Issuu on Google+

Process Book Artist Identity project

Allison Barnes by Caio Logato


About the artist Allison Barnes / Interview 1) How would you describe your process when working on a project?

that my family left behind. It is this land that informs my way of working.

I like to think that my process is rather intuitive. Shooting with a large format 8x10 camera requires me to slow down and to really see. I travel near and far to make photographs, but I leave for weeks at a time. This allows me to be fully present with my subject matter. When I am living in my work, I feel more open to possibility and I take in so much more than when I am on a day or weekend trip. Learning about the landscape – what it is made of, who lives there, etc. is a crucial part of my work, and the only way to really learn those things is by eating, sleeping and walking the land. I work mostly in landscape, and I find it interesting that my camera has as much of a presence as I do. And when I am making self-portraits, it is as though I am looking at the camera looking back at me. I enjoy the symbiotic relationship that I have with my tool – I want my final outcomes to be products of my own way of seeing

Though I may always be rooted to the rural landscape, I find inspiration in the west as well, where a majority of my recent work was made. I seek out traces and marks that tell a history, and there is so much to be found in the American Southwest.

2) Could you tell me 10 words that you think could describe your work, or you as a professional? 1. quiet 2. intuitive 3. encounters 4. autiobigraphical 5. geological 6. American (the landscape and myself) 7. contact 8. isolated 9. determined 10. methodic 3) What inspires you? What amuses you? Why did you choose art and photography? I grew up in an extremely rural area and had an assortment of agriculture all around me. Our formative years are important to how we view the landscape, and for me it is the cornfields, mountains, and old farmhouses that inspire me and that I still visit today when I get the chance. The connection I have to my childhood home is strong – the image Homestead 1991, Port Murray, NJ is a family portrait. I had the chance to visit the house I grew up in for the first time in sixteen years, and what I came across were the impressions

It is in the desert where the history of our native ancestors is under the full blaze of the sun. I am inspired by the usage of land and how humans interact and connect with it. I am always thinking about how space gets transformed into “place,” which is by the attachments we form based on the experiences we have in certain locations. I never disregard the work of my predecessors – the great photographers who traveled west to uncover the mysteries of that enormous space. I find it fascinating that artists are still exploring these regions and gathering inspiration. In visiting the desert for three years, I always seemed to have new eyes. In this land I am inspired by the slow change over time, both within geology and civilization. The history of story telling is fascinating, and I often seek inspiration from many forms of narration, whether it is photographs or music. The history of the landscape in photography is always somewhere in the back of my head. Knowing what came before you and how your own work plays a role within your medium is crucial. I choose photography because of its ability to both transform and mimic my perception – the ability it gives me to share the point of contact I had. The 8x10 ground glass is a window, and I look through it in the same way I saw the world through the window of that Homestead house. When I look at other artist’s photographs I really believe that they saw what their camera captured, and I am often stunned by the dreams and nightmares that truly exist. 4) Can you get a clear picture of your work improvement? How would you describe that personal growth, and has SCAD helped you with that? I work rather methodically, that has never changed. I make decisions very slowly, but I have gotten stronger at committing to a photograph. There is no reason to second-guess a

picture. I now fully embrace the potential an image has. Even if I’m not sure what something will look like photographed, I make the picture anyway. When I travel, I must make the photograph when I see it because there is no turning back. I have to say that the most important thing that SCAD has provided me is their amazing professors. My work and concepts would not be where they are today if it weren’t for the connections that I have made specific individuals. Being able to fully express your ideas and comfortably share work is a crucial part of succeeding in a homogeneous community. 5) Where do you see your work going? Where do you want to take it? Who’s your audience? I am going to continue on my own re-working of the landscape and just keep building and creating. Ideally, I would like to show this work in a gallery or other appropriate setting. Since my work depicts types of histories – art, ancient, Native American, etc., a museum would function as a suitable location as well. Nationally, I can think of many spaces I would like to exhibit my work, but locally would be nice as well. Savannah doesn’t offer many options for exhibition space, but the Historical Society and Georgia Science Center may be alternative routes for me to take. My audience is artists, historians, scientists, writers, etc 6) Could you give me a brief Record of your work / resume / CV? See attached. 7) What brought you into photography? My father gave me my first Minolta 35mm camera when I was 15 and he fed my ever-growing interest in image making, specifically in black and white. Though, I didn’t know much about the medium’s history until I went to college for it, I just made photographs that I liked. My father would take me out of high school to go to museums in New York and Philadelphia, so I was exposed to many other forms of art as well. However, the day I became a photographer was the day I made a photograph in response to a poem entitled, Reflections on a Gift of Watermelon Pickle Received from a Friend Called Felicity, by John Tobias. Even though I was halfway through college and


