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April 2018

INDUSTRY NEWS YOU NEED... Celebrating the 40th steak & Eggs event A.I. tips that may benefit you Charolais & Brangus advantages April 2018 California Cattleman 1


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CLM RepResentatives Jake Parnell ..................................916-662-1298 George Gookin .......................... 209-482-1648 Kris Gudel .....................................916-208-7258 Mark Fischer ............................... 209-768-6522 Rex Whittle..................................209-996-6994 Joe Gates ..................................... 707-694-3063 Abel Jimenez ...............................209-401-2515 Jason Dailey ................................ 916-439-7761

wednesday saLe sCHedULe Butcher Cows ..........................................8:30 a.m. Cow-Calf Pairs/Bred Cows ........... 11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle .............................................. 12 p.m.

aUCtion MaRket

aMadoR-eL doRadosaCRaMento CoUnty CattLeMen’s feedeR saLes Saturdays: May 12 • June 9 Brunch at 9 a.m. • Sales at 10 a.m.

CattLeMen’s speCiaL feedeR saLes Wednesdays at 12 p.m. April 18 • May 2 • May 23 May 30 • June 20

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Address ......12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office..............................................209-745-1515 Fax .................................................. 209-745-1582 Website/Market Report ....www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ............www.lmaauctions.com 2 California Cattleman April 2018

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May 3 • May 24 • June 7


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SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: APRIL 16

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: MAY 16

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: MAY 30

April 2018 California Cattleman 3

watch, listen and bid online at www.wvmcattle.com


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS

PRESIDENT David Daley, Oroville FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Pat Kirby, Wilton Mike Miller, San Jose Cindy Tews, Fresno TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Brendlen DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Jenna Chandler OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Katie Roberti

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

Educate Yourself We’re all in this together by CCA Feeder Council Vice Chair Trevor Freitas No matter what sector of the beef production industry you work in, it is essential to know that each sector depends on the others. I also find it valuable to educate myself in the issues impacting the other beef production segments. Coming from the feedyard sector myself, working on a calf ranch near Tipton, I enjoy learning what my counterparts in the cow-calf sector are facing. Upon returning from the Cattle Industry Convention and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Trade Show in Phoenix, Ariz., I realized I had gathered quite a bit of information to process and I am still trying to wade through everything I had picked up over the four days I spent in Phoenix. I kept myself busy between committee meetings, speakers and catching up with friends from our industry that I don’t get to see often enough. One of the big take aways from my time in Phoenix was that no matter where you call home we all have a lot of the same issues, I did seem to get a lot of sympathy though when other producers figured out I was from California. There are a couple of topics that are always out of a rancher’s hands no matter where you are from – weather and the markets – and I am beginning to believe our volatile markets are trying to rival mother nature at times to see who can be more unforgiving. Cattle-Fax gave their industry outlook during the convention and I think it highlighted some of our industry’s more vulnerable issues going forward the biggest of which in my opinion are export markets and trade issues. The future is definitely pointing to the need for strong export markets and as I write this I feel like we are teetering on the brink of taking a huge step backwards when it comes to trade and the consequences of that are a scary thought. With the forecast

for global beef demand on the rise we need to be front and center when it comes to being a supplier and meeting those demands is vitally important the first time any opportunity is presented. Export data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Meat Export Federation from January show a solid increase across the board to the Asian markets, proving once again that those markets are a key piece of the market for U.S. ranchers. One of the big highlights coming from the NCBA convention was being there as Kevin Kester took the reins as the 2018 NCBA President and I wanted to personally congratulate Kevin on an amazing accomplishment as he continues to be a great leader for the cattle industry. As we head into spring I am reminded once again about how busy this time of year is for CCA staff and officers who are planning and attending various events throughout this vast state. Being a part of the feeder council, I get the opportunity to help plan the California and Arizona Feeder Meeting, held annually in the San Diego area. The feeder meeting is always a great event that packs plenty of useful information into two days of discussion using a line-up of speakers from various segments of our industry. As our industry continually faces new challenges the hot topics we discuss change from year to year and this year is no different. I always recommend the feeder meeting to everyone in the cattle industry as it covers a wide range of topics from market conditions to legislative and regulatory issues, just to name a few, and it’s always tough to beat San Diego in May. For more information on this year’s meeting, contact the CCA office or refer to the ad on page 19. I hope to see you there!

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Bakersfield, CA and additional mailing offices. Publication # 8-3600

4 California Cattleman April 2018

National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

APRIL 2018

With spring now in full swing, this month’s cover, taken by photographer Dennis Frates near Grapevine, depicts the radiant hues that spring brings to all parts of the Golden State.

Volume 101, Issue 4

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE CCA up and down the state sharing news you need

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA developing new predator control committee

8

HERD HEALTH CHECK Awareness for prussic acid poisoning

10

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Details about CBCIA, its purpose and progress

25

RANGELAND TRUST TALK Preserving for the future

30

SPECIAL FEATURES

CCA celebrates 40th legislative breakfast A.I. tightening your calving window Carcass merit in Bos indicus breeds Charolais EPDs see simplification

READER SERVICES

12 16 20 26

Cattlemen’s Report 32 Obituaries 34 New Arrivals 35 Buyers’ Guide 36 Advertisers Index 42

UPCOMING CCA MEETINGS & EVENTS April 10-12

NCBA Legislative Conference Washington, D.C.

May 23-25

CA & AZ Feeder Meeting San Diego

June 20-22

CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting Redding

Aug. 1-4 Nov 28-30

NCBA Summer Business Meeting Denver, Colo.

102nd CCA & CCW Convention The Nugget Resort & Casino, Sparks,Nev.

April 2018 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE

SHOW UP TO GO UP Your participation needed at upcoming events by CCA Director of Finance Lisa Brendlen Each year as spring approaches, the California Cattlemen’s Association has a packed calendar. We have a full to-do list, and completion of those tasks relies heavily on your participation at the local and state level. Our priority at CCA is to help keep ranchers in business, and we strive to achieve this goal every day. To that end, every year in the spring and the fall, the CCA officer team and CCA staff hit the road, with the goal of meeting with every one of our local associations at least once a year. The issues affecting the ranching industry are different in every county across the state,. and these tour meetings give both the officer team and the CCA staff the opportunity to hear directly from you about which issues are impacting your day-to-day operations at the local level. Like years past we are hearing this year that our members are plagued by drought, fire, predators and private property issues. In addition to hearing from our local associations, the other goal of these meetings is to share what staff is working on a daily basis in Sacramento to help alleviate some of these concerns. Another purpose of these tour meetings is to share the many benefits of your CCA membership. They also give us the opportunity to discuss events that are coming up and how you, as a member, can get involved at the state level. CCA just wrapped up its 40th annual Steak and Eggs Legislative Breakfast on March 14 at the Sutter Club in downtown Sacramento. This is one of our most popular and well-attended events. Over 175 CCA members, state legislators, legislative staff and regulators enjoyed a delicious steak and eggs breakfast. Legislators and regulators mingled with CCA members, staff and the officer team. After breakfast, CCA members made their way across the street to the Capitol to lobby their local legislators to discuss issues specific to their area. With our local tour meetings and legislative breakfast in the books we are looking forward to June and the Annual CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting. This year’s meeting will be held June 20 through June 22 at the Win-River Casino in Redding. I would like to encourage you to mark your calendar and plan to attend. CCA is a memberdriven organization, and the purpose of these meetings is for producers to ensure that their organization is moving in the direction the members want. At Midyear, be part of the CCA policymaking process and maximize your membership by attending committee meetings. Discuss current cattle industry issues with fellow producers, as well as hear from industry leaders, agencies and affiliate organizations. Your voice helps develop policy that provides direction for you organization and 6 California Cattleman April 2018

will influence the future of ranching. This year we have added a new event to the schedule: Wednesday, June 20, the Midyear Meeting will kick off with a CattlePAC Dinner, Dance and Fundraising Auction. The LISA BRENDLEN evening is sure to be a funfilled evening that will include a delicious prime rib dinner, entertainment provided by the Buck Ford Band and a lively auction filled with not-to-be-missed items. Every dollar raised from this event will go directly to the CCA’s Cattle-PAC fund. Cattle-PAC dollars are the most difficult dollars to raise but we see the best return from them. We need your help to in continuing to build a strong PAC. A strong PAC not only enables our industry to assist political candidates who are committed to our vision, but enables us to have a strong voice in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., to defeat harmful legislation and promote the interests of cattlemen and women. While the ranching industry will constantly be faced with challenges, CCA needs your support and involvement in making a difference. At CCA, we are actively working on these issues, both proactively and defensively, at the local, state and national levels. We understand how difficult it is to get off the ranch, and that there is never a good time to be away, but we hope that you are able to attend this year’s Cattle-PAC fundraiser and Midyear Meeting in Redding. If you have any questions regarding either event, please do not hesitate to contact me in the CCA office.


EARLY SPRING MARKET EVENTS

TUESDAY, APRIL 10 EARLY SPRING FEEDER SALE FEATURING 2,000 HEAD OF CALVES AND YEARLINGS AT 9 A.M.

SATURDAY, APRIL 14 HERE’S THE BEEF SPECIAL WEIGH COW SALE JOIN US FOR BURGERS AT NOON FOLLOWED BY THE SALE AT 1.P.M.

TUESDAY, APRIL 17 SPRING PAIR AND BRED COW SALE

SALE AT 12 0’CLOCK NOON SPECIALS EVERY TUESDAY IN MAY & JUNE FEATURING LARGE RUNS OF CALVES & YEARLINGS

36th Annual

CONTRA COSTA-ALAMEDA & SAN JOAQUIN-STANISLAUS CATTLEMEN SHOWCASE FEEDER SALES

SATURDAYS - MAY 5 • MAY 19 • JUNE 2 - BRUNCH AT 8 A.M. • SALE AT 9 Featuring NHTC, Natural/Age and Source Verification Cattle. These sales will feature some of the best cattle producers in the state of California have to offer, so whether your cattle are enrolled in aspecial program or not, these are the sales for you!

SELLING SOME OF THE FINEST CALVES AND YEARLINGS FROM THESE COUNTY ASSOCIATIONS: Merced-Mariposa, Santa Clara, Napa-Solano, Madera, Calaveras,Tuolumne, Fresno-Kings, San Benito, Tahoe and Kern.

CALL US TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONSIGNING CATTLE TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES!

JOIN US IN VISALIA APRIL 11 AND MAY 3 & MAY 24 IN COTTONWODD!

