S. beef, as well as efforts to identify and capitalize on emerging markets. Halstrom noted that in addition to the strong recent performance in Asia, demand for U.S. beef is regaining traction in Mexico. “If there’s one pleasant surprise in 2016, given the economic environment, it’s been Mexico,” Halstrom said. “Despite the weakness of the peso versus the dollar and the pricing challenges we face there, Mexico is still a $1 billion market for U.S. beef that’s become very reliable and dependable. I don’t want to say that it’s price-inelastic, but demand there is definitely resilient.” Halstrom cited Central and South America as a region that has recently developed into a strong destination for U.S. beef and noted that USMEF is always watchful for similar opportunities in other parts of the world. He cited West Africa as an area in which demand for protein is rapidly growing, and in which U.S. exporters have great interest. USMEF is also planning an August 18 buyers’ showcase in South Africa, which recently reopened to U.S. red meat. Thad Lively, USMEF senior vice president for trade access, gave the committee an update on efforts to regain access for U.S. beef in China. He noted that China and Hong Kong (which is open to U.S. beef) may combine to import more than 1 million metric tons of beef in 2016, making it all the more important that the United States remain committed to reopening the Chinese market. Lively 40 California Cattleman September 2016

said that while technical negotiations with China can be very frustrating, this is the reality the U.S. industry faces as is seeks access to the world’s fastest-growing beef market. Travis Arp, USMEF director of market access and export services, and Cheyenne McEndaffer, technical services manager, updated the committee on several key issues impacting U.S. exports. Arp explained efforts to gain approval in Japan for certain pathogen reduction treatments in order to ensure smooth flow of product into the leading destination for U.S. beef. He also discussed how the U.S. industry worked with regulators in Egypt – a critical market for U.S. beef livers – to ease concerns about hormone use in beef production. McEndaffer explained tools the U.S. industry is using to educate international buyers about beef quality grading, as well as efforts to overcome cold chain challenges for U.S. beef shipments entering Colombia. USMEF Economist Erin Borror discussed the U.S. beef supply situation relative to major competitors. She noted that Australia and New Zealand have entered a major herdrebuilding phase that it is limiting their slaughter numbers, and this creates an opportunity for U.S. beef to win back market share – especially in key Asian markets. Borror noted that beef production has also declined in Japan and Korea, leading to very high prices and new opportunities for U.S. beef to displace domestic product. For more information about the Export Growth Committee, please visit the Cattlemen’s Beef Board website.

USMEF President and CEO Philip Seng addresses the Checkoff Export Growth Committee


These bulls sell plus 190 more just like them! BEEF SOLUTIONS B U LL S A LE

Fall Round Up

ngus A S

A ngus

im

I O N E , CA

Circle Alumni C767 • 4/4/15 • Reg 3077168 • 1/4 SM 3/4 AN Power and substance; all while boasting a negative bw epd!

Bruin Rubicon 4356 • 12/14/14 • Reg 18162924 • Angus You won’t find a more powerful individual. Look him up!

190 BULLS

110 S IM A NG U S ™ • 80 A NG US

T HUR SD AY , S EPTEMBER 22 At the Circle R anch Head q uar t er s, Io ne, C A Pr im e Rib Lunch at Noon • Sal e at 1 p m Au ctioneers: Rick Machad o and John Rod g er s

209 -7 6 5 -1 8 1 5 • 530-392-0154

Bruin Rubicon 4356

Circle Calgary C813 • 3/12/15 • Reg 3075777 • 1/2 SM 1/2 AN Bruin Tradesman 4322 • An impressive phenotype and flawless structure!

11/8/14 • Reg 18162908 • Angus

A Full Power son and herd bull prospect with a great spread!

Circle Beef King C100 • 8/10/15 • Reg 3123409 • 3/4 SM

Bruin Torque 5261 • 8/2/15 • Reg +18248293 • Angus

A stout made Beef King son that is a definite sale highlight!

A maternal brother to Bruin Uproar 0070 with more guts!

Circle Game Plan C81 • 8/3/15 • Reg 3123397 • 1/2 SM 1/2 AN

Bruin Thrive 5244 • 7/29/15 • Reg 18248279 • Angus

Extremely good hipped and free moving!

Another maternal brother to Uproar with all the right tools!

SIMANGUS™ SIRES TFS BLACK OYNX 1442Y • WS BEEF KING W107 SDS ALUMNI 115X • HPF Optimizer A512 CIRCLE GAME PLAN A189

ANGUS SIRES CONNEALY CAPITALIST 028 • CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE BRUIN UPROAR 0070 • SAV INTERNATIONAL 2020 PA FULL POWER 1208

VIDEOS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON ALL BULLS AFTER SEPT 8. CALL TODAY TO REQUEST YOUR DVD COPY OR VISIT US ON YouTube.com.

CONTACT EITHER PRODUCER TO BE ADDED TO THE MAILING LIST OR DOWNLOAD A SALE BOOK FROM EITHER BREEDER WEBSITE

BRUIN RANCH OFFICE: SACRAMENTO, CA • RANCH: AUBURN, CA Lloyd Harvego, Owner • www.BRUINRANCH.com Joe Fischer, Manager • 530-392-0154

Circle Ranch

Tim and Jill Curran • 209-765-1815 • 209-765-0450 1000 Cook Rd. • Ione, CA 95640 circleranch@volcano.net • www.CIRCLERANCH.NET September 2016 California Cattleman

41


7 a.m. – 3 p.m 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. 12 – 5 p.m. 1 – 2 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m. 2 – 5 p.m. 3 – 5 p.m. 3 – 4 p.m 4 – 5 p.m. 5 – 9 p.m.

6:30 – 7:30 a.m. 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.

7:30 – 8:30 a.m. 7:30 – 9:30 a.m. 9:15 – 10 a.m. 9:45 – 10:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 12 a.m. – 1 p.m. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 1:30 – 4 p.m. 2 – 4 p.m. 2:30 – 4 p.m. 2:30 – 4 p.m. 2:30 – 4 p.m. 4 – 5 p.m. 4 – 6 p.m. 5 – 6 p.m. 5 – 6 p.m. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. 6 – 7 p.m. 7 – 11 p.m.

6:30 – 7:30 a.m. 7 – 11 a.m. 7 – 9 a.m. 8 – 9:15 a.m. 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. 9:30 – 12:15 p.m. 10:15 – 11:15 a.m. 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. 12 – 1 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 5 – 6 p.m. 7 – 10 p.m.

Exhibitor Move-In CCA Scholarship Interviews California Rangeland Trust Board Meeting Registration Open CBCIA Finance Meeting YCC Officer Interviews Media Training CBCIA Board Meeting CCA Officers Meeting CCW Executive Committee YCC Networking in Tradeshow Tradeshow Opening Reception & NFR Party

Prayer Gathering Registration Open Allied Industry Council Trade Show Breakfast in the Trade Show 7 – 9 a.m. Bloody Mary Bar Open 7 – 10 a.m. Lunch in the Trade Show 12 – 1 p.m. CCA Finance/Membership/Convention Committees CCW Presidents’ Breakfast CCA General Session 1 CCW Heritage Meeting CCA Cattle Health & Well Being/BQA Committee CCA Cattle Marketing & International Trade Committee CCA Federal Lands Committee California CowBelle of the Year Lunch Lunch in the Tradeshow CCA General Session 2 CCW Education Workshop Cattlemen’s Poster Session CCA Property Rights & Environmental Management Committee CCA Agriculture & Food Policy Committee Tax & Credit Committee Cattlemen’s College Session 1 CCA General Resolutions Meeting Allied Industry Wine & Cheese Reception YCC Meeting CCW President’s Reception CCA Centennial Celebration Gala Reception CCA Centennial Celebration Gala Dinner

CCA Nominating Committee Registration Open CCW Awards Breakfast CattleFax Breakfast Cattlemen’s College Session 2 LMRF Meeting CCW Board Meeting Cattle PAC Meeting Cattlemen’s College Session 3 POSSEE Meeting Beef Promotion Lunch CCA Board & Membership Meeting CCA President’s Reception CCA & CCW Awards Banquet

Cattlemen’s All Inclusive Registration

$285

*denotes inclusion (no substitutes)

Full Registration

$100

Non-CCA Member Registration

$200

Includes meetings, tradeshow, NFR Party, breakfast and lunch in the tradeshow on Friday and the Allied Industry Wine and Cheese Reception Includes meetings, tradeshow, NFR Party, breakfast and lunch in the tradeshow on Friday and the Allied Industry Wine and Cheese Reception

YCC Registration

$50

CCW President’s Breakfast

$15

CCW Cowbelle of the Year Lunch

$25

*Cattlemen’s College Session 1

$15

*CCA Centennial Celebration Gala

$75

CCW Awards Breakfast

$25

*CCA CattleFax Breakfast

$25

*Cattlemen’s College Session 2

$15

*Cattlemen’s College Session 3

$15

*CCA Beef Promotion Lunch

$25

*CCA & CCW Awards Banquet

$55

Includes NFR Party, all three Cattlemen’s College sessions, breakfast and lunch in the tradeshow on Friday and CCA’s Centennial Celebration Gala

Includes cocktails, dinner and entertainment featuring Buck Ford

2016-2017 Cattle-PAC Membership

$200

Please write a separate check to Cattle-PAC

TOTAL Name(s) attending: ____________________________________ _________________________________________________ Local Affiliation: ______________________________________ Payment method: CHECK

Please make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association

Card #: ______ ______ ______ ______ Exp. ___/___ Cardholder’s Name: ___________________________________ Cardholder’s Phone Number: _____________________________ Billing Address: ______________________________________

__________________________ City

____ State

__________

Zip Code


McPhee Red Angus As good as the best and better than the rest!

