Page 1

February 2018

New This Month...

CCA Shares Long-Range Strategic Plan tax changes for 2018 advantage of using Hereford & Beefmaster Genetics Fires take toll on california ranchers February 2018 California Cattleman 1


Cattle Co. Teixeira Performance Plus Bull Sale ual n n A 17 th

President’s Day • Monday, Feb. 19 • 1 p.m. 3867 NW Lower Bridge Way • Terrebonne, OR

SELLING 130 ANGUS & SIMANGUS BULLS ALSO OFFERING 30 SPRING BRED FEMALES

SELLING SONS OF INDUSTRY ELITE SIRES LIKE: PAYWEIGHT • IN FOCUS • DISCOVERY • FORTRESS • DESTINATION • COMRADE TEX FORTRESS 6506 TEX PAYWEIGHT 6533 EPDS

+9 +.4 71 117 2.18 .73 .47 .035 77.46 113.80

EPDS

TRAIT RANK

CED BW WW YW SC MB RE FAT $W $B

+5 +2.8 81 144 1.30 .91 .56 .018 65.30 183.17

25% 30% 4% 10% 1% 25% 50% 85% 2% 50%

TRAIT RANK

CED BW WW YW SC MB RE FAT $W $B

60% 80% 1% 1% 20% 15% 35% 65% 10% 1%

REG # 18737298 • 13 BROTHERS SELL!

REG # 18711166 • 3 BROTHERS SELL!

TEX PHENOM 6508

TEX DEMAND 6537 EPDS

+4 +.2 49 92 1.14 .69 .75 -.028 60.45 129.75

EPDS

TRAIT RANK

CED BW WW YW SC MB RE FAT $W $B

+8 -.1 46 72 .68 .78 .23 .021 55.98 105.39

70% 25% 55% 45% 25% 30% 15% 10% 20% 30%

REG # 18687155 • 26 BROTHERS SELL!

TRAIT RANK

CED BW WW YW SC MB RE FAT $W $B

35% 25% 65% 85% 55% 20% 90% 70% 25% 60%

REG # 18687142 • 23 BROTHERS SELL!

TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO. WANTS TO INTRODUCE YOU TO IGENITY TESTING WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO. CUSTOM INDEX ON FEB. 19 AT 10 A.M. FOR A 30-MINUTE PRESENTATION THE MORNING PRIOR TO THE BULL SALE. “WE AT NEOGEN GENESEEK OPERATIONS ARE PROUD TO PARTNER WITH TEIXEIRA CATTLE CO. IN INTRODUCING AN EASY-TO-READ CUSTOM SELECTION INDEX BASED ON IGENITY TESTING. THE TEIXEIRAS ARE CLEARLY FOCUSED ON THE PROFITABILITY OF THEIR CUSTOMERS.” - NEOGEN GENESEEK OPERATIONS JOHN TEIXEIRA (805) 448-3859 ALLAN TEIXEIRA (805) 310-3353 TOM HILL (541) 990-5479 ADAM TEIXEIRA (805) 459-1519 CATTLE@THOUSANDHILLSRANCH.COM WWW.TEIXEIRACATTLECO.COM 2 California Cattleman February 2018

ALL BULLS GENESEEK TESTED!

Sale Managed by:

Larry Cotton (517) 294-0777 Ryan Cotton (806) 206-8361

WATCH FOR BULL VIDEOS ON OUR WEBSITE COMING SOON!


February 2018 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION David Daley, Oroville

Looking Forward & Adapting to Change

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

by CCA Second Vice President Cindy Tews

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Mark Lacey, Independence

business is something to be very proud As a child, early mornings consisted of getting out of bed before sunrise to either of for all of us! I am happy to tell my Pat Kirby, Wilton ship cattle with my dad, Phil Tews, who part of that story on many levels, from Mike Miller, San Jose was at that time an order buyer, or having the counter at our market, to sitting on a Cindy Tews, Fresno my mom Sandy Newman saddle up two tailgate with a customer, to giving a speech TREASURER horses so that I could go help gather. Both in front of school kids, to talking about Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis were my favorites. it sitting next to an airplane passenger, to Fast forward to this point in life and lobbying my message in Sacramento and STAFF the same holds true. Both shipping and Washington, D.C. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT gathering are my favorites. Along with my Being given the opportunity to serve Billy Gatlin father, we have cows and calves on the as a CCA Second Vice President is a VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS pastures in the foothills of Clovis. As a huge honor to me! I have reviewed the producer, I recognize what is necessary to schedule for 2018 and am ready to attend Justin Oldfield get cattle to the corrals and sorted to sell as many county, state and federal meetings DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS and how stressful the whole process can as my schedule will allow. I look forward Kirk Wilbur be. What is done often times just once a to taking my knowledge and experience year when so much of the bottom line is DIRECTOR OF FINANCE and sharing it with those that create the riding on it. How many hats that need to Lisa Brendlen regulations that govern our businesses. be worn to succeed, not to mention the I have traveled to D.C. many times and DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS help from mother nature and rainfall. am comfortable speaking to lawmakers of Jenna Chandler I see it every week at our livestock OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR market, whether that producer is culling a all ranks. I look forward to attending the Steak and Eggs breakfast once again and Katie Roberti non-income producing animal or selling walking the halls of our state capitol. To the product they have invested an entire year to market. Often times they just stop any that are interested in getting started, I PUBLICATION SERVICES strongly encourage you to do so! in to visit about the weather, feed costs, OFFICE & CIRCULATION Whether it be Sacramento or politics or an update on family. It is those Office: (916) 444-0845 Washington, D.C., walking the halls is ties that bind us to the community. My Fax: (916) 444-2194 similar to walking in your pasture. There community includes the beef community MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR can be some manure that you need to step and that is an area I am very proud of. Stevie Ipsen over. But once you lend your voice to the Seeing cattle grazing on the grasses in (208) 996-4922 voices of others, it gains momentum. For California is an absolute joy! We are great stevie.ipsen@gmail.com without telling our stories, we will all be stewards of the land! Our gathering, magazine@calcattlemen.org handling and working techniques are very vulnerable to our way of life becoming ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES advanced and being a part of the livestock extinct. Matt Macfarlane mobile: (916) 803-3113 SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 office: (916) 434-5970 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or M3cattlemarketing@gmail.com California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org 4

The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher.

Periodical postage paid at Bakersfield, CA and additional mailing offices. Publication # 8-3600 National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman February 2018 California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON COVER ONTHE THE COVER

In longstanding tradition, the spring issues of the California Cattleman highight news from major breed associations. In February, the California Cattleman brings to you news from the Hereford and Beefmaster breeds. This month’s cover, shot on the Central Coast and shared by international photography firm Q Images, depicts the warm winter of the coast being enjoyed by a healthy set of Hereford cows.

FEBRUARY 2018 Volume 101, Issue 2

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE When work is what you love

8

UPCOMING CCA SPRING TOUREVENTS

UPCOMING CCA MEETINGS & EVENTS Feb. 7

Santa Barbara County Cattlemen’s Meeting Santa Maria

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK Administration passes tax reform

10

HERD HEALTH CHECK Spring calving versus fall calving

20

Feb. 16 Butte County Cattlemen’s Meeting Oroville

WORKING RINGSIDE Spring brings marketing optimism

34

Feb. 17

Humboldt-Del Norte Cattlemen’s Dinner Dance Ferndale

RANGELAND TRUST TALK CRT marks 20th anniversary

38

Feb. 17

Fall River-Big Valley Cattlemen’s Meeting Bieber

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Recognizing efforts of our youth

54

SPECIAL FEATURES

Are your ready for tax changes 12 CCA implementing new strategic plan 16 Ranchers rebounding after fierce fire season 24 Prestige of Certified Hereford Beef 28 Butterflies return after cattle graze 44 Snyder Livestock offers tough testing regimen 50 Beefmaster crossbreeding benefits 58

READER SERVICES

Buyers’ Guide 62 Obituaries 68 New Arrivals 69 Advertisers Index 70

Feb. 22 San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Meeting Paso Robles Feb. 23

Monterey County Cattlemen’s Meeting Location to be determined

Feb. 24

Santa Clara County Cattlemen’s Meeting Gilroy

March 8

Inyo-Mono-Alpine Cattlmen’s Meeting Livermore

March 13 March 14

CCA Executive Meeting Sacramento CCA Steak & Eggs Legislative Breakfast & Lobby Day Sacramento

March 14

San Joaquin-Stanislaus Cattlemen’s Meeting Stockton

March 19

Contra Costa-Alamenda Cattlemen’s Meeting Stockton

April 10-12

NCBA Legislative Conference Washington, D.C.

May 24 & 25

CA/AZ Feeder Meeting San Diego

June 21-23

CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting Redding Cattleman 5 February 2018 California


A Family Business Selling Bulls Under One Iron Since 1959

A N N U A L

C E N T R A L

O R E G O N

B U L L SA L E F E B R UA RY 22, 2018

Madras, Oregon

180 BULLS • 15 ELITE FEMALES

RED ANGUS HERD SIRE PROSPECTS LOT 1:

HB

135 17%

Lorenzen Headliner 7086

LOT 2:

Lorenzen Moneyball D005

LOT 3:

Lorenzen Storm Trooper 7203

Brown Oracle X NSF Leading Edge

Brown Oracle X Six Mile Upper Deck

Brown Oracle X Andras New Direction

An outlier bull for carcass and growth with loads of capacity and excellent disposition

A stout, dark cherry red 18 month old bull that is a full sib to our high selling Red Angus bull in California last fall.

Calving Ease, Growth, and Efficient! One of the highest performing bulls on test and ranked in the top 10 for our feed efficiency test

GM

CE

BW

WW

57 8 -1.3 81 1% 32% 57% 2%

YW

STAY

MARB

REA

125 12 1.49 1.03 3% 19% 1% 1%

HB

145 11%

GM

CE

BW

WW

YW

STAY

MARB

REA

54 10 -2.2 74 113 14 1.07 0.79 2% 19% 39% 8% 10% 6% 1% 1%

HB

GM

CE

BW

WW

YW

STAY

MARB

LORENZEN RANCHES • 22575 Skyview Lane • Bend, Oregon 97702

6 California Cattleman February 2018 Larry Lorenzen 541.969.8034

REA

132 53 8 -3.2 71 106 12 0.84 0.53 19% 8% 27% 24% 12% 20% 24% 8% 6%

| Sam Lorenzen 541.215.2687 | www.lorenzenranches.com DISH Network 231 DIRECTV 345


CALVING EASE BULLS IN VOLUME!

LORENZEN TAKEBACK 7867

LORENZEN TAKEBACK D206

LSF TAKEBACK X BROWN PREPONENT

LSF TAKEBACK X SEQUOYA

HB

GM

194 1%

CE

55 1%

BW

11 10%

HPG

-5.3 5%

15 11%

STAY

17 1%

MARB

HB

1.11 1%

GM

191 1%

55 1%

CE

BW

10 15%

HPG

-5.2 5%

STAY

17 2%

17 1%

17,115 1%

LORENZEN ASSET 7302 LSF TAKEBACK X ELLINGSON IDEAL 3/4 RA • 1/4 SIM

MARB

HB

1.41 1%

FEED EFFICIENT PERFORMANCE BULLS

$ Profit

OVER 100 BULLS IN THE OFFERING RANK IN THE TOP 25% FOR CED AND BW

GM

CE

BW

HPG

MARB

REA

$Profit $Ranch $Feeder FGABC INTAKE

125 53 12 -4.6 12 0.65 0.67 11,959 47.34 80.58 0 12 25% 7% 9% 8% 36% 20% 2% 2% 8% 6% 46% 25%

OVER ½ OF THE OFFERING HAS BEEN FEED EFFICIENCY TESTED & EVERY BULL SELLS WITH F:G AND INTAKE EPD’S

LORENZEN NEXT PROTÉGÉ 7261

LORENZEN ANALYTICS E05

LORENZEN 7253

LSF NEXPECTATION X GAR PROTÉGÉ Full sib to Leachman Pledge 3rd best Red Angus Feed Efficiency Bull

BROWN ORACLE X BIEBER MAKE MIMI 4th Best Red Angus Feed Efficiency Bull. Stems from the great Lakota 56 cow family

5/8 RA • 1/8 AN • 1/4 SM One of the top ADG & RFI Bulls in entire offering

GM

56 1%

CE

7 1%

BW

-2.8 41%

WW

65 29%

YW

CEM MARB

113 7 1.4 27% 20% 1%

REA

FGABC INTAKE

0.44 -0.29 -35 12% 5% 2%

$ Profit

HB

GM

15,862 182 1% 1%

56 1%

CE

BW

WW

YW

10 -4.6 72 111 18% 9% 11% 13%

STAY MARB

REA FGABC INTAKE

18 1.36 0.97 -0.37 10 1% 1% 1% 2% 23%

AGE ADVANTAGE HYBREDS

$ Profit

GM

CE

16,630 54 1% 4%

BW

WW

YW

MARB

YG

REA

FGABC INTAKE

9 -3.4 65 96 0.97 -0.26 1.09 -0.19 25 19% 20% 29% 39% 4% 3% 1% 18% 37%

STOUTEST OFFERING OF 18 MONTH AND LONG YEARLING HYBREDS WE'VE EVER OFFERED

LORENZEN HUNTER D002

LORENZEN JUST RIGHT 6894

LORENZEN MAXIMIZER 7851

BAR CK HUNTER X LORENZEN COMMITMENT 5/8 RA • 3/8 SM Calving ease bull that is a maternal grandson to Lorenzen Katie 0285

LORENZEN JUST RIGHT X 174W 13/16 • RA • 3/16 GV Calving Ease bull with loads of Phenotype

LORENZEN ASSET 5027 X RAINMAKER 5/8 RA • 1/4 SM • 1/8 GV #2 Overall Feed Efficiency tested bull

$ Profit

GM

BW

WW

YW

ME

MARB

10,358 50 -2.4 62 87 -1 0.5 5% 34% 39% 39% 59% 36% 39%

YG

REA

FGABC INTAKE

-0.25 0.95 0.01 2 3% 1% 71% 15%

$ Profit $ Ranch

7,762 35.48 20% 25%

AGE ADVANTAGE SIMANGUS

$Feeder CE

BW

WW

YW

YG

CW

REA

BF

49.62 11 -2.7 68 98 -0.12 24 0.14 -0.05 26% 9% 31% 20% 35% 11% 43% 50% 4%

$ Profit

6,598 31%

ENTIRE SIMANGUS OFFERING AVERAGES OVER $14,500 ON $ PROFIT

$ Ranch

32.26 33%

$Feeder

40.95 34%

CE

11 11%

WW

YW

YG

CW

REA

73 103 -0.25 29 0.6 9% 26% 3% 28% 4%

BF

-0.05 4%

15 ELITE FEMALES

LORENZEN C654

LORENZEN 4172

LORENZEN MISS PARAMOUNT 720

TEBOW X BLUE MOON 1/2 AN • 1/2 SM Born & raised on the high desert up until yearling!

TARGET X BREAKOUT 3/8 AN • 5/8 SM Calving ease bull with EPD's & $Profit ranking in the elite 1%

BROWN PARAMOUNT X BROWN ASSURANCE Maternal Granddaughter of Rebas Robin

$ Profit $Ranch $Feeder CE

14,594 55 1% 3%

BW

WW

YW

MCE MARB

API

TI

FGABC INTAKE

100 16.6 -2.2 70.6 120.3 10.2 0.95 179.8 94.6 -0.08 25 1% 15% 10% 25% 10% 15% 1% 1% 1% 44% 38%

$ Profit $Ranch $Feeder CE

16,280 54 1% 3%

BW

WW

YW

MCE MARB

API

TI

FGABC INTAKE

120 19.2 -3.8 0.24 10.3 13.8 0.96 182.6 88 February -0.13 -4 1% 4% 2% 30% 15% 20% 1% 1% 3% 32% 12%

HB

GM

BW

WW

YW

HPG

CEM

STAY

MARB

10%

22%

39%

15%

17%

13%

25%

9%

25%

143 California 51 -2.1 69 107 14 6 13 70.58 2018 Cattleman


BUNKHOUSE LOVING WHAT YOU DO

the value of having a job that provides more than a paycheck by CCA Director of Communications Jenna Chandler It is hard to believe, but Christmas is over and the new year is already here in full force. Although we are now entering somewhat of a break from the hustle and bustle of holidays for a while…aside from everyone’s favorite, Tax Day right?...we do have one more this month, Valentine’s Day! Although for many it is the time for celebration of romantic love, it doesn’t have to be all cupid and chocolates. It can also be a time to think about all of the other things you love in your life. Family, a warm, safe home and,. for many, their job! For me, this year brings changes and excitement in a new position and new communications responsibilities at CCA, and during this time of love, I reflect upon how lucky I am to work at a job

that I love so much. Our members’ love for their job is evident, too, and absolutely infections. It truly reminds me, in those mundane, quiet (albeit rare) days in the office, what we are here for and why we do it; in a free country where we could all do anything else, we choose this particular industry because we truly love it. Seeing our members do what they do, the hard work day in and day out, THAT is true love. With floods, fires, fluctuating markets, being forced to contend with a barrage of new regulations every time you turn around and a new consumer that has an ever changing relationship with their food and the way it is produced, the only answer to why they keep doing it MUST be love. And, more and more, that’s the story I see our members and our industry telling

8 California Cattleman February 2018

JENNA CHANDLER consumers. Ranchers don’t ranch because it is all sunshine and glamour; they ranch because they love it. They love the work, the lifestyle and, of course, the animals. That care and dedication to the work that they love is going into the food we all eat. And that message seems to be resonating. Millennials, currently the largest dollar value consumer group, spend significantly more on meat than the boomers before them. For a generation who makes more spending choices based on “animal welfare” issues than cost (as the boomers tend to) to spend more on meat than their cost conscious predecessors, the beef industry narrative that producers have been trying so hard to share is clearly hitting home, and that’s something we can all love. So, keep doing what you’re doing! Love your job and tell you story, and then buy YOURSELF a heart shaped box of chocolates and eat it while you go feed cows. Your love for the industry, the product and the beef lifestyle are showing…and the consumer seems to like it.


