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APRIL 2020

NEWS YOU NEED... mountain lion policy gets closer look legendary ranching couple Changing of the guard at rangeland trust April 2020 California Cattleman 1


THD ©

CLM REPRESENTATIVES Jake Parnell .................916-662-1298 George Gookin .........209-482-1648 Rex Whittle.................209-996-6994 Mark Fischer ..............209-768-6522 Kris Gudel ................... 916-208-7258 Steve Bianchi ............707-484-3903 Joe Gates ....................707-694-3063

UPCOMING CLM SPECIAL FEEDER SALES AND THE 2020 AMADOR-EL DORADOSACRAMENTO AND CALAVERAS COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S SPECIALS

PLUS ADDITIONAL CO. CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATIONS A PORTION OF THE PROCEEDS WILL BE DONATED BACK TO COUNTIES

CLM SPECIAL ...............................WED., APRIL 8 CLM SPECIAL ...............................WED., APRIL 29

Jason Dailey ...............916-439-7761

COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S.........MON., MAY 11

Brett Friend ..................510-685-4870

CLM SPECIAL ...............................WED., MAY 20

WEDNESDAY WEEKLY SCHEDULE Butcher Cows ................................... 8:30 a.m. Cow-Calf Pairs/Bred Cows ..... 11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle ........................................ 12 p.m.

AUCTION MARKET Address 12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office........................................209-745-1515 Fax ............................................ 209-745-1582 Website/Market Report ..www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ......www.lmaauctions.com 2 California Cattleman April 2020

COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S.........MON., JUNE 1 CLM SPECIAL ...............................WED., JUNE 10 COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S.........MON., JUNE 15 CLM SPECIALS ............................BEGIN AT 12 P.M. COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S.........BEGIN AT 9 A.M.

CALL TO CONSIGN TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES

May 7 • May 28 • June 11 • July 13-15


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CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE MAY 20

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HONORED TO BE RECOGNIZED AS THE California Cattleman 2020 NATIONAL BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE MARKETER OFApril THE2020 YEAR!

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CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Message from Sacramento during Covid-19 emergency by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin

As of press time, March 20, there were 1,060 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in California. On the evening of March 19, the Governor ordered all Californians not working in an essential industry to stay home. Restaurants are shuttered. Schools are closed for the remainder of the school year. Grocery stores are scrambling to keep food on the shelves. There’s a lot of uncertainty. It’s hard to believe that just one week earlier, on March 13, there were only 247 confirmed cases. At that time, CCA staff and officers were discussing whether we should postpone our annual Steak and Eggs breakfast scheduled for March 25. CCA officers and staff even attended two tour meetings that week in Fresno and Visalia. Now all CCA tour meetings have been cancelled through May. It’s safe to assume that by the time you are reading this article, things will have significantly changed. It’d be pointless for me to describe in detail CCA’s response because our response and efforts are progressing at the speed demanded by the virus and environment we are working in. CCA has two main goals. First, ensure that cattle and beef production can continue to operate unimpeded so that there is no slow down in our supply chain from pasture to plate. Second, we want to secure financial relief for all ranchers that are negatively impacted by the disruption in the market caused by the virus. We know that this virus has already put tremendous pressure on the cattle market and that cattle producers at all levels will be financially impacted. We will work to make sure ranchers are included in the recovery effort.

For now, we will make sure that California ranchers can continue to perform the essential service of putting beef on Californian’s plate. As Californians swarmed the grocery stores, they rushed to the meat case and purchased all the beef they could fit in their freezers. Beef continues to be an American staple and America’s comfort food. Even as the meat cases emptied, stacks of fake meat remained behind. The events of the last week have crystalized for me that Americans love meat, milk and eggs and are deeply appreciative of the American ranchers and farmers that put that food on their plate. We don’t need to ask for or win their respect—we simply have to keep it. We don’t have to be defensive or engage people that attack us. The attacks are coming from a minority that have had an outsized voice. Let’s rise above them, embrace the millions of meat-loving Americans and together keep beef at the center of the plate. It’s safe to say that the COVID-19 virus has impacted all Americans. Many are calling this a once-in-a-lifetime event that will alter the course of America forever. The impacts of this event will exceed that of any previous crisis in the last 100 years. I know that as California shifts from mitigating the impacts of the virus to recovery that ranchers will continue to play a critical role. CCA will work to ensure that ranchers have a strong voice in shaping the future of California. Ranchers are resilient. America is resilient. We will fight this fight, and we will win. We will recover.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Bakersfield, CA and additional mailing offices. Publication # 8-3600

4 California Cattleman April 2020

National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

APRIL 2020 Volume 103, Issue 4

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE COVID-19 causes delays, cancels some CCA Events

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CDFW expands mountain lion policy

10

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Rangeland Summit brings innovative minds together

14

CHECKING IN ON YOUR CHECKOFF Sustainability in beef production

22

WORKING RINGSIDE Unprecedented bull sale run

32

SPECIAL FEATURES

U.S. Roundtable on Beef Sustainability Charolais: Being engaged in the industry Honoring the Openshaws Rangeland Trust honors current, future CEOs

12 18 20 26

During unprecedented times in society, one thing cattlemen in the West can count on is the value of a crossbred calf. This month’s cover, taken by photographer Katherina Notariani, shows the increasingly popular Angus-Charolais cross calf that we are seeing in beef herds around the country. To learn more about the data backing up the Charolais breed, see the article on page 18 along with the advertisement for Charolais breeders near you.

UPCOMING CCA MEETINGS & EVENTS June 17

Cattle-PAC Auction & Dinner, Paso Robles

June 17-18

CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting, Paso Robles CCA Steak & Eggs Breakfast

—Postponed — Watch for event to be scheduled for a later date.

NCBA and PLC Legislative Conference

READER SERVICES

Cattlemen’s Report 32 Obituaries 34 Buyers’ Guide 36 Advertisers Index 42

— Canceled —

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, please watch for updates from CCA on social media, the website, Legislative Bulletin, the Hot Irons newsletter or this magazine. For questions about specific events and local meetings, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

April 2020 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE

IN WAKE OF RECENT CANCELLATIONS, CCA LOOKS FORWARD TO FUTURE GATHERINGS by CCA Director of Finance Lisa Brendlen The last 30 days have been a time of extreme uncertainty and we are experiencing things that many of us have never experienced in our lifetimes: school closures, travel bans and self-quarantining. In a very short time, the coronavirus (COVID-19) has had a major impact on the world; we are in the very beginning stages of this pandemic and we will surely feel the effects for months, if not years, to come. As we announced in March, in light of Governor Newsom’s directive that large gatherings ought to be postponed or canceled to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, for the first time in 42 years CCA elected to postpone our Annual Steak & Eggs Breakfast, originally scheduled for March 25. CCA will work to re-schedule the event for a later date, likely in late summer or early fall. Stay tuned for future announcements regarding a re-scheduled event. The CCA office will remain open for the foreseeable future and staff does not anticipate any disruptions to our normal operations resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Please continue to reach out to our staff with any policy issues or to order your selenium boluses and anaplasmosis vaccines. Prior to the imposition of travel restrictions and restrictions on large gatherings, CCA staff and the officer team worked hard the first quarter of 2020 to get this year started off on the right foot. In January, our local tour meeting season kicked off and we were busy traveling up and down the state several times, going as far north as Siskiyou County and as far south as Santa Barbara County, with at least a dozen counties’ local association meetings in between. The goal of attending these tour gatherings is meeting with every one of our local associations at least once a year. The issues affecting the ranching industry are different in every county across the state, and these tour meetings give both the officer team and CCA staff the opportunity to hear directly from you about the specific issues that are impacting your day-to-day operations at the local level. Aside from hearing from our local associations, the other goal of these meetings is to share what staff is working on daily in Sacramento to help alleviate some of these concerns. Additionally, these tour meetings allow us to share the many benefits of your CCA membership, give us the opportunity to discuss events that are coming up and to inform you of how you, as a member, can get involved at the state level. Our priority at CCA is to help keep ranchers ranching, and we strive every day to achieve this goal. Part of realizing that goal is ensuring that our ranchers remain healthy enough to keep ranching. Unfortunately, in midMarch this meant that CCA staff, CCA officers and local cattlemen’s associations throughout the state had to make 6 California Cattleman April 2020

the hard decision not to hold or attend local association meetings during the COVID-19 crisis. In addition to traveling around the state, prior to the imposition of travel restrictions staff, officers and close to 200 hundred CCA members made their way to San Antonio for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s LISA BRENDLEN (NCBA) annual convention and tradeshow in February. Such a great representation from our state—not only this year in Texas, but each year at NCBA’s meetings—is a testament to the dedication California members have for being engaged and involved in the industry, from the local to the national level. While there is always plenty of fun to be had at this convention, it also comes with work to be done, and this work would ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

Events Canceled Or Postponed... CCA Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast

—Postponed — Watch for event to be scheduled for a later date

NCBA and PLC Legislative Conference — Canceled —

As the COVID-19 situation evolves, please watch for updates from CCA on social media, the website, the Hot Irons newsletter or this magazine. For questions about specific events and local meetings, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.


THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA LIVESTOCK MARKETING CENTER UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO SALES: MAY 7 • MAY 28 JUNE 11 JULY 13-15

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD Contra Costa-Alameda and San Joaquin-Stanislaus County Cattlemen’s Associations 38th Annual ales

SATURDAYS AT 8 A.M.

S

howcase Feeder

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2020

ales

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MAY 2 • MAY 16 • MAY 30

ALSO SELLING CATTLE FROM THESE CALIFORNIA COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATIONS:

Merced-Mariposa • Santa Clara • Napa-Solano • Madera • Calaveras • Tuolumne • Fresno-Kings • San Benito • Tahoe

FEATURING NHTC NATURAL/AGE AND SOURCE VERIFICATION CATTLE

These sales will feature some of the best cattle producers in the state of California have to offer, so whether your cattle are enrolled in a special program or not, these are the sales for you!

SALE DAY IS PAY DAY

When marketing your calves at TLAY, don’t forget how essential the 2nd round of shots is. Make sure to include a Modified Live vaccination.

TLAY REPRESENTATIVES Max Olvera Steve Faria Brandon Baba Chuck Cozzi John Luiz Jake Bettencourt Tim Sisil John Bourdet Travis Johnson Matt Miller Bud Cozzi Eddie Nunes

209 277-2063 209 988-7180 209 480-1267 209 652-4479 209 480-5101 209 262-4019 209 631-6054 831-801-2343 209-996-8645 209-914-5116 209 652-4480 209 604-6848

Website: www.TurlockLivestock.com

WATCH & BID LIVE: LMAAuctions.com

UPCOMING TLAY SPECIALS Sat., April 4: HERE’S THE BEEF SPECIAL

Weigh Cow Sale with Burgers at the Sale Barn Burgers to go at 12 Noon, followed by the Sale at 1 p.m.

Tues., April 14 & 28: TLAY Spring Feeder Sale Featuring 2,000 Head of Calves & Yearlings at 9 a.m.

Tues., May 5 & 19: TLAY Spring Feeder Sale

Special Dedicated to Showcasing Calves and Yearlings from Consignors with 50 Head or Less at 9 a.m. plus

Specials Every Tuesday in May and June

• Turlock, CA 953817 209 634-4326 • 209 667-0811 • 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA/P.O. AprilBox 20203030 California Cattleman


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6

not get done without active members such as ours showing up and attending policy and committee meetings year after year. With hopes that the COVID-19 crisis passes quickly, the next event up on the CCA Calendar is our annual Midyear meeting from June 17-18. This year’s meeting will be held in Paso Robles at the Paso Robles Inn. At Midyear, CCA staff encourages all members to be part of the CCA policy-making process and maximize your membership by attending committee meetings. Come discuss current cattle industry issues with fellow producers, as well as hear from industry leaders, agencies and affiliate organizations. This year the Midyear meeting will kick off with the Cattle-PAC Auction and Dinner/Dance at the Paso Robles Fairgrounds. Tickets for the dinner are $75 per person or $125 per couple. The evening is sure to be a fun-filled time that will include a delicious prime rib dinner, entertainment provided by the Chad Bushnell Band and a lively auction filled with not-to-be-missed

items. Every dollar raised from this event will go directly to CCA’s Cattle-PAC fund. Cattle-PAC dollars are the most difficult dollars to raise but we see the best return from these dollars. We need your help in continuing to build a strong PAC. A strong PAC not only enables our industry to assist political candidates who are committed to our vision but enables us to have a strong voice in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., to defeat harmful legislation and promote the interests of cattlemen and women. While the ranching industry will constantly be faced with challenges, CCA needs your support and involvement in making a difference. At CCA, we are actively working on these issues, both proactively and defensively, at the local, state and national levels. We understand how difficult it is to get off the ranch, and that there is never a good time to be away, but we hope that you can attend this year’s Cattle-PAC fundraiser and Midyear meeting in Paso Robles. If you have any questions regarding either event or are looking for sponsorship opportunities, please do not hesitate to contact me at the CCA office.