B ULL AND F EMALE S ALE S EPTEMBER 2 4 , 2 0 1 6 • F EMALES

1 0 : 30 AM • L UNCH AT N O O N • • B ULLS SELL AT 1 : 00 PM •

SELL AT

S EL L ING • Bulls • 65 Spr in g an d Fal l Ye arl in g s • Females • 20 Fal l Ye arl ing He if e rs 10 Spri ng Bre d He if e rs and C ow s

B ACKED BY OVER 45 YEARS OF RAISING R ED A NGUS , M C P HEE CAT TLE EXCEL WITH PERFORMANCE ACROSS THE BOARD , FROM CALVING EASE TO GROW TH , SUPERIOR CARCASS TRAITS AND SECOND TO NONE MATERNAL TRAITS !

Featuring the progeny of

BROWN COMMITMENT X7787 • He was a past sale highlight at RA Brown, TX. • Sired our 2014 high selling bull to Alta Genetics for $25,000, McPhee Trophy 36 (reg# 1597069). • Very consistent progeny with added performance! • Moderate, powerful, and athletic! • His first females in production look fantastic!

MCPHEE TROPHY 36

(reg #1597069)

• He was our record selling bull to Alta Genetics in our 2014 Production Sale at $25,000. • Dam was the high selling cow in the 2016 Mile High sale in Denver. • Unbelievable phenotype, power, and depth! • Semen available through Alta Genetics. Call or email for a catalog! For more information, go to www. McPheeRedAngus.com

McPhee Red Angus Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95240 Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 info@mcpheeredangus.com

Home of many champions! Including the 2015 Midland Bull Test High Indexing Red Angus!

September 2016 California Cattleman 43


uail valley ranch first angus female sale mon., October 1o, 1 p.m.

spend columbus day with us in prineville, oregon

ffering

20 Cows with Spring heifer Calves 15 Spring Bred heifers 20 Fall Cow-Calf Pairs 5 Feature E.T. heifers

Follow Us Facebook

Qv EmBlynETTE 4403 Emblynette 4403 (at right) sells bred to Connealy Black Granite. This maternal sister to Accelerated Genetics’ sire, SAV Thunderbird 9061, is out of SAV Registry 2831 – a featured bull at Accelerated Genetics.

sale features

The offering will feature progeny from Quail Valley foundation donors that produced the Select Sires’ bull, SAV Beacon 0068, and the Accelerated Genetics’ bull, SAV Thunderbird 9061.

Featured a.i. sires • SAV Resource 1441 • SAV Final Answer 0035 • SAV Bismarck 5682 • AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Connealy Black Granite • Connealy Confidence 0100 • Connealy Consensus 7229 • Sitz Upward 307R • And Many More

uail valley ranch KURT LOCKHART 541-480-0773 • quailvalleyranches@gmail.com TRAViS & BECKy TEKAnSiK: TRAViS 541-699-8563 BECKy 541-699-8562 • magibell2@hotmail.com

sale facility

7311 S. Crooked River Hwy. Prineville, Oregon 97754

For your free reference booklet, contact anyone in the office of the sale manager TOM BURKE, KURT SCHAFF, JEREMY HAAG of the AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME, at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660 Phone 816-532-0811 • Fax: 816-532-0851 • E-mail angushall@earthlink.net

44 California Cattleman September 2016

THD ©


‘Partners for Performance’ Angus Female Sale

SAt., OCtOBER 8, FIREBAuGH, CA, 3 P.M. Selling 100+ Angus Show Heifers, Bred Heifers, Open Heifers, Cow-Calf Pairs, Pregnancies and Embryos

don’t miss this opportunity to invest in the same genetics as these recent champions ...

2016 Western Regional Jr. Angus Show Grand Champion Owned Female and 2016 Western National Angus Futurity ROV Reserve Intermediate Champion Female for Charlize Guess, Springville, Calif.

Grand Champion Female at the 2015 Oregon State Fair ROV and NILE ROV Angus Show, 2015 Oregon State Fair Jr. Angus Show Reserve Champion and 2016 State Field Day Champion for Brandon Pacheco, Paso Robles, Calif.

Sire: Silveiras Watchout 0514 Dam: Silveiras Saras Dream 1349 • Dam’s Sire: Silveiras Style 9303

Sire: SCC First-N-Goal GAF 114 Dam: Silveiras Erica Diana 0318 • Dam’s Sire: Gambles Hot Rod

2016 National Junior Angus Show Owned Division I Champion Female for David Smith, Longmont, Colo.

2016 National Junior Angus Show Owned Late Senior Champion Female for Case Wilson, Bowdon, Georgia.

Sire: Silveiras S Sis GQ 2353 • Dam: EXG Saras Dream S609 R3 Dam's Sire: BR Midland

Sire: Silveiras Style 9303 • Dam: EXG Saras Dream S609 R3 Dam's Sire: BR Midland

SILvEIRAS SARAS DREAM 4374

SILvEIRA’S SARAS DREAM 5530

Rick & Allison Blanchard ........ 559 217-1502 Darrell Silveira ......................... 559 217-1504 Garrett Blanchard ................... 559 978-2778 Carole Silveira ........................... 559 240-6004 Matt Leo, Herd consultant ............ 209 587-5338

SILvEIRAS ERICA DIAnA 4390

Watch and Bid Live

SILvEIRAS SARAS DREAM 4540

Matt macfarlane, Sale manager .. 916 803-3113 FAX ........................................................559 674-9097 Website........................ www.silveirabros.com EMAIL .............................. silveirabros@msn.com THD address .........P.O. Box 37, Firebaugh, CA 93622 ©

September 2016 California Cattleman 45


Silverbelly 10X & 30X

10X hat band buckles made by Vogt Silversmiths

Black 10X & 30X

30X hat band buckles made by Vogt Silversmiths

Natural 30X only

Each hat is stamped with a gold foil centennial logo

All hats are silk lined

Orders placed between now and September 5 will be delivered at the 100th Annual California Cattlemen’s Association & California CattleWomen’s Inc. Convention Dec. 1-3 or can be shipped for $20 per hat. Orders placed from September 6 until convention will be shipped for $20 per hat.

Name: ___________________________________________________ CCA Centennial 10X Hat

$275 ea.

_____ Black

_____ Silverbelly

CCA Centennial 30X Hat

$400 ea.

_____ Black

_____ Silverbelly

_____ Natural

_____ Yes, I will pick my hat(s) up in person at the convention Dec. 1-3 in Sparks, Nev. _____ Please ship my hat(s) $20 per hat x _____ hat(s) = _____ Grand Total: $_______ Shipping Address: ________________________________________ City ____________________ State ______ Zip Code ___________ Name on card: ____________________________________________ Card No. _____ _____ _____ _____ Exp. Date _____ / _____ Signature __________________________________________

Make checks payable to California Cattlemen’s Association

Please return toCattleman the CaliforniaSeptember Cattlemen’s Association, Attn. Centennial Hat, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 46 California 2016


September 2016 California Cattleman 47


Federal restrictions lifted on movement of California cattle California has regained its be harmful to humans, including bacterial disease caused by “accredited-free” status for bovine tuberculosis organisms. The state’s Mycobacterium, a group of bacteria tuberculosis (TB), allowing cattle two raw milk dairies are regularly that usually affects the respiratory and bison to move to other states tested for tuberculosis. All cattle system. Bovine tuberculosis does without the federal requirement of processed for meat are inspected for not threaten the quality and safety TB testing. The upgraded status is a signs of tuberculosis infection and of milk and meat products produced result of several years of testing and rejected if they show signs of the in California. Milk pasteurization related biosecurity efforts following disease. destroys organisms that could the detection of the disease in five dairy herds dating between 2008 and 2013. These herds have all been declared free of the disease. “This announcement is several years, thousands of lab tests and hundreds of herd inspections in the making,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Annette Jones. “It is a testament to the biosecurity efforts of California dairies, and to the hard work of a lot of vets and animal health officials from the federal, state and local levels. It means some very welcome relief for our dairymen and women and our beef cattle ranchers, and they’ve earned it through their vigilance in protecting the health of their herds.” Bovine TB was detected and subsequently eradicated in one herd in San Bernardino County in 2009, three in San Bernardino County in 2011, and one in Tulare County in 2013. No additional herds have been diagnosed with TB. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has completed its review of California’s TB eradication program and determined that the state now meets the requirements for accredited free status. California’s program included testing 1,444,122 cattle in several hundred herds. The program also encompasses rules to address other potential pathways for the disease to enter the state, including testing 800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com of breeding dairy cattle entering California and TB surveillance at General Insurance Brokers License 0208825 slaughter plants. www.andreini.com Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious 48 California Cattleman September 2016

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

WILD

Doug Winnett


Join Us the First Monday in October

SelliNg eFFiCieNT BUllS THAT Will WOrk FOr yOU ...

90 Bulls ANGus I HEREFORD

October 3, 1 p.m. • Fort Klamath, OR

Just a Sample of the Genetics Selling...

TwO-yEAR-OlD AND lONG-yEARliNG Bulls AlsO sElliNG BRED HEiFERs I FiRsT-cAlF HEiFER pAiRs

Bulls Sell Ultrasound-Tested, Semen Tested and Trich-Tested – All Backed by a Complete Herd Health Program

tr ultimate answer 8621

Sire: OCC Ultimate Answer 118 Dam’s Sire: Connealy Consensus 7229 BW +.3 • WW +64 • YW +109 • MILK +31 MARB +.49 • RE +.77 • $W +63.95 • $B +115.70

traynhams insight 8545

Sire: PVF Insight 0129 Dam’s Sire: EXAR Rito 5118 of Rito 1I2 BW +3.4 • WW +60 • YW +105 • MILK +32 MARB +.45 • RE +.57 • $W +52.16 • $B +123.98

Delivery AvAilABle Affordable Wintering Options SAle DAy lUNCH SPONSOr Central Oregon ranch Supply

JOiN US FOr A Pre-SAle DiNNer: SUN., OCT. 2, 6 P.m.