Modoc Bull Sale

February 16, 2018 Alturas, CA POLLED & HORNED HEREFORD BULLS WITH BREED-LEADING GENETICS! pre sale viewing all day: Modoc Auction Yard CA-299, Alturas, CA

4 p.m. Sale & Dinner:

Niles Hotel 304 South Main St. Alturas, CA

Lot 1 • REG NO. 43763493

Lot 4 • REG NO. 43763499

Lot 6 • REG NO. 43763483

Lot 8 • REG NO. 43763479

Thank you to these gracious sponsors! The Lambert Family

CALL US FOR A CATALOG OR VISIT US ONLINE LAMBERTRANCHHEREFORDS.COM

Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 slambert@digitalpath.net

Oroville • Chester lambertranchherefords.com •Alturas•

February 2018 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK PRESIDENT TRUMP SIGNS COMPREHENSIVE TAX REFORM LEGISLATION On the morning of Dec. 22, 2017, President Donald Trump signed comprehensive tax reform legislation better known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The legislation was debated intensely by both the House of Representatives and the Senate ultimately leading to a conference report which represented a negotiated deal between both chambers. Major provisions of the bill include: • Death Tax: The death tax exclusion is doubled to $10 million for individuals and $20 million for couples beginning in 2018. Full step-up continues as is. The exemption is also indexed to inflation which is currently rated at $5.49 million per individual. • Bonus Depreciation: 100 percent bonus depreciation is allowed on all new farm assets for property placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017 and before Jan.1, 2023. After 2022, this percentage reduces by 20 percent each year until bonus depreciation is eliminated. • Section 179: Section 179 is bumped to $1 million effective for taxable years beginning in 2018 and is indexed to inflation. The phase-out begins at $2.5 million up from the current $2 million level. • Cash Accounting: Increases the eligibility threshold from $5 million to $25 million. It includes farm corporations, farm partnerships with a corporate partner and family farm corporations. • Interest Deductions: Interest expense is allowed for all farm operations with gross receipts under $25 million. If revenues exceed this amount, producers can continue deducting interest capped at 30 percent of modified income. Language was maintained that will allow farming operations with gross receipts in excess of $25 million to elect to deduct 100 percent of interest expense, and in exchange will be forced to use longer 10 California Cattleman February 2018

depreciation lives and cannot take bonus depreciation. • Section 1031: Like-kind exchanges are restricted to real property. • Net Operating Loss (NOL): Farm net operating losses are allowed to be carried back for 2 years instead of the current 5 years. Also, you can only offset an NOL carryforward against 80 percent of your income effective immediately. • SALT: State, local and foreign property taxes and state and local sales taxes are allowed as a deduction only when paid or accrued in carrying on a trade or business. For example, in the case of property taxes, an individual may deduct such items only if these taxes were imposed on business assets. Under the agreement, individual taxpayers can still claim an itemized deduction up to $10,000 for personal SALT taxes. Although the bill is far from perfect, it did bring about needed reform. The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is likely a first step in a series of continued debates that will occur over the coming years to improve and refine the bill. Many of the provisions will also expire at a point in the future forcing Congress to act and continue the debate on further tax reform, including a full repeal of the estate tax, for another day.


SHAW CATTLE CO.

Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Bu

sines s

450 Hereford, Angus & Red Angus Bulls • 12 noon MST, at the ranch near Caldwell, ID

Th eB

ull

HEREFORD SIRES –Boom Town, Leader, Tested, El Dorado, Hometown, Domino 955, Fort Payne and On Target 936.

ANGUS SIRES –Payweight 1682, Powerball, Black Granite, Solution, Comrade, Innovation and Dominance.

Since 1946

RED ANGUS SIRES –Merlin, Nightcalver and Redemption.

REQUEST YOUR CATALOG. VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

SHAW CATTLE CO. 22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 greg@shawcattle.com www.shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

 First Breeding Season Guarantee  Sight-unseen Purchases Fully Guaranteed  Family Owned and Operated for over 70 Years

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

“2016 BIF SEEDSTOCK PRODUCER OF THE YEAR”

February 2018 California Cattleman 11


New Tax Laws and the Livestock Industry by John Alan Cohan, Attorney at Law The new tax law signed by President Trump, called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), has several provisions beneficial to owners and breeders in the horse and livestock industries. I will discuss some of the highlights. New Deduction for Pass-Through Businesses: The new law changes how “pass-through” entities, such as sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations and LLCs, are taxed. This includes 85% of owners in the horse and livestock industries. Now, for the first time ever, the owner’s qualified business income (QBI) from pass-throughs is allowed a 20 percent deduction, subject to restrictions that can apply at higher income levels. This constitutes a 20 percent tax cut for pass-through filers. QBI is generally defined as the net amount of qualified items of income, gain, deduction and loss from any qualified business of the noncorporate owner. (QBI does not include certain investment items, reasonable compensation paid to an owner for services rendered to the business or any guaranteed payments to a partner.) Also, the new law provides the top rate on income earned by owners of pass-through business at 37 percent -- which is a slight reduction from the former 39.6 percent rate. The pass-through provisions are an incentive for employees to become independent contractors. Many personnel working in the horse and livestock industries are already independent contractors, such as trainers, laborers, farriers, veterinarians, vendors, etc. Immediate Expensing and Bonus Depreciation: For property placed into service in tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, the new law increases the maximum amount a taxpayer may deduct (or “expense”) to $1 million, and increases the phaseout threshold to $2.5 million. The “bonus depreciation” deduction for breeding stock, race horses, farm machinery and equipment will now

12 California Cattleman February 2018

be 100 percent, an increase from the former 50 percent rate, for property placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017. This applies to new or used property purchased by the taxpayer. (Starting in 2023, bonus depreciation will go down to 80 percent.) Estate Tax: The long-disputed estate tax has been modified so that the exemption for married couples will be $10.98 million, compared to the former exemption of $5.49 million. This will greatly reduce the number of family businesses susceptible to the estate tax. New Corporate Tax Rate: For operations conducted as C corporations, the new law reduces the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent. Many large breeders and ranchers, as well as racetracks, conduct business as C corporations. Limitation on Losses: There are stricter rules for deducting losses. The maximum amount of taxable income that can be offset with net operating loss (NOL) deductions is generally reduced from 100 percent to 80 percent. NOLs can be carried forward indefinitely. However, NOLs can no longer be carried back to an earlier year, except for certain farming losses, which can be carried back for two years. The “hobby-loss” rules remain the same in terms of the taxpayer’s need to prove that the activity is engaged in for profit if there is a history of losses. This means that, as before, it is important not only to keep records to prepare accurate income tax returns, but to also keep records that measure your activity’s financial performance. The IRS is already grappling with a prolonged funding cut, a staff reduced by 23 percent since 2010, and outdated computers. The IRS will need to write countless guidelines and regulations to clarify key terms and concepts in the new law, as well as design new forms. Thus, enforcement and auditing capabilities are likely to drop significantly.


e v i l s u Joirnonline! o WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AT THESE UPCOMING EVENTS... SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE FEBRUARY 22

VISALIA, CA

BROADCAST ON DISH 998 • CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE MARCH 26

watch, listen and bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy.

February 2018 California Cattleman 13


Join us for the annual

Legislative “Steak & Eggs”

Breakfast

March 14• 8 a.m.

Sutter Club, Downtown Sacramento RSVP to Katie in the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or katier@calcattlemen.org by March 7.

12th Annual Bull Sale New date!

SATURDAY, MARCH 17, 2018 1 p.m. at the ranch near

Gardnerville, Nevada Angus • Salers • Salers Optimizer Composites

GUEST CONSIGNORS: Rancho Casino • Dal Porto Livestock Selling Early Fall 2016–Early Spring 2017 Ranch Ready Bulls!

/ To sign up for our mailing list, e-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com… voice/text: (775) 790-6148

14 California Cattleman February 2018

Ward Ranches “YOUR

GARY WARD & FAMILY Gary Ward (775) 790-6148

Katie Ward (916) 990-4818 P. O. Box 1404, Gardnerville, NV 89410 E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com Ranch: 1155 Foothill Rd., Gardnerville

Western G E NET I C S O U R C E”


Jerry Baker > 208.739.3449 Samuel Mahler > 208.739.0475

2175 Bench Road > Vale, OR 97918 Email > baker.baker@fmtc.com

Genetic Excellence Sale SatuRday, FEBRuaRy 24

>>

ValE, OREgOn

>>

1 p.M.

Selling 150 angus Bulls, 16 to 17 Months Old

this sale includes the highest volume of calving-ease bulls we have ever offered. all bulls sell with complete Zoetis i50K genetically enhanced Epds. the traits on these sale bulls in the top 35% or better are noted in yellow...

BaKER authEntic 4503

8-28-16 EF authentic 0829 x S a V Resource 1441 Weaning Wt Ratio 111 • Yearling Wt Ratio 111

BaKER chiSuM 4635

9-21-16 S chisum 6175 x carter Onward 104 Weaning Wt Ratio 99 • Yearling Wt Ratio 105

cEd BW WW yW MilK MaRB RE $W $B +8 +1.4 +80 +136 +24 +.68 +.88 +82.83 +145.23

cEd BW WW yW +4 +2.8 +69 +122

BaKER ROcK SOlid 4675

BaKER JOuRnEy 4569

9-27-16 pine View Rock Solid x tc Vance 011 Weaning Wt Ratio 100 • Yearling Wt Ratio 105

cEd +5

BW WW

yW

MilK MaRB RE

+2.6 +71 +126 +16

$W

$B

+.58 +.97 +56.29 +178.38

MilK MaRB RE $W $B +17 +.63 +.47 +59.59 +146.72

9-6-2016 WR Journey-1X74 x Wilson total Value 722 Weaning Wt Ratio 105 • Yearling Wt Ratio 107

cEd +4

BW WW +.8 +55

yW +92

MilK MaRB RE $W $B +35 +.86 +.84 +68.30 +152.56

BaKER dOuBlE ViSiOn 4572 9-5-16 Rathbun double Vision B629 x connealy Mentor 7374 Weaning Wt Ratio 108 • Yearling Wt Ratio 108 cEd +11

BW WW yW MilK MaRB RE $W $B +.8 +70 +124 +36 +.30 +.88 +80.87 +172.17

Mcc 4694 RESOuRcE

10-4-16 S a V Resource 1441 x Sydgen c c & 7 Weaning Wt Ratio 109 • Yearling Wt Ratio 108 cEd BW WW yW MilK MaRB RE $W $B +5 +2.1 +63 +114 +19 +.42 +.52 +58.66 +127.68

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STRATEGIC PLANNING

In-Depth Review of Association Creates New Road Map to Keep CCA Moving in the Right Direction in Sacramento and Beyond by CCA Director of Communications Jenna Chandler

D

ishes have recipes, do-it-yourself home projects have instructions and vehicles come with an owner’s manual. Running one of the largest, oldest and most influential trade associations in the most populous state in the union, unfortunately, doesn’t. Or does it? As members, officers and staff look to 2018 and beyond, the formation of a new organizational strategic plan offers just that, the instruction manual for a successful California Cattlemen’s Association. What exactly a strategic plan is can differ depending on the organization. It can be as short as a page or fill up a book, but they all have one thing in common: they are the defining documents that establish an organization’s direction. For CCA, that means helping to determine where we are, where we want to be and how exactly we go about getting there. “A strategic plan for CCA offers a longer vision for the staff and officer team, even as terms and presidents turn over,” said CCA First Vice President Mark Lacey, Independence. “It helps the staff to know the wishes of the membership and execute them, and the strategic plan for CCA hadn’t had a revision since the early 2000s. It was time.” So with the help of an outside firm, early last fall, the strategic planning process began. As it should with any member driven organization, the process began with the membership. One of the most important parts about CCA’s strategic planning process, Lacey mentioned, was that it involved not only the typically very active and vocal members, but also the more quiet supporters as well. The team was carefully selected to represent all of the various sectors, scales of production, geographic regions and other diverse interests within the California beef community. To start, private one-on-one phone interviews were

taken. Both specific and open ended questions were asked of all of the participants and responses were gathered and categorized. An electronic survey of the board was also developed. Over 100 members representing all of the local associations and regions weighed in on similar questions. Then, a small committee of members was gathered for a more intensive planning session. Those on the panel spent two days cloistered in a Sacramento office building discussing all aspects of CCA, the good, the great and, of course, the things that could be better. The sky was the limit and no idea was too off-thewall to be considered. They discussed ideas from themselves, their friends, their regions as well as those from the digital and phone interviews. Those concepts that passed muster were fleshed out further. The CCA staff then had a similar meeting and even members of the legislature weighed in on their perceptions of and interactions with the organization and the industry as a whole. To capture even more opinions, digital surveys were emailed to the membership and print copies were available at the 2017 CCA and CCW Annual Convention. After all of the information was gathered, the development of the actual plan began. The first and probably most important thing to come out of the plan was the mission, the overarching idea that all other aspects of the plan fall under. Whether big or small, traditional or grass fed, northern or southern parts of the state, it is CCA’s mission to improve and secure a favorable business climate for all of our state’s producers. But, how do we do that? And that’s where the rest of the strategic plan comes in, helping the staff, officer team, board of directors and ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

CCA MISSION STATEMENT

Enhance and promote a more favorable business environment for California producers. 16 California Cattleman February 2018


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Lot 13 • C 5280 105Y CATAPULT 7036 ET

Lot 84 • C CJC 5280 MCKEE 7257 ET

Lot 21 • C 4212 BLACK HAWK 7057 ET

these lots were in Colyer’s 2015 string of pen bulls at Denver! BW

2.4 WW

58

YW 81

MK 40

IMF .03

URE .58

A calving ease, maternal young sire with power. He is a well made bull with lots of body and muscle. His mother “4038” is one of the good young donors in the breed. She is a daughter of “1311” a full sister to “Miles” and the donor dam of 2017 National Champion “Double Your Miles.” Member of the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Three at the National Western Stock Show.

Lot 59 • C 5192 BAILEES VIC 7180 ET

BW

3.6 WW

52

YW 84

MK 28

IMF .15

BW

2.2 WW

55

YW 82

MK 27

IMF .12

URE .58

This one has as much look and eye appeal as any. Smooth made and great front end with a perfect hip and hind leg. He should sire some tremendous females. His mother is one of our standout young donors that has a great udder.

URE .54

BW

3.0 WW

55

YW 87

MK 37

IMF .37

URE .56

LOT 172 • CCC RESOURCE 7050

Lot 256 • C 1008X 7325 ET

4.6 WW

58

YW 93

MK 35

IMF -.02 URE .59

March polled female that has all the right pieces. She blends together “Bailee” and “1008X” who have been the most consistent producers of National Champions for us. She is a dark red, deep-sided female that will make a great breeding tool.

Guy, Sherry & Katie Colyer (208) 845-2313 Kyle & Bobby Jean Colyer (208) 845-2098

GUY CELL (208) 599-0340 • GUY@HEREFORD.COM KYLE CELL (208) 250-3924

BW

1.3 WW

59

YW 108 MK 20

MB

.22

REA .89

Powerful son of “Resource” with extra ribeye and performance. This one is bred to sire extra muscle shape and pounds to a set of cattle. Big square hip and lots of body width. He ranks in the top 4% of the breed for REA.

2.7 WW

56

YW 88

MK 30

IMF .11

URE .70

Lot 50 • C 5280 KAT 7138 ET

Lot 89 • C 4088 WILDCAT 7270 ET

First sons of herd sire “5192” who was a member of the 2016 Unique individual that has as much red as you could want on one. pen of bulls and sold to King, Micheli and Sonoma Mountain. Powerful built and out of a great young donor “4088.” One of the This is a well bred prospect who blends together some of our most maternal oriented young sires available that blends together most elite donors “2052” and Bailee” into one pedigree. He is a some of the breed’s most consistent cow makers. With his look and genetics he should sire the cattlemen’s kind in volume. deep sided, soggy made horned calf. Member of the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Three at the National Western Stock Show.

BW

BW

One of the unique breeding tools in the offering. First sons of the two time Fort Worth Champion “Black Hawk Down” out of a full sister to “Wildcat.” Low birth with tremendous performance and look. He is a rare combination.

BW

4.1 WW

58

YW 83

MK 29

IMF .07

URE .45

Tremendous phenotype and quality in this young polled prospect. His full sisters have topped past sales and we will have two full sisters to him in the Denver string. He will be a member of our Denver pen. Member of the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Three at the National Western Stock Show.

LOT 185 • CCC BLACK GRANITE 7080

BW

0.7 WW

58

YW 100 MK 26

MB

.57

REA .72

This is a correct well made son of “Black Granite” who has proven to be one of the best sires we have used in recent history. His daughters are some of the nicest young females we have with excellent disposition and udder quality. This young prospect has been a standout all along and is made as well as any.

