Connect Magazine: 2022–Issue 3

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MAGAZINE

Connect

2 0 2 2 : I S S U E T H R E E • T H E P U B L I C AT I O N O F C A I - G R E AT E R I N L A N D E M P I R E

HOT SUMMER OPICS INCLUDING CALIFORNIA MEGA DROUGHT FIRE SAFETY REMINDERS DOES YOUR POND N E E D T O B R E AT H ?

T H E I M P O R TA N C E O F P O N D A E R AT I O N

CLUBHOUSE R E N TA L / P O O L U S E

EXCLUSIVE USE OF COMMON AREA

THE ANONYMOUS CHEF T H A I WAT E R M E L O N S A L A D

: SUPPLEMENTAL MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY—NEW AND UPDATED LISTINGS

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MAGAZINE

Connect

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E G R E AT E R I N L A N D E M P I R E O F C A I

W W W. C A I - G R I E . O R G EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE President Gina Roldan, Bemus Landscape, Inc. President-Elect Ty Jaglowski, Environmental Concepts Landscape Management, Inc. Vice President Robert Riddick, CMCA, Sunnymead Ranch PCA Secretary Jessica Sedgwick, CMCA, AMS, Golden Rain Foundation Treasurer Patrick Gabriele, Estates at Canyon Crest Riverside, Inc. Past-President Nick Mokhlessin, Everthrive Landscape

BOARD DIRECTORS Adam Armit, Harvest Landscape Enterprises, Inc. Greg Borzilleri, Accurate Termite & Pest Control Tim Peckham, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Powerstone Property Management Betty Roth, CMCA, AMS, LSM, PCAM, Heritage Lake Master Association

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Committee Co-Chair and Editor in Chief A.J. Jahanian, Esq., Beaumont Tashjian

TABLE of CONTENTS 4

Advertiser’s Index

5 President’s Message Gina Roldan

6 COVER STORY Califonria

Mega Drought

Nick Mokhlessin

9 Editor’s Link A.J. Jahanian, Esq.

10 Does your pond need

to breath? importance of Pond Aeration

Patrick Simmsgeiger

17 Clubhouse Rental/Pool Use: Exclusive Use of

Common Area

Eric Zarr, CMCA, AMS

19 CAI-CLAC Legislative Update: May 2022 Louie Brown, Jr.

20 2022 Supplemental

Membership Directory: New and Updated Member Listings

22 The Anonymous Chef:

Thai Watermelon Salad Anonymous Submission

14 Director’s Message A.J. Keefe

15 Fire SafetyReminders Terri Guest, CIRMS, CMCA

Committee Co-Chair Daniel Heaton, Richardson|Ober|DeNichilo, LLP Committee Members Matthew A. Gardner, Esq., Richardson|Ober|DeNichilo, LLP Mallorie Hall, CMCA, AMS, Associa-PCM, AAMC Kimberly Lilley, CMCA, CIRMS, Berg Insurance Agency Gina Roldan, Bemus Landscape, Inc. Christy Towner-Quesada, CMCA, AMS Eric Zarr, CMCA, AMS, FirstService Residential, AAMC

CHAPTER STAFF Executive Director AJ Keefe, CAI-Greater Inland Empire Director of Marketing and Magazine Design Sean Floody, CAI-Greater Inland Empire Administrative Assistant Elda Pfitzinger, CAI-Greater Inland Empire All articles and paid advertising represent the opinions of authors and advertisers and not necessarily the opinion of either Connect or the Community Associations Institute–Greater Inland Empire Chapter. Information contained within should not be construed as a recommendation for any course of action regarding financial, legal, accounting or other professional services and should not be relied upon without the consultation of your accountant or attorney. Connect is an official quarterly publication of Greater Inland Empire Chapter of the Community Associations Institute (CAI– GRIE). The CAI–GRIE Chapter encourages submission of news and articles subject to space limitation and editing. Signed letters to the editor are welcome. All articles submitted for publication become the property of the CAI–GRIE Chapter. Reproduction of articles or columns published permitted with the following acknowledgment: “Reprinted with permission from Connect Magazine, a publication of the Greater Inland Empire Chapter of the Community Associations Institute.” Copyright © 1998–2022 CAI-Greater Inland Empire Chapter.

