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April 2015

The Sign of Quality, Value and Service Keeps Happy Customers Coming Back

Special FeatureS... GRAP: An In-Depth Examination Calf Health At Weaning April 2015 California Cattleman 1


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April 2015 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Billy Flournoy, Likely FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Mark Lacey, Independence Jack Lavers, Glennville Rich Ross, Lincoln TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Pherigo

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Malorie Bankhead

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Katie Almand

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (916) 897-0550 stevie@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

4 California Cattleman April 2015

Standing Your Ground by CCA Second Vice President Rich Ross

We have academics who help us in countless ways and agencies devoted to helping agriculture. God bless them. But many other agency staff dislike livestock, view all land as subject to a public trust, and hold themselves as empowered to direct your management practices. As a practicing attorney myself, the last 50 years has been spent dealing with them. When a government agent appears, invite them in, offer understanding and some coffee. People fear what they don’t understand and a simple conversation may make everything good. Demanding search warrants and being evasive can result in search warrants and invasive response. That is not to say invite them to search, but a guided tour of something could resolve the question. If there is a concern, it is usually in your best interest to express a desire to be compliant with the law and to invite assistance in achieving compliance. Enforcement actions usually result if there is a perceived lack of interest in compliance. But, seeking compliance requires understanding what you are complying with. You need to ask what specific statute is at issue so you can focus corrective action on its mandates. An agent who is evasive may well lack authority. If they cite authority – check it. Agencies have been reinterpreting the law lately. If you question agency dictates, go higher. CCA can help and so can your legislators. I like to escalate issues to state level legal counsel/the Attorney General’s office to reduce influence by officious intermeddlers in the agencies. In reviewing agency actions there are some fundamental rules to keep in mind: • “The powers of state government are

legislative, executive, and judicial. Persons charged with the exercise of one power may not exercise either of the others except as permitted by this Constitution.” • Only the legislative branch can create regulatory programs. • The executive branch may only implement laws enacted by the legislative branch. • The executive branch may only clarify, define and make specific legislation through regulations adopted pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act (with a few exceptions) and non-APA guidelines, policies & rules are void. • A legislative enactment in California may only deal with a single subject. • All funds spent by a state agency, from whatever source, must be appropriated for a specific use by the legislature. • A state agency cannot enforce federal law; it can only enforce California state law. • CEQA applies to projects to be carried out by state agencies and NEPA applies if there is federal funding. • The grounds upon which an agency acted must be clearly disclosed and cannot be changed as time passes and new justification is discovered. • “Extortion is the obtaining of property from another, with his consent, . . . induced by a wrongful use of force or fear, or under color of official right.” Alone, it is hard to deal with complex regulatory compliance issues. Pooling resources and experiences in an organization like CCA is the best way for us to stand our ground. Belonging helps, participation helps. Steers have limited life spans.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER

APRIL 2015 Volume 98, Issue 4

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE Living as individuals in a diverse society

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 8 CCA works on state wildlife plan VET VIEWS Are your calves ready for weaning?

12

FROM THE SALE RING Northwest sees record sale season

16

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Korean market looks good for U.S. beef

20

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER Should you wean early?

26

CHIMES 28 Agriculture’s finest ladies meet at Harris Ranch

SPECIAL FEATURES

Scrapping GRAP What will summer weather bring? Q&A with California Charolais breeder

10 14 22

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READER SERVICES

Cattlemen’s Report 36 Buyers’ Guide 38 Obituaries 44 Advertisers Index 46

April 2015 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE Without Diversity There Can Be No Harmony by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen Last month as I was preparing for this issue, I found myself in need of some new spring photographs. As such, one morning before work I left home earlier than normal, camera in tow. Not far from my home in Elk Grove is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife refuge that in the spring months is home to some commerical beef cattle and a variety of other species. This time of year, it is not uncommon to see a large number of coastal birds and migrating geese in the area. So I wasn’t surprised upon my arrival to see hundreds of geese resting near the contently grazing cattle. As I started snapping pictures I thought about the claim we in the beef industry make that cattle grazing is good for the environment and. when properly managed, can benefit other species as well. It was fascinating for me to witness how little the cattle and geese acknowledged one another. It was as though both species were of the mutual understanding that they could peacefully coexist without impeding on one another’s needs. While I was reflecting on the symbiotic relationship between the refuge and the cattle, a movement near one of the grazing red cows caught my eye. At first sight, I assumed it was a calf coming out from behind its mother. But after zooming my lens in closer, I realized it was something far different. As a CCA staff member and ranching advocate who has understandably grown quite irritated

6 California Cattleman April 2015

by the mere mention of wild canines existing near livestock populations, you can likely imagine my disgust at that lazy, well-conditioned coyote stalking the cattle (and perhaps the geese) on the refuge. I was fully aware that on a USFWS refuge the coyote was just as protected, if not more so, than the livestock. So I quickly snapped a few photos and went on my way. The next morning the fog in the area was quite dense and was lingering just above the refuge, so I once again stopped to see what kind of photos I might be able to acquire. It didn’t take me long to see that fat coyote once again through my viewfinder. Only this time it wasn’t alone. I watched, amused, as the two coyotes got close to the nose of a mama cow, whose calf was plenty big enough to stand up for itself. After the cow let the two dogs know they had worn out their welcome, they were on their way, meandering thought the herd once again. Now, I recognize that those two coyotes have every right to make a home in the same location as the other species on the refuge and that it is by the good graces (and common sense) of the USFWS that cattle are allowed to graze the property even if only for a limited time. But this experience also gave me a broader understanding of how our society functions as many parts that make up a whole. While we don’t see eye-to-eye with other ranchers on every single issue and we certainly don’t share the

STEVIE IPSEN same views as many other interest groups outside of the ranching community, we are all inhabitants of the same society. We must all live and work amongst all other kinds of interests, some of which are in strong opposition to what we do. We may not get them to see our point of view, as they too feel that what they stand for is a noble and worthy cause. But like the geese, coyotes and cattle on the wildlife refuge, we too can coexist with mutual respect for those around us who might not understand or even appreciate what we do. And when push comes to shove, just like the mama cow, we should take the opportunity to stand up for ourselves and defend what we hold dear. At CCA, your staff and lobbyists are constantly working to garner postive relationships in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., to help further our cause and ensure that ranchers like you can continue to do what you do and coexist with other sectors of society despite the challenges that continue to face your operation.


April 2015 California Cattleman 7


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

ALWAYS AT THE TABLE

CCA Helping to shape swap companion plans by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur In 2005, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) developed a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) for the state of California. California’s SWAP was developed in compliance with the State Wildlife Grants Program enacted by the federal government in 2000, which required states to submit comprehensive wildlife conservation strategies to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in order to obtain federal funding for wildlife conservation. While there were some positive elements to the 2005 SWAP, CCA did have a number of concerns with the plan. For instance, CCA was concerned about statements in the initial SWAP which attributed wildlife habitat loss to livestock grazing, as well as statements which over-emphasized the effects of livestock grazing upon California’s waterways while overlooking wildlife’s impacts upon water quality, to name a few. CDFW is currently working on a 10-year update to SWAP, which it expects to complete late this year. A significant element of the 2015 SWAP will be a series of “companion plans” developed by CDFW with the input of “development team working groups” composed of a diverse group of stakeholders. Companion plans will focus on nine resource and economic areas: agriculture, consumptive and recreational uses, energy development, forests and rangelands, land use planning, transportation planning, tribal lands, water management and marine resources. As required every 10 years by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the update process will allow CDFW to integrate new information and leverage more funding. The CDFW objectives for the update include: • Create a vision for fish and wildlife conservation in California, • Provide an accounting of accomplishments, • Stratify analysis of impacts and stressors by ecoregions,

8 California Cattleman April 2015

• Incorporate climate change impacts and adaptation strategies, • Update species at risk, vulnerable species and species of greatest conservation need, and • Recommend conservation actions consistent with planning documents developed by other agencies. CCA has been invited by CDFW to participate in the development team working groups for two of these resource areas: agriculture and forests and rangelands. Our active participation in these areas will help to ensure that the 2015 SWAP recognizes the benefits that grazing and other ranching practices bestow upon the state’s wildlife populations, and will help ensure that wildlife management does not unduly burden California’s cattle ranchers. Additionally, though CCA is not on the development team working groups for other areas of interest—for instance, land use planning and water management— CDFW has assured stakeholders that “cross-sector conservation issues will be well-integrated amongst natural resource managers and partners,” and CCA will be sure to provide input on all areas of concern to our membership throughout the nine resource and economic areas. The companion plan process is currently in its early stages. A “kickoff call” between CDFW and stakeholders across all nine companion plan areas was held on March 10 to set the framework for companion plan development, but no further action has yet been taken. CDFW anticipates that there will be three more sector-specific meetings for each of the nine resource and economic areas (as well as robust “homework” for the stakeholders between each meeting) before the companion plans are completed late this year. CCA will continue to keep you informed on the development of the SWAP and its companion plans throughout the year. For more information, please contact Kirk in the CCA office.


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A TOP PRIORITY

Grazing Regulatory Action Project continues to be at forefront by CCA Immediate Past President Tim Koopmann, chairman, GRAP adivsory committee

A

fter several years of rumors regarding a statewide rangeland water quality program and after several regional water quality control boards developed specific programs for their geographic jurisdictions, the Grazing Regulatory Action Project (GRAP) was hatched and reared its ugly, malformed shape in early November of 2014. After giving life to GRAP, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) has yet to define and explain what creature they allowed to emerge. The official “birth announcement” came in the form of invitations to selected groups and individuals that allegedly represent a cross section of stakeholders. Stakeholder interests included environmental organizations, grazing and timber harvest interests, academia and research groups, and tribal representatives. CCA was well-represented at the one targeted listening session aimed at industry, with a combination of officers, staff and members in attendance. At the CCA annual meeting in mid-November, the membership developed and approved a policy resolution in

opposition to GRAP, in whatever form it ultimately takes. Following the CCA meeting and the initial focused listening sessions—and amidst valid concerns regarding the definition of, need for and purpose of a statewide GRAP— the SWRCB scheduled three larger-capacity public meetings to allow stakeholder input. Meetings were held in San Luis Obispo, Redding and Bishop and attendance from the grazing community and CCA members was overwhelming, necessitating an additional afternoon session at both San Luis Obispo and Redding. During this time frame, key CCA members and staff were taking advantage of opportunities to speak individually with board members and staff from both the SWRCB and Regional Water Quality Control Boards (RWQCBs). CCA was also instrumental in developing a joint GRAP Advisory Committee, along with the California Farm Bureau Federation (CFBF) and the California Wool Growers Association (CWGA). One of the most significant recent developments on the GRAP front is the information which was provided at the 3rd Annual Rustici Rangeland Science Symposium, hosted by the University of California (UC) Cooperative Extension at UC Davis March 3 and 4. The symposium was attended by roughly a dozen staff members from the SWRCB and RWQCBs, including the executive officer of the Lahontan RWQCB, which is the regional board taking the lead on GRAP. Their presence was extremely important at an event where California’s foremost rangeland water quality specialists discussed the state of the science and ranchers, agency officials and others shared real-world experiences about the ranching community’s proactive efforts at stewardship of our state’s rangelands and waterways. The first day of the Rustici Symposium began with three presentations on the state of rangeland water quality science. GRAP formed the backdrop of the discussion, with Ken Tate, Ph.D., noting that “this conversation is now in the context of the proposed Grazing Regulatory Action Project.” Tate kicked off the symposium with a presentation broadly focused on rangeland water quality planning, education and science. Referencing recent top-notch research done by his colleague Leslie Roche, Ph.D., and graduate student D.J. Eastburn, Tate delved into the data the SWRCB has used to justify GRAP. The SWRCB has claimed that they need to regulate grazing because grazing is “potentially” linked to the impairment of 122 waterways in the state. The research presented by UCCE demonstrated two particularly interesting points. First, that the waterways potentially-impaired by grazing exist Image courtesy of Leslie Roche and D.J. Eastburn, UC Davis

