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AUGUST 2019

AUGUST 2019

FEATURING 8 The Enclave at Las Colinas HOA 12 Budgeting for a Different World 14 Keep It Down! 23 4 Ways to Cut Costs and Keep HOA Assessments Stable 24 El Presidente Is Not El Jefe 28 Can I Park Here? 30 Preparing Budgets for Security Guard Services in the Future 31 Is It a Good Rule?

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Quorum August, 2019


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CONTENTS

2019 QUORUM COMMITTEE MEMBERS CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

JENNIFER JAMES, ESQ., CHAIR Green Bryant & French, LLP RODNEY BISSELL, CO-CHAIR Bissell Design Studios, Inc. GEN WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL, BOARD LIAISON Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC

8

KIMBERLY BURNETT DSI Security Services DIANE CARMONY Coachella Valley Water District SIERRA CARR, CMCA Trilogy La Quinta CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

12

BRUCE LATTA, CMCA Parc La Quinta

14

24

DEA FRANCK, ESQ. Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

MARNE LOGAN, CCAM The Management Trust Desert Division

28

GLENN A. MILLER, CGCS Southwest Landscape & Maintenance, LLC GRACE PALUCK, CMCA The Management Trust Desert Division KUMAR S. RAJA, ESQ. Tinnelly Law Group MIKE REY Rey Insurance Services A FARMERS® Insurance Agency CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

30

STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM Personalized Property Management

Renovating Old Rules

JOSH WIDENMANN MRC Smart Technology Solutions A Xerox Company

31 Checklist

FEATURES

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Yes No

Does the rule make sense?

8

12

By Marne Logan, CCAM

Is this the least restrictive to 24 Elway Presidente approachIsthe Not El Jefe issue? By Kelly G. Richardson, Esq.,

Budgeting for a Different World

Is the rule still 28 Can I Park Here? needed?

The Enclave at Las Colinas HOA

CCAL

By John Beaman, CMCA, AMS, By CAI National PCAM, LSM Does it address a

30 Preparing Budgets current problem? for Security Guard Is it acceptable to By CAI National Services in the residents? Future 23 4 Ways to Cut Costs and By Kimberly Burnett Keep HOA AssessmentsIs compliance relatively easy? Is it Rule? Stable 31 Is It a Good possible?By CAI National By Sierra Carr, CMCA

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Keep It Down!

Quorum August, 2019

Does the rule create new problems?

SUSAN BROWNE ROSENBERG Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

RODNEY BISSELL Bissell Design Studios, Inc. rodney@bisselldesign.com (714) 293-3749

ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS OR ADVERTISING INFORMATION admin@cai-cv.org

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

The Coachella Valley Quorum Magazine is a publication expressly prepared for association leaders, managers and related business professionals of the Community Associations Institute. Members are encouraged to submit articles for publishing consideration. All articles accepted for publication in Quorum are subject to editing and rewriting by the Quorum Committee. Quorum Magazine is printed at the CAI-CV Office on a Xerox Versant 180 Press. Discounted printing is now available to CAI members. Call Bissell Design Studios, Inc. at (714) 293-3749 or the CAI-CV office for more information, (760) 345-0559.


ADVERTISERS ACCOUNTANTS & BOOKKEEPERS BRABO & CARLSEN, LLP................................. 25

ASPHALT AMS PAVING.................................................... 38 ASPHALT MD'S................................................ 29 NPG ASPHALT.................................................. 37