CONTACT Advertising, Articles or Correspondence CAI-GRIE Chapter Headquarters 5029 La Mart Dr, Ste A • Riverside, CA 92507-5978 (951) 784-8613 • info@cai-grie.org CAI-GRIE Chapter CAI-GRIE.org

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CAI–GREATER INLAND EMPIRE The CAI–Greater Inland Empire (GRIE) Chapter hosts educational, business and social events that provide the Chapter’s Business Partners various opportunities to promote their companies’ products and services to Community Association owners and managers serving the Community Association Industry. It is expected that all participants in Chapter events – whether they be educational, business or social – will conduct themselves in a professional manner representative of their business or service organization so as not to detract from the experience of others seeking to benefit from their membership in the Chapter. For more information, visit cai-grie.org

Advertisers Listed Alphabetically by Company Company

Page/Location

Avalon.............................................................................................................................................................................Inside Front Cover AMS Paving Inc..........................................................................................................................................................................................8 Bentley Community Management............................................................................................................................................................13 Berding | Weil..................................................................................................................................................................Inside Back Cover CIT.............................................................................................................................................................................................................8 Community Legal Advisors.........................................................................................................................................................................9 Elias Bros. Contractors, Inc.......................................................................................................................................................................13 Fiore, Racobs & Powers, A PLC..................................................................................................................................................................4 Sherwin Williams.....................................................................................................................................................................................14 The Management Trust..............................................................................................................................................................................9 Tinnelly Law.............................................................................................................................................................................. Back Cover Weldon L Brown Company, Inc...................................................................................................................................................................3

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CONNECT MAGAZINE • ISSUE THREE 2022


Volunteer Today!

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE GINA ROLDAN

BEMUS L ANDSCAPE, INC.

C

AI-GRIE, is only as strong as its members. As your 2022 president I am grateful for all of your volunteerism, advocacy, positive attitudes, and most importantly your presence. We grow by growing others. So please continue to show up, continue to volunteer, talk about our chapter and what it has done for you and your career. We are building future generations of CAI members. Mental health awareness month was in May. That does not mean we only take that month to reflect. Self care is how you take your power back. Whatever that looks like for you, make time each day for YOU! Here we are in the middle of 2022, can you believe it? My hope is that we are all doing our best to stay positive. We are still in COVID’s after math, so remember to keep your guard up and continue to sanitize and wash your hands. We have had some fun events in the first part of the year and here are some up coming events: • E ducation Luncheon (Caliente Fiesta Themed): Come learn how to successfully resolve disputes and avoid costly litigation through effective use of IDR/ADR. This luncheon is held in-person at the Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula on Wednesday, August 17th at 10:00am. • Monte Carlo Night—”Monte Carlo: A Broadway Show”: Join CAI-GRIE at the Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula on Saturday, September 10th at 6:00pm for an exciting night on Broadway as we celebrate the show, ‘MONTE CARLO- A Broadway Show’. Will your outfit look like you are part of a Broadway cast or an audience member? Either way, this is a CAN’T MISS EVENT and we’re looking forward to one heck of a night! • Oktoberfest: Lederhosen, pretzels and bratwurst… OH MY! This year we’re bring Germany back to Murrieta to enjoy beers, brats and good times while singing along to German drinking songs. This event is shaping up to be a polka-polka-polka good time and don’t want to miss out! This event is held in-person at the Solaris Beer & Blending in Temecula on Murrieta, Friday, September 30th at 5:30pm. For updates or sponsorship opportunities on upcoming events and other Member focused items, make sure to check out the Chapter website (cai-grie.org) and follow the Chapter’s social media accounts (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkdin). Let’s keep those new members coming and don’t forget 2022 is about rising up.

“ Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away” –Maya Angelou HAVE YOUR COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEMBERS CHANGED SINCE LAST YEAR?

BE SURE TO UPDATE

your board’s member names, titles (President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, and Board Member), and contact information to ensure your board members receive all the latest CAI member benefits!