CATTLE-PAC AUCTION + DINNER DANCE

8 California Cattleman April 2020


100 Balancer Bulls • 75 Southern Balancers • 50 Super Calving Ease • 40 Black & Red Angus

G E N E T I C S

T H A T

reproductive reproductive traits traits first first

M A T T E R Stockmanship & Stewardship with Dean Dean Fish Fish Crater Ranch Headquarters April 17th, 3:00pm

Every cow produces a calf every year in big country within 45 days or SHE IS GONE!

Join us as Dean Fish, Santa Fe Ranch Foundation manager provides insight into problem solving research developed to help fellow beef producers during a Stockmanship and Stewardship demonstration.

Highest Highest selection selection of of HIGH HIGH RANKING RANKING BULLS BULLS in in the the Country. Country. TOP 15% FOR MARBLING & AVERAGE DAILY GAIN TOP 20% FOR CALVING EASE DIRECT & BIRTH WEIGHT TOP 25% FOR RESIDUAL FEED INTAKE, FEEDLOT PROFIT INDEX, & EFFICIENCY PROFIT INDEX

Meteor Crater Social April 17th, 5:00pm Cocktails, heavy hors d'oeuvres, humor &....

Tanner beymer

Bulls are developed on a no grain ration.

Associate Director of the Public Lands Council, Tanner Beymer provides entertainment and humor to the evening through experiences gained during lobbying efforts, western political campaigns, auctioneering and the cattle industry.

200+ BULLS SELL APRIL 18th, 1:00pm CRATER RANCH, WINSLOW, ARIZONA April 2020 California Cattleman 9 The Prosser Family | P.O. Box 190, Winslow,AZ 86047 | 928.289.2619 (winter) | www.bartbar.com


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

CDFW EXPANDS “THREE-STRIKES” MOUNTAIN LION POLICY AS CESA PETITION PENDING by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur The December edition of the California Cattleman provided an update on CCA’s efforts to defeat a petition by the Center for Biological Diversity and the Mountain Lion Foundation to designate mountain lions in the Central Coast and Southern California regions as a threatened species under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA). While CCA’s fight against that petition rages on (the California Fish and Game Commission is poised to make an initial determination on whether “the petitioned action may be warranted” at its April 15 hearing), the California Department of Fish and Wildlife in February took a related action to expand mountain lion protections throughout the Central Coast and Southern California regions. On February 13, the Department expanded its “threestrikes” mountain lion depredation policy throughout the Central Coast and Southern California (not coincidentally, the policy is applied to the boundaries outlined by the CESA petition). The policy—initially applied to the Santa Ana and Santa Monica mountains in December of 2017—requires three reported-and-confirmed depredations by a mountain lion before a lethal take permit will be issued for the animal. Under the policy, the Department will issue non-lethal take permits the first two times a mountain lion is found to have perpetrated a depredation of livestock. Specifically, if a depredation permit is requested after the first livestock kill, the Department will issue a non-lethal depredation permit to “pursue/haze the mountain lion,” with examples of hazing in the policy including “deploying temporary deterrent systems” such as “motion sensitive lighting [and]

10 California Cattleman April 2020

loud music.” After the second depredation, the Department will issue a second non-lethal depredation permit allowing “additional measures” such as “use of beanbag shots.” Only after a third depredation will the Department issue a lethal depredation permit (the language of the policy suggests that such permits will additionally only be granted if the requesting party specifically requests a lethal permit). Even when three depredations are confirmed, however, it is unclear under what circumstances the Department will issue a lethal take permit; according to the Department’s February 13 memo, “all mountain lion depredation permits within the [region] will require the convening of a Response Guidance Team (RGT) and no final permit decisions will be made without RGT/headquarters involvement and approval.” CCA firmly believes that the policy is in violation of California law, specifically 1990’s voter-approved Proposition 117 which outlines mountain lion management in the state. Hazing mountain lions—the means of management proposed after a ‘first strike’—does not necessarily entail ‘take,’ in which case no permit is required by statute. Additionally, Proposition 117 does not appear to constrain which form of ‘take’ may be used to respond to a depredation event, even clarifying that “Mountain lions authorized to be taken pursuant to this chapter shall be taken by the most effective means available to take the mountain lion causing the damage or destruction.” CCA is also concerned about the policy’s vagueness. For instance, it is not clear during which timeframe the three strikes would run, or if the policy would ‘reset’ after a certain period. Additionally, Proposition 117 allows ranchers to immediately take a mountain lion caught in the act of killing livestock, and it is not clear how the Department’s policy treats such a circumstance. While the petition to list mountain lions as threatened under CESA looms large in the background, the Department’s sudden expansion of the “three-strikes” policy is largely a response to the January 27 permitted killing of a mountain lion designated as P-56. P-56 was a radio-collared breeding male and an icon among mountain lion advocates. But for more than a year, P-56 was a chronic depredator, killing at least 11 sheep and lambs on one ranch just outside of the Santa Monica mountain range that was then the boundary of the “three strikes” policy.


The landowner instituted numerous non-lethal deterrents, including livestock guard dogs, motion-activated lights and electric fencing, but continued to experience depredations. After a twelfth depredation, the rancher obtained a lethal take permit and USDA Wildlife Services took P-56. Mountain lion advocates were incensed by the lawful killing of the iconic mountain lion. While P-56 could have been lethally taken even if the three-strikes policy had been in force in the area, the Department responded to the outcry by expanding the three-strikes policy throughout the Central Coast and Southern California. The expanded policy also appears to be a response to Governor Newsom, whose father was among the proponents of Proposition 117. In late February, Governor Newsom expressed frustration that Proposition 117 prevents him from putting a complete moratorium on issuance of mountain lion depredation permits. The “three-strikes” policy is currently in force throughout all of Imperial, San Diego, Riverside, Orange, Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, San Francisco, Alameda, and Contra Costa counties. The policy also applies south of Highway 58 and I-15 in San Bernardino county; in Kern County south of Highway 58 until it reaches I-5 and then west of I-5; west of I-5 in Kings, Fresno, Merced, Stanislaus, San Joaquin and Sacramento counties, and south of I-80 in Solano and Yolo counties. CCA has heard reports, however, that the Department is applying the policy in area near the boundary (but which are outside the geographic boundary of the policy), and that the Department may be denying take permits for collared lions. CCA members with information about such denials are encouraged to contact the CCA office with details.

mountain lions should not be protected under California’s Endangered Species Act. The most successful comments will be those that address mountain lion impacts to your ranch and likely impacts that mountain lion protections would have upon your operation. Any information you may have about mountain lion population abundance in Southern California or the Central Coast may also be valuable. Because the Commission has yet to release its agenda for its April 15-16 hearing, CCA encourages you to send your letters to CCA’s Kirk Wilbur at kirk@calcattlemen.org or by mail to the CCA office. Letters should be addressed to Eric Sklar, President; California Fish and Game Commission; 1416 9th Street, Room 1320; Sacramento, CA 95814.

may 9 Temale Sale led ancel c Modesto, California

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the 2020 Wsaa sale scheduled fOr may 9 has been cancelled mark yOur calendar fOr the entry deadline Of march 15 fOr the 2021 sale in mOdestO, ca

To assist CCA in challenging this policy, CCA advises members to do the following: Request a depredation permit when mountain lions injure or kill livestock; • Document your communications with the Department (e.g. whether they deny the permit outright, limit the permit to nonlethal take, delay in issuing the permit, etc.); and • Communicate those interactions to CCA staff. Finally, regarding the April 15 Fish and Game Commission hearing regarding the CESA petition to list mountain lions in the region as threatened, CCA continues to encourage members to write to the Commission and tell them that

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U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef What it is. What it’s not. Why it matters. by CCA member Mike Williams For many ranchers the term sustainability carries a negative connotation. For years, niche markets, and antibeef organizations have used the word to beat ranchers over the head with as they defined sustainability in whatever way supported their personal agenda. Several years ago, when I learned that the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) was heavily engaged in a organization called the U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (USRSB) and that the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) was a member of this organization, red flags began to go off in my mind, I feared that efforts like this might have a negative effect and put unwarranted pressure on ranchers. I decided to attend a meeting and find out for myself what it was all about. I left that first meeting somewhat comforted, but also concerned. I was comforted to find that producers from across the U.S., as well as representatives from NCBA and other producer organizations were doing a good job representing the interests of cattle producers in the early meetings of this organization. I was concerned that although this effort included the whole supply chain, it was clear that the greatest focus was on the producer and especially the cow/calf producer. It was apparent more producer involvement would be important. After a discussion with CCA leaders it was decided that I would attend the meetings on behalf of CCA and represent the interest of ranchers in California. In that capacity, I have been participating in these discussions since 2016. Recently, there has been some concern expressed by some CCA members regarding the U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef and CCA’s membership in the organization. Some of the concern rises simply from the term sustainability, and some concern is based on misleading information that has been passed around on social media, and other venues. In this article I intend to describe what the USRSB is, what it is not, and why CCA is involved in the organization. I am not working or advocating for the USRSB, but as a rancher who is very familiar with the organization.

WHAT IT IS The USRSB is a non-profit organization, formed in 2015. Its membership consists of individual businesses, educational institutions, conservation groups and trade 12 California Cattleman April 2020

associations who work in, or have interests in, the raising of cattle or the production of beef. While the priorities and focus of members vary greatly, all members must support the concept that cattle and beef can play an important and positive role in our environment and our food supply. This premise, that anyone wanting to be a member of USRSB MUST believe fundamentally in raising cattle for the human consumption of beef, is different than organizations who work with HSUS, for example, who OPPOSES eating animals, period. In fact, the USRSB denied two applications over the last two years because the organizations applying could not demonstrate that they fundamentally supported the U.S. beef industry. The first several years of the USRSB were spent in the development of what became known as the Sustainability Framework. In this document, the members of the USRSB defined the meaning of beef sustainability, identified six “High-Priority Sustainability Indicators” or key areas of concern and focus that relate to the sustainability of beef, and selected and defined sector specific metrics for each of the indicators. Metrics are measurable actions that if adopted are likely to positively affect the indicator. I will not go into the details of the Framework here, but it can be found at https://www.beefsustainability.us/. The concept behind the Framework is that sustainability is best achieved by encouraging and supporting gradual and ongoing improvements on individual operations. As individuals and businesses across the beef supply chain make improvements, the overall sustainability of the beef industry in the United States will be enhanced. Also, measurement of the metric improvement is at the industry scale, like is done in the Beef Industry Lifecycle Assessment (LCA). There will be NO mandates, and NO reporting requirements. For ranchers the metrics include, adopting and improving on a grazing management plan, identifying and tracking herd performance indicators, incorporating Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) principles and stockmanship and safety training for all workers. As pastures improve, herd health and performance are enhanced, and safe livestock handling is encouraged, the sustainability of each individual operation is increased. As the sustainability of individual operations increases, the sustainability of the industry as a whole is increased. Current efforts of the USRSB include, a messaging campaign through trade media promoting the adoption


of the Framework, developing educational modules that can help producers identify ways their operations can improve with references to resources that can help them make those improvements, an online Self-Assessment Tool that allows individuals and companies to voluntarily (and privately) assess and measure sustainability efforts (this tool can be found at https://nobleapps.noble.org/ USRSBAssessment/), recognizing industry programs that align with the sustainability Framework and supporting research, educational and other collaborative projects that advance the principles laid out in the Framework.