Follow Us on Facebook WATCH FOr DeTAilS ON THe BUllS SelliNg iN THiS ANNUAl eveNT

Sale Book Requests

Matt Macfarlane, Sale Manager Matt MaCfarlane Marketing 916-803-3113 Cell

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

aUCtiOneer: eriC DUarte

h3l 028x sensation 108b

Sire: Churchill Sensation 028X Dam’s Sire: mHW iceman 505 BW +1.2 • WW +52 • YW +84 • MILK +32 • M&G +59 RE +.32 • MARB +.24 • $BMI +25 • $CHB +30

h3l 592r mr rancher 116b

Sire: Churchill Rancher 592R Dam’s Sire: UPS Domino 6162 BW +3.7 • WW +55 • YW +95 • MILK +28 • M&G +55 RE +.11 • MARB +.37 • $BMI +23 • $CHB +30

Bulls for Cattlemen by Cattlemen

REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS 79337 Soto Lane • Fort Rock, OR 97735 www.huffordsherefords.com Ken & Leslie Hufford 541-576-2431 541-403-1044 Cell • ijhufford@yahoo.com Jesse 541-576-3541 • 541-810-2460 Cell

Brad and Buckley cox

1881 Brophy Road • Eagle Point, OR 97524

541-840-5797 • 541-840-8788 www.traynhamranch.com info@traynhamranch.com

THD ©

September 2016 California Cattleman 49


BARRY RANCHES HEREFORD AND ANGUS HERD REDUCTION SALE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 • 1 P.M. Central Oregon Livestock Auction • Madras, Ore.

170 HEREFORD AND 20 ANGUS FEMALES SELL!

Show heifer prospects, open heifers, bred heifers, bred cows and more!!!!

A Superior Set of Spring Bred Heifers and Cows Sell!

BHR 910 Dominette 556

Sire: BHR Ramrod 13Y 310 • MGS: HH Advance 5104R CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC -2.2 3.5 51 83 30 55 2.2 100 1.05 1.06 0.8

CW FAT REA 65 -0.016 0.43

MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ -0.01 14 12 12 23

• She sells bred AI April 26, 2016, to UPS Domino 5216.

BHR Stock Dominette 543

Sire: C Stockman 2059 ET • MGS: UPS Domino 5216 CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC 2.7 3.9 49 77 36 60 4.0 73 1.23 1.21 0.9

CW FAT REA 57 -0.011 0.43

MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ 0.00 16 17 12 23

• She sells bred AI May 29, 2016, to HH Advance 767G.

BHR Dominette 546

Sire: GV CMR Y125 Mr 8201 A325 • MGS: KF Got Class 809U CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC -0.2 4.9 50 81 23 48 1.1 84 1.19 1.23 1.0

CW FAT REA 62 0.014 0.37

MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ 0.05 18 14 16 23

• She sells bred AI May 29, 2016, to UPS Domino 3027.

BHR Timley Dominette 105

Sire: CRR About Time 743 • MGS: STAR KKH SSF 533P Keifer 23T ET CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC 0.7 3.3 47 76 20 44 1.8 108 1.19 1.18 0.7

CW FAT REA 57 -0.033 0.23

MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ 0.04 17 15 15 23

• She sells pasture exposed after May 11, 2016, to KPH Whiskey Red 26U 26B ET.

BHR SW Dominette 515

Sire: STAR Shock Wave 13Y ET • MGS: STAR Handsome As Ever 103X ET CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC -6.2 6.0 56 92 24 52 1.9 98 1.20 1.23 0.7

CW FAT REA 69 0.001 0.48

MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ -0.05 12 8 10 23

• She sells bred AI May 29, 2016, to UPS Domino 3027.

BHR 3Z Princess 407

Sire: KF Trip 3Z • MGS: JWR 024P Saras Prince 153T CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC -2.4 4.4 54 89 26 53 -0.8 110 1.08 1.08 0.9

CW FAT REA 66 -0.011 0.58

MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ 0.05 16 11 14 26

• She sells pasture exposed after May 11, 2016, to KPH Whiskey Red 26U 26B ET.

Featuring the get and service of these Hereford AI Sires and Herd Bulls STAR SHOCKWAVE 13Y ET HH ADVANCE 0002X C STOCKMAN 2059 ET KF GOT CLASS 809U CRR 719 CATAPULT 109 HEREFORDS AND ANGUS CRR ABOUT TIME 743 M A D R A S, O R E G O N HH PERFECT TIMING 0150 ET Joe Barry, Owner • 503-807-9397 KPH Whiskey Red 26U 26B ET KPH Whiskey Red 26U 26B ET Scott LeQuieu, Manager • 541-639-7509 Sire: AH JDH Cracker Jack 26U ET • MGS: KF Big Time 702T CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE MCW UDDR TEAT SC CW FAT REA MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ UPS DOMINO 3027 Charlie Woo, Show and Sale Cattle • 541-410-1029 -0.3 4.5 46 75 18 41 1.8 109 1.15 1.16 0.1 62 0.006 0.37 0.11 12 13 9 22 UPS DOMINO 5216 • The first service of this outstanding junior herd sire sells! HH ADVANCE 767G 1ET Matt Macfarlane Marketing m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BHR SHOCKER 13Y 306 Featuring the get and service of these www.m3cattlemarketing.com BHR RAMROD 13Y 310 Angus AI Sires and Herd Bulls 916-803-3113 BHR CLASSY DOMINO 215 SAC CONVERSATION • EF COMMANDO 1366 Auctioneer: EXAR POSTTIME 5091B • DEER VALLEY PATRIOT MLC S109 TIDALWAVE 4A Trent Stewart – 541-325-3662 BHR BRIGHT KEIFER 126 C&C McGUINESS 2010 • A A R TEN X 7008 S A R B ACTIVE DUTY 010 • WK SMOOTH GV CMR Y125 MR 8201 A325 KF GOTCLASS 809U

BARRY RANCHES

50 California Cattleman September 2016


Teixeira Cattle Co.

22nd Annual

October 7•4 p.m. offering bulls, spring & fall heifers, embryos, steers and pregnancies

She Sells!

Sons Sell!

CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE FEATURING 50 BULLS INCLUDING SONS OF: BLACK GRANITE • COMRADE • IN FOCUS DESTINATION • PROCEDE • PROPHET • WAYLON

CHECK OUT SOME OF THIS YEAR’S IMPRESSIVE BULL OFFERING! TEX PROPHET 5049

AAA No. 18161087 • 1/10/15 Sire: G A R Prophet • MGS: A A R Ten X 7008 S A

TEX DEMAND 5156

5 Brothers

Sell! AAA No. 18220645 • 3/14/15 Sire: Tex Demand 2791 • MGS: S A V Bismarck 5682

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

+4

+2.1

75

130

-.09

+36

+1.14

+.60

+78.56

+153.42

+11

-.4

75

101

+.87

+21

+.99

+.62

+53.18

+146.73

TEX WAYLON 5371

AAA No. 18160082 • 4/4/15 Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 • MGS: B/R New Frontier 095 CED

BW

WW

YW

+9

+.7

58

101 +1.05

SC

TEX 9Q13 5105

AAA No. 18358150 • 2/12/15 Sire: Rito 9Q13 of Rita 5F56 GHM • MGS: Rito Revenue 5M2 of 2536

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

MK

+31

+.98

+.51

+71.74

+152.62

+8

+1.6

44

85

-.08

+21

Allan & Cecilia Teixeira John & HeatherTeixeira (805) 595-1416 • (805) 448-3859

855 Thousand Hills Rd., Pismo Beach, CA 93449 www.teixeiracattleco.com Psalms 50:10

MB

RE

$W

+1.11 +1.06 +38.93

$B +148.96

Guest consignors:

Veenendaal Angus JV Angus• Canaday Ranch SALE MANAGED BY:

LARRY COTTON (517) 294-0777 RYAN COTTON (706) 206-8361

September 2016 California Cattleman 51


Back to School Meals that Matter! Slow Cooker Southwest Beef Wraps Time: 6 hours on high or 10 hours on low • Makes 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

1 beef Shoulder Roast Boneless or Bottom Round Rump Roast (3 to 3-1/2 pounds) 1 medium onion, cut into quarters 3 cloves garlic, peeled 3/4 cup water 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 2 jars (16 ounces each) prepared chunky salsa with cilantro 8 flour tortillas (10-inch diameter), warmed Fresh cilantro (optional)

TOMATO-CORN RELISH

1 cup frozen corn, defrosted 1 cup chopped fresh tomato 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Cut beef roast into 4 even pieces. Place onion and garlic in 4-1/2 to 5-1/2-quart slow cooker; top with beef. Add water, salt and pepper. Cover and cook on HIGH 5 to 5-1/2 hours or on LOW 9 to 9-1/2 hours or until beef is fork-tender. (No stirring is necessary during cooking.) 2. Remove beef; cool slightly. Strain cooking liquid; skim fat. Shred beef with 2 forks. Place beef in 2-quart microwave-safe dish; add 1/2 cup cooking liquid. 3. Combine relish ingredients in medium bowl; stir in 1/4 cup salsa. 4. Add remaining salsa to beef; mix well. Cover and microwave on HIGH 8 to 10 minutes or until heated through, stirring once. 5. Top each tortilla with 3/4 cup beef mixture, leaving 1-1/2-inch border around edge. Top beef with about 1/4 cup relish. Fold right and left sides of tortillas over filling; fold bottom edge over and roll up. Garnish with cilantro, if desired.