UPDATE TODAY:

ONLINE at www.caionline.org EMAIL addresschanges@caionline.org MAIL to CAI, P.O. Box 34793, Alexandria, VA 22334-0793

CAIRenewalBuckslips3.5x8.5_2021.indd 2

1/26/21 12:21 PM

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fter three years of record-breaking drought conditions, State Water Project deliveries to Southern California are historically low. Metropolitan Water District has determined that there is not enough water available to meet normal demands this year. If you live in Southern California, there is a good chance you get some of your water through Metropolitan Water District (MWD). Metropolitan serves 26 public water agencies that then deliver supplies to 19 million people in the Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego and Ventura counties. In April this year, Metropolitan Water District declared a water shortage emergency and is mandating drastic cuts in water use starting with restricting outdoor watering to one day per week in areas that depend on state project supplies. These new restrictions were implemented June 1, 2022. The affected water agencies include Calleguas Municipal Water District, Inland Empire Utilities Agency, Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Three Valleys Municipal Water District and Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District. Even if the water district that services your property is not mentioned in the list above, it is anticipated that all districts serviced by MWD will be tightening their own local restrictions and water conservation targets. Metropolitan Water District is calling on all residents and business in its region to immediately cut their water consumption by 20-30% to avoid a full ban on watering later in the summer. There is not one outlet to determine the watering restrictions for agencies across the State. It is imperative that you are aware of which water district services your community to know the current local watering restrictions. Ban on Watering Ornamental Turf On May 24th, the State Water Board adopted an emergency water conservation regulation that bans irrigating turf at commercial (includes HOAs), industrial, and institutional properties. The ban does not include watering turf that is used for recreation or other community purposes, water used at residences or water to maintain trees.

The second step is to take advantage of available rebates for making water conservation improvements to your property. Communities that are serviced by Metropolitan Water District qualify for the following rebates: • Weather Based Irrigation Controllers / Soil Moisture Sensors $35 per active station • Turf Replacement $3-4 per square foot • High Efficiency Nozzles - $2-$3 per nozzle Quality Water Conservation Projects As more communities shift to converting landscape and retrofitting irrigation systems to conserve water, it is important that these projects are completed in a way that will provide lasting value to your community. Partner with a landscape service provider that you can trust to provide you with quality work. For example, if you are going to install a drip irrigation system on your property, you should understand that there are varying levels and price points for drip irrigation. An inexpensive drip irrigation system may save you money upfront, but can cost thousands of dollars of repairs, re-work and plant replacements. A solid-pipe pvc drip system that is buried underground can last over a decade with minor maintenance, while a ¼”drip tubing system installed on-grade will likely require constant repairs and ultimately, replacement, within a few years. Plant selection, smart controller technology, flow sensing, nozzle selection are just a few examples where it’s not just “one size fits all”. It requires a trained professional to select and install the right upgrades that will provide the best value, conserve the most water, and provide lasting benefit to your community. Nick Mokhlessin is the COO and Managing Partner at Everthrive Landscape. He started in the CID industry immediately after college and has been in the commercial landscape industry for over ten years. Nick currently serves on the CAI-GRIE Board of Directors as well as on the Board of Directors for a Master Association in Temecula with over 1800 single family homes. He is a holds his Qualified Water Efficient Landscape certification and has a real passion for sharing the scientific art that is commercial landscape.

This means that turf parkways (narrow areas between sidewalk and street), turf islands, and other non-functional turf areas will not survive if the new state regulations are followed. Fortunately, there are rebates available for converting turf area to drought tolerant plant material. Water Conservation Planning and Rebates Find a landscape service provider that is able to help you put together a water conservation program that helps your community meet the immediate needs of abiding by new restrictions, as well as provide short- and long-term planning for improving your community’s water efficiency. The first step to reducing water waste is hiring certified irrigation professionals. Landscape contractors with trained and certified staff will use best management practices to ensure only the amount of water necessary is used on the landscape. Your contractor should be able to evaluate your landscape and irrigation system to identify the largest wasters of water and come up with a plan to correct these inefficiencies.

Photo: California home drought tolerant plants for landscape design. ISSUE THREE 2022 • CONNECT MAGAZINE

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A

s we trek through the dog days of summer, we hope that this issue of Connect gives you and your community some helpful tips and reminders during the next few hot days and weeks. In this issue our contributors discuss the impending water drought in the state of California, as well as recommendations for maintaining healthy ponds. On a more “refreshing” note, you will also find a helpful recipe inside, to keep you cool (in spite of the drought). As always, we hope that through Connect, we can educate and inform, through the spirit of collaboration and community pride. Volunteers like our article contributors and you, our community leaders, are what continue to make our CAI-GRIE chapter unique and thriving. It is my ongoing pleasure to serve as the editor of Connect Magazine and I look forward to yet another successful summer for our Inland Empire community. A.J. Jahanian, Esq. is an associate attorney with Beaumont Tashjian who devotes his career to serving common interest developments. He can be reached at ajahanian@HOAattorneys.com