10 California Cattleman April 2015


in small clusters in just a few areas of the state, suggesting that a statewide regulation isn’t the solution. Secondly, Tate noted that some of the waterways are impaired from causes not typically attributable to grazing, such as high levels of salinity. Rob Atwill, DVM, Ph.D., provided a presentation on pathogens, which are the cause of a number of the impairments listed by SWRCB as potentially-related to grazing. Since November our industry has told the SWRCB that wildlife are a much greater culprit of pathogen impairments than our cattle, and Atwill’s research backed that up with hard data. According to Atwill’s presentation, wildlife contributes much greater levels of those pathogens that are harmful to human health than do cattle. Randy Dahlgren, Ph.D., followed up with a presentation on nutrient loading, demonstrating that background sources of nutrients already present in nature—such as nitrogen found in sedimentary rock—often exceed SWRCB standards. Cattle grazing can hardly be blamed for water quality impairments when the state’s water quality standards are already violated from naturally-occurring sources. On the second day, presentations focused on ranch applications that work to provide water quality enhancements. I had the opportunity to make a brief presentation on my experience as the rangeland manager of a 40,000-acre grazed watershed that provides drinking water to over 2.6 million residential customers. In 1997, following a pathogenic outbreak of human disease in the mid-west that was prevalent in the news media, my water agency began the process of eliminating grazing from watershed lands. There was no history of human infectious cases attributable to cattle grazing, constant water testing provided no indicators of dangerous levels of pathogenic organisms and the managed grazing on the watershed provided no direct contact with the water storage reservoirs. Despite the facts, we developed a few additional management protocols that provided a perception of risk reduction, and in combination with several well-attended field trips were able to illustrate that managed cattle grazing provided numerous benefits to the natural watershed resources and posed no water quality risks. Though the SWRCB has yet to “scrap GRAP” as I first termed it during the San Luis Obispo listening session, it

is clear that our active opposition to GRAP has not been in vain. Between San Luis Obispo and the later listening session in Bishop, the SWRCB significantly toned down their rhetoric on GRAP, and in the past months staff and members of the SWRCB have suggested that GRAP is not a high priority. Members of the Water Board have also signaled that they’ve heard our industry’s objections loud and clear. That said, there is still significantly more that needs to be done on this front. Even if our industry succeeds in convincing the SWRCB to “scrap GRAP,” we are likely to be confronted with future regulatory efforts aimed at addressing water quality issues perceived as being “potentially related” to grazing. This month, CCA is taking a few more steps to ensure that we’re well-equipped to address this regulatory threat to our industry. On April 3, CCA and Prather Ranch are hosting a ranch tour near Redding which will be attended by SWRCB member Tam Doduc and staff of both the SWRCB and the Central Valley RWQCB. I know that as we attend this ranch tour, we will have many opportunities to share our thoughts with the key GRAP leaders. The tour’s purpose is to demonstrate to regulators the realities of ranch management, just some of the proactive steps toward water quality management voluntarily undertaken by ranchers and to point out some of the alternative sources of water quality impairments not attributable to grazing. Additionally, attendees of the ranch tour will discuss a vision for approaching grazing and water quality issues moving forward. Additionally, the Joint CCA/CFBF/CWGA GRAP Advisory Committee, which I am honored to chair, will meet April 6 to address our industry’s approach to this issue moving forward. The purpose of the meeting will be not only to discuss our organizations’ next steps regarding GRAP, but also to outline a long-term strategy for dealing with real and perceived grazing issues related to water quality, as this is an issue our industry is likely to persistently face in the future even if we defeat the current GRAP. CCA staff, officer team and members have exhibited a strong opposition to GRAP. We as of yet have no clear definition or description of what monster GRAP was intended to grow into, however we will continue to provide science and facts that we hope will lead to the early demise of this unwelcome and unneeded action.

April 2015 California Cattleman 11


VET VIEWS

WEANING PREPARATION

are your calves ready to be on their own? by Russ Daly, DVM, extension veterinarian, South Dakota State University One fact on which cattlemen, veterinarians and animal scientists can agree is that of all the events in most calves’ lives, weaning is the most stressful of them all. If a calf can weather this stress unscathed, they have cleared a major hurdle to a productive future in the feedlot or as a replacement in the breeding herd. Prolonged stress in a calf ’s life results in elevated levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, in his bloodstream. High cortisol levels affect many parts of the immune system. The reproductive capability for lymphocytes – the white blood cells that produce antibodies or kill infected body cells – becomes limited. Activity of lung macrophages – the white blood cells that engulf germs in the depths of the lungs – is reduced. The immune response shifts away from actions that combat viral infections. In other words, a calf undergoing prolonged stress is now more susceptible to bacteria and viruses that previously were not problems. Add in the effects of low energy intake and dehydration due to feed and water disruptions, and the physical conditions are just right for illnesses like shipping fever (Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex). Preparing a calf for weaning can therefore be broken into two

12 California Cattleman April 2015

different goals: reducing stress and preparing the immune system for what stress might still occur. While stress reduction at weaning is usually thought of in terms of the actual weaning process itself, how the calf is treated pre-weaning can also help. Making sure stressful procedures are completed well before weaning is an example. Three to four weeks prior to weaning is a good time to work cattle in preparation for weaning. This allows the calf to recover from stressful procedures before the next stress – weaning – occurs. If not yet done, bull calves should be castrated at pre-weaning processing. The calf benefits the most when castration is performed as early as possible: shortly after birth or at branding time is better than waiting until pre-weaning. Likewise, if calves need to be dehorned, it should be done at pre-weaning processing time. This timing allows enough time for healing prior to weaning. In addition, the stress of the procedures is diminished when the calf can reunite with his mother. Castration and dehorning are less stressful at pre-weaning time compared to at weaning. Stresses are considered additive: cortisol levels are higher and take longer to recover when multiple stressful events (like castration plus dehorning plus weaning) occur at once. An increasing number of veterinarians are addressing pain relief and prevention as additional measures to combat stress. Lidocaine

nerve blocks and anti-inflammatory medications in conjunction with castration and dehorning are examples. Even when we do everything in our power to eliminate stress on calves, these animals will still face some stress and immune suppression in the days to come. For those reasons, it’s necessary to bolster the immune system through vaccinations. The three to four week interval prior to weaning will afford calves enough time to respond to vaccines such as those against respiratory viruses (e.g. IBR, BRSV, BVDV, and PI-3) and bacteria (e.g. Mannheimia hemolytica). This is especially true when calves have had previous vaccinations (at branding or turnout time, for example). When a calf sees a vaccine for the second time (compared to the first time), the immune response is quicker and stronger. If pre-weaning processing is the time of first vaccination, it may be necessary to provide a booster dose around the time of weaning. The choice of pre-weaning vaccines should be discussed with a veterinarian. Some modifiedlive vaccines will caution against vaccinating calves nursing pregnant mothers if the mothers have not been recently vaccinated. While most veterinarians have not noted problems with this practice, every operation and situation is different, so veterinary input is important. The timing of preweaning processing may also be good for other procedures such as implanting and deworming, especially when calves will be weaned and backgrounded at home. Regardless of whether calves will be kept or marketed, reducing stress and preparing the immune system prior to weaning are things we can control and will result in a healthy transition through weaning.


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EARLY WINTER STORMS TEASE & TAUNT RANCHERS ON WEST COAST by Meteorologist Brian Bledsoe Some of you may have heard me talk about the Pacific Decadel Oscillation Phases (PDO) or have read something from me talking about the PDO. It is such an important driver in terms of long range weather in the Western U.S., and for that matter, the whole United States. Graphic 1 below shows the different states of the PDO. The positive or warm phase shows warmer than normal water off the West Coast. The negative or cool phase shows cooler than normal water off the West Coast of the U.S. Once the PDO gets locked into its 20- to 30-year phase (usual length of duration of a particular phase), it is tough to get a sustained “detour” to the other phase. However, during the past year we have seen such a “detour.” While they are rare, this has been a very important “detour.” Roughly in 2005 to 2007, the PDO flipped from a warm/positive phase that dominated from 1978, to a cold/ negative phase. Table 1 to the right shows the state of the PDO since

2005. I have italicized and put in bold face all of the negative numbers. You can see that since the full flip occurred in 2007, there have been far more negative numbers. When the PDO is negative, history suggests that we see more frequent and longer lasting La Nina episodes. While La Nina episodes usually act to create, maintain,and expand drought conditions in the Southwestern U.S., it also acts to bring significant moisture to Northern California and northward. So, is it any wonder that drought has been a problem for us, during the past several years? Back to that important “detour.” In January 2014, the PDO started taking a “detour” from the prevailing and long-term negative/cool phase. Since September, the PDO has not only been warm/positive, but has been record setting in December and January. I firmly believe that this positive/ warm phase of the PDO is very

GRAPHIC 1. PACIFIC DECADEL OSCILLATION PHASE

Cool Phase Anomoly

Warm Phase Anomoly

14 California Cattleman April 2015

much responsible for creating the strong blocking high pressure that has contributed to California’s drought. However, it has also been partly responsible for a very wet December and a very wet first half of February. Check out the total moisture for the last six months. It has definitely been an extreme weather pattern and the problem is that it has been feast or famine when it comes to the moisture. It has not been consistent or evenly distributed in time or space. On the West Coast, there are clearly areas that have seen rain and those that have not. Through the end of February, the Drought Monitor clearly showed which areas are still having the biggest problems. The whole state of California is still an issue for long-term drought. However, if you look at a different product from the Drought Monitor suite, you get a different perspective. The “Short-Term Drought Indicator” shows which areas have been seeing the moisture recently. We all know that California is still struggling in terms

TABLE 1. PACIFIC DECADAL OSCILLATION

Negative = Cold

Positive = Warm


of long-term moisture. A drought of this magnitude doesn’t end quickly or easily. That being said, as ranchers, you are in a lot better shape now than they were last year because rangelands have seen some moisture, unlike the winter of 2013/ early 2014. As you are well aware though, farmers and municipalities are still in for a very long year as water storage is a dire situation. So what is the fix? Well, I think one of those fixes for the state will be a pattern that continues to favor moisture in the Western U.S. I still think that the next few months will be favorable for helping alleviate the drought. The long-term fix is returning the Pacific back closer to “normal,” so it doesn’t have the propensity to develop the large blocking high pressure that got us in here in the first place. I think the PDO will remain in this positive/warm mode for the next several months. Therefore, there will still be extremes in the pattern. One side of those extremes will benefit us with moisture. However, the other side will also hurt us with periods of drought. This is exactly why I stressed “cautious optimism” at the annual CCA/CCW Convention in November. The pattern is far from fixed, but does offer us much better moisture than last year. As ranchers, you know all too well that patience and preparation will get you through this.

MAP 1. SHORT-TERM DROUGHT INDICATOR: FEB. 21, 2015

MAP 2. U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR READING: MARCH 17, 2015

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FROM THE SALE RING THE END OF THE SPRING BULL SALE TRAIL work isn’t work when you enjoy what you do by Matt Macfarlane, California Cattleman Representative, M3 Marketing

As I write this column, I have just returned from what is indisputably the highest-averaging bull sale season for beef producers in the Pacific Northwest. From February 5 through March 16, I have traveled just over 12,000 miles, spent more than 30 nights in hotel rooms, met both new and familiar faces, evaluated some outstanding cattle, eaten some great pre-sale lunches and more convenient store meals than I care to admit. To some of you, that many miles on commercial and private flights and in the driver seat of my pickup may sound exhausting — and it was — but, for me it has also been a pleasure to work with outstanding seedstock producers and help market the product of their hark work and commitment to the beef industry. It was also an honor to be trusted with the task of helping buy bulls for order buyers in California and throughout the West. Whom these producers choose to help staff their sales is not a decision that they, nor I take lightly. For years prior to each production sale, these producers painstakingly take precautions and steps and make breeding decisions toward producing the best bulls and genetics that commercial producers are looking for. The energy that producers put into the cattle they market at their production sales is what drives to give them my best effort in finding buyers for their bulls and representing their sale and operation to the best of my ability. Every time I get hired on to help work a production sale, I am reminded of their faith they are putting into not just me, but also into this publication, to help attract buyers to their sale events. That said, it is with sincere 16 California Cattleman April 2015

congratulations that I praiseproducers across California, Nevada, Idaho, Oregon and Washington for the huge success they experienced this year in marketing their purebred cattle. It wasn’t just the end result the sale averages - that made these sales successful; though the averages were impressive to say the least. The number of buyers and supporters who showed up to these sales despite the dwindling beef cow numbers in the U.S. was exciting and a reminder that they beef industry is alive and well, and that I am privileged to be a small part of it. In speaking with commercial and purebred producers both in and out of California, there seem to be many who are concerned that live cattle prices like this can’t be sustainable forever, and they may be right to an extent. But, having witnessed the quality of bulls that I have seen so far this year as well as last fall, I am confident that as long as ranchers continue to be selective in their breeding decisions and only sell the bulls that meet high standards, we will see high bull sale prices for the foreseeable future. Likewise, as long as producers are retaining their best heifers and raising solid calves, auction market and on-the-video sale prices will stay favorable. Will we continue to see $3,000 to $4,000 heifer prices forever? I highly doubt it. But my view is that as long as consumers are eating beef and producers are progressive in meeting their demands, the beef industry as a whole will reap the benefits. Of course there will always be environmental and regulatory factors that are not in our control, as California producers know all too

MATT MACFARLANE well. But if you as producers continue to work through the challenges and evolve your operations to meet those challenges, you will be in this business for a long time to come. Once again, a thank you to all of our bull sale clients and buyers who continue to demonstrate faith in the marketing job we do for you. I am excited about what the future holds and hope you are as well. It has been a great spring reacquainting with each of you and those you hold dear. With families being such an integral part of this business, I would be remiss if I didn’t recognize the most important people in my life, my twin teenage girls, Mazie and Mackenzie, who both make measurable sacrifices on my behalf during spring and fall sale seasons. As much fun as it is to be on the road with clients, I always look forward to the slower pace that lies ahead of this time of year and the upcoming softball season, when I am reminded once again of the importance of what really matters. A motto I have come to appreciate is, “work to live, not live to work. “ Fortunately, for me — and for you as producers — we love what we do so most of the time it doesn’t feel like work at all.