31058 Colyer Road Bruneau, ID 83604 Fax: (208) 845-2314 February 2018 California Cattleman 17


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16

come. Membership in general was also a hot topic. Much time committee chairs effectuate the mission. was spent on communication and outreach strategies for Where do we spend time? Where do we spend money? current and prospective members. As a member funded Where are the efforts focused? Where do we want to be? and driven organization, this strategy is probably one of the Where do we want our efforts to be focused? What does the most important. Focus here is on imparting the value of membership want to see? CCA as an organization, framing CCA membership as a solid Of course, the culmination of any good strategic plan investment in the business plan of any producer. Importance is the action part. It is the concrete, workable action items was also put on the organization being an advocate and voice that lead us where we want to go. This holds the staff and for the beef industry, regardless of the segment or type of the association even more accountable to the membership. beef production. There is no question as to what decision to make or in In all, the strategic plan gives a clear vision for the future. what direction to go, because the members themselves have So why does CCA do the things we do? Simply because written those answers right into the strategic plan! The plan we’ve always done them? includes fiscal, membership, legislative, outreach and other Sometimes taking a long, hard, analytical look at those goals, both short and long term, all spelled out concisely and things can be difficult and somewhat uncomfortable, with measurable benchmarks to gauge progress along the especially for an organization with as long of a history way. as CCA. There is emotion attached to many of the old Another one of the things to come out of the strategic traditions and part of the aim of the strategic plan is to plan was an updated messaging platform. For the general honor and preserve the important ones, while reestablishing public, emphasizing good stewardship of land and animals is new goals and strategies to maximize our current focuses. paramount. For legislators, presenting CCA as an accessible The newly developed plan seems to have done just that. and respectful source of information was the goal. Of course “The final product shows our members, staff and being influential in the political arena is also imperative. outsiders what our objectives are. It is what we are doing In addition to messaging, a recurring theme throughout well, what needs attention and is a census of the membership the phone interviews, written questionnaires and in-person that goes beyond the surface level. It’s what we stand for,” sessions, was to reposition perceptions of California’s Lacey said. beef industry. With heightened consumer interest in food And judging even just by the mission statement, it origin being the “it” topic right now, the priority was about absolutely is what CCA stands for. taking hold of that public perception and presenting that CCA would like to sincerely thank all of those who took positive truth about beef in the Golden State, to make time to participate in the strategic planning process. To view both consumers and legislators just as passionate as the a copy of the complete strategic plan, please call the CCA membership about preserving ranching for generations to office.

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HERD HEALTH CHECK THE PROS AND CONS TO SPRING CALVING VERSUS FALL CALVING by Alabama Cooperative Extension Animal Scientist Darrell Rankins, Ph.D., On numerous occasions the topic of calving in the fall versus calving in the spring has come up as a topic of discussion among cattlemen. There are advantages and disadvantages associated with each of them, and, as with most management decisions it becomes a matter of which fits your production scenario the best.

FALL CALVING

Most cattlemen who utilize a fall calving season calve during the months of September through November. Ideally, the system would allow for the first calf heifers to calve in early September and then be followed by the mature cows that would finish calving by the end of November. The two main disadvantages of this system are that during calving season an adequate supply of good quality forage (pasture) is not available. Warm season forages have dramatically declined in quality by this time and cool season forages have not yet produced appreciable growth by this time of the year. The second factor that makes fall calving unattractive for some producers is the fact that you will need to feed a lactating cow a lot more feed during the winter than you will a pregnant, non lactating cow. The advantages of a fall calving season include the following: 1) The weather is generally mild during this time period. Most of the baby calves will be born during times of warm days and cool nights and relatively dry conditions. This type of weather is good for calf survivability and health. 2) In the spring when forages are abundant and the quality of those forages is excellent the calf has gotten old enough to spend an appreciable amount of time grazing and will have excellent weight gains as a consequence. This leads to heavier weaning weights of the calves compared to spring-born calves of the same age. 3) It is quite common for a fall-born calf to be sold as a weaned feeder calf in August of the following year. Historically, calf prices tend to be relatively good during that time of the year.

20 California Cattleman February 2018

SPRING CALVING

The months that comprise a spring calving season are somewhat variable but for many it would start with the heifers calving in February and then followed by the cows for the next two months, March and April. The disadvantages of this system include the following: 1) The weather is generally more erratic during this time period leading to slightly more baby calf health problems. 2) Breeding season would be in late April for the heifers and from late May through late July for the mature cows. In general, conception rates tend to be lower during extremely hot weather which would be the case during July inmany places in the continental U.S. 3) Calves tend to have lower weaning weights when they are weaned in the fall because forage quality and quantity are usually limited during September and October. 4) Weaning and selling the spring born calf in October coincides with the historically low calf price of the year. Most calves in the U.S. are spring-born, thus there are extremely large numbers of weaned calves being marketed during the fall of the year. A large supply equals a decreased demand which equates to lower prices. The main advantage of calving in the spring is that it allows the cow herd to get the vast majority of their nutrients from grazing forages and results in minimal feeding of both hay and supplement. It does not require a lot of high quality feed to winter a dry cow and when her nutrient demands peak (60 days after the calf is born) she has abundant amounts of lush spring forage available. Take home message: Calving during the spring or fall can have both advantages and disadvantages. Like most management decisions it becomes a matter of what works best in your situation. The primary advantage of calving in the spring is that it requires considerably less supplemental feeding for the cow herd. The primary advantage of calving in the fall is that you are able to market heavier calves at a time when market prices tend to be a little higher. Either fall or spring calving is much better than year round calving.


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February 2018 California Cattleman 21


Red AAA Releases Spring 2018 EPDs in Time for Bull Sale Season

As a new calendar year has arrived, so has the blitz of spring bull sales. Beef producers desire up-to-date genetic information to make their purchasing decisions, hence accurate and reliable information is necessary. The Red Angus Association of America has just released its spring 2018 EPDs, allowing producers to utilize the most current data from the industry’s best Red Angus genetics at upcoming production sales. The Red Angus breed has been dedicated to providing trustworthy and accurate EPDs for decades, which are backed by Total Herd Reporting data across the breed and membership. The newly released spring 2018 EPDs are conveniently displayed with in-breed ranking percentiles to facilitate selection decisions. Red Angus’ strong foundation of THR data, combined with genomic enhancement from DNA tests, provides EPDs with excellent reliability. The information sourced in genomic data can be as informative as a cow’s lifetime production record or an individual bull’s first calf crop. Additionally, since the genomic data is incorporated directly into the EPDs, beef producers don’t have to learn how to interpret anything new. Ultimately, these factors yield higher accuracy EPDs for bull buyers who rely on sound data to make their purchasing decisions. “Red Angus continues to invest heavily in genetic characterization through EPDs,” said Tom Brink, RAAA CEO. “A positive from the past several years of rapid breed growth is a significantly larger database and a greater number of total performance records that build animal proofs more rapidly than ever before. This benefits commercial cattle producers who count on Red Angus genetics to keep their operations profitable.” Producers can access individual animals’ EPDs and breed percentiles, or calculate the projected EPDs of specific matings, via the RedAngus.org website.

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by CCA Director of Communications Jenna Chandler The close of 2017 sadly marked the most destructive wildfire season on record in the history of the Golden State. According to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire), upwards of 1,381,392 acres have burned. In addition to the scars on the land, the economic toll will top $180 billion. While a large portion of what burned was residential, much of it was rural, dealing a devastating blow to area ranchers. And with fires raging in Northern, Southern and Central California, it seemed no area was safe. In October, a series of wildfires broke out throughout Napa and Sonoma counties. Fires forced the evacuation of over 20,000 people and burned much of California’s iconic wine country. Sonoma county rancher Fred Radelfinger, Windsor, was one of those affected. “I woke up at midnight to flames on the horizon,” Radelfinger recounted. The Tubbs fire originated right next door and had reached his leased ground. Thankfully, he was able to open a series of gates and allow his cattle onto a neighbor’s property with relative ease. Feeding them was a different story, however, as getting in every day through the mandatory highway patrol evacuation was challenging. In and out, day after day, firefighters battled the blaze and Radelfinger was there with coffee and donuts as a slight relief for the exhausted crews. Although a neighbor lost a bull and some cows, when all was said and done, Radelfinger had only lost fence and feed, and thankfully the animals and the buildings on the property were spared. According to CalFire, the animals were the reason the buildings were saved. “CalFire said that the only reason they were able to save the buildings on the ranch was because the cattle had grazed down the grass and created a fire break. The fancy subdivision next door, with ornamental grasses practically up to their front doors, burned to the ground,” Radelfinger said. Also igniting in early October, the Cherokee, La Porte and Cascade fires raged across Northern California’s Butte and Yuba counties. Although somewhat less covered by the media due to the concurrently blazing Napa Valley fires, these northern infernos were no less devastating. Just ask Oroville rancher, Steve Lambert, who also represents Butte County on its board of supervisors. “When I last checked at 8 p.m., I remember thinking that the fire was in Cherokee, so far enough away not to 24 California Cattleman February 2018

have to worry. At about 1 a.m. I got a call from the local fire chief that the fire was headed right toward the ranch. I asked him ‘what ranch?’ ‘Yours!’ was his response,” Lambert said. Thankfully, Lambert got lucky. The 60-mile-per-hour winds changed and all he lost was feed, but not without stress and panic first. After evacuations from the breach of the Oroville Dam earlier in the year and the destruction of the fires, he even ended up renaming his Butte County bull sale the “Hell or High Water” Bull Sale. “Come hell or high water we were selling bulls! And the toughest around too; they have seen and survived it all!” he said. Rounding out the shocking 2017 fire year, in early December, a number of wildfires sparked in the southern California counties of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Ventura, San Diego and Riverside. Precipitation early in the year leading to large amounts of dry vegetation, paired with unusually long lasting Santa Ana winds, led to a perfect storm for fire conditions. The Thomas Fire, at time of print had just been 100 percent contained, but had grown to over 281,893 acres, earning it the title of California’s largest modern wildfire. “The night the fire started everything was quiet, then the whole canyon exploded,” Rob Frost, Santa Paula, said. “The firefighters did their best, but there was just no stopping it.” When the fire had finally passed, 11,000 acres of his ranch had burned, along with a heifer and two calves, sadly born during the blaze. Although of little consolation after the devastating shock of loss to a fire, a tiny bit of good news is that there are state and federal assistance programs available and two of the ranchers said that they were able to take advantage of them. Radelfinger said U.S. Department of Agriculture representatives had already been out to assess the damage to his leased ground and that he has applied for help with fencing costs and for loss of forage assistance. Rob Frost said that he has taken advantage of the USDA Livestock Indemnity program and that USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Survice, California will help with reseeding. More information about these and other disaster assistance programs can be found on the CCA website. The problem with all of these programs though, according to Frost, is that they take a while, leaving it up to the rancher to figure out how to cope in the meantime.


A ranch in Loma Rica burns during the fall of 2017.

Photo Courtesy Katie Ward

Photo Courtesy Cathy Tobin

A rural Santa Rosa neighborhood is reduced to rubble.

But as they say, in times of great tragedy, you often see great human kindness, and the 2017 California fire season was no different. Amid the chaos and the devastation, people and groups stepped up. Stories hit the news every night about people just picking up, driving down and asking “what can I do?” The beef community was no different. The Sonoma-Marin Cattlemen’s Association gave $10,000 to members who sustained losses to help with feed costs and to repair fencing and are holding a corned beef dinner fundraiser to help offset the losses incurred by local 4-H and FFA students. Other local associations and Farm Service Agency offices donated hay as well and, of course, neighbors helped neighbors. “Everyone up here was so eager to help out. They lined up to help with transport and opened up their pastures to displaced animals,” Lambert said. It wasn’t just evacuation or feed they helped out with either, members of the California beef community were right on the front lines as well. Just as ranchers are jacks

of all trades on the ranch, they are off the ranch too, even when it comes to fighting fires. San Luis Obispo rancher Anthony Stornetta, Atascadero, works as air and wildland fire battalion chief of the Santa Barbara County Fire Department and was in the thick of it fighting the blaze, barely making it home in time for Christmas. Fred Radelfinger said he was amazed when he realized that CCW President Cheryl Foster, Montague, had a daughter who was one of the firefighters working to save his ranch. As the flames subside and the embers settle, thoughts, no doubt, turn to the future. What could we have done differently? What can be done next time? All three ranchers with broadly different experiences and from vastly different parts of the state seemed to agree on one thing: better grass and woodland management. “We will always have wildfires,” Lambert said, “but they don’t have to be so devastating.” Radelfinger described the firefighters telling him that the only reason many of the structures on his lease survived was because the cattle had grazed down the extra grass. Frost expressed frustration that before the fire broke out, he had been struggling with the county for months to acquire a permit for a controlled burn in the area. Lambert echoed those concerns about all of the excessive underbrush from a wet winter that needed to be thinned, making the surrounding woodlands a tinderbox. While standing back and picking up the pieces of these historic fires they all said the same thing. In the west, occasional blazes are inevitable, but especially after a wakeup call such as 2017, let’s use good management strategies to do our best… and not add fuel to the fire. February 2018 California Cattleman 25


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9728 Blue Mtn Road • Whitmore, CA 96096 lorenmrnak@aol.com • www.mrnakherefordswest.com

26 California Cattleman February 2018

CAUTION: Federal (U.S.A.) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal (U.S.A.) law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: Each mL of Enroflox 100 contains 100 mg of enrofloxacin. Excipients are L-arginine base 200 mg, n-butyl alcohol 30 mg, benzyl alcohol (as a preservative) 20 mg and water for injection q.s. INDICATIONS: Cattle - Single-Dose Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle; and for the control of BRD in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M. haemolytica, P. multocida, H. somni and M. bovis. Cattle - Multiple-Day Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. Swine: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment and control of swine respiratory disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis and Streptococcus suis. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Cattle: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Swine: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 5 days of receiving a single-injection dose. HUMAN WARNINGS: For use in animals only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes. In case of dermal contact, wash skin with soap and water. Consult a physician if irritation persists following ocular or dermal exposures. Individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to quinolones should avoid this product. In humans, there is a risk of user photosensitization within a few hours after excessive exposure to quinolones. If excessive accidental exposure occurs, avoid direct sunlight. For customer service, to obtain a copy of the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) or to report adverse reactions, call Norbrook at 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: The effects of enrofloxacin on cattle or swine reproductive performance, pregnancy and lactation have not been adequately determined. The long-term effects on articular joint cartilage have not been determined in pigs above market weight. Subcutaneous injection can cause a transient local tissue reaction that may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Enroflox 100 contains different excipients than other enrofloxacin products. The safety and efficacy of this formulation in species other than cattle and swine have not been determined. Quinolone-class drugs should be used with caution in animals with known or suspected Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. In such animals, quinolones have, in rare instances, been associated with CNS stimulation which may lead to convulsive seizures. Quinolone-class drugs have been shown to produce erosions of cartilage of weight-bearing joints and other signs of arthropathy in immature animals of various species. See Animal Safety section for additional information. ADVERSE REACTIONS: No adverse reactions were observed during clinical trials. ANIMAL SAFETY: In cattle safety studies, clinical signs of depression, incoordination and muscle fasciculation were observed in calves when doses of 15 or 25 mg/kg were administered for 10 to 15 days. Clinical signs of depression, inappetance and incoordination were observed when a dose of 50 mg/kg was administered for 3 days. An injection site study conducted in feeder calves demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue and underlying muscle. In swine safety studies, incidental lameness of short duration was observed in all groups, including the saline-treated controls. Musculoskeletal stiffness was observed following the 15 and 25 mg/kg treatments with clinical signs appearing during the second week of treatment. Clinical signs of lameness improved after treatment ceased and most animals were clinically normal at necropsy. An injection site study conducted in pigs demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue. Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland I02 September 2016 The Norbrook logos and Enroflox® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


www.norbrook.com

The Choice is Simple

Single-Dose BRD Treatment & Control Same Active Ingredient & Dosing Regimen as BaytrilÂŽ 100 in Beef & Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle Available in 100 mL, 250 mL & now in 500 mL Bottles Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. Cattle intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Use with caution in animals with known or suspected CNS disorders. Observe label directions and withdrawal times. See product labeling for full product information.

The Norbrook logos are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited Enroflox is a registered trademark of Norbrook Laboratories Limited Baytril is a registered trademark of Bayer Animal Health

0717-495-I02B

February 2018 California Cattleman 27 OR Enroflox 100 2018 Norbrook.indd 1

12/13/17 4:03 P


Excellence Built By Tradition

The Business Behind the Brand from Certified Hereford Beef

Hereford cattle have long enjoyed a reputation for producing truly great tasting beef. It started when innovative farmers in early 19th century America began importing the red-bodied, white-faced cattle from Herefordshire, England to breed to their dairy based stock in order to “beef up� the quality of future generations of cattle. In 1881, Hereford breeders formed the American Hereford Association (AHA) to protect the genetic purity of the breed and to promote its use by farmers and ranchers throughout the country. The first association of its kind, the AHA has been tracking the lineages of Hereford cattle ever since, registering animals long before the American Kennel Club, the American Quarter Horse Association or any other cattle breed association. The Certified Hereford Beef program began as a marketing initiative of the AHA in 1995. Based on the findings of over three years of Colorado State University research that proved the superior eating quality and consistency of Hereford beef, the three-fold mission of the program was, and continues to be: 1) To provide consumers with consistently tender, juicy and flavorful beef products 2) To enhance the marketing opportunities of food industry distributors, retailers and restaurateurs 3) To increase the demand for commercial Hereford influenced cattle

28 California Cattleman February 2018

The concept behind Certified Hereford Beef was simple; give consumers a superior product at a competitive price. The program would do so by harvesting only Midwest, grain-finished Hereford and specific Hereford crossbred cattle, genetically proven to produce better tasting beef. From the early 1990s to the present time Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) has continued to excel as a premium branded beef product

CHB growth

Being part of a constantly changing beef industry means that you must be progressive to experience growth. Certified Hereford Beef has been successful at doing just that. With the help of great packer partners, CHB has created value- added opportunities through retail and foodservice outlets to increase tonnage sold and carcass utilization. This increase translates to a growing demand for high-quality Hereford- influenced cattle and Hereford genetics in general. Today, licensed packers sell more than 50 million pounds annually of Certified Hereford Beef to retail and foodservice outlets nationwide and internationally. The facts are clear, Certified Hereford Beef is growing and will continue to grow as consumers seek a high-quality beef product.


Baldy Builders

Pedretti Ranches Registered Herefords Since 1946

Bulls For Sale at the ranch private treaty

Pedretti Ranches Gino Pedretti ����������������������������������������������������209/756-1609 Mark St� Pierre �������������������������������������������������209/233-1406 Gino Pedretti Jr� �����������������������������������������������209/756-2088 Gino Pedretti III������������������������������������������������209/756-1612 Justin Sandlin ��������������������������������������������������209/233-1404 E-mail���������������������������GBL1domino@sbcglobal�net

1975 E ROOSEVELT RD • EL NIDO, CA 95317

February 2018 California Cattleman 29


Facts about

CErtIFIED HEREFORD BEEF

Did you know...