FROM THE SIERRAS TO THE SEA, OUR TEAM IS ALWAYS HERE TO ASSIST YOU IN MEETING YOUR BUYING AND SELLING NEEDS! TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA................................ 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA ................................ 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES............................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI .............................. 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .................................... 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ..................................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA......................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ................. 209 262-4019 TIM SISIL ...................................... 209 631-6054 TRAVIS JOHNSON ...................... 209 996-8645

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE:

209 634-4326 • 209 667-0811

10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 Aprilwww.turlocklivestock.com 2018 California Cattleman 7


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

CCA MOVES TO ESTABLISH JOINT PREDATORY ANIMAL CONTROL COMMITTEE Predator management is a significant priority at CCA. Anyone who has picked up a copy of the California Cattleman since 2012 is probably well-aware of our opposition to the listing of the gray wolf as an endangered species in California, and of our pending lawsuit against the Fish & Game Commission to overturn that decision. Last year, CCA was successful in defeating a bill, AB 8 (Bloom), which would have given the Department of Fish and Wildlife discretion whether or not to issue a depredation permit for mountain lions found to have killed livestock. CCA has also routinely defended your right to protect your cattle from coyotes, including our current opposition to a petition by the Center for Biological Diversity and Project Coyote to ban all nighttime hunting and trapping activities in 10 northern counties. But there remain significant predator concerns that are not often well-publicized or well-addressed. For instance, a number of CCA members have reported raven attacks on their newborn calves. While ravens are often scavengers, they may also grievously injure calves by pecking their eyes out, and may even peck calves to death. A 2015 National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) survey estimates that 2.4 percent of calves lost to predators in California are killed by predatory birds such as ravens. Black bears are an even more significant cause of predation on cattle (9.4 percent of cattle predation in California, and 6.2 percent of calf predation), and dogs are responsible for 3.8 percent of predation upon cattle and 3.1 percent of predation on calves. Moreover, the prevalence of wolf-dog hybrids (and confusion over whether a given animal is a protected “wolf ” or a non-protected “wolf-dog hybrid” or “dog”) is an emerging problem in areas where gray wolves have taken a foothold, such as Lassen County. The scope of the predator problem is vast, and there are no shortage of stakeholders who are impacted. Recognizing

this, the CCA membership adopted a resolution supporting “the formation and continued cooperation of a joint predatory animal committee including affected members of the CCA, the California Wool Growers Association, the California Farm Bureau Federation, and any other group concerned with economic losses suffered by livestock and property owners due to predatory animals.” While the policy has been on the books for many years, the Joint Predatory Animal Control Committee has not been active in quite some time. With re-adoption of the resolution at the 2017 Annual CCA Convention, however, the policy has been reinvigorated. This renewed vigor is in part driven by the need to overcome the challenges faced by ranchers across the state and for solutions to be driven by those members who are most affected. The California Farm Bureau Federation and the California Wool Growers Association have already expressed interest in working with CCA membership on the Joint Committee. So, too, has the California State Beekeepers Association, whose members are all-too-often plagued by depredation issues involving bears. As the Joint Committee takes off, other agricultural organizations are likely to join. Currently, the Joint Predatory Animal Control Committee is in its nascent stages, with CCA reaching out to affected organizations and individuals. Initial conference calls will be held in the coming months to establish the foundation for the Joint Committee, with a goal of holding the inaugural meeting of the Joint Predatory Animal Control Committee at the CCA/CCW Midyear Meeting to be held at the Win-River Casino in Redding June 20-22. If you are interested in participating in the Joint Predatory Animal Control Committee, or have suggestions for the Committee, please contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.

TO PARTICIPATE IN CCA’S JOINT PREDATORY ANIMAL CONTROL COMMITTEE, CONTACT KIRK WILBUR IN THE CCA OFFICE AT (916) 444-0845 OR BY E-MAIL AT KIRK@CALCATTLEMEN.ORG. 8 California Cattleman April 2018


CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Zone 2 - Peach

Zone 1 - Yellow

1 2

Humboldt-Del Norte Mendocino-Lake Sonoma-Marin Napa-Solano

Siskiyou Modoc Lassen Fall River-Big Valley

Zone 3 - Light Blue Shasta-Trinity Plumas-Sierra Tehama Butte Glenn-Colusa Yuba-Sutter Tahoe (Placer-Nevada) Yolo

3

Zone 4 - Pink

Zone 5 - Green

Zone 6 - Purple

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Calaveras

Merced-Mariposa Madera Fresno-Kings

San Joaquin-Stanislaus

Tuolumne

Zone 7 - Tan

5 4

CCA committee leadership

San Mateo-San Francisco Santa Cruz Santa Clara Contra Costa-Alameda

POLICY COMMITTEES

Zone 8 - Turquoise

Monterey San Benito San Luis Obispo

Santa Barbara Tulare Kern Inyo-Mono-Alpine High Desert

AG & FOOD POLICY Chair: Jack Lavers Vice Chair: Ramsay Wood

Zone 9 - Orange Southern California San Diego-Imperial Ventura

6 7

CATTLE HEALTH & WELL BEING Chair: Tom Talbot, DVM Vice Chair: A.E. “Bud” Sloan, DVM

8

CATTLE MARKETING Chair: Col. Jake Parnell Vice Chair: Holly Foster

FEDERAL LANDS Chair: Mike Byrne Vice Chair: Buck Parks

9

PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Chair: Adam Cline Vice Chair: Clayton Koopmann

2018 CCA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Dave Daley

Zone Director 5 Gib Gianandrea

ddaley@csuchico.edu • (530) 521-3826

cgianandre@aol.com • (209) 256-3782

First Vice President Mark Lacey

Zone Director 6 Bob Erickson

mjlacey1@me.com • (760) 784-1309

bobericksonequipment@yahoo.com • (209) 652-3536

Second Vice President Pat Kirby

Zone Director 7 Anthony Stornetta

pat.kirby@algilbert.com • (209) 604-3719

anthony.stornetta@sbcfire.com • (805) 391-0044

Second Vice President Mike Miller

Zone Director 8 John Hammon

western-beef@juno.com • (408) 929-8425

hamdawg66@gmail.com • (559) 623-1538

Second Vice President Cindy Tews

Zone Director 9 Bud Sloan

beefnmore@aol.com • (559) 970-6892

Asloan5119@aol.com • (805) 340-0693

Treasurer Rob von der Lieth

Feeder Council Member Paul Cameron

rvdlieth@aol.com • (916) 769-1153

Feeder Council Chairman Mike Smith msmith@harrisranch.com • (559) 301-0076

Feeder Council Vice Chair Trevor Freitas trevor@mendescalfranch.com • (559) 805-5431

Zone Director 1 Ramsey Wood ramseywood83@gmail.com • (530) 680-8985

Zone Director 2 Hugo Klopper hugoklopper@frontier.com • (707) 498-7810

cca affiliate organization leadership ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL Chair: Heston Nunes

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

President: Rita McPhee Vice President: Ryan Nelson Secretary: Celeste Settrini

pcmesquitecattle@sbcglobal.net •(760) 427-6906

Feeder Council Member Jesse Larios lariosjess1@gmail.com •(760) 455-3888

At Large Appointee Myron Openshaw openshaw4@gmail.com •(530) 521-0099

For more information about CCA’s Executive Board or committees, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

At Large Appointee Mark Nelson kmarknelson@gmail.com •(916) 849-5558

At Large Appointee Rob Frost rbmaf@juno.com •(805) 377-2231

Zone Director 3 Wally Roney

At Large Appointee Darrel Sweet

bjr@billieweb.com •(530) 519-3608

dsweet@cattlemen.net • (209) 601-4074

Zone Director 4 Mike Bettencourt

At Large Appointee Jerry Hemsted

mbteamroper@aol.com • (209) 499-0794

Jhemsted@att.net • (530) 949-6294

April 2018 California Cattleman 9


HERD HEALTH WATCH

ALLEVIATING WORRIES FOR NITRATE AND PRUSSIC ACID POISONING by Josh Davy, University of California Cooperative Extension Livestock and Range Advisor Tehama, Glenn and Colusa counties and Birgit Puschner, DVM, Professor of Veterinary Toxicology, University of California Davis Grazing of warm season grasses such as sudangrass, johnsongrass, and other sorghum relatives presents a risk for livestock to develop nitrite/nitrate and prussic acid (HCN) poisoning. Clinical signs of both intoxications are very similar including respiratory distress, tremors and convulsions. In most cases, cattle are simply found dead. Post-mortem examination is often nonspecific but sampling can be used to diagnose nitrite/nitrate poisoning (best: eye ball) or cyanide poisoning (best: frozen muscle). However, these are very valuable sources of summer forage because of their high yields. They can also be a very good option for spring planting to prepare a field for a permanent pasture planting in the fall. Rather than avoiding their use, a few key management points can prevent toxicity issues. These tips can help.

• Both poisonings can be brought on by drought conditions. If sudangrass or related plants have been subjected to drought and are then irrigated, wait 14 days before grazing to reduce risk for nitrite/ nitrate poisoning. HCN levels should be dissipated in less time. • Do not graze after a frost. • Nitrate tends to accumulate in the lower 3 to 5 inches of stems so swathing plants higher when haying will help avoid the most toxic plant part. • Prussic acid will dissipate when forages are cut for hay (within 24 hours on a hot, sunny day; longer time is needed on cooler days), but nitrate levels will not. • Do not graze with horses. Horses are not susceptible to nitrate poisoning but can be affected by cyanide. In addition, a syndrome causing cystitis is possible in horses

grazing sorghum family plants. Lab testing Lab testing can help decision making on whether forages are safe to feed. The California Animal Health and Food Safety lab at UC Davis can test for both prussic acid (cyanide, $30) and nitrate (nitrate/nitrite, $25) of forages. Samples for HCN should be frozen in an air tight container immediately to prevent dissipation. Lab contact information and submission sheets can obtained at http://cahfs.ucdavis.edu/index.cfm. Your veterinarian and/or farm advisor can assist you in sampling and interpretation as proper sample collection is crucial. If quality sampling is already being conducted it is usually possible to add nitrate testing to list of forage quality parameters, but this is not always the case with HCN. Table 1 provides guidelines for interpreting forage samples.