WHAT IT’S NOT

The USRSB does not, will not and cannot force or compel anyone to become members, or incorporate any of the metrics and practices promoted in the Framework. The only way the USRSB can effect change and advance its vision for beef sustainability is by identifying and promoting correct and practical principles and practices that will enhance individual operations as well as improve the overall strength and viability of the beef industry. The USRSB does not engage in regulatory affairs or legislative lobbying, business-to-business ventures, or the mandating of standards and/or verification of an individual’s performance.

environmental, social and economic concerns. When all sectors of the supply chain sit down and work through these issues, ranchers and feeders gain a better understanding of the concerns that packers and retailers are facing, and packers and retailers gain confidence in the job producers are doing. Working together, with important input from academics, conservation organizations and our allied industry partners, we can better communicate where we are as a industry as well as how we are improving. The concerns around sustainability are real and need to be addressed. It is important that ranchers participate in efforts that address these concerns. The USRSB provides an opportunity for ranchers to team up with other members of the supply chain in reassuring consumers we take their concerns seriously and we are managing our land and animals in a sustainable way. For more information on the USRSB go to https:// www.usrsb.org/. You can also email me at mbw61@aol.com.

WHY IT MATTERS

Beef production in the U.S. is the most sustainable system on the planet! Nowhere on earth are more pounds of beef raised with fewer resources and done so much more efficiently and humanely than here. So why all the talk about sustainability? Why did people and businesses across the beef supply chain feel the need to come together and form an organization dedicated to beef sustainability? Just because we’re the best doesn’t mean we can’t get better. As the population grows and resources dwindle, managing those resources, and becoming increasingly efficient and effective at raising beef, becomes increasingly important. The USRSB’s goal is to provide tools and resources to aid producers and other sectors of the beef supply chain to examine and improve the sustainability of their own operation. All of the cow/calf sector metrics, if adopted, or improved upon by ranchers, will have a positive impact on the success of the ranch. Also, in spite of valiant checkoff funded efforts to communicate how effective ranchers have become at managing their natural resources, and how efficient they have become at converting those resources into beef, many people, including those in retail who sell our products to the consumer, don’t know how effective ranchers are at managing our resources and caring for our animals. Retail and food service providers are under tremendous pressure to be socially and environmentally responsible when sourcing their products, and to do it in a very public way. Sustainability is a term that consolidates April 2020 California Cattleman 13


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER RANGELAND SUMMIT FOCUSES ON RANGE HEALTH, SUSTAINING RANCHERS, COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEMS by Karen Sweet, California Rangeland Conservation Coalition and Bob Johnson, California Farm Bureau Federation Each Rangeland Summit brings range managers and educators together annually to renew their commitment to a common vision of sustaining rangelands and ranching by sharing approaches and tools that are working in communities across California, and to share and spread hope that our work will continue to benefit land, wildlife and people. Bre Owens, Cobblestone Ranch and California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (CRCC) Chair welcomed colleagues in January to focus on rangeland sustainability. The 15th annual Rangeland Summit was co-sponsored by California Rangeland Conservation Coalition and University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources and supported by many generous sponsors. Participation included diverse rangeland stakeholders, including ranchers from 14 counties, four universities, 19 conservation organizations and agencies and 13 consultancies. The Summit goal was to develop a common understanding about California rangeland sustainability and the critical elements - environment, economics and people. To set the stage regarding the status, issues and trends of global and state rangelands were Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE); Keali’i Bright, Department of Conservation; and Sasha Genett, The Nature Conservancy and U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef. Other experts, including many ranchers shared research and experiences that described these sustainability elements, concluding with a conversation about sustainability in

14 California Cattleman April 2020

leasing systems. To provide perspective on the science, challenges and opportunities as we manage rangelands and the food system, Mitloehner links global rangelands size, methane/ carbon cycles, ruminant animals and food waste. He shared tools to communicate this information with the public. He communicates regularly as @GHGguru on social media and through the CLEAR Center. See his slides, video and other resources on the CRCC Summit website, www.carangeland. org/2002-summit. It contains all presentations and commentary, contest photos and list of gracious sponsors. Congratulations to photo contest winners, Maxine Harper, Carissa Rivers and Bruce Rominger, and sponsor, Point Blue Conservation Science. CRCC appreciates the following Summit article by Bob Johnson that focuses on cattle markets and sustainability. At a time when more people want to know where their food comes from, thousands of California ranchers are challenged because their animals are raised, processed and sold in a complex global system. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

RANGELAND SUSTAINABILITY

• Environmental Stewardship • Economically Healthy Ranches and Ranchers • Social Responsibility for Rural Communities and Land Stewards


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 Although cattle make it economically possible to preserve rangeland up and down the state, only a very small percentage of California’s beef cattle are raised by a single rancher and sold directly to consumers who know where this food came from. “There are 16,000 beef producers in the state, but most are very small,” said Sheila Barry, University of California Cooperative Extension livestock and natural resources farm advisor in the San Francisco Bay Area. “The average size is a herd of 40, but the median is eight. The median size among the direct marketers is just two.” Barry made her remarks as researchers and ranchers discussed the complex economics and public perceptions of beef during the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s 15th annual Rangeland Summit in Stockton. The most common production pattern is for the animals to be moved from state to state as available grass demands, and eventually processed and sold far away from the California pastures that were once home. “We have a production system that is very tied to national markets,” Barry said. “When the animals go out of state, many are going to Oregon, but they are also going to Nevada, Wyoming and Texas. Less than 2 percent of our cattle are direct-marketed to consumers. It is a complicated system that makes it hard for consumers to connect to food production, because very few ranchers actually take their animals through to slaughter.” As if raising and caring for their animals were not work enough, cattle ranchers and dairy farmers face the additional challenge of responding to ill-informed charges that their production of beef, milk and cheese is destroying the planet. “Only 37 percent of consumers view beef production positively in the U.S., but only 24 percent claim to know how beef is raised,” said Sasha Gennet, leader of the Nature Conservancy’s Sustainable Grazing Lands strategy in North America and spokesperson for the U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef. The roundtable is a coalition of cattle ranchers, suppliers, processors, packers and retailers who have begun developing a set of priorities and a self-assessment program since they came together in 2015 (www.usrsb.org/). The roundtable already includes ranchers with 30 percent of the cattle in the country as well as many major retailers who are working on standards and best practices when it comes to water, land, air and greenhouse gases, efficiency, yield, worker safety and well-being and animal health and well-being. “The U.S. is still the largest beef producer in the world, and the most efficient when it comes to greenhouse gases,” 16 California Cattleman April 2020

Gennet said. Efficiency has made it possible for U.S. and California ranchers to build a substantial global market for their beef. “In 2018, we exported $8.3 billion in beef,” said Darrel Sweet, a fifth-generation rancher, past president of the California Cattleman’s Association and current alternate board member of the California Beef Council. “In the 1980s, we didn’t export any. We have developed all of this demand since the 1980s. Exports are up to a little over 14 percent of production, and we expect that to go up in 2020.” A significant share of the exports provides sources of “extra” revenue because it is parts of the animal U.S. consumers eat in only small amounts, like tongues and livers. Japan, Korea, Mexico, China, Canada and Taiwan are the leading export destinations, but other areas are figured to become markets as they develop. When incomes increase, the demand for animal protein increases significantly, Sweet said. While the future global market for beef looks strong, in California the loss of grazing land to urban development or more intensive crop production is a growing factor. “We map California’s farmland and since 1984 we have lost 1.5 million acres,” said Keali’i Bright, assistant director of the California Department of Conservation in charge of the Division of Land Resource Protection. “We see farmland as one of our underutilized climate change resources.”

“I enjoyed meeting amazing people at the Rangeland Summit and discussing how to support ranchers, communities and ecosystems. Conservationists, ranchers, state agency staff work together to responsibly manage almost half of our state’s total land.” – Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D. UCCE.


Feede Meetin Ma 20-22 . San Dieg REGISTER TODAY AT CALCATTLEMEN.ORG! Registration is $300 and includes: access to all meetings, breakfast on Thursday and Friday, lunch on Thursday and Thursday night’s dinner and entertainment at the San Diego Air & Space Museum. Additional Thursday night dinner tickets are available for $100 per guest.

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WHITNEY BOND Food Blogger

SHAWN DARCY

National Cattlemen’s Beef Assoc.

ALLYSON JONES-BRIMMER Animal Ag Alliance

Plus, don’t miss: KIM STACKHOUSELAWSON, PH.D. JBS

BRADLEY JOHNSON, PH.D.

DONALD K. LAYMAN, PH.D U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

DUANE LENZ CattleFax

COLIN WOODALL

Texas Tech University Speaking on: Carcass Differences between Holstein vs. Angus vs. Dairy/Angus

National Cattlemen’s Beef Assoc.

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Make your hotel reservations through the CCA group rate today by calling (619) 234-1500. Thank you to our 2020 TITLE SPONSORS April 2020 California Cattleman 17


BE PRESENT AND ENGAGED by J. Neil Orth, American International Charolais Association Executive Vice President

There are as many marketing philosophies as there are philosophers. Product life cycles, supply and demand, advertising, brand messaging, customer satisfaction and top of mind awareness, all profess to convince the consumer with a better message. The beef business is a little bit different. We definitely appreciate good marketing, attractive ads, good photography. Messages are important and customer satisfaction keeps a loyal commercial producer coming back for generations. But, in the beef business, often we need to simply be present and engaged with our contemporaries. The shiniest marketing message will only work in the short term without a beef animal that has value throughout a very complex supply chain. The first quarter of each year provides ample opportunity for your breed association and staff to show up and be present. Our Charolais families across the country work, day in and day out, over generations to continually making improvements to their cow herds. They reinvest in their family owned operations, hoping to make it sustainable for the next generation. Our Charolais families are present and participate in state and national associations and organizations to be better informed and make a difference. One of the most important roles of the AmericanInternational Charolais Association (AICA) is to represent our members and be a positive public face on behalf of the breed. The AICA hospitality tent in the yards at the National Western Stock Show has become a busy gathering spot over the years. Manned by the AICA staff, the tent is always warm and the coffee’s always hot. The tent has become a welcome respite for beef producers of all breeds to gather, reconnect and renew relationships. We were present and engaged with our peers. The National Beef Cattlemen’s Association (NCBA), the largest gathering of beef producers in America, didn’t disappoint recently in San Antonio, Texas. This year’s attendance, more than 9,000 cattle producers and allied partners, was one of the largest on record. The trade show that accompanies the convention grows larger each year, with a waiting list of producers, cattle feeders, pharmaceuticals, corporations and implement manufacturers trying to directly connect with industry decision makers. AICA was a trade show exhibitor at NCBA and took advantage of every opportunity to showcase Charolais. We unveiled a new promotional campaign and display materials. AICA staff member, Colt Keffer, was interviewed for a follow-up, onsite interview with Working Ranch Radio, promoting the advantages of Charolais genetics. Colt also interviewed Max Martin, commercial cow-calf producer from Loving, Texas. Max is a progressive beef producer that places a lot of value in Charolais genetics in his operation.

18 California Cattleman April 2020

Charolais breeders participated in meetings throughout the convention that ultimately will determine the future direction of the beef industry. Again, we are present and engaging with our industry peers. The AICA staff are on the road every day promoting the Charolais breed and the beef industry. Each person is an industry professional carrying a positive message. By the time we get to the finish line of a busy spring season, collectively, the field staff will have been present and engaged in more than 150 livestock shows and sales, actively promoting the breed on behalf of every family under the big Charolais umbrella. The first NCBA Beef Quality Audit, published in 1985, sent a shocking signal across the industry. The audit told us the consumer was dissatisifed with the quality of beef. The survey essentially told us the marketing message didn’t matter and the beef industry needed to do better and find ways to improve the quality of the product showing up in the supermarket meat case. Our industry’s investment in research set the beef business on a path that has resulted in a quarter century of paradigm-shifting improvements in beef quality, as well as how we manage live cattle. This arduous, sometimes rocky, process has also helped us to create an industry message based on facts about the health, safety, affordability, quality and eating satisfaction of beef. Progress doesn’t happen in a vacuum. The Charolais breed is more relevant today than ever because of breeders and commercial producers that have been and are willing to be present and engaged with peers and industry thought leaders. The breed continues to be relevant because it contributes greatly to the production of a profitable calf and quality beef. The breed is relevant today because registered and commercial producers using Charolais genetics bought in to the concept of adding value throughout the supply chain. Today, marketing the Charolais breed is quantifiable because the message is firmly rooted in what the breed does best. We simply use new marketing materials to start the conversation.