◆ The Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) Program was established and recognized by USDA Agriculture Marketing Service as an official “Meat Grading and Certification Branch Certified Beef Program” in 1995. ◆ The American Hereford Association wholly owns the brand and formed Certified Hereford Beef LLC in 2000 with a separate board of directors representing producers and food, packing, and feed industry representatives. ◆ Two packing companies process for CHB LLC including National Beef Packing Co. LLC with plants located in Dodge City and Liberal, Kan., and Greater Omaha Packing Co. Inc. with a plant in Omaha, Neb. ◆ In 2010 the program certified more than 250,000 head and merchandised just less than 40 million lb. of product into 36 states. ◆ Live animal specification includes straight Hereford and black- and red-baldie steers and heifers. ◆ The carcass specification allows for USDA Select or higher graded carcasses and several brands are sorted within the specification according to targeted markets. ◆ The goal of the program is to enhance the value of Hereford baldie cattle. Black-baldie steers and heifers are afforded an advantage because they can fit into any of the more than 30 USDA recognized Angus programs as well as CHB®. ◆ Red-baldie cattle have the exact genetic package as blackbaldie cattle other than a color gene, and are encouraged to go through the CHB program. ◆ The goal of the CHB program is to grow the program by annually influencing the value of more than 1 million head of specification feeder cattle and reduce any noneconomical color bias between black and red cattle that tends to be prevalent at times. ◆ The CHB program encourages crossbreeding of Hereford and Angus genetics in an effort to maximize on-farm profit potential using the advantages in heterosis that the two breeds bring together collectively. ◆ The CHB program has bridged the market imbalance between black-hided and red- hided cattle due to the growing markets accepting the Hereford influenced beef. 30 California Cattleman February 2018

Carcass Specifications

◆ USDA Select or higher marbling ◆ “A” maturity only ◆ Medium or fine texture marbling ◆ 10-16 in2 Ribeye Area ◆ Less than 1” fat cover ◆ Hot carcass weight of 1,050 lb. or less ◆ Moderately thick or thicker muscling ◆ Less than 2” hump ◆ NO dark cutters ◆ NO capillary rupture

Carcass Specifications

◆ Must have predominately (51%) whiteface ◆ Hereford and Hereford-English crossbred cattle (Herefords, Black Baldies, Red Baldies) ◆ Beeftype breeding only ◆ NO dairy breeding ◆ NO excessive hump – bos indicus influence ◆ NO bulls, cows or heiferettes ◆ Cattle may be either horned or polled


GL

PERFORMANCE HEREFORD GENETICS,

IT’S A PROGRAM.

CURRENTLY OFFERING FOR SALE

ur Bu ll S Announcing O

ale Changes!

G ENOA L IVESTOCK ’ S 8 TH A NNUAL S ALE S EPTEMBER 11, 2018

HEREFORD BULLS HORNED AND POLLED AVAILABLE

REGISTERED HEREFORD COWS/HEIFERS BRED TO ANGUS BULLS • DUE IN MARCH/APRIL

Now at the ranch in Minden, NV See you September 11!!

REGISTERED HEREFORD HEIFERS COMMERCIAL F1 BALDIES OPEN AND READY TO BREED 775-782-3336

OUR BULLS ARE FULLY GUARANTEED WITH SIGHT UNSEEN PURCHASES BACKED 100%. WE ARE IN THE BUSINESS OF BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS WITH SUPERIOR CATTLE AND WE INTEND TO MAKE OUR CUSTOMERS HAPPY. PLEASE JOIN US SEPTEMBER 10 FOR AN EVENING OF FRIENDS, SOCIALIZING, AND LIVE MUSIC. THE FOLLOWING DAY WE ARE SELLING THE BEST HORNED AND POLLED HEREFORDS WE’VE EVER OFFERED TO DATE!

GL

G ENOA

Visitors are always welcome!

640 Genoa Lane • Minden, NV 89423 Office 775-782-3336 • Bob Coker 916-539-1987 Chris Beck 618-367-5397 info@genoalivestock.com

WWW. G ENOAL IVESTOCK. COM

L IVESTOCK

F OR

M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N , G O T O


32 California Cattleman February 2018


COOPER HEREFORD RANCH nd

52

CL 1 Domino 710 E 1ET

Annual Production Sale Tuesday, March 13, 2018

at the ranch, 1/2 mile South of Willow Creek, MT

Free Delivery!!

first 1,000 miles on purchases totaling $5000+

All animals selling have Genomically Enhanced EPDs

&

Complete Performance & Ultrasound Data

# 43800218

Sire : CL1 Domino 215Z

Dam : HH Miss Advance 9119W

Excellent combination of calving ease, performance & maternal. Top bull in the sale for BMI Index and #2 for CHB Index. Clean fronted and well made.

CL 1 Domino 739E 1ET

Selling: 85 Yearling Bulls 20 Yearling heifers 8 Young Bred Cows 4 proven donor Cows # 43800335 Our line bred program has withstood the test of time and has always focused on producing cattle that thrive in all programs, registered or commercial.

In 2017

70%

of our yearling bulls sold for an average of

Heterosis

Sire : CL1 Domino 553C Dam : CL 1 Dominette 055X

Nicelly patterned bull with a big top, tremendous rib expression and a big ol’ hip. Act. WW of 870 lbs. and looks to be a top performer among this year’s group.

$5,550

CL 1 Domino 744E

Capitalize on the value of using our Line Bred Hereford bulls on your Angus based cowherd.

# 43800340

Sire : CL 1 Domino 5191C Dam : CL 1 Dominette 512C Loads of volume and extra thickness down the spine. #2 bull in the sale for BMI Index

Vistit us on the web to see full pedigrees & EPDs along with pictures & videos of our 2018 sale offering!

Cooper (406) 539-6885 Contact: Mark Dave Hanson (406) 570-5519

www.cooperherefords.com February 2018 California Cattleman 33


WORKING RINGSIDE MARKET AND SPRING BULL SALE SEASON SHOW OPPORTUNITY FOR PRODUCERS by M3 Marketing’s Matt Macfarlane Now that 2018 is in full swing, I hope you all are still focused on the goals you set for the year. It is great to see the moisture pick up on the West Coast as we had one of the drier Decembers on record in most parts of California and the West. The much needed rain has bought forth some optimism and relief to many parts of the west. But we will see if the snowpack builds as we rely heavily on it going into the summer months. Mother Nature has control and will be the great equalizer, but forecasts look good so far into the first quarter of 2018. The market on lighter stocker cattle has gotten a slight boost as they have started to steadily increase in California as warmer temperatures and steadier rain have allowed stocking rates to increase with the added forage coming on strong. The market at recent Western Video Market and Superior Livestock video sales in January showed a decrease in prices for heavier cattle weighing 700-900 pounds, which were steady at $140-150, while steer calves between 500-600 pounds were bringing about where they were all fall at $170-190. Cattle with a program behind them brought a premium over current market. Many experts have said we are still in the stage of the cattle cycle where supplies are going to get larger for another couple years, but the cattle industry has gotten through those obstacles well. The export markets are better than anticipated, domestic demand has been good, with better than average consumer spending. This is a direct result of increasing domestic household income and growing consumer confidence coupled with the highest-quality beef supply in some time, with the Prime-Choice spread at a very large level even with increased supplies.

All told ,domestic and export markets look to be steadily- increasing into the future as our foreign markets continue to open up, the high-quality beef continues to be produced and our economy continues on the positive path it has over the past several months. I had the opportunity to attend two of my favorite industry events that happen to both fall in January, the National Western Stock Show (NWSS) in Denver, Colo., and the Red Bluff Bull, Gelding and Stock Dog Sale in Red Bluff. Optimism in the seedstock circles seems very high and the sales I attended while in Denver have been very solid across all breeds. My favorite part of the NWSS is to visit breeders in the “Yards” and get a good taste of what’s available across the country for commercial and seedstock breeders alike looking to improve their genetics and ultimately their bottom line. Seeing so many cattle from so many parts of the country is always educational and enlightening. Of course, it’s always great to catch up with old friends you only get an opportunity to see at events like this, as well, and to pick their brains on what is working and what is not, and take that information home for my customers to utilize. As always, I appreciate those that continue to support the publications that serve your state cattlemen’s groups. Having been a representative of the California Cattleman for now nearly 20 years, I am proud of the work CCA does and that I get to play a small role in that. Recently, CCA began helping the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association improve their publication, the Oregon Cattleman, formerly known as the Oregon Beef Producer. With a larger and more experienced publications staff, CCA has been able to help OCA members and

34 California Cattleman February 2018

MATT MACFARLANE advertisers get even more from their OCA dues through a quality publication that OCA members can be proud of and adverisers want to be a part of. I have had nothing but compliments on these publications and how well they are serving western cattle producers. The organizations, their leadership and staff continue to work very hard on your behalf to keep the cattle industry vibrant, sustainable and profitable for those involved in it and your continued support for these associations is crucial to the longevity of the cattle business on the West Coast. As your look through this large edition, I hope you will pay special attention to the advertisements from some of the country’s premier seedstock producers. In this spring’s bull sale offerings, you are certain to find some of the best bulls in the northwest that will put pounds on your calves and maintain the quality of your cowherd. I look forward to seeing you on the Northwest region’s spring bull sale tour, and if you have any questions or concerns or need any assistance finding the right genetics for your program, please do not hesitate to contact me.


February 2018 California Cattleman 35


It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

WILD Doug Winnett

800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

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Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products... 576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • 36 California Cattleman February 2018


Thomas Angus Ranch Spring 2018 Sales Saturday

February 17, 2018 Burley, Idaho 100 BULLS

Tuesday

Thursday

March 6, 2018

March 15, 2018

11 a.m. • Baker City, Oregon

Gering, Nebraska

200 BULLS & 75 FEMALES

100 BULLS

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Bryce Schumann, Manager of Cooperative Solutions • Cell (785) 424-0360 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

Also Note:

Sale Managers: www.cotton-associates.com 517-546-6374

March 5, 2018 • Baker City, Oregon

Harrell Hereford Ranch Bull Sale at the Western Genetic Event


RANGELAND TRUST TALK Marking A Milestone

rangeland trust celebrates wins over last 20 years from the California Rangeland Trust Happy New Year! We hope you enjoyed a wonderful holiday season with your loved ones. Here at the California Rangeland Trust, we’re looking forward to a big year with lots to celebrate. 2018 is a milestone for us, marking 20 years of protecting hundreds of thousands of acres of California rangeland. At this important moment in our history as an organization, we’d like to pause and consider both our past and our future. 2-3-4 is a simple tagline we are using this year to summarize the work accomplished by the Rangeland Trust: 20 years of success, 300,000 acres conserved, and 400,000 acres in queue. As you can see, we have a lot

to celebrate—and we’re ready to do just that! In honor of the important year ahead, the Rangeland Trust has a packed calendar. We have planned a series of events designed to acknowledge two decades of service, protection and partnership with rancher conservationists all over the state of California and beyond. The big event will take place on Saturday, June 16, in A Western Affair 2018— an extraordinary evening set to take place at the historic Hearst Ranch in San Luis Obispo County’s Old San Simeon Village. The location is fitting, as there are few locations that can more effectively communicate the work of the California Rangeland Trust than the spectacular 82,000acre Hearst Ranch. The largest privately-owned working cattle ranch on the California coast, it was protected forever in 2005 through a conservation easement that is held by the Rangeland Trust. This agreement set a powerful precedent, redefining conservation paradigms in the state. The conservation easement serves to restrict any

38 California Cattleman February 2018

future development on the 80,000acre swathe of the ranch located east of Highway 1, ensuring the preservation of scenic, open space, agricultural and natural resource values on the ranch for perpetuity. Our 20th anniversary celebration is going to kick off with a reception for leaders and VIP ticket holders on the South Terrace of the Hearst Castle at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 15, 2018. The main event will start on Saturday, June 16 at 5:00 p.m. with a silent auction and cocktails, followed from 6 to 10 p.m. by dinner, a live auction, music, and dancing. In a setting that combines the best in California fine dining and superb wines with gorgeous views of Hearst Ranch, Hearst Castle and the Pacific Ocean, A Western Affair 2018 will truly be an evening to remember. This celebration will bring the West to life and honor the invaluable support of our partners in ranching conservation, as we look forward to another 20 years of conserving California’s ranching legacy and rangeland for future generations to use and enjoy. The continued work of the California Rangeland Trust is worth ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 40


Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits

Cattlemens’ Classic Spring Sale March 10, 2018 • 1 PM PST

Dry Creek Ranch sale facility • Terrebonne, Oregon A sampling of the tremendous group of bulls we’re offering in our Spring Sale

DUNN ACQUISITION B506 Reg # 1686395

FEDDES SILVER BOW B226 Reg # 1687147

BIEBER GLADIATOR C386 Reg # 3474701

Reg #

ID

E746 E705 E720 E823 E777 E799 E814 E817 E821 E845

145 143 135 151 144 144 144 144 144 158

Reg #

ID

HB

Reg #

ID

3788277 3788297 3790075 3788269 3788247 3788211 3788199 3788231 3788223 3788361 3788281 3788191 3788177 3788235 3788179 3788361 3788283 3788269 3788303 3790085 3788263 3788309 3788361 3788295 3788259 3788169 3788305 3788253 3788239 3788271

E761 E849 E750 E827 E834 E845 E756 E823 E737 E862 E733 E766 E845 E734 E735 E736 E767 E771 E772 E773

HB

162 161 158 158 158 158 151 151 149 149

GM

51 52 52 52 51 53 53 53 53 54

Calving Ease Prospects: Sure shot sleep all night bulls CED

12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 10

BW

-3.1 -3 -4.3 -4.3 -3.8 -3.7 -3.7 -3.7 -3.7 -3.6

WW

53 58 55 58 71 65 65 65 65 59

YW

89 96 89 93 114 106 106 106 106 101

Milk

28 24 23 23 24 27 27 27 27 21

ME

0 -3 5 1 3 0 0 0 0 -1

HPG CEM

12 9 13 12 13 13 13 13 13 13

6 8 6 7 9 7 7 7 7 5

Stay

13 12 12 13 11 12 12 12 12 14

Marb

0.52 0.65 0.59 0.58 0.44 0.56 0.56 0.56 0.56 0.94

HerdBuilder Prospects: Bulls that will build your cow herd GM

51 50 51 52 52 54 52 52 51 52

CED

9 10 9 9 9 10 8 11 9 8

BW

-3.4 -2.2 -3.2 -2.5 -2.5 -3.6 -2.4 -4.3 -2.5 -2

WW

57 62 64 64 64 59 80 58 65 69

YW

88 98 97 101 101 101 119 93 101 108

Milk

21 21 20 19 19 21 14 23 22 22

ME

3 1 2 0 0 -1 -1 1 0 0

HPG CEM

13 13 14 14 14 13 14 12 15 13

4 6 9 6 6 5 4 7 6 6

Stay

16 15 14 14 14 14 14 13 13 13

Marb

0.63 0.33 0.53 0.75 0.75 0.94 0.6 0.58 0.6 0.77

YG

CW

YG

CW

-0.04 -0.03 -0.05 -0.05 0.1 -0.09 -0.09 -0.09 -0.09 0 -0.08 -0.08 -0.03 -0.02 -0.02 0 0.02 -0.05 -0.05 -0.02

GridMaster Prospects: Bulls that will yield you dollars in the feedyard HB

141 118 158 136 130 138 129 130 127 127

GM

54 54 54 53 53 53 53 53 53 53

CED

8 4 10 6 9 8 4 10 9 9

BW

-3 -2.4 -3.6 -1.3 -3.2 -1.7 -0.5 -3.4 -4.2 -4.2

WW

65 70 59 81 75 87 78 73 68 68

YW

110 106 101 128 118 131 120 116 107 107

Milk

19 21 21 19 16 16 21 25 26 26

Everett Flikkema: 406.580.2186

ME

-3 6 -1 -1 0 2 6 6 4 4

HPG CEM

13 16 13 14 13 14 19 14 14 14

6 5 5 7 5 9 4 8 5 5

Stay

12 10 14 11 10 11 11 9 10 10

Marb

1.05 1.06 0.94 0.91 0.67 0.68 1.07 0.74 0.72 0.72

YG

0.01 -0.05 0 0.08 0.02 0.02 0 -0.01 0.06 0.06

19 23 17 19 32 28 28 28 28 25

17 25 23 26 26 25 37 19 26 31

CW

31 29 25 44 35 45 40 34 27 27

RE

0.22 0.2 0.36 0.43 0.22 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.39 RE

0.29 0.49 0.39 0.27 0.27 0.39 0.43 0.43 0.41 0.41 RE

0.52 0.16 0.39 0.36 0.48 0.51 0.22 0.48 0.27 0.27

BF

0 -0.01 0.02 0.02 0.03 0 0 0 0 0.03 BF

-0.01 0.01 0.02 0 0 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.01 0.01 BF

0.04 -0.03 0.03 0.02 0.03 0.02 -0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03

Jack Vollstedt: 818.535.4034 February 2018 California Cattleman 39 Terrebonne, Oregon • vfredangus.com


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 38 recognizing—not only because our supporters deserve to be honored and acknowledged, but also because these efforts will only gain relevance and importance in the years to come. Conserving California’s open spaces and ranching stewardship serves many purposes. It provides local jobs, recharges the groundwater and increases freshwater supplies, protects the habitats of approximately 95 percent of endangered species in the state, sequesters carbon, ensures a safe protein source and much more. These purposes have formed our mission here at the California Rangeland Trust since we first opened our doors in 1998, and we are

excited when we think about the future and how our efforts will continue to serve communities across the state of California and beyond. Thank you for your continued support of the California Rangeland Trust! Whether you’re a longtime partner in our conservation efforts or new to the work we do, we would love to see you in June at A Western Affair 2018. Head to our website (www. RangelandTrust.org) to book a table for yourself and a group, or to purchase individual tickets. If you are a business owner interested in connecting with an exciting new audience of ranchers, conservationists, business professionals and elected officials at this keynote event, please contact us to learn more about sponsorship opportunities.