20

GURALNICK & GILLILAND, LLP........................ 39

7 CAI-CV New & Renewing Members 26 In Loving Memory of Renee Gumbel, PCAM

CONSTRUCTION VANTAGE POINT CONSTRUCTION INC............... 3

By Rhonda M. Drews, PCAM

DESIGN

Welcome Aboard 25 RealManage

By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH

By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH

BISSELL DESIGN STUDIOS, INC....................... 38

GATES & GARAGE DOORS

33 Eric Mosser with Edward Jones

AUTOMATION PRIDE........................................ 39

35 Time Honored

FIORE RACOBS & POWERS, A PLC.................. 29 GREEN BRYANT & FRENCH, LLP...................... 15

CHAPTER NEWS

ATTORNEYS

LANDSCAPING

Fran Mullahy By Grace Paluck, CMCA, CamEx, CCAM

CONSERVE LANDSCAPE ................................. 25

35 CAI-CV Educated Business Partners 40 2019 Corporate Sponsors

PWLC II, INC. LANDCARE MANAGEMENT.......... 3

CHAPTER EVENTS

MANAGEMENT COMPANY

PRO LANDSCAPING INC................................... 39 WATER RITE - VINTAGE ASSOCIATES, INC...... 37

ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT....... 2

20 CAI-CV Day at the Races

PEST CONTROL

Del Mar Thoroughbred Club Thursday, July 18, 2019

27 Board Leadership Development Workshop

CARTWRIGHT TERMITE & PEST CONTROL, INC..................... 11

40 Upcoming Chapter Events

POWERFUL PEST MANAGEMENT.................... 37

By Steven Shuey, PCAM, CCAM

REALTORS

DEPARTMENTS

PALM SPRINGS REGIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS.................................................. 15

6 President’s Message 16 HOA Law

RESERVE STUDIES

Service Dogs and Support Animals By Jennifer James, Esq.

ADVANCED RESERVE SOLUTIONS, INC. ......... 39

ROOFING

32 About CAI-CV

Who Me? Serve on a CAI Committee? By Michael Traidman

BRS ROOFING INC. ......................................... 25 ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT........................... 37

34 Platinum Spotlight

SUNTECH ROOFING......................................... 39

36 Water Wise

SECURITY

Vantage Point Construction, Inc.

WESTERN PACIFIC ROOFING............................. 3

CVWD Increases Rebates for Two Landscape Programs By the Coachella Valley Water District

AMS CONNECT.................................................. 3 CAI-CV.org

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FROM THE CHAPTER

President’s Message Mike Traidman Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA

CAI presidents, presidents-elect and executive directors from the eight California chapters and representatives from CAI national meet this month to discuss California specific issues and to outline the master calendar for 2020. Among their considerations will be a statewide voluntary certification program for community association board members. The chapters will work with CAI national to make sure all of CAI’s courses are scheduled to be easily accessible to California members. With more than 4,500 CAI members in Southern California, CAI has increased the frequency of courses to keep pace with the growth. With our new classroom, CAI-CV will be offering CAI’s M-100, all of CAI’s M-200 series courses and hopefully some M-300 courses in 2020. CAI-CV’s Professional Managers Committee had a promising meeting with the Vice President of Instruction at the College of the Desert in July to discuss higher education options for community association managers. They will meet with the dean of COD’s School of Applied Science & Business in early August to continue these discussions with the hope of developing a degree or specialization in community management. CAI believes that having higher education options for current managers and potential managers will help elevate the CID industry and help address the shortage of managers in the Valley. I hope you enjoy the photos on pages 20-21 of CAI-CV’s Annual Day at the Races that took place on July 18th. It was another great event with fantastic weather, beautiful views of the ocean (and track), great food and even better company. Thanks to Gary Butler (Asphalt MD’s) and Alison LeBoeuf (Sherwin-Williams Paint Company) for their leadership and hard work to make this CLAC fundraiser a success. Also, a special thanks to Sharron Badham, PCAM (Associa Desert Resort Management) and Steven Shuey, PCAM (Personalized Property Management) for teaching Management Essentials on the bus. Managers who attended received three CEUs and a few $2 bills for answering questions correctly. CAI-CV offered CAI’s California Common Interest Development (CID) Law Course on Friday, July 26th, to a full class of association mangers and board members. Our thanks to Jennifer James, Esq. (Green Bryant & French, LLP) and Steven Shuey, PCAM (Personalized Property Management) for teaching this day-long course that satisfies the State requirements for legal training for managers to call themselves “certified” in California. The CID Law course will be offered again in October at CAI’s California Statewide Legal Forum in Irvine. For more information, call the CAI-CV office. On the morning of August 2nd, we have a Manager on the Run class on manager professionalism at the CAI-CV office that will be taught by Tiffany Christian (Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC) and Alison LeBoeuf (Sherwin-Williams Paint Company). We are offering business partners CAI’s Educated Business Partner (EBP) course on Friday August 16th. After completing the course and test, business professionals will receive CAI’s EBP distinction and may use the CAI-CV EBP logo on their business cards and marketing materials. They will also be listed in Quorum each month. The EBP distinction shows managers and board members that these professionals are educated about the requirements of the HOA industry. I hope you all have an enjoyable and safe August.

