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December 2016

CCA Hosts Special Drought forums CCA Accomplishments in 2016 How will Election Results impact You? 1 December 2016 California Cattleman


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2 California Cattleman December 2016

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December 2016 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Billy Flournoy, Likely FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Mark Lacey, Independence Jack Lavers, Glennville Mike Williams, Acton TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Malorie Bankhead

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jenna Chandler

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com magazine@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane mobile: (916) 803-3113 office: (916) 434-5970 M3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

AS 2016 COMES TO A CLOSE, 2017 AFFORDS NEW OPPORTUNTIES by CCA First Vice President Dave Daley, Ph.D. As 2016 comes to a close, I would like to thank the membership of the California Cattlemen’s Association for their continued involvement and support of the cattle industry and their community. I have had the good fortune to visit with many of you at meetings or on the officer tour during the past year, and I am always impressed by your commitment to our industry and to agriculture in general. You are the members of the school board, the water districts, the county committees, the FFA and 4-H advisory boards and so much more. You generously give of your time for the good of our community and it is noticed. In many counties, the cattlemen’s groups are a relatively small group of people, but they are highly respected and very involved. When our local associations take a position, the county leadership notices. The north state has received much needed moisture this fall and things look much better than we have in many years. Green grass that I have rarely seen in November is standing tall in many areas north of Sacramento. We have a long way to go and we all hope for a snowpack to fill reservoirs but it is still nice to have grass started and to maybe reduce supplemental feeding (I hope!). The ongoing drought has dramatically challenged all of California agriculture. I will say, however, that these dry warm falls has made it a little tougher to gather cattle off the mountains and our public land permits. They haven’t been ready to come home! Although winter ranges are off to a

great start, our cattle market has been pretty tough for a good part of 2016. The challenge of moving a big supply of protein (beef, pork and poultry) has really hit our markets hard, along with a strong dollar which has somewhat limited export markets. Most agricultural commodities have suffered the same market downturn. Nothing is simple and I remember several old timers telling me that it is pretty rare to have a feed year and a market year – and sometimes you are lucky to get one of the two! And as we look to 2017, I sure hope we see some strength to return to the beef sector. I am very proud and humbled to be offered a chance to further serve this organization as president. There are clearly some big shoes (boots) to fill from the leadership that has come before. I am excited to work with the other officers and members to help continue the excellent grassroots tradition and success of California’s cattlemen and women. With the recent elections, there will be significant challenges and opportunities both in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. With our outstanding staff and the relationships that we continue to build in both locations, I am optimistic that we can continue to work to protect the ability of cattlemen to succeed. It is easy to see the challenges that we face, but I hope we can also look to the opportunities for ourselves and young producers to move the cattle industry forward. Have a great New Year!

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman December 2016


DECEMBER 2016 Volume 99, Issue 11

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

ON THE COVER

4

BUNKHOUSE 6 How the 45th U.S. President got elected

This month's cover photo was taken by managing editor Stevie Ipsen and was shot between Loyalton and Sierraville in Sierra County. The Sierra Valley's largest commodity is beef cattle. In Sierra County, which is California's second smallest in terms of residents, cattle outnumber people nearly 4 to 1.

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 8 CCA sees productive year in 2016 FROM COAST TO COAST 19 NCBA's views on new administration FUTURE FOCUS Young leaders share experience

SPECIAL FEATURES

CCA election results and the impact on ranchers Herd nutrition during winter CCA hosts series of drought forums UC system opens new diagnostic lab in Tulare

READER SERVICES

Cattlemen's Report New Arrivals & Wedding Bells Buyers’ Guide Advertisers Index

28

10 12 16 24

30 31 32 38

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS DEC. 1

DROUGHT DISASTER & ASSISTANCE WORKSHOP 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. The Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev.

DEC. 1 TO 3

100TH ANNUAL CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev.

JAN. 24 TO 28

RED BLUFF BULL & GELDING SALE Red Bluff

FEB. 1 TO 3

CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION AND NCBA TRADE SHOW Nashville, Tenn.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

December 2016 California Cattleman 5


AN ELECTION FOR THE HISTORY BOOKS by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin On Tuesday, Nov. 8, Donald J. Trump shocked the world by securing enough Electoral College votes to become President-elect of the United States of America. As I was watching the votes come in late into the evening and early the next morning, myself and everyone else seemed to be asking the same question: "How did Donald Trump pull off one of the biggest upsets in American political history?" A month later we have a better idea of how President-elect Trump pulled off an improbable victory. A few things stick out besides the obvious loss of the popular vote. Not only did Trump lose the popular vote, but he received slightly fewer votes than both Romney in 2012 and McCain in 2008. On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton received 5 million fewer votes than President Obama did 4 years ago. Voter turnout was severely depressed, but Trump voters were slightly more motivated than Clinton voters. This election was less about how many voters showed up and more about who showed up. We know that Trump was able to secure enough Electoral College votes because he won the "Rust Belt." For the first time in over two decades Republicans won the states of Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Ohio also continued its streak of voting for the eventual

PROJECTED ELECTORAL VOTE MAP (TOP) VERSUS ACTUAL ELECTORAL MAP (BOTTOM) Source: New York Times

6 California Cattleman December 2016

winner. Trump won Wisconsin because urban voters (largely African American) in Milwaukee did not show up in the numbers necessary to overwhelm the votes in rural Wisconsin. Consider that Trump won Wisconsin by 27,000 votes and Clinton received 43,000 fewer votes than Obama did in 2012 in BILY GATLIN Milwaukee. A similar thing happened in Pennsylvania, where 40,000 fewer Philadelphians voted for Clinton than voted for Obama in 2012. One of the primary reasons Clinton lost the election is because African American voters in urban areas did not show up in the same numbers they did for President Obama. Meanwhile, rural voters, including some Democrats, delivered more votes than pollsters anticipated. The red wave that swept across America delivering the presidency and both houses of Congress to Republicans was blocked by a blue tsunami coming out of California. Californians voted for Clinton over Trump by a 2-to-1 margin delivering a 2 million vote victory for Secretary Clinton. Democrats in the state Assembly picked up three seats, regaining a two-thirds super majority and possibly one in the Senate (as of press time, the 29th Senate District is too close to call). Californians also voted to raise income taxes on the wealthy, legalize marijuana for recreational use and require registration to purchase ammunition, reaffirming the strong liberal beliefs of an overwhelming majority of Californians. While California's Republican legislators woke up on Wednesday to find themselves as irrelevant as Democrats in Washington, D.C., CCA scored some victories in helping to elect moderate Democrats over their more liberal opponents. A more detailed wrap up of California’s legislative election results can be found on page 8. CCA's ability to work with like-minded Democrats in our state is more critical than ever. The success of our association's legislative priorities falls squarely on the shoulders of moderate Democrats. While Republican legislators provide a base of support, nothing can be accomplished without the help of Democrats. With the recent election results taken into account, 16 Democrats are necessary in the Assembly to pass a bill and 15 are necessary to stop a bill. In the Senate, seven Democrats must vote with Republicans to pass beneficial legislation and six must vote no or not vote to stop harmful legislation. These are the cards California voters have dealt us and in order to be successful, we must find a way to play this hand. CCA leadership and staff is ready to engage our political allies in Washington, D.C., and Sacramento to secure legislative victories for California ranchers.


