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APRIL 2014

Inside this Issue... 2014 CCA-Sponsored legislation More about surviving drought April 2014 California Cattleman 1


2 California Cattleman April 2014


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April 2014 California Cattleman 3


California Cattlemen’s Association OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Tim Koopmann, Sunol

REFLECTING ON SIX YEARS OF SERVICE

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Billy Flournoy, Likely

SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Fred Chamberlin, Los Olivos David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville Rich Ross, Lincoln

TREASURER

Jack Hanson, Susanville

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Stevie Ipsen

ASSOCIATE DIR. OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead

Office Administrator

Katie Almand

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 • Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen stevie@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

by CCA Treasurer Jack Hanson

As I sat down to write this officer column after six years as the treasurer of the California Cattlemen’s Association, I realized that this could very likely be the last time I write as an officer for the CCA magazine. This milestone of sorts has prompted reflection on my terms, both as second vice president and as treasurer. It has been a truly rewarding experience. At the risk of overlooking somebody, I would like to recognize a few key people who have provided support and advice during my years of CCA leadership. First and most importantly, I would like to thank my family, Darcy, Wyatt and Brad, for their support and understanding. They willingly tolerated many phone calls and meetings and took care of business on the ranch in my absences. It has been an honor to serve with a great group of officers. I appreciate their friendship and their dedication to ranching and the beef industry in California. I would like to recognize my treasury predecessors, Gordon Rasmussen, Pleasanton, and Myron Openshaw, Oroville, for their service to CCA and council during my term. Obviously, one does not do this job alone. Consequently, I would like to express my appreciation to all the members of the CCA Finance Committee for their collective wisdom, dedication and thoughtful advice. I find it difficult to adequately express my appreciation to the staff at CCA, especially Billy Gatlin, Lisa Pherigo, Stevie Ipsen and Justin Oldfield. Each person in the office has contributed to the financial success of CCA and each has demonstrated their dedication to the organization and the beef industry as a whole. Finally, I would like to thank all CCA members for their trust and support during my time as an officer. I will forever be indebted to you for allowing me to have had this unique opportunity. I feel fortunate

Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

and blessed to call so many of you “good and loyal friends.” I would be remiss if I did not at least touch on the current financial condition of CCA. Despite the challenges faced by California ranchers, both membership and dues revenue are up for the fiscal year to date. This, combined with the generous support of our Allied Industry partners, especially Andreini and Company, Silveus Insurance Group and Pacific Trace Minerals. By producing positive financial results, CCA is better able to serve you by hiring additional staff and more experienced staff. CCA’s financial reserves continue to be well in excess of 50 percent of our annual operating expenses. Finally, it is hard to write a column this year without reflecting on Mother Nature. As I write this article, on March 4, the moisture situation in most of California has improved; however, irrigation and stock water remain the most influential factor to our agricultural operations. This year’s drought has reminded us that, while issues such as legislation, endangered species, product labeling, the farm bill and transportation issues are all relevant and important, Mother Nature still has the greatest effect on our operations and bottom lines. Hopefully by the time this article is published we will have experienced a “Miracle March” resulting in plentiful feed and fat cattle, and we continue to be fortunate to have great cattle and beef markets for all. Again, my thanks to all for a great experience. If anyone has any questions or observations about CCA’s financial condition, do not hesitate to contact me any time.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman April 2014


April 2014

Volume 97, Issue 4 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Optimism during unprecedented times

THE COVER 4

BUNKHOUSE 8 New administrative staff creates own rural roots

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 2014 CCA-sponsored legislation

10

VET VIEWS 12 The importance of a client-veterinary relationship

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER 14 Genetic engineering may be necessary to feed population

FUTURE FOCUS 28 Sealing the deal on a perfect internship

CHIMES 32 A recap of the 2014 CCW Spring Meeting

SPECIAL FEATURES

More information on drought survival

16

Charolais EVP stresses value in marketing 22 New grass option for Sacramento Valley

26

READER SERVICES

Bull Buyers’ Guide 34 Obituaries and New Arrivals

40

As the green grass grows and beef prices continue to soar, cattlemen throughout the state should be feeling optimistic about their way of life. Along with the arrival of Spring come many ranch tasks. From branding and vaccinating to fencing and weaning, the list can seem endless. Fortunately, Conlin Supply Co., Inc., with stores in Oakdale and Merced, has everything to suit your ranching needs. Albert Conlin and his customer service team can assist you in anyway possible when it comes to caring for your cattle and family operation. Conlin distributes liquid and dry supplements from Foster Commodities and works with area ranchers to deliver Foster’s Fos-Pro supplements direct to their ranches. As you determine your needs this Spring, let Conlin Supply show you how they can help you better your beef business. With a comprehensive selection of animal health products, handling equipment from the industry’s leading manufacturers, and fencing supplies and equipment, you can find all you need and more at Conlin Supply. For more information on Fos-Pro liquid and dry supplements, or to locate a dealer near you, contact Geoff Tipton at (559) 259-2429 or Bill Ruble (559) 260-4570. Come visit us in person, online, or call anytime to learn how we can help you!

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Cattlemen’s Report 41 Advertisers Index 42

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April 2014 California Cattleman 5


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BUNKHOUSE Loving What you Do, Doing What you Love by CCA Office Administrator Katie Almand Born and raised to be a “city girl,” I’m proud to say I never fit that stereotypical mold. Hello, my name is Katie Almand, and I am the most recent addition to your Sacramentobased California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) staff. I am thrilled to be working at CCA, an organization that represents you – the California beef producer. Growing up in the Los Angeles suburb of Anaheim, cattle were not a common sight. Living in this urban environment I received little exposure to agriculture or livestock, but for some reason fields of crops and animals grazing in open pastures have always captivated me. For as long as I can remember I have wanted to work with livestock, and more specifically, cattle. My dream was to be a large animal veterinarian. Not having any exposure to the beef industry, I thought that was the only way I could make a career out of working with cows all day. Consequently, I moved to Northern California to attend the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) to study Animal Science. When I was accepted to my dream college, I was ecstatic because I knew the hands-on experience I would receive would be the best. I was also excited to move to a different region of my home state; a more rural, agriculturally-centered area where I would be able to not only learn more about the industry, but also live it. While studying Animal Science at UC Davis, I was exposed to many different production animals, many of which I had previously had little to no experience with. The hands-on labs opened my eyes to the world of

livestock that I could not have even imagined. As you may have guessed, my Orange County high school did not offer agriculture education courses, and I certainly did not have room in my back yard for a lamb, let alone a steer. I was different from the Southern California “norm” at UC Davis; I wanted to study production animals instead of dogs and cats. Studying at UC Davis was the perfect opportunity for me to learn and grow. Even though it was fun to milk goats and flip sheep, cows always held a special place in my heart. One of my most valuable experiences at Davis was living on the UC Davis dairy. Not only did I gain valuable knowledge about the cattle industry, but also practical experience. As a resident I was responsible for heat checks, middle of the night calvings, feedings and treatments. Convincing a calf to drink colostrum at 3 a.m. or trying to jumpstart a tractor were not things covered in lectures, and they were invaluable experiences that I will never forget. Living at the dairy gave me a great appreciation for farmers and ranchers and their sacrifices. As you well know farmers and ranchers are people who have lives, families and hobbies like everyone else, but they don’t get holidays and weekends off. It’s a sacrifice you make to ensure the health, safety and production level of your herd so that people around the globe can eat. In my final year at Davis I was able to take classes more specifically geared toward the cattle business. It was during these last few months that I learned I did not have to be a veterinarian to pursue a career in this field. I was exposed to all the

8 California Cattleman April 2014

Katie Almand different avenues of production involved in this diverse way of life. From pharmaceutical sales and communication to teaching and lobbying, there are countless ways that people interested in agriculture can play vital and active roles in its success. Knowing that the variety of career paths were virtually endless, I was motivated to find the right one for me. I knew I wanted to work with the people who make the food in our stores possible, while also educating the public about the industry. Growing up in an urban region that knows very little about the issues ranchers face and how their food is produced, agricultural education was an area I wanted to be active in. I look forward to working with all of you in the future as CCA’s office administrator. I hope to learn and grow in this position and represent our membership in the best way possible. I look forward to getting to know more of you at our upcoming meetings. In the meantime, if there is anything I can do for you, please do not hesitate to ask. You can reach me and other CCA staff in the CCA office by calling (916) 444-0845 or by e-mailing me at katie@ calcattlemen.org.


April 2014 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA-Sponsored Legislation Advances Industry Priorities CCA has sponsored several pieces of legislation this year to ensure member priorities are met and ranchers’ voices are heard in our state’s Capitol. While working to defeat legislation that has the potential to harm California beef producers and property owners, it is equally important to play offense when dealing with politicians in Sacramento. First, CCA is sponsoring Assembly Bill (AB) 1722, by Assemblymember Frank Bigelow (R-O’Neals). Specifically, AB 1722 will require the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s (CDFA) Bureau of Livestock Identification (BLID) to cancel a registered brand for an individual found guilty of livestock theft and prohibit that individual from holding a brand for a period of five years following the conviction. Likewise, a person without a brand that is convicted of livestock theft will be denied an application to register a brand if the individual has been found guilty of livestock theft within the last five years. The bill also requires that an individual found guilty of livestock theft submit to a thorough brand inspection any time cattle are moved, transported or sold regardless if the animals are in a closed or otherwise further regulated zone. Any violation of these provisions will be charged with a civil fine administered directly by the Secretary of CDFA of $1,000 per animal required to be inspected. AB 1722 builds upon the success of AB 924 which was authored by Bigelow and signed by the governor last year. AB 924 realigned a significant portion of the money derived through fines assessed against those convicted of livestock theft to the BLID to specifically help fund the efforts of state brand inspectors to assist local law enforcement in investigating cases of cattle theft. AB 1722 is expected to be referred to the Assembly Agriculture Committee and heard sometime later this month. In addition, CCA is sponsoring AB 1101 by Assemblymember Wesley Chesbro (D-Arcata) which extends an existing exemption that allows legal livestock semitrailers to operate along all portions of U.S. Highway 101 in Mendocino and Humboldt counties.

Without this exemption, livestock producers and auction markets located in these counties would be severely restricted from shipping cattle to buyers outside the North Coast region. Due to the width of the road and the inability to complete scheduled roadway improvements on time, livestock semitrailers have been prohibited, along with other California legal semitrailers, from driving through Richardson Grove State Park along U.S. Highway 101 in Humboldt County. Caltrans is working to complete roadway improvements in the park to allow California legal livestock trailers to safely operate, however longterm progress continues to be hampered by litigation. Without this bill, ranchers

10 California Cattleman April 2014

would be left with very few and cost prohibitive options to ship cattle. AB 1101 marks the eighth bill CCA has sponsored to ensure this vital exemption remains law until roadway improvements are completed. In the past the exemption carried a five-year sunset however AB 1101 includes provisions that would align the exemption to the completion of the roadway improvements. This bill has already passed the Assembly and is awaiting a hearing in the Senate. Remember, CCA works for you. Never hesitate to contact CCA staff with federal, state or local concerns you may have that we can help address.