Mike Traidman

Mike Traidman, Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA

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CAI-CV NEW & RENEWING MEMBERS NEW NATIONAL CORPORATE MEMBERS

2019 COACHELLA VALLEY CHAPTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ALLOY HOME Phil Lamb (480) 352-1206 phil.lamb@smartrent.com

MIKE TRAIDMAN PRESIDENT Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA MATT LAWTON, CIC, CIRMS PRESIDENT-ELECT Prendiville Insurance Agency

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

MARGARET "GEN" WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL PAST-PRESIDENT Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC JOLEN ZEROSKI, CMCA TREASURER Union Bank

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

DEA FRANCK, ESQ. SECRETARY Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

CARDINAL AMBROSE, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management MICHA BALLESTEROS DIRECTOR RHONDA DREWS, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR RealManage

CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

LONI PETERSON, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM DIRECTOR Personalized Property Management LOUISE STETTLER DIRECTOR Palm Valley Country Club HOA

CAI Coachella Valley Office 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert, CA 92211 Tel: (760) 341-0559 Fax: (760) 341-8443 Website: www.cai-cv.org CAL LOCKETT Executive Director clockett@cai-cv.org

The materials contained in this publication are designed to provide our members with timely and authoritative information; however, the CAI Coachella Valley Chapter is not engaging in the rendering of legal, accounting or other professional types of services. The Coachella Valley Chapter has not verified and/or endorsed the contents of these articles or advertising. Readers should not act on the information contained herein without seeking more specific professional advice from legal, accounting or other experts as required.

CONDOCERTS KC Ross (913) 725-1330 kross@uhlig.com WELCOMELINK Felicia Summerlin (913) 725-3114 fsummerlin@uhlig.com

NEW BUSINESS PARTNER WORLD FIRE PROTECTION, INC. Danai Chapman (949) 287-1086 dchapman@worldfireprotection.com

RENEWING BUSINESS PARTNERS ADAMS | STIRLING PLC Maureen Davidson (800) 464-2817 mdavidson@adamsstirling.com ADVANCED RESERVE SOLUTIONS, INC. Roxi Bardwell (510) 693-1620 rbardwell@arsinc.com CARTWRIGHT TERMITE & PEST CONTROL, INC. Will Cartwright (760) 346-6767 wc@cartwrightpc.com

ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT Cardinal Ambrose (760) 399-2192 cambrose@drminternet.com Catherine Baker (760) 346-1161 cbaker@drminternet.com Carol Calhoun (760) 346-1161 Ext. 103 ccalhoun@drminternet.com Rosie Galla (760) 346-1161 rgalla@drminternet.com Candra Rodriguez (760) 346-1161 crodriguez@drminternet.com Joanne Rose (760) 346-1161 jrose@drminternet.com

NEW VOLUNTEER LEADERS

DATATECH BUSINESS CONSULTANTS, INC. Katherine Melbern (760) 808-2752 Katherine@datatechcorporation.com

SUMMERSET SPRINGS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION John Schmidt

FIRSTSERVICE RESIDENTIAL Berenice Ceja (760) 834-2482 berenice.ceja@fsresidential.com Bonnie Sanchez (760) 834-2490 bonnie.sanchez@fsresidential.com