WESTERN

Charolais

BREEDERS

POUNDS=PROFIT

AVILAMikeCATTLE CO. & Char Avila

PO Box 398, Clements, CA 95227 (530) 347-1478 • (530) 941-5025 cavila1956@att.net Bulls sell at World of Bulls in Galt and off the ranch. Select females for sale private treaty.

BAR 6JimCHAROLAIS Ansbach

43861 Burnt Ranch Rd. Mitchell, OR 97750 (541) 462-3083 Annual Bull Sale • February 2021 • Madras, OR

BIANCHI RANCHES Robert, Chris & Erica Bianchi

6810 Canada Rd. Gilroy, CA (408) 842-5855 • (408) 804-3153 Erica’s cell (408) 804-3133 Robert’s cell Bianchiranches@aol.com • www.bianchiranches.com California Girls Online Heifer Sale in October, watch for details. Bulls for sale private treaty and at leading bull sales. Call early for best selection.

BROKEN BOX RANCH Jerry and Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760, Williams, CA (530) 681-5046 Cell • (530) 473-2830 Office BBR@citlink.net • www.brokenboxranch.com Bulls available at Red Bluff, Fallon and off the ranch.

FRESNO STATE AGRICULTURE FOUNDATION California State University, Fresno 2415 E. San Ramon, Fresno, CA Randy Perry (559) 278-4793 http://fresnostate.edu/jcast/beef Bulls available private treaty

W

e believe strongly in the value of crossbreeding and the benefits of heterosis or hybrid vigor. Crossbred calves are more vigorous at birth, they are more resistant to disease and they have increased performance levels or weight gain. In addition, crossbred beef cows have higher fertility levels, they are also more disease resistant and they are superior in terms of longevity, an often overlooked but very economically important trait in a beef herd. These combined factors result in the generation of more total pounds of beef being produced from a commercial cowherd when crossbreeding is utilized. We believe that Charolais bulls are the logical and best choice to use on the Angus-dominated commerical beef cowherd that currently exists in this country. They will infuse the benefits of heterosis and produce the “smokies” and “buckskins” that have been popular with cattle feeders and packers for decades. Look for these Charolais breeders from throughout the West as your . or at leading source for Charolais genetics available off the ranch California, Oregon and Nevada sales.

JORGENSEN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen 25884 Mollier, Ave, Orland, CA (530) 865-7102

Top quality bulls available at the ranch and through Snyder Livestock’s ‘Bulls for the 21st Century’

NICHOLAS LIVESTOCK CO.

Nicoli Nicholas 6522 Vernon Rd., Nicolaus, CA • (916) 455-2384 Breeding Charolais cattle for 57 years, 150 bulls available private treaty in 2020.

ROMANS RANCHES

Bill & Cindy Romans • (541) 538-2921 Jeff & Julie Romans • (541) 358-2905 romansranches@hotmail.com www.romanscharolais.com Annual Production Sale • March 2021 • Westfall, OR

April 2020 California Cattleman 19


TEAM OPENSHAW Myron and Sharon Openshaw recognized for their leadership in Butte County and beyond

by CCA Director of Communications Katie Roberti, with help from Butte County Cattlemen’s President Holly Foster Each year at the Butte County Cattlemen’s Red Meat Dinner, the association awards a leader in their community with Cattleman of the Year. However, this year the local group sought out to honor two people who have played irreplaceable roles in building the Butte County Cattlemen’s and CattleWomen’s Associations and have gone the extra mile in giving to agriculture, the local community and beyond. On February 21, Myron and Sharon Openshaw were honored and presented with a Butte County Cattlemen’s Lifetime Achievement Award. “You might call these two a Butte County power couple,” Butte County Cattlemen’s President Holly Foster shared at the presentation of the award. “But for me, they epitomize what our association is about: community service, supporting and promoting our industry and way of life, and the camaraderie and friendships that are a big part of our county associations. To be honest, they are pretty fun to have around.” Myron and Sharon were surprised to have their two kids, Jerry and Jenny, as well as several of their five grandchildren in attendance to celebrate the award. Representatives from Senator Jim Nielsen’s office and Representative Doug LaMalfa’s office also made presentations to the couple with resolutions from the California Legislature. “I was shocked. I had no idea,” Myron said. “[Sharon and I] were both completely surprised and humbled. It was neat.” Additionally, multiple past and current CCA officers joined them in celebrating, including Jerry Hemsted, who served as CCA president from 1999-2000 and his wife Joan, who served as California CattleWomen’s president from 2003-2004. Jerry, who has known Myron for over 60 years, said they became close friends during Jim Timmon’s term as CCA president from 1987-1988. Jerry served as CCA’s membership chair at the same time Myron was CCA first vice president. “CCA is lucky to have people like Myron; he’s been an active member for over 40 years,” Jerry said. Over the years, Jerry and Myron have stayed close friends, and Joan and Sharon have too. “He is always up-to-date on things and is just a good person. I have no better friend than Myron,” Jerry said. “When [Joan and I] found out they were getting the award, we just made up our minds we had to be there.” For over a century, the Openshaw family has been in Butte County’s beef business. Myron was born and raised in Oroville, and he and Sharon both attended Oroville High School, where they became high school sweethearts. Following high school graduation, Myron attended UC Davis and returned home to Oroville in the summer to work on the cattle production side of the family business. Once he earned his degree in agriculture, he came back to Oroville and has been involved in cattle production in Butte County since. 20 California Cattleman April 2020

Over the years, he has served multiple terms as Butte County Cattlemen’s president and still is active in the local association today. “His willingness to serve multiple terms over the course of many years shows his dedication to our small, but mighty group, and we can’t thank him enough for that service,” Foster said as she continued to share a tribute to both Myron and Sharon. “He is our ambassador. Any civic group hosting a barbecue in Butte County requests Myron, Stan Avrit, and the crew to come barbecue. As a result of his barbecue skills and his infectious personality, he has been the face of our association and industry at many public events where we may not have had a presence otherwise.” Outside of Butte County Cattlemen’s, Myron’s leadership has shown through civic duties in the community. He has served on the Oroville Hospital board, Golden Feather Union School District board, and for over 20 years has been an integral part of Superior Ag, an organization that works to ensure the future of agriculture funding for Chico State University’s College of Agriculture. In 1998, Myron also helped bring a vet clinic to the community. It had been a dream of his to bring a “miniature UC Davis” clinic to Oroville, so when Myron met Michele Weaver, DVM, and started helping her on ranch calls, the two eventually decided there was a need for a permanent office. With Myron’s help, Look Ahead Veterinary Services was built. Now, 22 years later, Myron is still going into the vet office every day. Beyond Butte County, in addition to serving over a decade on CCA’s officer team, including his term as CCA president, dedicating his time to be on countless committees and continuing to sit on CCA’s Executive Committee today, Myron also served on the California Department of Food and Agriculture board. Nationally, he has represented the beef industry through many positions, serving on the National Cattlemen’s Association Cow/ Calf Council and the National Ag Policy Committee, as well as the U.S. Meat Export Federation’s board, to name a few. The California Chamber of Commerce recognized Myron


County CattleWomen’s meetings and events throughout the year, as the 1995 Livestock Man of the Year, a prestigious honor. as well as meetings at the CCA/CCW Annual Convention, CCA/ A story in the October 1995 issue of the California Cattleman, CCW Midyear Meeting and the California CattleWomen’s Spring announcing Myron as Livestock Man of the Year, included this Beef Promotion. quote about Myron from a fellow cattlemen, “While many of “Sharon is the person who encouraged me the most to take today’s agriculture leaders spend the majority of their time talking the office of CCA president,” Myron said as the newly elected to one another, Myron is out visiting and getting to know those CCA president at the December 1988 CCA convention. “She has who aren’t directly involved. He’s serving and participating on been my biggest supporter.” civic, political, urban and social groups whose members don’t “I will work very hard to maintain the strong traditions understand agriculture—Myron’s reaching these people and of CCA and make sure that we do everything we can for the teaching them about our industry.” betterment of our beef industry,” Myron said as he continued But it’s not just Myron who has led and given so much to to address CCA members at the business meeting. “I’d like to agriculture and the community—Sharon Openshaw has a list be remembered for something I’d done and not for something I of achievements of her own showing that same dedication and didn’t do.” leadership. A few years later, it’s clear both Myron and Sharon are “Behind every great man is a great woman, and Myron will already remembered by so many for the hundreds of acts of be the first to give credit to his wife, Sharon,” Foster said. “This is service they did do, the leadership they have shown over the a lady who I believe epitomizes feminine grit.” decades and the dedication they continue to share. Our industry In 1961, when Sharon married Myron, she also married is forever better because of this team. Congratulations, and thank into a cattle ranching family. She became a member of the Butte you, Myron and Sharon. County CattleWomen and has been active on local, state and national levels for many years. “While I have a lot of memories attending county cattlewomen’s meetings with my mom as a little kid, my memories of cattlemen’s and women’s events as an adult always involve Sharon, right there by Myron’s side,” Foster said. “And, that group gets extended to Diane and Stan Avrit, Myron and Sharon’s close friends. I can’t thank Diane enough for helping to contribute to tonight’s tribute to Sharon.” For the Butte County CattleWomen, Sharon has served multiple years as membership chairman. She has organized and put together baskets for the Red Meat Dinner and state convention, purchased mystery gifts for the CowBelle of the Year Luncheon, and volunteered at many events over the years, including Sharon and Myron were surprised to have their two kids, Jenny and Jerry, the Kids’ Day at the Farm during the Farm City as well as several of their grandkids in attendance. Celebration. She’s traveled to San Diego to assist the San Diego CattleWomen with barn tours and food demonstrations at the Del Mar Fair and has previously received the honor of CowBelle of the Year. Working on the state level as a member of the California CattleWomen (CCW), Sharon has also held many roles. She has been chairman of the Beef Promotion Book Contest, chairman of the Credentials Committee and co-chairman of the State Beef Cookoff Committee. Additionally, she has also given her time and skills in other ways, such as organizing receptions for CattleWomen presidents. In the early 1990s, Sharon was asked to work on the National Beef Cook-off and decided to help at this level for the first time. At the National Beef Cook-off, she had the task of being in charge of airport arrivals. This responsibility consisted of organizing cattlemen and cattlewomen who were to meet each contestant, CCA officers, past and present, came to celebrate with the Openshaws. food editor, national committee member and other From left to right: CCA Second Vice President Greg Kuck; Jerry Hemsted, CCA President 1999-2000; Myron Openshaw, CCA President 1989-1990; VIPs at their gates of arrival. This was a big job done CCA President Mark Lacey; Dave Daley, CCA President 2017-2018; and well by a very organized lady, Diane Avrit shared. CCA First Vice President Tony Toso. Today, Sharon is still active and participates at Butte April 2020 California Cattleman 21


CHECKING IN ON YOUR BEEF CHECKOFF

SPRINGING AHEAD INTO NEW BEEF PROMOTION CAMPAIGNS by California Beef Council’s Jill Scofield The spring months sure are busy for our industry, and that is certainly the case for the California Beef Council (CBC) as well. April launches our first integrated marketing campaign of 2020, targeting consumers in a variety of ways with the goal of increasing beef purchases statewide. This month, we will also be gearing up for our annual Pasture to Plate Beef Tour, which takes place in early May as a way to provide influencers in the foodservice and retail industries with a comprehensive education on all aspects of beef production. And among many other programs taking place throughout California and the nation thanks to Beef Checkoff funding, there is one national campaign we’d like to showcase this month. With that, let’s drill down into some of the specifics of some of these efforts. California Campaign: Tacos, Tequila y Más Starting this month and leading up to Cinco de Mayo, the CBC and its partners will be encouraging shoppers to fill their retail baskets with the ingredients needed to create their own ultimate taco night at home. “Tacos, Tequila y Más” is an integrated marketing campaign featuring a partnership with Mission Foods and E&J Gallo – specifically its Camarena Tequila label

22 California Cattleman April 2020

- and iHeart Media for a co-branded Cinco de Mayo promotion, seeking to influence and inspire consumers as they plan meals for the holiday or for any day of the week. Last year, a similar partnership and campaign led to robust programming tactics that delivered over 13 million impressions. The campaign will include a variety of elements to reach consumers on their path-to-purchase, including radio advertising across iHeart radio stations in select California markets, including a 60-second spot featuring food blogger and influencer Whitney Bond as the voice of the campaign. Additionally, :15 sec. broadcast spots will air on the Total Weather Network across 25 stations, and other campaign elements include digital display ads, video preroll, and mobile geo-fencing which will deliver ads to target consumers’ mobile devices when within one mile of every retailer. In addition to voicing the radio spots, Whitney Bond has also worked with the CBC to create a taco recipe video specific to the campaign. In-store signage will include logos of all three partners. This campaign also includes a cash-back rebate offer on carne asada through the Ibotta mobile app. The $3 rebate on one lb. or larger any brand Skirt Steak, Flank Steak, Top Sirloin Steak, Shoulder Steak, Bottom Round Steak, Sirloin Flap, and Beef Fajita or Beef Taco meat pre-seasoned


Beef brings in more dollars than any other item at retail (2.1 percent of total), while nearly 6.3 percent of baskets include beef. So, bringing in beef shoppers generates greater sales across the entire store. The average basket with beef is more than twice that of the typical ring ($85.70 vs. $41.33, respectively), and baskets with beef drive 44 percent more total store sales than baskets with chicken and 21 times the total sales as baskets with beef substitutes.