A Tip of the Hat The foundation of a representative democracy is grounded in the philosophy that those citizens elected to office will represent their constituents and the issues they face. Former senator and current Assemblymember Wesley Chesbro (D-Arcata) is a model of an elected official who has worked on behalf of his constituents, including ranchers, in his current legislative district that includes portions of Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma and Trinity counties. Most notably, Chesbro has worked hard to champion a Wesley Chesbro fix to a local transportation issue that without his help would leave many ranchers seeking to sell and move cattle out of California’s North Coast region stranded. An ongoing battle has brewed for some time over roadway improvements and the safety of certain vehicles operating along U.S. Highway 101 through Mendocino and Humboldt Counties. Of the three specific segments the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) identified as in need of repair in order to allow semis with California legal livestock trailers to fully operate, only two have been repaired. For years Caltrans and environmentalists have battled over how to complete the improvements on the last remaining segment which is surrounded by old-growth Redwoods. Ranchers would have been left with very limited and cost prohibitive measures in order to move cattle outside the region if it had not been for Chesbro’s leadership. Chesbro has authored eight pieces of legislation to allow semis with livestock trailers to travel on all segments of U.S. Highway 101 in Mendocino and Humboldt counties while roadway improvements are pending. In his last year as a member of the California Legislature, Chesbro is again working on behalf of ranchers in his district by authoring AB 1101, which will indefinitely extend exemption for livestock haulers with California legal trailers to operate on all segments of U.S. Highway 101 along California’s North Coast region until the remaining roadway improvements have been completed. It has been a pleasure for CCA to work alongside Chesbro and his staff to tackle challenges facing ranchers in the state as he transitions out of Sacramento and on to his next journey.


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April 2014 California Cattleman 11


VET VIEWS Who’s Got Your Back? The Importance of a Strong Veterinary Relationship from the American Association of Bovine Practicioners The American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) offers its members and other beef and dairy veterinarians newly created guidelines for effective veterinary-client-patient relationships (VCPR). The guidelines, Establishing and Maintaining the Veterinary-Client-Patient Relationship in Bovine Practice, are meant to assist veterinarians in developing more comprehensive relationships with their cattle-producing clients. Keith Sterner, DVM, Sterner Veterinary Clinic, PC, Ionia, Mich., chaired the AABP VCPR Task Force that created the guidelines. “As regulatory and consumer concerns over drug use in cattle make the news, more direct veterinary involvement with the dairy farm, ranch or feedlot is needed,” Sterner says. “The AABP convened a task force to help better spell out just what constituted a VCPR. The VCPR is the very foundation on which all parties concerned can use to be assured of responsible production practices being employed on farming operations.”

The six principles underpinning the AABP VCPR guidelines • Maintain written agreements for working relationships • Have a veterinarian of record • Clarify any and all relationships with consultants and other veterinarians • Provide written protocols • Ensure written or electronic treatment records are maintained • Provide drugs or prescriptions for specific time frames and for specific protocols The VCPR is a mechanism that, when in place and adhered to by all parties, assures responsible drug use and that protocols are in place and regularly reviewed on the livestock operation. “The VCPR guidelines are a measured and carefully reasoned mechanism that veterinarians can use to assure that lines of communication and records are in place between them

12 California Cattleman April 2014

and their clients for responsible drug use,” Sterner adds. “At the same time, these guidelines will help to assure the public that there are excellent, responsible and documented procedures being employed on farming operations,” he says. “This will help to ensure a positive image for both the dairy and beef industries as well as the veterinary profession.” AABP President Dan Grooms, DVM, Ph.D., Michigan State University, says, “A major part of AABP’s mission is to equip our members with tools that will improve the well-being of cattle. AABP is in the process of developing additional science-based cattle well-being guidelines for our members and the cattle industry as a whole. As cattle veterinarians, it is important that we develop, follow and promote guidelines that help ensure the wellbeing of the cattle whose health and welfare is entrusted to us.”


ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING THE VETERINARYCLIENT-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP On Beef Operations The veterinary-client-patient relationship (VCPR) is an integral part of proper drug use on cattle operations. State and federal codified VCPRs regulate the practice of veterinary medicine legislatively. This document describes non-regulatory management practices endorsed by the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) as general guidelines for its members and beef producers to refer to during their course of practice. WRITTEN AGREEMENT

Maintain written agreements for working relationships

A veterinary practice or individual should establish a written agreement with the client that identifies the farm veterinarian who is accountable for drug use and treatments administered to the cattle on the farm operation. If more than one veterinarian or veterinary practice has a working relationship on the operation, then the agreement should establish which one has the overall responsibility for treatment protocols, drug inventories, prescriptions, personnel training, oversight and drug use on the operation. The identified veterinarian is referred to as the “veterinarian of record.�

VETERINARY OVERSIGHT

Have a Veterinarian of Record The veterinarian of record is the responsible party for providing appropriate oversight of drug use on the farm operation. Such oversight is a critical component of establishing, maintaining and validating a VCPR. This oversight should include, but may not be limited to, establishment of treatment protocols, training of personnel, review of treatment records, monitoring drug inventories and assuring appropriate labeling of drugs. Veterinary oversight of drug use should include all drugs used on the farm regardless of the distribution of the drugs to the farm. Regular farm visits are an essential component to providing such oversight, however this can be supplemented through laboratory data evaluation, records evaluation, telephonic and electronic communication. The timeliness of farm visits should be determined by the veterinarian of record based on the type and size of the operation.

RELATIONSHIP WITH CONSULTANTS AND OTHER VETERINARIANS

Clarify any and all relationships with consultants and other veterinarians If a veterinarian who is not the veterinarian of record provides professional services in any type of consultative or advisory capacity, then it is incumbent on that veterinarian to ensure that the veterinarian of record is contacted and informed of their findings and recommendations. No protocols or procedures that have been established by the veterinarian of record should be changed unless or until there is an agreement by all parties about such changes. The agreement between the veterinarian of record and the client should establish which management groups of the farm operation are covered in the agreement. For instance, reproduction, milk quality, youngstock/ replacement, feedlot, cow-calf and sick animal treatments are possible identifiable areas.

TREATMENT PROTOCOLS

Provide written protocols Protocols and treatment guidelines for commonly occurring, easily recognizable conditions should be established in writing agreed upon by all parties involved, signed and dated. Training of personnel authorized to use drugs on the operation should be undertaken and periodically reviewed. The frequency of such training and review should be determined by the size and type of the operation, the rate of personnel turnover, and the changes in protocols and procedures. The treatment protocols and procedures should include all drugs used on the operation (over- thecounter, prescription, extralabel, veterinary feed directive, water soluble). All protocols should clearly define when to quit treating and seek professional help (poor response, increase in severity of signs).

Ensure written or electronic treatment records are maintained

Written/electronic treatment records of all animals or groups of animals treated are an essential component of maintaining and establishing the VCPR and to decrease the risk of violative drug residues. Such records should include, at a minimum, the date, identification of animal(s), drug(s) used, frequency, duration, dose, route, appropriate meat/ milk withdrawal intervals and the person administering the treatment. Periodic and timely review of the treatment records, drug inventories and usage is an important part of oversight by the veterinarian of record.

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

Provide drugs or prescriptions for specific time frames and for specific protocols Provision of drugs or drug prescriptions should be for specific time frames appropriate to the scope and type of operation involved and only for the management groups within the operation that the veterinarian of record has direct involvement and oversight. Additionally, failure to follow agreed upon protocols and procedures should be grounds for denial of provision of drugs or prescriptions except for an individual patient needing treatment at the time of examination. Routine examination of drug inventories on farm and product purchase records (pricing information is unnecessary) review are recommended. Cooperation with distributors is encouraged. Establishment of a VCPR for the sole purpose of the sale of drugs or increased sales of a particular brand of drug product is not a valid or ethical reason for having a VCPR.

WRITTEN/ELECTRONIC TREATMENT RECORDS April 2014 California Cattleman 13


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Genetically-Modified Animals Do we need them? What are the Risks? by Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., genetic specialist, University of California, Davis The prospect of genetically modified food animals has been looming on the horizon for over 30 years, ever since the first genetically modified, or more correctly, “genetically engineered,” mice were produced in the 1980s. Animal breeders have been “genetically modifying” animals using traditional breeding techniques for centuries, for example, developing the Chihuahua from its wolf progenitor. Genetic engineering (GE), however, refers to the use of recombinant DNA techniques or biotechnology to intentionally modify the genome of an animal to produce a desired outcome or trait. In the case of animals, this outcome might be an agriculturally related trait like improved disease resistance or a faster rate of growth, or something related to product composition such as pork with elevated levels of omega-3 fatty acids. There are currently no GE animals approved for food purposes. Conversely, GE plants, which were first produced in 1983, were approved for food purposes in the 1990s and have been rapidly adopted by farmers globally. Approximately 420 million acres of GE crops (12 percent of total arable land) were cultivated worldwide by 17.3 million farmers in 2012. This is a 100-fold increase from the 4.2 million acres that were planted in 1996, making GE the most rapidly adopted crop technology in recent history. During the period from 1996 to 2011, the cumulative economic benefits from cost savings and added income derived from planting GE crops is estimated to have been $49.6 billion in developing countries and $48.6 billion in industrial countries. A high proportion of the global soybean (81 percent), cotton (81 percent), corn (35 percent), and canola (30 percent) supplies are currently derived from GE crop varieties. Approximately 70 percent of processed foods available in U.S. grocery stores contain an ingredient from a GE crop. Animal agriculture is also highly

dependent on GE crops; over 70 percent of harvested GE biomass is fed to food-producing animals throughout the world. Even in the European Union (EU), where there is little cultivation of GE crops, it has been estimated that 80 percent of all animal feed is imported and that more than half of this is from GE crops imported from Brazil, the USA and Argentina. The EU imports approximately 70 percent of the soybean meal used in animal feed and of this 80 percent is GE. It has been projected that if the EU were not able to import soybean protein from outside the EU it would only be able to replace 10 to 20 percent of imports by high protein feed substitutes, and that this would result in a substantial reduction in animal protein production, exports and consumption and a very significant increase of animal protein imports into the EU. Despite the widespread adoption of GE crops, no GE animal has been approved for food consumption in any country. Pharmaceutical drugs produced by GE animals have received regulatory approval; however, the commercial approval of a GE food animal has yet to be accomplished. The first and currently only GE food animal up for approval, the fast-growing AquAdvantage salmon, has been undergoing regulatory review in the USA for over a decade. All regulatory studies, including food safety evaluations, were completed in 2009 at a cost of over $60 million. In 2010, the FDA determined that the “AquAdvantage Salmon is as safe as food from conventional Atlantic salmon” and that “no significant food safety hazards or risks have been identified with respect to the phenotype of the AquAdvantage Salmon.” Despite these findings and the proposed production of infertile triploid, all-female fish in contained inland tank systems to prevent escapement, no statement has yet been issued by the FDA regarding approval