THE SPRINGS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Mary Hores

HERITAGE PALMS HOA/CC Dennis Elam (760) 772-5755 delam@heritagepalms.org MILLENNIUM COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT Mary Walker (760) 469-7026 mewmgmt@aol.com

NEW MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS

OASIS PALM DESERT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Eve Weber (760) 345-5661 eweber@theoasiscountryclub.com

CORONADO SHORES CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Jerry McDonald (858) 336-3789 jerrymcdonald@hotmail.com

HIDDEN PALMS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Joyce Floyd LAGUNA DE LA PAZ HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Dean Priser John Tribbett LAKE MIRAGE RACQUET CLUB HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION David Teeter PORTOLA PALMS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Danny Gonzalez

SUN CITY SHADOW HILLS Linda Aasen

RENEWING VOLUNTEER LEADERS BERMUDA DUNES COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Patrick Bohner

DESERT HORIZONS OWNERS ASSOCIATION Dick Frankel Lee Simpson

SUN CITY PALM DESERT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Vanessa Schussler (760) 200-2260 vanessa.schussler@scpdca.com

RENEWING MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS

THE GAFFNEY GROUP, INC. Bobbie Gaffney (760) 327-0301 bobbie@thegaffneygroup.net

ALBERT MANAGEMENT INC. Patricia Forte (760) 346-9778 trish.forte@albertmgt.com

THE LAKES COUNTRY CLUB Jim Schmid (760) 498-6647 jimschmid@gmail.com THE MANAGEMENT TRUST, DESERT DIVISION Cassie Gertz (760) 776-5100 Ext. 6345 Cassie.Gertz@Managementtrust.com Susanne Graeff (760) 406-3145 suegraeff@hotmail.com

CAI-CV.org

DESERT BRAEMAR, INC. Garth Steeves

DESERT FALLS MASTER ASSOCIATION Bonnie Shanahan

SECURITAS SECURITY SERVICES USA, INC. Matthew Hills (760) 779-0728 matthew.hills@securitasinc.com

ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT Tera Willis (760) 346-1161 twillis@drminternet.com

John Turley

LAGUNA DE LA PAZ HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Greg Asbra Jacquelyn Kausman Larry Saward PORTOLA PALMS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Mary Burns James Doyle Elbert (Jay) Jarvis Charles Morris Meghan Raabem RANCHO MIRAGE RACQUET CLUB Jacqueline Harth Mike Renner THE SPRINGS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Roger Beaman Daniel Ginsey Tom Hockin Bill Priest Ann Van Balen VISTA MONTANA Dwayne DeRose Connie Imerti Connie Lichtfuss

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FEATURE

The Enclave at Las Colinas HOA By Marne Logan, CCAM

T

he Enclave at Las Colinas is a gated Planned Unit Development (PUD) in Indio with entrances on Fred Waring and Clinton Street. There are 213 one and two-story single-family homes on 53 acres. The homes come in three floor plans and have either two or three-car garages. Some homes include a casita. Home prices range from $250,000 to $350,000 and the assessments are only $100. The common area includes two parks that also serve as the community’s retention basins. The HOA is responsible for the roads, gates, common areas and parks. Las Colinas is a diverse community where you will find residents of all ages, stages of life and backgrounds. In the

morning, you are likely to see runners and dog walkers and in early evening hours, it’s not unusual to see whole families out for a walk. To help keep the community connected, the board publishes their newsletter in Spanish and English and, with the help of Google Translate, occasionally in Vietnamese. Home builder GHA was the initial developer of The Enclave at Las Colinas selling 179 of the 213 homes from 2005 until the housing crash of 2008. According to board president, Jim 8

Quorum August, 2019


FEATURE Leighty, “After the market crash, our tireless, creative and totally committed first homeowner board president, Gary Slade, took some exceptional steps to enable residents to stay in their homes. Today we have many original owners who weathered the bad times and are still here.” The 34 remaining lots were left empty until 2016 when Global Development came in and completed the build-out. Today, approximately 82 percent of the community is owner-occupied. The Enclave at Las Colinas is built on the historical land where dates were first introduced to America over 100 years ago. In 1900, Dr. Walter Swingle and fellow USDA explorer, David Fairchild, studied date palms growing in Algeria, Iraq, Morroco and Egypt. They found that the growing conditions were like those in the Coachella Valley. Dr. Swingle brought back and planted 60 pound off-shoots cut from the bottoms of the foreign palms. These shoots thrived and are the lineage

"THE ENCLAVE AT LAS COLINAS IS BUILT ON THE HISTORICAL LAND WHERE DATES WERE FIRST INTRODUCED TO AMERICA OVER 100 YEARS AGO."