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CCA SPENDS 2016 WORKING AROUND THE CLOCK TO ENSURE BEEF PRODUCERS' VOICES ARE HEARD by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield and CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur With 2016 coming to a close and CCA about to celebrate its 100th year, the time is right to reflect on the successes of the past year and the value of your membership in the only state association devoted entirely to protecting the rights of cattle ranchers in California. Without your membership and support, CCA would be unable to have a strong and effective presence in Sacramento. It should be noted that the successes discussed in this article only partly represent the benefit of your membership in CCA; CCA staff and officers also work to favorably shape a wide array of regulation and legislation throughout the year, and many of CCA’s efforts span across a number of years. In a state like California, it’s imperative to remain vigilant and engage in all issues that have the potential to impact your bottom line. To that end, below is a list of some of CCA’s major legislative, regulatory and legal accomplishments from the past year:

of Livestock Identification reduces the frequency the advisory board is required to meet from four times every calendar year to two times every calendar year. The advisory board approved a motion recommending the legislature take this action. The bill retains the ability for the chair of the advisory board to call additional meetings as necessary.

CCA-SPONSORED LEGISLATION SIGNED INTO LAW

AB 2002 (STONE) & SB 1190 (JACKSON) These bills would have required any person representing an individual or group of individuals before the California Coastal Commission (CCC) earning more than $2,000 to register as a lobbyist in accordance with the California Fair Political Practices Commission and adhere to the Fair Practices Reform Act. AB 2002 discourages individuals or businesses impacted by the CCC to hire technical or legal consultants to provide proper guidance on CCC issues.

AB 1960 (LACKEY) This is CCA’s sponsored transportation legislation that will exempt most pickups and trailers used in agriculture from the Basic Inspection of Terminals (BIT) program administered by the California Highway Patrol. Currently, pickups and trailers exceeding 40 feet in combined length must participate as well as pickups with a flatbed or a gross vehicle weight rating of greater than 11,500 pounds. The BIT program requires fleet inspections at least once every six years and a fee of $130 be paid annually. The BIT program serves as the mechanism for various enforcement actions against a carrier. CCA SUPPORTED BILLS SIGNED INTO LAW AB 1577 (EGGMAN) This bill will enable growers, processors and packers to donate goods directly to a qualified food bank and receive a tax deduction equal to 15 percent of the total value of the donation. The bill is sponsored by the California Farm Bureau Federation. AB 2029 (DAHLE) This bill is sponsored by the California Forestry Association and will allow individuals with a Timber Harvest Plan to harvest trees with a stump diameter of less than 28 inches in 28 counties that took part in a previous pilot project. These provisions would remain in statute until January 1, 2023. AB 2483 (COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE) This bill sponsored by CCA at the request of the Bureau 8 California Cattleman December 2016

AB 2716 (DODD) AB 2716 simply reauthorizes the state meat inspection program administered by CDFA. CDFA licenses and inspects numerous harvest and meat packing facilities throughout the state that do not sell or export product interstate, with the exception of poultry products. An individual seeking a state license must pay an initial fee of $100 and a relicensing fee of $100 each year thereafter. If AB 2716 is not approved, the state meat licensing program will cease to exist. CCA OPPOSED LEGISLATION THAT WAS DEFEATED

AB 2162 (CHU) This bill would have circumvented regulatory authority currently held by the counties and prohibit the harvest of an oak tree without a permit from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. At CCA’s urging, the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection has declined twice to regulate the harvest of oak woodlands. Counties currently regulate the removal of oak trees as they see fit. SB 1317 (WOLK) This bill would have required counties overlaying medium and high priority groundwater basins to issue temporary use permits for any new groundwater wells. Some counties already opt to do this, but SB 1317 would have removed this discretion from counties entirely. All medium- and high-priority groundwater basins are already subject to the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act and must be managed in accordance with a Groundwater Sustainability Plan in the future. SB 1396 (WOLK) This bill would have established a working group within the Wildlife Conversation Board (WCB) to focus on


the “Inner Coast Range” area comprised of Colusa, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Shasta, Siskiyou, Solano, Trinity, Tehama and Yolo counties. SB 1396 authorized the WCB working group to accept public funds and purchase fee interest in property for another public agency. The working group was also authorized to purchase real interest in property so long as it is not the majority owner. Although the bill did not allow the WCB to hold fee interest in property unless its donated, the fact that WCB could be used as a conduit to transfer private lands to public ownership is against CCA’s “no net loss of private property” policy. SUCCESS IN HAWKES In June, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in U.S. Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes, unanimously holding that landowners have the right to go to court to challenge federal agency assertions of Clean Water Act jurisdiction (previously landowners could only appeal to the federal agency which made the jurisdictional determination). CCA had filed an amicus curiae (“friend of the court”) brief in the case, arguing that judicial review of jurisdictional determinations is necessary to mitigate the potential unconstitutional vagueness of the Clean Water Act. CCA’s argument was key to the decisions of at least three of the justices. CLARIFYING EXEMPTIONS FROM DIVERSION MEASUREMENT AND REPORTING REGULATIONS In response to CCA-sponsored AB 2357 (Dahle), in June the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) clarified how recent requirements for the measurement and reporting of water diversions would apply to those who divert 10 or fewer acre-feet per year. While those with diversions under 10 acre-feet of water

annually are not required to install measuring devices under the regulations, they are required to accurately report the quantity diverted annually. CCA was concerned that this would create a de facto requirement that even these small diverters would have to install measurement devices at their points of diversion. In response to the CCA-sponsored legislation, in a letter sent to Assemblyman Dahle, CCA President Billy Flournoy and California Farm Bureau Federation President Paul Wenger, the SWRCB clarified that those diverting less than 10 acre-feet annually may estimate their diversions using their knowledge of the point of diversion, solidifying the exemption from measurement for the smallest diverters. SUING THE STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS Civil litigation is notoriously slow, meaning few of CCA’s recent legal challenges can be counted as accomplishments for 2016. That said, holding state and federal officials’ feet to the fire is an accomplishment in and of itself. In 2016, CCA sued the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to force the agency to conduct status evaluations of 233 species currently listed as threatened or endangered (in hopes of eventually removing those species from the California Endangered Species List). CCA has also filed a number of amicus briefs in support of private property rights through CCA's partners at the Pacific Legal Foundation, including in Murr v. Wisconsin (seeking clarification in takings law), Scher v. Burke (avoiding implied public easements over private property) and in two cases seeking to limit the power of the California Coastal Commission, Lynch v. California Coastal Commission and Surfrider v. Martins Beach. Additionally, CCA has worked closely with the ranchers at Point Reyes National Seashore to protect their ranches in light of recent litigation by a trio of environmental groups.