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DOES YOUR POND NEED TO BREATH? IMPORTANCE OF POND AERATION BY: PATRICK SIMMSGEIGER, DIVERSIFIED WATERSCAPES

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eration introduces oxygen into an aquatic ecosystem through various methods. Air compressors, waterfalls and fountains inject small oxygen bubbles, increasing the Dissolved Oxygen (DO) level of the water feature. DO is one of the most important facets of a healthy body of water, since it affects overall water quality, fish and plant health, and more subtle processes. Low DO in ponds often results in sick or dying flora and fauna, accelerated muck accumulation, and foul odors. The inevitable result of low DO leads to reduced efficiency of bacterial use of organic matter. Accumulated organic matter thickens at the lake’s bottom, reducing overall depth. Additional decaying matter exacerbates health challenges, causing the biosphere to slowly destabilize, and favors the abundance of toxic algae and cyanobacteria. When the DO level drops, bacterial species use more nitrates to function. But nitrates are vital to plant survival as well. If bacteria are utilizing the same resource, plants start to suffer. When nitrates become scarce, bacteria will start processing sulfates. The waste-product of bacteria consuming sulfates is Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), which is toxic to fish and other aquatic organisms, and gives water the smell of rotten eggs. A vulnerable lake, suffering from a combination of low DO and bio-imbalance, only needs a slight push to generate a harmful algal bloom (HAB), which can be dangerous to humans and deadly to smaller animals. HAB’s tend to accompany shifts in water health. Higher temperatures in recent decades have created an environment well-suited to a HAB, some of which are not algae at all, but cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria, the oldest of all life on Earth, are always present and always waiting for an opportunity to expand. A large influx of decaying matter allows algae/ bacteria populations to expand their colony size. This colony increase will continue past the stasis point, which ultimately depletes available nutrients. Once the carrying capacity of the water is exceeded, the algae starts a die-back process, leaving their biomass behind. The pond is then incapable of handling all this decaying organic matter, so buildup continues unabated. In a healthy ecosystem, bacteria slow the accumulation of solids, help reduce odors, and assist in the maintenance of a lake’s depth. Maintaining healthy DO is vital to a lake’s life, which relies on a balance of many organisms,

Photo: An algae covered pond do to a lack of proper maintinence and aeration.

many of which rely on a delicate combination of factors such as DO, Temperature, Nutrients, pH, Time of Year, and Chemistry. Maintaining a healthy pond is a subtle art-form. What can be done to carefully address a sick lake? What are the proper steps? The most effective long-term solution is to install an aeration system. Aeration systems, composed of air-compressors, waterfalls and/or fountains, inject DO while promoting circulation. Each of these mechanisms deliver a different set of advantages, as they mimic nature. Aquatic experts know what depths, circulation, temperatures and water chemistry work best, which in turn favor fish and plant species. Stratification is a natural phenomenon which works against pond diversity. Water splits into layers based on depth and temperature. Anyone who has dived down in a body of water has experienced stratification first-hand. As one descends, at a certain depth the water suddenly gets much colder. Stratification restricts DO and nutrients to particular areas. Aeration is the process of purposely and mechanically causing the different stratification layers to mix. Combining aeration with a proper application of treatments, both biological and chemical, a pond can remain healthy even under dramatic shifts in environment. Turnover, the natural mixing of layers, occurs with seasonal changes. This natural mixing of stratified layers due to convection, usually in Spring and Fall, can cause a dramatic downturn in an already unhealthy body of water. Mechanical aerators use pumps to pull water from the bottom of the water column, inject

pressurized air using a compressor, then push this enriched mixture to the surface. Aerators work best below a certain depth. Exchanging the bottom water layer with the surface mixes DO levels, water temperature, and water chemistry into a more homogeneous distribution at all levels. This sharing of water chemistry increases overall organism populations and diversity. This invigorates lake organisms, allowing them to survive a wider range of environmental pressures, such as seasonal changes or increased pollution. Aeration is not a solution for all water problems, but increasing DO is a great tool for boosting an ecosystem’s health and invigorates fish and plants. For a lake that is currently still and stratified, the deepest layer may be devoid of oxygen, known as anoxic water. If this layer is mixed suddenly with normally high DO water at the surface, the sudden shift can be deadly for aquatic life. Drastic turnovers tend to cause a kill-off in the pond’s biosphere, which is another harbinger to a HAB. While oxygen can be sparse in deep water, the majority of nutrients are also in this layer. When these nutrients get circulated into the upper layer of the pond, opportunistic organisms begin to multiply. If their natural competitors have simultaneously died off, this multiplication can happen at an astounding rate. As algae decompose the solids in the water-column they consume oxygen, reducing DO levels, which cause fish to suffocate. Dead fish are often the first visual signs that the hidden weakness of a lake has triggered an especially bad cycle. CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