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FEATURE of many of the date palms we see today. This success caused the U.S. Department of Agriculture to open the Date and Citrus Experiment Station in Indio in 1907 which became the world center of date research. Dr. Walter Swingle's home, built around the same time (the historical Swingle homestead) was in what is now the Las Colinas community at the corner of Avenida Atwater and Avenida Davina. On July 2, 1982 the property was listed as "Federal property to be sold to reduce national debt” and thereafter became private property. The home and site were used by the Las Colinas developer for storage and a construction office at the beginning of the Las Colinas development but was destroyed by fire in 2011. The board has worked hard to maintain their community while keeping assessments affordable. Jim Leighty said, “Our retention basin parks are well used, and landscaping gets plenty

"TODAY WE FIND LAS COLINAS HOMEOWNERS ADDING SWIMMING POOLS, IMPROVING LANDSCAPE AND LIVING THE GOOD LIFE IN THEIR PURSUIT OF THE AMERICAN DREAM.”

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of attention, and we have worked hard to bring our reserve account from being underfunded to the current respectable level. Major refurbishment projects of streets, gates, walls and landscaping have all been funded in advance without need for any special assessments. Today we find Las Colinas homeowners adding swimming pools, improving landscape and living the good life in their pursuit of the American dream.” They work with many CAI business partners including Conserve LandCare, Asphalt MD’s, Martin Street Sweeping, Signarama, Delphi Law Group, LLP, Guralnick & Gilliland, LLP, and Automation Pride. The Enclave at Las Colinas HOA has been managed since inception by Personalized Property Management. Jim Knickerbocker, CCAM, is the Community Manager. Jim can be reached at (760) 325-9500 or by email at Jim@ppminternet.com. For more information about the community, you may also contact board president Jim Leighty, PE, at jim.leighty@gmail.com. Marne Logan, CCAM, is a community association manager for The Management Trust Desert Division. She can be reached at (760) 340-1703, or by email to marne.logan@managementtrust.com.

CAI-CV ELECTION OF DIRECTORS The Annual Election of Directors for the Coachella Valley Chapter of CAI has been scheduled for Tuesday, October 29, 2019, at 3:00 p.m., at the CAI-CV Chapter office, 75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102, Palm Desert, CA 92211. The election will be run by the third-party professional elections company, The Inspectors of Election, and ballots will be available online beginning September 30, 2019. Voting will continue until October 28, 2019. Each CAI-CV member will receive one vote and receive one login ID and password. Ballots will be sent to the person on record with CAI’s National office. If you are a business partner who is on the CAI-CV local database but not on the CAI National database, please contact the CAI-CV office to find out where your company’s ballot information will be sent. There are four open seats for three-year terms, from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2023. Each year, three or four board terms are completed, making these seats available for election. Board members may serve up to two three-year terms. This year, all four board members are eligible to run for a second term. All CAI-CV members in good standing who have served recently in a leadership position on a CAI-CV Standing Committee are eligible to run. Nomination forms are available online at cai-cv.org or by calling the CAI-CV office at (760) 341-0559. CAI-CV.org

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FEATURE

Budgeting for a Different World By John Beaman, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, LSM

D

eveloping an annual budget is one of the primary tasks for a board of directors. Sometimes it can be challenging. We are in one of those challenging periods that affect all associations in the Coachella Valley. The good news for HOAs is the economy is strong; with low inflation. Housing values have been holding steady; with some uptick. Delinquencies and foreclosures are at a manageable level.