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0B48084

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com Lic #0124869

Dan VanVuren 209.484.5578 dan@dvvins.com Lic #0E44519

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! 52 California Cattleman September 2016


NEED A CATALOG? e-mail jmmick@sonic.net

September 2016 California Cattleman 53


51st Annual

Tuesday, November 1 12 o’clock noon •

Shasta Livestock Auction• Cottonwood, California

Offering 125 Top Quality Bulls BULLS WILL BE GRADED AND SIFTED ON MONDAY, OCT. 31 Hereford Red Angus Charolais Angus Composites

Join us for Western Her itage Night

A HOSTED BAR & STEAK DINNER! MONDAY, OCT. 31

Sale Book Requests & Western Heritage Night Reservations:

Greg and Maureen Thomas, Sale Managers (541) 545-3417 or ycross@centurylink.net

UCCE Offers OnLINE RANGEland Research and Information Center The California Rangeland Research and Information Center (CRRIC/Califorina Rangelands) has been officially relaunched as UC Rangelands (rangelands.ucdavis. edu! The UC Rangelands site hosts the most recent information on UC and UCCE research and outreach on California’s grazinglands, as well as guest blogs and news highlights. The site is still growing and addinga, so please bookmark us for updates (and send us your feedback!). The former CRRIC/California Rangelands site will now serve as the UC Rangelands Research & Education Archive (rangelandarchive.ucdavis.edu<http:// rangelandarchive.ucdavis.edu>), providing access to past rangeland and pasture information. Key additions to the archive site include: • Archived publications and reports (rangelandarchive.ucdavis.edu/ Publication_Archive<http:// rangelandarchive.ucdavis.edu/Publication_ Archive>) • Find historic and limited distribution publications (>700 publications!) and 54 California Cattleman September 2016

county reports dating back to the late 1800s. • Online learning resources (rangelandarchive. ucdavis.edu/Online_Learning_Resources<http:// rangelandarchive.ucdavis.edu/Online_Learning_ Resources>) - The online course, “Ecology and Management of Grazing” is now freely available!


Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits

Looking forward to seeing you at VF's Fall Cattlemen's Classic Sale!

October 8th • 1 p.m. PST • Terrebonne, Oregon

Join us at our Sale and get a close look as we walk each of our 50 Elite Bred Heifers & 50 Top Red Angus cows inside our NEW sale facility at Dry Creek Ranch. A sampling of a few Elite Donor Cows & Bred Heifers at the Sale…

LARSON VICTORIA JOAN 063

VF CHLOE C365

Reg #1384679

Projected Calf EPD’s Bieber Gladiator #3474701 GRID

CED

HPG

CEM

STAY

145 12

56 4

8

12

BW

WW

MARB

YG

-4.2

1.00

MILK

ME

HERD

GRID

CED

CW

REA

BFAT

HPG

CEM

STAY

105

.01

27

Due by Sale Date Projected Calf EPD’s Brown Incredabull #1550654

Projected Calf EPD’s Dunn Acquisition #1686395

YW

59

Reg #964462

Due midJanuary 2017

Due May 2017

HERD

LARSON POLYANA 427

Reg #3515089

25

.51

5

.04

155 12

54 4

10 14

BW

WW

MARB

YG

-3.9 .85

YW

MILK

ME

HERD

GRID

CED

CW

REA

BFAT

HPG

CEM

STAY

67

107

-.03

28

22

.51

2

.02

117 13

53 4

6

11

BW

WW

MARB

YG

-2.7 .64

YW

MILK

ME

CW

REA

BFAT

73

116

.05

35

25

.44

5

.04

Everett Flikkema: 406.580.2186 Jack Vollstedt: 818.535.4034

Terrebonne, Oregon vfredangus.com September 2016 California Cattleman 55


SCENES FROM WESTERN VIDEO MARKET’S ANNUAL JULY SALE For many California beef producers and members of the California Cattlemen’s Association, who market their cattle through the Western Video Market (WVM), based in Cottonwood, their biggest payday of the year comes during WVM’s annual summer sale in Reno, Nev. As such WVM’s largest event of the year, this year’s sale, held July 11 through 13 was attended not just by buyers and consignors but also of by family, friends, seedstock suppliers,

pharmaceutical representatives, bankers and other well-wishers who enjoy seeing hard work pay off for these cattlemen and women. Pictured here are just a handful of folks who attended this year’s event. In a year that left many producers concerned about beef prices and marketability, CCA officers and staff extend a sincere congratulations to WVM and its consignors on another successful sale.

WVM’s Ellington Peek, Cottonwood, and Col. John Rodgers, Visalia, with American Angus Association’s Terry Gotton.

Celebrating 100 Years of CCA

Col. Rick Machado announces lots as < special edition coffee table book >Rodgers, WVM Co-founder Col. John Visalia, takes the mic as auctioneer.

IMI Global’s Jason Judge, La Grange; Sudden & Hollister’s DC Hollister, Lompoc and Bentley Agrowdynamics Matt McKinney, Minden, Nev.

Pre-order copies for you, your family and your friends before Oct. 1 to receive special pre-sale prices! Pre-order until Oct. 1: $40 per book + flat rate shipping* After Oct 1: $50 per book + flat rate shipping - Call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 for special pricing on orders of 5 or more books -

Pictured (L to R): Zoetis’ Larry Gran, Belle Fouche, S.D.; Megan, Matt and Lucas Byrne, Plumas Lake; Zoetis Intern Angela Faryan, Mike Byrne, Tulelake; and Zoetis’ Kurt Urricelqui, Palo Cedro.

*Pre-ordered books can be picked up in person at the 100th Annual CCA & CCW Convention Dec. 1-3 in Sparks, Nev. or shipped for an additional flat rate fee. Detach and fill out the form below and mail with a check or call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 to pay over the phone by credit card.

Name: ______________________________________ Phone number: _________________ Please reserve _____ coffee table books @ $40 each = _______ Shipping: $14 (up to 2 books) = _______ + $7 per each add’l book x _____ books = _______

___ Yes, I will pick up my order in person at Convention ___ No, I won’t be able to make the convention, please ship to:

Total: _________

_____________________________________________________________________

Each year at the WVM event, a saddle benefitting Water for Life is auctioned off. Pictured are some of this year’s buyers with Water for Life personnel and Col. Max Olvera.

56 California Cattleman September 2016

_____________________________________________________________________ Make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association and mail to: California Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: 100 Year Coffee Table Book 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

< No refunds will be granted >


Heterosis.

Real Money. Real Fast. Benefit from heterosis without sacrificing carcass merit and customer satisfaction.

The science, as well as dollars and cents, behind this phenomenon are well documented. The increase in production from using Brangus and Ultrablack genetics in a crossbreeding program amounts to $186 annually/cow exposed, as well as a 38% increase in longevity, when compared to a straight-bred breeding program. Furthermore, research has proven a crossbreeding program with Brangus genetics shows an increase in production of 25-30% over a crossbreeding program combining two English and/or Continental Breeds. The science is real, the results are real, and the dollars are certainly real!

Dr.’s Willie and Monnie Carol Carter, Hope Hull, AL“We added 100# to our weaning weights the first year. This was just from using Brangus sires. Now those calves are 825 pounds at shipping. We didn’t change anything else. Heterosis is responsible for that increase in weaning weights.” Scan this QR code and enter to win a $250 credit toward Brangus or Ultrablack genetics from any IBBA member in 2016.

Brangus. More than maternal. www.gobrangus.com

or visit gobrang.us/ccsept16

September 2016 California Cattleman 57


58 California Cattleman September 2016


— 60 Annual — Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo th

Sunday, October 2, 1 p.m. 145 YEARLING BULLS

Angus, Polled Hereford, SimAngus, Red Angus, Horned Hereford, LimFlex, Brangus

JOIN US FOR THE YOUNG CATTLEMAN’S COMMITTEE FUNDRAISER DINNER SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REQUEST A CATALOG CONTACT: Keela Retallick-Trennepohl Beef Cattle Specialist (805) 756-2685 kretalli@calpoly.edu

@calpoly bull test

Aaron Lazanoff Beef Operations Manager (805) 801-7058 alazanof@calpoly.edu

www.bulltestcalpoly.edu

@cp_ bulltest

September 2016 California Cattleman 59


SLO RECOGNIZES CATTLEMAN, WOMAN OF THE YEAR Top ranching leaders in San Luis Obispo’s agricultural industry were honored in July at the California Mid-State Fair, in Paso Robles. Susan Cochrane was named 2016 Cattlewoman of the Year and Steve Johns was named 2016 Cattleman of the Year. Both are integral parts of the ranching community on the Central Coast and on the state level. The San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen’s Association honored Cochrane for her long-time dedication and leadership in promoting and protecting the beef industry. Cochrane is a San Luis Obispo County native who grew up on a ranch along the western edge of the Carrisa Plains. She is a descendant of a pioneering family that settled in the area in 1862, including Col. Albert Stone, who guided wagon trains to settle the West. She and her husband, Bill, are full-time ranchers, running a herd of stockers. In addition to continuing to operate Cochrane’s

60 California Cattleman September 2016

century-old multi-generational operation, the Navajo Ranch. Cochrane said ranch work is her relaxation, along with gardening, dancing and trail riding. The San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association honored Johns for his dedication to water issues, attending countless meetings throughout the state and protecting property and water rights. For the past 20 years, Johns has headed the Estrella Ranch cattle operation in Shandon, working for the late George Hearst and now his son, Steve Hearst. He has been married to his wife, Becky, for 39 years. The local cattlemen’s association also credits Johns for always being on the leading edge of the beef industry and keeping up with the latest cattle health programs and genetic advancements. In addition to Cochrane and Johns, Hugh Pitts was honored as 2016 Agriculturist of the Year at the Mid-State Fair.

SUSAN COCHRANE

STEVE JOHNS


. W P.

and r b i l l Gi

Cattle Co

Brings to Cal Poly

mpa ny

QUALITY YOU CAN COUNT ON

SELLING THREE OUTSTANDING HEREFORD BULLS OCTOBER 2 LOT 127 Sire: HYALITE ON TARGET 936 MGS: SCHU-LAR RED BULL 18X Reg # 43631574 • DOB: 8/27/15 Index

CED

BW

WW

YW

104.8

+5.3

+2.6

66

110 +24 +.48 +.15

MK

REA

MB

$CHB +35

TEST INDEX AS OF JULY

LOT 127 5T RED BULL TARGET 15011

LOT 126 Sire: CHURCHILL DOMINO 2243Z ET MGS: CL 1 DOMINO 955W Reg #43631812 • DOB: 8/18/15 Index

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

REA

MB

$CHB

63

101 +34

+.54

+.19

+34

104.3 +1.9 +2.8

TEST INDEX AS OF JULY

LOT 126 CHURCHILL DOMINO 5339C

\

CHURCHILL STUD 5312C - LOT 125 Sire: CHURCHILL STUD 3134A MGS: CHURCHILL DOMINO 589R ET Reg #43631787 • DOB: 8/12/15

Index

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

REA

108.1

+.2

+3.3

63

101

+24

+.54 +.15

MB

$CHB +31

TEST INDEX AS OF JULY

ALSO SELLING THESE CALVING-EASE POLLED HEREFORDS! CONTACT US TODAY!

GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 15015

5T BONANZA APACHE 15014 Sire: GENOAS BONANZA 11051 • MGS: H EASY DEAL 609 ET Reg # 43631578 • DOB: 10/1/15

Sire: R NEW YORK 4593 • MGS: R VISION 4921 Reg # 43631563 • DOB: 10/12/15

CED

BW

WW YW

MK

REA

MB

$CHB

CED

BW

WW

YW

MB

+5.7

-1.9

41

+25

+.15

+.30

+24

+5.5

0.0

57

92

+28 +.56 +.19

68

Dwight Joos, Ranch Manager PWGCattle.com• (805) 428-9781 Simi Valley, CA

REA

MB

$CHB +31

September 2016 California Cattleman 61


Sudden & Hollister Cattle Co. Offering The Best of All Worlds At Cal Poly, October 2 Angus Genetics • Multi-Trait Bulls • Calving-Ease Bulls Angus division • 107 Test Index

A Multi Trait division • 100.2 Test Index

LOT 25 S&H Consensus 5020 Reg: 18337553 Sire: V A R Consensus 2051 • MGS: B C C Shear Force 3096-8532 CW BW WW -5 +3.3 54

YW 100

MK MB $B +21 +.36 110.82

Calving Ease division • 109.9 Test Index

LOT 12

LOT 15

S&H Discovery 5012 Reg: 18337561

S&H Complete 5010 Reg: 18337550

Sire: V A R Discovery 2240 • MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

Sire: V A R Complete 1209 • MGS: 21AR Roundup 7005

CW BW WW +4 +1.4 62

YW 122

Sudden & Hollister Cattle Co.

CW +6

MK MB $B +42 +.82 152.87

BW +.6

WW 62

YW 109

MK MB $B +34 +1.11 144.24

David Hollister 444 South N Street • Lompoc, CA 93436, (805) 588-5668

SLO event raises scholarship dollars The Central Coast Beef and booth. Wine Festival, hosted by the SLO CattleWomen President San Luis Obispo County (SLO) Susan Cochrane said, “The CattleWomen on Aug. 6 at the ranches of California’s Central new Silo Barn at Halter Ranch Coast produce superior cattle. Vineyard raised over $7,000 for Created to promote the local beef their agricultural scholarship fund industry, the SLO CattleWomen and must! charities. The first-time dedicate their time, energy and event was designed to celebrate devotion to educate the public and educate guests about locally about beef. “Beef, It’s What’s For grown. Ranchers and producers Dinner.” is not only a popular ad who raise beef, grow and/or campaign, it’s just about all you produce wine showcased their found on the menu at this good wines alongside beef dishes. time tasty educational fundraising With beef and wine stations, festival. We created the event to guests grazed and sipped their encourage folks to slow down, way through the Halter Ranch step back in time, learn and Silo Barnyard, and heard the appreciate so many good things sounds of Shelly Cargill & The our community has to offer, Classics. Beef was provided by especially our locally grown beef.” Harris Ranch and prepared by Wineries that participated RFD-TV cooking celebrities in the event all raise cattle, as Billy and Sue of Cowboy Flavor. well as grow grapes. The winery Beef dishes featuring various cuts participants included: Ancient of meat were paired alongside Peaks Winery, B&E Vineyard, local wines. SLO CattleWomen Bridlewood Estate Winery, CASS & BBQ Masters served up and Winery, Halter Ranch Vineyard, shared “how-to” prep, cooking Hearst Ranch Winery, Jack Creek and health tips about beef, while Cellars, Ranchita Canyon Winery, must! charities showed guests a Seven Oxen Estate Wines and good time at the wild west photo Vintage Cowboy Winery. 62 California Cattleman September 2016

Cal Poly Foundation

MAKING THE GRADE WITH ANOTHER SET OF OUTSTANDING BULLS PUT TO THE TEST!

LOT 86

POLY POSITIVE 5000

SIRE: S A V POSITIVE 3417 MGS: CONNEALY CONFIDENCE 0100 CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

+16

-2.5

50

91

22

+.37

+.76

HE’S IN THE TOP 1% OF THE BREED FOR CALVING EASE DIRECT!

Contact us about this and other bulls from Cal Poly in this year’s offering! KEELA RETALLICK-TRENNEPOHL Beef Cattle Specialist (805) 756-2685 kretalli@calpoly.edu

AARON LAZANOFF Beef Operations Manager (805) 801-7050 alazanof@calpoly.edu


The 1%ers

SELLING AT CAL POLY BULL TEST SALE OCTOBER 2, 2016 Lot 31 is a top 1%er for 8 important traits and $values WESTWIND INTIMIDATOR DJH 542 Reg # 18184282 Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 x S A V Pioneer 7301

CED

BW

WW

YW

RADG

CW

MILK

RE

$W

$F

$B

+11 +.9

79

143

+.34

+70

+31

+1.36

81.88

123.32

175.33

1%

1%

1%

1%

5%

1%

1%

1%

1%

Test index of 118.23 as of July

Lot 36 is a top 1%er for 7 important traits and $values WESTWIND INTIMIDATOR DJH 538 Reg #: 18184665 Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 x S A V Pioneer 7301

FLUSH MATE TO LOT 31

CED

BW

+10

+1.5

WW

YW

RADG

CW

RE

$W

$F

$B

70

129

+.33

+65

+1.36

69.24

104.80

168.84

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

2%

1%

1%

Test index of 116.37 as of July

THEIR DAM IS FROM THE HIGHLY RESPECTED, PRODUCTIVE, AND PROVEN EMBLYNETTE FAMILY.

For more information on these and other low-birth and multi-trait leaders, contact us today!

WESTWIND RANCH ANGUS Where Cowmen Buy Bulls

David J. Holden • (530) 736-0727

38 Montana Ave, Oroville, 95966 wstwind@hotmail.com • www.westwindangus.com September 2016 California Cattleman 63


Thomas Angus Ranch Thomas Lucy Rose 41104

The Brand That Covers the Nation

18040363

CED MRB +11 +1.02 BW RE +1.6 +.62 WW $W +70 +80.44 YW $F +115 +80.67 Milk $B +36 +142.36

Sire: GAR Prophet • Dam: Thomas Lucy Rose 1931 MGS: SAV Bismarck 5682

Thomas Lady Jet 4107

Due 9/4/2016 to KCF Bennett Absolute.

Thomas Pride 3754

17836366

CED +5 BW +.3 WW +54 YW +104 Milk +30

Selling on October 20th!

17734633

MRB +.84 RE +.86 $W +62.89 $F +69.67 $B +148.17

CED -2 BW +2.9 WW +53 YW +91 Milk +28

MRB +.86 RE +.80 $W +49.37 $F +39.98 $B +148.67

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam: Thomas Lady Jet 2130 MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 • Dam: Thomas Pride 0060 MGS: Papa Forte 1921

Due 9/18/2016 to Thomas Big River 4081.

Due 9/16/2016 to EF Commando 1366.

Thomas Prophet 5576

18368207

CED MRB +10 I+1.14 RE BW +.6 I+.69 WW $W +77 +81.47 YW $F +132 +96.50 $B Milk +38 +128.88

Sire: GAR Prophet • Dam: Thomas Blackcap 3929 MGS: AAR Ten X 7008 SA

64 California Cattleman September 2016

Thomas Ten X 5616

18366143

CED +13 BW -1.5 WW +59 YW +110 Milk +29

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam: Thomas Erica 2027 MGS: SAV Final Answer 0035

MRB I+1.03 RE I+.60 $W +59.89 $F +76.93 $B +140.18


11 A.M.

Fall Female & Bull Sale

October 20, 2016

Baker City, OR

Selling: 250 BULLS & 400 FEMALES Females Will Sell Immediately Following Bulls

Thomas Rampage 5809

Thomas Xpand 5835

18369725

CED +8 BW +1.3 WW +66 YW +129 Milk +33

MRB I+.54 RE I+1.17 $W +60.70 $F +111.41 $B +166.10

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Dam: Thomas Lucy Rose 8902 MGS: Mytty In Focus

18368376

CED +13 BW -2.4 WW +56 YW +97 Milk +27

MRB I+.97 RE I+.64 $W +60.68 $F +54.22 $B +148.66

Sire: Baldridge Xpand X743 • Dam: Thomas Lucy 81041 MGS: GAR Predestined

Also please join us -

September 20th

Galt, California

Selling: 125 BULLS SALE 131 Robin Ct. MANAGED Howell, MI 48855 BY: 517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

