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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 £3.00

BAKING ~ DECORATING ~ SHARING

Cake Idol

Cake Competition inspired by

by Dawn Butler

T-Shirts!

Afternoon Tea in San Francisco

Up and Away!

PREVIEW VERSION

Fantastic 3D Cake Tutorial

Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk

THE

NOVELTY Mike McCarey CAKE ISSUE Michelle Wibowo

Chris Russom

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Interview with Lara from Tasty Cakes, Airbrush essentials, Depressed Cake Shop, The Great British Bake Off from RoxyRaRa Couture Cakes, Sculpted Cakes Showcase LONDON CAKE & BAKE SHOW 13-15th September + lots more!


Novelty Cakes SHOWCASE

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Up and Away! 3D Cake Tutorial

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EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 FEATURE

Contents 4 10 20 24 27 28 30 65

   Welcome  to  the  September  issue   of  Cake  Masters  magazine. I  don’t  know  about  you,  but  I  am   always  amazed  by  how  people  push   the  limits  of  sponge  and   sugarpaste.  It's  incredible  and   inspiring  to  see  such  creative   minds  put  cake  to  board,  and   produce  what  can  only  be   described  as  astonishing  creations   that  sometimes  even  appear  to  defy   gravity!  This  issue  is  jam-­‐packed   with  some  of  the  very  best  of  the   best  novelty  and  sculpted  cakes  for   us  all  to  gaze  at  open  mouthed!

Cake Idol  by  Dawn  Butler London  Cake  &  Bake  Show Afternoon  Tea  -­‐  Crown  &  Crumpet Baking  Wish  List The  Depressed  Cake  Shop Airbrush  Essentials  with  Dinkydoodle  Designs The  Bake  Off  is  Back  -­‐  RoxyRara  Couture  Cakes Novelty  Cake  Collection

Tutorial

In fact,  we  have  so  much  packed  into   this  issue;  I  can’t  mention  it  all  here!  So  as  a  taster…   We  have  the  honour  of  interviewing  three  masters  of  novelty  and   sculpted  cakes:  the  ultra-­‐realistic  Michelle  Wibowo  from  Michelle's   Sugarart,  the  scale  and  precision  pro,  Mike  McCarey  from  Mike's   Amazing  Cakes,  and  the  awesome  and  elegant  Chris  Russom,  from   Christoher  Garren’s  Let  Them  Eat  Cake.  We  are  also  showcasing  their   amazing  works  of  art  for  your  delectation!  

48 Up and  Away  Cake  Tutorial  by  Edible  Art  by  Kate Interviews 12 26 33 36 40

Christopher Garren’s  Let  Them  Eat  Cake Lara  -­‐  Tasty  Cakes Michelle  Sugar  Art Cake  Competition  inspired  by  T-­‐Shirts:  Threadcakes Mike’s  Amazing  Cakes

In this  issue,  we  also  have  a  fantastic  novelty  cake  tutorial  from  Kate  Lau,   who  shows  us  how  to  make  her  Xloating  bunch  of  balloons  cake  -­‐  it  is   amazing,  and  we  hope  that  you  will  be  inspired  to  try  something  equally   adventurous. We were also lucky to get the CEO of Threadcakes into the magazine too! I am not sure if many of you in the UK have heard of Threadcakes, but it is a fantastic  cake  competition  run  every  year  out  of  the  USA,  where  entrants   have  to  make  a  cake  inspired  by  a  T-­‐shirt  design.  You  have  to  see  it  to   really  believe  how  unique  this  competition  is.   How  are  you  enjoying  The  Great  British  Bake  Off?  -­‐  For  me,  there  is  now   new  meaning  to  my  Tuesday  evenings!  I  really  can’t  get  enough  of  this   show  and  have  always  wondered  how  hard  it  is  to  get  through  the   application  process.  The  fantastic  Roxy,  from  RoxyRaRa  Couture  Cakes,   has  been  kind  enough  to  share  the  highs  and  lows  of  her  application   process,  right  through  to  the  last  stage,  and  tells  us  how  she  feels  about   missing  out  on  being  in  the  Xinal  bunch.   Finally,  I  am  so  excited  about  the  Cake  &  Bake  Show  in  London  13th-­‐15th   September.    Cake  Masters  will  be  there  with  our  own  exciting  stand   showcasing  our  magazines,  running  mini  classes  and  giving  you  a  chance   to  win  a  beautiful  Kenwood  Nostalgia  mixer  -­‐  please  do  come  by!   I  really  hope  that  you  enjoy  this  issue;  it  has  knocked  the  cookie  issue  off   the  top  spot  and  is  now  Xirmly  my  favourite  issue  to  date! As  always,  I  would  love  to  hear  any  feedback  from  you.

Review Ceri Roberts www.creativetext.co.uk Content editor@cakemasters.co.uk

Rosie x

Advertisements magazine@cakemasters.co.uk

Editor

Product features magazine@cakemasters.co.uk

Front cover: Featured  Cake  -­‐  Bake  &  Makers  Cakes

Class directory magazine@cakemasters.co.uk

Inside Cover: Mama  Rhu  @  Pimp  My  Cake,  Antonella  Di  Maria  Torte  &  Design,  Way  Beyond  Cakes   by  Mayen

editor@cakemasters.co.uk

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CAKE IDOL

Continued >

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By Dawn  Butler  of  Dinkydoodle  Designs


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 FEATURE

“I always  like  a  challenge,  and  never  seem  to   settle  for  an  easy  life!  In  fact,  whilst  most   people  would  be  in  bed,  (it’s  currently   4.30am  )  I  am  instead  putting  the  Oinishing   touches  to  my  latest  cake  adventure.   In  the  morning,  I  shall  be  taking  a  one  and  a   half  hour  train  journey  down  to  London,   with  my  2  boys  and  a  very  special  cake   delivery,  to  my  greatest  idol  Sir  Richard   Branson.   Wow….  I  hear  you  cry,  how  did  she  get  the   order  to  make  that  cake?  Well  the  truth  is,  I   didn’t,  and  he  doesn’t  even  know  about  it   yet!  But,  the  other  thing  you  should  know   about  me,  is  that  I’m  a  Oirm  believer  that  you   make  your  own  opportunities,  and  all  being   well,  this  could  be  one  of  them.   Let  me  explain... You  may  be  aware,  that  I  have  my  own  range  of   products  for  cake  craft,  namely  the   Dinkydoodle  Airbrush,  airbrush  paints  and   airbrush  stencils,  all  of  which  retail  in  over  45   different  countries  all  over  the  world.  As  such,  I   get  requests  to  teach  airbrushing  all  over  the   world  too,  and  my  next  teaching  trip  will  be  to   Australia  for  6  weeks  later  this  month.   I  happened  to  be  discussing  my  forthcoming   trip  with  a  friend,  who  suggested  that  I  should   look  into  getting  sponsorship  for  my  tour,  as   Xlights  to  Australia,  along  with  the  internal  ones   would  be  costly.  This  lit  a  spark  in  my  brain  as  I   started  to  think  about  how  I  could  go  about   this.   My  Xirst  thoughts  turned  to  my  idol  Richard   Branson,  and  how  I  could  not  only  hope  to  get   sponsorship  for  Xlights,  but  hopefully  grab  his   attention  too!  I  think  he’s  an  amazing  man,  who   has  achieved  so  much  both  professionally  and   personally.       I  thought  long  and  hard  and  felt  that  an  e-­‐mail   with  some  pictures  of  my  cakes  attached  would   not  get  the  right  response.  I  can  only  imagine   how  many  e  mails  he  must  receive  a  day;  in   fact,  I’m  sure  that  someone  else  Xilters  them  out   for  him,  so  a  cold  e  mail  would  actually  have   very  little  chance  of  reaching  him  at  all.   It  suddenly  dawned  on  me.  Why  not  show  him   what  I  can  do  with  cake?.....  Let’s  make  him  one   and  take  it  down  to  London!  ....  and  that’s  how  it   came  about!     For  ages  I  ran  through  some  ideas  in  my  head   about  what  to  make,  from  airplanes,  and  hot  air   balloons  to  his  space  shuttle!  I  even  asked  the   very  talented  Emma  from  Richards  cakes  if  she   would  make  me  a  Xigure  of  Richard  in  a  space   suit  to  sit  on  top  of  my  creation.   I  set  myself  a  delivery  date  and  decided  on  a   space  theme.    