Tips to avoid poisoning • In irrigated areas fertilize with low rates of nitrogen to avoid TABLE 1. INTERPRETING NITRATE (DIFFERING REPORTING UNITS) AND PRUSSIC ACID (CYANIDE) FORAGE TESTS nitrate accumulation. High rates of fertilization can also cause prussic acid poisoning. Splitting applications of smaller rates over summer is a safer strategy. • In dryland situations, avoid fertilizing with nitrogen, and plant a low prussic acid accumulating variety called “piper” sudangrass. Hybrid forage sorghum varieties should be avoided in the central valley in dryland areas. 10 California Cattleman April 2018


The Spring Run is On

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Large runs of calves & Yearlings every monday at famoso in april & may Expecting Large Groups from Local Reputation Ranches, as well as Out-of-State, Top Quality Calves & Yearlings

Summer Specials at Famoso Famoso Opportunity bred cow & Pair specialS mondays: June 4 and July 9

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Selling 1,500 Fancy, Angus 3-Year-Old Cows, Bred to Angus Bulls

Western stockman’s market 31911 Highway 46, mcfarland, california 93250

www.westernstockmansmarket.com dWIGHT meBane ................. 661 979-9892 Mark Your Calendar JusTIn meBane ....................661 979-9894 53rd annual Famoso Frank machado ................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane..................661 201-8169 all-Breed Bull sale office ...........................................661 399-2981 sat., october 20, 2018 April 2018 California Cattleman 11


40 Years of Legislative Steak and Eggs Breakfasts Net Political Advances for California Cattlemen by CCA Director of Communications Jenna Chandler

T

he year was 1978. The BeeGees topped the charts, the Cowboys had just defeated the Broncos in Super Bowl XII, Proposition 13 would soon be on the ballot and in a familiar twist, Edmund “Jerry” Brown was Governor of California. Joe Russell was CCA president and Gordon Van Vleck was chairman of Cattle-PAC. A breakfast gathering of cattle producers, legislators and regulators occurred, kicking off a decades-long tradition that would eventually morph into what we now call the Steak and Eggs Legislative Breakfast— a tradition that has endured the test of time and helped build the bridges that ensure a strong cattle industry for California. Fast forward four decades and on March 12, legislators, regulators and staff donned their cowboy boots and CCA provided the hats for the 40th Annual Steak and Eggs Legislative Breakfast. Joining CCA members and cattle producers from around the state, they were treated to a delectable steak breakfast, engaging speakers and profound talks about cattle ranching. CCA members were seated among tables of regulators, legislators and staff, allowing for informative and eye opening conversations to be had. Although some of the people and politics have changed over the last 40 years, the goal still remains the same, to connect CCA members with their legislators and to build relationships that foster a collaborative environment when it comes to policy making time. While CCA staff members are very successful in building relationships with regulators and legislators, it is these connections with the state’s cattle producers themselves that mean the most. After everyone got to know the others at their table and breakfast was served, the program got underway. The invocation was offered by Johni Phillips, niece of CCA Second Vice President Cindy Tews, Fresno, who supplied an inspiring, grateful (and adorable) kick off to the breakfast tradition. After the opening invocation, CCA was in for an extra special surprise. Sen. Jim Nielsen, Gerber, long time CCA supporter, presented CCA President Dave Daley of Oroville and the Association with a resolution commemorating the 40th anniversary of the breakfast, noting the impressive number of other legislators that had lent their support for the celebration and signed on as coauthors—an astonishing 43. 12 California Cattleman April 2018

Next up were a number of speakers. Introduced by Daley as one of the most optimistic people in the room, second only to himself, California Secretary of Agriculture, Karen Ross addressed the crowd. She spoke of the value of California agriculture and of the 2016 move of cattle and calves from the fifth to the fourth most valuable agricultural commodity in the state, highlighting the importance of California beef as an export to emerging South East Asian markets. “California cattle are going across the country and around the world. California was not only the number one agriculture state in 2016 […] but also the number one exporter […]Our markets in South East Asia are where the fastest growing population and the fastest growing middle income populations exist. [They are] where people who have more discretionary dollars want to feed their families better, and that means more protein. Those markets, Japan, Korea, China and Hong Kong, make up 85 percent of our exports, over 300 million dollars.” Sen. Mike McGuire also took to the podium to commend the efforts of California’s cattle producers, but primarily, to discuss his CCA sponsored SB 965, the California Cattle Commission bill. “[This bill is going to] highlight why California beef is the best in the land. And [it] is going to assist hard working ranchers and cattlemen from the Central Valley to the Oregon border, as well as the greater Los Angeles region, to be able to focus on research marketing and education […] Last year as all of you know, this bill had some hiccups, but thanks to the hard work of your legislative team, we have been able to fix those flaws and are bringing back a better, more strategic bill that will help this industry thrive in California for years to come. But I’ll be blunt. It is going to take all of us, no matter if you are a Democrat or a Republican, to be able to see this bill through and the more we work together the better this industry will be for decades to come.” The crowd erupted in applause as Daley thanked McGuire for his support and leadership on this important issue. After all of the guest speakers concluded, Daley took ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 15


CCA President Dave Daley addresses Sen. Mike McGuirew was among several breakfast attendees. lawmakers to speak at the breakfast.

CCA member Mike Furlong with CCA Assemblymember Steven Choi and CCW Second Vice President Pat Kirby. President Cheryl Foster.

Chico State Young Cattlemen’s members Harlee Maupin, Delia Hayden and Hailey Pritchard.

San Luis Obispo Cattlemen’s Association members Anthony Stornetta, Kaitlin Heely and Claude Loftus outside of the Governor’s office.

Clifton Dorrance, Molly Lambert with Merced-Mariposa cattleman Bob Erickson.

Justin Oldfield and Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry.

CCA members (left to right) Jason Hunt, Justin Niesen, Weston Roberti and Ramsey Wood.

Jack Lavers, Cindy Tews, Tom Fane, Sen. Jean Fuller, Johni Phillips, and Sam Avila. April 2018 California Cattleman 13


CCA’s Justin Oldfield briefs members at the capitol before meetings with legislators.

40 YEARS OF LEGISLATIVE BREAKFASTS

Former State Controller and Assemblyman Ken Cory with the CCA Second Vice President Gil Aguirre.

Pictured (left to right): CCA member John Cronin, Sen. Peter Behr, Sen. Jack Schrade, and Fish and California Game Director Ray Arnett at the Legislative Breakfast in 1978.

CCA Feeder Council Chair Walt Past CCA President Myron Openshaw and Past CCA Executive Vice President John Braly Fisher with Gov. George Deukmejian fit lawmakers with cowboy hats at the annual Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast in 1998. in 1988.

In 2008, then CCW President Merrilee Doss visits with then Assemblymember Jim Nielsen. 14 California Cattleman April 2018

In 2008, then Lt Gov. John Garamendi talks withi CCA members John Ahmann and Ron Masingale.


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

agriculture is one of [this state’s] major industries and it is important to us that we be of assistance to agriculture. Armed with the dedication of our states ranchers, California will continue to more forward and will continue to be the outpost of opportunity.” And if the 2018 40th Anniversary CCA Steak and Eggs Legislative Breakfast is any indication, it certainly will be. CCA would like to thank all of the legislators, regulators, staff and CCA members who took time out of their busy schedules to attend this important event. It is because of you that the day was such a great success! Check out CCA’s Facebook for pictures and video clips of this year’s breakfast, and don’t forget to plan on coming next year!

the microphone again to close and left guests with a parting thought about an issue important to rural and urban legislators alike—water quality—and the importance of the cattle community to that issue. “We are the ones that provide the filter to buffer that water quality across our land. But we haven’t been able to communicate that in a way that [the public believes us]. Beef is not our only message. It’s great that you love beef, and thank you for that, but that’s not all that we do. And we need your constituency in Los Angeles and Orange County, and other places that are urban. Thank goodness that beef is there and that it is nutritious and affordable and safe, but we are also protecting the landscape and that’s a critical part of the message […] in Annual Bred Cow & Pair Sale the future as we move forward.” And it was that message, along with a few others, that cattle producers took to the state capitol for their legislative meetings following breakfast. Rain finally made a welcome appearance in the state and made for a BBQ lunch at noon • sale at 1 p.m. wet time as CCA members headed across the street to the Capitol for legislative meetings. These sit downs, without the distractions of speakers or breakfast, are integral to advancing CCA’s message and MANY WITH SOLID FOOTHILL EXPOSURE legislative platform. After a quick briefing with CCA Vice Featuring President of Government Affairs Justin 150 head of fancy Angus first-calf heifers calving at 32 months of age, off two Northern Oldfield, members were on their way for California and one Idaho ranch. Foothill/Anaplaz exposed, running in California Foothills since meetings with their local legislators. October 2016, complete vaccination program, AI bred to Right Answer, calving Sept. 1. These heifers are as fancy as they come with solid Foothill exposure. Along with asking for support for SB 965 and addressing water quality issues, 100 head of fancy Red Angus first-calf heifers calving at 32 months of age. Originating the explosive 2017 fire season was a hot from Broken Chain Ranch, Sumatra, MT. Foothill/Anaplaz exposed, running in California Foothills topic during cattlemen’s legislative visits. since October 2016. AI bred to calve Sept. 1 to Ludvigson Stock Farms Red Angus low-birth sire With that devastation at the Take Off. Excellent set of long age heifers with solid Foothill exposure. forefront of the minds of many urban 150 Angus & Angus-cross second calf, one-iron cows 3 years old originating off one representatives, the fires brought Nevada ranch. AI bred to VAR Ingenuity 3305 to start calving Sept. 1. legislators to the table on the issue of grazing that had never considered it as a 150 head of fancy, young Angus & Red Angus 3 and 4 year old cows. Bred to top end Beck and Silveira Angus bulls to start calving Sept. 1. Cows originated off 2 Montana ranches. positive management strategy before. With new ears opened, CCA members 200 Angus & Red Angus-cross 3 and 4 year old cows, ran in the New Cuyama hills and did a great job sharing their personal Western Sierra Foothills. 50% California purchased, 50% Oregon purchased. experiences and first-hand knowledge This is a fancy set of young cows! on the critical topics that they are so intimately involved with. Plus many more smaller consignments of good young and older As policy meetings concluded, cattle fall bred cows and spring pairs. producers left legislators with bellies full Call for more details on this great offering of females! of steak and novel perspectives to ponder, having built new bridges and reinforced old ones, setting CCA up for political success for yet another year. As then California Governor George Duekmejian said at the 10th anniversary of the legislative breakfast in 1988, “We 733 NORTH BEN MADDOX WAY who have been coming to these breakfasts in recent years understand the plight of VISALIA, CA – (559) 625-9615 ranchers and agriculture, in general. We RANDY BAXLEY 559.906.9760 have really come to admire the grit you WWW.VISALIALIVESTOCK.COM display for hanging in there and being able to continue in such a high risk business. YOUR COMPLETE MARKETING SERVICE! But we in the Capitol also understand that

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GETTING YOUR HERD IN SYNC

Strategies for calving 85% of the cow herd in 30 days by Adrienne Lulay and Clint Sexson, All West/Select Sires