On the National Stage: Digital Campaign Busts Beef Myths

April 2020 California Cattleman 23


CFAH Holds Stakeholder Meeting to Present 2019 Projects, Outline 2020 Priorities In late February, the Center for Food Animal Health (CFAH) hosted its annual stakeholder working group and advisory meeting. Representatives from the UC Davis School of Veterinary medicine, extension offices from across the state and commodity groups came together to discuss current research, industry needs and the future to help serve California’s food animal producers. Of interest to cattle producers were a number of research projects aimed at the health, efficiency and profitability of beef cattle. One such study focused on Foot and Mouth Disease modeling and vaccination strategies to prepare for and mitigate outbreak emergency situations. Researches evaluated testing techniques, costs and resources needed for vaccination and preparedness gaps, including the reconstruction of truck routes to model disease spread and incorporate airborne spread. Continuing research will expand into impacted species other than cattle and their interaction within an outbreak event. Slaughter and carcass condemnation were also a topic of discussion. One study focused on spatial and temporal trends in cattle condemnation across the U.S. Initial research found that California is responsible for 35.76 percent of all condemnation cases in dairy cows in the U.S. While research continues, causes and ways to avoid carcass condemnation will be explored. Of particular interest was a project focusing on the risk of a brucellosis outbreak. This study sought to assess the brucellosis risk to California cattle from elk and bison carriers in the Greater Yellowstone area. Questions explored include what is the risk of moving animals? How do wildlife migrations impact possible commercial herd exposure? While these and more specific questions were answered, the overall conclusion discovered is that the risk to commercial cattle is actually very low, concentrated to a few counties. Further studies will expand research into other countries such as Mexico and evaluate no-vaccine or alternate vaccination protocols. Some familiar faces presented projects as well. Dr. Gaby Maier presented her research on the efficacy of an intranasal vaccine to combat pink eye. While early research revealed no difference in the rate of pink eye incidence between vaccinated and unvaccinated animals, overall ulcer size was smaller in vaccinates. Further research with a higher vaccine concentration of Moraxella bovis and Moraxella bovoculi (the pathogens that cause pink eye) will be conducted. Iodine as a preventative and eye patches as a curative measure for pink eye were also studied. The increase of dietary iodine via bolus was also investigated with the goal of increasing the concentration of lactoperoxidase and thus tears, lubricating the eye and decreasing incidence and severity of pink eye. While initial research showed that the levels fed did not quite increase concentrations enough to make a marked difference, researchers will next try the administration of increased iodine via loose minerals versus simply a bolus.

24 California Cattleman April 2020

An additional hypothesis tested was that the use of eye patches for pink eye would decrease healing time in affected cattle and therefore, increase weight gain. Steers with pink eye were treated with either an eye patch, or no eye patch. The conclusion reached was that ulcers lingered longer in animals with no patch and additionally, animals treated with patches gained 190 pounds compared to the 165 pound gain of those without. Breeding was also a source of research focus for Dr. Maier, particularly spermatozoa. While the specifics are somewhat complicated, the overall outcome of the project presented was that oxygen consumption correlated to sperm motility could give producers a novel parameter for sperm viability. This could have important implications for the artificial insemination of beef cattle, including the analysis of sperm morphology, assessment of current freezing parameters and the comparison of subsequent ejaculates over time in addition to the effects of antimicrobials and anti-inflammatories on viability. Another name familiar to California producers presented a project equally familiar to the beef community. Dr. Jeff Stott presented the most current data on the Foothill Abortion Vaccine Trial. While it is well documented and well established that the UC Davisformulated vaccine is effective, now that commercialization is nearing completion, the subtleties of the disease process and vaccination can be studied. One of the focuses of study is the ideal vaccination time frame. In the study, cows vaccinated under five months gestation, lost approximately 30 perent of their calves. Those vaccinated at six months gestation saw an increase in weak calves, and those vaccinated over six months gestation had calves whose thriftiness was indistinguishable from those of the unvaccinated controls. Another current study is focusing on the immunity of heifers born through cows vaccinated in their third trimester. The bacteria known to cause foothill abortion disease (and used to manufacture the vaccine) was noted in all neonates born from dams vaccinated at six to seven months gestation at levels higher than calves with only passive immunity from colostrum. Those neonates, now heifers themselves, will be bred in April and challenged at 100 days gestation to confirm immunity. In addition to presenting research, the stakeholder group also discussed the 2020 priorities of the Center for Food Animal Health. Of significant benefit to beef producers are the focuses on exploring alternatives to medically-important antimicrobial drugs (following their veterinary restriction pursuant to Senator Jerry Hill’s 2015, SB 27), analysis of animal production systems to increase profitability and sustainability, and investigation into endemic and production-limiting diseases of food animals. For further information about these projects and more, visit the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine’s Center for Food Animal Health at https://cfah.vetmed.ucdavis. edu/.


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Passing the Reins

California Rangeland Trust Honors Outgoing CEO and Welcomes New Leader by California Rangeland Trust Communications Director Alyssa Rolen upbringing on a multi-generational California family ranch Big changes are happening at the California Rangeland that provided Nita with the passion and common sense to Trust. After twenty years of service, CEO Nita Vail will drive success. leave her position at the end of April, passing the reins to Nita’s great-grandfather, the legendary cattleman Walter Michael Delbar, who has been with the Rangeland Trust L. Vail, along with J.V. Vickers, purchased Santa Rosa for ten years and currently serves as its chief operating Island in 1901 for their ranching operation. He saw the officer. island as a perfect place to continue expansion of their It is hard to picture the Rangeland Trust without California operations and secure additional grassland for Nita Vail. During the last twenty years she has led the winter range. Under Vail and Vickers’ ownership, the land Rangeland Trust from its humble beginnings, born from a and cattle business thrived, even with extended droughts group of ranchers seeking ways to hold onto the ranching and volatile cattle markets. way of life in California, to one of the largest and most “Santa Rosa Island was where I learned to cowboy influential agricultural nonprofits in the state. From a in rough, big country, pilot a plane onto a dirt strip with staff of two, the organization now has fifteen individuals 45 mph crosswinds, and experience so much fun and working to preserve California’s rangeland on every front— from providing funds to ranchers for conservation freedom,” recalled Nita. “The island deeply shaped me in ways that later helped my work with the California easements, to changing public policy, to engaging in Rangeland Trust.” During an age where women were innovative collaborations with all sectors of society. not naturally welcomed into business, Nita spent years at Looking back at her personal journey, and that of the her father’s side learning about land stewardship and all Rangeland Trust, it is evident that no better person could aspects of a marine ranch operation that ran up to 8,000 have helped found and lead the organization from its head of yearlings in a wet year. She watched how her early years through maturity, becoming a major force in father successfully built long-term relationships based on rangeland conservation throughout the state. integrity, his word and a handshake. “There was a great deal of polarization between the It is also where she learned first-hand the family environmental and ranching community at the time when heartbreak of losing an intergenerational ranch and the Nita first began to lead the Rangeland Trust,” said Steve negative consequences of an environmental community Sinton, founding Chairman and current Emeritus Council that lacked science-based, accurate knowledge about Member. “Nita is a bridgebuilder, and right away began to the beneficial role of well-managed ranches in the create a common vision between ranchers and others in the California conservation community. She was a game changer, a rainmaker and her involvement in conservation activities statewide and throughout the West brought us respect.” Nita’s involvement and history with the Rangeland Trust seems like a perfect act of destiny—as if her upbringing and life experiences were carefully orchestrated, all along guiding her towards the role of CEO. With a degree in Agricultural Business Management from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, an MBA from Santa Clara University, a five-year appointment by Governor Wilson as Assistant Secretary of Agricultural and Environmental Policy for the California Department of Food and Agriculture under Secretary Ann Veneman, and as a graduate of the California Agricultural Leadership Program, Nita After 20 years of service, Rangeland Trust Chief Executive Officer Nita Vail was uniquely positioned to lead. But it was her will pass the reins to longtime Chief Operating Officer Michael Delbar. 26 California Cattleman April 2020


environment. The 54,000-acre island remained in the Vail and Vickers families until the late 1970s when Congress created legislation to expand the Channel Islands National Park. Fearing almost certain condemnation, Vail & Vickers sold Santa Rosa Island to the government in 1986 and brokered a deal to allow them to stay on the island and continue their ranching operation for the next 25 years, until 2011. During the next decade, inaccurate information about endangered species that had been supported by ranch operations for decades resulted in the end of all livestock operations on the island. The last cattle drive occurred in 1998. Nita’s ranch upbringing helped instill in her the core values of integrity in business and a love for the land. Looking back, it seems only natural that she would be at the forefront of helping to establish and grow the Rangeland Trust from the ground up. Nita stated: “I am profoundly aware of the rare gift I’ve been given in transforming that early, extensive, and painful knowledge about how to conduct land transactions into many joyful, positive conservation successes.” In 1997, seeing the multitude of challenges facing California cattlemen and women, a group of forwardthinking ranchers from the California Cattlemen’s Association identified an inherent need to offer creative conservation solutions to the ranching community. They also were networking and learning from groups like the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association who had formed the Colorado Cattlemen’s Agricultural Land Trust five years earlier and the Malpai Borderlands Group in Arizona and New Mexico. The California Rangeland Trust was born from this creative ferment. As a founding board member, Nita helped establish a clear vision for the new organization. The Trust sought to provide real tools, common vision, and collaborative opportunities. By enabling ranchers to band together, and working with ranchers individually, the Trust could help them conserve private ranches, monetize development and habitat values, and change public opinion about ranching. It would be an organization for ranchers, run by ranchers, saving rangelands for all Californians. Shortly after its creation, the Rangeland Trust was fortunate to have some early wins. The first conservation easement was completed on the Touch the Earth Ranch in Calaveras County in 1998, which helped the organization establish itself amongst funders, supporters, and landowners. Then in 2001, right as the organization began to build significant momentum, the executive director at the time stepped down.

One of the last gathers at Carrington Point on Santa Rosa Island.