14 California Cattleman April 2014

or otherwise of this first GE food animal. Part of the reason for this protracted regulatory evaluation of the AquAdvantage salmon has been pressure from special interest groups and a handful of elected officials to prevent the product coming to market. Some activist groups have even begun actively targeting supermarket chains to boycott the GE salmon by threatening to cease purchasing at those chains unless they cede to their demands. The on-going regulatory uncertainty has had a pervasive chilling effect upon the development and commercial adoption of GE animals. Regulatory inaction has the consequence of threatening not only the AquAdvantage salmon, but animal biotechnology in general. Although some might argue that this is a desirable outcome, it is not in society’s interest to give up on a promising set of technologies when science has consistently shown that there is nothing uniquely or inherently risky about food produced from GE animals or crops. The risks associated with GE animals may even be less than those associated with existing production systems. For example, Atlantic salmon are commonly produced in floating ocean net-pens. Hazards presented by conventional production include: (1) local eutrophication due to nutrient enrichment from decomposition of uneaten feed and animal wastes; (2) transmission of parasites and pathogens among cultured and wild fish populations; and (3) escapement of selectively-bred, fast-growing fertile salmon and interbreeding of cultured and wild Atlantic salmon populations. A shift to greater aquacultural production in on-shore facilities presents an option to reduce these environmental impacts and concomitantly decrease pressure on wild-caught fisheries. Demand for livestock products is expected to continue growing strongly through the middle of this century,


and by 2050 nearly twice as much meat will be produced as today. Some of the promising applications of this technology involve the development of GE animals that are disease resistant. For example, a consortium of scientists from New York University, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Nairobi, Kenya, the Roslin Institute and The University of Liverpool have been awarded a grant by The National Science Foundation of the USA and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop GE cattle that are resistant to African Bovine Trypanosomiasis. Trypanosomiasis is a disease caused by blood parasites of the genus Trypanosoma that are transmitted in Africa by tsetse flies (Glossina spp). Tsetse and trypanosomiasis threatens approximately 45 to 50 million head of cattle and are the major factors preventing the establishment of sustainable agricultural systems in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Direct losses in meat production and milk yield and the costs of programs that attempt to control trypanosomiasis are estimated to amount to up to $1.2 billion each year. If the disease did not exist, many more

families could use draught animals to plough their fields rather than manual labor. All told, trypanosomiasis is estimated to cost sub-Saharan Africa $4 billion or more each year. There are many other examples of potentially beneficial applications of GE animals, including applications that improve the healthfulness of animal products and the health and welfare of the animals themselves. These include GE animals with altered milk (e.g. decreased lactose) and meat (e.g. increased omega-3 fatty acids) composition for food purposes. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, are working on goats that produce milk which is protective against juvenile diarrhea, a major killer of infants in developing countries. Other researchers are working to develop GE animals that produce single-sex offspring in species where only one gender produces the food product, such as eggs or milk. Yet another group is working to edit the DNA sequence of a single gene in the bovine genome of horned cattle breeds to render them naturally hornless or polled, thereby negating the need for dehorning, an unpleasant process that is routinely carried out for both farmer

and animal safety. Relative to GE crops, the commercialization of GE food animals is at a nascent stage. Subjecting the GE animal approval process to prolonged political interference and unaccountable regulatory delay is having an inhibitory effect on the commercialization of this potentially beneficial technology. Focusing solely on the potential risks associated with GE animals while ignoring both the known risks associated with current production practices, and as importantly, the potential benefits, results in an uneven evaluation of the potential of this technology. Worldwide GE regulations have disproportionately focused only on the potential, and largely unrealized, risks associated with GE technology. While regulation to ensure the safety of new technologies is necessary, in a world facing burgeoning demands on agriculture from population growth, economic growth and climate change, creating an impassable regulatory hurdle for promising technologies is a roadblock that global food security can ill afford.

April 2014 California Cattleman 15


How you can mitigate the impacts By Larry Forero, Ph.D., and Glenn Nader, Ph.D., livestock farm advisors, University of California This spring, the lack of rainfall and snowpack in California has cattle producers working through a set of challenges many have never faced before. This article will discuss a list of actions to consider: annual rangeland forage production, destocking rangeland, feeds and feeding strategies and irrigated pasture. While it is likely that none of these comments will perfectly apply to your operation, the concept discussed might. Ranchers who have gone through previous droughts can be a valuable resource of possible options to consider. Your Bottom Line At the end of the day, your family ranching operation is your livelihood and the negative impacts of the severe drought have a myriad of implications for the property you manage, your cowherd and your bank account. As you formulate a game plan for dealing with drought, make sure your banker understands your drought plan and the financial ramifications of it. Taxes from Drought Induced Livestock Sales Drought induced sale of breeding animals could result in large tax liabilities. It is important to conserve as much of the equity from these sales as possible to rebuild the herd after the drought. There are two provisions in the tax code that address the ability of livestock owners to exercise deferment of taxes: IRS codes 451(e) and 1033(e). It is important that you discuss these with your accountant. The two sources in the sidebar at right can assist your accountant in their research of these options. Livestock Marketing Experts Keep in close contact with livestock marketing experts. They are in the market every day and know 16 California Cattleman April 2014

price and inventory trends. If you are contemplating early weaning or selling breeding cows, talk with them to develop a marketing strategy. An example is that in February the price of 300- to 400-pound calves were high enough that it may have been more prudent to sell off the cow than to wean and feed out calves to 500 pounds. Farm Advisor Assistance Take time to make a call to your local office to learn what resources might be available. Livestock farm advisors have access to cost studies, ration formulation software and a host of peer-reviewed publications to help guide decisions. NEED HELP WITH YOUR RANCH BUDGET? A one-page cow/calf budget that you can use to do simple management action calculations can be found at http://cesutter.ucanr.edu/Livestock_and_Range_Management/

OTHER TAX INFORMATION The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association offers a Q&A about Tax Options for Drought Sales of Livestock. Find it at:

http://www.beefusa.org/taxoptionsfordroughtsalesoflivestock.aspx

Weather Related Sales of Livestock http://ruraltax.org/files/uploads/Livestock%20Sales%20 (RTE%202010-09).pdf

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 20


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Cattlemen’s Capitol Concerns

Forest Management and Wildfire Prevention Package Passed The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and the Public Lands Council (PLC) this week hailed the U.S. House of Representatives Natural Resources Committee’s passage of the Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act, H.R. 1526, legislation to prevent the continuation of catastrophic wildfire events by improving federal forest management. The bill, passed on a voice vote, was offered by Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (R -Wash.) and includes prescriptive measures offered by various western congressional members whose districts are threatened by catastrophic

families and their communities, it has wildfire and forest mismanagement. PLC and NCBA specifically applauded also contributed to a massive overload of fuel. H.R. 1526 sets this upsidethe package’s inclusion of Rep. Paul Gosar’s (R-Ariz.) Catastrophic Wildfire down situation straight.” Prevention Act, which was introduced NCBA President Scott George, a as a stand-alone bill earlier in 2013. Cody, Wyo., rancher, stated that “Decades of mismanagement have unless Congress gives this turned our U.S. Forest Service and administration clear direction on forest Bureau of Land Management lands and range management, the entire into a tinderbox,” said PLC President nation stands to lose important wildlife and Hesperus, Colo. rancher, Brice habitat, watersheds and production of Lee. “Over the years, ranchers who food and fiber. Scott said that “if the count on the grass resources for their resources continue to go up in smoke, livelihoods have been told they must so does a huge portion of American scale back grazing. Not only has this livestock production. This hurts been economically damaging for their consumers everywhere.”

2013 Cattle Industry Summer Conference Around the Corner The National Cattlemen’s Beef women from across the country. Association (NCBA) is gearing up for “We are looking forward to an actionthe 2013 Cattle Industry Summer Conference which kicks off next week packed conference this summer in Denver. NCBA is a member-driven in Denver, Colo., Aug. 7-10. The organization and is the trusted leader conference features meetings of and definitive voice of the cattle Cattlemen's Beef Promotion & industry,” said George. “In order to Research Board (CBB), American continue being successful, cattle National CattleWomen, Inc. and National Cattlemen's Foundation. It is producers must continue to be engaged in the policy process so that where cattle producers discuss the beef industry remains viable and current issues as a group, work on beef continues to be on kitchen tables programs and initiatives and set the around the country and the world.” course the industry should take with various projects for the betterment of Conference highlights include the beef cattle industry. General Session I on Thurs. Aug 8, which officially kicks off the event. NCBA President Scott George said Rep. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) will take the event gives cattle farmers and ranchers an opportunity to engage in the stage to welcome the audience and give an update on what’s NCBA’s grassroots policy process happening in Washington, D.C. John while also networking with and Huston, executive vice president learning from other cattlemen and

emeritus of NCBA, will then address the group and discuss 50 years of the Federation of State Beef Councils. During General Session II on Fri., Aug. 9, NCBA and CBB leadership will identify the key outcomes and updates in both the policy and checkoff program areas and will set the stage for the focused plan of work for Fiscal Year 2014. Also, don’t miss the “Cattlemen’s Night at the Colorado Rockies,” where conference attendees can enjoy a night of peanuts and Cracker Jacks at the old ballgame as the Rockies take on the Pittsburgh Pirates. Only on-site registrations will be accepted for the conference after July 19. For more information, click here.

Correspondence and updates from Washington, D.C., as well as access to a vast array of producer education tools.

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Here’s what NCBA members are saying about the value of their membership “My NCBA membership saved me $1,000 on a John Deere tractor.” Steve – Prospect, TN “I’m an NCBA member because they are determined to preserve our way of life so we can pass our ranch on to our kids.” Cody – Wheatland, CA “Because of the New Holland discount, I was able to buy a new baler instead of a used one. Thanks NCBA!” Mary – Omaha, GA “As an NCBA member, I saved $7,000 on a new fully-loaded dually Ram truck! That’s well worth my annual dues.” Jerry – El Reno, OK “After joining NCBA I bought a new pair of Stetson boots and saved twice as much as what my membership cost.” Mark – Lincolnville, KS “I support NCBA because they are my eyes, ears and voice on issues that affect my operation every day.” Jeff – Onaway, MI

April 2014 California Cattleman 17

Here’s what NCBA


Land & Livestock Management Annual Rangeland Forage Production It is important to remember that most of the annual range forage production occurs in the months of March and April. The February rains provided much needed moisture to get production started. As we write this article (late February), rain is falling. If timely rains continue, we could have a productive spring. We have received many questions regarding the necessity of reseeding. Work done by University of California, Berkley, Professor James Bartlome, Ph.D., during the drought of the 1970s concluded there is adequate seed in the soil to assure future germination (see reference list at end of article). Now is the time to think about how to manage the residual forage at the end of the season. Hay prices may be high in the coming fall and leaving as much dry forage as possible could help get through the next winter with minimal feeding. If you can leave forage for next fall, be sure to consider a fire mitigation strategy of fire breaks or insurance. Destocking There are many factors that need to be considered when developing a drought plan that makes sense for your ranch. How many cows do you want to try to keep? There are values to keeping a core herd that include genetics, diseases and cattle’s familiarity of the range they graze. All of these attributes have real costs when rebuilding a herd. As you reduce herd numbers, determine how fixed costs will be covered. Some have used the equity from additional cow sales to cover those costs. But then, how do you rebuild the herd after the drought ends? Early Weaning Calves Early weaning will save the cow’s body condition and will reduce feed consumption. Both of these have longterm savings. The calves can be sold or confined and put on a higher plane of nutrition that will increase their gains. Lactation in cows increases their protein requirement by 100 percent and energy by 60 percent. Most producers will early wean 30 to 90 days before normal. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON EARLY WEANING, VISIT: http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/pages/publicationD. jsp?publicationId=1388