But as  the  time  came  to  it,  I  didn’t  feel  inspired   any  longer  to  make  a  space  shuttle  out  of  cake.  I   thought  Mr  Branson  may  have  seen  just  about   everything,  and  only  having  one  shot  at  making   an  impression,  I  decided  to  make  it  really   count!   In  one  of  those  three  o’clock  in  the  morning   moments,  the  idea  of  making    “Richard  Branson     himself”  sprung  into  my  head,  and  before  I   knew  it,  I  looked  like  an  obsessed  and  crazed   fan,  with  a  collection  of  Google  images  on  my   iPad.   With  now  only  a  few  days  to  go….  It  was  time  to   make  the  cake!!! I  opted  for  death  by  chocolate  as  a  base;  it’s  still   one  of  my  favourites  in  terms  of  Xlavour  and  it’s   sturdy,  but  not  too  heavy  to  carry.  (I  didn’t   fancy  carting  fruit  cake  on  my  train  journey   down  to  London)   Let  the  carving  begin!  Some  people  wouldn’t   have  a  clue  where  to  start  on  this  kind  of  cake,   but  honestly  they’re  not  that  complicated.    All   carved  novelty  cakes  with  height  to  them  are   essentially  the  same  as  a  tiered  cake;  it’s  just   that  with  a  carved  novelty  cake,  the  tiers  aren’t   always  the  same  shape.   The  basic  shape  here  is  a  cake  of  three  tiers.   The  Xirst  is  the  shoulders,  the  second  the  neck   and  the  Xinal  tier  is  the  head.   As  with  all  tiered  cakes,  the  structure  is   supported  by  the  dowels  within  it,  and  not  the   cake  itself.  All  you  are  doing  is  creating  an   illusion  that  each  tier  is  sat  on  the  next  (when   in  fact  it  is  sat  on  the  supports  within  the  cake) The  next  problem  people  have  with  novelty   cakes  is  the  carving  itself.    The  general  rule   when  carving  a  layered  cake  is  to  only  ever  cut   through  one  layer  of  sponge  at  a  time.  This  way   you  wont  be  tempted  to  take  too  much  off,   leaving  yourself  with  a  cake  that  still  feeds  as   many  guests  as  is  needed.   I  usually  take  my  cuts  at  a  45  degree  angle,  and   from  there  rub  the  rest  of  the  cake  into  shape   (again  meaning  that  I  don’t  just  cut  and  cut   until  there  is  nothing  left.)   Once  cut  into  shape  I  carefully  remove  each   layer  Xill  with  my  chosen  buttercream   (chocolate  in  this  case)  and  carefully  replace   each  layer,  taking  the  time  to  ensure  that  when   I  put  each  one  back  into  place,  that  it  is  in  the   right  place,  and  the  right  way  round.  There   would  be  nothing  worse  than  spending  hours   carving  a  particular  shape,  to  Xind  that  you  have   put  it  back  together  wrong  and  it  no  longer   looks  like  it  should.     The  other  reason  I  like  to  use  chocolate  cake,  is   that  I  can  then  coat  it  in  ganache  for  a  brilliant   smooth  surface.  

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 FEATURE

I Xind  ganache,  not  only  allows  you  to  create  a   smooth  surface  for  your  sugarpaste,  but  also   acts  as  a  great  cement,  holding  the  shape  of   your  cake  together  really  nicely  under  the   sugarpaste.   After  giving  my  carved  cake  a  coating  of   ganache  (and  smoothing  over  with  a  hot  pallet   knife)  I  was  ready  to  add  the  details.   I  like  to  do  all  the  “workings  out”  underneath   my  icing,  and  using  white  chocolate  paste  I   make  shapes  for  the  lips,  brows,  mouth,  nose   and  cheeks  and  stuck  these  to  the  cake  with   ganache.   The  key  here  is  to  not  make  anything  too  big.   Whenever  I  use  this  technique,  I  always  use   only  HALF  the  amount  of  paste  that  I  think  I   need.  This  means  that  when  I  have  covered  the   whole  thing  again  with  a  Xinal  coating  of  sugar   paste,  the  feature  will  end  up  the  right  size,   instead  of  too  large.   I  also  make  these  items  out  of  chocolate  paste   (or  Xlower  paste)  because  if  you  make  them  out   of  sugarpaste,  you  will  Xind  them  to  be  too  soft,   Then,  when  you  go  to  re-­‐cover  them,  the  weight   of  the  sugarpaste  over  the  top  will  simply   squash  anything  you  have  made  and  you  will  be   left  with  large  lumps  underneath  your  icing   with  no  deXinition  at  all.

Once I’m  happy  with  this,  I  begin  to  cover  the   cake;  but  again  I  use  chocolate  paste,  in  order   that  I  can  cover  it  in  stages  and  blend  each   piece  I  cover  together.   When  working  on  novelty  cakes  there  is  one   tool  that  I  couldn’t  live  without,  and  that’s  my   Dresden  tool.  I  use  this  for  just  about   everything,  from  blending  and  smoothing,  to   creating  lines  and  grooves.   Once  I’ve  covered  the  face  of  the  cake,  I  begin  to   add  the  markings  that  will  deXine  the  features.     You’ll  notice  that  I  have  only  covered  the  front   of  the  face  and  neck,  as  I  can  add  the  hair  etc.   separately.   Most  of  the  details  are  carved  in  with  my   Dresden,  but  the  teeth  I  add  separately  once  the   mouth  detail  is  marked  out.   This  is  done  by  adding  a  sausage  of  chocolate   paste  for  the  bottom  row  of  teeth,  and  gently   Xlattening  and  marking  them  out  with  the   Dresden  tool.  Next  the  top  row  go  in,  which   overlay  the  bottom  row,  giving  the  impression   of  real  teeth  in  the  mouth.   Once  I’m  happy  with  the  face,  the  hair  can  be   added,  and  again  this  is  done  in  pieces  and   marked  with  a  Dresden  tool.  Torn  pieces  of  

kitchen paper  provide  protection  for  the  face,   under  pieces  of  hair  that  touch  the  skin.  When  I   come  to  spray  these  later,  I  will  need  to  watch   out  for  over  spray,  so  this  allows  me  to  protect   my  work  as  I  spray.   I’m  now  happy  with  my  face  and  hair,  so  it’s   time  to  start  bringing  it  to  life  with  some   colour.   I  love  my  airbrush,  and  I  don’t  do  many  cakes   without  some  form  of  airbrushing  to  them;  but   again,  this  is  something  that  scares  some   people  as  they  don’t  know  where  to  start.   Having  the  conXidence  to  have  a  go,  would  be   my  Xirst  piece  of  advice,  and  secondly  allowing   time  to  practice….  It  doesn’t  take  long  to  get  the   hang  of  it,  but  you  could  do  with  this,  without   the  pressure  of  a  looming  cake  order  that  needs   to  out  in  3  hours! The  key  things  to  remember  when  airbrushing   is  the  difference  in  spray,  (from  wide  to   narrow)  is  all  about  2  things:   The  distance  you  are  away  from  your  project,   and  the  amount  you  are  pulling  back  the   trigger.  

PREVIEW VERSION Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk

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ADVERTISEMENTS

              

        

     

 

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ISSUE 11 AUGUST 2013

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creator of the world’s most exquisite cakes 10

© Kate  Whitaker Photograph  Brian  Dorsey  ~  New  York

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW Cake Master and


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

Food Network Challenge winner and star from the hit US TV Show

Amazing Wedding Cakes EXCLUSIVE CAKE MASTERS INTERVIEW If you  had  to  describe  yourself  in  three   words,  what  would  they  be? Attention  to  detail So  you  are  a  stickler  for  detail?   Oh  I  think  it’s  important,  a  lot  of  people  refer  to   me  as  a  perfectionist  and  I  Xind  that  a  little   annoying,  because  that’s  something  I’m   not….We  have  an  attention  to  excellence  and   there’s  a  big  difference.  Especially  to  strive  for   perfection,  in  an  artistic  world  that’s  not   possible.  What  brings  beauty  to  art  is   imperfection.  We  understand  that,  and  we  just   want  to  strive  to  do  the  best  job  we  can  do;  but   it’s  never  going  to  be  perfect  and  part  of  that   beauty  are  the  Xlaws,  they  just  need  to  be  kept   to  a  minimum. Tell  us  a  little  bit  about  yourself Well  I  am  self-­‐made.  I  have  been  working  in   restaurants  since  I  was  about  14,  by  18  I  was   managing  a  restaurant;  so  I  go  way  back  as  far   as  a  culinary  environment.  I’ve  done  lots  of   stuff  over  my  career  from  construction,  to  tiling   to  masonry  work  and  landscaping,  a  kind  of  a   jack  of  all  trades.  The  beauty  of  all  that,  is  that  

the construction,  horticulture  and  landscaping   background  has  given  me  an  edge  when  it   comes  to  what  I  am  doing  currently.    The   construction  comes  through  in  the  cakes  that   need  a  lot  of  engineering.  Then  the  horticulture   and  landscaping  makes  it  a  lot  more  satisfying,   because  I  know  what  a  Xlower  should  look  like,   what  the  parts  should  look  like,  what  the   sexual  organs  are  and  all  that  helps  you  bring   an  element  of  realism  to  the  detail. You’ve  had  a  lot  of  creative  careers  to   date,  when  did  you  actually  realise  that  it   was  cake  that  was  your  calling? I  don’t  think  I  ever  did  actually.  I  think   people  want  me  to  say  “Oh  I  had  a  passion  for   it  since  I  was  like  9”.  I  do  remember  being  8  or   9  years  old  and  wanting  to  make  a  cake,  and   calling  my  mum  at  work  because  I  had  a  cake  in   the  oven  for  2  hours  and  I  couldn’t  work  out   why  it  hadn’t  risen.  When  she  walked  me   through  it  I  was  like  “oh  I  forgot  to   put  the  Xlour  in”…I  remember  that   as  one  of  my  earliest  baking   memories.