M

any producers have different management scenarios to juggle as spring rapidly approaches. We are all calving cows, planning brandings, preparing to move pairs from winter pastures to Bureau of Land Managment, Forest permits and mountain pasture and going to bull sales. There are so many decisions to be made. We need those bigger calves that walk the distance or weather the long haul to greener pastures and return as big strapping feeders to push down the scales in the fall. How great would it be to have all those calves on the ground early, branded and ready for spring turnout? Here are a few thoughts to consider going forward. If you could have 425 out of 500 calves on the ground in a month’s time, they would sure have a jump start on their journey to greener pastures. You may want to consider the benefits of synchronization and artificial insemination (A.I.). How is this achievable you ask? Synchronization allows every cow an opportunity to conceive on the first day of the breeding season, and the cows that miss will have the chance to settle in 21 or 42 days following synchronization. Wow, three chances to get bred in 42 days?! Yes! And better yet, with a 55 percent conception rate on first and second service, you only have 75 cows left to get pregnant in the second month of the breeding season. You ask what about the financial risk? Does it pay? Let’s discuss the logistics of implementing this aggressive program. If you are starting into an A.I. program for the first time with your cows, you need to be ready to commit for the long run. The results will become very evident by year four or five, when your young cows are comprised of the early born heifers resulting from synchronization. And if your goal is to cut your calving season down to 45 days you will have to make tough culling and marketing decisions. There will be many good cows that simply will not make the cut because they calved too late in the previous calving seasons. However, there will be a chance to give some of those cows an opportunity to catch up 16 California Cattleman April 2018

with the main herd. A few years down the road when you calve out heifers that were themselves from an A.I. sire, you will see huge differences in your calf crop. Cows chosen for the first synchronization should be at least 45 days post calving when you start them on a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) synchronization program. This should have given them enough time for their uterus to return to normal size and for them to start cycling. Some very healthy cows will cycle as early as 21 days post-partum while others will still be anestrus (not cycling) at 45 days. The benefit of still synchronizing those anestrus cows is that you will create an artificial “cycle” for them using the synchronization hormones. By using CIDRs, you expose the cow’s body to progesterone that she has not experienced since calving and you essentially jump start her, allowing for a more robust follicle to be formed on the subsequent cycle. Normal A.I. conception rates on a program of sevenday co-synch plus CIDR synchronization with fixed time AI range from 48 to 65 percent. In order to gain even higher conception rates with the seven-day co-synch plus CIDR synchronization program for cows you should consider applying the split time AI technique to your program. This involves identifying cows that are in estrus on schedule and giving cows not in estrous additional time to go into heat and be bred accordingly. With the help of heat detection aids like Estrotect heat detection patches, you can identify standing heat with minimal effort. Estrotect patches are similar to a lottery ticket with a grey coating that is scratched off when other cows mount the cow in heat. The mounting cow’s brisket rubs off the grey revealing a bright, easily distinguished color beneath. A cow is considered in estrus when at least 50 percent of the sticker is rubbed off. Estrotect stickers are applied when CIDRs are pulled and the prostaglandin shot is ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18


April 2018 California Cattleman 17


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 given on day seven. When using the stickers in a split time A.I. synch, you will separate off all the cows that have an activated sticker at 66 hours post CIDR pull and A.I. cows that do not have an activated sticker at 66 hours are separated till 20 to 24 hours later when they will be brought in and artificially inseminated. Cows that have not shown estrus at 90 hours also receive gonadatrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) shot (Cystorelin or Fertagyl). Using the split time A.I. protocol provides a happy medium between entirely fixed timed A.I. and longer term heat checking. By only giving GnRH to cows that have not shown heat you should have a significant savings on your drug costs. Additionally, you will capture more pregnancies by listening to the cows and breeding off of heats. The figure to the right also helps illustrate this concept. In the study by Patterson’s group evaluating split time A.I. at the University of Missouri, they found that on average, 63 percent of cows showed a heat by 90 hours post PGF shot. Pregnancy rates were increased 7 percent from 49 percent pregnancy rate with fixed time A.I. versus 56 percent pregnancy rate with split time A.I. While this system requires some extra labor and the cost of the Estrotect patches, the extra cost can be entirely offset by reduced GnRH costs. If you get an increase of 7 percent in A.I. pregnancy rates the extra labor is entirely worth it. In the 500 cow example, using the split time A.I. you could get an additional 35 calves from A.I. that will be born in the first two weeks the calving season. Those 275 calves born to A.I. will have an additional 21 days of gain on their natural service herd mates as well as genetic gain. Some of the cows will not be able to “accept the challenge” of getting pregnant on the synchronization with A.I., but you will have set them up to be successful on their second cycle 21 days later. This will front load the first 30 days of the calving season with the first 275 calves and a second “wave” of 150 calves. Once you have implemented a synchronization program you will need to be aggressive with monitoring pregnancies, culling of open cows or marketing cows with short term pregnancies. Clean-up bulls should be pulled 45 days after artificial insemination. If ultrasounding you will want to diagnose pregnancy at 45 days after the clean-up bulls are pulled out. You can also use the Bio-Pryn blood test for pregnancy diagnosis in which case you can test as early as 30 days after you pull the bulls. There may be a significant number of open cows at this time, but they do not fit your calving window so they should be culled or marketed as bred cows. They may be perfectly good cows that will do well in a later calving herd for someone else. If it is the first year you are using A.I. and you are unwilling to cull a lot of cows, you may want to synchronize a second set of your later calving cows. Set your second group of cows up for breeding 21 days after the first group so they get two chances to be bred. This way, you can accumulate another decent sized group of cows that have passed 45 days post-partum and will have a good chance of becoming pregnant to the AI. This will allow you to ease your herd into a shorter calving season. And now for the dollars and pounds of the matter! 18 California Cattleman April 2018

FIGURE 1. Seven-day co-synch plus CIDR with split time A.I.

Compared to a traditional natural service what is the return on investment? It comes down to at least 30 pounds and $75.42 return on investment per head on steers and 30 pounds and $67.89 return on heifers produced in the synchronized mating system. “Tell me more,” you say? OK, let’s break it down. Given a 95 percent pregnancy rate on 500 cows, you will have over 400 calves synchronized to be born in the first 21 days compared to approximately 275 calves in a bull breeding system. Those 400 should push the scale down with more than 30 pounds per head of extra sellable weight considering both steer and heifer mates alike. Or approach it from this view, how many more actual pounds of calf are generated? If 275 head of natural sired calves are born in the first 21 days of the calving season and weigh 537 pounds at weaning, you have almost three 50,000 pound loads of calves to market without keeping replacements. If compared to the synchronized and A.I. program with a 55 percent first service conception, you should receive at least 30 more pounds of weaning weight per head on 275 A.I. sired calves born in the first two weeks of the calving season (275 calves x 30 pounds = 8250 more pounds) and 125 more calves born in the first 21 days of the calving season (125 calves x 568 pounds =71,000 pounds). If you are marketing 50,000 pound loads of calves in the fall, you can now market four loads of early born calves, as well, you can keep more than 50 replacements heifers. If the calculated return on investment is correct, the 200 steers should return over $15,050 and 200 heifers should return over $13,575 above and beyond traditional natural service. These numbers are generated above and beyond input costs of the A.I. program. The bonus is the genetic value of the female offspring retained for replacements. So if those potential herd building genetics are added to the operation, your returns are greater looking forward. The benefits seem to outweigh the extra labor and costs of doing business. If you are looking to get the most pounds out of the early spring grass, those early born calves are your best bet. Ask your local A.I. representative how to get started down the road to greener pastures and with more pounds of high quality genetics. To put wheels under those extra pounds of marketable calf start with synchronization and A.I.


April 2018 California Cattleman 19


Carcass Merit & Meat Quality

Bos Indicus-Influenced Cattle make the grade by Raluca Mateescu, Ph.D., University of Florida

T

he U.S. Beef Quality Audit identified low and inconsistent quality as major impediments to improving domestic demand for beef products. Consumers evaluate the quality of beef at the point of purchase with respect to freshness, marbling and color. Consumers evaluate the quality of beef at the point of consumption, where the focus is on quality of eating experience or palatability described by three sensory traits: tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Ability to deliver a consistently superior quality product is important if the beef industry is to maintain and expand its share of the market. The strength shown by the high-quality branded-beef market in the last few years confirms that a sizable proportion of consumers are willing to pay for assured quality, indicating that the importance of quality is only going to increase going forward. Meeting and exceeding quality expectations will be needed to maintain or even increase market share. Even more important for the future of the industry is expanding the consumer base. As the average income increases, new consumers will enter the beef market, and the eating quality these new consumers experience will largely determine if they will continue to demand beef.

20 California Cattleman April 2018

Improving eating quality is critical to convince both habitual and new consumers of the superior value they are getting from the money spent on beef. Tenderness is the most important sensory attribute consumers use to judge beef quality and is a major focus in my research program at the University of Florida. The USDA grading system, established in 1996, is based on marbling and maturity and is used to separate beef carcasses into groups with uniform quality. In the absence of any other system, the beef industry is using the USDA grading system to determine premium and discounts to predict the palatability of the meat from a beef carcass and to communicate it to the consumers. Although the USDA grading system has served the industry well, changes in consumers’ preferences, limitations in the ability of the system to predict eating quality, and limited consumer understanding of how the system works are some of the problems associated with using this system as indicator of palatability. By comparison, beef is an expensive animal protein and what sets it apart are its distinctive sensory attributes leading to a unique eating experience. Programs to improve eating experience when consuming beef and the ability to better predict the eating quality level for marketing purposes are critical to increase consumers’ confidence that quality expectations are met. Management and genetic programs designed to address these issues and management practices that positively or negatively influence eating experience need to be developed. To analyze the relationship between the USDA quality grade and the degree of tenderness, I used a dataset of 3,125 animals spanning the range from 100-percent Angus to 100-percent Brahman. In this data set, 1,378 were BrangusŽ animals. The phenotypes of interest were tenderness assessed by Warner...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and USDA quality grade. The WBSF is an objective measure of tenderness, and it measures the force required to shear a cooked steak in kilograms (kg). The lower the number, the less force is required – indicating a more tender steak. The USDAAgricultural Marketing Service (USDA-AMS) is engaged in designing standards to indicate the degree of tenderness for beef. In this program, a steak with a WBSF less than 4.2 kg is considered tender, and a steak with WBSF less than 3.7 kg is considered very tender. The average WBSF for the population used in this study was 4.49 kg and, using the USDA-AMS standard, 42.8 percent of our animals would be considered tough, 11 percent tender, and 46.2 percent would qualify as very tender. Based on the USDA grading system, cattle in our data were classified as 7.4 percent Standard, 44.1 percent Select, 33.1 percent Choice-, 11 percent Choice, 3.3 percent Choice+ and 1.1 percent Prime. Table 1 shows the tenderness classification of steaks from different quality grades based on the WBSF measurement. For example, 65.37 percent of the cattle graded Standard were graded as very tender, 7.79 percent as tender and 26.84 percent as tough, based on the WBSF. The scatterplot in Figure 1 shows the distribution of our cattle across these quality grades and their respective toughness or tenderness measured by WBSF. There are three important points to take from this figure. There is considerable variation in the degree of tenderness across all quality grades. There is a small trend in the average tenderness across quality grades, described TABLE 1.