Alternative Cattle feedstuffs The first thing that ranchers say that they learned from past experiences is that you cannot afford to feed your way out of a drought. In limited droughts, purchase of hay to supplement on range can be implemented. The drought question will be how much additional spending on feed can be sustained. This will depend on many factors including calf prices at the time of sale, what the breeding pairs will be at the end of the drought and cash flow available. One of the advantages of cattle production in California is the alternative feeds that are available. These feeds are sold by food processing plants, commodity brokers or growers. Challenges in feeding include: 18 California Cattleman April 2014

• • •

Variation in their nutrient value Handling requirements Possible nutrient imbalances that can occur from feeding high levels of by-product feeds in the diet

Table 1. Concentrated Energy Sources Average Values (%)

Dry Matter

Crude Protein

TDN

Crude Fiber

Ash

Rice Bran

91

14

76

12

14.8

Almond Hulls

91

4.2

54

17

6.6

Canola Meal

88

36

63

10.6

6.3

By-Products and Unusual Feedstuffs in Livestock Rations. Western Regional Extension Publication No. 39, October 1980. 22 pages

Rice Bran Rice bran has been popular as an energy feed due to its 13 percent fat content. It also contains protein, B vitamins and very high levels of readily-available phosphorus. Feeding levels should not exceed 20 percent of the ration, as high amount of unsaturated fats can lower the cellulose digestion and impacts fat metabolism and absorption. Animals fed too much rice bran will go off feed or scour. Rice bran can be fed with salt to limit intake on a range operation. Intake needs to be monitored to adjust the salt level to reach the desired intake. The salt levels can increase water consumption. Almond Hulls Almond hulls are a good source of energy, but are lower in protein (4.5 percent). They can be fed in troughs. The major problem with the purchase of hulls is that some processors sell loads of hulls that may also contain low nutrient contaminates of shell or twigs. It is prudent to get a purity percent and or nutrient testing for crude fiber before comparing price quotes on almond hulls. Vegetable Oil Seed Meal Seed meal is another option that is available as an alternative feed source. The effectiveness of the processing plant to extract the oil from the seed will vary the energy content of the meal. Dairies are now using canola meal from Canada. It comes in pellets, as that is the only way they can ship it in rail cars to our area. Feed brokers can be one method of locating this feed. Corn Over the past year, we have seen corn come down in price. In other droughts, corn has been used to spare limited hay supplies. The general rule of thumb is that one pound of corn will replace two pounds of alfalfa or three pounds of meadow hay. The challenge for range operations is finding a way to feed corn at the ranch. Troughs or feeders work best. To prevent acidosis, use a two-week step adjustment period, feed whole corn at the same time each day and provide 30 inches of bunk space per cow. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FEEDING CORN, GO TO: http://www.okstate.edu/OSU_Ag/oces/timely/feeding.htm


Roughages During droughts or when dry matter is limited, rice straw and corn stover (baled corn stocks) have been used as low quality forage. It is recommended that before purchasing either of these products that a laboratory analysis should be conducted for Crude Protein (CP) and Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF). This allows the producer to select a product of the higher nutrient value that will decrease supplement costs to meet cattle needs. ADF is a laboratory method of determining the fiber content that can assist in predicting the digestibility of a feed. The lower the ADF, the more digestible the feed is. A dry beef cow requires a diet containing 7 percent crude protein. Table 2. Concentrated Energy Sources Crude Protein

ADF

Ash

Corn Stover

5.9

46

5.8

Rice Straw

4.5

48

16.6

Wheat Straw

3.6

52

7.2

Lima Bean Straw

7.6

39

9.3

Kidney Bean Straw

9.9

43

10.4

By-Products and Unusual Feedstuffs in Livestock Rations Western Regional Extension Publication, No. 39

Rice Straw A survey of over 70 harvested rice straw stacks found that they vary greatly in protein (2 to7 percent) and ADF (44 to 55 percent). The lower the CP percent of the straw, the higher the costs of additional feeds or supplements to meet the cow’s nutritional requirements. Suggested forage value criteria for rice straw for beef cattle are: • Crude Protein of 4.5% or higher • ADF of 50% or lower • Moisture of 12% or lower For more information on rice straw Consider the following publications: Feeding Rice Straw to Cattle - http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/ pdf/8079.pdf Rice Producers Guide to Marketing Rice Straw- http://anrcatalog. ucdavis.edu/pdf/8425.pdf Rice Straw Use in Dairy Heifer Rations - http://anrcatalog.ucdavis. edu/pdf/8392.pdf

Corn Stover Feeding of corn stover is best utilized by placing bales in feeders. Ranchers have observed more waste when just placing the corn stover bales free choice in the field which

usually does not occur with rice straw. Corn stover that have the stocks chopped before baling allow for more complete consumption. Nitrates can be a problem in corn stover, especially if non-protein nitrogen supplements are also being fed. Analysis for nitrates may also allow for prudent management of feed for the safety of the cattle. Irrigated Pasture This year is shaping up to be the shortest water year inrecent history. Limited snowpack and empty reservoirs make the possibility of full irrigation deliveries bleak. It is anticipated that irrigated pasture ranches available to rent this summer will be in short supply. Developing a strategy to deal with the lack of summer pasture now will make future decision making easier. Here are a couple of ideas to consider applying: •Irrigate as close to Evapotranspiration (ET) as possible. To obtain information on this go to www.cimis.water. ca.gov to find the location and site nearest to you. •Take the time to maintain your system prior to the start of irrigating. Fix the problems that have resulted in water loss and poorer distribution of water. •Carefully consider your past irrigation scheduling. Can you spread out irrigation intervals in the spring and fall without negatively affecting production? Irrigate on soil moisture content, not by a set day interval basis. The simple method is to dig down and check the moisture in the root zone. Purchase of water marks, which are probes placed in the soil, can provide more exact water management. •Reduce land area irrigated as water gets short. It may be more productive to focus what water you have on reduced acres with the best soil. Deciding now which fields are priorities to irrigate will make it easier to do if the time comes to cut back. •If you are going to fertilize, consider soil or plant tissue testing to make sure that if any nutrients other than nitrogen are limiting that they are addressed. Consider dividing the nitrogen applied into two applications for more efficient utilization. •Don’t overgraze these perennial pasture plants. Leaving 3 to 4 inches of stubble should facilitate fall growth should rain or additional irrigation water be available. Poison Plants UC veterinary toxicologists have seen an increase in occurrence of plant poisoning of cattle during droughts. Look at the poison plant publications in the reference section below to see what plants you have on your range. Avoidance of the infested area or treatment with herbicides could be options to consider.

Poisonous Plants, Refererences to consider: http://californiarangeland.ucdavis.edu/Publications%20pdf/8018_AnnForageProd http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/8034.pdf http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/repositoryfiles/ca3012p14-72081.pdf http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/8398.pdf

April 2014 California Cattleman 19


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USDA Reaching Out to Ranchers Impacted by Drought By Val Dolcini, state executive director, USDA Farm Service Agency A wetter than usual February has helped turn the brown hills of California’s coastal ranges and Sierra foothills a light shade of green and while these rangelands won’t be mistaken for Ireland any time soon, this precipitation was a welcome relief from weeks of severe drought conditions. Despite this much-needed rainfall, 2013 was one of the driest years in California’s history. In fact, some scientists think that we’re in the midst of one of the region’s driest periods since Sir Francis Drake landed on the California coast in the year 1579! We will need a sustained period of heavy precipitation throughout the remaining spring weeks to mitigate widespread drought-related impacts during the summer months ahead. These historic drought conditions have affected all of California’s farmers, ranchers and rural communities. Hundreds of thousands of acres will likely be fallowed throughout California, livestock and dairy herds across the state have been thinned or will be entirely sold off in some cases, municipal water sources are running dangerously low in some rural communities and thousands of farm workers will be unemployed in communities already hard hit by turbulent economic times. On top of all of this is the specter of higher food prices for consumers this summer as a result of the drought. In difficult times like these, whether it’s a freeze in the citrus belt, wildfires in the Sierra, unexpected flooding, or in this case, a historic statewide drought, the ‘safety net’ programs offered by the US Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency can offer a helping hand to affected farmers and ranchers that just might mean the difference between staying in business or closing the barn door for the last time. The men and women of the USDA are working every day with farmers and ranchers all across California to deliver programs, tools and reliable customer service that will help defray the costs of feed and water for livestock and develop new and permanent water sources for cattle

operations. We’re reaching out with a wide array of loans from low-interest microloans to emergency loans that can help with daily operating costs and other critical needs. We’re working to ensure that the disaster relief payments we make through our various programs are done in a timely and customerfriendly way while still maintaining the highest levels of program integrity. Finally, we’re preparing to roll out disaster assistance programs next month that will tackle the needs of California’s livestock industry hit hard by a third consecutive year of drought. These programs and others contained in the Farm Bill signed by President Obama earlier this year are a

part of a broader commitment that we make to each other as Americans to ensure that the farm families who grow our food are protected against the sometimes capricious whims of Mother Nature. The safety net won’t make these farming operations whole, but it will provide some hope and encouragement that better days are ahead and that the rain will fall once again. In the meantime, the US Department of Agriculture stands ready to help all of California’s farmers, ranchers and farmworkers to ensure that in these challenging times, the needs of those who grow and harvest the bounty of our fields are being met.