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“I had a cake in the oven for 2 hours and I couldn’t work out why it hadn’t risen...oh I forgot to put the flour in…!”


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

I remember  always  enjoying  the  culinary  arts   as  a  process,  but  I  don’t  think  I  ever  really   wanted  it  –  I  had  a  friend  at  21,  who  I  was   dating,  and  she  and  her  mum  were  into  cake   decorating.  They  were  old  school,  doing  a  lot   of  stuff  that  people  aren’t  even  doing   anymore.  I  remember  sitting  down  with  them   in  my  early  twenties  and  they  were  trying  to   teach  me  how  to  make  royal  icing  roses  and   pipe,  and  I  remember  saying  to  them  at  the   time,  “sorry  I  have  absolutely  no  interest  in   this,  this  is  something  I  could  never  do.”    And   here  I  am.  I  think  sometimes  in  life  you  don’t   choose  it,  it  chooses  you.

Tell me  about  the  team  that  you  work  with Well  I’ve  worked  with  Marjie  for  15  years   now,  and  she  is  both  my  muse  and  the  bane  of   my  existence.  If  I  say  it’s  black,  she’ll  say  white   and  if  I  say  it’s  too  tall  she’ll  say  short,  and  if  I   say  it’s  beautiful  she’ll  pick  out  every  one  of  its   Xlaws.  So  it’s  what  keeps  me  honest,  teaches   me  patience  and  also  is  what  has  kept  me  in   the  business  for  so  long.   Not  only  Marjie,  but  I’ve  had  Kristen,  who’s  on   the  third  season  of  the  show,  and  she’s  been   with  me  5  and  half  years  now.  She’s  one  of  the   most  talented  artists  I  have  ever  worked  with   in  my  life;  I  would  put  her  up  against  any  cake  

I had   a   catering   company   and   it   was   mostly   savoury   and   I   worked   as   a   savoury   chef.   Someone   asked   me   to   do  their   wedding   cake,   because   I   was   doing   the   food,   and   I   was   probably  too   stupid   to   say   no.   So  I   said  Ok   sure   and  it  sort   of   just   blossomed   from   that….I   Xigured   it   out   as   I   went   along   and   then   realised   oh   I   have   a   knack   for   this.   So  I   just   sort   of   fell   into  it,   it   wasn’t  any  sort  of   conscious   “Oh   I   want   to   be   a   great   pastry   chef   and   have   a   career  as  a  cake  decorator.” So  how  did  you  decide  what   you  were  going  to  call  your   business? I   didn’t   want   something   k i t s c h y ,   a n d   I   w a n t e d   something   that   people   would   remember   and   that   would   set   me   apart…so   I   came   up   with   “Let   Them   Eat   Cake”.   And   it’s   hard   because   in   a   marketing   environment   there’s   always   this   name   recognition  element   and   branding   issue,   and   I   thought   how   are   we   going   to   get   people   to   remember   us… like   for   instance   its   “Rosie’s   Cakes”   well   that’s   a   fairly   generic   name,   it’s   something   that   people   won’t   remember,   so   We   thought   that   Let   Them   Eat   Cake   because   of   its   historical   connotation   was   something   people   would   remember,   but   we   started   d o i n g   f o o d   n e t w o r k   competitions   and   suddenly   there   were   Let   Them   Eat   Cakes   all   over   the   united   States.  So   in   hindsight   it   might   not   have   been   the   best   idea.   That’s   why   we   actually   ended   u p   c h a n g i n g   o u r   n a m e ,   because  of  that.

decorator in  the  United  States  or  Great  Britain,   because  she’s  just  really  talented.  So  I   appreciate  my  staff,  but  I  also  learn  from   them.  There  are  times  I  watch  them  and  they’ll   inspire  me,  and  I’ll  ask  them  “how  did  you  do   that?,    I  would  have  never  have  thought  of   doing  it  that  way  and  you  just  saved  20   minutes  off  a  technique  that  would  have  taken   me  an  hour!”.   I   think   that   the   beauty   of   working   with   very   talented   people,   and   my   staff   are   very   talented,   is   that   not   only  do  I   teach   them,   but   they   teach   me.   It’s   that   give   and   take   that   I   think   makes   a   successful   team   and   the   fact   that   I  am   learning   as  much  from   them,   as  they   are   learning   from   me.  The  energy  in  the  team is   one   of   the   most   important   t h i n g s ,   b e c a u s e   I ’ v e   h a d   talented   people,   but   if   their   ego   comes   into   the   room   before   they   do,   then   that   usually   isn’t   going   to   work   out.   Part   of   us   w o r k i n g   a s   a   t e a m   a n d   cohesively,   is   the   fact   that   you   can’t   get   defensive   and   you   can’t   get   upset   if   someone   says   “I   don’t  think   that’s   working”  or   “I  think  that’s  too  bright”  or  “the   top  of  that  cake   is  not   level…  it’s   still  and  eighth   of   an   inch   off”… It’s   about   being   receptive   and   being   able   to  take   feedback  and   criticism,   in   a   constructive   way,   but   nevertheless   its   criticism   about   the   project   and  still   being   able  to  work  together.   If   your   ego   is   too   big   and   you   can’t   take   feedback,   it   makes   it   frustrating.   Sometimes   you   can   have   talented   people,   but   if   their   energy  isn’t   good   and   you   don’t   work   well   as   a   team   it’s   hard.     We   are   small   staff   and   what   makes   this   successful   is   the   fact   that   we   work   well   together   and   that   we   are   a   family. What  is  your  motto  in  life? A   hard   question,   I   don’t   know   how   to   answer   that.     I   think   in   everything   it’s   giving   100%.     I   never  want   to  walk  away  from   a   project,   be   it   personal   or   business,  and  think   that   I  under   sacriXiced   or   didn’t   give   my   all   to   something.     I   think   it’s   important   in   life   to   commit   to   y o u r   o b l i g a t i o n s   a n d   b e   responsible.   If   I   have   a   cake   in   my   store   and   the   bride   only   paid   for   4   hours   of   labour   and   at   4   hours   it’s   not  done,  it   gets   a   5th   hour.  It  doesn’t  matter  to  me   whether  she   paid   for  it  or   not,   it  

PREVIEW VERSION 12

Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 ADVERTISEMENT

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Crown & Crumpet Afternoon Tea San Francisco - USA 14


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 AFTERNOON TEA

Travel ~ Taste ~ Try If you  were  just  to  look  at  these  pictures  I   snapped  of  my  afternoon  tea  visit  to  Crown   and  Crumpet,  you  may  well  think  that  I   happened  across  one  of  the  most  adorable  tea   rooms  in  England  somewhere.    But,  nope  -­‐  this   is  in  San  Francisco's  Japantown!!  OK,  how   excited  was  I? I  Xirst  visited  Crown  and  Crumpet  a  few  years   ago,  when  they  were  located  in  Ghiradelli   Square.  Truth  be  told,  it  was  always  rammed   with  tourists  and  I  could  hardly  get  a  clear   shot  of  anything,  let  alone  Xind  anywhere  to   sit.  So,  I  was  intrigued  by  their  choice  of  the   new  Japantown  location,  and  really  couldn't   wait  to  visit.  Reserving  a  table  was  relatively   easy,  just  using  OpenTable. I  arrived  for  one  of  the  Xirst  seatings,  which   was  a  great  call,  as  I  was  the  Xirst  to  arrive  and   had  ample  time  to  photograph  their  really   VERY  CUTE  decor.  I  mean  -­‐  I  seriously  need   this  teacup  clock  in  my  life!!    The  vintage-­‐y,   Xloral-­‐y,  shabby-­‐chic-­‐y  touches  were  all  lovely,   and  they  even  supplied  tea  cosies!!    From  the   fresh  roses  and  Xlowers,  to  British  cushions   and  bunting;  the  setting  in  itself  was  a  feast   for  the  eyes.

How lucky  was  I  to  be  greeted  by  the  owner,   Chris  Dean?!    Yup,  the  owners  are,  indeed,   ENGLISH!!    And,  yup,  you  guessed  it  -­‐  I  was   served  a  wonderful  ENGLISH  afternoon  tea  -­‐   yay!!    (and  with  a  few  yummy  extras,  as  well).   AND  A  CRUMPET  with  loads  of  butter!    The   tea  selection  was  awesome;  I  had  the  "Alice"   blend,  Xlavoured  with  a  lil'  champagne…   delicious!    It  was  all  really  rather  delightful;   and  here's  the  best  bit...  it  was  all  relatively   inexpensive  too,  at  only  $26  USD  per  person.   Great  value  for  money,  and  enough  savoury   and  sweet  selections  to  Xill  you  up  for  either   lunch,  or  even  an  early  dinner.    All  of  their   offerings  are  served  in  gorgeous  china  to  boot! Oops,  I  almost  forgot  to  mention  that  they  also   serve  the  scones  and  crumpets  with  clotted   cream,  jam  and  LEMON  CURD  -­‐  my  fave!!   Bonus!  Lots  of  exclamation  points  here,  on   purpose  :-­‐)   Being  away  from  my  home  in  England  for  such   an  extended  time,  I  really  was  starting  to  miss   English  tea,  I  mean  'a  real  taste  of  home.'  Yes,   they  even  serve  "builder's  tea"  here,  with  PG   Tips.  LOL.  It's  the  small  things.