About the artist Interview I had been making pictures for years before, the self-portrait I made on this day was the beginning of my own unique way of working, one that I still reflect on today. This photograph was the start of a love affair with both the landscape and self-portraits. 8) What’s the message you try to send? From within my work or my daily mantra? I guess either way the message is similar. I take the pictures I take because I can live the life I want to be living while still creating work that is meaningful to me. I hope this inspires others to do the same. 9) And a more deep question, who are you? (Past/Roots) | What brought you to SCAD? Well, I think some of my previous answers give some insight to who I am. After leaving the country to live in Brooklyn, NY for a substantial amount of time, I decided that it was time for a change, both in my work and my surroundings. I wanted to live within or closer to the type of landscape I was interested in. For me, Savannah is a perfect location because of position it puts me in to explore many areas of the country. I can visit rural land – it is right outside of downtown Savannah – As for SCAD, what drew me was it’s facilities and that the photography department still had a focus on darkroom photography. Many programs are removing their darkrooms, but SCAD still supplies state of the art wet darkrooms. I grew up in an extremely rural area and had an assortment of agriculture all around me. Our formative years are important to how we view the landscape, and for me it is the cornfields, mountains, and old farmhouses that inspire me and that I still visit today when I get the chance. The connection I have to my childhood home is strong – the image Homestead 1991, Port Murray, NJ is a family portrait. I had the chance to visit the house I grew up in for the first time in sixteen years, and what I came across were the impressions that my family left behind. It is this land that informs my way of working. My father gave me my first Minolta 35mm camera when I was 15 and he fed my ever-growing interest in image making, specifically in black and white. Though, I didn’t know much about the medium’s history until I went to college for it, I just made photo-

graphs that I liked. My father would take me out of high school to go to museums in New York and Philadelphia, so I was exposed to many other forms of art as well. However, the day I became a photographer was the day I made a photograph in response to a poem entitled, Reflections on a Gift of Watermelon Pickle Received from a Friend Called Felicity, by John Tobias. Even though I was halfway through college and I had been making pictures for years before, the self-portrait I made on this day was the beginning of my own unique way of working, one that I still reflect on today. This photograph was the start of a love affair with both the landscape and self-portraits.


About the artist Allison Barnes


Logo Studies Visual research - clichĂŠs


Logo Studies Initial sketches


Logo Studies Initial sketches


Logo Studies Initial sketches


Logo Studies Initial sketches


Logo Studies Roughs

A L LI S O N BA RNE S

AL L ISON BARNES


Logo Studies Type studies A L L IS O N BA R N E S

ITC Avant Garde

A L L ISON B A R N E S

Bodoni

ALLI SO N B A R N E S

Centaur

AL L I S O N BA RNES

Mrs. Eaves

A L L IS O N BA RNE S

DIN 1451 Std


Logo Studies Final


Exhibition Ideation for concept


Exhibition Ideation for concept


Exhibition Gallery Map

Sure-footed by Allison Barnes Exposition Map - Oglethorpe Gallery Arizona

7

1

Anthropod Mating Encounter, Delaware Bay, New Jersey

2

Deer Head by Homestead As Leaves Turn up to Rain, Port Murray, New Jersey

3

Homestead 1991, Port Murray, New Jersey

4

Small Pound with Runoff, Cumberland County, New Jersey

5

American Bison Encounter, Badlands, South Dakota

6

A Triassic Display; Crystal, Slate, Petrified Wood, Apache, Arizona

7

Palimpsest; Saguaro Cactus, Tucson, Arizona

8

Hands in Salt Deposits, Zion, Utah

9

Palimpsest; 12 AD to 1954, San Juan County, Utah

10

F. Gilmer Breckinridge Was Here, 1859, El Morro

11

Buffalo Courds, Raw Material, Mountainaire, New Mexico

12

Racoon Hands, Skidaway Island, Georgia

13

Louisie's Fur, Savannah, Georgia

14

Matted Cotton, Raw Material, Blountstown, Florida

15

Turtle Shell During Tornado Watch, Everglades, Florida

16

Searching for the Dead Lakes, Wewahitchka, Florida

6

South Dakota

5

8 Utah

9

10 New Mexico

11

12 Georgia

4

13 3 New Jersey

14 2 Florida

15

16

1

About Allison Sign-book and gifts (post-cards + catalogues)

Sure-footed vinyl wall


Exhibition Wall graphics

Sure-footed by Allison Barnes

sure-foot路ed or sure路foot路ed adj 1. unlikely to fall, slip, or stumble 2. not liable to error in judgment or action;


Exhibition Wall graphics


Exhibition Wall graphics


Exhibition Wall graphics


Exhibition

Wall graphics | Tag

2,5 x 2 in


Post-cards Roughs


Post-cards Finals


Post-cards Finals


Poster Roughs

December 21st January 5th

December 21st January 5th

Oglethorpe Gallery 406 East Oglethorpe Avenue

Oglethorpe Gallery 406 East Oglethorpe Avenue


Poster Roughs + Final


Catalogue Sketches


Catalogue Roughs


Catalogue Final


Catalogue Final layout


Catalogue Final layout


Catalogue Final layout


Catalogue Final layout


Catalogue Photos


Business Card Roughs


Business Card Final


Thank You


Process Book