FIGURE 1.

22 California Cattleman April 2018

by the red line, indicating that, on average, steaks from higher quality grades tend to be more tender, or have lower WBSF. However, it is also clear that, most of the variability in tenderness is within quality grades and not between grades. The tenderness of steaks from carcasses graded Select or Choice, which was the majority of our animals, varied from very tender to very tough. This highlights the limitation of the USDA grading system to predict eating quality or tenderness. On the right side of the graph, for steaks graded higher as Choice or Choice+, about 43 percent are in fact tough, based on WBSF. Consumers buying these steaks are paying a premium, and they expect a high-quality product, but 43 percent of the time, they will end up with a tough steak and, therefore, a less-than-desirable eating experience. This, in the long run, will translate into decreased beef demand, negatively impacting all sectors of the beef industry. On the left side of the graph, 63 percent of the steaks from carcasses graded Standard or Select are in fact tender or very tender. Consumers buying these steaks are paying a lower price, purchasing a very tender steak that will provide a very positive eating experience. This is great for the consumer and will help increase beef demand, but this is an opportunity loss for the producers as they are selling a high-quality product for a lower, or even discounted, price. Although no errors are desirable, from the consumer and marketing point of view, errors may have different consequences. We could speculate that misclassification errors for moderately tender group have relatively small market consequences, because if the price of the product reflects eating quality, as it would with a “certified tender” program, the consumer is paying and expecting average eating quality and this expectation is most likely met. On the other hand, misclassifications of a product with “tough” or “tender” quality may have a greater negative impact on consumers. Again, if we assume the eating quality is positively associated with the price of the product, not meeting quality expectations leads to dissatisfied consumers. This could have important consequences as past experience is a critical factor regarding attitude toward food. A report evaluating the factors contributing to the intent of consumers to repurchase a product concluded that eating quality was the most important factor at 65 percent, followed by price at 28 percent. Unfulfilled eating quality expectations lead to consumers’ dissatisfaction, reduced future beef purchases and lower demand. The negative consequences associated with misclassifications of carcasses with “tender” into “moderately tender” or “tough” groups are of different nature. These errors represent opportunity losses for the industry, as the product is undervalued Programs to improve eating experience when consuming beef and the ability to better predict the eating quality level for marketing purposes are critical to increase consumers’ confidence and, subsequently, improve the economic position of the beef industry through increased demand for beef products. All the components defining eating quality are quantitative traits, controlled by many genes and impacted


by environmental factors. These traits are not available until late in life or after the animal has been harvested, and measuring them is difficult and expensive. Improving these traits through traditional phenotypic selection is impractical. Genomic selection using genetic markers that account for a worthwhile proportion of variation to improve provide a viable alternative. Warner-Bratzler Shear Force and the intramuscular fat content (IMFC) were identified from an extensive set of carcass and meat composition traits to be the best predictors of eating quality. Those indicator traits are difficult to measure on live animals. An important objective of our research is to develop DNA tests that can accurately identify cattle with superior genetics for WBSF and IMFC to be used by the industry to address these issues. Knowledge of the genetics controlling these traits along with a precise understanding of the biological networks and interactions underlying the meat quality complex will increase the ability of the industry respond to consumer expectations.

IBBA RELEASES 2018 GENETIC EVALUATION The International Brangus® Breeders Association (IBBA) has announced the release of March 2018 genomic-enhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPDs). In this round of genetic evaluation, over 1.4 million animals were considered. Of those, GE-EPDs were produced for more than 15,000 Brangus®, Red Brangus™, Ultrared, and Ultrablack® animals that have either high- or low-density genomic profiles in the database. Members are encouraged to look at their individual profiles on IBBA’s member portal, at int-brangus.org, to see if any animals in their herd have qualified for GE-EPDs. Animals with a GE-EPD are identified on the website with the double helix DNA logo beside the EPD. Additionally, percentile ranks are posted to provide standings for individual traits of animals. These ranks are available on IBBA’s website at http://www. gobrangus.com Members can find confidence in their efforts knowing these evaluations improve the predictions of offspring performance when making selection and mating decisions for the future. Increases in the number of genotyped animals continues to improve the predictive power of the genetic evaluation. The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA), headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, strives to provide the commercial cattle industry, domestically and internationally, with the best genetics possible.

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PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

CBCIA PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PRODUCERS FOR GENERATIONS by CBCIA Board Member Tracy Schohr The California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) is a producer-driven organization that fosters beef improvement and economic production based on information and education. The CBCIA is devoted to improvement of beef cattle in California through scientific breeding methods, performance evaluation and education. We appreciate the CCA members who have chosen to be members and supporters of the CBCIA. Since 1959, the mission of CBCIA has been to help cattle producers become more efficient and productive. “CBCIA accomplishes our mission to improve livestock production today and in the future through the dissemination of information, recognition of leaders and youth scholarships,” states Lodi-based Rita McPhee, CBCIA President 2018-2020. “We have a dedicated team of volunteers that serve on our board who are cattle producers, along with technical advisors from universities and cooperative extension agents.” 2018 Discover Southern Oregon Tour Registrations are coming in for the premier event of the CBCIA, our bus tours! These event’s draw ranchers from across California for a three-day packed agenda with tourist destinations, behind the scenes looks at agricultural operations and tours of ranching operations. This year’s event will include stops at Shasta Livestock, Driscoll Farms and Crater Lake. Ranchers who are opening their gates for the bus tour include: Tom and Kathy Deforest; Mike Byrne; Mike LeGrande; Duane Martin Livestock; Traynham Ranch and Hinton Ranch. The tour commences with a stop at a vertically integrated operation in Siskiyou County, Belcampo Ranches. “CBCIA tours are committed to the CBCIA mission of rancher education, by offering tours of ranching operations, in addition to other unique stops along the way,” says Abbie Nelson, Wilton, past CBCIA president and 2018 tour chairman, “The event is packed with fun, features great food and will offer amazing sights, an event you will not want to miss!”

24 California Cattleman April 2018

Educational Grants CBCIA offers small grants to encourage and support educational events. Eligibility is open to colleges, universities, youth organizations, local livestock and natural resources advisors and related organizations. CBCIA has supported youth breed activities including the Red Angus Leadership Roundup tour in California in 2015. CBCIA annually sponsor the Food Animal and Reproductive Medicine (FARM) Club at UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine annual cattle symposium, UC Cooperative extension seminars and other trainings for ranchers across the state. “The donations by CBCIA to statewide and regional educational events hosted by University Cooperative Extension Specialists and Farm Advisors allow for scientific researchers and industry experts from across the state and nation to speak with producers locally,” states James W. Oltjen, Ph.D. Cooperative Extension Animal Management Systems Specialist - Department of Animal Science, UC Davis. “In addition, CBCIA works with university staff to host an annual Cattlemen’s College at CCA Convention.” 2018 will mark the third year of recognizing exhibitors at the California State Fair who are showing a bred and owned animal. This contest is designed to showcase the breeding program of the exhibitor and their future herd production goals. The contest awards $1,500 annually and is based on an interview and herd book evaluation by a CBCIA committee. “In the Young Producer Award interview portion of the contest, we asked each contestant a series of questions pertaining to their background, current cattle management practices, future career and beef production goals and knowledge of current issues in the beef industry,” recalls judge Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., California State University, Chico. “All of the judges were very impressed by the caliber of applicants in the contest and we are excited to see participation continuing to grow in the competition.” Training Future Leaders Annually CBCIA selects two to three college students


majoring in beef cattle production and/or genetics to attend the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) Annual Symposium. The event is the industry’s premier forum to develop cooperation among all segments of the beef industry in the compilation and utilization of performance records to improve efficiency, profitability and sustainability of beef production. “The scholarships provided by CBCIA to attend the BIF conference allowed me to make valuable connections with those working on beef cattle genetics and enhance the applicability of the research projects I am working on at UC Davis,” said Emily Andreni, UC Davis graduate student. Hank Stone Memorial Scholarship Fund In 2014, the CBCIA Board of Directors voted to honor longtime CBCIA supporter and past president, Hank Stone, by dedicating our annual scholarship in his memory. Annually, $2,500 is awarded to two college student’s pursuing careers to improve the beef industry though the CCA scholarship program.

by paying your CBCIA dues that are an option on your annual CCA membership. If you would like to make a special donation to support the CBCIA initiatives above, checks can be made payable to CBCIA and mailed to the CCA office at 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. “I am honored to be a part of such a well-rounded program that provides education and insight into beef cattle. From the future leaders program and young producer awards to the tours and seed stock/commercial honors there is a place for all to be involved,” states CBCIA Secretary Celeste Settrini, Salinas.

looKing for the best the West has to offeR

Recognizing Industry Leaders CBCIA has honored California’s seedstock and commercial producers since 1972 who embrace genetic technology, scientific research, and are involved in industry organizations along with their local communities. Support CBCIA Help continue the good work of the CBCIA to improve the California cattle industry today and into the future 2018 CBCIA Discover Southern Oregon Tour - July 29-31 Registration and additional information available at www.calcattlemen.org 2018 CBCIA Officers Rita McPhee, President, Lodi Ryan Nelson, Vice President, Clements Celeste Settrini, Secretary-Treasurer

2018 CBCIA Board of Directors Jeff Clark, Rio Vista Kasey DeAtley, Chico Marissa Fisher, Browns Valley Jerry Hemsted, Cottonwood Cheryl LaFranchi, Calistoga Jerry Maltby, Williams, Carissa Koopmann Rivers, Montague Tracy Schohr, Gridley Lana Trotter, Porterville

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April 2018 California Cattleman 25


Improving the Use of

Genetics in Charolais EPDs by Sally Northcutt, Ph.D., Method Genetics LLC, AICA Genetic Consultant

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he Spring 2018 National Cattle Evaluation released in late December incorporated the use of single step genomic evaluation methodology provided by the AICA genetic evaluation service provider, Angus Genetics Inc (AGI). This was the initial release of expected progeny differences (EPDs) that were generated using proven technology allowing the most accurate and complete combination of the pedigree, performance and genotype SNP data generated by breeders and housed by the AICA. Favorable Comparisons Between Single Step and Previous Evaluation A comparison of the released Spring 2018 single step results to the Fall 2017 North American Charolais

26 California Cattleman April 2018

Genetic Evaluation yielded impressive results. While some breeds’ transitions to the single step methodology have created reranking of animal EPDs in certain traits, the Charolais animal EPD rankings between the two evaluation methodologies were very similar. This result was typical to previously published evaluation comparisons when new animals and performance records were added to past updates. The conservative weighting of the previously used molecular breeding values in the correlated trait model helped to moderate the EPD changes as the improved, single step methodology was implemented. In general, the rank correlations for the growth trait, scrotal, maternal milk and calving ease EPDs were .99 between the Fall 2017 and the Spring 2018 evaluations. An unchanged rank of animals would have a correlation of 1.00. The correlations for the carcass trait suite were in the .98 to .99 range. Also, keep in mind that genomic results were previously a correlated trait and the molecular breeding values were only incorporated into the CED, BW, WW, YW, Milk, REA, Marbling, and SC

EPDs. The single step methodology now also includes genotypes for the CEM, CW and Fat EPDs. Again, the molecular breeding values previously used as a correlated trait were removed from the single step approach, in which the genotypes were put directly into the national cattle evaluation. With single step, no calibration or updates of training populations are necessary. Like any evaluation update involving a methodology change, some of the actual EPDs may shift in magnitude within the population, and there will be some individual animals with EPD changes. It is always important to consider the EPD percentile ranks on an animal from one evaluation to the next. The percentile rank tables are updated with each AICA National Cattle Evaluation release, and consideration of these tables is especially important as the new single step methodology is implemented. Of course, like any evaluation update, the inclusion of new data from progeny or ancestors can also cause individual animal EPDs to change. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 28


WESTERN

AVILAMikeCATTLE CO. & Char Avila

Charolais

BREEDERS

PO Box 398, Clements, CA 95227 (530) 347-1478 • (530) 941-5025 cavila1956@att.net Bulls sell at World of Bulls, the Shasta Bull Sale and the Red Bluff Bull Sale. Select females for sale private treaty.