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By Jennifer  DeGuzman-­‐Rolfe Jen’s  Just  Desserts  

So, whether  you're  a  Bay  Area  native,  or  a   road-­‐weary  traveller  looking  for  a  traditional   English  afternoon  tea  experience,  I  would   highly  recommend  Crown  and  Crumpet.  You   won't  be  disappointed!! PS  -­‐  They'll  even  point  you  in  the  direction  of   where  to  buy  the  elusive  Green  Tea  Kit-­‐Kats  in   Japantown.


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 BAKING WISH LIST

Baking Wish List

Lavender sugarflair  gel   Cake-­‐stuff.com  £1.75

Silicone rose  baking  pan Biggers-­‐cookware.co.uk £15.00

H20 detailer  Hp Sam’s  cupcakes  London  £3.15

Sweet Lace  Vienna  Mould The  Great  Cake  Warehouse   £12.50

10” Milk  glass  stand thecakedecoraBngcompany.co.uk   £54.99

180 Cupcake  cases Windsor  Cake  Cra<   £3.99

MulH Hered  non  sHck  pan   cakescookiesandcra<shop.co.uk   £29.99

Chocolate extract thecupcakeco.co.uk  £6.50

Edible flower  fragrances The  Cake  DecoraBng  Company   £11.95

Ginger co=on  apron Amazon  £16.99

Thermospatula Lakeland £14.99

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Dinkydoodle airbrush  machine thecakedecoraBngcompany.co.uk   £119.99


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 BAKING WISH LIST

Baby pink  edible  gli=er edible-­‐gliPer.co.uk  £2.40

Li=lepod vanilla  extract souschef.co.uk  £6.50

Squires Kitchen  modeling   cocoform Squires  Kitchen  £5.55

PME floral  impression  mat Hobbycra<  £1.99

Garden trading  cooling  rack John  Lewis  £12.00

Rainbow dust  click  twist  brush Nutrafresh  fruit  powders thecakedecoraBngcompany.co.uk   Sam’s  Cupcakes  London  £3.25 £4.99

Red magneHc  close  box midpac.co.uk  £1.00

Covapaste sugarpaste  5kg The  Great  Cake  Warehouse   £13.50

Cupcake corer Lakeland  £3.99

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Playing cards  patchwork  cu=ers Patchwork  CuPers  £7.00  

Delia’s collecHon  by  Silverwood surbitonart.co.uk  £6.95


Meet Lara From Tasty Cakes

“Hi there  fellow  Cake  Fans.  My  name  is  Lara   Clarke  and  I  am  the  owner,  maker,  sculptor  and   pot  washer  over  at  Tasty  Cakes.  I  love  anything   big  and  bold,  and  making  things  that  look,  well,   just  like  they  are  supposed  to.   I  started  making  cakes  in  2011  when  a  family   friend  asked  me  to  make  them  an  anniversary   cake.  After  watching  series  after  series  of  Cake   Boss  and  Ace  of  Cakes,  I  thought  to  myself...   "How  hard  can  it  be?"...  as  it  turned  out...  very!! My  Xirst  few  cakes  were….  how  can  I  put  this   nicely?.....  Like  fondant  had  exploded  over  a   sponge.  As  a  beginner,  I  didn't  think  to  include   the  heat  of  summer  into  my  plans...  so  as  I   watched  the  buttercream  ooze  out  from  the   sides  of  the  cake,  and  the  fondant  slowly  slip  to   it's  demise,  I  thought  to  myself...  "perhaps  this   isn't  for  me?" Luckily  I  didn't  give  up.  I  researched  everything   cake,  watched  YouTube  videos,  read  books  and   asked  as  many  questions  as  I  could…  and  now,   two  years  on  I  Xind  myself  making  4ft  tall   Grinch  Cakes  standing  on  one  leg! My  most  recent  carved  cake  that  I  created  was   for  a  couple  who  wanted  the  opposite  of   tradition.  I  have  known  the  bride  for  a  couple  of   years,  and  to  say  she  is  Disney  mad  is  an   understatement.  If  she  could  be  anyone  in  the   world,  it  would  deXinitely  be  Minnie  Mouse.   Then  there  is  her  lovely  Xiancé.  He  loves  all  the   old  comic  strips,  Batman,  Superman...  but  in   particular,  Ironman!

They came  to  me  wanting  to  incorporate  the   two  characters  into  a  cake.  The  bride  decided   she  wanted  the  pair  holding  hands...  perhaps   painted  on  the  Xlat  sponge.  Now,  anyone  that   knows  me  will  understand...  the  word  Xlat  does   not  come  into  my  vocabulary.  

Anyway, in  the  end  it  was  all  worth  it.  The   couple  LOVED  their  cake...  as  did  all  of  their   guests,  as  they  knew  instantly  who  the  cake   was  for  and  why.  Seeing  the  bride  with  her   Minnie  Mouse  ears  posing  next  to  the  cake  with   a  massive  grin,  made  my  tummy  Xlutter.  

I asked  her  if  she  trusted  me,  she  said  yes,  so  off   I  went.  I  baked  a  mountain  of  yummy  chocolate   sponge  cake  on  the  Saturday  and  popped  it  in   the  freezer  until  the  Monday  (frozen  cake  is   MUCH  easier  to  carve).  Then  as  I  waited,  I   created  the  frame  using  wood,  steel  and  PVC   pipes,  (I  swear  I  am  becoming  more  and  more   of  a  carpenter  every  day!)  I  also  made  Minnie   Mouse’s  head  and  ears  so  they  would  have  time   to  dry.  Then  I  set  about  making  the  cake.  

So why  not  give  it  a  go!  After  my  cake  disasters   of  2011,  I  thought  about  throwing  the  towel  in;   but  now,  I  couldn't  be  happier  on  my  cakey   adventure!”

The carving  doesn't  actually  take  as  much  time   as  people  think...  It  is  really  more  about  the   stacking.  If  you  don't  take  as  much  time  as   possible  stacking,  you  will  have  a  cake   disaster...  especially  when  gravity  is  well  and   truly  against  you!   After  a  generous  crumb  coat  using  thick   chocolate  ganache...  I  sat  back  and  waited  for   everything  to  dry  before  starting  my  favorite   part...  the  decorating. The  details  took  about  two  days  to  complete,   but  once  you  get  into  the  cakey  zone,  an  hour   can  feel  like  10  minutes!

Before sugarpaste  is  used  to  cover  the  cakes

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Continued >


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 BAKING FOR CHARITY

THE

Depressed CAKE SHOP The Depressed  Cake  Shop  is  the  Cakehead  Loves  chosen  charity  project  for  2013.  It  aims  to  raise   awareness  of  mental  health  issues  and  use  cake  as  a  universal  platform  on  which  this  can  be  discussed.   Due  to  the  overwhelming  support  for  the  concept;  this  is  a  dedicated  page  for  all  those  wanting  to  take   part  in,  or  simply  Xind  out  more  about,  the  series  of  events  which  will  be  held  around  the  UK  and   indeed  the  world. One  in  four  people  will  suffer  from  mental  illness  at  some  point  in  their  lives  –  The  Depressed  Cake   Shop  will  provide  a  unique  (and  delicious)  cake  platform  on  which  to  raise  awareness  of  and  discuss   mental  health  issues  -­‐    whilst  at  the  same  time  raising  valuable  funds  for  various  mental  health   charities.  It  will  provide  a  valuable  platform  for  discussion  about  mental  illness  and  to  engage  with   people  on  the  myriad  of  complex  issues  that  stem  from  this  disease.  It’s  an  awareness  campaign,  as   opposed  to  a  fundraising  one,  so  each  of  the  cake  shops  will  be  donating  money  to  the  mental  health   charity  of  their  choice.

Top four  images  from  Summer  Food  &  Craft  Fair  at  BroomXield  Hall  in  Derby  and  we  donated  to  Derbyshire  Mind  -­‐  Photographs  by  Miss  Fortune Remaining  two  images  from  Leeds  Depressed  Cake  Shop  Corn  Exchange-­‐  Photographs  by  Mark  Murphy

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 GREAT BRITISH BAKE OFF

The Bake Off is Back Actress and  cake  designer,   Roxanne  Saili,  originates  from  the   Midlands  and  moved  to  London  at   the  age  of  18.  With  an  Egyptian,   Italian-­‐Maltese  mother  and  a   Persian  father,  Roxanne  grew  up  in   a  dramatic  household  of  exotic   Olavours  and  developed  a  passion   for  good  quality,  luxurious  food. Tell  us  why  you  decided  to  apply  for  the   GBBO The  main  reason  I  applied  for  the  GBBO  is  that  I   am  a  huge  fan  of  the  show.  I  watched  it  from   the  very  Xirst  series  and  fell  in  love  with   everything  about  it...  the  judges,  the  contestants   and  of  course,  Mel  and  Sue.  It  was  around  the  

time of  the  second  series  of  the  Bake  Off  that   baking  had  become  a  real  passion,  and  major   part  of  my  life.   Did  you  make  the  application,  or  was  it   someone  else? My  family  suggested  I  apply  for  the  GBBO  after   we  watched  the  Xinal  of  the  second  series.  An   advert  came  up  after  the  show  looking  for  new   applicants  for  the  third  series,  so  I  noted  down   the  website  and  email  address  and  said  I  would   consider  applying  just  to  shut  my  family  up.  I   actually  completely  forgot  all  about  it  until  my   sister  was  at  her  best  friend’s  30th  birthday   party,  which  I  had  made  a  huge  birthday  cake   for.  A  friend  of  my  sister’s  friend,  who  was  at   the  party,  just  so  happened  to  work  for  the   production  side  of  the  GBBO  team  and  when   she  tasted  the  cake  she  asked  who  had  made  it.  