CALIFORNIA RANGELAND TRUST

Extended-Release Injectable Parasiticide 5% Sterile Solution NADA 141-327, Approved by FDA for subcutaneous injection For the Treatment and Control of Internal and External Parasites of Cattle on Pasture with Persistent Effectiveness CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS FOR USE LONGRANGE, when administered at the recommended dose volume of 1 mL per 110 lb (50 kg) body weight, is effective in the treatment and control of 20 species and stages of internal and external parasites of cattle: Gastrointestinal Roundworms Bunostomum phlebotomum – Adults and L4 Cooperia oncophora – Adults and L4 Cooperia punctata – Adults and L4 Cooperia surnabada – Adults and L4 Haemonchus placei – Adults Oesophagostomum radiatum – Adults Ostertagia lyrata – Adults Ostertagia ostertagi – Adults, L4, and inhibited L4 Trichostrongylus axei – Adults and L4 Trichostrongylus colubriformis – Adults Parasites

20 of SUCCESS 2 k CONSERVED 300 3 k QUEUE 400 in 4 YE

AR

AC

YE AR

S

RE

AC

S

RE

S

f o y r o hist Ranching in

CALIFORNIA 40 California Cattleman February 2018

Gastrointestinal Roundworms Bunostomum phlebotomum Cooperia oncophora Cooperia punctata Haemonchus placei Oesophagostomum radiatum Ostertagia lyrata Ostertagia ostertagi Trichostrongylus axei Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus

Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus – Adults

Grubs Hypoderma bovis

Mites Sarcoptes scabiei var. bovis Durations of Persistent Effectiveness 150 days 100 days 100 days 120 days 120 days 120 days 120 days 100 days 150 days

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) should be given only by subcutaneous injection in front of the shoulder at the recommended dosage level of 1 mg eprinomectin per kg body weight (1 mL per 110 lb body weight). WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Withdrawal Periods and Residue Warnings Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 48 days of the last treatment. This drug product is not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Animal Safety Warnings and Precautions The product is likely to cause tissue damage at the site of injection, including possible granulomas and necrosis. These reactions have disappeared without treatment. Local tissue reaction may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Observe cattle for injection site reactions. If injection site reactions are suspected, consult your veterinarian. This product is not for intravenous or intramuscular use. Protect product from light. LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) has been developed specifically for use in cattle only. This product should not be used in other animal species. When to Treat Cattle with Grubs LONGRANGE effectively controls all stages of cattle grubs. However, proper timing of treatment is important. For the most effective results, cattle should be treated as soon as possible after the end of the heel fly (warble fly) season. Environmental Hazards Not for use in cattle managed in feedlots or under intensive rotational grazing because the environmental impact has not been evaluated for these scenarios. Other Warnings: Underdosing and/or subtherapeutic concentrations of extendedrelease anthelmintic products may encourage the development of parasite resistance. It is recommended that parasite resistance be monitored following the use of any anthelmintic with the use of a fecal egg count reduction test program. TARGET ANIMAL SAFETY Clinical studies have demonstrated the wide margin of safety of LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin). Overdosing at 3 to 5 times the recommended dose resulted in a statistically significant reduction in average weight gain when compared to the group tested at label dose. Treatment-related lesions observed in most cattle administered the product included swelling, hyperemia, or necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue of the skin. The administration of LONGRANGE at 3 times the recommended therapeutic dose had no adverse reproductive effects on beef cows at all stages of breeding or pregnancy or on their calves. Not for use in bulls, as reproductive safety testing has not been conducted in males intended for breeding or actively breeding. Not for use in calves less than 3 months of age because safety testing has not been conducted in calves less than 3 months of age. STORAGE Store at 77° F (25° C) with excursions between 59° and 86° F (15° and 30° C). Protect from light. Made in Canada. Manufactured for Merial, Inc., Duluth, GA, USA. ®The Cattle Head Logo and ®LONGRANGE are registered trademarks of Merial, Inc. ©2015 Merial, Inc. All rights reserved. 1050-2889-06, Rev. 2/2015, 8LON016C


Here, TIM E I S M E AS U R E D IN

GENERATIONS. That’s why you need LONGRANGE for up to 150 days of parasite control.1 Bloodlines. You’re as proud of yours as you are of theirs. But if you used a short-term dewormer like CYDECTIN® (moxidectin) or DECTOMAX® (doramectin), you may not have been doing your genetics justice. That’s because your cows and heifers were probably reinfected with parasites just halfway through the grazing season – right when they need to gain weight to breed back and give milk.

Only LONGRANGE delivers true season-long control.1

25.4 lbs.

LONGRANGE heifers gained 25.4 lbs. more on average over those treated with DECTOMAX.2

Out here, there is no time for shortcuts. This year, think LONGRANGE.

theLONGRANGElook.com CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS: For use in cattle only, not for use in humans or other animal species. Keep out of reach of children. Not for use in breeding bulls, or in calves less than 3 months of age. Not for use in cattle managed in feedlots or under intensive rotational grazing. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows, or in veal calves. Post injection site damage (e.g., granulomas, necrosis) can occur; these reactions have disappeared without treatment. Not for intravenous or intramuscular use. Do not underdose. Do not treat within 48 days of slaughter. 1

Merial is now part of Boehringer Ingelheim. ®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks of Merial. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. ©2017 Merial, Inc., Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. BOV-0534-ANTH1017

2

Dependent upon parasite species, as referenced in FOI summary and LONGRANGE product label. Results based on actual on-farm comparative demonstration. Individual herd results may vary. Data on file at Boehringer-Ingelheim. Consult with your veterinarian to discuss expectations for your operation.

Available in 500 mL, 250 mL and 50 mL bottles. Administer subcutaneously at 1 mL/110 lbs.

February 2018 California Cattleman 41


peek Named Tehama County Cattleman of the year

On Jan. 12 at the 15th annual Tehama County Cattlemen and CattleWomen Scholarship Fundraiser with the 66th annual Winter Dinner, the Tehama County Cattlemen’s Association Man of the Year Brad Peek was honored by local cattlemen. Currently the General Manager BRAD PEEK of Western Video Market and Shasta Livestock Auction Yard, Peek has served as president of the California Livestock Marketing Association of California, and served on National Cattlemen’s Beef Association committees. The Peek family has been instrumental to the success of the California livestock industry. His father, Ellington and brother Andy have been TCCA Men of the Year. Ellington Peek was the first honoree in 1973, and Andy followed in 2008. Kari Dodd was recognized as CowBelle of the Year. Both received congressional certificates. At the event, Josh Davy also recognized the TCCA Scholarship winners: Nicole Tomasello, Will Macdonald, Kegan Richards, Wayde Henderson, Mahlon Owens, Madison McCarthy. Vicky Dawley recognized the TCCW recipients: Jessica Macdonald, Will Macdonald, Bailey Brownfield, Jenny McCluskey, Sutter Long.

SELENIUM BOLUSES From Pacific Trace Minerals Se 365 selenium bolus for nutritional supplementation of beef cattle.

• treat once a year • for beef cattle over 3 months of age.

For sale & use in California Only — Organically Listed— CCA member: $240/box o f60 CCA Non-Members: $288/box shipping additional

cmaas@pacifictraceminerals.com www.pacifictraceminerals.com

ORDER FROM OR PICKUP AT: California Cattlemen’s Association 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA • (916) 444-0845 42 California Cattleman February 2018

Cattle Ranch and Pasture Leases Available

‐‐Locations in Eagleville CA, Lassen County CA and Washoe County NV ‐‐Year Round and Summer Range Options ‐‐Competitive Rates ‐‐Must be Experienced Operator, Licensed, Insured, etc. ‐‐Long‐Term Tenants Preferred ‐‐Call (775) 315‐4231 for Additional Information


February 2018 California Cattleman 43


BRINGING IN THE

Butterflies

Cattle grazing helps restore threatened butterfly habitat in the Bay Area by U.S. Fish ¶ Wildlife Service Public Affairs Officer Byrhonda Lyons

W

hen people escape San Jose for a 10-mile trip south of the city to Santa Teresa County Park, they expect to see spectacular views, nature and wildlife. Many don’t anticipate coming close to 1,000-pound animals that ‘moo,’ but that’s exactly what happens when they visit the park nowadays. Cattle are a part of conservation efforts to rid the park of non-native grasses and restore its threatened butterfly habitat. Santa Teresa Park covers more than 1,600 acres in Santa Clara County, and many of those acres are filled with native grasses that thrive in serpentine soils. The soils develop when serpentine rocks weather over the years. The thin rocky soils are comprised of decayed minerals that don’t have many nutrients. But years of pollution from nearby cities has affected the soil and serpentine grasses. “The smog from Silicon Valley is basically fertilizing the grasslands,” said Stuart Weiss, Ph.D., chief scientist at Creekside Center for Earth Observation. It’s called atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The nitrogen in the atmosphere from pollution fertilizes the serpentine soil, making it difficult for native grasslands. “[Atmospheric nitrogen deposition] is delivering 10-20 pounds

of nitrogen to the [serpentine grasslands] per acre per year,” said Weiss, who has studied the effects of nitrogen deposition for decades. “That makes our nutrient-poor serpentine grasslands not so nutrient-poor anymore.” Serpentine grasslands are critical for many wildlife species that depend on its native grasses for habitat. One of those species is the bay checkerspot butterfly. Over the years, the butterfly’s population has significantly declined, leading to it being listed threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1987. Since then, local scientists have worked to establish conservation methods that will protect the species and improve serpentine grasslands. “Because of the nutrient deposits, non-native annual grasses grow really thick and strong, and they thatch over,” Weiss said. “So you end up with a layer of thatch that’s smothering all of the [native] wildflowers that the butterfly needs.” One way to fight back against the non-native grasses choking out serpentine grasslands is through cattle grazing.

GRAZING AT THE PARK

Before Santa Teresa County Park was open to the public, the area was privately owned and operated by ranchers. “This [park] was grazed as private ranches,” said Don Rocha, deputy director of Santa Clara Parks. “At that time, we were buying parcels and the parks department was taking cattle off the land. Volunteers were coming in and pulling out the infrastructure, the

BAR 6 Charolais 44 California Cattleman February 2018

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 46


As Seen in The Nevada Rancher Magazine

February 2018 California Cattleman 45


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44 fence lines and everything that was associated with cattle grazing.” But around the late-1990s, things began to change. Weiss wrote a scientific article highlighting the benefits of cattle grazing for checkerspot butterfly habitat in 1999. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated the Santa Teresa County Park as critical habitat for the butterfly under the ESA in 2001. The park’s serpentine soils, which produce native grasslands, require special management considerations, such as grazing, in order for the butterfly to survive. “It took a while for us to get the momentum to bring the cows back and identify the funds to construct the infrastructure to manage the cattle in a way that is compatible with public access and park operations,” Rocha said. After years of thinking about it and educating the public to the idea of having cattle in the park, “the plans started to align,” Rocha added. Both the Service and the Bureau of Reclamation (awarded Santa Clara Parks almost $800,000 to reestablish grazing infrastructure in the park. The funding is through the Central Valley Project Improvement Act Habitat Restoration Program (CVPIA-HRP) and the Central Valley Project Conservation Program. Both programs protect and restore native habitats and stabilize and improve native species populations that were impacted by the Central Valley Project. Projects are selected through a competitive solicitation process. “Our grants provided funds to install fencing, water troughs, water tanks and corrals,” said Caroline Prose, co-program manager for CVPIA-HRP. “Having the cattle out there grazing will also control invasive grasses, increase biodiversity and reduce the risk of fire from

thatch build-up.” About 490 acres of serpentine soil grasslands are enhanced because of managed grazing at the park. “We’ve worked with ranchers, and their goals are pretty much the same as ours, removing the non-native grass every year,” said Weiss. The infrastructure was installed at the park in 2016, and the cattle have been grazing there ever since. Park visitors are bound to see cattle from a distance or even spot cow pies near some of the trails, but even if people

don’t see evidence of cattle, it’s difficult to miss the huge signs that let folks know the cows are nearby. “There aren’t inherent conflicts between cattle and park operations,” said Rocha. “Cattle grazing provides a much-needed conservation benefit for all of us, and an enhanced recreational experience due to the resulting wildflower displays and return of serpentine flora and fauna. The parks department will be increasing its outreach to added conservation benefits for all of us.”

SHORT ON WATER ? Two Alfalfas in One

46 California Cattleman February 2018

Plant If Your Pivot Only Pumps 400gal/

Plant On Dryland On the Market for 29 years

(and still unbeatable)

Greenway

360-D

We are a non-GMO seed house! Never a positive hit for GMO

Alfalfa

port Never a Re ill of Winter K

land ng Dry se Planti When fa always u Alfal ed seed! coat it!) prove s u (Let

This Alfalfa has been called a tetraploid anomaly by alfalfa breeders. On the market for 25 years, and being improved twice, It remains the highest yeilding, low water alfalfa on the market! HERE’S WHAT GROWERS ARE SAYING: "We plant 360-D every year, and we now have over 1000 acres. We took a second cutting when many other growers in our area only cut once." Bruce Davenport - Goldendale, WA

"We planted 360-D in an irrigated field that was very short on water. Side by side was field with normal water. The 360-D yielded with the well irrigated adjacent field! No difference in yield!" Ryan Telford - Richfield, ID

Alan Greenway Seedsman

Over 40 Years Experiance

Greenway Seeds Caldwell, ID Alan Greenway 208-250-0159 (cell) 208-454-8342 (message)

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Will produce AT LEAST 80% of crop with 50% of water Will produce a subsequent cutting after water is gone Plant on dryland/ guaranteed to out yield Ranger or Ladak Plant under pivots that only pump 400 gal/ Plant on fields that have only early season creek water Plant under end guns on pivots Plant in the late fall with your dormant seeded grasses

w w w. g r e e n w a y s e e d a n d i n d u s t r i e s . c o m We have sold out by March 1st each of the last 3 years. Order early!


February 2018 California Cattleman 47


Saturday & Sunday March 10-11, 2018 Can a ranchis If Ranching

provide a young family a sustainable income and retirement? Get answers at our annual seminar and social

165 Osborne Ln. Yerington, NV 89447 Office 775-463-2677 Lucy 775-790-0801 FUNDED IN PART BY GRANTS FROM THE YERINGTON AND LYON COUNTY ROOM TAX BOARDS


22 TOP ANGUS ON TEST!

FEATURING SONS OF THESE LEADING SIRES!

CED

BW

WW

YW

CW

MB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

+9

+.7

+64

+123

+51

+.93

+.66

-.008

70.83

90.63

48.32

$B 162.23

15%

10%

15%

10%

2%

10%

10%

10%

5%

A A R TEN X 7008 S A CED

BW

WW

YW

CW

MB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

+2

+2.5

+68

+128

+54

-.04

+.76

-.047

60.99

86.06

12.16

120.82

10%

4%

10%

10%

2%

10%

S A V RECHARGE 3436

CED

BW

WW

YW

CW

MB

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

+13

-1.6

+64

+120

+43

+.90

+.33

+.022

61.69

89.69

39.63

144.27

10%

10%

15%

10%

10%

10%

A & B SPOTLITE 3065

ALSO SELLING SONS BY THESE BREED LEADING BULLS... Westwind Waylon DJH 342 Mohnen Impressive 1093 MGR Impeccable 4068 Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 WR Journey1X74

Thorenfeldt Land & Cattle Co. 40639 Hwy 20 East • Burns, OR 97730

David Holden • (530) 736-0727 e-mail: wstwind@hotmail.com

Bo Thorenfeldt • 650-333-0594 e-mail: bothorenfeldt@gmail.com

February 2018 California Cattleman 49


What keeps buyers and consignors coming back by Katie Roberti for the California Cattlemen’s Association

nnovation: a buzzword that seems to be getting more and more popular every year. For many, the buzzword is a newer idea and trend, but some, such as the Snyder family of Snyder Livestock Company, Inc. have been innovating for decades. Since the mid 1800s the family has been ranching in the Mason Valley, just outside of Yerington, Nev. and finding ways to implement new ideas. One of their many successful innovations, the Bulls for the 21st Century Sale, was born in 1999 and is now considered one of the most challenging bull tests in the West. Since the beginning of the test and sale, the Snyder family, under the direction of Lucy (Snyder) Rechel aimed to develop a test that emphasized evaluating bulls by multiple factors, not just feedlot gain. Although the core of the test hasn’t changed much, small adjustments to the evaluation system have been made to better improve the test over the years. Conformation, gain on test, weaning performance, fertility, muscling, carcass characteristics and feed efficiency are the seven factors used to evaluate the bulls leading up to the 19th annual sale on March 11. In addition to the test serving as an evaluation of the bulls, Rechel organizes the information collected from the factors in the test in a tangible way and then makes data available for consignors and buyers to digest. “We try and provide numbers that commercial cattlemen can really use as valid tools,” Rechel said. “We believe commercial cattlemen are intelligent, demanding, informed, progressive, and deserve to know everything possible about the bulls they purchase.” Providing more data on each bull than the average sale does, Rechel sees it as an opportunity for cattlemen and women to take that information and then use it to improve their own operations. Buyers and consignors both recognize the benefits the test provides and the data that comes with it. Charlie Hone, of Hone Ranch in Minden, Nev., has been consigning to the Bulls for 21st Century Sale since the first sale. The evaluation the bulls receive is one that speaks to the quality of the animals in his opinion. “I think that the scoring system is a good test of the overall management of your cow herd,” Hone said. “The bulls that do well in the sale have cows that also breed back