BAR 6JimCHAROLAIS Ansbach

POUNDS=PROFIT

43861 Burnt Ranch Rd. Mitchell, OR 97750 (541) 462-3083 Annual Bull Sale • February 2019 • Madras, OR

BIANCHI RANCHES Robert, Chris & Erica Bianchi

6810 Canada Rd. Gilroy, CA (408) 842-5855 • (408) 804-3153 Erica’s cell (408) 804-3133 Robert’s cell Bianchiranches@aol.com • www.bianchiranches.com California Girls Online Heifer Sale this October, watch for details. Bulls for sale private treaty and at leading bull sales. Call early for best selection.

BROKEN BOX RANCH Jerry and Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760, Williams, CA (530) 681-5046 Cell • (530) 473-2830 Office BBR@citlink.net • www.brokenboxranch.com Bulls available at Red Bluff, Fallon and off the ranch.

FRESNO STATE AGRICULTURE FOUNDATION California State University, Fresno

2415 E. San Ramon, Fresno, CA Randy Perry (559) 278-4793 http://fresnostate.edu/jcast/beef Cody McDougald • Student Herdsman (559) 284-4111 Bulls available each June during our private treaty bull sale, as well as leading fall sales.

W

e believe strongly in the value of crossbreeding and the benefits of heterosis or hybrid vigor. Crossbred calves are more vigorous at birth, they are more resistant to disease and they have increased performance levels or weight gain. In addition, crossbred beef cows have higher fertility levels, they are also more disease resistant and they are superior in terms of longevity, an often overlooked but very economically important trait in a beef herd. These combined factors result in the generation of more total pounds of beef being produced from a commercial cowherd when crossbreeding is utilized. We believe that Charolais bulls are the logical and best choice to use on the Angus-dominated commerical beef cowherd that currently exists in this country. They will infuse the benefits of heterosis and produce the “smokies” and “buckskins” that have been popular with cattle feeders and packers for decades Look for these Charolais breeders from throughout the West as your . or at leading source for Charolais genetics available off the ranch California, Oregon and Nevada sales.

JORGENSEN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen 25884 Mollier, Ave, Orland, CA (530) 865-7102

Top quality bulls available at the ranch and through Snyder Livestock’s ‘Bulls for the 21st Century’

NICHOLAS LIVESTOCK CO.

Nicoli Nicholas 6522 Vernon Rd., Nicolaus, CA • (916) 455-2384 Breeding Charolais cattle for 57 years, 150 bulls available private treaty in 2018.

ROMANS RANCHES

Bill & Cindy Romans • (541) 538-2921 Jeff & Julie Romans • (541) 358-2905 romansranches@hotmail.com www.romanscharolais.com Annual Production Sale • March 2019 • Westfall, OR April 2018 California Cattleman 27


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26 Interim EPD Procedural Changes With the shift to the single step genetic evaluation, there will no longer be interim EPDs calculated using the genomic data in the time in between the three, national cattle evaluation runs per year. Newly tested animals will have the genomic results incorporated into their EPDs only when processed through one of these national cattle evaluation runs. That said, pedigree estimates, as well as interims based on phenotypic records (e.g., weights, scans) in proper contemporary groups submitted by AICA members, will continue to generate interim EPDs prior to an upcoming national cattle evaluation. Moving forward, breeders will need to plan ahead for their potential DNA testing to ensure that the genotyping results are completed at the lab and received by the AICA office prior to the national cattle evaluation data cutoff in order to be included as part of the evaluation results. Again, animals with performance data submitted in proper contemporary groups and passing edits will continue to receive interim EPDs as they have in the past. New Technology at a Lower Price Charolais breeders will be able to access a new genomic

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test option at a lower price that allows wider use of genomic testing across the herd. Through the cooperation of the AICA genomic service provider, Neogen/ GeneSeek, the GGP BOV50K option will be available for purchase, with the results incorporated into the genetic evaluation. The cost on the new test to be advertised by the AICA often includes parent verification. Modernizing the AICA Genetic Evaluation System The single step methodology for genetic evaluations is a modern, proven technology used not only in the beef industry, but widely accepted in other species such as dairy, swine and poultry. In addition, at Method Genetics, we have worked with single step genetic evaluations in commercial cattle populations since 2014. We have found this methodology to provide accurate, robust use of both the DNA results, pedigree, and existing performance data to create dependable genetic selection tools. The improvements in the AICA genetic evaluation system by moving to single step methodology will allow breeders to aggressively select for traits of economic relevance with more confidence. This is an exciting step in ensuring that Charolais breeders and their commercial customers have improved genetic selection tools that will reliably characterize Charolais genetics moving forward.


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• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • April 2018 California Cattleman 29


RANGELAND TRUST TALK

PLANNING TO PROTECT LAND FOR FUTURE from the California Rangeland Trust Many ranchers face challenges as they plan how they will protect their land for future generations. It’s a question that has haunted Marilyn Russell, a third-generation rancher from Mendocino County, since her childhood—until last year, when she and her husband Jerry made the generous decision to donate the conservation easement on the SagehornRussell Ranch to the California Rangeland Trust. “I knew this ranch was my heritage, something I needed to be responsible for,” explains Marilyn. She describes other special interest groups who made generous offers for her land. “But they are not ranchers. They are city people who don’t have the right management practices at all. So, the California Rangeland Trust really got on my radar as I thought about it and studied it. I read the easement and the language and I thought, you guys understand. You understand what’s going on.” A conservation easement is a legal agreement regarding a property’s future use. The property owner can decide to enter into this agreement, surrendering certain private rights involving the use of their land while still retaining land ownership and all unrestricted rights not detailed in the easement terms. At the California Rangeland Trust, conservation easements are carefully tailored to the needs and circumstances of each individual landowner. The conservation easement on the Sagehorn-Russell Ranch will protect it from being parceled or developed, ensuring that the Sagehorn family’s legacy will be preserved and honored in perpetuity. Growing up, Marilyn was her ranching father’s “righthand man.” It was a tough life without luxuries or amenities. “We did not travel,” she remembers. “The ranch was everything.” Her family went without in order to pay for her college education. Marilyn describes it all with gratitude, expressing a sense of privilege that she was able to have spent her formative years so close to the land. “You really have to love the land to live out here and work hard,” she says. “You have to feed stock when it’s cold, wet, snowing, boiling hot. You understand when the sun comes up and what the weather is and how you have to dress for that day and what you need to do for your stock. You are intimately associated with the land. You’re not protected in a home. You are part of the land.” During her 30-year career as a biology teacher at Livermore High School, Marilyn helped generations of young Californians connect to the world around them. Although Marilyn and Jerry did not have children of their own, the wonderful relationships she built with many of her students led her to call them her “gift sons and daughters.” She describes taking students who had never been off the pavement or seen the ocean on night drives to look for wildlife, or day trips to explore the tidepools. Her generational way of thinking reflects the quintessential perspective of a rancher who understands the 30 California Cattleman April 2018

importance of the past and feels a duty toward the future. She repeats the old Native American saying, “We don’t inherit the land from our ancestors. We give it on to our children.” “You can’t just graze the land flat for one year to make some money,” Marilyn says. “You have to manage it so it goes on. It’s generational. You’re thinking seven generations out.” After years of struggling to find the right ranch manager, Paul Holleman came on the ranch in 1994, and the place saw a major turnaround under his guidance. Now, Paul’s son Colter, daughter-in-law Renee and the couple’s two children, Cleo and Colter Jr., serve an integral role in the daily management of ranch operations. Marilyn and Jerry Russell have made the decision to leave the ranch in the hands of Colter and Renee Holleman. In this, Marilyn has found the answer to her childhood question about the future of the Sagehorn-Russell ranch. She has peace in her stewardship decisions and security knowing that her family’s beloved home will stay in good hands, protected forever in her partnership with the California Rangeland Trust. “It is a very beautiful world,” Marilyn says. “ I want to leave my piece of it in the best shape possible—with a family that has those same values, and a land trust that also shares those wonderful connections.”

Colter Holleman with handmade reata.