THE COACHELLA VALLEY CHALLENGES The principle challenge for boards in developing a budget over the next three years is the mandated increase in the minimum wage. A large percentage of association budgets are tied to landscape maintenance and security, both of which use employees paid at or slightly above the minimum wage. This also holds true for food and beverage staff and often administrative staff. It also affects related services like delivery truck drivers. The minimum wage has already increased 20% over the last four years. Vendors have worked to absorb this as best they can i.e. delaying equipment purchases, slimming down crews, maximizing their resources, etc. They have run out of opportunities to absorb so the 25% minimum wage increase scheduled over the next three years will be passed on to associations. The challenge for associations and vendors is not just raising wages for the minimum wage employees to comply with the law, employers must also address “wage compression.” For 12

Quorum August, 2019

example, if an employee currently makes $3.00/hour more than minimum wage, if you fail to increase wages commensurate with the minimum wage increases, then that employee may be only making say $1.00 more than minimum wage at the end of the three years. You will lose valued employees because they see new hires earning almost the same as them and morale issues will surface. The minimum wage increase challenge is coupled with a highly competitive job market in the Coachella Valley due to low unemployment and a limited supply of some skilled positions, often due to the reluctance to relocate to the Coachella Valley due to our hot summers. To retain good employees and recruit quality new employees, associations and vendors need to keep wages competitive. As if this were not a big enough challenge, aging infrastructure in many of our older communities is becoming a major challenge – especially for those communities without adequately funded reserves. Associations need to work with their reserve specialists to ensure all components are correctly identified and replacement costs valued correctly. Also make sure that association operated hidden infrastructure, such as electrical distribution systems, are identified and included. Rising utility costs will continue to impact the Coachella Valley. The next drought could be right around the corner. Our water rates are significantly lower than many parts of the country so we do not generate much sympathy when we complain about increases. Our large inventory of golf courses that made the Coachella


FEATURE Valley a favorite destination of golfers is becoming a burden for some associations as the valley is overbuilt when it comes to golf, especially with the retiring baby boomers playing less golf than previous generations – and this will continue to decline with subsequent generations who have a wider range of interests. Operational costs are also rising, putting a greater squeeze on the golf course operators. What can boards do? Unfortunately, tactics such as deferring maintenance or using operating equity to avoid or minimize assessment increases is merely an avoidance tactic. These impacts are not going away so it is better to address them now. A strategy to mitigate effects must be developed.

MINIMUM WAGE IMPACT Effective Date

Minimum Wage

% Change

$10.00 1/1/17

$10.50

5.0%

1/1/18

$11.00

4.8%

1/1/19

$12.00

9.1% 20.0%

1/1/20

$13.00

8.3%

1/1/21

$14.00

7.7%

1/1/22

$15.00

7.1% 25.0%

OPTIONS Some potential options for addressing the budget squeeze are: Develop a 3 – 5 Year Budget Plan Identify Expense Reductions Revisit long-standing service levels and expectations • Alterations to maintenance matrix • Convert flower beds to perennials • Reduce flower beds • Reduce pool heating • Reduce frequency of painting • Closure of amenities • Reduce security coverage • Reduce association office hours • Automation Identify Other Revenue Sources Implement or increase use fees Increase administrative fees Increase transponder fees Implement or increase rental fees Vendor access programs Cell tower leasing Implement advertising or increase advertising fees Memorials Spend Now to Save Later Turf conversions Irrigation system modernization Lighting investments