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marketing

Without Advertising, a Strange Thing Happens. Nothing. by American-International Charolais Association Exectuve Vice President, J. Neil Orth Reprinted with permission from the Charolais Journal

Each year, the first quarter is stacked with industry events that most always set the stage for the rest of the year. Denver and the National Western Stock Show kick off the year, followed by Fort Worth, San Antonio, Houston, then spring junior livestock shows, spring production sales and national and state conventions. These events provide multiple, unprecedented opportunities to market your product and promote your brand to literally every sector of beef production. The American-International Charolais Association Board of Directors approved a new advertising campaign at the fall meeting. The ads are a mix of print and digital advertising and are components of a more extensive marketing strategy designed to drive traffic to the AICA website, www.CharolaisUSA.com, a virtual library of all Charolais resources. Several years ago, AICA changed its mindset from simply placing an ad in media and an occasional radio spot during the early morning market

report was the extent of affordable advertising. Today, digital and Internet media opportunities are increasing at warp speed. Savvy beef producers can take advantage of social media through Facebook and YouTube and instantly connect with an audience. AICA launched a Facebook page prior to the Junior National events in 2013. More than 700 folks follow our Facebook page. Some may perceive “social media” as, well, social. It is. But, it’s also a medium to instantly connect with people wanting to know about you and your product. Through social media, we have immediate access to promote the Charolais message. Due to the cyclical nature of the cattle business, some years’ potential buyers are more interested than others. Check out your favorite source of industry news and you are bound to read about the bullish cattle market print to strategically thinking how to maximize every placement regardless of media. Collecting the web data and

22 California Cattleman April 2014

analyzing the results have been exciting and interesting, but most of all, valuable to the AICA brand-building process From Jan. 1, 2013, through Sept. 30, 2013, www.CharolaisUSA. com averaged more than 10,800 total visits per month. More than 31 percent of the total were new visits. We know from our analysis, on average, visitors browse 2.12 pages per visit and see more than 23,000 pages per month. Our digital advertising, all linking to the

“Savvy beef producers can take advantage of social media through Facebook and YouTube and instantly connect with an audience.”


website, was directly responsible for nearly 4,000 new visits. This time of the year, it’s a foregone conclusion most producers would rather have a root canal than deal with advertising, ad salesmen or publication representatives! Calving, feeding and breeding tend to be allconsuming this time of year. Getting the catalog information (and all things related) organized is necessary—just not a priority for most ranchers. Consequently, advertising, while necessary, is done without much expectation, other than to promote a sale. A wise marketer once said, “Doing business without advertising is like winking in the dark. You know what your are doing, but nobody else does.” Before the Internet, as far as a typical beef producer is concerned, print forecast. It is important now, more than anytime in recent history, to promote your brand and your product. The new national AICA ads are available for AICA members to use in their own promotional efforts. The ads can be customized and resized for state or regional affiliates and designated to your choice of publications. You now have multiple digital options through AICA and an array of publications. Producers can promote through banner ads on websites by the day or month. Your promotional message can now reach thousands through email blasts that link to your website or the destination of your choice. The sale catalog is a great genetic reference tool. Now, your finished sale catalog can be available online with a link to the digital version on your website. Some producers are likely overwhelmed and still do not feel confident with new media opportunities. Seek out marketing professionals that can better explain the media as well as the cost effective advantages. At the end of the day, you have a product that is industry relevant, in demand and you have a brand to promote. This year, 2014, may define the beef industry for the next generation. You may not have a better, more favorable marketing environment for many years to come. For more information on the Charolais breed, visit www.CharolaisUSA.com.

Charolais News

The AICA 50K Genotype Project The American-International Charolais Association has been working to build a research database of 50K genotypes. This database will serve as the research base to help make the incorporation of DNA into genomically-enhanced EPD (GE-EPD) for AICA. AICA already has available to them 50K (and High Density, HD) genotypes on some animals through various research projects including the Weight Traits Project and the Bull 2000 Project with the Meat Animal Research Center (MARC). The initial recommendation for AICA to move forward is to establish a research database on 1,000 progeny proven sires. This should allow AICA to develop an effective panel with the ability to predict GE-EPD and improve accuracy of selection, especially on younger bulls and females. Research projects of this size require a breed-wide effort and the cooperation of Charolais breeders is needed to help build the discovery population. The AICA Board of Directors is asking for membership support to submit DNA samples (50K SNP test) on their herd sires as well as those high accuracy sires they’ve owned in the past. The results of this project will be of benefit to every member of AICA and those commercial producers using Charolais genetics through GE-EPD that have higher accuracy values for animals at younger ages. AICA has worked to build a list of animals already known to have 50K genotype available so that as few animals as possible are genotyped more than once. Please see the lists of specific animals that have already been tested in addition to the list of those animals which are of high accuracy and for which 50K’s are desired. This list of desired sires was made available through the Animal Breeding faculty at Iowa State University based on informative accuracy in the current AICA genetic evaluation. Genotypes through this project in the discovery population will be owned by the AICA to be used for research and genetic prediction. While the AICA Board of Directors appreciates that many breeders will cover the cost to 50K genotype those sires listed on the “Desired” list AICA has directed funds to help get AICA to the targeted number of 1,000 informative sires. Please check these lists periodically as they will be updated as more animals are genotyped. When possible AICA will add more animals to the “Desired” list as funds permit. For more information regarding sample collection, sample handling and submission of samples please contact the AICA office. April 2014 California Cattleman 23


the National On From American-International Junior Charolais Association Secretary Chelsea Woodcock

I

may not have descended from generations of cattle ranchers, but you could say I was born into the cattle world. I attended my first cattle show at San Francisco’s Cow Palace when I was only four days old, where my parents were exhibiting 15 head of Charolais. As I grew up, my parents wanted to ensure that raising cattle was something I was committed to, before I could have a heifer to show and raise. We had two Charolais cows at the time – “Lucky” and “Quaky.” I raised two market steers before my first heifer “Havannah” was born. The day “Havannah” was born was one of the most exciting days in my life. It was with her that I used to learn how to fit, clip and improve my showmanship skills. For the next two years, I took “Havannah” all across California to different jackpots, my county fairs and state fair. Today, my family runs a small herd of Charolais breeding cattle near Clovis which we drag to shows around the state and around the country. Along the way, my brother John and sister Josie began to show too. We all became heavily involved in the AmericanInternational Junior Charolais Association (AIJCA) and have now attended nine Charolais Junior National Shows. I consider myself lucky and grateful that each summer my parents load up the trailer with cattle to travel halfway across the country for a week at Charolais Jr. Nationals. In 2009, I was elected to serve as the Area 2 representative to the AIJCA Board of Directors. This position gave me many responsibilities that included communicating with the juniors in the western part of the United States, attending board meetings twice a year,

Stage

promoting our breed and helping run the Charolais Jr. Nationals. I am now serving my second year as Secretary. I have had the opportunity to attend and help run the National Charolais show at several stock shows including the National Western Stock Show in Denver, Colo.; Fort Worth Stock Show in Fort Worth, Texas; and American Royal in Kansas City, Mo., as well as attend Youth Beef Industry Congress (YBIC) during the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s Cattle Industry Convention and Trade Show in 2012. At YBIC, I met the leaders of the other breed associations, participated in leadership building activities and listened to guest speakers about being activists for agriculture. The message I took away from all my experiences was to get up and share my story. Last year, I was selected to represent the Charolais breed’s young members and attend a genomics conference in Nebraska. In attendance with around a dozen other college level students, we toured GeneSeek and the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center Neb. During our trip, we sat in on the yearly meetings with the ranchers invested in the research of the Weight Traits Project. It was an eye-opening experience to see the research invested in the future of the beef industry. When I started college in 2010, the first organization I joined was the Young Cattlemen’s Association at California State University, Fresno. This was one of the best decisions I have made because it not only introduced me to new people, who I now call friends, but also to people in the industry. I have enjoyed serving at barbecues and talking to ranchers and their families. Every year our group tries to take an end-of-theyear trip. Last year we stayed local but had the opportunity to tour different sectors in the agriculture industry. I will be graduating from Fresno State this December and plan on applying to veterinary school to study to be a large animal veterinarian. Parts of my future may be unclear but one thing I am certain of – there will be cattle in it.

Chelsea Woodcock, pictured at left with brother John Woodcock while showing at the 2013 American-International Junior Charolais Association Junior National Show and Leadership Conference in Texarkana, Ark., is a born-and-raised Californian who has served on the AIJCA Board since 2009. She is currently the secretary of both AIJCA and the Fresno State YCA.

24 California Cattleman April 2014


California

Charolais Breeders

AvIlA CATTle CO. Mike, Char, Mikie, Bobby & Bailey Avila 19760 Amen lane, Cottonwood, CA (530) 347-1478 • cavila1956@att.net

Bulls sell at the Red Bluff Bull Sale and off the ranch. Select females for sale private treaty.

BIANCHI RANCHeS Robert, Chris & Erica Bianchi 6810 Canada Rd. Gilroy, CA (408) 842-5855 • (408) 842-4945 Fax (408) 804-3133 Robert’s cell Bianchiranches@aol.com

Bulls and females available at the ranch. Call early for best selection. Watch for bulls at leading fall sales as well.

Charolais POUNDS =PROFIT

BROkeN BOx RANCH Jerry and Sherry Maltby PO Box 760, Williams, CA

(530) 681-5046 Cell • (530) 473-2830 Office BBR@citlink.net • www.brokenboxranch.com Bulls available at the 2014 Black Gold Bull Sale, Sept. 11, in Colusa, or off the ranch.

FReSNO STATe AGRICUlTURe FOUNDATION California State University, Fresno

2415 e. San Ramon, Fresno, CA Randy Perry (559) 278-4793 http://jcast.fresnostate.edu/beef/ Purebred herds/bull and heifer development Martin Castro (559) 380-7442 Commerical Cattle: Anthony Suniga (209) 840-9541 Bulls available each June during our private treaty bull sale, as well as leading fall sales.

JORGeNSeN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen 25884 Mollier, Ave, Orland, CA (530) 865-7102

D

ifferences do exist in the marketability or value of different beef breeds and breed crosses. We don’t disagree that black-hided calves are some of the most marketable in the industry. However, we believe strongly in the value of crossbreeding and the benefits of heterosis or hybrid vigor.

Crossbred calves are more vigorous at birth, they are more resistant to disease and they have increased performance levels or weight gain. In addition, crossbred beef cows have higher fertility levels, they are also more disease resistant and they are superior in terms of longevity, an often overlooked but very economically important trait in a beef herd. These combined factors result in the generation of more total Nicoli Nicholas 6522 Vernon Rd., Nicolaus, CA • (916) 455-2384 pounds of beef being produced from a commercial cowherd when crossbreeding is utilized. Breeding Charolais cattle for 54 years, 150 bulls Top quality bulls available at the ranch private treaty.

NICHOlAS lIveSTOCk CO. available private treaty in 2014.

ReIS lIveSTOCk Tony, Mary, Nathan & Nicole Reis

648 Cowee Ave., Gridley, CA 95948 (530) 846-3940 • (530) 682-0305 reis@digitpath.net • www.reislivestock.com Cattle for sale private treaty at the ranch.

We believe that Charolais bull are the logical and best choice to use on the Angusdominated commerical beef cowherd that currently exists in this country. They will infuse the benefits of heterosis and produce the “smokies” and “buckskins” that have been popular with cattle feeders and packers for decades

. Look for these California Charolais breeders from throughout the state as your source for Charolais genetics available off the ranch or at leading California and Nevada sales.

April 2014 California Cattleman 25


New Perennial Grass Tested For Sacramento Valley Rangeland by Josh Davy, University of California Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor Tehama, Glenn, Colusa counties Multi-year testing has shown great promise in the use of a new perennial grass for dryland range. The variety is called ‘flecha’ fescue. Unlike most fescues planted in irrigated pasture, flecha is completely summer dormant and would not be used for irrigated pastures. It greens up with the first fall rains and remains green until fully senescing from mid June to early July depending on spring rainfall. During early summer it becomes fully dormant and will remain so until fall. It also differs from traditional fescues such as ‘fawn’ tall fescue by being much finer leaved. Once established it has proven palatable, drought resistant, grazing tolerant, and very productive. There is no perfect plant, all have their drawbacks. For example, annual ryegrass produces a lot of feed and is easy to establish, but doesn’t reseed itself well in subsequent years. The drawback for this plant is the establishment phase. Flecha fescue is very slow to establish the first year. It requires good seed placement and complete weed control for establishment success. Discing and other intensive ground preparation is usually not necessary. The ideal step by step plan for obtaining good weed control and establishing a dryland pasture of flecha fescue would be:

“Flecha” fescue at the end of it’s seedling year.