“The board felt lost and had no idea how to maintain our role in the conservation community,” said Steve Sinton. “Nita stepped forward offering to lead us and lead us she did.” Nita’s visionary leadership helped transform the organization into the largest land trust in California. Nita understood the need to build bridges between environmental and ranching groups, especially after witnessing what had happened on Santa Rosa Island. She, along with the board of directors and staff, worked to create a broad base of philanthropic support and connect the organization to state and federal agency partners. She also made it a priority to educate people from all walks of life on the public benefits rangelands provide. Those connections allowed the Rangeland Trust to raise significant funds for rangeland conservation. With Nita at the helm, the Rangeland Trust has completed nearly 90 conservation projects. One of the biggest and most challenging projects involved the landmark conservation agreement on the Hearst Ranch. In 2005, Nita and others from the Rangeland Trust, worked alongside the Hearst Corporation and the American Land Conservancy to complete the conservation project on the 80,000-acre ranch along California’s scenic Highway One. Steve Hearst led the Hearst Corporate team and had this to say about Nita: “Nita had the ability to bring people with very different views to a shared vision and outcome. There were times ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

“The board felt lost and had no idea how to maintain our role in the conservation community. Nita stepped forward offering to lead us and lead us she did.” – Steve Sinton April 2020 California Cattleman 27


With the Hearst Corporation and the American Land Conservancy, Rangeland Trust CEO Nita Vail helped solidify the landmark conservation agreement on the Hearst Ranch in 2005. The Rangeland Trust has certainly come a long way over the last twenty years. In 2001, the organization had $250 thousand in assets. Today, the organization has worked with more than 70 ranching families to conserve more than 340,000 acres of pristine rangeland throughout the state. It also boasts $32 million in assets, much of which is comprised of restricted endowments for its perpetual stewardship responsibilities on conserved ranches. “Nita helped build the California Rangeland Trust and her legacy will remain strong,” said Rangeland Trust Co-Chair Mark Nelson. “We started with two employees and a mission to conserve working land. We now have fifteen team members, an engaged board, and valuable partnerships across the state that have allowed the With the Hearst Corporation and the American Land Conservancy, Rangeland Trust CEO Nita Vail helped solidify the Rangeland Trust to preserve thousands of acres of open landmark conservation agreement on the Hearst Ranch in 2005 space in California.” While Nita is proud of the Rangeland Trust’s work to date, she is most proud of the trust the organization has established within the ranching community. “I look back on my time at the Rangeland Trust with so much pride and deep gratitude for not only the accomplishments, but also the culture in which we have executed them,” she exclaimed. “Having one without the other would not be the ‘cowboy way.’ I have had the honor of working alongside so many genuine, hardworking rancher conservationists to conserve our state’s precious natural resources.” At the end of April, Nita will be stepping down from her position at the Rangeland Trust. While this has not been an easy decision for Nita, she believes this to be an important and critical change for a strong organization like the Rangeland Trust to continue to grow and thrive. Nita stated, “The timing is right. The organization is stronger than ever with a dedicated board, talented staff, committed volunteers, and results showing the extraordinary impact we’ve had preserving California’s rangelands and ranching culture, wildlife and ways of life.” Nita’s legacy, impact and love for the land will live on as Nita’s legacy, impact and love for the land will live on as pillars pillars within the Rangeland Trust. within the Rangeland Trust. With this decision, Nita is looking forward to spending more time with family and friends and getting horseback ...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27 regularly. She also plans to apply her unique expertise acquired over the last twenty years to new endeavors during our five-year prosses of negotiating the assisting landowners with conservation and ranch real conservation easement on San Simeon when we had a estate strategies and continuing to make a difference in the difficult time finding common ground with the government ranching industry. While she will no longer be managing and non-government organizations. It was difficult not to the organization’s day-to-day operations, her impact and feel uneasy with some individuals and organizations legacy will live on as a pillar within the organization. when you feel they are trying to get the best of you. When “Nita’s influence will benefit the California Rangeland negotiating with anyone on this or other deals, I have Trust for years to come, and we are grateful to have had always felt that the transaction had to work for all those her leading the way for the last 20 years,” said Rangeland involved. Many times, when negotiations end, someone Trust Co-Chair Valerie Gordon. “Her work was more than feels like they won, and others feel like they lost. That’s not just a job. It was about healing our planet and leaving the my idea of a great deal. land as a heritage to our wildlife, landscapes, agriculture Fortunately, Nita Vail felt the same way. We became and, most importantly, our families. Nita deserves our good friends and we worked so well together that we have gratitude for her devoted and long service.” done two more transactions with the Rangeland Trust. Nita While Nita will certainly be missed, the Rangeland Trust will be missed by all but, we all know she’s a phone call away. is fortunate to have once again found the perfect person to I am sure that she will be successful in whatever she decides lead the organization forward. In May, Michael Delbar will to do going forward.” assume his new role as CEO. 28 California Cattleman April 2020


“The Rangeland Trust has succeeded because of the hard work, dedication, and passion of Nita Vail,” said Michael. “Filling Nita’s shoes won’t be easy, but I am honored to lead the Trust at this juncture, and I look forward to building on Nita’s incredible work.” With a degree in Agricultural Business from California State University, Chico, 12 years of service on the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, a two-year stint as executive director of the Lake County Farm Bureau and as a graduate of the California Agricultural Leadership Program, Michael is well-poised for his new leadership role. And like Nita, Michael’s story about how he became involved with the Rangeland Trust seems like an act of fate. Michael hails from a multi-generational ranching family in Mendocino and Lake Counties where they raise beef cattle, timber and hay. His first experience with conservation easements came when a land-use decision was made in his home county which would have detrimental impacts on surrounding agricultural lands. To mitigate against these impacts, proponents advocated for a conservation easement. The problem was that at the time, no organization capable of holding an easement of this nature existed. Various groups had talked about forming a land trust, but they were not agricultural-friendly organizations. Fearing that these groups may not have the agricultural land stewards’ best interests in mind, Michael rallied other local ranchers to work on creating their own land trust.

Incoming CEO Michael Delbar hails from a ranching family in Mendocino and Lake Counties Simultaneously, Michael put his hat in the ring and ran for a county supervisor seat in 1996. The agricultural community was underrepresented, and Michael felt the need to serve as a voice for the farmers and ranchers in his community. While the news of him winning the race was exciting, it also meant the time he would be able to devote to forming an agricultural land trust would be limited. Luckily, it was around this same time that the California Rangeland Trust was created. This offered a solution to the agricultural producers in Mendocino County, so there was no longer a pertinent need for Michael and his team to continue forming their own

organization. Fast forward 12 years after Michael had wrapped up his service on the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors. He heard about an opening for a new chief operating officer at the California Rangeland Trust, so he took a chance and called Nita. He joined the Rangeland Trust in 2010, and the rest is history. For Michael, his journey with the Rangeland Trust has come full circle. It began with a desire to preserve the land and natural resources in his home region. Now, he will have the opportunity to do this on a statewide level as he leads the California Rangeland Trust forward. As for Nita, she could not be more thrilled with the announcement of her successor. “When I first met Michael ten years ago, I was struck by his talent, passion and family’s deep multi-generational roots in the ranching industry,” she exclaimed. “Michael knows the ins and out of this organization and cares deeply about the mission of the Rangeland Trust. Knowing that he will be stewarding this organization makes this transition easier and more seamless than I could have ever hoped. The future is truly bright.” California Rangeland Trust’s dedication to a collaborative, science-based approach to ranch conservation has increased both general understanding and attracted new and important allies to the cause of protecting the state’s dwindling rangelands as they face a host of economic and population pressures. The Rangeland Trust is forever grateful to Nita Vail for her dedication and longstanding service to the ranchers and working landscapes of California and is excited for its continued success in service to its mission and continued growth under its new leadership.

Incoming CEO Michael Delbar hails from a ranching family in Mendocino and Lake Counties. April 2020 California Cattleman 29


PEACEFUL PLANNING

Estate Transfer from the view of a mediator by Lee A. Scharf Some say ranchers are a dying breed. Ranching requires physical strength and stamina. It requires brains and good business sense. The ability to do it all. Not every kid can handle it. Not every child wants to live the ranch life. As parents we want to treat our children in an even handed manner. But each one is different, so while aiming to treat everyone equally also bear in mind the motto, “each according to their abilities, each according to their needs.” It’s a balancing act. Is everyone in your family clear about where things stand in regards to future plans and succession issues? Is everyone content? When families can set aside their differences and agree to disagree if necessary and finally come together it is a powerful thing. To achieve family unity in today’s chaotic world is difficult. In many family business situations the process of mediation can be helpful. A mediator is a neutral third party. Mediation is a process to resolve disputes but it is a voluntary process and can only succeed when everyone wants a fair solution. Without the sincerity it doesn’t work. But if everyone wants a fair solution mediation can help you achieve it. Every mediator has their own approach and style of working. Here is how I usually work. The first step is often a phone interview where I listen to your description of the situation and decide if it is appropriate for mediation. One aspect of mediation that I stress is confidentiality. Everything discussed is totally confidential. This is backed up by law. When I speak with each family member separately it is in strict confidence. This encourages trust and candor. The more I know, the more I can help. After interviewing everyone then we are ready for the more formal group session. During the mediation I don’t allow name calling. No yelling. No threats. Swearing is okay. and crying also. Everyone gets a chance to say their piece. I encourage each

30 California Cattleman April 2020

family member to not hold back. Let it all out. It can be like purging poison from your body. This is an important step in the mediation process. From these conversations we begin to identify the issues in dispute. I separate out the emotions, the side issues, and the family dynamics that are often just below the surface. I grew up in a family business and I’m well aware of how powerful these family dynamics are. Now we can zero in on the crux of the matter. When everyone agrees on exactly what the issue is then we have reached a milestone. Time for a break. Once we all agree on the problem we can figure out the solution. Everyone has their wants and desires but what is fair? What’s best for the family? I used to mediate child custody issues in Boise, Idaho with divorcing couples. I would tell the parents to shift their focus from what they want to what is best for the kids. This is a crucial step for mediation to succeed. Each family member needs to think about what is best for the family. As I said before, when a family can unite it’s a powerful thing. If the focus can be shifted to what is best for the family, from there I help guide the discussion to figure out workable solutions. When terms for an agreement can be spelled out and agreed to, when everybody comes to terms then I will write up the agreement. Not every family can agree on what the issues are. Not every family can set aside their differences enough to come to terms. Not every mediation is successful. I’m not a magician. The success or failure of mediation is up to the family. Lee A. Scharf lives part time in Jamaica where he is mediating land disputes. He lived in Boise, Idaho during the 1980s and 1990s where he raised his family and was instrumental in getting the Idaho State Supreme Court to utilize mediation. He currently lives in the desert of southern California and can be reached at (760) 7671229.


CANADA RATIFIES USMCA, REPLACING NAFTA FOR NORTH AMERICAN TRADE In mid-March, both houses of the Canadian Parliament voted to ratify the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), the third and final country needed to make the trade pact official. This historic agreement replaces 1993s North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). “Now that the USMCA has been approved by all three countries, a historic new chapter for North American trade has begun,” said U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. The agreement faced early opposition in the Canadian Parliament with detractors citing too many concessions to U.S. interests, becoming stuck for several weeks. In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, however, and with many Canadian officials sequestering themselves, both houses of parliament moved at lighting-speed to ratify the USMCA before adjourning for the month to stop the spread of the virus. “USMCA is a great victory for America’s agriculture industry, and I am pleased to see Canada’s Parliament approved the deal today,” said U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. “USMCA locks in and expands access to our neighbors to the North and South. I thank President Trump for negotiating this deal and for always supporting America’s farmers and ranchers. We will continue to work with both Canada and Mexico in implementing this agreement.” With all countries in agreement, a timeline for implementation is expected to be announced in the near future. Canada’s approval signifies the start of a three-month period for the countries to agree on such an implementation strategy. Once all obligations are met and each country notified, the deal will take full affect approximately 60 days later. USMCA and its implementation are of particular note to cattlemen, in large part due to the strong percentage of American beef that is exported to Canada and Mexico every year. According to the US Department of Agriculture, Canada and Mexico are the United States’ first and second largest export markets for food and agricultural products, totaling more than $39.7 billion in food and agricultural exports in 2018. These exports support more than 325,000 US jobs. CCA will continue to keep you updated as the full implementation of the agreement develops further. April 2020 California Cattleman 31