December 2016 California Cattleman 9


ELECTION 2016

WHAT ELECTION AT THE STATE LEVEL AND BEYOND COULD MEAN FOR CCA AND THE BEEF PRODUCERS IT REPRESENTS

No doubt, the focus of this year’s election results fall on the selection of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. President-elect Trump will be joined by a Republican-held Congress after Democrats failed to capture enough seats to retake the Senate. Although losing six seats, Republicans, at press time, will maintain a firm control in the House of Representatives by a margin of 238-193 with votes from four seats still under consideration. Two of those Congressional seats are in California with the challenge of sitting Representatives Ami Bera (D-7) and Darrell Issa (R-49). At press time, both candidates appear to be keeping their seats by a very slim margin. The U.S. Senate will also remain in Republican control. At press time, Republicans lost one seat in Illinois and they are also likely to lose one seat in New Hampshire. Even with the loss of both, they will maintain control with a margin of 52-48. Republicans will still lack 60 votes to force cloture which must be overcome to force a vote on most issues on the Senate floor unless the rules are changed or altered. With the focus on the national election cycle, it’s extremely important to not lose sight of election’s impact on California Senate and Assembly races which will set the tone for next year’s legislative session. Prior to the election, Democrats fell one vote shy in the Senate and two votes shy in the Assembly of a two-thirds super majority. Democrats originally sought to target six seats in the Assembly that were determined to be “swing” seats with the chance they might capture up to five of the six seats. Cattle PAC worked closely with Republican leadership to help maintain those seats. Going in to the last week of the election, it appeared that four of the six seats were neck-andneck and were likely to change hands. As of press time, with almost 100 percent of precincts partially reporting, it appears that Democrats in the Assembly will pick up three seats but will fall short in capturing all six. Cattle PAC was successful in working to defend: • The 16th Assembly District which will continue to be held by Assemblymember Catharine Baker (R-Dublin) • The 35th Assembly District by electing Jordan Cunningham (R-San Luis Obispo) who will replace outgoing Assemblymember Katcho Achadjian (R-San 10 California Cattleman December 2016

Luis Obispo) • The 36th Assembly District which will continue to be held by Assemblymember Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale) • The 40th Assembly District which will continue to be held by Assemblymember Marc Steinorth (R-Rancho Cucamonga) Unfortunately, Republican incumbents in the following seats will be replaced by incoming Democratic members: • Assemblymember David Hadley (R-Manhattan Beach) will be replaced by former Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi • Assemblymember Eric Linder (R-Corona) will be replaced by Sabrina Cervantes • Assemblymember Young Kim (R-Fullerton) will be replaced by former Assemblymember Sharon Quirk Silva Although Democrats have recaptured a two-thirds super majority in the Assembly, disparate personalities and a difference of opinion on certain issues, primarily those affecting business, will make it a challenge for Assembly leadership to hold their caucus together on every issue. In the Senate, it appears at press time Republicans will hold the seat vacated by Sen. Bob Huff (R-San Dimas) with the election of former Assemblymember Ling Ling Chang (R-Diamond Bar) to the 29th Senate District. At press time, only 4,000 votes separate Assemblymember Chang and her opponent. If Republicans hold this seat, they will prevent a two-thirds super majority in the Senate. Several moderate Democrats in the Senate and Assembly also held their seats with the help of Cattle PAC after being challenged by more liberal democrats. Former Assemblymember Bill Dodd (D-Napa) beat former Assemblymember Mariko Yamada to replace outgoing Sen. Lois Wolk (D-Davis) for the 3rd Senate District. Other moderate democrats that were elected to replace outgoing democrats include Cecilia Aguiar-Curry in the 4th Assembly District and Tim Grayson in the 14th Assembly District. CCA has built relationships with many of the candidates recently elected for the first time and many of those reelected to office and will look forward to working with them next year to advance CCA's priorities and objectives.


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EASY KEEPING

Tips for Keeping Cows in Good Condition this Winter from Biozyme "The bottom line is, early cold stress can result in a snowball effect if left unchecked. Cold temperatures significantly raise energy requirements. Undeveloped winter hair coats, wet hides and wind all combine to magnify this increase in energy requirements," says Kevin Glaubius, director of nutrition and technical sales at BioZymeÂŽ Inc. "The combination of calving cows and colder environmental conditions can easily result in producers not providing enough feed energy and cows losing weight." Glaubius says now is the time to take an honest evaluation of body condition and match your feeding program to the needs of your cows. St. Joseph, MO.-based BioZyme manufactures vitamin and mineral supplements for a variety of livestock. So what can producers do to manage the cold stress and feed adequately during the winter months? Glaubius offers some tips: 1) Feed higher quality hay (with more energy) and expect cows to increase intake. Without a forage

analysis, you cannot be exactly sure of your hay's energy level, which can lead to inadequate nutrition. BioZyme offers complimentary hay testing and nutrition analysis to producers through its nationwide dealer network and Area Sales Managers. For more information, visit http://vitaferm. com/testyourhay/. 2) Feed cattle a supplement that contains BioZyme's AmafermÂŽ to improve digestibility of feed and helps ensure that they are extracting all of the energy possible. Research shows that feeding a supplement that contains Amaferm has similar benefits to feeding at least 1 pound of grain. 3) Consider moving cows to locations with protection from the wind and wet weather. The energy requirement of beef cattle increases about 3 percent for each degree that the wind chill is below 59 degrees F. This increases even further in wet conditions and prior to fully developing a winter hair coat. 4) Match animal nutrition requirements to the quality of your

12 California Cattleman December 2016

forage. Heifers and thin cows require a more energy-dense diet, compared to older or fleshy cows. Sorting animals into groups based on body condition allows you to feed the available forage more effectively. Start by targeting your higher quality, more immature forages toward heifers and thin cows. These earlier harvested forages will be the most energy dense as energy declines considerably with maturity. The older and higher body condition cows can then be fed slightly more mature forage. This allows you to maximize the use of your forage supply while better targeting the nutritional needs of your entire herd. 5) A good guideline is to feed 3 to 6 pounds of energy supplements like soyhulls, corn gluten feed, or corn to avoid weight loss during these stressful periods. A strong nutrition program is key to maximizing the performance of your cow herd. For more information about winter supplementation, contact Kevin Glaubius at 816-344-5762 or kglaubius@biozymeinc.com.