September 2016 California Cattleman 65


RANGELAND TRUST TALK TWO YEARS, TWO MONTHS AND 18 DAYS CONSERVING KEEGAN AND EPPERSON PLACE RANCHES by Jessica Kong, communications director, and Nancy Schaefer, Bay Area program manager, California Rangeland Trust “I took that [photo] two years ago.” It was 6 o’clock in the evening. In the light breeze, the faint smell of moist soil on a warm summer evening wafted off the vernal pool area Jack Alderson, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Engineer, had come to photograph. The sun had dropped behind the hills and the dusky glow of twilight bathed the masses of popcorn flowers in painted light. It was the moment he was waiting for. Jack snapped a series of photos with his tripod mounted Nikon D800 and telephoto lens which he’d later stitch into a panorama. “Depending on the rains, the flowers in this vernal pool can be very different from year to year. I wanted a picture of it for the project and for Jim [Keegan].” In 2011 and 2012, three members of the Keegan family applied to conserve two ranches that have been owned and stewarded by Keegan family members since the 1880s – Keegan Ranch and Epperson Place Ranch. As Jack took shot after shot, the click of the shutter, the rustle of the wind, and the noise of horses grazing were the only sounds. “That silence and calmness is precious,” Jack continued. “When I got there, the horses were up by the buildings, about

a quarter mile away. I had been taking photos quite some time, maybe an hour, when they seemed to suddenly become quite interested in what I was doing. They came running to see me and one of them named Chief insisted I pay him some attention. When I took my camera off the tripod to get some close ups, Chief started nibbling on it. After fooling with the horses for a while, they settled down and grazed beside me.” Chief and the other horses don’t realize that they are manicuring one of the most famous and bountiful wildflower destinations spots in California. Jack along with eight others, representing agencies and conservation organizations, are about to send letters in support of California Rangeland Trust (CRT) acquiring conservation easements on Keegan Ranch and Epperson Ranch. What was once the dream of one family had become the goal of many. 809 days later, the clanging of a cowbell announced the closing of the Keegan Ranch conservation easement at CRT headquarters in Sacramento. Epperson Ranch would follow about 30 days later. During those two years, two months and 18 days, letters of support were written, multiple tours were conducted, funding was secured, the conservation easements went through escrow, and finally, they are

66 California Cattleman September 2016

held by California Rangeland Trust. “When you look back at these photos Jack took, you realize why so many people from so many agencies invested so much time and energy to conserve these ranches,” said Nita Vail, CRT’s Chief Executive Officer. “Each conservation easement is an enormous undertaking and each project closing is a testament to the dedication, collaboration, and commitment of every team involved.” In response to the recent closing of Keegan Ranch, John Donnelly, Wildlife Conservation Board (WCB) Executive Director said, “The WCB is proud to be a partner with CRT in the 2,502 acre Keegan Ranch conservation easement to support and protect oak woodlands, deer and mountain lion habitat, watersheds, and wildlife corridors. Additionally, this property supports a number of special status species and is renowned for its wildflower resources. The ability to protect this property for future generations was a fantastic opportunity for which the WCB is proud to be a part.” Conservation easements on the 2,502 acre Keegan Ranch and 1,547 acre Epperson Ranch add 4,049 acres to the existing 16,130-acre wildlife corridor in the valley – the already conserved Bear Valley and Payne Ranches. In collaboration with CRT, WCB and NRCS matched funds to


conserve the two ranches. The ranches boast open grassland, native oak and foothill pine woodland that provide foraging habitat for resident and wintering raptors, migratory birds, black-tailed deer, Tule elk, bobcats, the greater roadrunner, and the occasional bear. Bear Creek runs through both ranches and is recognized as a significant stream by noted UC Davis fishery biologist Peter Moyle because the native fish fauna remains intact and includes Sacramento pike minnow, California roach, and Sacramento sucker. Also found in Bear Creek are yellowlegged frog and western pond turtle, both California Species of Concern. Among special status species found in Bear Valley are bald eagle, golden eagle, peregrine falcon, burrowing owl, long billed curlew and American badger. While the wildlife appreciate the valley year round, it’s the springtime splendor of prolific fields of wildflowers that draw the people. Jim Keegan, who owns Keegan Ranch and manages both ranches, used to drive a team of mules drawing wagon loads of wildflower enthusiasts throughout the ranch. Home and Garden Television, Bay Area Backroads, and Sunset magazine made the tours famous. While they are now a thing of the past, the Keegan’s hospitality is strong as ever. A wildflower access gate allows people to walk into the fields of flowers without letting cattle out. “It’s

hard for city people to shut a gate,” Jim says. “Jim’s wildflower access is so generous,” Jack added. “Over the years I have seen so many people looking longingly over the fence. They have the opportunity now to walk out among the flowers, and sometimes horses.” The spectacular flora makes the Keegan Ranch and Epperson Place conservation easements the first NRCS Grasslands of Special Environmental Significance in California. Bear Valley is renowned for an exceptionally large number of rare and endangered plants due to serpentine soils. “We are proud to be a part of preserving the Keegan Ranch and the unique beauty this property provides,” said Carlos Suarez, NRCS California State Conservationist. “From the rare serpentine soils, extensive wildflower fields and

native grasses to the productive rangeland, this working cattle ranch is a great example of how ranchers can work with conservation groups to voluntarily protect the natural environment and sustain a way of life.” “You will never see the future if you keep looking at the past.” said Jim. He looked to the future and wanted to see the family ranch preserved. With the help of multiple agencies, his dream became reality on July 7, 2016. And Jack? When asked how he felt two years three months and three days after he snapped those photos, he simply said, “Delighted.” A pause later, he continued, “It’s beautiful and I like it to stay that way.” We may have never experienced the magic of these ranches firsthand, but after seeing these photos, so do we, Jack, so do we.

September 2016 California Cattleman 67


Apply to be a CCA Convention Intern! Are you a Young Cattlemen’s Committee member with an interest in attending the 100th California Cattlemen’s Association Convention? This landmark event will take place in Sparks, Nev. at the Nugget Casino Resort Dec. 1-3. CCA is seeking interns with a desire to serve and assist CCA members and CCA staff. The convention intern team assists CCA staff members behind the scenes at the convention with event set up, registration, event monitoring and more! You can take minutes in the CCA committee meetings that interest you most or help the cattlemen and cattlewomen from across the state get settled and squared away with their convention registration, in addition to building relationships and making connections with industry professionals and a large group of your like-minded peers. If you are a hard worker with a high standard for customer service and a can-do attitude, please send YCC advisor, Malorie Bankhead, a cover letter outlining your desire to serve on the CCA Convention intern team and what makes you an ideal candidate. Please email your letter no later than Oct. 14 to malorie@calcattlemen.org.

SELENIUM BOLUSES From Pacific Trace Minerals Se 365 selenium bolus for nutritional supplementation of beef cattle. • treat once a year • for beef cattle over 3 months of age.

For sale & use in California Only — Organically Listed— CCA member: $240/box o f60 CCA Non-Members: $288/box shipping additional

We Believe... ...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

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68 California Cattleman September 2016

cmaas@pacifictraceminerals.com www.pacifictraceminerals.com

ORDER FROM OR PICKUP AT: California Cattlemen’s Association 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA • (916) 444-0845

We Believe... ...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

Calving ease. Carcass. Cows.

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September 2016 California Cattleman 69


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rward o F k o o L e W u in to Seeing yo ! Idaho Falls

Riverbend Ranch GENETIC EDGE FEMALE SALE

October 15, 2016

Selling 300 Head from the Breed’s Top Families RITA 9Q15 OF 5F56 GHM 16408440

Sire: Gardens Highmark Dam: Rita 5F56 of 1I98 FD CED +6, BW +.9, WW +47, YW +89 Milk +22, CW +45, MB +1.31 RE +1.56, Fat +.030, $W +45.45 $F +61.85, $G +61.13, $B +174.84 Selling choice in three heifer pregnancies from the $140,000 new addition to the Riverbend Ranch donor program, Rita 9Q15. These choice pregnancies are sired by the proven growth sire, Discovery, the $100,000 Index and the multi-trait sire, Generation 2100. Rita 9Q15 is a direct daughter of the herd sire producer, Rita 5F56 and a full sister to the longtime REA and $B leader, Rito 9Q13. A special opportunity from the Riverbend embryo program!

RIVERBEND BLACKCAP Z721 17312409

RIVERBEND LUCY C709 18126372

Sire: Summitcrest Complete 1P55 • Dam: Rita 2811 of 2536 BVND 878

Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 • Dam: Basin Lucy S161

CED +6, BW +1.0, WW +51, YW +92, Milk +37, CW +39, MB +.75 RE +.85, Fat +.009, $W +60.37, $F +62.62, $G +44.23, $B +146.26

CED -6, BW +2.5, WW +63, YW +110, Milk +30, CW +64, MB +.53 RE +.96, Fat -.057, $W +62.95, $F +74.43, $G +40.45, $B +170.01 Selling half interest in this sensational daughter of the now-deceased Riverbend Ranch donor, Lucy S161 sired by the proven MB and $B sire, Waylon. Lucy C709 is one of the top bred heifers ever offered at Riverbend Ranch and she was produced by the powerful full sister to the growth and CW leaders, Payweight 006S and Payweight 107S. Lucy C709 sells due January 27, 2017 to VAR Generation 2100.

This direct daughter of the $330,000 valued Riverbend Ranch donor, Rita 2811 sired by the REA leader, Complete sells as a special headliner of the Blackcap family. Blackcap Z721 post s a BR 1@99 and a WR 1@101 while selling due January 30, 2017 to WR Journey-1X74.