Have you ever thought about applying to be a contestant on the Great British Bake Off? Read about Roxy’s journey through the process and just missing out on being in the final 12...

Continued >

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 GREAT BRITISH BAKE OFF

My sister  began  chatting  with  her,  and  before   long  I  had  a  phone  call  telling  me  to  Xill  out  my   application  form  immediately...  So  I  did!   What  is  the  Oirst  stage  like?   The  Xirst  stage  (past  the  application  form)  was   a  phone  interview.  They  had  called  me  whilst   my  hands  were  literally  covered  in  cake   batter.  I  had  to  ask  them  to  call  me  back  once  I   had  put  the  cake  in  the  oven...  Once  they  called   me  back,  we  had  a  general  chat  about  my   application  form,  the  pictures  I  had  sent  and   talked  about  me  as  a  person.  It  was  very   informal  and  quite  enjoyable;  it  hardly  felt  like   they  were  interviewing  me  at  all!  At  the  end  of   the  conversation,  they  asked  me  to  answer  a   few  baking  questions.  This  was  when  I  started   to  panic.  I  loved  baking,  but  what  if  I  couldn't   answer  the  simplest  of  questions?!   They   asked   pretty   basic   questions   like   "describe   what   a   creaming   method   would   be   in   regards   to   baking   cakes"   and   "what  are   the   ingredients   used   to   make   bread?"   Even   though   the   questions   were   relatively   simple,   the   pressure   and   nerves   got  to  me   so   much,   that   I   began   bumbling   and   getting   questions   wrong.   I   thought   I'd   blown   it.   They   thanked   me   for   my   time,   and   then   hung   up   the   phone.   I   called   all   my   friends   and   family   and   told   them   I   had   failed   the   interview.   My   family   told   me   I   had   done   well   to  get   a   phone   call   and   not  to  worry.   Within  an   hour   or  so,   the  bake   off   team   called   me   back  and  told  me   to  prepare   two   baked   dishes   as   I   would   be   meeting   them   for   the   second   round   of   auditions   in   Hoxton,   London,   in   a   couple   of   weeks’   time.  I  was  elated!

the food  production  team  came  out  to  talk  to   us.  She  thanked  us  for  our  time  and  effort  in   bringing  the  sweet  and  savoury  bakes,  and   said  that  a  small  percentage  of  successful   candidates  will  be  asked  to  stay  on  later  in  the   day  to  go  through  to  a  camera  interview.  She   reiterated  that  to  get  this  far  from  thousands   of  applicants  was  a  great  achievement  and   that  only  a  few  would  be  making  it  through.   With  this  in  mind,  I  thought  I  had  reached  the   end  of  the  line  and  once  my  cake  and  tarts   were  in  with  the  judges,  I'd  be  going  home.  I   waited  nervously  to  see  the  producers  who   were  judging  the  food  and  eventually  I  was   called  into  the  hall  to  Xind  two  young  ladies   sitting  with  my  bakes  in  front  of  them.  The   room  was  Xilled  with  people  scattered  around   the  edges  taking  notes  and  watching.  I  sat  in   front  of  the  two  young  ladies  and  instantly   they  put  me  at  ease.  "Obviously,  your  cake  is   amazing"  one  of  the  girls  said,  to  which  I   almost  chocked  and  replied  "errr  thanks!".  We   then  talked  about  the  bakes.  They  loved  them   both  and  congratulated  me  on  doing  so  well.   We  then  talked  about  what  got  me  into  baking,  

it  through  to  the  Xinal  stages  of  the  auditions.   How  did  you  prepare  for  the  stages? Once  I  had  the  call  that  I  had  made  it  through   to  the  Xinal  round  of  auditions,  the  practising   and  preparations  really  started.  We  were  told   that  the  Xinal  stage  would  be  a  day’s  Xilming  in   a  commercial  kitchen  with  Mary  and  Paul   judging  our  bakes.  A  week  before  the  audition   we  were  given  two  recipes:  a  scone  and  bread   recipe,  to  bake  at  home  and  bring  with  you.   We  were  told  to  bring  a  recipe  that  we  had   created  ourselves,  and  also  told  to  be   prepared  to  bake  a  surprise  technical  bake  on   site  whilst  being  Xilmed.   What  did  you  practice  baking  at  home? For  the  weeks  before  my  Xinal  audition,  it  was   the  Christmas  break  and  I  remember  getting   up  every  day,  baking  for  my  family  and   friends…  anything  and  everything  I  could  Xind   in  my  baking  books.  I  had  never  baked  a  loaf   of  bread  before  in  my  life!  On  that  Christmas   eve  I  baked  my  Xirst  ever  cheese  and  herb  loaf.   Throughout  the  Christmas   holidays  I  baked  continuously.   Bread,  croissants,  cakes,   biscuits...  Anything!  I  lived,   breathed  and  dreamt  baking,   and  put  absolutely  everything  I   had  into  making  sure  I  was   prepared  for  the  Xinals.  Once   we  were  sent  the  recipes  for   the  scones  and  bread  that  we   had  to  bring  with  us  to  the   Xinals,  I  baked  hundreds  and   hundreds  of  batches!  I  was   giving  scones  away  to  anyone   and  everyone  who  would  have   them!

“Throughout the Christmas holidays I

baked continuously. Bread, croissants,

cakes, biscuits... Anything! I lived, breathed and dreamt baking - I put absolutely

everything into making sure I was prepared

What is  the  second  stage  like? For  the  second  round  of  auditions,  you  had  to   bring  two  baked  goods  of  your  choice.  A  sweet   and  a  savoury  bake,  both  contrasting  in   technique  to  show  different  skills.  They  asked   me  to  email  the  recipes  for  each  bake  I  was   bringing  and  to  conXirm  my  attendance.  For   the  sweet  bake  I  decided  to  make  a  chocolate   trufXle  torte  with  chocolate  ganache  Xilling  and   fresh  berries.  For  the  savoury  bake  I  made   mini  feta,  pancetta  and  baby  tomato  tarts  with   a  cheddar  cheese  crust. Once  I  arrived  at  the  hall  in  Hoxton,  I  was   greeted  by  the  production  team  taking  names   and  giving  out  name  badges.  My  bakes  were   put  on  a  conveyor  belt  like  table,  along  with   the  tons  of  other  baked  goods  made  by  the   other  auditionees.  I  then  sat  nervously  in  the   waiting  room  with  all  the  other  candidates,   waiting  for  my  bakes  to  be  taken  in  to  the   producer’s  room  to  be  tasted.  A  member  from  

for the finals”

what type  of  things  I  bake  and  what  I  would   Xind  the  most  challenging  part  of  being  in  the   show.  I  said  the  technical  bake.  I  told  them   that  it  would  be  a  challenge  to  stay  conXident   when  baking  a  recipe  you've  never  seen   before  under  such  a  time  limit.  They  agreed   and  said  that  somehow  people  always   manage. With  that,  I  thanked  them  both,  shook  hands   and  left  the  room  exhilarated,  exhausted  and   struggling  to  recover  from  the  adrenalin  and   nerves.  I  was  then  quickly  told,  by  one  of  the   team  outside,  to  stay  behind  as  they  deXiantly   wanted  to  see  me  again  for  the  camera   audition.  Overjoyed,  I  was  whisked  to  another   waiting  area  and  given  my  half  eaten  bakes  to   take  to  the  camera  room.  Before  I  had  chance   to  realise  what  was  going  on,  I  was  sat  in  front   of  a  camera  and  interviewed.  The  questions   asked  were  similar  to  those  asked  before,  but  I   guess  they  wanted  to  see  how  you  look,  act   and  sound  on  camera.  Within  ten  minutes  or   so,  I  was  thanked  again  for  my  time  and  told  I   would  hear  in  up  to  three  weeks  if  I  had  made

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Tell us  about  the  next  stages,  what  did  you   make,  how  you  were  tested? When  the  Xinal  audition  day  came,  I  had  stayed   up  the  night  before  to  make  sure  I  baked  the   freshest  loaf  and  scones  for  Mary  and  Paul  to   taste.  The  audition  day  came.  Sick  with  nerves,   I  went  to  the  commercial  kitchen  space  in   Hackney  with  my  bakes  in  hand  and  was  met   by  the  same  production  team.  12  candidates   waited  nervously  in  the  waiting  room,  whilst   our  bakes  were  lined  up  to  go  in  to  Mary  and   Paul.  We  were  talked  through  how  the  day   would  work  and  what  was  expected  of  us.  I   was  one  of  the  last  candidates  to  go  in  to  see   the  judges.  I  kept  thinking  I  had  never  baked  a   loaf  of  bread  before  a  couple  of  weeks  ago,  and   now  I  was  about  to  get  judged  by  Paul   Hollywood  himself!