“My three GREATEST LOVES are my family, THE LIVESTOCK and the land.” —Tom Talbot, UC Davis ’75, Talbot Ranch, Bishop

When cattle rancher and veterinarian Tom Talbot returned to his hometown after graduating from UC Davis, he found joy in working with animals in the place he knew best. “This work is so much more than a job,” Tom says. “We love where we live and the people we serve. I couldn’t have asked for more than the life I have.” UC Davis understands that kind of dedication. We’ve partnered with experts like Tom to pioneer animal health, veterinary medicine and disease surveillance for more than a century, protecting animals and land in the state we love. Find out more at OneCalifornia.ucdavis.edu.

Our College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and School of Veterinary Medicine are educating leaders in agriculture, health and sustainability.

April 2015 California Cattleman 17


Senate Remains Involved in 2015 Dietary Guidelines Process On March 11, the Senate actively maintained their oversight role in the process of crafting the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. At the Senate Appropriations Agriculture Subcommittee hearing, Chairman Moran (R-Kan.) asked the Committee’s witness, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Hamburg, what role the FDA has in the process of writing the Dietary Guidelines, urging the Commissioner to maintain the focus on nutrition and health science. Senator Daines (R-Mont.) reinforced the Chairman’s sentiment asking Commissioner Hamburg why environmental approaches were incorporated into the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s report, especially in light of Congressional language to the contrary; to which the Commissioner

assured the senator that the secretaries will base their decisions on the science of nutrition and health. Additionally in mid-march, 30 senators sent a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Burwell and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack expressing their concern with the Advisory Committee’s recommendation to remove “lean meat” from a healthy dietary pattern and request an extension of the 45-day comment period. The letter pointed specifically to the Committee’s conclusion that “dietary patterns with positive health benefits are also described as lower in red and processed meat,” noting that the statement is “misleading as it suggests that current American diets include too much meat.” This is not only misleading as

current evidence shows Americans are not overconsuming meat based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, but it is confusing as the Committee favorably reviewed dietary patterns much higher in the consumption of meat, like the Mediterranean diet. The letter also expressed concern with the Committee’s disregard of peer-reviewed and published scientific evidence on the role of lean red meats as part of a healthy diet and the expansion of their purview beyond nutrition and health research into topics such as sustainability. The comment period on the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s recommendations is currently open through May 8. Cattle producers can review sample comments and submit their comments online at www.BeefUSA. org.

foster Joins Western Video as Video Operations Manager Western Video Market, Inc. (WVM), the second largest video cattle auction in the United States, based in Cottonwood, recently announced that Holly Foster will be joining the company as Video Operations Manager. In her new role, Foster will eventually oversee sale production as long-time marketing and production manager Kevin Devine will be reducing his daily participation after more than 20 years with WVM. Foster will also be combining her past experience in public relations and cattle marketing to support the efforts of the company’s large network of regional representatives to effectively market consignors’ cattle. “Holly brings a wonderful set of skills and experience to Western Video Market; we look forward to the added benefit she’s going to bring to our customers and our company,” Devine said. Foster is a fourth generation cattle 18 California Cattleman April 2015

producer, who is actively involved in a family-run cow-calf operation in northern California. She has been working for IMI Global, a division of Where Food Comes From, Inc. since 2009, where she helped develop the company’s third-party verification business in the western region. She has also worked as a public relations consultant for several agricultural organizations and agricultural companies since 1998. Foster received her undergraduate degree from California State University, Chico, majoring in animal science and minoring in business administration. She holds a master’s of science degree from Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., in the Beef Industry Leadership program. Prior to launching her own communications consulting business, Foster worked for the California Beef Council as director of public relations for five years. She has also worked as

an associate editor for Vance Publishing Corporation’s Drovers CattleNetwork and as managing editor of HOLLY FOSTER Farm Journal’s Beef Today magazine. Integrally involved in the beef industry, Foster is also the chairman of CCA’s Beef Quality Assurance Committee and works to educate producers throughout the West on the importance of the BQA and its role in value-added premiums at market time as well as its importance in public perception of the beef industry as a whole.


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April 2015 California Cattleman 19


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD PROMISING OUTLOOK FOR U.S. BEEF EXPORTS TO KOREA by Erin Borror, economist, U.S. Meat Export Federation this year to 246,000 metric tons (mt). enjoyment of U.S. beef. U.S. beef exports to South Korea In recent years, Korea’s domestic The cattle herd is expected to bottom got off to a slow start in 2015, due in production situation has had a large part to the backlog at the West at 2.6 million head in 2017, then begin significant impact on import volumes. Coast ports, which are used for almost to rebound in 2018 as producers retain Korea’s Hanwoo beef cattle inventory all meat exports to Asia. But exports females. Imports are expected to had increased from 1.41 million head to Korea are coming off a strong continue to increase, reflecting tighter in 2002 to 3.06 million head in 2012. performance in 2014, when value domestic supplies but also an increase But the herd contracted to 2.76 million in consumption of red meat. This is increased 39 percent to a record $847 in 2014, down 5 percent year-overmillion, and several indicators point due in part to lingering concerns about year. From early 2012 to May 2013, toward continued growth this year. radioactive contamination in seafood the Korean government adopted a Korea relies on imported beef for imports from Japan. program to cull 200,000 head of cattle more than half of its consumption, The U.S. dollar has strengthened to alleviate the oversupply situation, as about 23 pounds per person, and dramatically against major importer Korean consumers are only inclined to the U.S. accounted for 35 percent and competitor currencies, making purchase a certain volume of highof Korea’s beef import volume last U.S. beef relatively more expensive, priced domestic beef. The Korean year. Prior to the BSE-related ban including the Japanese yen (-18 percent government has continued to support imposed in December 2003, the U.S. year-over-year), the Mexican peso the decrease in numbers, partly was Korea’s dominant beef supplier, (-17 percent), the Canadian dollar (-14 as adjustment to recently adopted accounting for 68 percent of imports, percent), and the Australian dollar free trade agreements with the U.S., and the U.S. has been regaining market (-18 percent). But the Korean won has Australia and Canada, which over time share for the past seven years. remained relatively resilient, declining will reduce import duties from 40 Although it has not been easy, just 5 percent. The Korea-U.S. free percent to zero. In 2014, Korea still Korean consumers have again realized trade agreement, implemented in 2012, had 99,285 cattle-producing farms. But the high quality, consistency and will continue to lower duties on U.S. this was a 16 percent decrease from affordability of U.S. beef. The U.S. beef each year until all imports will be 2013, as producers with less than 50 dominates the rib category of Korea’s duty-free in 2026. The tariff this year is head disappear and the number of imports, including bone-in short 29.3 percent, compared to 34.6 percent producers with more than 100 head ribs, chuck short ribs and rib fingers, on Australia beef, as the Koreaincreases. Those producing the highest while Australia is the largest supplier Australia FTA was just implemented in grade Hanwoo have been profitable, of loins, shoulder clods, briskets and December 2014. And U.S. beef is still showing Korea’s preference for highly round cuts. relatively affordable when compared to marbled beef. U.S. beef is a popular item for domestic Hanwoo, with carcass prices Following a 4 percent decrease in Korean barbecue dishes. To get an in early March averaging $6.88 per 2014, Korea’s 2015 beef production is idea of the cuts and concepts, you can expected to be down another 7 percent pound. download the U.S. Meat Export Federation’s Korean barbecue app on your smart phone by searching FIGURE 1. KOREA’S ANNUAL BEEF AND VARIETY MEATS IMPORTS “USMEF Korean BBQ.” As customers across the world – and especially in Asia – rely more and more on their smart phones, USMEF has developed applications and websites to educate them about U.S. beef in each of our unique markets. USMEF-Korea also recently launched American Steak Week, as middle meats have sparked renewed interest in Korea’s highly competitive foodservice industry. These features help elevate the overall image of U.S. beef, as the focus of USMEF’s marketing efforts shifts from safety to the high quality, versatility and 20 California Cattleman April 2015


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Charolais Breeder Answers Valuable Questions for Commerical Beef Producer Charolais breeder Fred Jorgensen, Orland, along with his wife Toni, runs about 60 mother cows on 70 acrews of irrigated and dry pasture. Each year, Jorgenson sells about 15 top quality bulls private treaty and through Snyder Livestock’s “Bulls for the 21st Century” Bull Test and Sale. Known for breeding some of the best Charolais bulls in the region, CCA staff recently spoke with Jorgensen about what the Charolais breed has to offer the commerical beef producer, how the breed has changed over the years and how he has worked to evolved the genetics of his own herd. Q. What drew you to raising Charolais cattle? A. I was raised in Sonoma County and have always been involved in agriculture. My grandmother and grandfather indivuually came to the U.S. from Sweden and after meeting and marrying, moved to Orland and bought 20 acres. I moved to their place in 1977 with an interest in the dairy industry. Because I didn’t have the capital needed to start in the dairy business, I chose to work with beef cows. My wife Toni was raised on a cow-calf operation in Modoc County so we helped raise a few Red Angus bulls for her family before venturing out to Charolais cattle. I work in the dairy sector for All West-Select Sires and have a great deal of interest in genetics. When Byrd Cattle Company, Red Bluff, was selling their Charolais cows, I thought it would be a good opportunity to work with a different breed of cattle and see what I could do with them. I’ve been very successful in A.I. breeding cows and have seen our numbers and quality grow significantly. Even when we have had to sell off cows due to drought, our successful A.I. program has helped us rebuild to a level we are very proud of. I am always interested in a challenge so I liked the prospect of trying something new. I am glad I took advantage of that opportuniy. Q. What are the benefits of using Charolais bulls in a commercial herd?

22 California Cattleman April 2015

A. For commercial cattlemen, Charolais bulls offer a variety of benefits. For me, the biggest advantage is the unique heterosis blend when Charolais bulls are used on English-bred cattle. The continental influence really pulls through and the two complement each other very well. As most beef producers know, Charolais calves wean heavier and gain very well on feed. Through selective breeding decisions, the right Charolais bulls can bring significant improvement to a calf crop. Q. Charolais cattle have been considered to be a more aggressive breed. How has that reputation changed over the years? A. I admit, the Charolais breed does have that reputation. I have had some close calls with Charolais cattle. That said, I have had close calls with other breeds of cattle as well. To say Charolais cattle are mean isn’t really accurate, all cattle can be aggressive. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


California

Charolais Breeders

AvIlA CATTle CO. Mike, Char, Mikie, Bobby & Bailey Avila 19760 Amen lane, Cottonwood, CA (530) 347-1478 • cavila1956@att.net

Bulls sell at the Red Bluff Bull Sale and off the ranch. Select females for sale private treaty.

BIANCHI RANCHeS Robert, Chris & Erica Bianchi 6810 Canada Rd. Gilroy, CA (408) 842-5855 • (408) 842-4945 Fax (408) 804-3133 Robert’s cell Bianchiranches@aol.com

Bulls and females available at the ranch. Call early for best selection. Watch for bulls at leading fall sales as well.

Charolais POUNDS =PROFIT

BROkeN BOx RANCH Jerry and Sherry Maltby PO Box 760, Williams, CA

(530) 681-5046 Cell • (530) 473-2830 Office BBR@citlink.net • www.brokenboxranch.com Bulls available at the 2014 Black Gold Bull Sale, Sept. 11, in Colusa, or off the ranch.

FReSNO STATe AGRICUlTURe FOUNDATION California State University, Fresno

2415 e. San Ramon, Fresno, CA Randy Perry (559) 278-4793 http://jcast.fresnostate.edu/beef/ Purebred herds/bull and heifer development Martin Castro (559) 380-7442 Commerical Cattle: Anthony Suniga (209) 840-9541 Bulls available each June during our private treaty bull sale, as well as leading fall sales.

JORGeNSeN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen 25884 Mollier, Ave, Orland, CA (530) 865-7102

D

ifferences do exist in the marketability or value of different beef breeds and breed crosses. We don’t disagree that black-hided calves are some of the most marketable in the industry. However, we believe strongly in the value of crossbreeding and the benefits of heterosis or hybrid vigor.

Crossbred calves are more vigorous at birth, they are more resistant to disease and they have increased performance levels or weight gain. In addition, crossbred beef cows have higher fertility levels, they are also more disease resistant and they are superior in terms of longevity, an often overlooked but very economically important trait in a beef herd. These combined factors result in the generation of more total Nicoli Nicholas 6522 Vernon Rd., Nicolaus, CA • (916) 455-2384 pounds of beef being produced from a commercial cowherd when crossbreeding is utilized. Breeding Charolais cattle for 54 years, 150 bulls Top quality bulls available at the ranch private treaty.