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Once the basics of aeration, turnover and bio-diversity are grasped, a lake manager would do well to gather all the necessary tools. The most effective are knowledge and patience. Other tools are a Muck Reducer, a Clarifier/Flocculent, an aquatic Pond Dye, a low-copper Algaecide, and an enzymemineral-bacterial Supplement. Also make sure to have some hardy jeans, goggles, and waterresistant gloves. If fish are to be stocked, one should probably delay their introduction until the pond has reached a new balance. As always, consult a fish expert for new stock introduction, especially when upgrading your pond. If landscaping is planned near a water feature, consult an aquatic expert as well, to avoid structural investments that could cause chronic issues, such as nutrient introduction. Beginning with the Muck Reducer is often wisest, depending on the total pond depth. The ratio of muck to water, plus the muck’s composition are both factors. As is true with most applications, treat about 1/3 of the total area of water at any one time. This allows your fish and other organisms to move away from danger zones while a new stasis is reached. As you shift from one section of the pond to another on successive days, you will be tempted to go all-in as progress is observed. Patience plays a vital role. As the pond metabolizes each step toward a new balance, the various species adjust. By reducing the muck first, the pond will have less nutrients available to complicate the next step. Treating the lake with an Aquatic-labeled Dye is now advisable. Follow the instructions carefully and remember that you can always add more, but you cannot add less! Owners and guests are accustomed to the historic color of the water feature, so this step may be unsettling. The point here is not to create an artificial color, but rather to reduce photosynthetic feeding for the native algae. Allow the pond residents to adjust over a day or two; then it is time to turn on the pumps. When the pumps are engaged, driving the aerator(s), waterfall and/or fountain, the remaining muck will begin to break up and surface. If the temperature is unusually warm and the sun is brilliant, then the algae population will increase in the top water layer. The Aquatic Dye will impede algal expansion at lower depths where the sunlight is reduced, but not at the surface. This is 12 |

why an Algaecide is applied at this stage. For best effect, use a doublechelated copper solution which is in liquid form, such as F-30 Algae Control. Most other products will interact with the water minerals quickly and precipitate into the bottom soil, requiring added product for the same outcome. Again, treat 1/3 of the surface area at a time; follow the product label instructions carefully, and consult an aquatic expert as needed. Applied correctly, the algae/HAB will slow their lifecycle at about .2 ppm copper. At .6 ppm the process is probably at maximum efficiency. For lower quality algaecides, application may need 1.0 ppm, which is the limit for potable water copper toxicity. If a lake has catfish, they will not appreciate the reduction in muck, but they will love the increased turbidity. Bottom feeders use the muck cover for concealment, avoiding predatory birds and even raccoons, which are both expert fishers. Koi are fine in a certain amount of turbidity, but most pond owners with Koi want to see and admire their fish. The other problems with too much turbidity are filtration issues and blocking the life-cycle of non-algal species. To manage turbidity is more than an aesthetic issue; this stage of pond treatment fine-tunes the biosphere to encourage diversity. Again, less is more. Quality Clarifier/Flocculants are highly concentrated, so be sure not to dilute them prior to application. Clean spills with a dry absorbent or cloth. Many aquatic experts have learned the hard way, how messy things can become when mishandling this vital tool. As the lake is seeking a new healthy balance, the flocculants bind the materials causing turbidity, returning them back to the bottom, where a now healthier mix of organisms maintain the beneficial layer of muck. Humans assume that a lake has all the nutrients, biological species, and minerals needed. In many ways, a pond is just like a human body: both need ‘good stress’ combined with supplements and rest periods. The last stage of a lake’s rehabilitation/ upgrade is the addition of supplements to allow for a healthy new biosphere. The main concern is to choose the product carefully, as there are nearly as many crazy people selling pond supplements as there are human supplements. Technology is useful in weeding