2880 N 55 W • Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 • 208-528-6635 www.riverbendranch.us Steve Harrison, General Manager • 208-681-9815 Dale Meek, Purebred Operations Manager • 208-681-9840 Chris Howell, Director of Customer Service • 208-681-9821

bulls@riverbendranch.us

SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374

Bid Online: September 2016 California Cattleman 71


Rob Frost, Santa Paula, graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, with a degree in Farm Management. He then went to work for a credit and finance company, then worked in farm equipment and construction equipment sales. He later started an ag and oilfield land clearing/grading business and a trucking company. After that he was able to lease a ranch and start raising cattle full time. He served as second vice president, first vice president and president of CCA and on the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association nominating committee for two terms. He’s served on various boards and is a board member of the California Beef Council. Frost says he’s always involved and always interested. He was honored as Ventura County Cattlemen’s Association Cattleman of the Year in 2001. He’s also served as a board member of the Ventura County Fair and local and state trucking associations. Question: What does being involved in the beef community mean to you? Answer: The beef community is our heritage and foundation for family on my mother’s side. My father was in the agriculture equipment business. Everything fell in place, and we keep it up. On the beef cattle side, it’s all about learning and growing with the new trends and things like quality assurance and animal ID. The biggest reward has been making friends around the country and learning from them and having a great relationship. There are no bad cattlemen; we all gain mutual support from each other. Question: What’s your day job? Answer: Cattle. I also have a consulting business where I appraise and evaluate farm equipment and livestock and evaluate projects for land clearing. If somebody needs some advice, I give them what I can. It keeps me close to my past activities and ties them into what I’m doing now. We operate a cow-calf ranch and we learn something every single day. We’re preparing for the next generation and bringing them up-to-speed. We work with students from the local college and they help us out during our round ups. This summer our grandson and his friends have been helping out as well. We’re trying to make a positive influence on the next generation. Question: Why do you ranch? Answer: Ranching is in our genetic makeup. Our family has been in the area since the late 1800s. It’s something we like to do and we’re making a living at it. We have rough, steep rangeland and a lot of challenges, but I love doing it. I’ve “always had a cow.” Ranching is very rewarding and we are grateful for great neighbors knowing we can count on each other with just a phone call and a favor, just like the old way things were done. Question: Why are you serving on the CCA Executive Committee? Answer: I was asked if I would be interested. For the person who is serious about this business, your work is never

72 California Cattleman September 2016

CCA EXECUTIVE MEMBER APPOINTEE AT LARGE ROB FROST, SANTA PAULA rbmaf@juno.com | (805) 377-2231 done. It keeps me up-to-date, and I’m allowed to share my thoughts and help staff make decisions. I’ve made some of my greatest friends in the world through CCA. It keeps me current on issues and I can share my thoughts with the committee and ultimately the staff. I’m probably a better student now than I was when I went to college. Question: What issues matter most to you in the beef industry? Answer: Marketing which is a result of quality assurance, animal ID and everything that goes along with selling calves is most important to me. If you don’t have quality and good weighing conditions, you’ll lose money. We are very adamant about our quality assurance program. It is practiced with due diligence on our ranch. It’s the biggest plus, because we have documentation on how well we do working under BQA. It pays off in the end. Question: Why should someone join CCA? Answer: We’re fighting battles for people who aren’t members, and because they aren’t members they aren’t as well informed on issues. There is so much information available for all aspects of the cattle business. We are carrying a load for those who don’t pay and aren’t members. It’s my biggest pet peeve when people sit around the coffee shop to complain and make no effort to fix the problem. No matter how many cattle you have, you have to pay attention, and CCA can and does help us.


Not a CCA Member?

JOIN TODAY! CCA is the ONLY group working SOLEY to protect California beef producers. • Because you have to be at home tending to the herd and need to have a presence in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., the California CAttlemen’s Association is your eyes and ears on all things legislative and regulatory.

• Whether you own cattle or not, you can support CCA efforts. producer members, supporting members and young members are welcome at all CCA functions and have access to all publications and information.

• Being a CCA member gives you a voice and a vote on how your association will lobby on your behalf.

• CCA Provides members-only educational opportunities to help your beef operation and bottomline.

• Being a CCA member gives you access to a full-time staff who can answer your questions about hot button issues at the local, state and federal level.

Want to learn more? Feel free to contact us to learn what we are doing for you!

916.444.0845 • www.calcattlemen.org


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs JOIN US SEPT. 17 IN GALT!

Mid Valley

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Join us Friday, Sept. 2 for our annual bull sale at the ranch in Los Molinos!

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016

74 California Cattleman September 2016


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2016.

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES! O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

THANK YOU TO OUR 2015 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2016 bull sale!

PLEASE JOIN US SEPTEMBER 17 IN GALT FOR THE ANNUAL MID VALLEY BULL SALE!

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

Mid Valley

Mid Valley

PRESIDENT'S DAY 2017, TERREBONNE OR JOIN US FALL 2016 FOR THE

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

September 2016 California Cattleman 75


Thank you to the buyers at our 41st “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Join us Sept. 7, 2016 for our annual “Partners for Performance” Bull Sale! Oct. 8, 2016 “Partners for Performance” Angus Female Sale

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

JOIN US AT OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE 9/1/16!

Progressive Genetics for over years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2386

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 76 California Cattleman September 2016

Mark your calendars for Oct. 15, 2016 for our bull sale in Kenwood!

h


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS We hope to see you out for our 2016 Production Sale in Lodi! 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com September 2016 California Cattleman 77


“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

Call Jon Today! 530-949-2285 78 California Cattleman September 2016


TOM PERONA, DVM 209-996-7005 Cell

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

THD ©

Market directly to your target audience through one of the most reputable publications in the west! The California CAttleman is also the only publication in California that puts its advertising revenue right back into protecting and supporting the beef industry. the California Cattleman is sent monthly to subscribing cattle producers and members of the California Cattlemen’s Association who need your services!

$450 for the first 11 months $400 for each annual renewal To learn more about an annual advertisement in this buyer’s guide, contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113. September 2016 California Cattleman 79


IN MEMORY VERNA VAN VLECK Born on the family farm in Elk Grove, Verna Van Vleck passed away on June 17 at the age of 95 in Rocklin. She was the daughter of John Davies Lewis and Rilla Belle Baker Lewis, whose families were pioneer farmers of Elk Grove. At the age of 17, Verna graduated Elk Grove High School Class of 1937. As a Music Major, graduated Sacramento City College class of 1939 at 19 years old. She went on to marry her high school and college classmate Gordon K. Van Vleck at her family’s home garden in Elk Grove on August 31, 1941. Gordon, a third generation cattle rancher, with Verna by his side, ran a successful cattle operation and both were very politically active with improving the cattle industry. The ranch was something they both loved very dearly. From 1941 to 1968 she resided at the family ranch in Sacramento County, Michigan Bar/Sloughhouse. They later lived on the family ranch in Amador County. Verna was presided in death by Gordon, her husband of 63 years, who passed away in 2005 at the age of 85. She wa also predeceased by a twin brother at birth and brother Edmund Lewis (Betty). Longevity runs in Verna’s family. Her maternal grandparents were married 72 years, her mother Rilla Lewis and aunt Cora Stelter each passed away a matter of days away from turning 106 years old. Verna was just 19 days away from 96 years. She is survived by four children: son, Lewis Van Vleck (Linda); daughters, Mary Ellen McCafferty (Gene); Susan Firchau (John); Barbara DeLaney (Robert Clouse); Eight grandchildren: Regina Ryan (Mark), Amanda Wilkinson (Adam), Bryan Riolo (Tina), Lloyd Firchau, Coree Keenan (Tim), Brooke Firchau, Todd Firchau, Andrew DeLaney (Noelle); Eight great-grandchildren: Hannah and Mason Wilkinson; Will and Anna Ryan; Wyatt, Garrett and Juliette Keenan; and Sara Riolo. Private services were held at East Lawn Memorial Park in Sacramento. Memorial contributions can be made to Amador/El Dorado/ Sacramento (AES) Cattle Women Scholarship Fund, c/o Ginger Appleton, Scholarship Committee Chairman, 27799 Dry Creek Road, Galt, CA 95632.

WEdding Bells STROUD & EASON

Katie Stroud and Brad Eason were married Aug. 20, in Adin. Stroud, a graduate of California State University, Chico, is a past Young Cattlemen’s Committee officer as well as a former California and National Beef Ambassador is the daughter of Andy and Helen Albaugh of Adin. The groom is the son of Mark and Kim Eason of Cleveland, Okla. The couple has made their first home in Ulysses, Kan. where they are both employed at JBS-Five Rivers.

80 California Cattleman September 2016

Cattle Ranching Runs Deep in California Agriculture Heritage Since its inception in 1948, the California Agricultural Heritage Club, formerly known as the 100 Year Club, has welcomed farming and ranching families and agribusinesses in California into it’s highly esteemed group of honorees for their commitment to agriculture in California. The 100 Year Club was formed on the 100th anniversary of the discovery of gold in California and has honored countless agricultural families and their operations over the years. This year, at a brunch at the California State Fair, three California Cattlemen’s Association families were inducted into the club for 150 and 100 or more years in the ranching business in California. Ione Conlan and her great nephew Guido Frosini of Conlan Ranches California (started in 1866) and True Grass Farms, all of Valley Ford, were honored for their family’s over-150-years of ranching in California. The Edsall family of Mountain View Ranch, established in McKinleyville in 1916, was recognized for its 100 years of California ranching. Cheryl LaFranchi and Frank Mongini, DVM, of Oak Ridge Angus, Calistoga, accepted the 100-year award for Oak Ridge, which has been in operation since 1912. Also amoung this year’s honorees was Rancho Omochumnes, Sacramento, honored for more than 175 years of agricultural operation. CCA is proud to congratulate these families and thank them for their commitment and services they have continued to provide to the California cattle industry for more than a century. The awards and breakfast event were made possible by generous sponsors: Farm Credit, California Grain & Feed Association, Zenith Insurance Company, CA Milk Advisory Board, California Farm Bureau Association and Friends of the California State Fair. For more information about the California Agricultural Heritage Club, or to look for next year’s application, visit http://www.castatefair.org/ca-agheritage/.


The California Cattlemen’s Association & California CattleWomen,Inc., invite you to enter the

HELP US CELEBRATE THE PAST AND PRESENT WITH NEW CATEGORIES IN 2016 !

Animals & Wildlife People Rural Life California Landscapes Beef. It ’ s What ’ s For Dinner.

NEW!

NEW!

• See official rules for more information • *All photos must be taken on a digital camera and submitted via e-mail with the exception of submissions from the two new categories. Cell phone photos shall be submitted by e-mail and historic photos may be scanned and e-mailed.