1. Spray the desired planting area in March or April the spring before planting. 2. Let the first fall rain germinate the planting area. 3. Plant flecha fescue at 5 pounds/acre using a no-till drill. 4. Apply broadleaf weed control the spring after planting. Additionally, it doesn’t tolerate grazing for the first year of the establishing period. These factors require careful consideration before trying to establish this plant because cutting any corners will lead to establishment failure. It is however, capable of establishing on very dry years if weed control and seed placement are adequately addressed. Once established, it is usually wise to defer grazing in May to allow the plant to build root reserves for summer dormancy. The dryland pasture can be heavily grazed in the summer and early fall if desired. In the fall, persistence is helped if the plants are allowed to grow for a while after their initial green up. Moderately grazing from late fall through spring and then again in the summer are advised and will not negatively affect the planted stand density. Flecha fescue is marketed by PGG seeds. Most seed vendors are able to order the seed through various distributors in California and Oregon. Currently, flecha fescue is free of endophyte infection in the United States. The seed cost varies yearly from $2 per pound to around $5.50 per pound.

26 California Cattleman April 2014

Established “flecha” fescue.

For more information on this grass or other grasses that would suit your operation, contact your University of California, Cooperative Extension Livestock, Farm and Rangeland Advisor.


FUTURE FOCUS 10 Steps to Internship Success Making the Most of Your Job Experience by CCA Associate Director of Communications and Young Cattlemen’s Committee Advisor Malorie Bankhead As ambitious agriculture students and career people in the making, now is the time of year that young professionals should begin making plans for summer. Whether it is a part-time job to help pay for next term’s books or a non-paid internship to help fulfill your requirements for graduation, the summer is a perfect time to figure out what you want to do once you have earned your degree. An internship can even help you impress the right people who can help you pave your path to your future dream job. Have you already begun the process of attaining an internship but have questions about the next steps and how to achieve them? Here are a few tips you should consider as your summer internship experience nears. Check these off your list and you’ll be well on your way to graduation and, as scary as it may seem, the real world!

Landing your dream internship

Sometimes this is easier said than done. However, like Walt Disney said, “If you can dream it, you can achieve it.” Make a plan you’d like to execute during your summers – or even other times of the year – in college. That way you’ll have a better idea of what you will need to strive for as you check your goals off your list. You can prepare for your dream internship by building your skill sets and developing the proficiencies you will need before you apply by taking certain classes or participating in various extra-curricular activities that will help make you an ideal candidate when it comes time to apply for the internship. Reach out to someone you respect as a business professional to help you groom your resume so that when your potential employer sees what you have to offer, he or she won’t be able to tell you no.

Actively communicate

Keep in contact with your future employer after you get the “Congratulations!” email. There will be details to sort out like where will you stay? Will your housing be covered by the company? What should you pack? What is the company dress code? When will you start? When will you complete your last day? Questions like these are best answered before you begin your journey with your internship experience. You can hash out a list of things you’d like to accomplish during your internship, too. Let your supervisor know ahead of time so that arrangements can be made for you to get the most out of your internship from a personal growth standpoint.

potentially meet during your internship who you will want to stay in touch with long after your last day.

Create a personal brand

Remember, if you wouldn’t show it to your grandmother, don’t post it on social media. Sharing your story throughout your internship can help you create a personal brand for yourself, one that others will recognize you for on social media platforms. Remember that as an intern for the company, you are connected with them, and therefore anything you put on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook is an indirect reflection of them. Unsavory things on social media can keep you from getting an internship at all as many of today’s employers use social media to screen potential hirees. Give your posts the “grandma test” and you should be fine. If you’re actually friends with your grandma on Facebook, that’s even better.

Travel

College is well-known for one of the only times in your life you’ll have the freedom to travel to awesome places and benefit from it, besides retirement, but that’s not on your

Make friends

The more you grow your network, the more you will thank yourself later. The world really is small, and it’s even smaller in agriculture. Do you have personal business cards? They don’t have to be anything fancy, but they are handy to have when making a connection with someone. Your name, major, school and contact information should be enough to keep the relationships you form going, which could help you down the road. You’d be surprised how many life-long friends you could

28 California Cattleman April 2014

Pictured above is California State University Student Cain Madrigal who completed an internship in the summer of 2013 with Harris Feeding Company, Coalinga.


Remember These 5 Rs Reach Out: You’ll never know if you don’t try, so don’t be afraid to put yourself out there!

Resume: Lean on experienced professionals to help you fine-tune your resume.

Responsibility: Show that you are reliable and

mature enough to handle anything thrown your way.

Respect: Show those you work with that you value their experience and advice.

Reconnect: Stay in touch with your co-workers

because they could be a stepping stone to your future.

agenda for a long time. Even if you travel relatively far from home to fulfill an internship, be sure to make time to explore on the weekends if you aren’t traveling for work, which also counts for this step. Consider traveling to a place away from home for your internship and travel while you’re at your internship – for work and for pleasure.

Follow directions

As a temporary “newbie” it is quite possible you might not be at the company long enough to truly figure out all the ins and outs of working where you landed your dream internship. It’s best to always follow directions. You can certainly add your own flair on your projects, because everyone has different strengths when it comes to different things, but make sure that you act as the upstanding temporary representative of the company that you are.

internship, your dress code may vary. If you can rock blue jeans for a ranch management internship or button up shirt and slacks for a marketing internship, do it, but make sure what you choose to wear always positively reflects on you, your company and your colleagues.

Inquire about future opportunities

At the completion of your internship, there may be opportunities for future permanent employment, and it never hurts to ask about the possibility. If throughout your internship, you feel you’ve proven yourself and your abilities to you temporary employer, when you ask the question they may agree to become your permanent employer. In some cases, you will know going in whether or not you have the option of being hired full-time by the company when you complete your internship. Sometimes you may be able to secure your first job out of college the summer of your junior year. Usually the most appropriate time to inquire about staying on or becoming full-time is during an end of an internship evaluation meeting, which will generally take place with the human resources director or your direct supervisor at the end of your internship.

Have fun

After all, since step 1 is ‘landing your dream internship,’ why wouldn’t you have a blast during the several months you get to spend with a company you may want to work for when you graduate? Your dream internship could become your dream job! Make friends, learn a lot, grow your skill set, challenge yourself, be the best you can be and take it all in, because before you know it, the experience is over and you’re headed back to school to continue to learn, grow and prepare for your future, and eventually the real world.

Ask questions

It’s better to ask forgiveness than to ask permission, right? Wrong. In an internship setting, you will most likely go through a rigorous training, because after all, you are a new employee. If you’re unsure of something, ask. If you have a new idea to incorporate, ask. If you’d like to go on that trip with a coworker in your department, ask. The worst feedback you can get is a “no.” In which case, you can try again later. But it’s always better to clarify and follow directions than to jump the gun and make a mistake.

Dress to impress

Not all internship situations may call for a suit and tie, but stay conscious of your appearance. It’s always better to over dress than under dress in any circumstance. If you’re questioning an outfit, it’s probably best to leave it in your closet. However, depending on what your duties entail during your

Pictured above is CCA’s Young Cattlemen’s Committee Chair Katie Stroud, who worked as a range management intern for University of California Cooperative Extension in Glenn, Colusa and Tehama counties. Internships are a great way to see if a particular job is for you as well as build professional relationships. April 2014 California Cattleman 29


PETTYJOHN RANCH

16,000-acre outdoor oasis

cattle • hunting • fishing The 16,000-acre Pettyjohn Ranch is west of Red Bluff, CA, and surrounded by privately-owned lands. Owned by one family for over 50 years, it represents what a distinctive cattle and hunting ranch should look like. Blue oaks dot the hilly countryside from meadows to steep wooded valleys where trophy blacktail deer hide. Water is the life-blood of any ranch and can be found everywhere on the Pettyjohn. Ther are many reservoirs, springs and seasonal streams. Cottonwood Creek runs for five miles through the ranch as does Cold Fork Creek for several miles. Both run year-round. You can ride and hike these valleys for days of endless fun. On a seasonal basis, the Pettyjohn Ranch will feed 800+ cow-calf pair. In addition, the ranch supports many and various kinds of game for the sportsman. There are numerous black bear, wildhogs, mountain lions and large trophy-size blacktail deer sought by many hunters. There are two seasonal wild turkey hunts. And, because of all the ranch water, quail and dove are found in abundance. Bass can be caught anytime in the large reservoirs. There aren’t very many ranches like the Pettyjohn. Asking price: $16 million

Van Cleve Associates

David Van Cleve, Broker • Oregon - California Ranch Brokerage 530-906-3978 • www.VanCleveRanches.com

NOWG HIRIN

Bartlett Cattle, llP, has great oPPortunities for exPerienCed feedyard managers, suPervisors and workers. with two feedyards – in southwest kansas & the texas Panhandle – we have a ComBined feeding CaPaCity of 100,000 head. Bartlett Cattle owns all of the Cattle that it feeds and emPloys a disCiPlined risk management PhilosoPhy. this strategy has made Bartlett Cattle a staBle and ProfitaBle Business.

We are interested in meeting the following:

Feedyard assistant managers Pen riders Cattle processors

Feedyard & feedmill supervisors Feed truck drivers Feedmill personnel

to learn more about Bartlett and these opportunities, contact matt Babler at 800-860-7290.

RELOCATION ASSISTANCE IS AVAILABLE! As a top agricultural company, Bartlett offers competitive pay and a great benefits package including health and life insurance premiums paid 100% for employee, 401(k) with company match, company sponsored profit sharing plan, paid vacation/holidays, short term disability insurance paid by the company, pharmacy plan, dental and vision coverage, and more. Bartlett Cattle Company is an affiliate of Bartlett and Company - a diverse, agri-business company headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri. Bartlett is more than 100 years old, and FORBES ranks it among the largest private companies in the U.S. Its principal businesses are grain merchandising and logistics, exporting, flour milling, feed manufacturing and cattle feeding. Family-owned and growth oriented, the company has facilities in Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Oklahoma, North and South Carolina, Texas, Virginia and Mexico. Financially strong and highly disciplined, we use our expertise to provide our customers with high quality products and excellent service. Throughout our operations, safety, cleanliness, and facility maintenance are a top priority and, as such, all employees must be absolutely committed to following our disciplined safety policies and procedures.