CONNECT MAGAZINE • ISSUE THREE 2022

out the crazies; find a long-serving aquatic expert with a good reputation. There are easyto-use pond kits available that can make this step simple, or at least less mysterious. Admiring a beloved water feature is a privilege, as water is at the core of life. Just as all people love water, there is also a universal knowledge gap in lake processes, biobalance, life-cycles, environmental threats, and treatments. A still lake will accumulate a thicker covering of plants, which further conceals and increases the suffocating loss of dissolved oxygen, triggering a slow-motion shift from diversity to an algal explosion. Harmful algal blooms are nature’s ultimate bio-assassin, which first kills a lake, and then slowly turns it into swampland. We have the tools to repair our domestic water features before they crash and die. Human nature is defined by making our environment more livable, and then more enjoyable. Your lake benefits from slow and deep breaths of oxygen, gradually stretching her stratified layers and cleaning out the years of accumulated muck. The reward will be a stronger and ever renewing bio-diversity, which supports the larger animal and plant species, including the humans. Founder and President of DWI, Patrick Simmsgeiger is a Licensed Aquatic Pesticide Applicator, Landscape Contractor, and Certified Lake Manager(CLM). He is an expert in all stages of aquatic treatment, from product development and manufacturing, to application and treatment. Patrick is well known on the speaking circuit, and puts water health and management first.


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DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE A.J. KEEFE

CA I -GR E ATER I NL A ND EM PI R E C H A PTE R

C

AI is a trade association and with that, it is presented with unique issues. Sometimes taking the temperature of the entire trade association landscape can help to provide insight or at least perspective that some of the issues we face are not all that unique. Association Laboratory, Inc. assessed more than 60 different factors on association members within 6 domains in 2021 and 2022 and compiled them in the 2022 Executive Summary and Discussion Guide Looking Forward® (Impact). The following chart identifies, in descending order, the top five factors identified by at least 25% of respondents who saw identical factors of issues that will impact Members over the next three years. See if you are also facing any of these issues.

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FIRE SAFETY REMINDERS BY: TERRI GUEST, CIRMS, CMCA, BERG INSURANCE AGENCY

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s we approach National Fire Prevention Week (October 8-14), we thought it timely to provide some important safety reminders regarding fire safety. FIRE SAFETY EQUIPMENT Never hang things on fire sprinkler heads, and make sure the area around them is clear so that the sprinklers can operate properly. Check your smoke detectors at least twice per year. If you have battery smoke / carbon monoxide detectors, change their batteries when the time changes for daylight savings time. Even if your building has fire extinguishers, keep a personal extinguisher in your kitchen. SAFE GRILLING Remember it is against fire code to grill on a balcony, under an overhang, or within 10 feet of a structure. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), residential grill fires result in $75 million of property losses each year. 28% of these fires start on balconies. CANDLE SAFETY The NFPA reports that over 25 home fires are started by candles every day. Avoid the use of candles in bedrooms or areas where people can fall asleep. Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn. HAVE A PLAN Draw a map of your home and map out 2 exit paths from each room. Practice an evacuation plan twice a year with each member of the family. Try to remember to close doors behind you as you leave to slow the fire from spreading. For more fire safety tips, visit the National Fire Protection Association or Red Cross website, www.nfpa.org/public-education.

OCT 8-14

Terri Guest, CIRMS, CMCA, is Sales & Marketing Representative for Berg Insurance Agency and the Insurance Agent for Shadowhawk HOA and may be reached at Terri@BergInsurance.com

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ISSUE • ISSUE TWO THREE 2022 2022


CLUBHOUSE RENTAL/POOL USE

EXCLUSIVE USE OF COMMON AREA BY: ERIC ZARR, CMCA, AMS, FIRSTSERVICE RESIDENTIAL, AAMC

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any Associations have pools and most larger Associations have clubhouses as well. While both are great amenities for the membership how does a Board balance the use of these amenities by the membership at large as well as the desire for private parties? When setting up rules for renting a room in a clubhouse, whether a large ballroom or a smaller meeting room, make sure to work with your Association’s legal counsel prior to sending out rules. A new rule regarding rentals or a change would require the twenty-eight (28) day homeowner comment process as required by Civil Code. If you already have rules and fees associated with different rooms it is good to review the fees every few years. While the ability to rent a space is an amenity and benefit for owners, most fees were set to be much less than a regular venue. However the cost for upkeep and reserves is going up so reviewing the Association fees is appropriate. While renting a room in a clubhouse is standard for many Associations, renting the pool can be fraught with complications. Most pools do not have lifeguards on duty but might require that for a private event at