NICHOlAS lIveSTOCk CO. available private treaty in 2014.

ReIS lIveSTOCk Tony, Mary, Nathan & Nicole Reis

648 Cowee Ave., Gridley, CA 95948 (530) 846-3940 • (530) 682-0305 reis@digitpath.net • www.reislivestock.com Cattle for sale private treaty at the ranch.

We believe that Charolais bull are the logical and best choice to use on the Angusdominated commerical beef cowherd that currently exists in this country. They will infuse the benefits of heterosis and produce the “smokies” and “buckskins” that have been popular with cattle feeders and packers for decades

. Look for these California Charolais breeders from throughout the state as your source for Charolais genetics available off the ranch or at leading California and Nevada sales. April 2015 California Cattleman 23


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22 Disposition is both learned an inherited. You can take a gentle cow and make her wild but its pretty near impossible to take a wild cow and make her gentle. The mean ones don’t stick around on our place and that way our cows with better dispositions breed for better dispositions. I have one cow who gets mad if you don’t pet her when you are out in the pasture with her. In an area with an abundance of coyotes, when the coyotes are active, the cows are more alert and more protective. I notice their level of aggression heightened during that time. In cases like that, I think it is good that they are a little more aggressive sometimes. Charolais mothers are very underrated, they are excellent mothers. Q. Charolais bulls are historically known for higher birth weights. What do you do as a producer to breed for more moderate bulls and bring birth weights down. A. Charolais have made a lot of progress in birthweight.I have brought my birthweights down about 5 pounds in the past 10 years. That is a pretty dramatic change in a short time period. I think that is proof that you can make a lot of progress by knowing genetics and making selective breeding decisions. In my experience, unless people are weighing their calves, they are often bigger than they think they are. A calf you think may be 50 pounds is actually probably 70 pounds. In order to keep birthweights down and make them more accurate, producers need to do a precise job in taking correct weight and keeping accurate records. Proper precautions also need to be taken during gestation. If you feed too much you can end up with bigger calves. It’s also a management issue not strictly a genetic factor. Q. If someone were considering introducing more heterosis into their herd what benefits could Charolais offer over other breeds. A. We’ve already briefly mentioned heavier weaning weights, which benefits the producer at marketing and benefits the feeder and packer down the line. Charolais cattle are also more heat tolerate than some other darker breeds, which is an advantage to producers here in California, especially in our area. Some breeders think that if they use Angus cows and Charolais bulls they can get growth from the Charolais and traits like marbling from the Angus cows, but I try to put some marbling into my Charolais bulls so breeders see improvement from both sides. When you rely on the cow to make up for something the bull lacks, you can put

24 California Cattleman April 2015

the cow at an unfair disadvantage. Bull producers from all breeds need to do their part in making sure the bulls they produce offer a balance of all traits in order to give buyers the maximum benefit. Q. In recent years, we have seen Charolais-influenced calves perform well on the video and on the rail. What are your predictions for the future market for Charolais cattle? A. An advantage for the cattle buyer is they know by looking at a load of calves if they have Charolais influence. And fortunately, those buyers know they can count on Charolais-influenced calves to perform well. For years, we have seen straight black-hided calves bring a premium at sale time, but buyers have come to see that while straight black may generally perform well, they don’t know what traits those straight black calves carry. When buyers see smokey colored calves, they know there is Charolais in them and can rest assured the calves will carry they heavy-weaning, high-gaining Charolais traits they are looking for. Feeders are very confident in them from a uniformity standpoint and when buyers know they can get more bang for their buck, they will return back for those calves time after time. That is a trend I expect to see continue. Q. What advice would you give someone who was interested in raising bulls? A. A fellow cattleman who I have a lot of respect for has told me, “You’ve got to pay your dues.” Meaning just because you raise a few good bulls one season doesn’t mean you have automatically made it. You have to stick it out, stay on top of trends and return with good bulls year after year. We have had these white cows the last 10 years and it’s just been in the last two years, we have had a lot of compliments and success and I think all our diligence in breeding is really starting to pay off. You need to ask questions and be humble enough to take suggestions. It’s rewarding when someone returns to you to buy bulls again because you know they were happy with the product and you are reassured you are doing a pretty good job. Q. What do you like most about being a Charolais breeder? A. I like the cows. I like the challenge. I like being different. It’s pretty simple for me. In my area, if I were smart I would plant trees but I wouldn’t get the challenge and without the challenge, I wouldn’t witness the change. I like being able to see the improvement and when you are successful it is rewarding.


GOV. ANNOUNCES LEGISLATIVE PLANS FOR DEALING WITH DROUGHT CRISIS On March 19, Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr. joined Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León, Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, and Republican Leaders Sen. Bob Huff and Assemblymember Kristin Olsen to announce legislation to help local communities cope with the ongoing, devastating drought. The $1 billion package will expedite bond funding to make the state more resilient to the disastrous effects of climate change and help ensure that all Californians have access to local water supplies. “This unprecedented drought continues with no signs yet of letting up,” said Governor Brown. “The programs funded by the actions announced today will provide direct relief to workers and communities most impacted by these historic dry conditions.” The legislation includes more than $1 billion for local drought relief and infrastructure projects to make the state’s water infrastructure more resilient to extreme weather events. The package accelerates $128 million in expenditures from the Governor’s budget to provide direct assistance to workers and communities impacted by drought and to implement the Water Action Plan. It also includes $272 million in Proposition 1 Water Bond funding for safe drinking water and water recycling and accelerates $660 million from the Proposition 1e for flood protection in urban and rural areas. “I want to thank the Governor, the pro Tem and the Speaker for inviting us today. We were briefed on this proposal just this morning, and so far it sounds like a good approach. We need to review the legislation in detail but it seems like a reasonable start,” said Senate Republican Leader Bob Huff. “Republicans have consistently said that storage is essential for providing a reliable water source to all of California for future generations. The Prop 1 water bond that was passed last year is a critical step forward in meeting the needs for California’s future. There’s no question California’s drought crisis has worsened, as once again we’ve experienced a dry winter. With the hot summer months approaching, it’s incumbent on all Californians to be responsible with how they use water. It’s critical that we act now.” “This emergency drought relief is an important band aid,” said Assembly Republican Leader Kristin Olsen. “We must move beyond temporary fixes. Projects to increase water supply have been hung up in government red tape for decades. I’m glad today we are making decisions that help people and look to us all to take real actions on long-term projects so emergency actions are no longer needed.” The Sierra Nevada snowpack, which Californians rely on heavily during the dry summer months for their water needs, is at a near record low. Readings were 5.5 inches (20 percent of average) and 5 inches (22 percent) respectively. Only in 1991 has the water content of the snow been lower.

Taking action to further strengthen water conservation in the state, the State Water Resources Control Board on Tuesday voted to expand and extend an emergency regulation to prohibit certain water use, such as washing down sidewalks, and create a minimum standard for outdoor irrigation restrictions by urban water suppliers. While CCA recognizes that the water situation is again in dire straights and that ensuring there is an adequate water supply for California’s large population is important, CCA will closely monitor this water legislation to ensure that it impacts ranchers and agriculture as minimally as possible.

April 2015 California Cattleman 25


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER SHOULD I WEAN MY CALVES EARLY? decision-making factors you’ll want to consider by Keela Retallick, Ph.D., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Weaning time is right around the corner for most beef producers in the state. While water conditions have potentially improved compared to last year, we are still short of water resources. Pasture productivity has certainly not been optimum in a majority of the state. Weaning is a management technique that can be used to manage conditions when pasture availability is limited. It can also have an effect on the performance of both the cow and calf and ultimately a producer’s bottom line. Early weaning can be defined as weaning a calf any time before the typical 205 days of age (6 to 7 months). So, how early is too early? A newborn calf lacks the microbial population in the rumen, meaning rumen digestion does not actively occur, making milk the most important nutritional source for the newborn animal. The microbial population does establish rapidly and with effective feeding management strategies, calves can be effectively weaned earlier. Consider the dairy industry; they typically wean calves at five weeks of age. Weaning as Pasture Management Tool A beef calf begins to consume native range at approximately 45 days of age. In drought conditions, this can place increased pressure on pasture productivity and growth. If your cows are getting very thin as you approach breeding season, you may want to wean as early as 45 days. Early weaning alleviates energy demands on the cow allowing for improved body condition score (BCS). This may 26 California Cattleman April 2015

also increase grazing days on the pasture and potentially reduce cow supplementation costs. When trying to implement a good drought management plan, weaning at 45 to 90 days of age is generally acceptable. If you notice your forage availability starting to become scarce due to less than optimal conditions; weaning at 90150 days would be a good way to combat this. Management of Early Weaned Calves Weaning early is a great tool to manage your pasture resources. But, the question often becomes who wants to buy those early-weaned calves, and how much can I get for them? While cattle prices appear that they will remain high into our selling season, selling calves off the cow at 45 to 60 days of age doesn’t always improve our bottom line. If you have the ability to manage these 45 to 60 day old calves on the ranch, you will be able to receive a higher

weaned calf sale price. This does not come without additional labor and feed resources for calves. Early-weaned calves will be smaller than typical cattle facility designs. This means accessibility to bunks and water may be problematic. I have seen producers build costeffective step-up ramp systems with pallets and a nonslip cover which allows access to bunks and water designed for larger animals. Also consider that the younger these animals are weaned, the more susceptible they are to illness. Managing and treating illness becomes very important. Reducing external stress due to inadequate space and dust may assist in illness prevention. It is critical to develop vaccination plan in cooperation with your veterinarian. These animals must also have access to clean water and feed. Fence line bunk systems and waterers typically work best since weaned animals tend to walk fence lines. Start calves on feed slowly. If creep


feeding is an option, this makes the transition easier. During the first week, animals should consume around 1 percent of their body weight in the form of a dry starter ration. A starter ration for a 200 to 300-pound calf should be approximately 17 percent crude protein and 70 to 80 percent of the total daily nutrition. This should be fed for one week and calves should be offered long stem hay. After 10 to 14 days of starting on feed, intake will increase to 2.5 to 3.5 percent of body weight in dry feed daily. This will allow hay to be introduced as a larger portion of the ration. A mixed ration consisting of two-thirds grain and one-third high quality hay will be acceptable for calves consuming 2.5 to 3.5 percent of their body weight in dry feed. This should allow for a ration that is 65 to 75 percent of the total daily nutrition and 14 to 16 percent crude protein. It is important that roughage be included to promote rumen health and, if possible, ad libitum access to long stem hay should always be provided. Overall, the diet should be energy dense, palatable, high quality, dust free, dry, and have similar particle size. Management of these calves requires proper nutrition, labor, and facilities. It also increases the overall amount of dry lot time for these calves, but you will be feeding them during a time when they are gaining efficiently. Dam Advantages • Reduced nutrient demands • Reduced intake • Less stress • Better BCS All of these advantages can help conserve pasture resources and promote reproductive efficiency in our cow herds. These advantages can be especially important for heifers that are lactating and still partitioning energy towards their own growth. Calf Advantages • Feed calves to optimum potential • Take advantage of efficient feed:gain • Can be earlier maturing

• •

Potential for more desirable quality grades Require less days on feed during the finishing phase

Most of these advantages are seen during the feedlot finishing phase which is not always economically relevant to the cow calf producer, but gains in cow reproductive efficiency due to early weaning can be very economically relevant. If managed properly, early-weaned calves can

achieve average daily gains equal to or greater than calves that remain with their dams. There are certainly advantages and disadvantages to early weaning. However, it is a great tool to use during drought conditions. It can also be used when your cow herd appears to have low BCS and to alleviate pressure on first calf heifers. As you prepare to wean calves in the near future, consider whether early weaning may fit.

NEWS YOU CAN USE FROM CBCIA Thank you for your CBCIA membership and support of its programs. As the educational arm of the California Cattlemen’s Association, CBCIA’s purpose is to help cattle producers become more efficient and productive. We do this with information, recognition and scholarships. The Board is planning several activities of interest in the year ahead and we invite you to attend! In addition to our regularly-scheduled events, on August 16-18, CBCIA will help host the international conference, Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle. Watch for more information to come. EDUCATIONAL GRANTS: CBCIA offers small grants to encourage and support educational events. Eligibility is open to colleges, universities, youth organizations, local livestock and natural resources advisors, and related organizations. To apply, submit a written proposal to a CBCIA director prior to a CBCIA Board meeting that describes the event and includes the organization name, contact information and funds requested. $250 limit for youth organizations and activities; $500 for others. NEW! The Young Producers Award for State Fair beef exhibitors will recognize the whole project and the individual’s future goals. Watch for more information in the State Fair book. REDBOOKS: CBCIA ordered a limited number of Redbooks this year due to decreased demand. To order your free book contact Lisa Pherigo at CCA at lisa@ calcattlemen.net or (916) 444-0845. BOARD MEETINGS SCHEDULE: We encourage our members to attend board meetings and look to you for direction and participation. There are four regularly-scheduled meetings each year. The February and August meetings are held at the FFA Center in Galt, and the others at the CCA Midyear Meeting in June and the annual CCA/CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev. Contact CBCIA Secretary Karen Sweet at ksweet@cattlemen.net for agenda. BOARD OF DIRECTORS: The CBCIA Board of Directors is a committed group of individuals who make things happen. Please let us know your interests in helping CBCIA provide educational activities that matter to you and our industry.