PREVIEW VERSION

When I  met  Mary  and  Paul,  they  were  sat  in  a   little  room  with  a  small  table  in  front  of  them.   My  bakes  were  on  the  table  untouched  and  a   few  people  were  dotted  around  the  edges  of   the  room  watching  and  taking  notes.  After  

Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW Michelle Wibowo,  founder  of  Michelle  Sugar  Art  Ltd,   creates  award-­‐winning  sugar  and  cake  sculptures   with  incredible  attention  to  detail  and  realism. Michelle  won  the  2008  and  2012  Culinary  Olympics   in  Germany,  with  gold  and  silver  medals  for  her   sugar  and  cake  sculptures.  

EXCLUSIVE CAKE MASTERS INTERVIEW

PREVIEW VERSION Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 INTERVIEW

Cake Competition

inspired by T-Shirts! Cake Masters  interviewed   founder  of  Threadcakes  to   Oind  out  more  about  this   extraordinary  competition.   Tell  us  about  Threadcakes   ‘Threadcakes  is  a  contest  I  started  as  a  way  to   share  gift  certiXicates  I  had  earned  for  a   crowdsourced  t-­‐shirt  design  site  called   Threadless.  I  suggested  the  contest  to  the   community,  and  everyone  really  enjoyed  the   idea  and  sent  in  several  dozen  cake  entries.   Back  then,  everything  was  done  manually  (with   people  emailing  me  cake  photos)  and  so  I  didn't   do  the  contest  the  next  year;  but  Threadless   awarded  me  with  a  community  prize  for  "best   independent-­‐run  contest",  which  was  really   nice. Threadless  is  a  unique  community-­‐centric  t-­‐ shirt  (and  other  apparel)  company  that  relies   on  artists  to  submit  designs  and  the  community   to  vote  on  the  designs.  Those  that  are  voted  the   highest  are  printed  and  sold. This  results  in  all  sorts  of  designs  of...   everything.  Popular  culture,  art  references,   original  pieces,  clever  sayings,  etc.   Two  years  later,  Threadless  reached  out  to  me   and  asked  if  I'd  be  willing  to  run  the  contest  

again. They  hired  me  to  build  out  the  site  to   accept  entries  online  and  I've  run  it  every  year   since.” How  did  you  come  up  with  the  idea? “I  had  heard  of  people  baking  elaborate  cakes   and  I  thought  that  it  would  be  a  fun  challenge   for  the  community.  I  had  just  a  small  amount  of   "prize  money"  to  give  away  (in  the  form  of   Threadless  gift  certiXicates  at  the  time.)   Threadless  now  sponsors  a  $1,000  grand  prize   ($500  cash,  $500  gift  certiXicate.)” How  long  has  it  been  running? “The  Xirst  year  was  2007.  After  a  hiatus  in  2008,   Threadless  asked  me  to  run  it  again.  I've  run  it   every  year  from  2009.” Why  is  it  called  "Thread"  cakes “The  entire  contest  is  based  on  the  existing   Threadless  t-­‐shirt  designs.  There  are  over   2,000  designs  they  can  choose  from  now. Each  entry  is  displayed  alongside  the  t-­‐shirt   design  inspiration,  so  people  can  see  how  the   2-­‐dimensional  design  has  been  interpreted   into  3-­‐dimensional  (ostensibly)  delicious   cake.” What  is  your  background? “I'm  a  web  developer  by  trade.  I  run  a  software   company  in  Tempe,  Arizona  called  Synapse   Studios.  “

T-­‐Shirt design  by  Diego  Fernandez  ~Cake  designed  by  Elizabeth  Marek  -­‐  Winner  2012 25


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Amazing cakes? What an understatement... Exclusive Cake Masters Interview

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

Challenging the boundaries of cake Food Network Challenge winner Mike McCarey from Mike’s Amazing Cakes

Tell us  a  bit  about  yourself,  and  your  family   and  your  background? Ah  I’ll  start  with  my  background.  I  started  when   I  was  in  High  School,  I  really  liked  cooking,   speciXically  desserts,  so  I  had  to  decide  between   going  to  Art  School  when  I  graduated  or  going   to  Cooking  School.  I  felt  going  to  Cooking   School  and  trying  to  become  a  Chef  was  a  much   more  practical  thing  to  do  to  stay  employed  and   expand  in  a  business  sense.  So  instead  of  going   off  to  Art  School,  I  went  to  a  culinary  school  in   Denver,  Colorado.  It  was  a  brand  new  school,   there  weren’t  that  many  culinary  schools  back   in  the  day,  back  in  1979.  So  I  went  to  that,  it   was  a  general  culinary  education.  The  part  I   liked  best,  of  course,  was  doing  desserts  and   pastries  and  the  whole  Pastry  Chef  side  of   things.  Also  within  that,  cake  decorating.  So  I   focused  on  that  as  soon  I  got  to  school,  lasted   about  2  years.  then  I  actually  went  broke  before   I  graduated.  I  would  have  been  in  the  second   class  to  graduate,  but  I  went  right  out  to  the   industry  and  started  learning  things  at  the   School  of  Hard  Knocks  basically. I  guess,  in  a  sense,  I  am  self-­‐taught  cake   decorating,  but  for  several  years  I  worked  as  a   Pastry  Chef  in  various  restaurants  and  catering   companies,  retail  outlets,  hotels;  and  very   classical,  when  you  think  of  a  Pastry  Chef  and   what  they  do.  Executive  Pastry  Chef  in  a  Hotel,   for  instance,  doing  kind  of  a  Jack-­‐of-­‐all-­‐Trades,   doing  everything!  Within  that,  of  course,  I  was   decorating  the  occasional  wedding  cake,   whenever  that  came  my  way,  and  that  went  on   for  about  7  years.  Then  I  moved  out  to  New   York,  to  help  as  a  Teaching  Assistant  to  a  very   famous  Pastry  Chef  named  Albert  Kumin.  You   would  know  who  he  is,  he  was  a  big  deal.  He  is   like  the  Obi  Wan  Kenobi  of  Pastry  Chefs  back  in  

the day.  He  is  about  95  years  old  now.  I  did   some  teaching  with  him,  and  then  I  ended  up   working  for  a  catering  company.  They  had  a   retail  component  to  their  catering  operation,   where  people  would  come  in  and  get  prepared   food.  They  had  a  bakery  side  of  that,  and  that’s   the  place  I  really  started  doing  more  and  more   occasion  cakes,  birthday  cakes  and  wedding   cakes;  and  I  really  became  very  fond  of  it. I  lived  there  for  about  3  years  doing  that,  and   New  York  got  to  be  a  little  too  much,  so  my  wife   and  I  moved  out  to  Seattle,  Washington.  I  got   out  here,  was  working  for  a  company  and  all   they  did  were  occasion  cakes.    Most  of  their   business  was  wedding  cakes  and  there  were   some  occasion  cakes.  They  weren’t  really   sculpting  anything  yet,  or  doing  anything  very   elaborate,  and  I  came  in  and  kind  of  brought   that  component  to  the  company.  I  did  that  for   about  2  years  and  then  I  decided,  with  a  guy   that  was  working  for  me  at  the  time,  to  start   our  own  company,  which  was  at  the  time  was   Amazing  Cakes.  Then  it  became  John  and  Mike’s   Amazing  Cakes,  because  John  was  my  Business   Partner  at  the  time.  He  did  it  for  about  2  years   and  his  commute  was  insane;  because  he  was   on  one  of  the  islands  out  in  Puget  Sound,  which   is  the  Waterway  off  our  shore.  Then  I  took  it   over  and  it’s  been  Mike’s  Amazing  cakes  for  the   last  14-­‐15  years.  The  business  has  been  around   17  years.   What  was  it  that  made  you  feel  that  you   actually  wanted  to  set  up  on  your  own   rather  than  working  for  someone  else? I  wasn’t  good  at  working  for  other  people;  they   didn’t  share  my  vision.  I  had  a  certain  idea  of   how  I  wanted  to  do  things,  and  what  could  be   done,  and  it  just  made  sense  to.  I  didn’t  Xit  into  

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“Oh boy, people have a real problem with covering those boards - I know everybody covers their boards in England ” !


ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

the corporate  world  very  well.  I  just  voiced  my   opinion  and  the  corporate  world  doesn’t  care   for  that. Do  you  remember  your  earliest  memory  of   actually  baking?    What  was  that  memory? Back  when  I  was14  or  15,  I  got  into  culinary   school  because  I  was  so  interested.  I  wasn’t  so   much  interested  in  cooking  as  much  as  I  was  in   just  dessert.  The  fact  that  they  didn’t  have  a   separate  baking  programs  per  se;  this  was   1979,  as  I  mentioned.  I  mean  there  might  have   been  a  couple  of  obscure  ones,  but  there  is   nothing  like  there  is  now.  Nicholas  Lodge,  he   has  a  whole  full  blown  2  year  program  or  I   should  say,  excuse  me,  16  week  program  in   Chicago  where  you  are  just  learning  to  do  cake,   not  just  pastry,  but  cake,  So  it  was  go  to  general   culinary  school  and  learn  what  you  can  about   baking  from  that.  So  I  was  making  desserts  by   the  time  I  was  15;  baking  things;  creating   mousses  and  stuff  like  that.  My  passion  kind  of   started  with  that,  and  then  general  culinary   education  was  where  I  would  go  to  Xind  more   education  in  that,  basically.  I  don’t  think  I  ever   had  the  idea  to  become  a  regular  Chef.  I  always   wanted  to  do  the  desserts  side  of  things. What  has  been  the  highlight  of  your  career   to  date? Oh  boy,  there  have  been  several  highpoints.  Do   you  guys  ever  get  the  Food  Network  Challenge   cooking  series? Back  in  the  day  when  it  started,  it  was  an   offshoot  of  a  Pastry  Chef  Competition  that  was   being  done.  So  the  rules  were  very…  I  don’t   want  to  say  strict,  but  they  were  very  adamant.   They  were  very  precise.  When  they  started   Challenge,  you  were  judged  on  how  you   worked  as  a  team,  how  clean  you  were,  how   precise  you  were.  It  wasn’t  just  who  had  the   best  cake  at  the  end  of  the  day:  they  evaluated   you  on  everything  you  did.  It  was  a  very   professional,  very  serious  and  a  very  judged   competition.  As  Challenge  went  along,  and  it   got  more  and  more  popular  on  the  Food   Network,  they  started  bringing  in  producers   who  worked  in  the  world  of  reality  television.   Like  one  particular  gentleman,  who  kind  of   took  over  Challenge,  came  from  The  Bachelor. They  decided  to  bring  in  a  reality  television   component  and  he  brought  that  into  the  mix.   They  stopped  worrying  about  cakes  so  much,   and  the  culinary  viewpoint  of  making  these   things,  and  started  casting  characters  to  create   a  storyline.  It  kind  of  changed  the  dynamic  of   Challenge.  But  when  the  Challenge  started,  it   was  a  very  great  place  to  see  how  well  you   could  do,  how  much  you  could  create  and  what   kind  of  achievement  you  could  create  in  a  very   limited  timeframe,  under  very  serious   professional  conditions  and  judgements.  So  I   guess  those  are  some  of  my  high  points.  What   my  assistant  Lana,  who  is  still  with  me  now,   achieved  in  those  challenges,  and  what  we  

created in  the  8  hours  we  are,  pretty  proud  of   what  we  did  there.  

don’t get  to  do  that  nearly  as  much  as  I  would   like.  It’s  always  a  blast  for  me.

There have  been  some  other  competitions  that   I  have  done,  where  there  were  high  points.  I  am   more  into  personal  high  points,  almost  on  a   daily  basis.  Somebody  comes  in  and  wants  a   particular  thing.  I  am  a  sculptor  by  trade,  I   don’t  draw  too  well…  not  much  of  a  sketcher.  I   am  not  2  dimensional.  I  can  barely  paint  my   name!  My  brain  really  processes  everything   into  3  dimensions;  so  I  am  a  sculptor  by  trade.   so  when  somebody  comes  in;  my  OfXice   Manager,  Teresa,  will  come  back  and  say   something  like  “somebody  wants  a  haggis”.  As  a   sculptor  I  have  to  embrace….  what  is  a  haggis?   What  does  it  look  like?  Oh  God,  how  do  I  make   that  look  interesting?  So  it’s  mounting  a   challenge  every  day’  is  really  kind  of  my   highpoint.  Did  I  pull  this  off?  Was  I  able  to     make  it  edible  and  delicious.  Also,  did  I  achieve   what  I  was  trying  to  sculpt?  How  accurately  did   I  recreate  this?  Did  I  give  this  thing  a  really   good  style,  if  I  was  creating  something  on  my   own?  Those  are  kind  of  my  personal   highpoints,  kind  of  on  a  daily  basis,  if  that’s  a   good  answer.

You have  talked  about  your  highlights  in   your  career  to  date,  what  have  been  the   lowest  points  for  you?   The  lowest  point,  I  think,  is  the  day  to  day   grind.  It’s  not  our  job  here,  or  what  I  am  doing   or  what  my  assistant  Lana  does.  It’s  never   boring,  which  is  really  one  of  the  pluses  to  it.   It’s  different  every  day;  there  is  very  little   repetition  so  we  don’t  get  bored.  b But  starting  a  business  eats  up  your  time  and   eats  up  your  creative  time  as  well.  I  found  that   when  I  was  back  working  for  somebody,  I   actually  had  more  time  just  to  be  creative.  The   only  thing  I  had  to  worry  about  was:  how  do  I   make  these  10  cakes  I  have  to  make  this  week   really,  really  cool?  Pushing  the  envelope  and   maximising  my  time,  and  just  doting  or  giving   all  my  attention  to  that.  I  just  can’t  do  that   anymore.  I  miss  those  days  where  I  could  just   worry  about  what  is  the  coolest  border  I  can   put  on  this  cake?  I  don’t  worry  about  borders   on  cakes  any  more.  You’ve  got  to  drop  your   priorities  and  change  everything,  and  things  fall   off  the  list  as  you  have  to  prioritise  other   things.  I  think  that’s  my  downside;  I  don’t  get  to   spend  nearly  as  much  time  being  creative  as   back  in  the  day  when  I  started,  than  I  do  now   running  the  business.

So is  accuracy  and  scale  a  really  important   thing  for  you? Oh  yes!  Oh  my,  I  live  for  scale.  Physics,  scale,   perspective,  being  as  accurate  as  I  can.  It’s  kind   of  my  trademark  I  guess.  You  know  I  talk  to   students  about  how  everybody  has  a  signature   thumbprint.  I  mean  Colette  Peters  has  a  very   speciXic  look;  you  know  a  Colette  Peters  when   you  see  it.  Michelle  Wibowo,  she’s  in  London,   hyperrealism  is  her  calling  card.  I  could  name  a   lot  of  different  people,  and  they  all  have  a   different  styles  and  things.  I  am  a  kind  of  a   chameleon.  I  don’t  adhere  to  one  style  too   much;  I  try  to  go  all  over  the  place,  which  is   kind  of  a  disadvantage.  Sometimes  I  wish  I  had   a  more  signature  style,  but  if  I  had  to  name  a   signature  style,  it’s  being  to  scale.  I  am  more  in   the  wheelhouse  of  Michelle  Wibowo  than   anything  else.   Her  single  mission  in  life,  from  what  I  can  see,   is  trying  to  be  accurate  with  everything  she   does.  I  mean  going  after  the  Culinary  Olympics,   and  making  a  Bassett  Hound  or  the  Queen  or   her  corgis;  she’s  trying  to  make  it  just  as   realistic  as  she  can,  and  that’s  my  mission  as   well.  When  I  am  re-­‐creating  something  from   life,  I  am  trying  to  make  it  as  serious  and   perfect  as  I  can;  ….  buildings  are  the  same  way   and  cars.  But  something  I  also  really  enjoy,   almost  more,  is  if  they  ask  me  to  create   something  from  my  own  imagination.  What   comes  into  play  then  are  my  inXluences.  I  am   really  into  illustrators;  one  of  my  heroes  is  Dr   Seuss,  Theodor  Geisel.  I  see  his  inXluence   whenever  I  am  creating  something  whimsical,   or  something  for  kids  of  my  own  design,  taking   something  from  what  they  might  bring  in;  and  I  

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Tell me  about  the  team  that  supports  you?     The  way  we  work  is  this:  Teresa  is  OfXice   manager  and  she  deals  with  the  clients;  I  am  in   the  back  in  full  production  with  Lana,  who  has   been  with  me  for  200-­‐  300  years!  She  is  great   because  she  comes  from  a  really  high   production  background,  and  she  was  much   younger  when  she  started  out  in  the  business.   She  was  working  at  a  facility  where  she  was   doing  around500  pies  that  day,  or  she  was  icing   10  cakes  that  day.  Her  production  skills  are   massive  and  I  come  from  a  pastry  shop   background.  We  really  can  pump  it  out.  We  do   anything  from  700  to  1000  cakes  a  year,  and   60%  to  70%  of  those  are  wedding  cakes.  The   rest  of  them  are  varying  assorted  occasion  and   birthday  cakes,  corporate  cakes.     We  are  right  next  to  Microsoft,  we  are   surrounded  by  Microsoft!  We  have  a  Nintendo   just  behind  us.One  of  Nintendo  cakes  we  did  for   the  CEO  of  the  North  American  Branch  retiring,   with  Mario  bursting  out  of  a  Golf  bag  (we  just   posted  it  on  Facebook).  So  we  are  doing  a  lot  of   stuff  like  that.  Our  business  is  kind  of  a  bell   curve;  where  it’s  slowest  in  January,  peaks  in   August  and  then  slowly  slopes  back  down  to   that  low  point  back  in  January.  So  we  bring  in   extra  help  in  the  summer.  We  have  somebody   come  in  doing  baking  and  prep,  and  working  on   cakes.  I  basically  always  have  2  solid  people   with  me,  and  then  I  will  bring  in  a  3rd,  kind  of  a   Xloater  or  a  person  that  Xills  in.  It’s  slowed  down   a  little  bit  because  of  the  economy.  Our  