the pool. That charge and the charge for a security guard that might be required by the Association’s rules could both be factored in to the rental fee. Exclusive use of the pool could cause tempers to flare during summer months when other members want to use the shared amenity. Clubhouse rentals can be an enhancement to the amenity to owners but owners renting the pool area could be too much for the membership. Make sure to work with your manager and legal counsel and take feedback from the community whichever way you go. Eric Zarr, CMCA, AMS, is a General Manager with FirstService Residential and holds both the CMCA and AMS designations. Eric has worked onsite at the K. Hovnanian’s Four Seasons at Beaumont Community Association, Inc a 55+ community with 1,853 homes. for 8 years, first as the Assistant General Manager and now as the General Manager for the past 5 years. Prior to being onsite he managed a portfolio of accounts for over 3 years including singlefamily homes, condominiums and townhomes. He served for three years on the Board of Directors for the CAI-GRIE where he was Secretary for 2 years and currently volunteers on the CAI-GRIE Communications Committee. ISSUE THREE 2022 • CONNECT MAGAZINE

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CAI-CLAC

LEGISLATIVE Update JUNE 2022 BY: MR. LOUIE BROWN, JR. CAI-CLAC’S LEGISLATIVE ADVOCATE

Visit CAI-GRIE.org/Legislative to download a copy of this Legislative update and more!

J

une in the Capitol reaches another level of chaos, because all bills passed out of the House of Origin need a policy committee hearing during these 30 days. This includes AB 1410 which will have 2 committee hearings during that time! AB 1410 is the bill we opposed during our Legislative Days at the Capitol. Our efforts have resulted in the bill being significantly amended, but it still needs work. Mandatory board member education is no longer in the bill, but it has been replaced with a Code of Ethics that will be costly and potentially lead to litigation. Our Governance Task Force has been working non-stop on potential amendments. If they are not accepted by the author, a Call to Action will be forthcoming, so please stay tuned.

June is also budget month in the Capitol. The Legislature is required to pass a balanced budget no later than June 15. Recently, the Senate Pro Tem and Assembly Speaker announced an agreement on a more than $300 billion budget, which includes spending the $97 billion surplus California is enjoying. Roughly $10 billion will be returned to taxpayers in some form or fashion, but the details remain unclear. Legislators will be in District during the month of July, so now is a great time to make meeting requests for those Local Lobby Days. Let’s not miss the chance to build on our existing relationships and create new ones. MARK YOUR CALENDARS Wednesday, July 13th at noon, CAI-CLAC will be holding a Virtual Town Hall: Supporting CAI-CLAC Through Fundraising. You will hear from CAI-CLAC Advocate Louie Brown, as well as CAI-CLAC supporters and how and why they do so. You can pre-register for the event here at CAI-GRIE.org/legislative. As always, please follow, like and share are CAI-CLAC social media posts on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. This helps to spread our message and show the strength of our community. ISSUE THREE 2022 • CONNECT MAGAZINE

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2022 SUPPLEMENTAL MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY NEW & UPDATED MEMBER LISTINGS LISTING DATES MAY 1–JULY 15, 2022

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he Membassador Committee and the Chapter office are constantly reevaluating the ways to get member contact information in front of the people that need it in the most efficient and effective ways possible. Unfortunately, the Membership Directory is printed only once a year and the information has the potential to become outdated as soon as we press print. Regardless of that, our Membership list constantly grows and evolves, so it is crucial that we find a way to publish that information more than just once a year... so that’s exactly what we’ve done! Starting in this issue of Connect Magazine, we are now publishing a Supplemental Membership Directory each quarter that will feature all of our new and updated member listings (since the last publication date). As always, our online/digital directory (cai-grie.org/directory) will continue to be updated and published in real-time. If you or someone you know is an new and unlisted Member or an existing Member that needs updates to a directory listing, just email the Chapter office at info@cai-grie.org.