2015 CBCIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Cheryl LaFranchi (President) Rita McPhee (Vice President) Carole Silveira (Treasurer) Karen Sweet (Secretary)

Tim Curran Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D. Jerry Maltby James Moller

Ryan Nelson Cari Rivers Tracy Schohr Lana Trotter

April 2015 California Cattleman 27


CHIMES POWERFUL WOMEN ccw, cwa team up for spring meeting from California Cattlewomen, Inc. On March 14, nearly 200 California CattleWomen, Inc. (CCW) and California Women for Agriculture (CWA) members met at the Harris Ranch Inn and Restaurant for the CattleWomen’s Annual Beef Promotion Meeting. The morning started with Jenny Holtermann, CWA member and “Almond Girl,” sharing her story about her journey through social media and in particular her blog You Say Almond, I Say Almond. Holtermann grew up on her family’s almond and walnut farm in Chico where her family has been farming since the early 1900s. As the day moved along, Sarah Ramirez Ph.D., the executive director for FoodLink for Tulare County spoke. In 2012 she and her husband co-founded BeHealthyTulare, a grass-roots collective. The daughter of Mexican farm workers, Ramirez and her siblings witnessed their parents, family and friends work long hours in the fields and suffer from chronic illnesses often resulting in premature death and chronic suffering. These experiences ignited Ramirez’s passion for understanding the conditions for these disparities and motivate her work for creating healthy communities. BeHealthyTulare takes a multigenerational popular education and participatory approach to create an environment that makes equitable health possible for everyone. Through BeHealthyTulare, Ramirez teaches in their local community garden, offers hands-on culinary education, leads group fitness and gleans excess produce from farms and backyards that is donated to FoodLink and disseminated throughout the county. Through BeHealthyTulare, Ramirez and her husband offer young people an opportunity to practice their leadership and compassion as role models who give back to their community. Ramirez has been recognized by MORE magazine as one of the 50 most inspirational women. She also received the UC Berkeley Thomas Yamashita Prize for social change, and she has been featured as a CNN hero. Many CattleWomen played a role in a very successful day! Brooke Behlen, Clovis, author of Meet your Beef blog, 28 California Cattleman April 2015

shared her blog and challenged those in the audience to, “Beef Up our Social Media Interaction.” CCW member Susan Cochrane, Paso Robles, provided a glimpse into her cattle operation and rangeland management practices. She showcased the benefits of prescribed burns to the rangeland, creating natural barriers to hold water and allowing cattle to graze, and in turn terrace, steep hillsides. Celeste Settrini, Salinas, talked about what success as a group means and encouraged us to share our story. No one else knows our story better than we do, and as the experts we need to share that story. Debbie Torres also shared a number of helpful Ag In the Classroom lessons and props to CCW and CWA members. Conference attendees were all impressed with the tour provided by

Tucker Knutz, Commodities Manager at Harris Feeding Company, Coalinga. Knutz bravely talked the 174 women through the feedyard on a large tour bus. The Harris Ranch entrance sign states, “Quality cattle proudly raised to the highest standard,” and that was demonstrated throughout the feedlot tour. Many of the ladies on board couldn’t believe the large number of steers that come from the dairy industry to supply the feedyard. A number of the attendees were impressed also with the Country Store at Harris Ranch and were quick to pickup a copy of NinaTeicholz’s book, The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat & Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet. CCW recommends that everyone take Past CCW President Judy Ahmann’s lead and purchase copies for school boards and dignitaries alike.

CCA, CCW PARTICIPATE IN AG DAY AT CAPITOL The west steps of the State Capitol building were packed again this year for the 2015 Agriculture Day at the Capitol, which fell this year on March 18, which was also National Agriculture Day. This annual event is a great opportunity for members of the agricultural community to meet legislators, school children and other consumers and have an open dialogue about what we all love best, agriculture. The California Cattlemen’s Association and the California Cattlewomen, Inc.’s booth was proudly represented by nine wonderful CattleWomen ranging from Tehama

County down to Kern County. CCA staff was also onhand at the event. Along with and irreplaceable partner, Buckhorn Grill of Sacramento, CCW was able to serve more than 3,500 tasty tri-tip sandwich samples (that amounts to 120 tri-tips!) along with a healthy dose of accurate beef information. Members of the public, legislators and their staff, and others walked away with information on confidently cooking with beef, the pasture-to-plate process, the nutrients found in beef and a little more zinc, iron and protein in their bellies that day.

CCW members take a moment to pose with California Department of Food and Agriculture Secretary Karen Ross (center).


UC DAVIS TOPS LIST Of nation’s best Veterinary schools The University of California, Davis, came out on top of the ratings of the best veterinary schools in the country, based on a list compiled by U.S. News & World Report. The publication ranked Cornell University, Mount Vernon, Iowa, second; Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., and North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C., tied for third; and Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, and University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., tied for fifth. The rest of the top 10 includes Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas; and the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, tied for seventh; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn., at ninth; and Tufts University, Medford, Mass. and University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., tied for 10th. The rankings are based on results of peer-assessment surveys sent to deans and faculty members at accredited veterinary schools. The UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, which annually cares for more than 48,000 animal patients and is educating more than 500 veterinary students plus residents and grad students, was ranked second in 2011, the last time vet schools were ranked by the magazine. The school runs a veterinary medical teaching hospital at UC Davis and satellite clinics in San Diego and the San Joaquin Valley community of Tulare. “Our ultimate measures of success are the quality of the students we graduate and the lives improved by our research, but it is always encouraging to see a broad range of our graduate programs recognized as among the best in the nation,” says UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi. “Special congratulations are in order for Dean (Michael D.) Lairmore and everyone at the School of Veterinary Medicine on being named the top program in the country.” Colorado State’s four-year DVM Program, founded in 1907, maintains an enrollment of about 550 veterinary students; those in their third and fourth years continue learning clinical skills in general veterinary medicine

and specialty fields at the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Many of CSU’s faculty are world-renowned for their teaching, discoveries and animal care. “We’re proud and humbled to be recognized as one of the very

best veterinary schools in the world, and we’re pleased to help represent overall excellence in teaching, research, outreach and clinical services at Colorado State,” said Mark Stetter, DVM, dean of CSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

DO MORE WITH LESS You Only Have One Shot at Stopping BRD, Pinkeye & Footrot Hit them hard with Noromycin® 300 LA - the industry’s most economical, broadspectrum 300 mg oxtet available without a prescription. Delivers the same dose of oxytetracycline as Liquamycin® LA 200 and Bio-Mycin® 200 in a lower dose volume. Observe label directions and withdrawal times. Not for use in lactating dairy animals. Adverse reactions, including injection site swelling, restlessness, ataxia, trembling, respiratory abnormalities (labored breathing), collapse and possibly death have been reported. See product labeling for full product information.

www.norbrookinc.com The Norbrook logos and Noromycin 300 LA are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Liquamycin is a registered trademark of Zoetis, Inc. Bio-Mycin is a registered trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim 0115-143-I00A

April 2015 California Cattleman 29


AGRILABS® TO EXPAND AUTOGENOUS VACCINE PORTFOLIO FOR CATTLE AgriLabs® is building on its partnership with Addison Biological Laboratory by rolling out two new autogenous products — Moraxella bovoculi and Streptococcus uberis mastitis vaccines — made with ENABL®, a new adjuvant from VaxLiant® that is U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-approved for safety. These products not only expand AgriLabs’ autogenous portfolio but also meet the growing demand for customized vaccine solutions, offering producers more options for maintaining herd health. “This product expansion further strengthens a partnership with Addison Labs that has been a significant asset to the growth of I-Site XP®, a broad protection vaccine against pinkeye,” said Brian Reardon, Business Unit Manager for AgriLabs. “By extending this partnership with Addison Labs, we are ensuring producers have more access to herdspecific vaccines as herd conditions change.” New autogenous vaccines added to the lineup “Environmental conditions are constantly in flux giving rise to new diseases and organisms,” said J. Bruce Addison, President for Addison Labs. “When a farm encounters an organism that is unique or variant, veterinarians and producers are faced with a challenge of how to handle the situation. If a commercial vaccine is not available for the bacterium, an autogenous vaccine may be useful.” Autogenous vaccines fit a specific need and are an option to control losses associated with disease. With this new offering of autogenous vaccines, AgriLabs is addressing problems such as: •

M. bovoculi — Pinkeye, associated with Moraxella bovis and M. bovoculi, appears to be an increasing problem among cattle. A single dose of I-Site XP® vaccine protects cattle against M. bovis. Currently, no commercial vaccines are available to treat M. bovoculi. Having an autogenous vaccine constructed by Addison Labs, marketed by AgriLabs, is an excellent choice. S. uberis — S. uberis is the most

30 California Cattleman April 2015

common Streptococcal species isolated from mastitis case submissions in the United Kingdom, New Zealand and U.S. This documented distribution and level of significance in such variable climates and management systems leads to the inevitable conclusion that S. uberis may be the greatest nemesis to economical milk production to all herds worldwide. The vaccine production process for this organism is efficient and allows the use of autogenous vaccines as an effective tool in the battle against such a formidable and significant mastitis opponent as S. uberis. All combination of Streptococcus can be included in the formulation as well as other causative autogenous bacteria. Bovine E. coli and Clostridium autogenous are also available. New VaxLiant adjuvant, ENABL® C1 autogenous option AgriLabs’ relationship with Addison Labs will incorporate an autogenous option using a novel ENABL adjuvant developed for use in cattle vaccines. Research shows that ENABL, which had a 21-day withdrawal period, improves vaccine

stability and can provide a stronger immune response. “Being able to provide these new vaccine options to veterinarians and producers is our main goal,” said Reardon. “We are excited about how these autogenous vaccines can help manage highly contagious diseases — saving producers time and money in the long run.” Going the autogenous route Addison Labs manufactures the licensed autogenous vaccines that contain ENABL, and AgriLabs is the exclusive distributor for these vaccines. Addison Labs follows all USDA regulations and approved guidelines to ensure a safe and quality product. When considering an autogenous vaccine, it’s best for producers to discuss with their veterinarian the best course of action. For more information, veterinarians and producers can contact their AgriLabs representative.product. When considering an autogenous vaccine, it’s best for producers to discuss with their veterinarian the best course of action. For more information, veterinarians and producers can contact their AgriLabs representative.

NOW HIRING RANCH MANAGER Genoa Livestock is seeking a qualified individual to oversee management of its registered Hereford operation. Must be proficient in herd health, A.I., nutrition and bull sale preparation. Position now open. Competitive salary, bonus, housing and health insurance.

640 GENOA LANE • MINDEN, NV 89423

CONTACT: BOB COKER, 775-782--3336 RBC@COKER-NEVADA.COM


NEW IGENITY® PRODUCT LINE RAMPS UP HEIFER SELECTION ACCURACY Neogen GeneSeek has introduced a new line of highly accurate Igenity® DNA profilers just as cow/calf producers are looking to grow their cow herds in the face of record low inventories. Producers use Igenity profiling to select heifers, manage their herd and market cattle of verified genetic merit, said Stewart Bauck, Ph.D., general manager of Neogen’s GeneSeek operation. “Previously we screened for hundreds of gene markers. Now we target thousands, and are focusing on the most powerful genes that affect profits in commercial cow herds,” Bauck said. While screening for many more gene markers, the new Igenity Gold and Igenity Silver profiles also zero in on gene-marker variations that play important roles in cattle development and performance. “Neogen has invested in world-class genotyping and built new products that detect gene variations which emerging science has linked to major effects on beef cattle profitability,” Bauck said. “These new Igenity profiles are built on an analysis of tens of thousands of animals genotyped with high-density markers. The product design, while using the latest in advanced genomic technology, is made easy for producers to access, understand and apply.” The new Igenity Gold profile ranks cattle on 12 categories of maternal, performance and carcass traits, plus verifies parentage. This full-power profile provides more insight for producers. The reports are useful for improving maternal lines, profiling bulls that lack EPDs, marketing bred heifers or growing high-quality beef, he said. The new Igenity Silver profile ranks heifers in six categories of maternal, performance and carcass traits, Bauck said. It is useful for screening large numbers of crossbred or straight-bred heifers, and now offers free parentage verification. “The cost to develop a replacement heifer is in the $1,000 to $1,500 range. Profiling helps you be confident you are raising mother cows that have quality calves and breed back well,” Bauck said. “Profiling and selecting heifers early in life helps you sort the best for breeding stock,” he said. “You also can make timely management

decisions if you are developing them as replacements or as feeder heifers.” Both profiles offer free parentage verification. Clients can still add on tests for genetic health and diagnostics, such as BVD-PI and pregnancy status. In addition, the profiles detect male Y chromosome in female cattle DNA, which researchers at USDA-MARC suggest may explain why some otherwise healthy cows are less fertile.