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Up and Away... Cake Tutorial

Oriental

PREVIEW VERSION

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Lily Tutorial By Claire McDonald from Claireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cakes and Bakes

by Kate Lau

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 TUTORIAL

Up and  Away  Tutorial Materials  List Tin  foil  

Toothpicks

Cling Xilm

XActo knife

Masking Tape

Rolling pins  large  and  small

Dual temp  hot  glue  gun

Sculpting tools

Dual temp  hot  glue  sticks

Food colours  for  colouring  fondant

Scissors

Fondant

MDF Board  (Medium  Density  Fibre)

Gum paste

Roto Zip  (Rotary  cutting  tool)

Edible glue

Roto zip  circle  cutter  guide  (optional)

Fondant smoother

Hack saw

Belt sander  or  sanding  paper  (to  taper  edge  5”   MDF  board)

Table vice  C  clamp  (table  clamp) Crescent  wrench  

Non-­‐toxic Easy  Mould  Silicone  Putty  (or  any   brand  you  can  use  to  make  a  mould)

Vice clamp

Turntable

Pipe cutter

1” circle  cutter

Pipe threader  (optional)

White paper  wires  24  gauge

Power drill

Thin pointy  paint  brush  for  painting  on  details

Drill bits

Small paint  brush  for  brushing  on  edible  glue

Green Fondant  to  cover  base  board

Internal Structure  Parts

Corn Syrup

3/ 4”  thick  MDF  board  cut  to  10”  diameter  with   drilled  hole

Paint brush Pizza  cutter

1/ 4”  thick  MDF  board  cut  to  5”  diameter  with   drilled  holes  and  tapered  sides

Metal Spatulas

4x Washers  5/  16  in  size

Rubber spatulas

4x Hex  nuts  5/  16  in  size

Serrated knife

5/ 16  (18  x  36”)  sized  Threaded  rod  cut  to  12”   length

Rulers 6”  and  18””

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 TUTORIAL

Step 9:   The  colour  of  fondant  you  choose  to  use  on  the   baseboard  is  up  to  you.  I  did  end  up  airbrushing  my   green  fondant  with  avocado  airbrush  colour  to   darken  the  look.  This  is  totally  optional.  Roll  out   your  green  fondant  to  cover  the  baseboard.  The   thickness  of  the  fondant  has  to  be  thick  enough  so   that  when  the  fondant  is  over  the  baseboard,  it  is   Xlushed  with  the  height  of  the  nut  (about  1/2”   thick).  Cut  off  the  excess  with  a  pizza  cutter  and   knife.  Smooth  out  any  imperfections  with  a  fondant   smoother.  Seal  the  fondant  with  cling  Xilm  to   protect  it  from  getting  dirty.

Step 10:   Take  the  polystyrene  cone  and  measure  1”  down   from  the  widest  side.  Make  a  mark  with  a  pencil.   Cut  along  the  line.  Discard  the  bottom  half  as  you   do  not  need  it  for  this  project.  

Step 11:   To  make  your  drill  hole  on  the  polystyrene,  place   your  polystyrene  in  the  centre  of  the  5”  MDF  board   so  you  have  a  reference  to  where  the  drill  hole   needs  to  be.  Use  a  skewer  to  poke  through   polystyrene.  Insert  the  polystyrene  through  the   threaded  rod.

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 TUTORIAL

Phase 5  -­‐  Adding  Decorations

Step 28:   The  materials  you  will  need  for  this  phase  are  different   colours  of  fondant  (red,  royal  blue,  sky  blue,  orange,  pink,   lemon  yellow,  and  lime),  EasyMold  or  Silicone  Plastique   (mold  making  materials),  chocolate  ganache  in  a  piping  bag,   gumpaste,  turntable,  scissors,  toothpicks,  white  Xloral  wires   (26  gauge),  and  white  Xloral  tape.  

Step 29:  

PREVIEW VERSION

With a  bit  of  gumpaste,  roll  a  ball  in  the  palm  of  your  hands.  On  one   end,  form  a  point.  You  don’t  want  to  make  the  balloon  too  big  as  the   weight  can  be  too  heavy  to  hold  up  on  cake;  about  1”  in  size  is   good.  Let  your  balloon  dry  completely.  

Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk Step 30:   Follow  the  instructions  on  the  packaging  to  the  EasyMold  (or  any  brand  you  have  available).  Form  your  balloon  mould.  Wash  the  newly  formed   mould  and  wipe  dry.  You  can  now  use  the  mould  to  form  different  colours  of  balloons.  

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ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 2013 TUTORIAL

Step 34:   You  can  leave  your  cake  like  this  and  proceed  to  steaming  your   balloons  and  then  adding  the  wires.  If  so  you  can  skip  this  step.  For  a   “popup  look”,  add  some  balloons  on  top  of  the  1st  layer  of  balloons.   It’s  a  good  opportunity  to  hide  the  spots  where  the  ganache  is  still   showing.  You  can  layer  as  much  as  you  want  just  keep  in  mind  the   less  weight  on  this  cake,  the  better.  Once  you  are  satisXied  with  the   overall  look,  use  a  clothing  steamer  and  slightly  melt  the  sugar  paste   to  give  it  that  shiny  look.   Step  35:   Carefully  remove  the  3  cardboard  pieces.  

PREVIEW VERSION Buy the full 84 page magazine at www.cakemasters.co.uk

Step 36:   If  you  haven’t  done  so,  cover  your  threaded  rod  with  white  Xloral   tape.  It  has  to  be  white  in  colour  to  be  camouXlaged  within  the  wires.   Cover  the  rod  with  white  Xloral  wires.  The  ends  are  cut  short  because   you  don’t  want  too  much  bulking  near  the  girl’s  hand.  Wrap  a  piece   of  Xloral  tape  to  hold  the  Xirst  set  of  wires  down.  Insert  your  2nd   round  of  wires,  keeping  it  close  to  the  1st  set.  Cut  the  ends  off  near   the  girl’s  hand.  Use  Xloral  tape  to  hold  down  in  place.  Continue  on   with  the  same  process.  When  you  are  at  your  last  set  of  wire  bulking,   use  hot  glue  gun  to  adhere  the  wires  in  place.  That  way  no  Xloral  tape   will  be  showing.  Start  to  insert  wires  through  the  balloons  near  the   bottom  of  cake.  This  will  help  loosen  the  bulky  look.  Use  hot  glue  gun   to  adhere  the  ends  of  wires.  Keep  inserting  as  many  wires  as  you   wish  until  you  are  satisXied  with  the  overall  look.  

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Eat Cake  Party

Novelty Cake Collection 36


Make Pretty  Cakes

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Way Beyond  Cakes  by  Mayen

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Dave’s All  Occasion  Cakes

Comper Cakes

Happyhills Cakes

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Kidacity

Indulge Designer  Cakes

Little Cherry  Cake  Company  (  T-­‐Cakes)

Indulge Designer  Cakes

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Antonella Di  Maria  Torte  &  Design 41


Pirikos Cake  Design

Pirikos Cake  Design

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Baker Maker  Cakes

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Creative Cakes   by  Julie Creative   Cakes   by  Julie

A Wish  and  a  Whisk

Creative Cakes  by  Julie

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Pirikos Cake  Design

OfF ThE  CuFf  CaKeS!!  

The Cake  Tin Rose-­‐Maries  Cakes  &  Sugarcraft   45


Cakes by  Angela  Morrison

Creative Cakes  by  Julie

A Wish  and  a  Whisk

Indulge Designer  Cakes

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A Wish  and  a  Whisk

Conjurer’s Kitchen

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PREVIEW VERSION

Brenda’s Dream  Cakes

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Eat Cake  Party A  Wish  and  a  Whisk

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Indulge Designer  Cakes Class  with  Margie  Carter

Happyhills Cakes

Conjurer’s Kitchen

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Mama Rhu  @  Pimp  My  Cake

Connie’s Cakes  Northallerton

Adam’s Cakes

La Bella  Torta 50


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Profile for Cake Masters

Cake Masters Magazine September 2013  

Novelty Cake Issue Exclusive Interviews: -Mike McCarey -Michelle Wibowo -Chris Russom Cake competition inspired by T-Shirts Up and Away 3D...

Cake Masters Magazine September 2013  

Novelty Cake Issue Exclusive Interviews: -Mike McCarey -Michelle Wibowo -Chris Russom Cake competition inspired by T-Shirts Up and Away 3D...

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