I

50 California Cattleman February 2018

well.” Consigning 13 bulls this year, Hone believes in the value of the data that the test provides to those in the cattle buying and breeding business. “You can’t figure out where you’re going until you know where you’ve been, and the only way to get there is data,” Hone said. “I don’t think there is any other sale that gives the buyer the presale information that Snyder’s sale provides.” In addition to Hone participating in the test every year, Philips Red Angus, Don and Diana Cardey, Steve Smith, and Lilla Bell have all been consigning bulls to the sale for the majority of the test’s duration. This year’s test has 16 consignors. Heather and Brian Kingdon, commercial cattle producers out of Taylorsville, have been purchasing bulls at Snyder’s sale for many years. The timing of the March sale works well with their ranch’s breeding schedule and gives the bulls time to acclimate after bringing them home and before turning them out with cows. In addition to the timing of the sale, the Kingdons attribute the thorough testing of the bulls as one of the primary reasons they keep going back year after year. The substantial amount of data

KINGDON ©

Col. Rick Machado, John Dickinson, Lucy Rechel and Col. John Rodgers on the sale block during the Bulls for the 21st Century Sale in Yerington, Nev.


available to consignors and potential buyers has made it easier for the Kingdons to sort through the bulls prior to even getting to the sale. “You get the catalog before the sale and then you go there and get handed more data, and what we find is you can cross compare,” the Kingdons said. “We find the ideal bull on paper and then make adjustments based on budget. Then when we get there, we can review the information on the bulls we picked out and do a visual exam.” Similar to the data making the pre-shopping prior to the sale easier, the Kingdons find value in watching the videos of the bulls provided online before the sale. Four years ago, the sale made the switch to selling bulls via video opposed to running them through the ring on sale day. This has been helpful both in keeping the bulls safer on sale day, as well as providing an additional marketing tool to consignors and buyers prior to the sale. “It’s easier on the cattle and the people,” Rechel said. “The stress of sale day is significant and just eliminating running them through a ring makes it an easier day for the bulls.” “They [the videos] are usually pretty true to form and it does help because you can get a good look at the bulls,” the Kingdons said. The Kingdons also noted that the video part of the sale is eliminating the chance for bulls to be injured during the sale. Just as the videos were implemented a few years back, this year’s 19th annual sale has a new innovation of its own. “I am really excited that this year we are trailer training all of the bulls,” Rechel said. Theoretically, Rechel wants to make it possible for cattlemen and women to be able to go out into the middle of a pasture with a gooseneck and easily load any of the bulls bought in this year’s sale. Rechel is aiming to train the bulls to want to go into the trailer. Anyone who is familiar with loading cattle and understands the difficulties that can sometimes bring will recognize the convenience this could bring. “We want the bulls to learn that the trailer is a safe and comfortable area,” Rechel said. Every video of each bull in this year’s sale will include

Bulls at Snyder Livestock in Yerington, Nev., feeding in Snyder’s GrowSafe System which provides data on each bull for buyers and consignors.

footage of the animal loading into a trailer. While this isn’t something Rechel and her crew have to do, unique and exciting implementations like this into their program are appreciated and recognized by the sale’s consignors and buyers. “She [Rechel] tries all of the latest techniques and is very proactive,” said the Kingdons. “When you go, there is always something surprising or new and exciting happening.” “I like how innovative Lucy and her program are” Hone said, “She is always looking for new ways to improve, not just with the marketing cattle, but the entire beef industry.” One of those ways she is looking to have a positive impact on the beef industry as a whole this year is through the continuation of the educational seminars hosted the afternoon and evening prior to the sale. The Kingdons, who have attended the seminars at past sales see value in the way the topics and speakers at the seminars are set up. “You get a lot of information,” the Kingdons said. “Lucy is always very good at bringing someone you wouldn’t have thought of and it brings depth to the sale.” While the seminar last year aimed to educate producers about the value of genetics, discussions surrounding the question, “Is your beef industry sustainable?” will be had at this year’s seminar. “I think it is something our industry needs to put some thought into,” Rechel said. “The economic sustainability of the industry needs to be questioned.” An impressive array of speakers will present Saturday, March 10 at 11:30 a.m., at the annual Bull Buyer’s Seminar. Dr. Sara Place, Senior Director of Sustainable Beef Production Research at National Cattleman’s Beef Association (NCBA), will discuss NCBA’s checkoff funded life cycle assessment food security and sustainability as it pertains to the beef industry. Myriah D. Johnson, Ph.D. serves as the economics program leader and as an agricultural economics consultant in the industry relations and stewardship program. She joined the Noble Research Institute in 2016. At Noble, Johnson helps lead the Integrity Beef Sustainability Pilot project which aims to improve the sustainability of the entire beef production value chain and act as a model for the U.S. beef industry. She also works with producers to analyze their financial performance, engage in risk marketing, and build financially sound operations. Additionally, Larry Kaagan, president of Kaagan Research, a polling, trend analysis, and strategy consulting firm, will explore the differences between producer and consumer perceptions of sustainability. Saturday evening at 4:30 p.m., following bull sale awards, Dr. Bill Payne, Dean of College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources at UNR, will moderate a panel discussion among the three afternoon presenters. It is Rechel’s goal that, through the seminars, producers will begin to explore some of the beef industry’s challenging questions. For more information on this year’s seminar kicking off the 2018 Bulls for the 21st Century Sale, March 10 and 11, and all of the innovating things happening at Snyder Livestock Company, Inc., visit http://www.slcnv.com.

February 2018 California Cattleman 51


8 OUTSTANDING RED ANGUS FROM TROTTERS! BUILT ON QUALITY YEAR AFTER YEAR! CALVING EASE RED ANGUS BULLS AND BULLS LOADED WITH CARCASS TRAITS

A dozen that will deliver! FROM HONE RANCH quality outcross angus genetics!

SELLING MARCH 11!

Featuring bulls from t his renowned sire!

INCLUDING FIVE IMPRESSIVE SONS OF BREED LEADER FEDDES OSCAR X28

SIRE: MYTTY IN FOCUS MGS: S A V ADAPTOR 2213

FEDDES OSCAR X28 RAAA #1368605

FEDDES OSCAR X28

CED

+13

BW

-6.4

WW

+61

YW

+108

CEM

+13

MARB

+.70

CED +9 MK 23

A A R Ten X 7008 S A

BW WW YW +.7 64 123 MB RE FAT .93 .66 -.008

SC 1.17 $B 162.33

Also selling sons of these sires: Leadore RS Retail Value 4108 QV Angus Valley 5028 Connealy Capitalist 028 Leadore RS Windy 57

RIBEYE +.02

ALL TROTTER RED ANGUS BULLS ARE RA50K TESTED!

TROTTER

RED ANGUS

h

CHARLIE HONE

LANA TROTTER

PO Box 1956 • Minden, NV 89423

(775) 691-1838

(661) 548-6652 • (661) 330-4617 lanaj548@gmail.com RT 4 Box 206A • Porterville, CA 93257

honeranch@frontier.com

YOUR NEVADA SOURCE for

HEREFORDS WITH A HISTORY! 60 years in the Hereford breed! 10 bulls sell at Snyders, including sons of CRR 100W TRUST 370 ET

Reg #P43384592 DOB: 3/12/13 BW 2.8 WW 46 YW 77 SCF 24.9 MK 32 REA .48 MB .10 $BMI 36 $CHB 29

ALSO OFFERING SONS OF:

CHURCHILL KICKSTART 501C ET KCF BENNETT ENCORE Z311 ET • BRL 118 T14 CLIP 25C Lilla & Woodie Bell Dan & Theresa Bell

Like us on Facebook at Bell Ranch Herefords

(775) 578-3536 PO BOX 48, PARADISE, NV 89426 BELLRANCHES@GMAIL.COM

52 California Cattleman February 2018

Some of this year’s outstanding offering: CED +10

BW +.5

WW +67

YW +113

MK +24

RE +.50

$W +64.37

$B +132.61

CED +7

BW +1.3

WW +61

YW +110

MK +31

RE +.37

$W +69.75

$B +158.11

CED +12

BW -.6

WW +56

YW +86

MK +22

RE +.83

$W +65.24

$B +125.69

FlyingchRJ Ran


FEATURING SONS OF MOHNEN IMPRESSIVE 1093 772 773

Mohnen Impressive Mohnen Impressive

-0.7 0.6

52 64

89 104

30 29

761

S A V Bismarck 5682

-0.5

41

62

760

S A V Bismarck 5682

0.1

32

52

702

G A R Composure

0.8

60

Vision Unanimous 1418 4.2

713

CED

BW

WW

MOHNEN IMPRESSIVE 1093

YW

SC

MK

MB

RE

FAT

$B

0.17 0.83

0.21 0.52

67 77.75 72.61 144.96

14

0.09

0.48

36.52 53.97

23

-0.08 0.64

34.51 45.49

98

28

0.33

0.54

64.1

66

112

20

0.67

0.18

57.04 127.68

113.6

722

Mohnen Impressive

1.4

56

91

21

0.58

0.27

55.07 113.81

729

R/M Ten X 3a94

0.8

43

76

27

0.1

0.2

41.94 52.47

715E 718E 732E

FBF1 Combustible FBF1 Combustible FBF1 Combustible

0.7 53.9 93.2 18.6 0.27 0.7 53.9 93.2 18.6 0.27 0.7 53.9 93.2 18.6 0.27

0.47 105.7 62.9 0.47 105.7 62.9 0.47 105.7 62.9

VIDEOS AVAILABLE OF ALL SALE BULLS EARLY MARCH WWW.GUDELCATTLECOMPANY.COM

FREE DELIVERY OF BULLS IN CALIFORNIA & NEVADA!

YOUR 21ST

CENTURY SOURCE

for Charolais Bulls from a

PROVEN PROGRAM! This past top-seller and 21st Century Graduate is standing at Select Sires and our 2018 bulls on test are from the same great cowherd, including the first sons of this exciting young sire! FTJ CASCADE 1508 CE BW WW YW MK REA FAT MB

ALSO SELLING SONS OF:

9.6 -1.1 37 69 12 .59 .018 .26

M6 FRESH AIR 8165 P ET • VPI FREE LUNCH 708T LHD FLAWLESS R1538 PLD • BJR HANK 984 P FTJ CASCADE 1508• FTJ PASKENTA 1530 FRED & TONI JORGENSEN 530. 865.7102 • 209.602.8130 . 25884 MOLLER AVE. • ORLAND, CA 95963

Jorgensen Ranch

ID # 540 542 545 546 703 705

CE 15 10 13 11 14 9

BW -7 -3.1 -4.3 -5.1 -3.4 -3.7

MM 20 18 16 17 20 18

HPG 12 13 10 12 8 9

MARB STAY .4 15 .37 13 .29 16 .59 15 .27 13 .54 11

Known for reliable, low-birthweight carcass bulls Don’t miss out on this year’s exceptional offering!

Phillps Ranch Red Angus

Cecil Felkins • (209) 274-4338 550 Buena Vista Rd. Ione, CA 95640 February 2018 California Cattleman 53


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER 2017 Carcass of Merit and Gold Seal Program Awards from the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association The commercial beef industry’s emphasis on value-based marketing has improved quality of beef products and increased consumer demand. This increased attention to beef carcass traits is recognized by CBCIA’s Carcass of Merit and Gold Seal Program. For many years, the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) has recognized outstanding beef carcasses from youth livestock shows throughout California. To qualify for the two awards (Certificate of Merit and Gold Seal) require carcass parameters to meet or exceed certain standards for weight and quality and yield grade. These standards have changed periodically with industry demands. If you have any questions regarding the Carcass of Merit Program or sending in results for next year please contact Amanda McKeith at amckeith@csufresno.edu. Additionally, if you are wanting to start a carcass contest at your county fair and need assistance, please contact Amanda as there is information available to help you get started. “The CBCIA’s recognition of youth who produce cattle that meet industry standards is a critical addition to local county fairs,” states Josh Davy, University of California Cooperative Extension livestock and natural resources advisor. “I work with the local cattlemen’s association to take the recognition from CBCIA and create a learning opportunity for beef exhibitors at the county fairs and host a dinner for steer exhibitors to receive their awards and learn more about beef carcass quality and consumer demands.” In all, 24 carcass contests were reported in 2017. CBCIA and the California Cattlemen’s Association want to recognize and congratulate the following participants: 2017 CBCIA CARCASS OF MERIT & GOLD SEAL AWARDS ALAMEDA COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Carissa Koopmann Rivers & Kim Bonde Gold Seal: Faith Osborn Carcass of Merit: Jessie Peterson, Ashley Porter, Cassidy Peterson, Gavin Johnson, Bridget Bowe, Joseph Porter and Gianna Perugi. AMADOR COUNTY FAIR
 Carcass Show Manager: Dan Sehnert 
 Carcass of Merit: Eric Gold, Robbie Woolsey, Tristen Krisman, Tino Meza, Regina Schneider, Rachel Lyman, Karson White, Johnna Klaot, Jokob Burtschi, Flynn Murphy, Ashley Lynch and Megan Lynch 54 California Cattleman February 2018

2017 CRITERIA

CARCASS OF MERIT GOLD SEAL Hot carcass weight, 600 - 950 lbs. Hot carcass weight, 650- 900 lbs. USDA Quality Grade min. USDA Quality Grade min. Choice Minus or higher Choice average or higher USDA Yield Grade Below 3.00 USDA Yield Grade Below 2.5

BUTTE COUNTY Carcass Show Manager: Tracy Schohr & Patrick Doyle Gold Seal: Wyatt Billman Carcass of Merit: Hunter Abbott, Gemma Donati, Nico Donati, Blake Jayne, Jaime McEntire, Mackenzie Mikulaco, Levi Niemela and Lexi Vanella. CALIFORNIA MID-STATE FAIR/SAN LUIS OBISPO CO. FAIR Carcass Show Managers: Mike Hall, Mark Clement Gold Seal: Leo Kemp, Jacob Grant, Grace Curtis, Trevor Straeck, Brayden Borden, Ashley Lewis, Johnny Schmitz, Shayna Kunze and Jace Donati Carcass of Merit: Mallori Seifert, Harrison Orradre, Sarahi Beltran, Hayden Taylor, Casey Nauta, Mattie Lindsey, Tyler Cassara, Kaitlynn Reichard, Seth Javadi, Wyatt DeBusk, Jessica Simonin, Jenna Lewis, Sheridan Dunn, Mackenzie Ramsey, Holly Thomas, Kaden Javadi, Wyatt Judge, Jacob Walker, Shelby Walker, Christobal Lopez, Emma Haas, Lacey Lewis, Hailey Borden, Thomas Phelan, Jenna Lee and Jarrett Rucker CHOWCHILLA/MADERA COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Amanda McKeith Gold Seal: Leighton Dill Carcass of Merit: Ethan Slate, Tehya Abrahams, Keilani Menderhall, Bailey Lopez, Samantha Wagg and Joseph Dudley DIXON MAY FAIR/SOLANO COUNTY FAIR 
 Carcass Show Manager: Morgan Doran Carcass of Merit: Daniela Setka, Shayley Gish, Sydney Weaver, AJ Granillo, Brayden Gish EL DORADO COUNTY FAIR 
 Carcass Show Manager: Dan Sehnert
 Gold Seal: Amelia KlovachClaudia Koll, Jack Koll, Hannah Wilkinson, Hannah Gollnick Carcass of Merit: Calista Schreck, Kassidy Wells, Joshua Lemos and Elizabeth Bloxsom ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 56


Spring Cove Ranch THE Pioneer Herd of the West

We’ve been raising registered Angus cattle at Spring Cove Ranch for nearly 100 years. Our bulls are raised outside on dry range conditions, are genetically designed to provide meat, marbling and muscle and to perform in our western environment while enhancing the durability, fertility and longevity in your cowherd and in ours.