The company also said it is upgrading its online livestock selection tools. “At Igenity.com, you can set selection criteria that helps you emphasize traits that match your climate or intended market. And, you can also benchmark your cattle against the nearly half a million records we have in our database. We are making both these systems easier to use,” Bauck said.

Spring Runs Are Here!

Join us for Our Spring Feeder Runs!

MAY 4 • MAY 18 • JUNE 1 at 1 p.m. cattle sell every Monday, Wednesday and Friday

Pay us a visit...We’re 2 miles north of Escalon VISIT US ONLINE AT: ESCALONLIVESTOCKMARKET.COM

MIGUEL A. MACHADO, PRESIDENT

OFFICE (209) 838-7011 • MOBILE (209) 595-2014

FIELD REPRESENTATIVES JOE VIERA......................(209) 531-4156 THOMAS BERT ...............(209) 605-3866 TONY LUIS .....................(209) 609-6455 MICHAEL MACHADO .........(209) 495-9208 DUDLEY MEYER ..............(209) 768-8568

25525 LONE TREE RD. ESCALON, CA 95320 OFFICE (209) 838-7011 FAX (209) 838-1535

April 2015 California Cattleman 31


I.D Traceability Compliance Requirements EFFECTIVE March 11 On January 9, 2013, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) published a final rule establishing general regulations for improving the traceability of U.S. livestock moving interstate. The rule became effective on March 11 of this year. “The United States now has a flexible, effective animal disease traceability system for livestock moving interstate, without undue burdens for ranchers and U.S. livestock businesses,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “The final rule meets the diverse needs of the countryside where states and tribes can develop systems for tracking animals that work best for them and their producers, while addressing gaps in our overall disease response efforts. Over the past several years, USDA has listened carefully to America’s farmers and ranchers, working collaboratively to establish a system of tools and safeguards that will help us target when and where animal diseases occur, and help us respond quickly.” Under the final rule, unless specifically exempted, livestock moved interstate would have to be officially identified and accompanied by an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection or other documentation, such as ownershipper statements or brand certificates. After considering the public comments received, the final rule has several differences from the proposed rule issued in August 2011. These include: • Accepting the use of brands, tattoos and brand registration as official identification when accepted by the shipping and receiving States or Tribes • Permanently maintaining the use of backtags as an alternative to official eartags for cattle and bison moved directly to slaughter • Accepting movement documentation other than an Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (ICVI) for all ages and classes of cattle when accepted by the shipping and receiving States or Tribes • Clarifying that all livestock moved interstate to a custom slaughter facility are exempt from the regulations • Exempting chicks moved interstate from a hatchery from the official identification requirements Beef cattle under 18 months of age, unless they are moved interstate for shows, exhibitions, rodeos or recreational events, are exempt from the official identification requirement in this rule. These specific traceability requirements for this group will be addressed in separate rulemaking, allowing APHIS to work closely with industry to ensure the effective implementation of the identification requirements. Animal disease traceability, or knowing where diseased and at-risk animals are, where they’ve been, and when, is very important to ensure a rapid response when animal disease events take place. An efficient and accurate animal disease traceability system helps reduce the number of animals involved in an investigation, reduces the time needed to respond, and decreases the cost to producers and the government. California specific tags will be available from CDFA in May 2015. If you would like more feedback on the Animal Disease Traceability Program, please email us at traceability@ aphis.usda.gov. 32 California Cattleman April 2015

COWBOY COMEDY

“I hope you can treat Shock, Dad Just Got the Feed Bill!”


Extended-Release Injectable Parasiticide 5% Sterile Solution NADA 141-327, Approved by FDA for subcutaneous injection For the Treatment and Control of Internal and External Parasites of Cattle on Pasture with Persistent Effectiveness CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS FOR USE LONGRANGE, when administered at the recommended dose volume of 1 mL per 110 lb (50 kg) body weight, is effective in the treatment and control of 20 species and stages of internal and external parasites of cattle: Gastrointestinal Roundworms Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus Bunostomum phlebotomum – Adults and L4 – Adults Cooperia oncophora – Adults and L 4

Cooperia punctata – Adults and L4 Cooperia surnabada – Adults and L4 Haemonchus placei – Adults Oesophagostomum radiatum – Adults Ostertagia lyrata – Adults Ostertagia ostertagi – Adults, L4, and inhibited L4 Trichostrongylus axei – Adults and L4 Trichostrongylus colubriformis – Adults Parasites Gastrointestinal Roundworms Bunostomum phlebotomum Cooperia oncophora Cooperia punctata Haemonchus placei Oesophagostomum radiatum Ostertagia lyrata Ostertagia ostertagi Trichostrongylus axei Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus

Grubs Hypoderma bovis

Mites Sarcoptes scabiei var. bovis

Durations of Persistent Effectiveness 150 days 100 days 100 days 120 days 120 days 120 days 120 days 100 days 150 days

SEASON-LONG PARASITE CONTROL • 15,000 HEAD • 9 STATES

+28 POUNDS AVERAGE Looks like our secret is out.

LONGRANGE averaged 0.28 lbs./day more Average Daily Gain (ADG)1 2.5 lbs.

Difference ADG 0.24*

2 lbs. 1.5 lbs.

1.93

Difference ADG 0.40 2.33 1.93

1.69

Difference ADG 0.30* 1.84

2.07

2.14 1.79

1 lb. .5 lb. 0 lb.

DECTOMAX/ivermectin Pour-on

Conventional Dewormers

Combinations

All Study

*Statistically significant

LONGRANGE

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) should be given only by subcutaneous injection in front of the shoulder at the recommended dosage level of 1 mg eprinomectin per kg body weight (1 mL per 110 lb body weight). WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Withdrawal Periods and Residue Warnings Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 48 days of the last treatment. This drug product is not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Animal Safety Warnings and Precautions The product is likely to cause tissue damage at the site of injection, including possible granulomas and necrosis. These reactions have disappeared without treatment. Local tissue reaction may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Observe cattle for injection site reactions. If injection site reactions are suspected, consult your veterinarian. This product is not for intravenous or intramuscular use. Protect product from light. LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) has been developed specifically for use in cattle only. This product should not be used in other animal species. When to Treat Cattle with Grubs LONGRANGE effectively controls all stages of cattle grubs. However, proper timing of treatment is important. For the most effective results, cattle should be treated as soon as possible after the end of the heel fly (warble fly) season. Environmental Hazards Not for use in cattle managed in feedlots or under intensive rotational grazing because the environmental impact has not been evaluated for these scenarios. Other Warnings: Underdosing and/or subtherapeutic concentrations of extendedrelease anthelmintic products may encourage the development of parasite resistance. It is recommended that parasite resistance be monitored following the use of any anthelmintic with the use of a fecal egg count reduction test program. TARGET ANIMAL SAFETY Clinical studies have demonstrated the wide margin of safety of LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin). Overdosing at 3 to 5 times the recommended dose resulted in a statistically significant reduction in average weight gain when compared to the group tested at label dose. Treatment-related lesions observed in most cattle administered the product included swelling, hyperemia, or necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue of the skin. The administration of LONGRANGE at 3 times the recommended therapeutic dose had no adverse reproductive effects on beef cows at all stages of breeding or pregnancy or on their calves. Not for use in bulls, as reproductive safety testing has not been conducted in males intended for breeding or actively breeding. Not for use in calves less than 3 months of age because safety testing has not been conducted in calves less than 3 months of age. STORAGE Store at 77° F (25° C) with excursions between 59° and 86° F (15° and 30° C). Protect from light. Made in Canada. Manufactured for Merial Limited, Duluth, GA, USA. ®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks of Merial. ©2013 Merial. All rights reserved. 1050-2889-02, Rev. 05/2012

Comparing more than 15,000 head in nine states, stockers treated once for parasites with LONGRANGE gained an average of 28 lbs. more over DECTOMAX® (doramectin), CYDECTIN® (moxidectin), SAFE-GUARD® (fenbendazole) and ivermectin-treated cattle – even when used in combination over 103 days.1 And at today’s market prices, that adds up to an extra $56 per head. Not bad for around a $5 investment.

If you want results like this, talk to your veterinarian about LONGRANGE or visit theLONGRANGElook.com.

Watch for a chance to win a

JOHN DEERE® GATOR™

Scan to watch video and enter, or go to theLONGRANGElook.com/sto13. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: Do not treat within 48 days of slaughter. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows, or in veal calves. Postinjection site damage (e.g., granulomas, necrosis) can occur. These reactions have disappeared without treatment.

®JOHN DEERE is a registered trademark, and ™GATOR is a trademark, of Deere & Company. Deere & Company neither sponsors nor endorses this promotion. ®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks of Merial. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. ©2015 Merial Inc., Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. RUMIELR1455-B (01/15)

Difference ADG 0.28*

Thanks to LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin), parasite control will never be the same.

Available in 500 mL, 250 mL and 50 mL bottles. Administer subcutaneously at 1 mL/110 lbs.

1

Data on file at Merial.

2

Dependent upon parasite species, as referenced in FOI summary and LONGRANGE product label.

3

LONGRANGE product label.

April 2015 California Cattleman 33


Hereford Executive moves onto serve AQHA Membership The American Quarter Horse Association is pleased to announce that Craig Huffhines, currently executive vice president of the American Hereford Association, has been selected to assume the executive vice president leadership role for AQHA. Huffhines will begin his new duties shortly after AQHA’s convention in March. Following a five-month, extensive search effort, the six members of the search committee coupled with the AQHA Executive Committee are confident Huffhines, with more than 17 years’ experience leading the Hereford Association, possesses the strong leadership skills and experience to move AQHA forward. After receiving applications from more than 40 interested individuals, Huffhines was tapped as the leading candidate for AQHA’s leadership role. AQHA President Johnny Trotter stated, “The goal of the search committee was how to take the current, accomplished management team here at AQHA to the next level. With the help of Witt/Kieffer, we were able to locate a seasoned, experienced leader as our next executive vice president, who has already proven his ability to lead a major association in the livestock industry.” President Trotter further noted, “I couldn’t be more pleased with how the process worked, which resulted in finding such a successful leader in Craig.” Huffhines brings not only his years of experience in the agriculture industry, but recorded success in areas such as turning around a 30-year decline in registration and breed popularity, balancing budgets during lean industry years, developing a new branded-beef enterprise, executing a revised governance structure to meet the demands of the 21st century and reinvigorating interest among youth, also while managing the American 34 California Cattleman April 2015

Hereford Association staff and growing the Hereford Research and Youth foundations. Huffhines’ enthusiasm is contagious and his knowledge and passion for the agriculture and livestock industries is quickly recognizable. Founded in 1940, the American Quarter Horse Association is the largest equine breed organization in the world. With headquarters in Amarillo, Texas, AQHA has a membership of more than 270,000 people in 86 countries and has registered more than 5 million horses in 95 countries.


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA 95814 916-444-0845 (Office) · 916-444-2194 (Fax) www.calcattlemen.org NAME(S):

RANCH/BUSINESS NAME:

ADDRESS: CITY:

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Step 1: CCA Membership PRODUCER MEMBERSHIP

FOR CATTLE OWNERS AND THOSE SEEKING A VOTING MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Cattle Numbers 2500 & Over 1600-2499 1000-1599 800-999 500-799 300-499 100-299 0-99 

Dues $1,690 $1,220 $930 $695 $590 $440 $310 $230

Calves under 6 months of age are not counted. Stockers pay at ½ the total number of stockers owned each year or minimum dues, whichever is greater.

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP

PRODUCTION BUT DO NOT OWN CATTLE NON-VOTING MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Statewide Allied/Feeder Associate $220

REGULAR MEMBERSHIP Cattle Numbers 1501 & Over 1001-1500 501-1000 251-500 101-250 0-100

Dues $750 + Fair Share $550 + Fair Share $400 + Fair Share $300 $200 $100

FAIR SHARE: ______@ 25¢/cow calf unit ______@ 12.5¢/feeder or stocker ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: $100 (ASSOCIATES CANNOT OWN CATTLE)

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00

Humboldt-Del Norte Inyo-Mono-Alpine Kern County Lassen County Madera County Mendocino County Merced-Mariposa Modoc County

Young Cattlemen’s Committee

$ 25

Statewide Stewards of the Land

Applicant’s Birth Date:_______________

$150

(Available to non-producers that own land on which cattle could or are run.)

CCA Supporting Member

$100

(Available to non-producers who support the industry.)

Must own fewer than 100 head of cattle. Must be 25 years of age or younger or a full-time student

- OR -

if over 25 years of age Applicant’s expected date of Graduation:

Step 3: Total Payment

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

MEMBERSHIP CBCIA is an affiliate of CCA and is a producer driven organization that fosters beef cattle improvement and economical production based on information and education.