Merck launches first modified-live vaccine for Bovine Coronavirus Merck Animal Health today announced the launch of BOVILIS CORONAVIRUS, the first USDA-approved modified-live intranasal vaccine to aid in reduction of enteric disease caused by Bovine Coronavirus (BCV). Most severe during winter months, BCV is often prevalent in cow/calf beef herds and dairy calves, and is frequently diagnosed as the leading pathogen in neonatal calves. This intranasal vaccine is approved for use in calves as young as three days of age. BCV is commonly transferred by animals during periods of stress, including shipping, parturition, cold weather, commingling or delivery to a backgrounding facility or feedyard. Scours and winter dysentery are often the two signs that will signal the presence of BCV. A 2012 study at the University of Wisconsin Diagnostic Laboratory tested 147 herds and found nearly half (49.4 percent) of the herds to be positive for BCV.1 In related research at Oklahoma State University, 37 percent of BCV cases are found in calves zero to 30-days old. “Bovine coronavirus is far more prevalent than producers realize and, thus, the need to vaccinate is vitally important,” says Scott Nordstrom, DVM, Merck Animal Health. “When used as part of a complete vaccination protocol, BOVILIS CORONAVIRUS delivers protection against the enteric signs of bovine coronavirus and is a critical component in improving the overall health of cattle on an operation.” In addition, the combination of vaccinating both dams and calves is critical to best management practices for scours protection. “Consistent vaccination of dams with GUARDIAN® and calves with BOVILIS CORONAVIRUS can greatly reduce the impact of BCV in the herd and helps ensure the maternal antibodies are passed through to the calves,” says Nordstrom. BOVILIS® CORONAVIRUS Product research results showed

the occurrence of scours in BOVILIS CORONAVIRUS-vaccinated calves was reduced by one-third and average duration of clinical signs was reduced to 3.40 days; versus an average of nearly seven (6.82) days in the control group. In addition, the severity of the symptoms was significantly less in the vaccinated calves compared to the

control group. Results of the safety trials demonstrated the vaccine is safe to use in calves as young as one day of age. BOVILIS CORONAVIRUS is available in 25-dose trays, 10-dose and 50-dose bottles. GUARDIAN is available in 10-dose and 50-dose bottles.

WAtch AnD biD live eveRy WeDnesDAy:

cAttleusA.cOM

Wishes You A And A

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Office ..................209-745-1515 Fax ......................209-745-1582 Website ........www.clmgalt.com

December 2016 California Cattleman 13


O'Connell Ranch Hosts Students “I didn’t realize how hard you fourth station allowed the students to work to grow food for us,” was just see and touch farm animals, including one of the epiphanies that was shared a steer, goats and a pig. Jerry and Sherry Maltby, by a Rosemont High School student after a day-long visit to the O’Connell Williams, from the Glenn-Colusa Cattlemen and CattleWomen were Ranch in Colusa. on hand to explain the importance This is the second year that of cattle brands. Each student got to Dan and Barbara O’Connell, brand a wooden board and take the Colusa, have hosted students from piece home with them. Sacramento for an Agricultural Field The day at the ranch was not Day. This year, 33 students who complete until the students were were part of a program called Green given a tour of the O’Connell’s Academy – Culinary Arts, wanted to working facility for their cattle. They understand how food gets from farms were shown the squeeze chute, cattle and ranches into their kitchen. They pastures, hay barn and cattle pens. were also exposed to a wide variety of The students left the ranch with jobs that exist in agriculture besides waves and smiles as the bus headed farming or ranching. Dan and Barb out the lane. Next, they were headed have a farm that specializes in tree to a Raley’s grocery store for a behindfruit, includes peaches, Asian pears the-scenes tour of what happens to and persimmons. They also raise the food when it reaches that phase of registered Angus cattle. The kids were the marketing chain. given a tram ride through the orchards Their instructor wanted his where they saw how the trees are students to have an appreciation for irrigated, how owl houses help deter all that goes into getting food to the rodent problems, how the harvest was table. He emphasizes not wasting any progressing and the importance of a of what they bring into their kitchens, good marketing program. They were because to do so wastes the energy given a tour of Barb’s Produce stand and resources that it took to get it to where they saw how the fruit was sold them. to the public on site, and packed for Dan and Barb want to thank shipping to other locations. the California Rangeland Trust for California CattleWomen President facilitating the ranch visit. A big Sheila Bowen, Glennville, explained shout out goes to Raley’s and AT&T what a cow-calf ranch is and how for sponsoring the program and it operates. She discussed what for providing the lunch. They also California ranches and California appreciate and thank all who came to cattle provide by way of benefits to present to the students. It was a day our state. well spent. Kelly Haywood, of Morning Star Packing Company, gave students an overview of how tomatoes get from the field and into the ketchup packets used in fast food restaurants. She highlighted some of the jobs that make this happen. FFA instructor Heather Thomas spoke about careers in agriculture including teaching and mechanics. Her FFA students from Colusa High School ran four stations that the kids rotated to throughout the day. One station focused on beef cattle, another on swine and a third challenged the Pictured (L to R) are: Dan O'Connell, kids with a variety of information Colusa; CCW President Sheila Bown, Glennvillel and Sherry Maltby, Williams. about California agriculture. The 14 California Cattleman December 2016

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For Subcutaneous Use in Beef Cattle, Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle and Swine Only. Not for Use in Female Dairy Cattle 20 Months of Age or Older Or In Calves To Be Processed For Veal. Brief Summary: Before using Enroflox® 100, consult the product insert, a summary of which follows. CAUTION: Federal (U.S.A.) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal (U.S.A.) law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: Each mL of Enroflox 100 contains 100 mg of enrofloxacin. Excipients are L-arginine base 200 mg, n-butyl alcohol 30 mg, benzyl alcohol (as a preservative) 20 mg and water for injection q.s. INDICATIONS: Cattle - Single-Dose Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle; and for the control of BRD in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M. haemolytica, P. multocida, H. somni and M. bovis. Cattle - Multiple-Day Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. Swine: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment and control of swine respiratory disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis and Streptococcus suis. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Cattle: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Swine: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 5 days of receiving a single-injection dose. HUMAN WARNINGS: For use in animals only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes. In case of dermal contact, wash skin with soap and water. Consult a physician if irritation persists following ocular or dermal exposures. Individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to quinolones should avoid this product. In humans, there is a risk of user photosensitization within a few hours after excessive exposure to quinolones. If excessive accidental exposure occurs, avoid direct sunlight. For customer service, to obtain a copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) or to report adverse reactions, call Norbrook at 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: The effects of enrofloxacin on cattle or swine reproductive performance, pregnancy and lactation have not been adequately determined. The long-term effects on articular joint cartilage have not been determined in pigs above market weight. Subcutaneous injection can cause a transient local tissue reaction that may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Enroflox 100 contains different excipients than other enrofloxacin products. The safety and efficacy of this formulation in species other than cattle and swine have not been determined. Quinolone-class drugs should be used with caution in animals with known or suspected Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. In such animals, quinolones have, in rare instances, been associated with CNS stimulation which may lead to convulsive seizures. Quinolone-class drugs have been shown to produce erosions of cartilage of weight-bearing joints and other signs of arthropathy in immature animals of various species. See Animal Safety section for additional information. ADVERSE REACTIONS: No adverse reactions were observed during clinical trials. ANIMAL SAFETY: In cattle safety studies, clinical signs of depression, incoordination and muscle fasciculation were observed in calves when doses of 15 or 25 mg/kg were administered for 10 to 15 days. Clinical signs of depression, inappetance and incoordination were observed when a dose of 50 mg/kg was administered for 3 days. An injection site study conducted in feeder calves demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue and underlying muscle. In swine safety studies, incidental lameness of short duration was observed in all groups, including the saline-treated controls. Musculoskeletal stiffness was observed following the 15 and 25 mg/kg treatments with clinical signs appearing during the second week of treatment. Clinical signs of lameness improved after treatment ceased and most animals were clinically normal at necropsy. An injection site study conducted in pigs demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue. Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland I01 March 2015 The Norbrook logos and Enroflox® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