2016 People’s Choice Award Winning Photo Taken by Janet Jones of Oroville.

Official rules available at www.calcattlemen.org September 2016 California Cattleman 81


9 Peaks Ranch...................................................83 Double M Ranch..............................................27 Pedretti Ranches.................................................2 Ag Credit Alliance............................................13 Eagle Pass Ranch..............................................47 Pitchfork Cattle Company...............................77 All West-Select Sires.........................................68 Edwards, Lien & Toso......................................78 Quail Valley Ranch...........................................44 Amador Angus...........................................35, 74 Endovac.............................................................58 Rancho Casino..................................................31 American Hereford Association.....................76 Five Star Land & Livestock................................9 Ray-Mar Ranches.............................................75 Andreini & Company......................................48 Five Star Land Company.................................78 Razzari Auto Centers.......................................70 Arellano Bravo Angus......................................15 Flood Bros. Cattle.............................................27 Red River Farms...............................................30 Baldy Maker Bull Sale......................................49 Freitas Rangeland Improvements...................68 Riverbend Ranches...........................................71 Bar R Angus..................................................9, 74 Fresno State Ag Foundation............................77 Sammis Ranch..................................................75 Barry Ranches Herefords and Angus............50 Furtado Angus..................................................75 San Juan Ranch.................................................76 Beef Solutions Bull Sale...................................41 Furtado Livestock Enterprises........................79 Schohr Herefords........................................32, 77 Black Gold Bull Sale.........................................11 Genoa Livestock.........................................32, 76 Shafer Ranch...............................................35, 75 BMW Angus.....................................................74 Gonsalves Ranch........................................27, 75 Shasta Bull Sale.................................................54 Bovine Elite, LLC..............................................79 Grand National Rodeo.....................................69 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard..........................6 Broken Arrow Angus.......................................74 HAVE Angus.....................................................75 Sierra Ranches...................................................77 Broken Box Ranch............................................78 Heritage Bull Sale...............................................9 Silveira Bros.................................................45, 76 Bruin Ranch......................................................41 Hogan Ranch....................................................76 Silveus Rangeland Insurance..........................52 Buchanan Angus Ranch..................................74 Hone Ranch.......................................................76 Skinner Transportation...................................78 Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale..............................27 Huffords Herefords....................................49, 77 Sonoma Mountain Herefords...................53, 77 Byrd Cattle Co..................................................74 International Brangus Breeders Association.57 Southwest Fence and Supply Co.....................78 Cal Poly Bull Test..............................................59 J/V Angus....................................................35, 75 Spanish Ranch...................................................76 Cal Poly Foundation........................................62 JH Feed..............................................................78 Sudden & Hollister Cattke Co........................62 California Breeders Bull Sale..........................18 JH Feed inc........................................................78 TBEEF.com........................................................26 California Bullfest.............................................32 Lambert Ranch...........................................53, 76 Tehama Angus Ranch................................17, 76 California Custom............................................78 Lander Veterinary Clinic................................79 Teixeira Cattle Co.......................................51, 75 California Wagyu Breeders.............................78 Leachman Cattle/Topline Cattle...............38, 39 The Cattle Range...............................................60 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market...........................6 Little Shasta Ranch...........................................77 Thomas Angus Ranch................................64, 65 Charron Angus Ranch.....................................74 McPhee Red Angus....................................24, 77 Tumbleweed Ranch..........................................76 Cherry Glen Beefmasters................................76 Mid Valley Bull Sale.........................................35 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard.....................19 Chico State College of Agriculture.................77 Multi-Min, USA...............................................16 Universal Semen Sales.....................................79 Circle Ranch......................................................41 Next Generation Bull Sale...............................53 Veterinary Services, Inc...................................78 Conlan Ranches California.............................78 Noahs Angus Ranch.........................................75 VF Red Angus.............................................55, 77 Conlin Supply Company.................................25 O’Connell Ranch........................................11, 75 Vintage Angus Ranch................................84, 76 Corsair Angus Ranch.......................................74 Oak Ridge Angus..............................................23 Western Fence and Construction...................78 Dal Porto Livestock....................................31, 75 ORIgen...............................................................79 Western Stockman’s Market............................37 Diamond Back Ranch......................................78 Orvis Cattle Company.....................................77 Western Video Market.......................................3 Diamond Oak Cattle Co..................................27 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Company....................61 Westwind Angus...............................................63 Donati Ranch..............................................11, 74 Pacific Trace Minerals................................68, 78 Wulff Brothers Livestock...........................11, 75

82 California Cattleman September 2016


DOES YOUR SEEDSTOCK PROVIDER HAVE A GOOD COWDOG? good cowdog.

our difference. 10 TH ANNUAL

BULL SALE

Zippy surveys the progress moving spring yearling bulls out of our forest allotment down to BLM. Photo taken Aug 1 after bulls have run outside for more than three months.

OCTOBER 11, 2016 â&#x20AC;¢ 1 P.M. FORT ROCK, OREGON

Selling 65 Spring Yearling & 50 Fall Yearling ANGUS RANGE BULLS

CHECK OUT OUR NEW A.I. HERDSIRES! S CHISUM 6175

MAR INNOVATION 251

AAA# 15511451

AAA# 16983331

BW

+2.8

BW

WW

+67

WW

+76

YW

+114

YW

+119

+2.0

MK

+20

MK

+16

MB

+.31

MB

+.65 +.88

RE

+.83

RE

$W

80.91

$W

68.56

$B

150.36

$B

107.80

We think Chisum is one of the most functional high $B sires available. One of the most attractive, complete performance sires we have used.

ALSO SELLING SONS FROM THESE TOP HERDSIRES: SIRE

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

$W

$B

PVF INSIGHT 0129

+1.5

+61

+109

+35

+.45

+1.09

70.32

127.20

COLE CREEK CEDAR RIDGE 1V

-1.1

+42

+74

+35

+.23

+.75

79.97

81.80

BRUIN UPROAR 0070

+1.4

+65

+119

+20

+.78

+.60

59.76

147.17

CONNEALY CAPITALIST 028

-.2

+62

+105

+20

+.56

+.94

66.48

93.44

SITZ LOGIC Y46

+2.4

+61

+116

+22

+.57

+.30

51.69

125.72

AARON AND REBECCA BORROR

Contact us for more information,or to request a Sale Catalog.

Aaron Cell: (541) 633-3284 Rebecca Cell (541) 771-4151 www.9peaksranch.com P.O. Box 38, Fort Rock, OR 97735

September 2016 California Cattleman 83


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Sunday, October 9, 2016

30th Annual “Genetic Gold” Production Sale Selling 86 Female Lots • At our headquarters in Modesto, CA • 1 p.m. TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $YG $B

+13 +1.1 +84 +146 +1.66 +10 +40 +76 +.65 +1.66 +93.16 +125.97 +48.53 +15.25 +194.91

BREED RANK

1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

VINTAGE BLACKBIRD 5415 • REG NO. 18212187 A direct daughter of Vintage donor Blackbird 8809, the dam of “Herdsires.” Sired by Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36. Blackbird 5415 is a maternal sister to the $250,000 VAR Generation, $110,000 VAR Index, $42,000 VAR Foreman, $40,000 VAR Ranger, $95,000 VAR Commander, VAR Complete and VAR Reserve. Selling 1/2 Interest in this donor prospect. Join Vintage in writing breed history with this unique female. TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $YG $B

+12 +.1 +63 +121 +1.54 +19 +29 +47 +.47 +1.25 +56.63 +87.31 +39.83 +12.66 +140.74

TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $YG $B

-2 +3.4 +62 +109 +1.76 +27 +36 +54 +.53 +1.12 +67.64 +83.09 +44.18 +14.78 +169.95

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $YG $B

+5 +2.7 +79 +140 +1.88 +23 +37 +74 +.69 +1.55 +81.05 +123.95 +49.41 +14.85 +199.01

BREED RANK

1% 1% 3% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 5% 1% 1%

the $200,000 half interest female of our 2015 sale.Sired by Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36, Rita 5383 is a granddaughter of the world famous $Beef queen, DRMCTR 1I1 Rita 6108. The dam of Rita 5383 is the $100,000-valued Vintage donor SJH Complete of 6108 1564. This future Rampage donor dominates in multi-trait excellence, ranking in the top 1% of the breed for 10 traits or Index’s: WW, YW RADG, Milk, CW, RE, $W, $F, $YG and $B. Selling 1/2 interest in this dominant donor prospect.

2% 1% 4%

1% 1%

QUAKER HILL BLACKCAP 0A35 • REG NO. 16925770 Selling full interest in the full sister to the hottest bull in the breed today, Quaker Hill Rampage. A flush sister to Blackcap 0A35 recently sold private treaty for more than $500,000 to High Roller Angus in Texas. October 9th will be your opportunity to take home one of the featured females in the breed today. Sell’s due to calve 2/23/2017 to WR Journey 1X74.

EPD

VINTAGE RITA 5383 • REG NO. 18212179 A maternal sister to Rita 5383 was

BREED RANK 5%

4% 4%

TRAIT

TRAIT

EPD

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $YG $B

+2 +1.5 +74 +129 +1.54 +18 +41 +50 +1.10 +.90 +92.66 +102.41 +56.26 +12.03 +170.84

BREED RANK

1% 1% 1% 4% 1% 1% 1% 5% 1%

VINTAGE RITA 5011 • REG NO. 18066032 This VAR Discovery bred heifer is a flush mate to the $200,000 half interest female, VAR Rita 5063, top selling female of the 2015 VAR sale. Her dam the $100,000 Vintage donor SJH Complete of 6108 1564. Rita 5011 is bred and ready to calve and start flushing in the spring, so you can begin building your own Rita 6108 family. Sells bred to calve 2/26/17 to Quaker Hill Rampage.

BREED RANK

2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 3% 1% 2% 1% 1% 1%

SJH COMPLETE OF 6108 2570 • REG NO. 17322755 A proven Vintage donor here. 2570 is a full sister to SJH Complete of 6108 1564 the donor responsible for the top selling female at VAR in 2015 and the top selling female at Crazy K in 2016. Another full sister sold half interest for $175,000 at Deer Valley in 2015 and a bred heifer from her went on to sell for $115,000 while three sons of her’s dominated Express Ranch bull sales at $210,000, $100,000 and $116,000 for 1/2 interest in EXAR stud. Sells bred to calve 3/20/2017 to VAR Discovery 2240.

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

CALL, E-MAIL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK!

California Cattleman September 2016  
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