WORKING RINGSIDE

UNPRECEDENTED TIMES SPRING SALE SEASON BRINGS BIG QUESTIONS by M3 Marketing’s Matt Macfarlane When early winter rains fell around Christmas time, the spring sale run and grass seaon was looking good for California cattlemen up and down the state. But as ranchers know all too well, that sort of prediction can change at the drop of a hat. Even as the new year approached it seemed the season might be decent, if only we could get some more winter rain. Being a lifelong cattleman myself, I was still optimistic for a good spring in spite of the fact that those early winter rains were not as long-lasting as any of us had hoped. The spring sale season kicked off with the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale at the end of January and if the results there were any indication, the spring bull sale run was going to be exciting. From top to bottom, bull prices in Red Bluff were solid. No extreme highs and no drastic lows either, it was just the kind of bull sale every ringman likes to see. If nothing else, the excitement of Red Bluff has definitely carried on throughout the spring sale run. Excitement has been a major theme of this spring though not necessarily the kind of excitement any of us would have expected or wanted to see. Over the past few years, as readership of this publication has grown, our advertising market has further expanded into the northwest making my spring run every bit as busy as the fall bull sale season, if not more so, due to the time spend on the road and in airports. As the relationships in the northwest have grown in numbers, I have thoroughly enjoyed the time I have spent there getting to better know commercial and seedstock producers in Nevada, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. What looked early on to be a promising bull season – with good averages and happy customers – gradually became more concerning as the now infamous coronavirus (COVID-19) made its was from Asia to our shores, first being detected in Washington where I have spend a good portion of my time. From day to day, the concerns became more severe and pretty soon producers were faced with the

32 California Cattleman April 2020

decision to hold their sale events or to cancel. Cancelling a production sale or even a weekly livestock market event comes with serious repercussions from feed costs to weaning delays. Understandably, each of these producers decided to push forward despite the cost and, in general, sales were strong and buyers were loyal. In all honesty, the sale season wrapped up just in the nick of time. With stricter travel requirements put in place and social distancing becoming enforced, being home with my family was a relief as March came to a close. As you can see in the sale reports on the next page, the sales were largely successful. The market for the spring is questionable at best, but I look forward to being back in the Golden State and able to help our livestock auction markets where I can to make the most of the current, unprecedented situation. There is a popular saying that if you do what you love you will never have to work a day in your life. That is not to say that being a traveling ringman and sale manager isn’t a lot of hard work, but it is truly a rewarding career and one that I am fortunate to enjoy, even during the tumultuous times we have seen in the past few months and will possibly see for months to come. In few other lines of work do you see competitors come together as friends and supporters, but that is something I see and experience day in and day out. The people I work with and work for are some of the best anywhere. As we navigate what some have called a “new normal,” I look forward to witnessing more resilience, more camaraderie and more success for our industry. Though the future may be unclear at this point in time, if this national emergency has shown us anything it is that consumers want our product and we are in it for the long haul. Good luck in the weeks and months ahead and as always, if I can aid you in marketing your cattle, please don’t hesitate to ask.


Cattlemen’s Report

Sale results in this report reflect advertisers who were featured in this publication in January, February and March 2020. SHAW CATTLE COMPANY BULL SALE Caldwell, Idaho • Feb. 19, 2020 Col. Trent Stewart and Col. C.D. Butch Booker 206 Angus bulls...................................................................................$5,010 169 Hereford bulls..............................................................................$4,348 20 Red Angus bulls............................................................................$4,950 BAKER ANGUS RANCH BULL SALE Vale, Ore. • Feb. 22, 2020 Sale Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing Col. Rick Machado 115 Angus bulls...................................................................................$3,439 11 SimAngus bulls..............................................................................$3,564 29 Commercial females....................................................................$1,237 BUCHANAN ANGUS RANCH BULL SALE with Country Inn Cattle and Santos Angus Klamath Falls, Ore. • Feb. 23, 2020 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 47 Angus bulls.....................................................................................$4,873 COLYER HEREFORD AND ANGUS PRODUCTION SALE Bruneau, Idaho • Feb . 24, 2020 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Kyle Colyer 136 Hereford bulls..............................................................................$5,161 76 Angus bulls.....................................................................................$5,559 1 F1 bull...............................................................................................$20,000 29 Hereford heifers............................................................................$3,116 20 Angus heifers..................................................................................$2,265 LORENZEN RED ANGUS BULL SALE Madras, Ore. • Feb. 27, 2020 Col. Trent Stewart 148 Red Angus and composit bulls..............................................$4,819 BAR 6 CHAROLAIS COWMAN’S KIND BULL SALE with Wilson Cattle Co Terrebonne, Ore. • March 2, 2020 Col. Denis Metzger 93 Bar 6 Charolais bulls....................................................................$3,992 9 Wilson Cattle Co. Charolais bulls...............................................$2,806 WINNEMUCCA RANCH HAND RODEO HORSE SALE Winnemucca, Nev. • Feb. 29, 2020 Col. Rick Machado 54 horses................................................................................................$6,081 THOMAS ANGUS RANCH Baker City, Ore. • March 3, 2020 Sale Managed by Cotto & Associatew Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 157 Angus bulls.............................................................................$4,306

HARRELL HEREFORD RANCH 41ST ANNIVERSARY SALE Baker City, Ore. • March 2, 2020 Sale Managed by United Livestock Brokers Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Co.l Rick Machado 97 yearling bulls..............................................................................$4,700 26 two-year-old bulls....................................................................$4,108 35 registered heifers.....................................................................$2,429 9 fall bred cows...............................................................................$2,806 11 horsees.........................................................................................$5,077 SNYDER LIVESTOCK 21st Bulls for the 21st Century Yerington, Nev. • March 8, 2020 Col. John Rodgers & Col. Eric Duarte 104 total bulls................................................................................$4,008 67 Angus.........................................................................................$4,368 2 Balancer.......................................................................................$2,600 10 Charolais...................................................................................$3,480 13 Hereford...................................................................................$3,073 2 LimFlex.......................................................................................$2,850 10 Red Angus................................................................................$3,860 SPRING COVE RANCH CENTENNIAL BULLSALE Idaho Falls, Idaho • March 9, 2020 Col. Rick Machado 134 Angus bulls............................................................................$5,031 28 registered yearling heifers.....................................................$1,652 ROMANS RANCHES CHAROLAIS BULL SALE Westfall, Ore. • March 10, 2020 Col. Denis Metzger 100 Charolais bulls.......................................................................$4,190 ROLLIN ROCK GENETIC PARTNERS BULL SALE Pilot Rock, Ore • March 13, 2020 Col. Joe Goggins and Roger Jacobs 166 Angus bulls.............................................................................$4,098 RIVERBEND RANCH BULL SALE Idaho Falls, Idaho • March 14, 2020 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 389 Angus bulls.............................................................................$6,676 WASHINGTON CATTLEMEN’S BULL TEST SALE Eltopia, Wash. • March 18, 2020 Sale Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 80 Angus, Hereford, Red Angus and SimAngus...............$3,708

April 2020 California Cattleman 33


IN MEMORY Michael LaGrande

On Saturday morning, planeload of constituents to Washington, D.C., to promote March 7, Michael V. the need to fund construction of the Tehama-Colusa LaGrande pulled his boots Canal. He served as a board member of the Westside on for the last time. Mike Water District, the LaGrande Water District and the passed away of heart Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District. failure in the midst of his Horses were Mike’s personal passion. Kristine and cows, joyfully bantering Mike met Dema and Jim Paul in the early 1980s, and never with his friends and looked back. Mike showed as a non-pro in the NRCHA cowboys, doing exactly Snaffle Bit Futurity and Maturity multiple times. He has what he loved. He was 76. owned countless horses, won a few buckles, and made Born in 1943, to many a great friend looking at and riding horses. Adele and Matt LaGrande, Mike was their third child Mike was a member of the Frontier Boys, the and described as a happy boy. He graduated Bellarmine Arbuckle Golf Club, Reames Country Club (Klamath College Preparatory School in San Jose, California, going Falls, Oregon), and the Glenn-Colusa Cattlemen’s on to study business and agriculture at California State Association. Perhaps most importantly, Mike LaGrande University, Chico, before beginning a life-long career of loved to have fun. He enjoyed every day; he loved to laugh farming and ranching. and to help others to laugh. Mike and Kristine were married in Klamath Falls, A devout Roman Catholic, he was a man of deep Oregon, and settled in Williams, California, where they personal faith, attending mass nearly every Sunday raised their children and were active in every aspect of life. wherever he found himself. He had special friends, whom Mike and his brother Ron began in the land levelling he valued enormously, and he had countless lives which business, financed with a small loan from their uncle, he touched throughout the many industries, countries and Harold LaGrande. In 1969, Mike planted his first crop of continents through which he travelled. cannery tomatoes and in 1979, his first crop of rice. In Mike is survived by his second wife, Cindy; his 1982, he bought his first cows. children, Michelle and Ken (Julie); his beloved grandsons, In 1986, together with his brother Ron, his cousin Andrew and Maxwell; his brother, Ron; his sisters, Penny Palmer Traynham and several others, Mike was a founding Lux and Nancy Smith; as well as dozens of cousins, partner in California Pacific Rice Milling, Ltd. (Cal-Pac) nephews, nieces and friends. and served as its President in the mid 1990’s. In 2000, Mike His parents, Adele and Matt LaGrande; his brother, and his son Ken co-founded Sun Valley Rice. Mike served Sam; and his wife, Kristine, preceded Mike in death. as President and CEO until 2006, and has since served as Funeral arrangement will be private. A memorial its Chairman. service will follow later this spring. In Mike’s memory, his Proud of his role as a rice miller, Mike pioneered family suggests supporting a charity of your choice. many innovations and new directions, constantly exhorting his team to see the next possibility. He was active in the USA Rice Millers’ Association, serving To share your family news, send obituaries, as its Chairman in 2006-2008. birth announcements or wedding announcements Mike took an early interest in to the CCA office by calling (916) 444-0845 or advocating for water causes. In the early by emailing them to 1980’s, together with Harold Myers, magazine@calcattlemen.org. Mike chartered a United DC-10 and sold tickets locally to bring an entire

Share your news with CCA!

34 California Cattleman April 2020


William ‘Mike’ Urrutia Mike Urrutia, age 82. passed way on Wednesday, March 11, after a valiant fight with cancer. He was born to Joseph and Nadine Urrutia in Fresno on September 27, 1937. Mike attended Friant Elementary School and then completed two years of high school at Sierra, followed by two years at Madera where he graduated in 1959. He received his bachelor of science degree in Animal Husbandry from the University of California at Davis. In college he made life long friends through the fraternity, Phi Sigma Kappa. He was a member of ROTC followed by service in the Fresno National Guard after Graduation. On returning home, Mike went to work for his father who was a cattleman. Mike immediately bought 57 cows and began his own operation. When his father retired in 1971, Mike took over the entire business. Today Urrutia Ranch runs thousands of heads of cattle in Madera, Merced, and Fresno Counties. He also runs cattle in Nevada and until recently Oregon. Serving on the Madera Co. Farm Bureau and the California Livestock Market were important contributions by this steadfast cattleman. He also served as a director and president of Producers Livestock Marketing Association, and he was chairman of the National Livestock Producers Association from 1993 to 1998. He also served on the National Council of Cooperatives. Closer to home, he served as a charter member of the board of directors for the San Joaquin River Parkway Trust. In 2007 he finished a 16 year term as director for the FresnoMadera Farm Credit Association. All of these appointments were followed by years of dedication to the Tri State Cooperation of Sacramento. His most recent contribution has been to serve on the Central California SPCA board of directors in Fresno. He will always be remembered for his respect to the land

and its resources and to all animals everywhere. In 2008 Mike was named Madera Co. Cattleman of the Year. In 2013 he was again named Cattleman of the Year for the Fresno-Kings Co. Cattlemen’s Association. Mike was preceded in death by his father, Joseph M. Urrutia and his mother, Nadine North Urrutia, and his stepmother, Delores Mitchell. He is survived by a brother, John Urrutia and his partner in life for over 50 years, Georgette P. Andreis. As an expression of sympathy, memorial contributions may be made to the Central California SPCA, 103 S. Hughes Ave., Fresno, CA 93706 or to a charity of the donor’s choice.

SHOULD YOU ORDER THE ANAPLASMOSIS VACCINE?

Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. The killed anaplasmosis vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age from infection and requires a booster given 4 to 6 weeks after the initial vaccination. Find out below if you should order the vaccine!