Annual Production Sale Monday, March 12, 2018

Selling 175 Angus bulls , 75 Angus females & 40 JBB/AL Hereford & Red Angus Bulls

Spring Cove Reno 4021 Reg 17926446 Sired by: KM Broken Bow 002 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702 CED+11 BW-0.4 WW+78 YW+132 SC+1.34 Milk+32 CW+53 Marb+.80 Rib+.63 $W+88.33 $F+105.85 $B+171.68

Reno sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Sitz Longevity 556Z

Sitz Longevity 556Z Reg 17179073 Sire: Connealy Final Product MGS: Woodhill Foresight CED+6 BEPD+.2 WEPD+60 YEPD+108 SC+.95 Milk+30 CW+38 Marb+.80 Rib+.34 $W+67.63 $F+79.58 $B+130.71 Longevity sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Spring Cove Crossbow 4205 Reg 17924903 Sired by : KM Broken Bow 002 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702 CED+17 BW -1.6 WW+61 YW+110 SC+.17 Milk+17 CW+54 Marb+1.01 Rib+.53 $W+55.29 $F+73.16 $B+165.93 Crossbow sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Spring Cove Paygrade 5064 Reg 18251392 Sired by: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702 CED+12 BW-.6 WW+55 YW+92 SC+.99 Milk+26 CW+34 Marb+1.04 Rib+.23 $W+64.45 $F+50.38 $B+123.55 Paygrade sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

S A V Resource 1411

Basin Bonus 4345

Basin Bonus 4345 Reg 17904142 Sire: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Connealy Consensus 7229 CED+9 BEPD+1.0 WEPD+75 YEPD+130 SC+.76 MEPD+38 CW+54 Marb+1.03 Rib+.54 $W+88.94 $F+98.06 $B+162.10 Bonus sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Sitz Resource 525C Reg 18084910 Sire: S A V Resource 1411 MGS: Sitz SLS Rainmaker 6914 CED+9 BEPD+.9 WEPD+60 YEPD+113 SC+1.48 MEPD+16 CW+42 Marb+.50 Rib+.84 $W+52.22 $F+69.19 $B+131.21

525C sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Also Featuring 20 Sons of Basin Payweight 1682 Spring Cove Ranch

For Sale Books Call: 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com

Angus since 1919

Find us on Facebook

For more information call: Art or Stacy Butler Josh Mavencamp Sarah Helmick Bliss, Idaho 208-352-4332 February 2018 California Cattleman 55


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54 GLENN COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Josh Davy Gold Seal: Kate Grimsman Carcass of Merit: Shelby Weinrich, Adam Abarca, Colton Geiger, Levi Kanakis, Thea Baldridge, Evan Bailey and Brady Holzapfel INTERMOUNTAIN FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Larry Forero Gold Seal: Jaycee Norris Carcass of Merit: Braylon Earnest, Lyndi Denny, Jessica Hammon, Elizabeth Madrigal, Argenis Moya, Austin Pritchett, Melody Pritchett, Daniel Rodriguez, & Triston Welander LASSEN COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: David Lile Carcass of Merit: Waylon Miller, Morgan Gould, Cade Lile MADERA COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Blanche Campbell Carcass of Merit: Haley Adams, Riley Barney, Hannah Santoro, Teyha Abrahams MARIPOSA COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Jennifer Taylor, Mariposa Farm Bureau Carcass of Merit: Fallon Butler, Gauge Butler MERCED COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Jennifer Taylor & Amanda McKeith Carcass of Merit: Kyle Oliver, Jayson Lopez and Brody Leo MONTEREY COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Scott Violini Gold Seal: Sierra Sala, Luz Cardenas Carcass of Merit: Hayden Laporte, Taryn Wright, Mackenzie Laporte, Tyler Carroll, Beatriz Rosas, Daniel Kennedy, Javier G Romo, Adrian G Romo NAPA TOWN AND COUNTRY FAIR Carcass of Merit: Jeremy Bradley, Jillian Hamois, Nicole Merrick, Lesby Rabanales, Ben Riley, Tommy Tarap Jessica Young PLUMAS-SIERRA COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Jane Roberti Carcass of Merit: Wade Neer, Jhett Neer, Cheyanne Morrison REDWOOD EMPIRE FAIR/UKIAH Carcass Show Manager: Tina Wilson and Stacey Anderson Carcass of Merit: Joey Beak, Wyatt Hobart, Natalia Angulo, Jared Williams, Jered Donahoo, Sierra Skinner, Josue Angulo, Gracie Bauer, Samantha Mann, Blair Beeson, Leo De La Torre, Joel Slates, Jodie Nelson, Kaiden Britton, Kirsten Britton, Jalyne Franco, Trenton Watkins, Jaden Doak, Caitlyn Forrester, James Brown, Katie Brown Julie Brown SAN BENITO COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Becky Doty Gold Seal: Tristan Schmidt, Brett Gines Carcass of Merit: Kenny Bisceglia, Joseph Bisceglia, Taryn Wright, Ali Perry, Clay Hubbell, Emmy Urbina, Trevor Wright, Schanell Twisselmann, Kate Brewen SANTA BARBARA COUNTY FAIR
 Carcass Show Manager: Mark Clement and Mike Hall
 Gold Seal: Adam Beck, Luis Guerra, Cheyanne Cordova, Wyatt Pankey, Jimmy Gardner, Madison Gamble, McKenna D Bohard, Nayeli Lazaro, Alex Heidepriem Carcass of Merit: Yareli Zaragoza, Reed Cunningham, Corbin 56 California Cattleman February 2018

Hayes, Madison Flick, Judith Zavala, Brooke Minetti, Jennifer Alaniz, Alex Emerick, Julia Martinez Bautista, Michelle Ambriz, Connor Hayes, Talya Cullum, Grace Chandless, Darbie Pond, Robert Hobbs, Lilly Masopust, Jasmyn Arroyo, Nancy Naranjo, Hannah Pope, Kierra VanPatten, Jenna Pankey, Gracen Hayes, Camden Paz, Jose Lemus, Aaron Nunez, Leonardo Alaniz, Luis Lucaz, Rosalva Diaz, Braidyn Cossa, Carina Fulgencio, Antonio Murillo, Mason Santos, Mackenzie Tremper, Lauren Ritchie, Kayleigh Hollum, Colton Callaway, Taylor Jones, Sage Pearce, Dylan Hill
 SANTA CLARA COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Janet Burback Gold Seal: Maddie Beckwith, Jacob Frank, Bella Boynton, Samantha Duke Carcass of Merit: Shelby Cheng, Kayla Fewkes, Ashley Jordon, Jacob Peacock, Cassie Moore, Brady Schmidt, Aimee Oxford SANTA CRUZ COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Kevin Hurle Gold Seal: Tristan Schmidt Carcass of Merit: Garrett Mansmith, Madeline Clarkson, Ellie Fisher, Brandon Smith, Robyn Morris, Angela Lopes, Blake Abercrombie, Brian Martin SHASTA DISTRICT FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Larry Forero Gold Seal: Gage Perry, Cody Frazer, Morgan Hedrick Carcass of Merit: Jack Simonis, Breanna Ellis, Chase Bunn, Jayda Staley, Sydney Oilar, Derek Adams, Scott Harrison, Megan Scheller, Loren Casey, Cole Trisdale SISKIYOU GOLDEN FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Carissa Koopmann Rivers Carcass of Merit: Trevor Truttman, Josh Scala, Creed Newton, Paige Hinton, Will Morris, Kylie Daws, Cody Brown, Nathanial Black, Elli Gomes, Zoe Newton, Jayne Harris, Chase Mercier SILVER DOLLAR FAIR Carcass Show Managers: Patrick Doyle and Shelley Livingston Gold Seal: Ivan Alvarado & Triston Benedict Carcass of Merit: Faith Fatchen, Rylee Hammons, Bailee Sutton, Matt Vanella, Taylor McNabb, Jose Sanchez, Gemma Donati, Chet Hervey TEHAMA DISTRICT FAIR Carcass Show Managers: Josh Davy Gold Seal: Clayton Cox, Clara Delong, Colbie Delong, Austin Flood, Shad Hiller, & Kegan Richards Carcass of Merit: Natalie Allen, Brian Coffey, Hannah Endres, Emily Haugen, Logan Lindeman, Rylee McGiffin, Amber O’Connor, Cheyenne Pilger, Brianna Puckett, Amy Stroing, Melissa Stroing, Ethan Sutfin,& Daniel Sutfin. TRINITY COUNTY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Larry Forero Carcass of Merit: Gabrielle Patton, Brian Harper, Kendal Dummer, Benjamin Jorgensen, Jacob Graham, Hope Ammon, Hannah Fornaciari, Colton Brown, Sara Prunty TULELAKE/BUTTE VALLEY FAIR Carcass Show Manager: Carissa Koopmann Rivers Carcass of Merit: James Lyman, Jocelyn Ibarra, Tucker Fine YOLO COUNTY FAIR & 4-H SPRING SHOW Carcass Show Manager: Morgan Doran Gold Seal: E Ethan Harlan and Jack Flynn Carcass of Merit: Montana Maggenti, Sara Harrison, Kathryn Kasbergen, Aidan Flynn


SELLING 8 FULL BROTHERS

80E Purebred Simmental W/C Loaded Up x 8543 Donor

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th 12:00 NOON SALE TIME AT THE RANCH

SELLING 60 SONS & GRANDSONS OF LOCK N LOAD

285E Purebred Simmental

27262 424th Avenue Emery, South Dakota 57332

Lock N Load x Dream Catcher

Selling 325 Head! FULL BROTHER TO W/C RELENTLESS

0135E Purebred Simmental Yardley Utah x 8543 Donor

155 YEARLING BULLS •••

ADJ 205 WT. 915 LBS

35 STRONG AGED BULLS •••

5014E Purebred Simmental

100 REGISTERED BRED HEIFERS

W/C Executive Order x Yardley Utah

•••

35 COMMERCIAL BRED HEIFERS OFFERING THE ENTIRE CROP OF RED BRED HEIFERS!

645D SimAngus™

W/C Loaded Up x SAV Iron Mountain Safe to CCR Anchor

6026D Purebred Simmental W/C Bullseye x Y770 Donor Safe to Leachman Cadillac

27262 424th Avenue, Emery, SD 57332 Home: 605-825-4219 • Dale 605-661-3625 Scott 605-682-9610 • Jared 605-933-1661 Call or email for a sale book, or visit www.WerningCattle.com Eberspacher Enterprises Inc.

638D Purebred Simmental W/C Executive Order x Lock N Load Safe to W/C Lock Down

6010D Purebred Simmental Sandeen Upper Class x HPF Sazerac Z074 Safe to CCR Anchor

Val & Lori Eberspacher 507-532-6694 Val Eberspacher Cell 612-805-7405 Email: sales@ebersale.com 2904 County Road 6, Marshall, MN 56258

Catalog also online at www.ebersale.com

February 2018 California Cattleman 57


CROSSBREEDING THAT DELIVERS ALL THE ESSENTIALS by Beefmaster Breeders United Executive Vice President Bill Pendergrass

W

hen Tom Lasater developed the Beefmaster breed, the beef industry of the 1930s – 1950s was very different than today. There were no modern selection tools such as Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs), ultrasound for live animal carcass evaluations or genomics (DNA) to help identify superior animals. Making genetic progress was difficult, but over time it helped develop the Beefmaster breed. Through following a well thought-out breeding program that utilizes a cross of Hereford, Shorthorn and Bos Indicus genetics, then selecting the most adaptable, performance oriented animals and breeding only the best, the Beefmaster breed was then born in the harsh brush country of South Texas. While there has been much written about the Lasater Ranch and the development of the Beefmaster breed, a simple, effective philosophy that is rooted in profitable beef production emerged. Known as the six essentials: fertility, disposition, weight, conformation, hardiness and milk production are the core traits that the entire Beefmaster breed was selected for and developed upon. Those six essentials are what makes the Beefmaster breed such a powerful crossbreeding tool for today’s U.S. beef industry. The genetic combination of roughly 25 percent Hereford, 25 percent Shorthorn and 50 percent Bos Indicus (specifically Gir, Guzerat and Nelore) proved to be very prolific. The resulting composites were selected using the six essentials and over time proved themselves to be very predictable. The unique genetic makeup of Beefmaster yields 63 percent retained heterosis, a vital statistic for the profitability of commercial cattlemen. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recognized Beefmaster as a breed in 1954. Why is crossbreeding important? The U.S. has the smallest beef cow herd we have seen as a nation since the 1950s. While our cow herd has become smaller, our human population continues to increase at a rapid pace. The demand for protein in higher quality diets across the world has increased the demand for beef. It takes a long time to expand a cow herd. That is why it is so important to create as much efficiency as possible in the beef supply chain. Planned crossbreeding with Beefmasters is the fastest way to create efficiency and profit in the cattle business. The U.S. cow herd is dominated by black hided, British breed-influenced genetics. These females excel at raising calves that produce high quality carcasses for the consumer

58 California Cattleman February 2018

and that is very important. Over time, to earn premiums for their calves, many producers have begun straight breeding their commercial cows. True, those black hided British calves earn a premium at the sale barn but at what cost to the producer? Crossbreeding using Beefmasters is a proven method to increase maternal efficiency and calf performance, resulting in more cost savings and profit for the beef producer. How do we know that crossbreeding works? There have been countless scientific research projects on the effects of Heterosis (the scientific name for the result of hybrid vigor that occurs with crossbreeding) in livestock production. Time and again, crossbreeding has proven to be the single most effective way to increase productivity in commercial cow herds. Heterosis or hybrid vigor, is the result of crossbreeding. Heterosis leads to performance advantages in crossbreds over the average of their straight-bred parents. When used properly, as in a well-planned crossbreeding program, heterosis can lead to big improvements in performance and efficiency. That in turn leads to more profit for the beef producer. There are three types of heterosis and how well a breeder harnesses these types will determine how much impact hybrid vigor will have on his calf crop. Individual heterosis, directly affects several traits that are economically important. These improvements actually begin before the crossbred calf is born because the fetus is more viable and resilient. After birth crossbred calves are more vigorous resulting in more live and healthier calves. Growthier, heavier calves at almost every point are a result of crossbreeding. True, crossbred calves can also have heavier birth weights but the improved calf survivability of crossbred calves overshadows those concerns. Who can say no to more live calves born, more calves surviving to weaning and the bonus of those calves weighing more? Maternal heterosis are the effects that come from using crossbred cows. Those effects are very profound for maternal traits. It all begins with fertility which is lowly heritable. Crossbreeding leads to big improvements in lowly heritable traits such as fertility, resulting in more calves born in a shorter time frame. The calves of crossbred mothers are more vigorous, grow faster and weigh more. As long as we sell cattle by the pound, these improvements are vital. While this is impressive, the big ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 60


BEEFMASTER PROVEN MATERNAL

PROVEN EFFICIENCY

PROVEN HETEROSIS

Beefmaster ranked second,

for both steers and heifers, in an

18-breed feed efficiency test

conducted by the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center.

beefmasters.org

Steers ADG,DMI = 0.203 Heifers ADG,DMI = 0.096 February 2018 California Cattleman 59


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 58 impact of crossbred cows come from having a longer productive lifetime and producing more calves. Given the cost of replacement heifers in today’s market, a cow that produces for three more years (at a minimum) is a big advantage. Beefmasters excel in maternal traits. Beefmaster sired females add even more punch to your crossbreeding program. Table 1, to the right, demonstrates the impact on individual and maternal heterosis on production is truly eyeopening. As you can see, crossbreeding pays dividends. Old time cattlemen used to say that “hybrid vigor is the only free lunch in the cow business.” Keeping a crossbreeding program simple is the key to success. Stressing the genetic differences between breeds used in crossbreeding is important. The more unrelated the breeds being used are; the more of an impact heterosis will have. Crossing British breeds such as Angus x Hereford works very well but there are genetically similar. Crossing British breeds with Continental breeds such as Angus x Charolais yields better performance results because those two breeds are less related than Angus x Hereford. Crossing British breeds with an American breed such as Angus x Beefmaster leads to even greater advantages because of the Bos Indicus influence in Beefmaster. The roughly 50% Bos Indicus content in Beefmaster is totally unrelated to the British genetics in this cross; resulting in even higher heterosis impacts for all traits. The icing on the cake for this particular cross is the outstanding maternal heterosis that leads to superior females that are more fertile, wean more and larger calves and live longer more productive lives. To maximize heterosis potential and to keep a crossbreeding program simple, many ranchers use a terminal crossbreeding program. A great example is Angus x Beefmaster to produce a crossbred female that is designed to maximize maternal heterosis. Then those Angus x Beefmaster crossbred females would be mated to Continental bulls such as Charolais to maximize performance potential in their calves. This mating system leverages the genetic diversity across British, Continental and American breeds resulting in higher performance at every level and exploits breed complementarity needed to maximize production and profit. In today’s beef industry that demands efficiency, Beefmasters answer the challenge by being exceptional convertors of feed. In multiple all-breed bull development facilities that measure feed efficiency and residual feed intake, Beefmasters consistently rank as the most efficient convertors when compared to other breeds in the same facilities. In commercial feedyards, dry matter conversions in the five pound range are typical for Beefmaster sired steers. Ask any cattle feeder and they will tell you the importance of feed conversion and performance. While maternal heterosis is the main calling card for Beefmasters, it should be noted that carcass merit is not overlooked in this versatile breed. Given the prominence of black hided commercial cows in today’s industry, it is interesting to look at a Beefmaster progeny test performed by Texas A&M University from 1998-2001. Commercial Angus cows from the Texas A&M University (TAMU) McGregor Experiment Station were mated to five Beefmaster bulls. TAMU staff collected the complete performance information from the calves that 60 California Cattleman February 2018

TABLE 1. Across breed comparisons of efficiency evaluated using either postweaning gain (PWG) or average Table: Across breed comparisons of efficiency evaluated using either postweaning gain (PWG) or average daily dailygain gain(ADG) (ADG)during duringfeed feedintake intakedata datacollection collection(SE) (SE)ofofeighteen eighteensire sirebreeds breedsrelative relativetotoAngus Anguswith withaamore more positive number indicating a more efficientbreed breed positive number indicating a more efficient Steers

Heifers

Breed

ADG,DMI

PWG,DMI

ADG, DMI

Angus

0.000

0.000

0.000

PWG, DMI 0.000

Hereford

0.099 (0.051)

0.067 (0.038)

0.094 (0.037)

0.069 (0.030)

Red Angus

-0.014 (0.050)

-0.004 (0.037)

-0.004 (0.035)

0.014 (0.029)

Shorthorn

0.070 (0.057)

0.036 (0.042)

0.025 (0.041)

0.012 (0.034)

South Devon

-0.041 (0.118)

-0.090 (0.087)

0.203 (0.094)

0.197 (0.078)

Beefmaster

0.203 (0.062)

-0.029 (0.046)

0.096 (0.047)

0.046 (0.039)

Brahman

0.100 (0.063)

-0.147 (0.046)

-0.023 (0.045)

-0.081 (0.037)

Brangus

-0.002 (0.060)

-0.118 (0.044)

-0.049 (0.045)

-0.073 (0.037)

Santa Gertrudis

0.119 (0.060)

-0.006 (0.044)

0.012 (0.042)

-0.002 (0.035) -0.063 (0.035)

Braunvieh

0.073 (0.063)

0.019 (0.046)

-0.078 (0.042)

Charolais

0.070 (0.052)

0.033 (0.038)

0.030 (0.037)

0.021 (0.031)

Chiangus

0.130 (0.060)

0.025 (0.044)

0.008 (0.041)

0.002 (0.034) -0.026 (0.029)

Gelbvieh

0.107 (0.050)

0.016 (0.037)

-0.027 (0.035)

Limousin

0.206 (0.051)

0.039 (0.037)

0.017 (0.035)

0.014 (0.029)

Maine-Anjou

0.130 (0.060)

0.045 (0.044)

0.031 (0.042)

0.034 (0.035)

Salers

0.070 (0.060)

-0.011 (0.044)

0.002 (0.042)

-0.011 (0.035)

Simmental

0.027 (0.052)

0.025 (0.038)

-0.004 (0.038)

-0.009 (0.031)

Tarentaise

0.050 (0.120)

0.011 (0.089)

-0.081 (0.081)

-0.041 (0.067)

Significant breed differences (P <0.05) in bold.

were all born, grown and finished at the McGregor Station. Additionally TAMU scientists and USDA Graders collected the carcass data, including Warner-Bratzler Shear Force tests after the cattle were harvested at Sam Kane Beef Processors in Corpus Christi, Texas. The results for the 258 Beefmaster x Angus progeny were impressive. Seventy-two percent of the cattle received a quality grade of Choice or Prime while the average yield grade was 3.28. In today’s sophisticated grid marketing systems, these cattle would have earned solid premiums. Since that project was conducted, Beefmaster breeders have worked very hard to add even more carcass merit by utilizing ultrasound carcass data and now genomic tests to improve the quality of their end product. Time and again Beefmasters have proven themselves a great crossbreeding partner with black hided and Continental cattle both in the yard and on the rail. No breed of cattle is perfect. Beefmaster breeders realize that. That is why planned crossbreeding is so important to the future of the beef industry. Beefmasters are the most versatile crossbreeding tool available. Beefmaster’s 63 percent retained heterosis means superior females, more fertility, heavier weaning calves, more longevity, significantly more lifetime production and the list goes on. If you want to add more productivity and efficiency to your herd then add Beefmasters to your crossbreeding program.