30 California Cattleman April 2014


April 2014 California Cattleman 31


CHIMES CattleWomen Hang Hats In Selma for Spring Meeting by CCA Associate Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead What do you get when you combine a group of 56 California CattleWomen, Inc., (CCW) members representing 15 California counties for a weekend with guest speakers, an industry tour and more? The answer is a spring meeting chock full of passion, commitment and an eagerness to continue to provide exemplary beef education to consumers and students alike. CCW members met at the Swan Court Conference Center in Selma March 7 through March 9 for the Beef Promotion Spring Meeting with the theme “Hang Your Hat in Selma.” CCW Beef Promotion Chair Susan Cochrane, Paso Robles, planned a weekend filled with educational opportunities for cattlewomen to stay informed and up-to-date on beef education surrounding food safety. On Saturday, Brandon Carlson, Ph.D., assistant vice president of operations at Harris Ranch Beef Company, presented to the group about food safety as it relates to the beef industry. The first photo on his presentation depicted a beef cow standing in a lush, green field. After pointing out that the photo indicates hope for the future, he noted that cattle ranchers are eternal optimists when it comes to production set-backs like the drought. Carlson continued to speak on food safety in the beef industry by explaining a timeline of important events that have occurred surrounding food safety. He touched on topics like E. Coli O157 H7, “the cow that stole Christmas” in 2003, and other issues that the beef industry works to combat daily. He went on to

say that the research arm of the Beef Checkoff helps to keep testing methods current, and grassroots members of the cattle community are to thank for helping to fund research on food safety. “Food safety is a non-compete item in the beef industry,” Carlson said. “We are all committed to the best.” CCW members Sarah Kramer, Pason Robles, and Ann Cochrane, Paso Robles, facilitated a communications workshop titled “Exploring Your Colors,” which helped cattlewomen determine what kind of personalities they have by taking a short quiz to determine their color. Their color told them what kinds of things may be most important to them, what their likes and dislikes are and the strengths and weaknesses of their personality type. The lesson of the workshop was learning what personalities their peers and fellow cattlewomen associated with and predicting what types of traits to be aware of that the consumers they encounter might bring to the table. “Not everyone may be just like you,” Cochrane said. “But you may be able to cater your message if you learn to pick up how consumers and your working partners will best receive your message when you communicate with them.” Meeting participants had the opportunity to tour Reedley-based Sun Valley Packing, a family-owned fruit and vegetable growers and shipping company, to meet with Chace Jiminez, food safety manager at the packing facility. The event was well received by the cattlewomen who attended, as the tour provided a parallel view of food safety in the fruit packing industry, as it is very similar to

32 California Cattleman April 2014

food safety protocols in the beef industry. After the tour, past CCW president Melanie Fowle, Etna, and current American National CattleWomen (ANCW) President-elect, helped the ladies in attendance refine their beef advocacy skills by brushing up on facts to share with consumers as well as delivery techniques. In friendly competition, Fowle went through a typical consumer presentation and called upon cattlewomen to answer the questions asked of consumers to test their knowledge. Everyone in the room passed with flying colors and learned something new in the process. After a beef industry quiz, cattlewomen were awarded for their A+ efforts in the lesson with bunny rabbit prizes in honor of spring time. The final day of the meeting played host to the general board meeting. Various reports were given by each committee chair with updates on their upcoming activities and calls to action for CCW membership. Some highlights included the Region VI ANCW meeting to take place in Lake Tahoe April 30 through May 2. All cattlewomen are encouraged to attend and bring a friend. You need not be a member of ANCW to attend. Another announcement was made that CCW will be participating in the ANCW Sam’s Club promotion event helping provide beef education to consumers in Sam’s Clubs across the United States over the course of six weekends from April to September. For more information about upcoming events, committee updates and beef industry news, visit www. cattlewomen.org.


CCA Photos

Brandon Carlson, Ph.D, Harris Ranch Beef Company spoke about food safety protocols at Harris Ranch.

Susan Cochrane, CCW Beef Promotion Chair with Karen Rickman who won the “money hat” drawing for attending all parts of the day Saturday.

CCW members Sarah Kramer (above left) and Ann Cochrane (above right) facilitated a personality test workshop called “Exploring Your Colors.”

Shelia Bowen, CCW first vice president, shared about the upcoming Region VI ANCW meeting in Lake Tahoe.

Chace Jimenez, food safety manager at Sun Valley Packing gives cattlewomen a tour of the processing plant.

Bill Dale, executive director of the California Beef Council spoke on Beef Checkoff revenue during the drought.

CattleWomen listen to Chace as he explains the fruit washing process.

Melanie Fowle, president-elect of the American National CattleWomen facilitated a beef advocacy workshop.

CCW member Barbara Cowley with CCA Associate Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead.

ANCW Outstanding CattleWoman of the Year, Joan Hemsted, with ANCW President Elect Melanie Fowle and CCW President Tammie McElroy.

Mustard andTime: Peppercorn Marinated Hangar Steak 4 to 36 hours • Serves 6-8 people

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 tablespoons coriander seeds 1 tablespoon black peppercorns 1 tablespoon brown mustard seeds 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 2 cloves 1 tablespoon kosher salt 3/4 cup canola oil Six 6-ounce pieces hanger steak, 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick INSTRUCTIONS 1. Coarsely grind the coriander seeds, peppercorns, mustard seeds, cumin seeds and cloves in an electric coffee/spice grinder. Sift the ground spices through a coarse sieve into a bowl. Stir in the salt and 1/4 cup of the oil. Generously pat the spice rub all over the steak. Marinate the steaks, covered and refrigerated, for at least 4 and up to 36 hours. 2. Bring the steak to room temperature and preheat the oven to 375°F. Heat 1/4 cup of the remaining oil in a 12-inch skillet over moderately high heat until it shimmers and sear three pieces of steak on all sides, about 3 to 6 minutes. (Don’t rush this step; careful browning will add great flavor.) 3. Transfer the steak to a baking sheet with sides. Sear the remaining steak in the remaining oil in the same way and transfer to the baking sheet. Put the baking sheet in the middle of the oven and cook the steaks, without turning them, for 4 to 6 minutes for medium-rare meat. 4. Transfer the steaks to a cutting board and let them rest at room temperature for 5 to 10 minutes. Cut them against the grain at a 45-degree angle into 1/4- to 1/2-inch slices. Arrange the meat on a warm platter. Pour any pan juices over it and serve at once. April 2014

California


M i d Va l l e y B u l l

S a l e

34 California Cattleman April 2014


2014 Bull Sale Sun., Sept. 7

M i d Va l l e y B u l l

S a l e

M i d Va l l e y B u l l

S a l e

April 2014 California Cattleman 35


The Best of Both Worlds

Phone 707.448.9208

h

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

36 California Cattleman April 2014


Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now Available!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

April 2014 California Cattleman 37


REAL ESTATE

“Specializing in farm and ranch properties� K. Mark Nelson

Ryan Nelson

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

38 California Cattleman April 2014


Do you have a business that has something to offer to California beef producers? Consider advertising in our buyers’ guide inexpensive

EFFECTIVE

professional

for more information on rates contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113 or

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

April 2014 California Cattleman 39


IN MEMORY HELEN BARLOW TALBOT Helen Julia Barlow Talbot was born Aug. 20, 1916 in Bishop, the oldest of four children of Arthur and Edith Barlow. Her grandfather was one of the early settlers in the Owens Valley and Barlow Lane was named after the family. She passed away peacefully on Feb. 21, 2014. Helen attended the Old West Bishop Grammar School and graduated from Bishop High School in 1934. She attended Occidental College for a year and later graduated from Woodbury Business College in Los Angeles. Upon graduation Helen worked for the Nevada-California Electric Power Company as secretary to Superintendent Dave Bromley. In 1938 Helen married Clark Talbot who had come to Bishop from Burbank to help his brother Ralph manage the Talbot Dairy. They had three sons, Steve, Bill and Tom. Helen was a homemaker and loved cooking and helping run the many family businesses, especially the family cattle operation – she was the chief cook and organizer-serving many meals to cowboys, children, grandchildren and many friends.

Helen was a member of the First United Methodist Church for more than 75 years and very active in the United Methodist Women. She was also a member of the Bishop Lady Bills. Helen is survived by her three sons and their wives, Steve and Jill of Gardnerville, Nev., Bill and Sharon and Tom and Laura all of Bishop. She had nine beloved grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren with one more on the way: Geoff, Darcy and Trace of Lafayette, Brinn, Sophia and Katarina of Truckee, Ryan of Squamish, British Columbia, Tobyn of Oakland, Chris and Lianne of Bishop, Tori, Jon and Grayson of Charlottesville, Va., Tim, Lenee and Ruger of Bishop and Kelly, Taylor, Shealyn, Tannyr and Jessie of Bishop, Kayla of Bishop and Ashley and Ben of Boise, Idaho. She is also survived by her sister, Betty Gillespie of Bishop; and her brother and sister-in-law, Jack and Betty Anne Barlow of West Hills and a niece and many nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Clark and her brother, Art Barlow, Jr. For those wishing to remember Helen, memorial donations may be made to the United Methodist Church or to the Alzheimer’s Care Center in honor of Helen’s husband Clark.

at the board of directors for 25 and in JAMES H. BICKFORD 1982 was honored as Cattleman of the James Herbert Bickford rodeo off Year. He also served on CCA’s Cattle into the sunset for the final time on Jan. Health Committee for over 30 years. 17. Born to Joseph Arthur and Margaret In addition, he served on the board of Biggs Bickford in Sacramento in 1917, directors for both the Placer County Jim grew up on the Bickford Ranch Farm Supply and Placer County Farm in Lincoln and is a 1934 graduate of Bureau. Lincoln High School. In 1988, Bickford moved his cattle He attended Sacramento City operation to Beaver Creek Ranch in College and University of California, Pittville and expanded the cow-calf Berkely, graduating in 1941 in Electrical operation to include sheep and hay. Engineering. Bickford went to work as an Following his dad and grandfather, enginner at the Naval Ship Yard on Mare Bickford was the third generation in the Island, Vallejo. In 1946, he entered the family cattle operation that continued for U.S. Army and was deployed to Okinawa, 137 years. in 2011, Bickford was named Japan. Fall River-Big Valley Cattleman of the Bickford returned to Sacramento in Year. 1947 and began work with the Bureau He was also involved in the of Reclamation. He married Dorothy Freemasons organization for 67 years. Waite in 1948 and in 1957, Bickford He is survived by his wife Dorothy, gave up his career in Sacramento and the four children: Ken (Gitch) of Fall River family returned to the Bickford ranch to Mills; Ron (Barbara) of Rocklin; Carol provide the children a better quality of (Bill) Buckman of Pittville; and Larry life. (Tina) of San Jose; six grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren. As a charter member of the Tahoe Cattlemen’s Association, Bickford served 40 California Cattleman April 2014

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New Arrivals Starla Sisil Col. Tim Sisil and wife Sheryl Sisil, Madera, welcomed baby girl Starla Gayle Sisil on Tuesday, March 4, when she entered the world weighing 7 pounds 9 ounces.. She joins big sisters Sydney and Sophia. Grandparents are Gary and Linda Geist, Madera and Dan and Pat Dewees from Merced. Tyson Ludwick Taylor Ludwick, DVM, and his wife Kelly Ludwick, Bishop, added another member to their family when Tyson Taylor Ludwick was born on March 11 at 8 pounds, 10 ounces. He was eagerly welcomed by sisters Shealyn, Tannyr, and Jessie. Grandparents are Tom and Laura Talbot, Bishop, and Bob and Wendy Ludwick, Santa Barbara.