Business Partners (BY COMPANY NAME)

Business Partners CONTINUED

Homeowner Leaders CONTINUED

AvidXchange Banking/Financial Services

Nano Banc Banking/Financial Services

Doug Mass Mountain Shadows R.V. Resort

1210 AvidXchange Ln Charlotte, NC, 28206 (800) 560-9305 avidxchange.com

Axela Technologies Assessment Collection Services Luis Gonzales 1401 Brickell Ave, Ste 320 Miami, FL 33131 (305) 343-9897 luis@axela-tech.com axela-tech.com

Gordian Staffing Staffing Company

Rob Buffington, CMCA 3423 N 190th Pl Elkhorn, NE 68022 (989) 467-3426 conferences@gordianstaffing.com gordianstaffing.com

Paul Donaldson 7755 Irvine Center Dr, Ste 300 Irvine, CA 92618 (213) 393-7823 pdonaldson@nanobanc.com nanobanc.com

Vote HOA Now Election Services

Cathi Sleight, CMCA 13500 SW Pacific Hwy Tigard, OR 97223 (503) 420-8663 cathi@votehoanow.com votehoanow.com

Homeowner Leaders (BY COMMUNITY NAME) Pamela Atkinson Mountain Shadows R.V. Resort 1295 S Cawston Ave Hemet, CA 92545 (951) 923-6897

1295 S Cawston Ave Hemet, CA 92545 (360) 771-4047

William Rusty-Yesford Mountain Shadows R.V. Resort 1295 S Cawston Ave Hemet, CA 92545 (951) 544-1638

Larry French Wolf Creek Maintenance Corporation 43529 Ridge Park Dr Temecula, CA 92590

Kathey Harris Wolf Creek Maintenance Corporation 43529 Ridge Park Dr Temecula, CA 92590 (503) 490-6402

Nick Mokhlessin Wolf Creek Maintenance Corporation 43529 Ridge Park Dr Temecula, CA 92590

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CONNECT MAGAZINE • ISSUE THREE 2022


SUPPLEMENTAL MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY CONTINUED Homeowner Leaders CONTINUED

Community Managers CONTINUED

Maria Samaan Wolf Creek Maintenance Corporation

Jessica Rae Quintero-Clifford FirstService Residential, AAMC

43529 Ridge Park Dr Temecula, CA 92590 (503) 490-6402

Brad Sullivan Wolf Creek Maintenance Corporation 43529 Ridge Park Dr Temecula, CA 92590

Angel Lopez-Ramirez Sunnymead Ranch Planned Community Association 10210 Via Pescadero Moreno Valley, CA 92557 (818) 388-1231

9130 Anaheim Pl, Ste 110 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 (909) 771-3096 jessica.clifford@fsresidential.com fsresidential.com

Kathy Cabrera, CMCA, AMS Seabreeze Management Company 391 N. Main St, Ste 203 Corona, CA 92879 (951) 834-9998 kathy.cabrera@seabreezemgmt.com seabreezemgmt.com

Community Managers (BY COMPANY NAME) Joy Ann Marino-Markwardt, CMCA Associa Equity Management & Realty Services, AAMC 27051 Towne Centre Dr, Ste 200 Foothill Ranch, CA 92610 (951) 750-8489 joy.marino@associa.us associaonline.com

Clint Taylor Associa Equity Management & Realty Services, AAMC 27051 Towne Centre Dr, Ste 200 Foothill Ranch, CA 92610 clint.taylor2@associa.us associaonline.com

ISSUE THREE 2022 • CONNECT MAGAZINE

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THE ANONYMOUS CHEF THAI WATERMELON SAL AD

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ith the Summer heat in full swing, light and refreshing recipes are just what the doctor ordered. Refreshing chunks of watermelon tossed in a light Thai inspired dressing is what makes the Thai Watermelon Salad perfect for summer! INGREDIENTS: One Lime, Juiced 1 tbsp Fish Sauce 1 tbsp Water 2 Sprigs Fresh Basil 1 Baby Seedless Watermelon ¼ cup Salted, Shelled Dry-roasted Peanuts Salt (optional) YIELD: 4 Servings DIRECTIONS: 1. To make the dressing, stir together lime juice, fish sauce and water in a small bowl. Then, add to two sprigs of basil torn into small pieces, stirring to combine. 2. R emove the rind from the watermelon, then chop the inside into bite size pieces and add to a separate large bowl. Pour dressing and gently toss in until evenly coated. 3. Top with peanuts, whole basil leaves and season with salt (optional) and enjoy! This recipe was submitted by an anonymous chef, which sparked the idea to create a reoccurring segment in our magazine. If you have a Simple, fun and delicious recipe you’d like to share anonymously, just send it along with some photos to info@cai-grie.org

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