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www.norbrookinc.com Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. Cattle intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Use with caution in animals with known or suspected CNS disorders. Observe label directions and withdrawal times. See product labeling for full product information. The Norbrook logos and Enroflox are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Baytril is a registered trademark of Bayer Animal Health. 0816-495-I01A

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December 2016 California Cattleman 15


SURVIVING DRY TIMES CCA HOSTS FIRST IN SERIES OF DROUGHT RESILIENCE WORKSHOPS by Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilvur

F

or California ranchers, the last several years of drought as undoubtedly left a lasting impression. Likewise, for personnel at the Western Estension Risk Management Education, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the California Cattlemen's Association (CCA), it has become increasingly obvious that more needs to be done to help farmers and ranchers weather the storm, so to speak, when extended dry spells arise. On Thursday, Nov. 3, CCA hosted a forum on Navigating California’s Complex Water Regulation at the Paso Robles Event Center. The forum was the first in a series of six workshops under the theme “Ranch Adaptation Strategies to Remain Economically Viable Throughout Periods of Drought,” which are produced under a grant from Western Extension Risk Management Education. The workshop focused on four current regulatory issues. Kathy Mrowka, program manager for the Enforcement Program at the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), provided an update on complying with diversion measurement and reporting regulations mandated by SB 88. In a separate presentation, Mrowka explained the requirements for registering stock pond diversions with the SWRCB. Jack Rice of the California Farm Bureau Federation provided an update on the implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, and Annee Ferranti, the environmental program manager for Habitat Conservation Planning at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Central Region provided an overview of the Department’s Lake and Streambed Alteration

16 California Cattleman December 2016

Agreements. Mrowka provided a broad overview of water measurement and reporting regulations adopted in January of this year, which require all water diverters to file annual statements of water diversion and use and require all users who divert more than 10 acre-feet of water annually to install measurement devices at their points of diversion. Importantly, Mrowka clarified that under Water Code § 5101, diverters serviced by a Watermaster who files reports with the SWRCB or a court pursuant to statute need not measure and report under the new regulations. Mrowka also outlined procedures for seeking alternative compliance and for applying for measurement methods, including shared measurement methods. Mrowka also noted that the forms for alternative compliance, applications for measurement methods and extensions of time under the measurement and reporting regulations will soon be available on the SWRCB’s website. Currently, sample forms are available at http:// www.swrcb.ca.gov/waterrights/water_issues/programs/ diversion_use/water_use.shtml. In overviewing the complexities of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, passed by the California legislature in 2014, Rice had one underlying call to action for ranchers: take an active role in the development of local Groundwater Sustainability Agencies, which will be charged with developing plans for the management and use of groundwater. Ensuring that ranchers are represented in GSAs will be crucial to ensuring that ranchers’ rights and interests are protected in groundwater management within any given watershed. Mrowka’s second presentation of the day focused


on SWRCB registrations for livestock stockponds, small domestic uses and small irrigation uses. The primary takeaway for ranchers was a reminder that their stockponds are legally required to be registered with the SWRCB. For details on registering your stockpond, or to check whether your ponds are currently in compliance, members are encouraged to contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office. Finally, Annee Ferranti of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) provided a comprehensive update on CDFW’s Lake and Streambed Alteration Agreement program, most notably defining what CDFW determines to be their jurisdiction under relevant statutes and what CDFW determines as requiring Department notification. Ranchers considering projects that impact lake or streambeds are encouraged to review the presentation, which is available on CCA’s website. For those that were unable to attend the workshop in Paso Robles, all of the speakers’ presentations are available on the CCA website at http://www.

calcattlemen.org/cca_events/drought-managementworkshop.aspx. CCA will also be conducting a workshop in the series will focus on Drought and Disaster Assistance, and is being held in conjunction with the 100th CCA & CCW Convention at the Nugget Casino Resort in Sparks, Nev., from 8 to 11 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 1 and will feature presentations on federal disaster assistance programs; livestock risk protection; pasture, range, and forage programs; current drought conditions; avoiding liabilities under federal and state tax provisions and the U.S. Drought Monitor. CCA will also host four more drought workshops throughout 2017, with topics including range management strategies for drought, leasing public and private land, lessons for government agencies and NGOs and livestock transportation. All workshops are free of charge and open to all ranchers regardless of CCA membership.

Speakers picture above include: Kathy Mrowka, top left; Jack Rice, top right; Anee Ferranti, bottom.

December 2016 California Cattleman 17


FROM COAST TO COAST

CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITY

NCBA's Views on New Administration's Impact on Producers by National Cattlemen's Beef Association President Tracy Brunner

With the reporting of election results in November and the announcement that Donald Trump will be the next president, cattlemen and women now face a great new opportunity in many areas and challenges in some others. Although it is too early to understand what a Trump Administration will look like, NCBA is prepared to engage with the president and a new Congress. With new leadership in the White House and new agency heads and political appointees, it is critical that we seize every opportunity to help ensure that our elected and appointed leaders understand the priorities of our members and our industry. The election may be over, but there is still much work to be done between now and the end of the year during the lame-duck session of Congress. At the same time we’re working on several long-standing issues, we will also be busy building relationships with the administration and the new Congress. By building strong relationships early, we’re optimistic that we can ensure we meet the goals and secure the policy priorities our members set in 2017 and beyond. Throughout the past election cycle, our NCBAPAC supported bi-partisan incumbents and candidates that, in turn, support the cattle industry, rural America and small business. This year our PAC achieved a success rate better than 90 percent. The vast majority of candidates we supported were either re-elected to the office they have held or were elected to their first term in Washington, D.C. As we look to the future, support for comprehensive tax reform, a farm bill that includes research, conservation and animal health and several other issues are going to be added to the list of

18 California Cattleman December 2016

NCBA’s top priorities. While the election brings a renewed sense of optimism, there is still work to complete this year. As congress looks to close out the current session, a number of top priorities remain for NCBA. These priorities include a spending bill for the upcoming TRACY BRUNNER year that defunds EPA’s misguided “waters of the United States” rule, reauthorization of the National Defense Authorization Act including language to mitigate the sage grouse stubble height requirements and other restrictions on grazing based on flawed science, and passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Passage of TPP gives the U.S. beef industry the best access ever negotiated to the Japanese market and levels the tariff gap between our competitors in that market that was created by the signing of the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement in early 2015. While the election changed many things, NCBA’s commitment to the cattle industry and rural America remains steadfast. Together, we will work to ensure the priorities of our members are met in Washington, D.C., and our way of life is protected for future generations. To our members, I say thank you for your support and if you’re not a member, I hope you’ll join today by visiting BeefUSA.org and lend your voice on behalf of this great industry.