Farm Credit shares ag career opportunities with californians the program expanded its offerings when it received state Adults and high school students interested in careers in certification for its new Beginning Farm and Ranch Manager agriculture will have help reaching their goals thanks to a Apprenticeship Program, which requires 250 hours of recent $15,000 donation by Farm Credit to the Center for coursework and 3,000 hours of paid on-the-job training on a Land-Based Learning, a non-profit that inspires, educates farm under the mentorship of a seasoned farmer. and cultivates future generations of California farmers and The FARMS Leadership program was Land-Based agricultural leaders. Learning’s first program, launched in 1993. It encourages high Farm Credit donated $10,000 to Land-Based Learning’s school students in 16 counties to get hands-on experience on California Farm Academy program which offers a sevenfarms and ranches and to consider making ag a career. month training program for adults interested in becoming Many of the students are the first generation in their farmers, and another $5,000 to the Farming, Agriculture, and families to attend college, and many in fact are the sons and Resource Management for Sustainability Leadership Program daughters of farmworkers. (FARMS), which introduces high school students to college and career opportunities in agriculture, especially in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math. The involved Farm Credit organizations -- American AgCredit, CoBank, Farm Credit West, Fresno-Madera Farm Credit and Golden State Farm Credit – are customerowned associations supporting rural communities and agriculture with reliable, consistent credit and financial services. Leili Ghazi, president of CoBank’s Western Region Agribusiness Banking Group, said the contributions are part of Farm Credit’s ongoing efforts to enhance agriculture in California and the West. “Farm Credit has been helping support the Center for Land-Based Learning for many years and over that time has contributed nearly $67,000 to help their programs grow,” Ghazi said. “For farming to remain viable, we need a constant influx of new farmers and people working in agrelated occupations, and helping the Center is an important part of our commitment to farming.” Christine McMorrow, the Winters-based Center’s director of development and communications, said the ongoing Farm Credit contributions have helped enable the Center to grow and expand. “Support from Farm Credit and other sponsors and supporters have made a big difference for our programs,” McMorrow said. “It’s allowed us to really establish our programs and to look at what needs we’re not fulfilling and given us the opportunity to offer more where needed.” Farm Credit funding helps provide 800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com tuition assistance for the Farm Academy – the program costs $4,000 a year – and also helps with an intensive tractor driving and General Insurance Brokers License 0208825 maintenance program. Earlier this year, www.andreini.com

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

WILD

Doug Winnett

April 2018 California Cattleman 31


Cattlemen’s Report

KESSLER ANGUS BULL SALE Milton-Freewater, Ore. • Feb. 20, 2018 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 114 Angus bulls...........................$5,015 SHAW CATTLE CO. Caldwell, Idaho. • Feb. 21, 2018 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Trent Stewart 158 Hereford bulls......................$4,321 174 Angus bulls...........................$4,046 27 Red Angus bulls....................$4,685

LORENZEN RED ANGUS BULL SALE Madras, Ore.. • Feb. 22, 2018 Col. Rick Machado 3 Red Angus herdbulls........... $19,670 90 Red Angus bulls....................$5,273 47 Red Composite bulls............$4,106 16 Black Composite bulls.........$3,735 14 heifers........................................$4,257 BAR 6 CHAROLAIS COWMAN’S KIND BULL SALE Madras, Ore.. • Feb. 23, 2018 Col. Rick Machado 99 Charolais bulls........................$4,631

Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 126 SimAngus & Angus bulls........$5,221 47 females..............................................$2,391 HARRELL HEREFORD RANCH Baker City, Ore. • March 5, 2018

BUCHANAN ANGUS RANCH BULL SALE Klamath Falls, Ore. • Feb . 25, 2018 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 39 Buchanan Angus bulls.........$5,301 20 consignor bulls.......................$3,645

Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 144 Hereford bulls.............................$6,140 34 registered heifers...........................$2,934 10 fall-calving cows............................$2,630 40 commercial heifers......................$1,501 7 ranch geldings..................................$7,250 10 mares................................................$5,680

COLYER HEREFORD AND ANGUS PRODUCTION SALE Bruneau, Idaho • Feb . 26, 2018 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Kyle Colyer 134 Hereford bulls......................$6,632 64 Angus bulls.............................$6,477 37 heifers........................................42,980 25 pregnant recipient cows......$4,556

Snyder Livestock’s high point Angus breeder Don and Diana Cardey (center), Turlock,also took home “Lucy’s Award” at the 2018 Snyder Livestock“Bulls for the 20th Century” Bull Test Sale.

High Point Charolais Breeder Fred Jorgensen, Jorgensen Charolais, Orland, with Snyder Livestock’s Lucy Rechel. 32 California Cattleman April 2018

TRINITY FARMS BULL SALE Ellensburg, Wash. • March 3, 2018

BAKER ANGUS RANCH BULL SALE Vale, Ore. • Feb. 24, 2018 Sale Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing Col. Rick Machado 130 Angus bulls..........................$3,675 20 commercial bred heifers....$1,650 41commercial open heifers....$1,177

American Hereford’s Mark Holt with Bobby Harrell at Harrell Hereford’s Bull Sale in Baker City, Ore. on March 5.

High Point Red Angus breeder Lana Trotter, Trotter Red Angus, Porterville, with Snyder Livestock’s Lucy Rechel.

Pictured are Dan Bell and Lilla Bell, Bell Ranch, as the 2018 Snyder LivestockHigh Point Hereford Breeder.


Cattlemen’s Report

THOMAS ANGUS RANCH Baker City, Ore. • March 6, 2018 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 145 Angus bulls.......................$4,307 39 fall-calving bred heifers...$3,185

RIVERBEND RANCH PRODUCTION SALE Idaho Falls, Idaho • March 10, 2018 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 412 Angus bulls.......................$5,330 SNYDER LIVESTOCK Bulls for the 21st Century Yerington, Nev. • March 11, 2018 Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers 102 bulls.....................................$4,079 67 Angus bulls.........................$4,206 4 Balancer bulls........................$3,725 9 Charolais bulls......................$3,800 6 Hereford bulls......................$4,142 2 LimFlex bulls........................$4,400 12 Red Angus bulls................$4,400 2 SimAngus bulls....................$4,400

SPRING COVE RANCH & JBB/AL HEREFORDS Cattlemen’s Connection Bull Sale Bliss, Idaho • March 12, 2018 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Kyle Colyer 150 yearling Angus bulls.......$5,742 35 yearling Angus heifers.....$3,098 19 commercial heifers...........$1,401 50 bred comm. heifers..........$1,700 38 Hereford bulls....................$2,450 ROMANS RANCHES CHAROLAIS BULL SALE Westfall, Ore. • March 13, 2018 Col. Dennis Metzger 68 fall bulls.................................$4,624 27 spring yearling bulls..........$3,815 95 total bulls..............................$4,394

Col. Rick Machado (center) with Art and Stacy Butler at the Cattlemen’s Connection Bull Sale near Bliss, Idaho celebrating the 99th aniversary sale of Spring Cove Ranch.

WARD RANCHES BULL SALE Gardnerville, Nev. • March 17, 2018 Col. Eric Duarte 46 Angus bulls.........................$4,172 21 Optimizer bulls..................$3,286 American Salers Association’s Dean Pike with Gary Ward at Ward Ranch’s Bull Sale in Gardnerville, Nev. March 17.

Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. This parasite infects the red blood cells and causes severe anemia, weakness, fever, lack of appetite, depression, constipation, decreased milk production, jaundice, abortion and sometimes death. This killed vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age from infection and requires a booster given 4-6 weeks after the initial vaccination.

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April 2018 California Cattleman 33


IN MEMORY Tom Griffith

Thomas W. Griffith, 66, passed away Tuesday, March 6, at Enloe Hospital in Chico, after a long and courageous battle with paralysis. Tom was born May 14, 1951, to Mary Elma (Seaver) and Robert Lawton Griffith. He attended school in Williams from K-12th grade, then attended Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and later Chico State University where he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Plant Science and Ag Business, as well as an Ag Teaching Credential. In 1975, Tom married Lisa Montgomery. They had one son Matthew. Matthew inherited Tom’s love and skill with horses and cattle. Tom grew up on his family’s farm and went on to farm with his father after graduating from college. Tom and his brother-in-law, Doug Parker, started Griffith and Parker in 1977 and farmed and ranched together successfully until 2004 when Tom and his son Matthew started Griffith Livestock, a California and Oregon based cattle operation.

A very civic minded person, Tom was a Williams Unified School Board member, serving as board president, past president of the Colusa Horseman’s Association and served as Williams Fire Commissioner. He also volunteered for the Army National Guard from 1971 to 1977. Tom was an avid team roper and was a member of the CCPRA, USTRC and ACTRA. He was also a member of the Colusa Farm Bureau, Glenn-Colusa and California Cattlemen’s Associations. Tom is survived by his wife, Lisa Griffith; son Matthew Griffith (Julie) of Williams; two grandchildren, Devin and Riley; and sister, Judy Griffith Parker (Doug) of Williams; as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Tom was preceded in death by both his parents. A Celebration of Tom’s Life was held Sunday, March 18, at the Williams Fire Station and a memorial team roping will be held Sunday, April 15, in Woodland. In his memory, contributions can be made to the Thomas Griffith Scholarship Fund. This scholarship will be awarded to young adults pursuing a higher education in Agriculture. Umpqua Bank, 540 Amanda Street, Arbuckle, California 95912.

Mary Violini

Mary Barnes Violini was born in Roswell, New Mexico on Feb. 26, 1915 to Charles and Dora Barnes. She passed away at her home on Jan. 29. Mary moved to Salinas where she attended Salinas High School and Heald Business College. She met her husband Joe and married in 1938. Mary spent her life as a homemaker and wife to Joe, a Monterey County cattleman. She was the bookkeeper for the family business, Violini Brothers. In the early years, sometime in the 1930’s, Mary attended art school in Oakland. Her many talents included tole painting, knitting, woodwork, making miniature dollhouse furniture and almost any other craft one could imagine. She could do anything! Being an accomplished seamstress, Mary sewed many a Halloween costume for family members as well as creating her own wardrobe. She was a clothing and textile leader for the Buena Vista 4-H for over 20 plus years, a founding member of the Buena Vista Garden Club and a member of the Monterey County Cattlewomen’s Organization (formerly Cowbelles). She was 34 California Cattleman April 2018

also involved in the Visiting Nurses Association, where she shared her quilting skills for a fundraising project. Mary was an excellent cook, providing a warming stew and polenta or enchiladas and beans to the cowboys at the family cattle brandings up at the ranch. Pies were her specialty also, and she passed on that skill to her grandchildren. She is fondly remembered by nieces and nephews for enriching their lives during difficult times and considered ‘mom’ to many. Mary is survived by her children Jim Violini (Kate), Joyce Secondo (Tim) and Annette Leeke (Tim), She is also survived by her grandchildren, Scott, Sheron, Kelly, Adam, Danielle and Hanna and 6 great grandchildren, along with numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband of 70 years, Joe and her siblings Martha, Henry, Gladys, Hillary, Jim and Bill. Family services have been held. Memorial contributions can be directed to the Monterey County Cattlewomen’s Organization, 22215 Tara Court, Salinas, CA, 93908 the Monterey County 4-H Fashion Revue, 1432 Abbott Street, Salinas, CA 93908 or donate to the charity of choice.


Katie White

NEW Arrivals

Katie White was born in Berkley on March 8, 1967 to Tula Gustafson Jeremy and Marissa Douglas and Sharon (Elam) Gustafson, Bakersfield, Eischeid. She passed away in welcomed a baby girl, Exeter, on March 7 at the age of Tula Whitney, on Dec. 10, 50, after a battle with cancer. 2017. Tula weighed in at 8 Katie married Terry White in November 2008. She worked pounds 4 ounces and was for 20 years in transportation as 21 and one-quarter inches the Transportation Director for long. Grandparents are Visalia Unified School District and Dan and Diane Gustafson most recently with the Madera of Susanville and Bob and Janet Hanson of 3H Cattle Unified School District. She loved her second home in Company in Hanford. Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Family was very important to her and she enjoyed the Sunday Night Dinners with the kids and grandkids. Katie is survived by her parents, Douglas Eisheid of Sunland and Sharon Elam of Santa Maria; her husband Terry To share your family news, send White of Exeter; one son Cole Avila of Palm Dessert; two obituaries, birth announcements or stepsons Brad (Emily) White of Visalia, Bryn (Melany) White of Exeter; two daughters Amanda (Jared) Little of Hanford wedding announcements to the CCA and Sara Avila of Chowchilla. She is also survived by her office by calling (916) 444-0845 three grandchildren, Mason, Memphis and Kenzie. or by emailing them to A Mass in her honor was celebrated on Saturday, March 17, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Visalia. Burial was in the magazine@calcattlemen.org. Exeter District Cemetery. Donations may be made in her name to Optimal Hospice, 2439 W Whitendale Ave, Visalia, CA 93277.