CCA

$

NCBA

$

CBCIA

$

Payment Options:

□ Check payable to CCA

Local (All) $ TOTAL

$

Regular Members: $35

Card #___________________________________

Associate Members: $35

Exp______/________

Young Cattlemen:

Name on Card ____________________________

$5

LOCAL ASSOCIATON MEMBERSHIP: (Circle up to four below) Amador-El Dorado-Sac Butte Calaveras Contra Costa -Alameda Fall River-Big Valley Fresno-Kings Glenn-Colusa High Desert

NON-VOTING MEMBERSHIP

(includes Feeder Council Associate, Allied Industry membership and second membership. Second membership does not include Allied Industry voting rights.)

Step 2: Other Optional Dues NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION

YOUNG CATTLEMEN MEMBERSHIP

FOR THOSE WHO SUPPORT CALIFORNIA CATTLE

$15.00 $25.00 NA $7.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00

Monterey County $10.00 Napa-Solano $5.00 Plumas-Sierra $10.00 San Benito $20.00 San Diego-Imperial $10.00 San Joaquin-Stanislaus $5.00 San Luis Obispo $20.00 Santa Barbara $10.00

Signature ________________________________ Santa Clara Shasta County Siskiyou County Sonoma-Marin Tahoe Tehama County Tulare County Tuolumne County

NA $20.00 $10.00 $5.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $10.00

Ventura County Yolo County

$35.00 $25.00


Cattlemen’s Report

COLYER HEREFORD AND ANGUS 35th Annual Production Sale Bruneau, Idaho • Feb. 23, 2015

Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Kyle Colyer 120 Hereford bulls......................................... $9,835 60 Angus bulls................................................ $8,871 37 open Hereford heifers.............................. $6,412 217 total lots.................................................... $8,985 LORENZEN RANCHES RED ANGUS HEIFER & BULL SALE Pendleton, Ore. • Feb. 25-26, 2015 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 2015 Winnemucca Bull Sale Overall Breed Champion & Champion Angus was consigned by Robison Ranch from Boulder, Utah and purchased by Conley Land & Livestock from Eureka. Pictured are: Winnemucca Bull Sale’s Michelle Hammond, and Robison Ranch’s Tabor Dahl, Catherine Dahl, and Winnemucca Bull Sale Committee’s Kim Petersen.

SELENIUM BOLUSES from Pacific Trace Minerals Se 365 Selenium Bolus for nutritional supplementation of beef cattle. • treat once a year • for beef cattle over 3 months of age.

FOR SALE & USE IN CALIFORNIA ONLY

— ORGANICALLY LISTED— CCA MEMBER: $240/BOX CCA NON-MEMBERS: $288/BOX OF 60 cmaas@pacifictraceminerals.com www.pacifictraceminerals.com SHIPPING ADDITIONAL

ORDER FROM OR PICKUP AT: California Cattlemen’s Association 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA • (916) 444-0845 36 California Cattleman April 2015

yearling Red Angus........................................ $7,012 fall yearling Red Angus.................................. $6,611 Red SimAngus................................................ $7,227 Black SimAngus.............................................. $5,244 146 bulls total WINNEMUCCA INVITATIONAL BULL & STOCK HORSE CHALLENGE Winnemucca, Nev. • Feb. 27-28, 2015 Col. Rick Machado 26 bulls averaged............................................ $5,456 32 horses averaged......................................... $5,784 HARRELL HEREFORD RANCH with Harrell-McKenzie Quarter Horses Baker City, Ore. • March 2, 2015 Sale Managed by United Livestock Brokers Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Rick Machado 106 yearling bulls............................................ $7,587 32 two-year-old bulls..................................... $7,445 47 registered heifers....................................... $3,888 21 commerical heifers.................................... $1,850 17 two-year-old started horses..................... $6,888 2 broodmares.................................................. $3,925 THOMAS ANGUS RANCH Spring Bull Roundup Baker City, Ore. • March. 3, 2015 Sale Managed by Cotton & Associates Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 69 fall yearling bulls....................................... $7,184 130 spring yearling bulls................................ $8,033 199 total bulls.................................................. $7,758 37 fall-calving heifers .................................... $6,526 37 total females............................................... $6,526 TRINITY FARMS Generations of Excellence Sale Ellensburg, Wash. • March 7, 2015 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Kyle Colyer


34 Angus bulls................................................ $5,300 85 SimAngus bulls......................................... $6,340 10 Simmental bulls......................................... $5,655 129 total bulls.................................................. $6,010 13 Angus heifers............................................. $2,712 1 Simmental heifers....................................... $2,750 49 total heifers................................................ $2,671 BAKER ANGUS Genetic Extra Sale Bull Sale Vale, Ore. • March 7, 2015

ROMANS RANCHES Charolais Bull Sale Vale, Ore. • March 10, 2015 Col. Dennis Metzger 55 fall yearling bulls...................................................... $6,759 24 spring yearling bulls................................................. $6,094 79 total bulls................................................................... $6,557

Sale Managed by M3 Marketing Col. Rick Machado 132 Angus bulls.............................................. $5,700 VF RED ANGUS CATTLEMEN’S CLASSIC Terrebonne, Ore. • March 7, 2015 Col. Trent Stewart 33 Red Angus females .................................. $3,100 103 Red Angus bulls...................................... $5,151 SNYDER LIVESTOCK Bulls for the 21st Century Bull test sale Yerington, Nev. • March 8, 2015 Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers

The Foreman Family of Trinity Farms at the Annual ‘Generations of Excellence’ Production Sale in Ellensburg,Wash.

43 Angus bulls................................................ $5,987 38 Calving-Ease Angus bulls........................ $7,163 1 Balancer bull................................................ $3,750 9 Charolais bulls............................................. $4,606 6 Hereford bulls............................................. $6,125 3 Limflex bulls................................................ $6,917 3 Red Angus bulls.......................................... $4,883 10 Calving-Ease Red Angus bulls................ $6,150 1 SimAngus bulls............................................ $7,500 SPRING COVE RANCH The Cattlemen’s Connection Bull Sale Bliss, Idaho • March 9, 2015 Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 42 Reg. Angus yearling heifers..................... $2,689 15 Comm. yearling Angus heifers .............. $2,083 12 two-year-old Hereford bulls ................... $5,291 6 Fall yearling Hereford bulls...................... $6,450 22 Yearling Hereford bulls .......................... $5,022 17 yearling Hereford heifers......................... $2,520 3 Red Angus bulls ......................................... $4,256 3 Red Angus heifers....................................... $2,100 150 Yearling Angus bulls ............................. $7,775

The 2015 “Lucy’s Award” at the Snyder Livestock ‘Bulls for the 21st Century’ Bull Test and Sale went to Kris and Casey Gudel, Gudel Cattle Company, Wilton.

RIVERBEND RANCHES Genetic Edge Bull Sale Idaho Falls, Idaho • March 14, 2015 Sale Managed by Cotton & Associates Col. Trent Stewart and Col. Rick Machado 448 registered bulls........................................... $6,854 435 commercial open heifers.......................... $1,801

Lucy Rechel welcomed buyers, consignors and guests to the annual bull test sale alongside representative John Dickinson and auctioneers Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers. April 2015 California Cattleman 37


California Cattlemen’s Association

BUYERS’ GUIDE Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 BULL BUYERS!

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Thank you to our 2014 Buyers! THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2015 38 California Cattleman April 2015


THURSDAY, SEPT. 17, 2015

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2015.

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2015 bull sale!

JOIN US SEPT. 19, 2015 FOR OUR 5TH ANNUAL MID VALLEY BULL SALE!

O’Connell Consensus 2705

JUNIOR HERDSIRES O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR Really Windy 7261 SIRE: VDAR Really Windy 4189 MGS: Sinclair Telecast 01S3

FCR Final Answer 0103 SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 MGS: N Bar Prime Time D806

+1.5 +56

+95 +31 +.94 +.71 +105.36

President’s Day 2016 THANK YOU TO OUR BUYERS AT THE 2015

April 2015 California Cattleman 39


GELBVIEH Thank you to our loyal buyers for helping make our 40th anniversary sale a success!

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

h

THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2015

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

The Best of Both Worlds

Phone 707.448.9208

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 BULL CUSTOMERS!

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

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THD ©

Gerber, CA

2015 RED BLUFF BULL SALE

Progressive Genetics for over 36 years Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 40 California Cattleman April 2015

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!


THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR 2014 BUYERS!

JOIN US OCTOBER 17, 2015 IN KENWOOD

Mark your calendars for Oct. 17 for our 2015 sale in Kenwood!

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HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

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LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

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ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

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April 2015 California Cattleman 41


AUCTION YARDS

Thank You To All Who Supported Our 2014 Production Sale

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v

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42 California Cattleman April 2015


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Your business could be here! Contact Matt Macfarlane to reserve your space today at (916) 803-3113. April 2015 California Cattleman 43


IN MEMORY

Nancy Foster

Nancy Rae Rossi Foster, 72, of Oroville, passed away peacefully at her home on March 16, 2015 after a courageous battle with cancer. Born on July 5, 1942 in Sacramento to William Gaetano Rossi and Verna Rae Rossi, the family moved to Chico in the early 1950s. Nancy graduated from Chico High School in 1960 and from California State University, Chico in 1964. She earned her elementary teaching credential and taught for eight years at Parkview Elementary. Nancy was an accomplished equestrian, showing in western events at parades, fairs and horse shows throughout Northern California. She married third generation rancher S. Robert Foster in 1969. She worked by Bob’s side throughout their 46-year marriage and loved being a rancher’s wife. Nancy had two children, Mark Foster, and Holly Foster, along with a step-daughter Kay Foster Nelms. In 1972, Nancy made the decision to stop teaching full-time and devote more time to her duties as a mother and wife. In 1976, she obtained a Community College Limited Service Credential, and taught Elements of Horse Production at Butte Community College until 2000. Nancy loved local history, collecting antiques and gardening. She was a member of the Butte County Historical Society and hosted several tours on the family ranch. She was active in the Butte County CattleWomen’s Association. She was also a longtime member of the Butte County Farm Bureau, California Farm Bureau Federation and California Cattlemen’s Association. At the age of 42, Nancy began having epileptictype seizures. While the condition was controlled with medication, she made the decision to stop driving for the safety of others. She never complained or talked about the unfairness of her situation. Nancy continued to stay active on the ranch with her animals, gardening and began a new “career” taking care of neighbors’ homes and animals while they were away. She maintained an active social life thanks to her friends, the “Denim Divas” and enjoyed her time with her grandchildren. She lived a full life on her own terms. She is survived by her husband Robert Foster; brother William G. Rossi (Shelly) of Orland; son Mark R. Foster (Brigitte) of Taylorsville; daughter Holly Ann Foster of Oroville; step-daughter Kay F. Nelms (Jay) of Oroville; grandchildren Rochelle Hugaboom (Ed), Amy Nelms, Adam Nelms, Sheldon Foster, and Sawyer Foster; nephew William F. Rossi (Kriztin) and niece Allison Rossi Ferrasci (David). Nancy was preceded in death by her parents, and sister, Michael Ann Rossi. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Butte County CattleWomen’s Scholarship Fund; Butte County Historical Society or the Durham Park Arena c/o Durham Parks and Recreation District A celebration of Nancy’s life will be held Sunday, April 19, at Robert Foster Ranch, 2521 Williams Road, Oroville, CA 95965 at 2 p.m.

44 California Cattleman April 2015

Gloria Van Horn

operation, a livestock molasses business, a hunting and Gloria recreation business and a café. Hillman In addition to these Darnall endeavors, Gloria’s love of Van children led her to start a Horn, summer camp having an who equestrian focus. Her great love passed and appreciation for nature away Feb. combined with her abilities as a 21, 2015, was born horsewoman led her to become a charter member of the San March Luis Obispo County Cowbells 9, 1928 Trail Ride in 1962 along with 12 in Berkeley. and spent her other ranching women. Every early childhood in Seattle, spring they would ride, study Wash., before her mother, B. grasses and wildflowers, camp K. Hillman, moved the family out and have a great time. to the Hillman Estrella Ranch. Gloria’s other interests Gloria’s childhood and teenage included photography, hunting, years were divided between genealogy, traveling to foreign the ranch, her grandmother’s home in Berkeley and school in countries and reciting poetry, but her greatest love was her Tucson, Ariz. While later attending a dance children and grandchildren. She in Parkfield, she met Martin Van is survived by her sons John M. Van Horn (Sharon) and Horn, whose family owned a Michael K. Van Horn (Denise), ranch nearby and had recently and daughter Cynthia M. Van returned from World War II. Horn. She also leaves behind They soon married and moved four grandchildren and five to Oregon for a brief stint in great grandchildren. A dual construction before moving memorial service for Gloria back to the Paso Robles area. and her husband Martin, who Gloria was employed at Camp Roberts during the Korean War preceded her in 2011, was be until the couple’s first child was held at the Parkfield Community born. She later worked alongside Hall on March 7. Memorial donations can be made to the her husband raising cattle and farming. They were periodically American Cancer Society (San involved in other businesses, Luis Obispo) or the Paso Robles including a custom haying Pioneer Museum.