CHARRON RANCH

FEATURING CALVING EASE AND MATERNAL GENETICS THAT YOU CAN BUILD A COWHERD AROUND 8 SAV FINAL ANSWER 0035 DESCENDANTS GOING TO RED BLUFF! Reg #

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36

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37

76

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0

46

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December 2016 California Cattleman 19


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Longtime CCA, CCW Advocates Honored at Grand National The Cow Palace in Daly City,celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2016. During the Cow Palace's Grand National Stock Show and Rodeo, there is always a great deal to see and do: rodeos, livestock competitions, school tours and more. At the 2016 Grand National, Melanie Fowle, Etna, was named the 2016 Cattle Queen of the Palace for her work as an industry leader, livestock producer, and her lifetime of dedication to youth. The Fowle Family raises registered Angus and Hereford cattle as well as sheep. Melanie is a past president of the American National CattleWomen and California CattleWomen. She taught school for 39 years while running their ranch and volunteering as the 4-H community leader. She and her husband, Ken, coached livestock judging and were the beef, swine and sheep 4-H leaders. For many years, they took kids to compete at the Cow Palace as well as other livestock competitions. Fowle has brought ag lessons to schools for years, including schools in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently she and the Siskiyou County CattleWomen adopted Gordon Lau School

It’s still the

WEST

in Chinatown. Each year they travel 700 miles round trip to bring agriculture onto this campus. Every other year they bring livestock for the kids to see and touch. On Oct. 12, the Siskiyou ladies presented their lessons to the students once again. On Oct. 13, Fowle spoke with members of the press who were interested in her ag education work. On Oct. 14, Fowle, state beef ambassador Ashley Mabery, and few other helpers presented a lesson on cattle brands to students visiting the Cow Palace. On Oct. 15, The Cow Palace put on an elegant luncheon where cowboys from the Flying U Rodeo served those in attendance. Rodeo clown Matt Merritt escorted Melanie to her seat. Several of Melanie's friends were in attendance. At this luncheon, she was recognized for her work and dedication to agriculture and presented with several lovely gifts. That evening Melanie was honored to ride in the back of the Dodge Ram truck during the Grand National Rodeo. As she was driven into the historic arena, the announcer shared Melanie's accomplishments with the rodeo fans. It was a memorable week mixed with joy and sorrow. Melanie lost her husband, Ken Fowle, on Oct. 4. Ken and Melanie worked together to build up their ranch, educate children and provide leadership opportunities for the 4-H and FFA kids in their community. Perhaps Ken had the best seat in the house and cheered her on along with the rest of her supporters. In addition to Fowle's honor, past CCA President Jerry Hemsted, Cottonwood, was honored as the 2016 Livestock Man of the Year by the California Chamber of Commerce. For a complete article on Hemsted and his award, see the October issue of this publication.

Among Fowle's many supporters at the event were several current and past CCW Presidents. Pictured (L to R): Sheila Bowen, Karen Rasmussen, Dee Lacey, Joan Hemsted, Melanie Fowle and Jean Barton.

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Past Livestock Men of the Year and Hemsted supporters included (L to R): Dave Wood, John Lacey, Gordon Rasmussen, Myron Openshaw, Jerry Hemsted, CCA President Billy Flournoy, Kevin Kester and Darrel Sweet.


Modoc Sale SAME QUALITY CATTLE, ADDITIONAL LOCATION POLLED & HORNED HEREFORD BULLS WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PREVIEW IN ALTURAS FRIDAY, FEB. 17, WITH SALE AND DINNER TO FOLLOW AT THE NILES HOTEL IN ALTURAS AT 4 P.M. BulL Preview

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December 2016 California Cattleman 23


To Serve You

Tulare diagnostic lab opens, will serve producers and public from the University of California, Davis A new diagnostic laboratory devoted to protecting farm animals, the food supply and the public against new and emerging diseases was dedicated Oct. 28, in Tulare by the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) School of Veterinary Medicine and the California Department of Food and Agriculture. The Tulare facility is one of four labs in the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, headquartered at UC Davis and operated for the state by the veterinary school to protect animal health and performance, and safeguard public health and the food supply. “California is proud to be home to the largest and most diverse agriculture in the world,” said Karen Ross, secretary of the California's Department of Food and Agriculture. “As we dedicate this new laboratory in Tulare we are reminded that skilled scientists with state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment are truly at the front line, working with farmers, ranchers and veterinarians to protect the safety and security of our nation’s food supply.” The new facility, which is a $49.4 million state-funded project, is named in honor of the lab system’s founding director and Professor Emeritus Alex A. Ardans, DVM, Ph.D., who led the statewide diagnostic service for 21 years. “It is quite fitting as we celebrate the construction of the new Tulare lab that we also honor Ardans, whose vision and many years of wise leadership enabled the statewide laboratory system to become a national leader in detecting and preventing livestock and poultry diseases,” said Michael Lairmore, DVM, dean of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

of former Director Richard Breitmeyer, DVM.

Statewide diagnostic successes

The new branch lab will build on a long history of successes achieved by the statewide laboratory system including: • Diagnosing exotic Newcastle disease among backyard chickens in 2002, which led to a $168 million statefederal eradication effort; • Minimizing the cost of that outbreak and hastening the reopening of international markets by helping to develop a high-throughput test for exotic Newcastle disease; • Detecting California’s first case of atypical BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy), or mad cow disease, in 2012 and helping to keep trade markets open for the state’s beef industry by demonstrating the effectiveness of the BSE surveillance program; and • Playing a major role in limiting the spread of avian influenza in 2015, as the U.S. experienced its worst ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

About the Tulare lab and statewide system

The new 29,000-square-foot laboratory is located adjacent to UC Davis’ Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, just east of Highway 99 and about eight miles south of the city of Tulare. When fully equipped, the lab will provide rapid detection and response to both routine illnesses and catastrophic, emerging animal diseases. Testing will be available for livestock, poultry and horses. In addition to the Tulare lab and the central diagnostic lab at UC Davis, the statewide laboratory system has branch labs in San Bernardino and Turlock. The Tulare laboratory is under the leadership of Branch Chief John Adaska, and the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System is led by Director Pam Hullinger, DVM, recently appointed following the retirement 24 California Cattleman December 2016

UC DAVIS©

CDFA Secretary Karen Ross, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine Dean Michael Lairmore, DVM, and California State Veterinarian Annette Jones, DVM, at the lab's dedication on Oct. 28.


uail valley ranch

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Selling 135 sons of Connealy Capitalist 028, Connealy Black Granite, SAV Resource 1441, SAV International 2020, Connealy Confidence 0100, SAV Thunderbird 9061, SAV Revenue 2854 and more. Many bulls are out of donors – SAV Abigail 6822, SAV Madame Pride 8180, SAV Embleynette 0179, SAV Emblynette 5341 and SAV Emblynette 7411 among others.

qv resource 5308 sire: s a v resource 1441 • DOB: 8-10-2015 Dam's Sire: Hyline Right Time 338 Dam: Qv erica 9061

Outstanding Natural Bull Out of Donor QV Erica 9061.

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qv Confidence 6006 sire: Connealy Confidence 0100 • DOB: 1-2-2016 Dam's Sire: S A V Net Worth 4200 Dam: s a v Madame Pride 8180

3 Full Brothers Sell. A Full Sister Makes Her Home at Shandar Angus in Utah.

BW +1.6 WW +52 yW +95 ceM +16 MiLk +24 MarB +.35 re +1.05 $W +47.65 $F +47.54 $B +113.09

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KURT LOCKHART 541-480-0773 • quailvalleyranches@gmail.com Travis & Becky Tekansik: Travis 541-699-8563 THD © BECKY 541-699-8562 • magibell2@hotmail.com December 2016 California Cattleman 25


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 • outbreak of the disease among poultry in history. In 2015, the statewide laboratory system conducted more than a half million diagnostic tests.