Do you own cattle?

NO

You don’t need it, but should still support the California Cattlemen’s Association

YES

YES

Do they graze in areas where Anaplasmosis is a problem?

YES

NO

(Consult your local veterinarian to find out)

Do you want to prevent the effects of the disease including severe anemia, weakness, fever lack of appetite, depression, constipation, decreased milk production, jaundice, abortion and possibly death?

NO You don’t need to order it

ORDER TODAY BY CALLING (916) 444-0845! Available in 10 or 50 dose bottles 10-40 doses: $8.50 per dose 50+ doses: $7.50 per dose *10 dose minimum and $10 flat rate shipping

SOLD ONLY TO CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBERS

April 2020 California Cattleman 35


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

18

M i d Va l l e y

Thanks to all our buyers at the annual BCC Bull Sale! We hope to see you again September 4

Join us Sept 17 in Denair for our 29th annual bull sale! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Thank you to our 2020 Red Bluff and Modoc Sale Bull Buyers!

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340

BULLS, FEMALES, EMBRYOS AND SEMEN FOR SALE AT THE RANCH IN LOS MOLINOS

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner (530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

36 California Cattleman April 2020

September 10, 2020


Angus

RAnch

Join us for our annual production sales Annual Bull Sale: Sat., September 1, 2018 in fall 2020: Inaugural Female Sale: Mon., October 15, 2018 Bull Sale • Sept 5 Female Sale • Oct 12

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES! O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

18

M i d Va l l e y

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2020.

O’NEAL RANCH Gerber, CA

— Since 1878—

Join us Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020

for the Performance Plus Angus Bull Sale

O’NEAL RANCH BULLS OFFER THE COMPLETE PACKAGE

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

GROWTH • PERFORMANCE ADAPTABILITY • CARCASS

Thank you to all of our 2019 bull and female buyers!

Join us for our 2020 “PARTNERS FOR PERFORMANCE” PRODUCTION SALES BULL SALE • SEPTEMBER 2 FEMALE SALE • OCTOBER 10 Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Gary & Betsy Cardoza

PO Box 40 • O’Neals, CA 93645 (559) 999-9510

Celebrating Angus Tradition Ssince 1974 April 2020 California Cattleman 37


CHENEY, WA • (916) 417-4199 Contact Clinton Brightwell for assistance marketing or buying your Hereford Cattle! (417) 359-6893 THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2020

CARLWULFF57@GMAIL.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

Thank you for attending the annual TAR bull sale! Join us again in 2020!

(530) 385-1570

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

A FAMILY TRADITION

Thank you to our spring cattle buyers!

Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479 www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

JOIN US SEPT. 3 IN LA GRANGE FOR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

CHAROLAIS Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

38 California Cattleman April 2020

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com


THANK YOU TO ALL OUR 2020 MODOC SALE SUPPORTERS! CONTACT US FOR CATTLE AVAILABLE PRIVATE TREATY OFF THE RANCH

Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

JoinususOct for15, our2018 annual production sale iu Modesto! Join for our annual production sale!

REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Bulls and females available private treaty!

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net

Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

THE DOIRON FAMILY (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results!

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

offering sons of this standout herdsire

POTTERS DISCOVERY C209

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

April 2020 California Cattleman 39


J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

(530) 949-2285

SALE MANAGEMENT

M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM (916) 803-3113

& Semen Distributor

• A.I, CIDR & heat synchronization • Extensive experience • Willing to Travel • Well-versed in dairy & beef pedigrees

JORGE MENDOZA • (530) 519-2678 jmmawss@gmail.com 15880 Sexton Road, Escalon, CA

FARM EQUIPMENT BALE WAGONS

M3 MARKETING SALE MANAGEMENT & MARKETING PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY ORDER BUYING PRIVATE TREATY SALES PRODUCTION SALE RING SERVICE ADVERTISING

Full Service JMM GENETICS A.I. Technician

New Holland self propelled and pull-type models/parts/tires Over 30 years of excellence in ag fencing & animal handling design-build

Christopher L. Hanneken 800-84-FENCE

www.southwestfenceandsupply.com

Ranch Fencing Materials and Accessories & Ranch Supplies

www.runningMgroup.com Monique Hanneken 805-635-4940

sell/buy/deliver/can finance

(208) 880-2889

www.balewagon.com Jim Wilhite, Caldwell, ID 35 Years in the Bale Wagon Business!

REAL ESTATE

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

3300 Longmire Drive• College Station, TX 77845 (800) 768-4066 • (979) 693-0388 fax: (979) 693-7994 e-mail: info@bovine-elite.com

40 California Cattleman April 2020

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

Idaho - Weiser River Ranch

2,103± acre cattle/hunting ranch has 587± irrigated, 3+ miles of river frontage, plus Cove Creek frontage, hunting lodge, 3 homes, hay storage & working corrals. Numerous upgrades to the property. Ranch can support 1,500± Animal Units per grazing season, and has 2 gravel sources for added income. Excellent hunting for waterfowl, game birds, elk and deer. $7,700,000

(208) 345-3163 knipeland.com


RANCHING TAKES GOOD PARTNERS. PARTNER WITH WSR.

Over the past eight years, WSR Insurance Services (WSR) has helped hundreds of CCA members with their Pasture, Range, Forage insurance needs. Last year, CCA expanded its partnership with WSR. In 2020, WSR will continue to partner with CCA to assist members with all their insurance needs. WSR’s commitment to their customers and the cattle industry makes this partnership a win-win for CCA members. Contact WSR now to see what opportunities may exist for you! For more information on the partnership contact WSR’s:

CCA members can benefit from WSR’s competitive pricing and best in the industry customer service. Give WSR a call today and find our what insurance packages may suit your needs at the best price!

From the changing seasons to labor force to government regulations, WSR understands the unique challenges ranchers face and works to provide the best coverage for you and your business.

Available Products: Farm Property and Liability Packages; Auto; Workers Compensation; Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF); Group Health/ Dental/Vision plans and more!

Kevin Hoppin, CIC kevinh@wsrins.com (530) 662-9181

April 2020 California Cattleman 41


Amador Angus Ranch................................................. 36

Genoa Livestock........................................................... 38

Red River Farms........................................................... 37

American Hereford Association................................. 38

Harrell Hereford Ranch............................................... 38

Romans Ranches ......................................................... 19

Animal Health international....................................... 40

HAVE Angus................................................................. 37

Running M Group........................................................ 40

Avila Cattle Co.............................................................. 19

Hogan Ranch................................................................ 37

Bar 6 Charolais.............................................................. 19

Hone Ranch................................................................... 39

Sammis Ranch.............................................................. 37

Bar KD Ranch............................................................... 36

Hufford’s Herefords...................................................... 38

Bar R Angus.................................................................. 36

J-H Feed Inc.................................................................. 40

Bar T Bar Ranch............................................................. 9

Jim Wilhite Bale Wagons............................................. 40

Bianchi Ranches........................................................... 19

JMM Genetics............................................................... 40

Bovine Elite, LLC.......................................................... 40

Jorgensen Ranch........................................................... 19

Broken Box Ranch..................................................19, 38

Kessler Angus................................................................ 37

Southwest Fence and Supply ...................................... 40

Buchanan Angus .......................................................... 36

Knipe Land Company.................................................. 40

Spanish Ranch............................................................... 39

Byrd Cattle Co............................................................... 36

Lambert Ranch............................................................. 39

Stepaside Farms............................................................ 38

Cattlemen’s Livestock Market....................................... 2

Little Shasta Ranch....................................................... 39

Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................. 38

Charron Ranch............................................................. 36

M3 Marketing.............................................................. 40

Teixeira Cattle Co......................................................... 38

Chico State College of Ag............................................ 40

McPhee Red Angus...................................................... 38

Conlin Supply Company, Inc...................................... 25

Morrell Ranches............................................................ 39

Tumbleweed Ranches.................................................. 39

Dal Porto Livestock...................................................... 36

New Generation Supplements.................................... 25

Dixie Valley Angus.................................................43, 36

Nicholas Livestock Co................................................. 19

Donati Ranch................................................................ 36

Noahs Angus Ranch..................................................... 37

EZ Angus Ranch........................................................... 37

O’Connell Ranch.......................................................... 37

Freitas Rangeland improvements............................... 31

O’Neal Ranch................................................................ 37

Fresno State Ag Foundation..................................19, 40

P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co............................................ 39

Western Stockman’s Market........................................ 15

Furtado Angus.............................................................. 37

Pacific Trace Minerals.................................................. 40

Western Video Market................................................... 3

Furtado Livestock Enterprises.................................... 40

Pinenut Livestock Supply............................................ 23

Wraith Scarlett Randolph............................................ 41

Gareth Fisher HDPE Pipe........................................... 31

Pitchfork Cattle Co....................................................... 39

Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................. 38

42 California Cattleman April 2020

Schafer Ranch............................................................... 37 Schohr Herefords.......................................................... 39 Sierra Ranches............................................................... 39 Silveira Bros................................................................... 37 Sonoma Mountain Herefords..................................... 39

Turlock Livestock Auction Yard................................... 7 VF Red Angus............................................................... 38 Vintage Angus Ranch............................................44, 38 Western Charolais Breeders........................................ 19 Western States Angus Association............................. 11


“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Thank you to our 2020 buyers from Snyder Livestock’s ‘Bulls for the 21st Century’ Bull Test Sale: Airola Cattle Co LLC, Angel’s Camp, CA Mori Ranches LLC, Tuscarora Depaoli Ranch, Lovelock, NV Roberti Grandi Ranch, Loyalton, CA Goodwin Ranch, Beckwourth, CA Spear S Cattle, Fallon NV Hunewill Land & Livestock, Wellington, NV T-Bone Angus, Brunswick, Ne Willow Creek Ranch, Susanville, CA

Special thanks to T-bone Angus for believing in our genetics with the $42,500 purchase of the bull test champion Sterling Pacific 904!

STERLING PACIFIC 904 Sire: Hoover No Doubt • MGS: G A R Prophet CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

CW

MARB

RE

$M

$W

$F

$G

$B

+10

+1.8

+90

+154

+19

+68

+1.20

+.76

+68

+82

+101

+81

186

Contact us today to purchase semen on these sires from dixie valley! STERLING ADVANTAGE 809

Connealy Confidence Plus X Connealy Consensus 578B

YON CHATOOGA G246

Yon Chattooga E46 X Yon South Edisto B136

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

+10

-.5

+76

+141

+30

+.81

+12

+1.7

+90

+165

+34

RE

$M

$W

$F

$G

$B

RE

$M

$W

$F

$G

+.89

+73

+89

+127

+66

+193

+.82

+68

+99

+120

+82

CED

$30/UNIT

$30/UNIT

JINDRA STONEWALL Jindra Acclaim X Jindra Double Vision

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

+1.08

+5

+1.9

+73

+142

+34

+.74

$B

RE

$M

$W

$F

$G

$B

+202

+.69

+32

+73

+167

+63

+229

$25/UNIT

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner 8520 5th Ave E., Montague CA 96064

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com


A special “Thank You” from

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH to committed and dedicated buyers

RANCHERIA LAND & LIVESTOCK, BAR KJ ANGUS and REDHOUSE BEEF

Commercial, seedstock and grassfed operations, based in Bakersfield, CA and Chiloquin, OR

Jake Cromley, Debbie Wise, Jennifer & Keith Gardiner

“Rancheria Land & Livestock has been using Vintage Angus bulls for four years. In that time, we have been able to create a feed efficient female with excellent maternal traits and conformation. Vintage Angus bulls have also helped us produce yearlings that perform on our grass fed operation at Red House Beef as well as in the feedlot and grading at 48% Prime. In addition, we have been using females from Vintage Angus to vastly improve the genetics of our registered cattle at Bar KJ Angus, creating an elite seedstock herd. The impressive genetics combined with the excellent customer service we have found at Vintage Angus is why we will continue to come back year after year to purchase bulls for our combined 2000 cow operation.” — Jake Cromley, Ranch Manager

27 th Annual

“Carcass Maker” Bull Sale Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020 LaGrange , CA

44 California Cattleman April 2020

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES • (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

Profile for California Cattleman

April 2020 California Cattleman  

April 2020 California Cattleman  

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