Cattlemen’s Report Hoffman Ranch Annual Bull Sale Thedford, Neb. – Feb. 21 Auctioneers: Col. Rick Machado 85 yearling Hereford bulls........................................ $7,706 32 Fall yearling Hereford bulls................................. $5,250 32 two-year-old Hereford bulls................................ $5,075 11 yearling Angus bulls............................................. $5,281 5 yearling SimAngus bulls......................................... $5,260

Thomas Angus Ranch Bull & Select Fall Bred Female Sale Baker, Ore. – March 4 Auctioneers: Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 87 Fall yearling bulls.................................................. $4,732 65 Spring yearling bulls............................................. $3605 152 bulls....................................................................... $4115 183 Fall-calving heifers.............................................. $2760

2014 Buchanan Angus & Friends Bull Sale Klamath Falls, Ore. – Feb. 23. Auctioneer: Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 70 Angus bulls............................................................ $4042 2014 Colyer Herefords and Angus Production Sale Bruneau, Idaho – Feb. 24 Auctioneers: Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Kyle Colyer 138 Hereford bulls..................................................... $4,878 21 Hereford heifers.................................................... $3,157 69 Angus bulls............................................................ $3,998 12 Angus heifers......................................................... $2,025 Lorenzen Red Angus Bull Sale Pendelton, Ore. – Feb. 27 Auctioneers: Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 171 bulls....................................................................... $4,318 Baker Angus Genetic Extra Bull Sale Vale, Ore. – March 1 Auctioneer: Col. Rick Machado 101 Angus bulls.......................................................... $3,494 56 Fall-bred commercial Angus heifers.................. $2,052 29 open Angus commercial heifers......................... $1,328

Riverbend Ranches Genetic Edge Bull Sale Idaho Falls, Idaho – March 8 Auctioneers: Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart 386 Angus bulls.......................................................... $4812

Snyder Livestock’s Bulls for the 21st Century Bull Test Sale Yerington, Nev. – March 9 Auctioneers: Col. Rich Machado and Col. John Rodgers 66 Angus bulls ........................................................... $3,680 13 Charolais bulls....................................................... $3,492 5 Balancer® bulls....................................................... $3,180 10 Hereford bulls....................................................... $3,005 2 LimFlex bulls........................................................... $2,950 15 Red Angus bulls.................................................... $2,789 1 Shorthorn bull......................................................... $2,000 111 total bulls.............................................................. $3434 Cattleman’s Connection Sale Spring Cove Ranch & JBB/AL Herefords Bliss, Idaho – March 10 Auctioneer: Col. Rick Machado 129 Angus bulls.......................................................... $,4811 38 Hereford bulls....................................................... $2,689 11 Hereford heifers.................................................... $1,755 3 Red Angus bulls...................................................... $2,500 35 Angus yearling heifers.......................................... $1,639 5 Angus bred heifers.................................................. $2,780 12 commercial Angus heifers................................... $1,408

Romans Ranches Charolais Bull Sale TRINITY FARMS GENERATIONS OF EXCELLENCE Vale, Ore. – March 11 BULL & FEMALE SALE Auctioneer: Col. Dennis Metzger Ellensburg, WA – March 1 86 Charolais bulls . .................................................... $4,031 Auctioneer: Col.C.D. “Butch” Booker 40 Angus bulls............................................................ $4,160 90 SimAngus bulls..................................................... $5,470 9 Simmental bulls....................................................... $4,090 TRUCK SCALES • LIVESTOCK SCALES • WAREHOUSE SCALES • RENTAL SCALES 139 total bulls.............................................................. $5,000 35 Angus heifers......................................................... $1,760 Your Truck and Livestock Scale Specialists 43 SimAngus heifers.................................................. $1,585 1 Simmental heifers................................................... $2,500 NEW SCALES USED SCALES 79 total heifers............................................................ $1,675

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2014 WINNEMUCCA INVITATIONAL BULL SALE AND HORSE SALE Winnemucca, Nev. – Feb. 26 - March 1 Auctioneer: Col. Rick Machado 39 bulls......................................................................... $2,759 38 horses...................................................................... $4,864 Harrell Hereford Ranch Spring Round Up Bull and Female Sale Baker, Ore. – March 3 Auctioneers: Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 93 yearling bulls.......................................................... $5,946 38 two-year-olds bulls................................................ $3,747 45 yearling heifers...................................................... $2,598 HarreLL-Mackenzie Quarter HORSES 16th Annual Performance Prospect Sale Baker Ore. – March 3 Auctioneer: Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker 15 two-year-old quarter horses................................ $5,443

STATIONARY Spokane Office Main Office Inland Scales NW Powell Scales NW, Inc. 5602 E. Desmet Ave. 39120 West Scio Rd. P.O. Box 11335 Scio, OR 97374 Spokane, WA 99211 503.394.3660 POWELL - INLAND 509.535.4295 1.800.451.0187 www.scalesnw.com • SteveOrr@scalesnw.com • Steve Orr 503.510.3540

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April 2014 California Cattleman 41


Don’t Forget to Take Advantage of FREE BQA Certification CCA wants to remind all livestock owners wishing to become certified in Beef Quality Assurance that until April 15, Boehringer Ingelheim is sponsoring FREE BQA certification at www.animalcaretraining.org.

This form of BQA certification qualifies for certification in CCA’s cow-calf beef quality assurance program. If you have not attended a BQA workshop since 2011, your certication has expired. For more information about BQA or certifying in California, contact Malorie Bankhead in the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or by e-mail at malorie@calcattlemen.org.

BQA — making a difference

With his unique persp world knowledge of thective of research and real Assurance (BQA) proge checkoff-funded Beef Quality BQA Educator of the ram, Dr. Clyde Lane, the 2014 information into prac Year, has been translating that producers for nearly fotical tools for Tennessee beef cattle that nearly half of the ur decades. Dr. Lane is proud producers in his state 40,000 beef cattle are BQA certified. “BQA is the right thin worked to create tool g to do. I’ve s that make its on-farm application ea can provide a quality sy, so cattlemen beef product.” Learn more at BQ A.org

Dr. Clyde Lane University of Ten nessee

Advertisers’ Index

101 Trailer Sales..................................................20 All West Select Sires...........................................40 Amador Angus...................................................34 American Hereford Association.......................36 Apache Polled Herefords...................................36 Avila Cattle Co....................................................25 Bar R Angus........................................................34 Bartlett Cattle, LLC............................................31 Bianchi Ranches.................................................25 BMW Angus.......................................................34 Bovine Elite, LLC................................................39 Broken Arrow Ranch.........................................34 Broken Box Ranch........................................25, 38 Buchanan Angus Ranch....................................34 Byrd Cattle Co...............................................34, 44 California Charolais Breeders...........................25 California Custom..............................................39 California Rangeland Trust...............................27 California State University, Chico....................37 California State University, Fresno.............25, 37 California Wagyu Breeders...............................38 California Windmill...........................................39 Cargill Animal Nutrition...................................31 Cargill Beef..........................................................20 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market............................. 3 Charron Ranch...................................................34 Cherry Glen Beefmasters..................................36 Conlan Ranches California...............................38 Conlin Fence Company.....................................38 Conlin Supply....................................................... 1 Corsair Angus Ranch.........................................34

Dal Porto Livestock............................................34 Diamond Back Ranch........................................38 Donati Ranch......................................................34 Dos Palos Y Auction Yard.................................20 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc................................38 El Rancho Espanol.............................................36 Escalon Livestock Market..................................21 Fair Oaks Ranch.................................................35 Famoso Western Stockman’s Market...............11 Five Star Land Company...................................42 Five Star Land & Livestock................................35 Freitas Rangeland Improvements.....................20 Furtado Angus....................................................35 Furtado Livestock Enterprises..........................39 Genoa Livestock.................................................37 Gonsalves Ranch................................................35 Haugen Livestock...............................................36 HAVE Angus.......................................................35 Hone Ranch.........................................................36 Jorgensen Ranch.................................................25 Kennedy Nutrition Services..............................39 Kerndt Livestock Products................................39 Lambert Ranch...................................................37 Laurel Fowler Insurance Broker, Inc................38 Lee Hutchens Herefords....................................37 McPhee Red Angus............................................38 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association............17 Nicholas Livestock Co........................................25 Noah’s Angus.......................................................35 Novartis................................................................. 7 O’Connell Ranch................................................35

42 California Cattleman April 2014

ORIgen Beef........................................................39 Orvis Cattle Co...................................................37 Pacific Trace Minerals..................................17, 38 Pitchfork Cattle Co.............................................37 Powell Scales NW, Inc........................................41 Producer’s Livestock Madera............................17 R&R Farms..........................................................37 RayMar Angus....................................................35 Reis Livestock......................................................25 Sammis Ranch....................................................35 San Juan Ranch...................................................36 Schafer Ranch.....................................................35 Schohr Herefords................................................37 Shaw Cattle Co...................................................... 9 Sierra Ranches.....................................................37 Silveira Bros.........................................................35 Skinner Livestock Transportation....................39 Sonoma Mountain Herefords...........................37 Tehama Angus....................................................36 Texeira Cattle Co................................................36 Tumbleweed Ranch............................................46 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard......................... 6 Universal Semen Sales, Inc................................39 Van Cleve Associates..........................................30 Veterinary Services, Inc.....................................38 Vintage Angus Ranch........................................36 Western Fence & Construction, Inc.................38 Western Video Market......................................... 2 Wulff Bros. Livestock.........................................36


2014 BULL BUYERS’ GUIDE

RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW FOR THE JULY/AUGUST ISSUE! CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE AT (916) 803-3113 OR MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET


Are you spending more $$$$ than ever on your cattle? LET US HELP YOU GET IT BACK ... FAST! Byrd Cattle Company offers unmatched customer service, taking pride in placing our customers’ calves for top dollar. With the goal of making our clients more $$$$, we make numerous calls to procurement managers for both traditional and grass-based finishing programs on their behalf. These contacts have indicated a willingness to pay significantly more for our customers’ cattle, as there are “mountains” of data documenting the profitability of BCC genetics in every segment of the beef production chain. At Byrd Cattle Company, we’re continually moving forward with new technology – again with the goal to put more net dollars in our customers’ pockets. We see feed efficiency as an untapped “great frontier” in the beef business – but it’s about to blow up and be HUGE!

With feed costs accounting for nearly 70% of the cost of raising cattle, it isn’t surprising that new grid pricing programs have appeared with a premium for feed conversion. BCC customers are primed to capitalize as we don’t just talk about feed efficiency; we’re one of very few breeders nationwide that have been testing for it for generations. Every bull in our sale sells with individual Residual Feed Intake (RFI) data, in addition to Zoetis 50K DNA percentile rankings. This adds a substantial cost on our end, yet the benefit to you, our customer, is priceless. If you’re thinking about buying Angus bulls, females or embryos, let us show you how BCC genetics can make you more profitable. We sell affordable cattle bred with cow sense, but most importantly with common sense!

Every Bull Sells with Individual Residual Feed Intake (RFI) Data and Zoetis 50K DNA Percentile Rankings!

14th Annual “Best of Both Worlds” Angus Bull & Female SalE

Friday, September 5

150 Bulls & 80 Females sell 2002 CBCIA SeedStoCk ProduCer of the YeAr

BYrd CAttLe CoMPANY, LLC P.O. Box 713 • Red Bluff, CA 96080

Dan 530-736-8470 • Ty 530-200-4054 byrdcattleco@hotmail.com • www.byrdcattleco.com THD ©

The West’s #1 Source for Low Birth, High Growth Bulls with Marbling, Muscle and Feed Efficiency!

44 California Cattleman April 2014


April 2014 for web