Ardans a leader in veterinary diagnostics

Minnesota in 1969. He joined the faculty of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in 1969, where he successfully taught the next generations of veterinarians and conducted important research to advance animal health. Throughout his career, Ardans remained current with the needs of agriculturists by actively

participating in a number of organizations including the California Woolgrowers, Pacific Egg and Poultry Association, California Poultry Industry Federation, Pork Producers, California Cattlemen’s Association, American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians and California Veterinary Medical Association.

As a veterinary researcher and former director of the statewide laboratory system, Alex Ardans is nationally and internationally respected as a leader in veterinary diagnostics. His research interests included viral diseases of livestock and development of veterinary diagnostic aids for viral diseases. He played a major role in working with the California Department of Food and Agriculture to restructure and revitalize the state diagnostic laboratory system and create the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System. He was named the founding director of the lab system in 1987, a position he held until his retirement in 2008. Ardans also worked to focus the lab’s expertise on the problem of fatal injuries among racehorses and to identify prevention methods through the California Horse Racing Board Postmortem Program. In addition, he participated in Hit them hard with Noromycin® 300 LA drafting legislation and developing a - the industry’s most economical, broadspectrum 300 mg oxtet available without program for racehorse drug testing a prescription. through the laboratory system's Equine Analytical Chemistry Delivers the same dose of oxytetracycline as Liquamycin® LA 200 and Bio-Mycin® 200 Laboratory. in a lower dose volume. He also has played a national role in the accreditation and improvement Observe label directions and withdrawal times. Not for use in lactating dairy animals. Adverse reactions, including injection site swelling, restlessness, ataxia, trembling, respiratory abnormalities (labored breathing), collapse and possibly death have been reported. See product labeling for full product information. of other diagnostic laboratories www.norbrookinc.com throughout the United States. Ardans received his doctor of veterinary medicine degree from UC Davis in 1965 and a master’s degree in virology from the University of USE C-Noromycin.indd 1 26 California Cattleman December 2016

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FUTURE FOCUS REMINISCING ON A YEAR OF SERVICE by Rebecca Swanson, YCC Publicity Chair After a full year of service, the California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) officer team has reflected on our experience. The team consists of four young women dedicated to the upcoming generation and our role in the beef industry. We had the opportunity to travel across the state, meet influential individuals within the industry, expand our knowledge, and promote YCC throughout the state. YCC Chair Crystal Avila says it has been the upmost honor to serve as chair for the California Young Cattlemen’s Committee. Throughout the year she reflected on the endless opportunities presented to the next generation of cattle ranchers. “First and foremost, I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to the individuals who so graciously support the YCC,” Avila said. She also said she values the opportunity to network with industry professionals and increase her knowledge. As YCC members we live by the motto of combining the wisdom of the past with the vision of the future; which she credits as her greatest challenge. “With an industry rich with past knowledge, yet a progressive bright future, the task to combine the two is difficult,” Avila explains. According to her, this year’s officer team, along with the staff at the California Cattlemen’s Association is remarkable. Avila offers her advice for YCC members, saying, “Get involved, take advantage of every opportunity presented to you, and be educated about laws and regulations that are affecting our livelihoods as ranchers.” This past year, Alise Azevedo has been very honored to serve on the YCC team as the vice chair. She said she has greatly appreciated working with her fellow officer teammates and Malorie Bankhead, our YCC Advisor. “Working alongside these ladies has truly been one of the greatest opportunities thus far,” Azevedo shared. She also said she values the opportunity to experience other individual’s stories and brainstorm together on how to empower the next generation in the beef industry. Alise feels it has truly been amazing to see the passion people have for the beef industry by attending the Annual Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show, Chico State’s Beef Symposium, CCA’s Midyear Meeting and CCA’s Annual Convention. “Becoming involved with YCC at the local and state level has taught me to take chances to step out of my comfort zone, how to network with other individuals involved in the beef industry and helped me envision my place in the beef industry,” Azevedo said. As this year wraps up, she said she is looking forward to 28 California Cattleman December 2016

seeing everyone at this month's CCA convention and cannot wait to hear new ideas for the future of YCC. Katie McDougald, YCC Secretary, cannot help but reflect on the experiences, contacts and memories she has made along the way. “This past year has only strengthened my passion for the beef industry and solidified my decision to pursue a career in this field,” McDougald said. Being able to serve on a committee with so many likeminded, goal-oriented people, has been such an amazing experience for McDougald. “I will be forever grateful for the adventures this position has given me as well as all of the lovely contacts I have made and will continue to use the rest of my life,” she said. One of McDougald’s favorite parts of the year was being able to interact with CCA staff and members and really learn what the organization does for the producer and consumer and how much of an important asset they are to the beef cattle industry. As for myself, my year of service as publicity chair has truly exceeded my expectations. I am immensely grateful for all of the incredible opportunities this industry has provided me. I greatly value all of the opportunities, events, challenges and successes afforded to me throughout this year. Overall, the part of this experience I found most important has been the people I have met along the way. I value the opportunity to meet and speak with our state legislators, along-side the producers being affected by the legislation, and speak on behalf of the next generation of the beef industry. At CCA Midyear Meeting, I sat down with a group of producers who have been in the business longer than I have been alive and listened to their stories of past struggles and successes, and most importantly their concerns and hopes for the future of the industry and the next generation of cattle ranchers. I am glad to have developed friendships with my teammates and to have navigated this year of service with such an incredible group of young ladies. I also value the relationship I fostered with Malorie, who always instilled passion and hard work into everything we did, and of course the importance of a great selfie game! I wish the next officer team the best of luck and would like to offer all YCC members the advice to take advantage of every opportunity and to never be shy. The team would like to extend our sincerest gratitude to all who have helped and supported us along the way. We will be forever grateful for the opportunity to have this experience.


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

JOIN US RINGSIDE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12! 10TH ANNIVERSARY

SPECIAL FEEDER SALE & CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY

Happy Holidays

From

FEEDER CATTLE AT 9 A.M. CHRISTMAS BUFFET AT NOON PAIRS AND BRED FEMALES AT 1 P.M.

Tulock Livestock Auction Yard best wishes for a great 2016!

TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA................................................. 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA ................................................. 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES................................................ 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI ............................................... 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI ..................................................... 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ....................................................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA ......................................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT.................................. 209 262-4019 TIM SISIL ........................................................208 631-6054

CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE: 209 634-4326 209 667-0811 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com

SQUEEZE CHUTES HEAD GATES CATTLE WORKING SYSTEMS

Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products... 576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • December 2016 California Cattleman 29


Cattlemen’s Report RECENT RESULTS & AVERAGES SHASTA BULL SALE

NOV. 1, COTTONWOOD

Shasta Bull Sale Consignors Char and Mike Avila, Cottonwood.