Larry Vance Dunn

Production Credit Association, owned his own trucking business Larry Vance Dunn beloved and owned and ran the auction husband, father, grandfather, yard. But Larry’s love of cattle brother, uncle and friend was always his top priority and passed away peacefully at his raising good cattle brought home Feb. 23, 2015, with his tremendous joy to him. wife at his side. Larry was born Larry loved stories and in Susanville to Edmund and when he was done telling a story Genevieve Dunn on Aug. 12, you were sure to of learned 1939. His parents raised cattle something. Some people will and Larry grew up loving to remember Larry as being up cowboy. front but everyone always knew While working on the Hansen Ranch at Horse Lake, he where they stood with him. Larry was a big jokester and he met Sandra Hansen and as the got a kick out of playing a good old saying goes, he fell in love joke on his friends and family. with the boss’ daughter. Larry Larry is survived by his wife, and Sandra were married on Sept. 11, 1962. During the years, Sandra; children, Kimberly Larry worked in the logging business, as a manager for ...CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


McCombs (Audie), Edmund Dunn (Cary) and Lori Galvin (Lonnie); grandchildren, Webb Dunn, Ethan Dunn, Lane Galvin, Chance Galvin, Dane McCombs (Lauren) and Shauni McCombs; great granddaughter, Tinsley McCombs; sister, Lynn Milton (Ron); nieces and nephews, Gary Dunn (Loressa), Brian Dunn (Linda),

Karen Marsters (Brian) and Debbie Fletcher and their families. Larry was preceded in death by his parents, brother, Robert Dunn, and sister-in-law, Ellen Dunn. Graveside services were held at the Alturas Cemetery, on Monday, March 2, 2015. Donations in Larry’s memory can be made to the Wounded Warrior Project.

Dick Harry

several fraternal, professional and philanthropic groups beginning with Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity in college. Others included the Capitol Outing Duck Club, Royal Order of Jesters with the Shriners, Sacramento Amador El Dorado Cattlemen’s Association that he served as president, Western State Meat Packers Association, Sacramento Grandfathers Club and Los Paisano Camp of the Rancheros Visitadores, in addition to supporting many youth groups in the region. “He was a true outdoorsman, through and through,” said son Mike. “Some of (his) best times were spent hunting and fishing with his family and many friends.” Besides Carolyn, Dick was preceded in death by his sister, Sue Ann Popp and grandson Daniel. He is survived by his wife Janet Hume with whom he spent several years traveling extensively; children Debbie Goehring (Arden), Tom Harry (Cindy), and Mike Harry (Anne); grandchildren Kristina Backer (Tony), Rachael and Camille Harry and Elliott and Mitchell Harry; and nephew Curtis Popp (Susan). A celebration of Dick’s life took place March 13 in Elk Grove. Remembrances may be made to the Carolyn and Dick Harry Memorial Scholarship, Elk Grove Regional Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 2021, Elk Grove, CA 95759; the CCHAT Center Sacramento, 11100 Coloma Rd., Rancho Cordova, CA 95670; Project R.I.D.E., 8840 Southside Ave., Elk Grove, CA 95624; or the Shriners Hospital for Children, 2425 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95817 Att: Bo. The family extends special thanks to the UC Davis Medical Center, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center and caregiver Bogie.

Dick Harry, owner of Elk Grove Meat Company and cattle rancher whose operations spanned three states, died Feb. 16, 2015 following a long illness. He was 79. Many Elk Grove residents will remember the meat company with its iconic cow just east of Old Town Elk Grove. It was founded in 1950 by brothers Tom and Carl Harry; later Tom bought his brother’s share. Son Dick took over in 1974 and operated the business until it closed in 1989, shipping and packing meat all over northern California, especially the Bay Area. His family said his real passion was for his cattle ranching operation which he began at age 14 with the purchase of one cow. His sons joined him in the business that now covers California, Nevada and Oregon. “Dick loved spending time on the ranch and including friends on the annual cattle drives at the Lucky 7 Ranch in McDermitt, Nevada,” they said. Thomas Richard Harry was born June 23, 1935 in Sacramento to Estelle “Sis” and Tom Harry. He grew up in Land Park and graduated from McClatchy High School where he played football. He then attended the University of California, Davis, graduating in 1957. It was while he was in college that he met his future wife, Carolyn Tyler, and together they raised their three children. She preceded him in death in 1996. Dick was a member of

Pete Stavrianoudakis Pete Stavrianoudakis passed away Feb. 14, 2015 at his home surrounded by his family. He was born on Feb. 28, 1936 to Pantelis and Maria Stavrianoudakis. He was a lifelong resident of Hilmar, where he attended grammar school and graduated from Hilmar High School. Pete was a farmer in Hilmar for most of his life and was involved with several community organizations including, Hilmar FFA, Valley Tractor Pullers Association, Hilmar Footbal Boosters and was a member of the Hilmar Lions Club since 1968. He was also a member of the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Modesto. Pete’s favorite pastimes included tractor pulling, building and fabricating, restoring antique tractors, visiting with friends at his shop and watching family activities. In his earlier years, Pete enjoyed bowling and softball. Pete also loved to host barbeques and entertain friends, and will be best remembered for his laugh. Pete is preceded in death by his parents, Pantelis and Maria Stavrianoudakis, his brothers, Stratis Stavrianoudakis, Steve Stavrianoudakis and Stephen Stavrianoudakis, his sisters, Katina Kordazakis, Annie Arvelas. Pete is survived by his wife; Karen Stavrianoudakis, his children; Darren Stavrianoudakis, Dana Stavrianoudakis (Adam Andrino), stepchildren; Buddy (Elizabeth) Cozzitorto, Chuck (Nicole) Cozzitorto and Robin (Johnny) Mattos, grandchildren, Brandon Stavrianoudakis, Kayla Stavrianoudakis, Falynn Mattos, Georgia Cozzitorto, Gianni Cozzitorto and Camryn Mattos. He is also survived by his sisters, Angie Devins, Bessie Micheletos and Olympia Peterson, as well as many nieces and nephews. Services were held funeral will be held Feb. 23. Memorial contributions can be made in Pete’s memory to The Hilmar Football Boosters or the Hilmar FFA, both care of Hilmar High School, 7807 Lander Ave. Hilmar, CA 95324. April 2015 California Cattleman 45


101 Livestock, Inc...................................................................................... 13 Agrilabs.......................................................................................................21 Amador Angus.......................................................................................... 38 American Hereford Association ������������������������������������������������������������� 40 Andreini & Company............................................................................... 25 Apache Polled Herefords.......................................................................... 40 Avila Cattle Co........................................................................................... 23 Bar R Angus............................................................................................... 38 Bianchi Ranches........................................................................................ 23 BMW Angus.............................................................................................. 38 Broken Arrow Ranch................................................................................ 38 Broken Box Ranch...............................................................................23, 42 Buchanan Angus Ranch........................................................................... 38 Byrd Cattle Co......................................................................................38, 48 California Custom..................................................................................... 43 California State University, Chico ���������������������������������������������������������� 41 California Wagyu Breeders...................................................................... 42 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market ������������������������������������������������������������������� 3 Central Valley Dodge................................................................................ 34 Charron Ranch.......................................................................................... 38 Chrerry Glen Beefmasters........................................................................ 40 Conlan Ranches California...................................................................... 42 Conlin Fence Company............................................................................ 42 Conlin Supply Co.................................................................................... 1, 5 Corsair Angus Ranch................................................................................ 38 Dal Porto Livestock................................................................................... 39 Diamond Back Ranch............................................................................... 42 Donati Ranch............................................................................................. 38 Edwards Lien & Toso................................................................................ 42 Escalon Livestock Market......................................................................... 31 Five Star Land and Livestock................................................................... 39 Five Star Land Company.......................................................................... 42 Freitas Rangeland Improvements ����������������������������������������������������������� 32 Fresno State Ag Foundation...............................................................23, 41 Furtado Angus........................................................................................... 39 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ���������������������������������������������������������������� 43 Genoa Livestock..................................................................................30, 41 Gonsalves Ranch....................................................................................... 39 HAVE Angus.............................................................................................. 39 Hogan Ranch............................................................................................. 40 Hone Ranch................................................................................................ 40 Hufford’s Herefords................................................................................... 41 J/V Angus................................................................................................... 39

46 California Cattleman April 2015

Jorgensen Ranch........................................................................................ 23 Kerndt Livestock Products....................................................................... 43 Lambert Ranch.......................................................................................... 41 Little Shasta Ranch.................................................................................... 41 McPhee Red Angus................................................................................... 42 Merial, Ltd.................................................................................................. 33 Nicholas Livestock Co.............................................................................. 23 Noahs Angus Ranch.................................................................................. 39 Norbrook.................................................................................................... 29 O’Connell Ranch....................................................................................... 39 ORIgen.......................................................................................................43 Orvis Cattle Company.............................................................................. 41 Pacific Trace Minerals.........................................................................36, 42 Pitchfork Cattle Co.................................................................................... 41 Ray-Mar Ranches...................................................................................... 39 Reis Livestock............................................................................................. 23 Sammis Ranch........................................................................................... 39 San Juan Ranch.......................................................................................... 40 Schafer Ranch............................................................................................ 39 Schohr Herefords....................................................................................... 41 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard ���������������������������������������������������������������� 19 Sierra Ranches............................................................................................ 41 Silveira Bros................................................................................................ 40 Silveus Insurance Agency......................................................................... 15 Skinner Livestock Transportation ���������������������������������������������������������� 43 Sonoma Mountain Herefords ����������������������������������������������������������������� 41 Southwest Fence Company, Inc. ������������������������������������������������������������� 43 Spanish Ranch............................................................................................ 40 Tehama Angus Ranch............................................................................... 40 Teixeira Cattle Co...................................................................................... 39 Tulare County Stockyard.......................................................................... 42 Tumbleweed Ranch................................................................................... 40 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard ��������������������������������������������������������������� 7 Universal Semen Sales.............................................................................. 43 University of California, Davis ��������������������������������������������������������������� 17 Veterinary Service, Inc.............................................................................. 42 VF Red Angus............................................................................................ 42 Vintage Angus Ranch............................................................................... 40 Western Fence Company.......................................................................... 42 Western Stockman’s Market....................................................................... 9 Western Video Market................................................................................ 2 Wulff Bros. Livestock................................................................................ 40


RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY IN THE

2015 BULL BUYERS GUIDE

CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET • (916) 803-3113 DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2015 April 2015 California Cattleman 47


Would you give away $20,000? You might be without even knowing it ... For nearly a decade, we’ve tested every sale bull for residual feed intake (RFI). RFI measures the difference between an animal’s actual feed intake in relation to the amount of feed the animal is expected to eat. Thus, RFI allows selection for animals that will reach the same level of growth, yet do so by consuming up to 20% less feed.

With pasture and feed costs accounting for nearly 70% of the cost of running cattle, it’s easy to see how selecting for feed efficient genetics can save you close to $140 per head from birth to harvest. If your average bull sires just 35 calves per year for four years, that’s almost $20,000 saved – on only one bull! As production costs continue to spiral upward, we believe in offering our customers every opportunity to save money through enhanced genetics. Therefore, we don’t just provide the standard EPD and ultrasound information; we incur the added expense to provide you with Residual Feed Intake (RFI), Dry Matter Intake

(DMI) and Average Daily Gain (ADG) data on every bull in the sale. Additionally, every bull will be Zoetis HD 50K tested to generate more reliable genomicenhanced EPDs. At Byrd Cattle Company, we’re different than most purebred breeders. We breed cattle that are designed to excel in an environment with limited feed resources – leaving you efficient, moderately sized daughters that wean in excess of 50% of their body weight, while producing steers that will top the market, then gain, yield and grade with any in the industry. We realize all the data in the world won’t tell you about things like attitude, udder quality, mothering ability, and the ability of a cow to wean a calf and breed back in a harsh environment – every year. At BCC, these intangibles have a direct effect on the most important number of all – THE BOTTOM LINE OF OUR CUSTOMERS.

If you’re interested in making money, not giving it away, plan to join us Friday afternoon, September 4!

Mark Your Calendar for the 15th Annual

‘Enhanced Efficiency’ Angus Bull Sale at 3:30 p.m.

Friday, September 4

110 Bulls Sell All with the BCC Bull Buyers’ Bonus

All bulls sell Zoetis HD 50K tested with with RFI, DMI and ADG data

Our famous BCC dinner and party will follow the sale!

E-mail byrdcattleco@hotmail.com or call 530-527-9036 to be added to our mailing list

BYRD CATTLE COMPANY, LLC P.O. Box 713 • Red Bluff, CA 96080

Dan 530-736-8470 • Ty 530-200-4054

THD ©

byrdcattleco@hotmail.com • www.byrdcattleco.com

48 California Cattleman April 2015

April 2015 California Cattleman  
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