Share your news with CCA!

Marie Porter

Marie Louise Porter of Salinas passed away at her home on Feb. 16. Marie was born in Los Angles on Sept. 2, 1929. She moved to Salinas in 1940 where she met her husband Edward and married in 1950. Marie, who loved her work as a homemaker, was also passionate about impacting the community she dearly loved. She was a member of the First Baptist Church of Salinas and a member of the Monterey County Cattlewomen’s Organization, a group that she enjoyed, not just because of the friendships made but also because of the cause the cattlewomen furthered. Marie was preceded in death by her husband Edward of 65 years. She is survived by her children Jeff, Kathleen and Robert of Salinas. Grandchildren Rebecca of Salem, Ore.; Kyle, Elizabeth and Sarah of Salinas. Great grandson, Ryan of Salem, Ore. Family services have been held. Memorial donations can be made to the Monterey County CattleWomen’s Organization, 22215 Tare Court, Salinas, CA 93908.

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April 2018 California Cattleman 35


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs M i d Va l l e y

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

M i d Va l l e y

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M i d Va l l e y

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

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Join us for our annual bull sale Friday, Sept. 7 at the ranch in Los Molinos!

36 California Cattleman April 2018


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2018.

Angus

RAnch

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Annual Bull Sale: Sat., September 1, 2018 Inaugural Female Sale: Mon., October 15, 2018

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i d ............................... V a l l e y Owners Tim & MarilynM Callison Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

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April 2018 California Cattleman 37


Annual Partners for Performance Bull Sale Sept. 5, 2018 Female Sale Oct. 13, 2018 Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

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Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. -PRODUCTION SALE SEPT. 22, 201814298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

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Gerber, CA

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 38 California Cattleman April 2018

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THANK YOU TO OUR MODOC BULL SALE BUYERS!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly!

h


Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

Join us Oct 15, 2018 for our annual production sale!

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

3L

Annual Sale First Monday in March

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

Progressive Genetics for over years

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

The Best of Both Worlds

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch! Phone 707.448.9208

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com THD ©

April 2018 California Cattleman 39


Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby (707) 876-3567 (707) 876-1992

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8.

Payette River Ranch $15,000,000 Idaho Cattle Ranch 50K± Acres with permit $11,000,000

2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

208-345-3163 www.knipeland.com

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

40 California Cattleman April 2018

THD ©


County groups honor cattlemen & Cattlewomen of the year

3300 Longmire Drive• College Station, TX 77845 (800) 768-4066 • (979) 693-0388 fax: (979) 693-7994 e-mail: info@bovine-elite.com

On March 23 at Seven Oaks Recently, several county cattlemen’s and cattlewomen’s groups paid homage Country Club in Bakersfield, the Kern to their outstanding members whose County Cattlemen’s Association and contributions to the livestock industry Kern County CattleWomen honored deserve praise. two longtime members for their service On Feb. 17 at the Butte County and sacrifice to the areas beef producers. Cattlemen’s Association’s annual Red Jack Lavers, Glennville was Meat Dinner, held at Gold Country recognized as the Kern County Casino in Oroville, hundreds of local Cattleman of the Year. Jack, who has beef industry supporters gathered for served as Kern County president also their annual extravaganza. This year, served as a second vice president to the in addition to the usual opportunity to California Cattlemen’s Association and mingle with longtime friends and fellow currently serves as chairman of CCA’s ranchers, the Butte County Cattlemen Ag and Food Policy Committee. honored Ed Lacque of the Orland Erin Rogers was named Kern Livestock Commission Yard with County’s Cattlewoman of the Year. their Cattleman of the Year Award. In As a wife and mother herself, she is addition to being a supporter of the passionate about her community and local Butte Cattlemen, Lacque also works diligently to improve it. She belongs to the Glenn-Colusa Cattlemen is a longtime member of the Kern and Plumas-Sierra Cattlemen. CattleWomen’s unit and steps up to While it wasn’t a cattleman or serve in any capacity when asked and cattlewoman of the year award, someone encourages others to play proactive role deserving of both was recognized at in their communities. the Feb. 22 spring meeting of the San CCA extends sincere congratulations Luis Obispo Cattlemen’s Association. to these and other award winners at JoAnn Switzer, Atascadero, was county events this spring. honored for 32 years of service to the county association as their secretary/treasurer. As mentioned at the meeting, anyone who knows JoAnn knows that no award could illustrate all that she has done for the agriculture industry on the Central Coast. On Feb. 23 at the annual spring meeting of the Monterey County Cattlemen’s Association, Steve Rianda Jr., Greenfield, was recognized as the group’s Cattleman San Luis Obispo Cattlemen Second Vice President of the Year by Monterey County Seth Scribner, President Claude Loftus and Vice Sheriff Steve Bernal President Anthony Stornetta with JoAnn Switzer.

Monterey County Sheriff Steve Bernal with Butte County Cattlemen’s Holly Foster Monterey Cattleman of the Year Steve Rianda, Jr. with Butte County Honoree Ed Lacque.

April 2018 California Cattleman 41


All West/Select Sires..................................................... 17

Freitas Rangeland Improvements............................... 28

Pinenut Livestock Supply............................................ 28

Amador Angus............................................................. 36

Fresno State Agriculture Foundation...................27, 40

Pitchfork Cattle Co....................................................... 39

American Hereford Association................................. 38

Furtado Angus.............................................................. 37

Andreini......................................................................... 31

Furtado Livestock Enterprises.................................... 41

Red River Farms........................................................... 38

Avila Cattle Co.............................................................. 27

Genoa Livestock........................................................... 39

Bar 6 Charolais.............................................................. 27

Gonsalve Ranch............................................................ 37

Bar R Angus.................................................................. 36

Harrell Hereford Ranch............................................... 39

Bianchi Ranches........................................................... 27

HAVE Angus................................................................. 37

BMW Angus................................................................. 36

Hogan Ranch................................................................ 38

Bovine Elite, LLC.......................................................... 41

Hone Ranch................................................................... 38

Broken Arrow Angus................................................... 36

Hufford’s Herefords...................................................... 39

Broken Box Ranch........................................................ 27

Endovac/Immvac.......................................................... 29

Skinner Livestock Transportation.............................. 41

Broken Box Ranch........................................................ 40

International Brangus Breeders Association ........... 21

Sonoma Mountain Herefords..................................... 39

Buchanan Angus........................................................... 36

J-H Feed Inc.................................................................. 40

Spanish Ranch.........................................................23, 39

Byrd Cattle Co............................................................... 36

J/V Angus...................................................................... 38

Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................. 37

California State University, Chico.............................. 40

Jorgensen Ranch........................................................... 27

Teixeira Cattle Company............................................. 37

California Wagyu Breeders......................................... 40

Knipe Land Company.................................................. 40

Cattlemen’s Livestock Market....................................... 2

Lambert Ranch............................................................. 38

Tumbleweed Ranch...................................................... 39

Charron Ranch............................................................. 36

Lander Veterinary Clniic............................................. 40

Cherry Glen Beefmasters............................................ 39

Little Shasta Ranch....................................................... 39

Conlan Ranches California......................................... 40

McPhee Red Angus...................................................... 38

Conlin Supply Company, LLC.................................... 29

Nicholas Livestock Co................................................. 27

Corsair Angus Ranch................................................... 36

Noahs Angus Ranch..................................................... 37

Dal Porto Livestock...................................................... 37

O’Connell Ranch.......................................................... 37

Donati Ranch................................................................ 36

ORIgen........................................................................... 41

Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.......................................... 40

Orvis Cattle Company................................................. 38

Western Stockman’s Market........................................ 11

EZ Angus Ranch........................................................... 37

P.W. Gillibrand.............................................................. 38

Western Video Market................................................... 3

Five Star Land Company............................................. 40

Pacfic Tracce Minerals...........................................35, 40

Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................. 37

42 California Cattleman April 2018

Romans Ranches.......................................................... 27 Sammis Ranch.............................................................. 37 Schafer Ranch............................................................... 37 Schohr Herefords.......................................................... 39 Sierra Ranches............................................................... 39 Silveira Bros................................................................... 38 Silveus ........................................................................... 43

Turlock Livestock Auction Yard................................... 7 Veterinary Service, Inc................................................. 40 VF Red Angus............................................................... 38 Vintage Angus Ranch............................................38, 44 Visalia Livestock Market............................................. 15 Western Charolais Breeders........................................ 27 Western States Angus Association............................. 25


IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA and gives a portion of insurance premiums back to the association watching your back in Sacramento!

Aaron Tattersall

303.854.7016 aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann

530.218.3379 jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0B48084

Matt Griffith

530.570.3333 matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com Lic #0124869

Dan VanVuren

209.484.5578 dan@dvvins.com Lic #0E44519

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! April 2018 California Cattleman

43


A special “Thank You” and congratulations from

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH

to long-time buyer and winner of the 2018 Beef Quality Assurance Award

BENTLY RANCH

Bently Ranch, based in Minden, Nev., is a large, diversified commercial cattle and farming operation that prides itself on sustainability. Bently Ranch was recently recognized by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association as the 2018 BQA Winner for its innovative approach to doing what is best for the land and natural resources, the livestock, and the community they are a part of. “Bently Ranch has been purchasing Vintage Angus Bulls for the last 15 + years. We have had and will continue to have full confidence in all of our bull purchases from Vintage. The Bulls are some of the top genetics to be found anywhere in the United States and will stack up to any breeder in the United States. The bulls have always been grown out well, both to show their genetic potential and always given us many years of service. We believe that the genetics from Vintage Angus have been a large contribution to our successful meat business and topping of the Western Video Market sales. We will continue to be a return buyer and will have full confidence in the genetics we purchase from Vintage Angus.”

— Matt McKinney, general manager

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

44 California Cattleman April 2018 OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

Pictured are Bently Ranch’s Matt McKinney (center) and Tod Radelfinger (right) accepting the 2018 BQA Award, presented by Cargill.

25th Annual

“Carcass Maker” Bull Sale Thursday, Sept.6, 2018 LaGrange , CA

California Cattleman April 2018  
California Cattleman April 2018  
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