Matter! at h T s ic et en G Combining COWBOY LOGIC and COMPREHENSIVE TESTING, Individual Feed Efficiency, LD DNA Tested, and Ultra Sound

Annual Bull Sale

APRIL 14 , 2018 1:00 PM PDT TH

Crater Ranch Headquarters Winslow, Arizona

e most d h t f o t Ou ow her C e g n a r proven untry. o C e h t in a calf in s a h w o Every C every year 45 days s gone. or she i

Free Delivery or $75 credit pick up at the ranch. Guaranteed sight-unseen purchases. Carcass ultrasound and fertility tested. Videos online March 30th.

• 50 BLACK AND RED ANGUS and high % ANGUS • 85 BALANCER • 60 SOUTHERN BALANCER (a touch of ear) • 10 GELBVIEH AND high % GELBVIEH • 75 Super calving-ease bulls ENTIRE OFFERING AVERAGES: TOP 20% OF THE BREED! Calving Ease Direct, Marbling and average daily gain. Top 30% for; For Preg 30: Residual Feed Intake and Efficiency Profit Index.

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“A Culture Of Stewardship” Bob BBo ob and and Judy an Judy Jud Ju dy Prosser Prro oss sser sser er 92 928-289-2619 2 8 2 8 9 2 6 19 1 9 • Cell: C l l 9 928-380-5149 28 3 80 561 149 February 2018 California Cattleman Growsafe System at Crater Ranch, Winslow, AZ. Email: info@bartbar.com


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs M i d Va l l e y

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

M i d Va l l e y

THANK YOU TO OUR CUSTOMERS FOR HELPING MAKE OUR 2017 BULL SALE A SUCCESS!

M i d Va l l e y

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Thank you to our 2017 bull buyers for your continued support!

62 California Cattleman February 2018


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2018.

Angus

RAnch

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES!

Annual Bull Sale: Sat., September 1, 2018 Inaugural Female Sale: Mon., October 15, 2018

O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

i d ............................... V a l l e y Owners Tim & MarilynM Callison

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com 6th Annual

GALT, CA SEPT. 17

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle

M i d Va l l e y

M i d Va l l e y JOIN US IN OCTOBER FOR OUR ANNUAL SALE BY THE SEA IN PISMO BEACH!

Thank you to our buyers at the 43rd annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale.

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

(530) 385-1570

THURSDAY, SEPT. 14, 2017

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

February 2018 California Cattleman 63


Thank you to buyers at our “Partners for Performance” bull and female sales! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

THANK YOU TO OUR 2017 HERITAGE BULL SALE BUYERS! CALL US TO LEARN ABOUT BULLS AND FEMALES AVAILABLE PRIVATE TREATY AT THE RANCH.

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition THANK YOU TO OUR 2017 BULL SALE BUYERS!

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Join us 3/10/2018 for our annual bull sale!

RED RIVER FARMS Call today about 13750 West 10th Avenue private treaty Blythe, CA 92225 offerings! Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Gerber, CA

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 64 California Cattleman February 2018

Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

JOIN US FEB. 16, 2018 IN ALTURAS FOR OUR MODOC BULL SALE Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

P.W. GILLIBRAND

h


Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

Join us Oct 15, 2018 for our annual production sale!

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

3L

Annual Sale First Monday in March

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

Progressive Genetics for over years

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

The Best of Both Worlds

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch! Phone 707.448.9208

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com THD ©

February 2018 California Cattleman 65


Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby (707) 876-3567 (707) 876-1992

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

J-H FEED INC.

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2,791± Irrigable acres, 5,285± Deeded acres. 41,000± Acres with seller’s interest in BLM Grazing Permits. $7,500,000 - Some cattle & equipment

SOLD

2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

208-345-3163 www.knipeland.com

Pay for itself in first season!

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

66 California Cattleman February 2018

THD ©


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1/11/2018 1:35:26 PM

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February 2018 California Cattleman 67


IN MEMORY Blair Smith CCA President 1968-1970

Blair Smith passed away on Jan. 2, 2018, in Yreka. He was 95 years old Blair was born on May 19, 1922, in Ross. He grew up in rural Marin County, and went to school at College of the Pacific in Stockton. Blair married Patricia Lee in 1942. He was very proud they were married for 75 years. Blair joined the U.S. Navy shortly after they were married. After World War II was over, he embarked on

his dream of being a cowboy and owning a ranch. The family came to Siskiyou County in 1950 to manage the SS ranch in Hilt. In 1956, Blair and a partner leased the A.P. Cattle Company near Callahan from Carl McConnell. This was a big range that went from the head of Moffett Creek to Toad Lake, and Fawn Creek above what is now Lake Siskiyou. In the center of the range was the Bear Creek Cabin, which was a welcome sight after long days in the saddle. In 1961, he and Pat purchased the O’Connor Ranch in Little Shasta, and finally owned their own ranch. From 1968 through 1970 Blair served as president of the California Cattlemen’s Association. Blair was very involved in the Montague Junior Rodeo, and served as the announcer for 20 years. He became an approved horse show judge, and judged big shows throughout the western states and Canada. In 1976, he was chosen as the California Livestock Man of the Year at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. He served on numerous boards through the years, including

68 California Cattleman February 2018

being the board chairman of the Farm Credit Banks of Sacramento, and Tri-State Livestock Credit Corporation. Blair loved all the rituals of ranching...the brandings in the spring, the cattle drives to the high mountains in early summer, and the roundup in the fall. In the fall, the cattle buyers would come through the country to fill their orders. He took great pride in knowing what the cattle market was, and might be. He saw great changes in agriculture in his lifetime. He lived a long, full life, and lived the life he wanted. Blair is survived by his wife, Pat; and four sons: Lee (Tracy), Roy (Cindy), Reg (Pam) and Keith; three granddaughters: Melanie (Jorge), Jenny (Trot) and Jada; five grandsons: Lyle (Jill), Logan (Tammy), Tyler (Tina), Sean and Brice; as well as numerous great grandchildren. Per his wishes, no services will be held. Memorial contributions in Blair’s name may be made to Madrone Hospice, 255 Collier Circle, Yreka, CA 96097 or a charity of one’s choice.


John Greber, Jr.

John Kandit Greber Jr, 44 died in a ranching accident at his home in Hazelton, Idaho on Jan 6. Johnny was born Oct 9, 1973 to John and Carleen Greber in Sacramento. He was raised in Elk Grove, on a ranch and moved to Idaho in 2009 with the parents to continue ranching and working cattle. He was an old soul who was born 150 years too late as he was a true cowboy, a western legend to many who knew him. Johnny was a horse whisperer, cowboy poet, ranch hand, and all around jokester who loved to laugh and belt out singing his country music. You could always count on him being there to lend a helping hand and be our cowboy counselor. Johnny is survived by his parents, sister; Lisa Greber and spouse Gina; nephews; Zane and Aidan, Uncles Gary and Fred, his love Amy Stephens, the Brune family and too many friends to list. Saddle up and ride free! In lieu of flowers, please donate in memory of Johnny Greber to your local 4-H club or Future Farmers of America programs. At his request, no funeral will be held. A Celebration of Life event was held in Hazelton on Jan. 13.

Wilbur Plaugher Wilbur Plaugher passed away on the evening of Tuesday, Jan. 2, surrounded by his family in Clovis, CA, at the age of 95, from natural causes. Wilbur was born on March 13, 1922, in Lima, Ohio. His family moved to Coalinga, at the age of five. Eventually, they moved to Fresno, where he graduated from Roosevelt High School. At an early age, Wilbur developed a love for horses, cattle, Wil James novels, and all things Western. At the age of 16, he got a job in the High Sierras working cattle and breaking horses. He worked tirelessly through wind, storm, and snow, with frost bite threatening and enjoyed every minute of it. He discovered the rodeo at the age of 19. He realized right then and there he’d rather buck off of horses on nice plowed earth, rather than the mountainous rocks. The funny thing is that in his bronc riding days, he rarely bucked off. However the one time he did, it landed him with a broken neck, thereby

New Arrivals BENNETT GATLIN Billy and Hillary Gatlin, Sacramento, welcomed baby boy Bennett Gatlin on Jan. 4. Bennett weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces and was 18 inches long. he joins big sisters Catherine (6) and Alexandra (2). Bennett’s dad is the executive vice president for CCA, while his mom is a psychiatrist for Kaiser Permenente.

receiving a medical discharge from his military service of welding ships during World War II. The doctors told him he could never ride again, but after six months of sitting in his mother’s house making quilts, he decided this was no life for a young man, and he threw caution to the wind and went back to the rodeo competing in every event and winning big. With his earnings he began to buy land in the Fresno foothills and started his beef cattle business. He ended up clowning in the rodeo as a result of filling in for an absent clown to protect the bull riders. He loved it and the rest is history. He began a worldwide career entertaining thousands at a time including the royal family of Great Britain. He dined and met with several presidents. He loved his life and walked closely with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ who granted him untold fame and success. He is survived by his wife Ruth; sons, Randall and Wesley; daughters, Shelly Cotter, and Zoe Pope; nine grandchildren; and 19 greatgrandchildren. A Celebration of Life was held Jan. 12 in Fresno Remembrances may be made to The Heart of the Horse, 14335 Academy Oaks Lane, Clovis, CA 93619.

NASH NELSON Brothers Jhett and Cort are excited to announce the arrival of their baby brother, Nash Kelly Nelson, who was born Dec. 23, 2017, weighing 8 pounds, 11 ounces. Parents are Ryan and Hailey Nelson, Wilton. Ryan works for the family real estate firm and ranch, Five Star Land Co., and Five Star Land and Livestock and Hailey works as an entrepreneur running her westen fashion business, Western and Co. February 2018 California Cattleman 69


Amador Angus............................................................. 62 American Hereford Association................................. 64 Andreini & Co.............................................................. 36 Baker Angus Ranch...................................................... 15 Bar R Angus.................................................................. 62 Bar T Bar Ranches........................................................ 61 Beefmaster Breeders United........................................ 59 Bell Ranch Herefords................................................... 52 BMW Angus................................................................. 62 Boehringer Ingenheim................................................. 41 Bovine Elite, LLC.......................................................... 65 Broken Arrow Angus................................................... 62 Buchanan Angus Ranch........................................20, 62 Byrd Cattle Co............................................................... 62 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc.................................. 65 Charron Ranch............................................................. 62 Cherry Glen Beefmasters............................................ 65 Colyer Herefords & Angus.......................................... 16 Conlan Ranches California......................................... 65 Conlin Supply Company, Inc...................................... 36 Cooper Hereford Ranch.............................................. 33 Corsair Angus Ranch................................................... 62 Cowman’s Kind/Bar 6 Charolais................................ 45 CSU Chico College of Ag............................................ 65 Dal Porto Livestock...................................................... 63 Donati Ranch................................................................ 62 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.......................................... 65 EZ Angus Ranch........................................................... 63 Five Star Land Co......................................................... 65 Flying RJ......................................................................... 52 Four Cross Ranch......................................................... 32 Freitas Rangeland Improvements............................... 42 Fresno State Ag Foundation........................................ 65

Furtado Angus.............................................................. 63 Furtado Livestock Enterprises.................................... 65 Genoa Livestock.....................................................31, 65 Gonsalves Ranch.......................................................... 63 Greenway Seeds......................................................22, 46 Gudel Cattle Company................................................ 53 Harrell Hereford Ranch.........................................35, 65 HAVE Angus................................................................. 63 Hoffman Ranch............................................................ 19 Hone Ranch.............................................................52, 64 Hufford’s Herefords...................................................... 65 J-H Feed Inc.................................................................. 65 J/V Angus...................................................................... 64 Jorgensen Ranch........................................................... 53 Knipe Land Company.................................................. 65 Lambert Ranch......................................................... 9, 64 Lander Veterinary Clinic............................................. 65 Little Shasta Ranch....................................................... 65 Lorenzen Ranches...................................................... 6, 7 McPhee Red Angus...................................................... 64 Mrnak Herefords West................................................ 25 Multimin, USA............................................................. 47 Noahs Angus Ranch..................................................... 63 Norbrook ...................................................................... 26 O’Connell Ranch.......................................................... 63 ORIgen........................................................................... 65 Orivs Cattle Company................................................. 64 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co............................................ 64 Pacific Trace Mineral.............................................42, 66 Pedretti Ranches........................................................... 29 Phillips Ranch............................................................... 53 Pinenut Livestock Supply............................................ 22 Pitchfork Cattle Co....................................................... 65

70 California Cattleman February 2018

Red River Farms........................................................... 64 Riverbend Ranch.......................................................... 71 Romans Ranches.......................................................... 43 Sammis Angus Ranch.................................................. 63 Scales Northwest........................................................... 65 Schafer Ranch............................................................... 63 Schohr Herefords.......................................................... 65 Shaw Cattle Co.............................................................. 11 Sierra Ranches............................................................... 65 Silveira Bros................................................................... 64 Silveus Insurance Group.............................................. 18 Skinner Livestock Transportation.............................. 65 Snyder Livestock, LLC................................................. 48 Sonoma Mountain Herefords...............................25, 65 Spanish Ranch............................................................... 65 Spring Cove Ranch....................................................... 55 Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................. 63 Teixeira Cattle Co..................................................... 2, 63 Thomas Angus Ranch.................................................. 37 Thorenfeldt Land & Cattle.......................................... 49 Trinity Frams................................................................. 23 Trotter Red Angus........................................................ 52 Tumbleweed Ranch...................................................... 65 Veterinary Service, Inc................................................. 65 VF Red Angus.........................................................39, 64 Vintage Angus Ranch............................................64, 72 Ward Ranches............................................................... 14 Werning Cattle Co........................................................ 57 Western Video Market................................................. 13 White Pine Ranch......................................................... 42 Winnemucca Ranch Hand Rodeo................................ 3 Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................. 63


Genetic Edge Bull Sale Please Join us at the ranch near Idaho Falls, Idaho

Saturday •

March 10, 2018

• 11 a.m.

Selling Sons of these Breed Leading Sires! Payweight 1682, Rito 4P26, Foretress Y331, Peerless 0016, Brigham C662, Jennings Z064, Rampage 0A36, Index 3282, Ingenuity 2623, Montana 104, Journey 1X74 and Ten X 5006B

The Riverbend Ranch Advantage

90 Sons Selling by the Carcass Leader Rito 4P26 50 Fall Bulls and 40 Spring bulls Rito 4P26

Reg# 17892063

BACKED BY THE BEST GUARANTEE IN THE BUSINESS! Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed! If you’re not happy with your bull purchase at anytime for any reason, we’ll give you full credit.

WE INVEST IN OUR CUSTOMERS!

In the last five years we have purchased over 65,000 head of cattle. Putting millions back into our customer’s pockets. Put our customer investment program to work for your operation.

2016 Certified Angus Beef Seedstock Producer of the Year

CARCASS DATA ON 59 STEERS KILLED 7/20/17 • 45% PRIME THE BALANCE WERE CHOICE • 97% YIELD GRADE 3 • 86% CAB

2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821 SALE MANAGEMENT 517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

www.riverbendranch.us February 2018 California Cattleman

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VAR

LEGEND

5019

V A R LEGEND 5019 AAA REG: 18066037

SIRE: V A R DISCOVERY 2240 MGS: SYDGEN C C & 7

MULTI-TRAIT EXCELLENCE WITH LEGENDARY POWER • V A R Legend was the Lot 1 featured bull from the 2016 VAR Bull Sale that has all the mass and substance necessary to back up his incredible performance predictions. • V A R Legend ranks in the top 10 VAR Discovery sires for all these important traits; CED, Weaning Weight, Yearling Weight, Carcass Weight, FAT, $Feed and $Beef, proving his Multi-Trait excellence. • V A R Legend is bold ribbed with a big square hip. Use Legend to add muscle, performance, and Angus character with a breed leading EPD pedigree. • V A R Legend descends form one of the breeds most powerful and proven female lines. His dam has progeny sales averaging $30,000 at VAR.

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 OWNER, JIM COLEMAN MANAGER, DOUG WORTHINGTON

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

EPDS +11 +.8 +80 +146 +.33 +1.42 +23 +14.6 +13 +19 +70 +.84 +.85 -.042 +70.65 +120.19 +53.56 +40.42 +7.72 +189.92 Semen: $30

HENRIETTA PRIDE 1044 - The dam of V A R Legend 5019.

V A R HENRIETTA PRIDE 5010 - The $40,000 full sister to V A R Legend 5019 at Spruce Mountain.

TRAIT CED BW WW YW RADG SC Doc HP CEM Milk CW Marb RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B

BREED RANKINGS 1% 1% 3% 15% 15% 5% 10% 3% 15% 5% 2% 10% 1% 10% 15% 1%

Certificates: $40

OWNED WITH: LISONBEE ANGUS RANCH, UT WILLMORE ANGUS, ID

February 2018 California Cattleman  
February 2018 California Cattleman  
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