Col. John Rodgers

Managed by Greg & Maureen Thomas 89 BULLS ..............................................................$2,955 WORLD OF BULLS Col. Jake Parnell

NOV. 7, GALT

Managed by Parnell Dickinson, Inc. 83 BULLS ..............................................................$3,340 CALIFORNIA-NEVADA HEREFORD ASSOCIATION HEREFORD CLASSIC NOV. 19, ROSEVILLE Col. Kyle Colyer

Shasta Bull Sale Consignors Kathy and Tom DeForest, Adin.

29 HEIFERS..............................................................$2,971 10 STEERS................................................................$1,513 2 EMBRYO PACKAGES............................................$1,400

SELENIUM BOLUSES From Pacific Trace Minerals Se 365 selenium bolus for nutritional supplementation of beef cattle.

• treat once a year • for beef cattle over 3 months of age.

For sale & use in California Only — Organically Listed— CCA member: $240/box o f60 CCA Non-Members: $288/box shipping additional

cmaas@pacifictraceminerals.com www.pacifictraceminerals.com

ORDER FROM OR PICKUP AT: California Cattlemen’s Association 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA • (916) 444-0845

30 California Cattleman December 2016


New arrival MADELINE SCHOHR

Madeline Jean Schohr, daughter of Steven and Amanda Farrah Schohr of Oroville was born Nov. 1 and weighed in at 7 pounds, 5 ounces and was 20 and one-half inches long. Madeline was also welcomed by proud brother Joseph. Grandparents are Carl and Susan Schohr, Gridley and Kathleen Mcnair-Farrah of Renondo Beach and the late Charles Farrah.

Wedding Bells EVERETT & THOMPSON Lauren Everett and Ryan Thompson were married in a ceremoney in Santa Margarita Nov. 5. The bride, who is currently employed by Platinum Performance as the equine marketing manager, is the daughter of Larry and Donna Everett, Nipomo. The groom is the son of Dave and Cindy Thompson, Chiloquin, Ore. The couple makes their home in Henrietta, Texas, where the groom manages a cow-calf operation.

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0B48084

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com Lic #0124869

Dan VanVuren 209.484.5578 dan@dvvins.com Lic #0E44519

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! December 2016 California Cattleman 31


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR 2016 BUYERS!

Mid Valley

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Thank you to our 2016 bull buyers! We look forward to seeing you in 2017!

32 California Cattleman December 2016


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LADING SALES IN 2017.

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES! O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2017 bull sale!

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 BULL BUYERS FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Mid Valley Mid Valley

PRESIDENT'S DAY 2017 TERREBONNE OR

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 BULL AND FEMALE BUYERS!

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

December 2016 California Cattleman 33


Thank you to the buyers at our 42nd “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Thank you to our buyers at the annual “Partners for Performance” Bull and Female Sales! Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 BUYERS!

Progressive Genetics for over years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2386

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 BUYERS

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 34 California Cattleman December 2016

h

JOIN US FEBRUARY 17, 2017 IN ALTURAS AS WE OFFER A TOP QUALITY SET OF POLLED AND HORNED HEREFORD BULLS!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Thank you to our 2016 bull and female sale supporters! 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com December 2016 California Cattleman 35


“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

Call Jon Today! 530-949-2285 36 California Cattleman December 2016


TOM PERONA, DVM 209-996-7005 Cell

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

THD ©

Market directly to your target audience through one of the most reputable publications in the west! The California CAttleman is also the only publication in California that puts its advertising revenue right back into protecting and supporting the beef industry. the California Cattleman is sent monthly to subscribing cattle producers and members of the California Cattlemen’s Association who need your services!

$450 for the first 11 months $400 for each annual renewal To learn more about an annual advertisement in this buyer’s guide, contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113. December 2016 California Cattleman 37


Advertisers’ Index All West-Select Sires.................................................30 Amador Angus..........................................................32 American Hereford Association..............................34 Andreini & Company...............................................22 Bar R Angus...............................................................32 BMW Angus..............................................................32 Bovine Elite, LLC.......................................................37 Broken Arrow Angus................................................32 Broken Box Ranch.....................................................36 Buchanan Angus.......................................................32 California Custom.....................................................36 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc..............................36 Cattlemen's Livestock Market..................................13 Charron Ranch................................................... 19, 32 Cherry Glen Beefmasters.........................................34 Conlan Ranches California......................................36 Conlin Supply Company, Inc...................................29 Corsair Angus Ranch................................................32 CSU Chico College of Agriculture..........................35 Dal Porto Livestock...................................................33 Diamond Back Ranch...............................................36 Donati Ranch.............................................................32 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.......................................36 Farm Credit Alliance................................................21 Five Star Land Company..........................................36 Freitas Rangelend Management..............................31 Fresno State Ag Foundation.....................................35 Furtado Angus...........................................................33 Furtado Livestock Enterprises.................................37 Genoa Livestock........................................................34 Gonsalves Ranch.......................................................33 HAVE Angus..............................................................33 Hufford's Herefords...................................................35 J/V Angus...................................................................33 JH Feed Inc.................................................................36 Lambert Ranch................................................... 23, 34

38 California Cattleman December 2016

Lander Veterinary Clinic..........................................37 Little Shasta Ranch....................................................35 McPhee Red Angus...................................................35 Noahs Angus Ranch..................................................33 Norbrook Animal Health............................. 14,15, 26 O'Connell Ranch.......................................................33 ORIgen........................................................................37 Orvis Cattle Company..............................................35 Pacific Trace Minerals....................................... 30, 36 Pitchfork Cattle Co....................................................35 Quail Valley Ranch....................................................25 Ray-Mar Ranches......................................................33 Razzari Auto Group..................................................27 Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale....................................2 San Juan ranch...........................................................34 Schafer Ranch............................................................33 Schohr Herefords......................................................35 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard................................11 Sierra Ranches...........................................................35 Silveira Bros...............................................................34 Silveus Insurance Group...........................................31 Skinner Livestock Transportation...........................36 Southwest Fence & Supply Company, Inc..............36 Southwest Fence, RunningM Group.......................20 Spanish Ranch...........................................................34 Tehama Angus Ranch...............................................34 Teixeira Cattle Co......................................................33 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard .............................29 Universal Semen Sales, Inc.......................................37 Veterinary Services, Inc............................................36 VF Red Angus............................................................35 Vintage Angus Ranch......................................... 34 40 Westen Stockman's Market........................................7 Western Fence & Construction, Inc.......................36 Western Video Market................................................3 Wulff Brothers Livestock..........................................33


VINTAGE NGUS ANCH ERDSIRES BRED FOR MULTI-TRAIT EXCELLENCE V A R GENERATION 2100

V A R INDEX 3282

V A R DISCOVERY 2240

V A R RANGER 3008

V A R EMPIRE 3037

VINTAGE COMMANDER 4152

VAR LEGACY 4409

V A R FOREMAN 3339

V A R HERITAGE 5038

V A R UPFRONT 0392

V A R RESERVE 1111

V A R LEGEND 5019

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER

V A R COMPLETE 1209

V A R RUBICON 5414

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 OFFICE: (209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM E-MAIL: VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

December 2016 California Cattleman  
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