Use Operating Equity/Retained Earnings This is only a delaying tactic because the increased costs remain after the operating equity is depleted. Important to use in combination with other tactics, including assessment increases, to avoid a large assessment increase when the operating equity is depleted. Use of Volunteers There is some question as to whether the upcoming generations will be as willing to volunteer as previous generations Volunteer options: Adopt a flower bed Assisting with office administrative functions Lifestyle programming Develop an Education/Communication Plan It is essential that the board educate the membership about the evolving economic realities to attain buy-in that assessments are going to increase and/or service levels are going to be reduced. Communicate, communicate, communicate • In newsletters, eblasts, town halls, etc. • Communicate the projected increases over the next five years Enlist suggestions from the membership to create a partnership in addressing the budget challenges In the end, even implementing the various options, assessments must increase. John Beaman, CMCA, AMS, LSM, PCAM is Division Vice President of Resort Communities for The Management Trust. John was a guest speaker at CAI-CV’s June 14th Educational Lunch Program. He can be reached at (769) 776-5100, Extension 6331 or by email at John.Beaman@managementtrust.com. CAI-CV.org

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FEATURE

Keep It Dow

By CAI National

n!

RS NEIGHBO R U O Y T ." RE: TREA PLIES HE M TO TREAT YOU P A E L U R E H N T E D T L "THE GO E WAY YOU WAN TH

N

oise is an inevitable reality in condominium communities. Condominium dwellers live in such close proximity, it’s essential that we consider the effect noise will have on our neighbors when deciding on floor coverings, where to mount the flat-screen television or when to knock out a wall. We—you and your neighbors—all have a right to enjoy our homes in peace and to furnish them as we like. But remember, how you furnish your unit may be a nuisance to your neighbors in theirs. Hard flooring—wood, ceramic, stone—is fashionable and collects far fewer allergens than carpet, making it very popular. But it can be a problem for the folks downstairs, even if you make an effort to tread lightly or wear soft shoes. If you’re considering installing hard flooring in your unit, first install a sound barrier—like cork—to reduce noise. And hope the people above you do the same. Flat-screen televisions are becoming more affordable every year, and many of our residents have them. Please mount your screen on an interior wall—not a wall you share with a neighbor. Reverberations from wall-mounted televisions can

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Quorum August, 2019

be an annoyance for those on the other side. How much noise does it take to be a nuisance? One definition says nuisance is a level of disturbance beyond what a reasonable person would find tolerable. But, sometimes the question isn’t how much noise we make, but when we make it. You or your neighbor might find the raucous party next door entirely tolerable—until about 10 or 11 p.m. A noisy renovation downstairs might be intolerable if it’s a religious or ethnic holiday for you. Whatever you’re planning, give some thought to the day as well as the time of day for your activity. If you have noisy neighbors, talk to them. They probably have no idea they’re disturbing you. Maybe you work nights and their teenager—whose room backs up to yours—blasts the audio system after school each day. The Golden Rule applies here: Treat your neighbors the way you want them to treat you. This article is from CAI national and can be found at www.caionline.org.


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HOA LAW

Service Dogs and Support Animals By Jennifer James, Esq.

C

ommunity associations must reasonably accommodate persons with disabilities who use service or support animals. Therefore, awareness of the laws governing service dogs and emotional support animals is necessary. It is important to understand what laws apply when federal and state law differ. Generally, whichever one offers greater protection will apply. California law typically offers greater protection than federal law for persons with disabilities. For example, California defines "disability" more broadly than the American Disabilities Act (ADA). Under the federal ADA, a physical or mental impairment qualifies as a disability only if it "substantially limits" a major life activity. In California, a physical or mental impairment need only limit, not "substantially" limit, a major life activity. This simply means that the impairment must make major life activities difficult, such as participating in social activities, walking, talking, or seeing (see California Code of Regulations 12926).

"While physical disabilities are more obvious, mental disabilities may be harder to observe."

SERVICE DOGS California’s definition of service animals is limited to dogs; however, in compliance with the ADA definition of service animals, California recognizes small horses as service animals in some limited circumstances. In California, service dogs are permitted in more public places than the ADA covers, including: • any place the general public is invited (i.e. restaurants, hotels, theaters, shops, concert halls, and government buildings); • medical facilities, such as hospitals, clinics, and physicians' offices, and • any public conveyance or mode of transportation (i.e. motor vehicles, trains, buses, streetcars, boats), whether private, public, franchised, licensed, or contracted.

PSYCHIATRIC SERVICE DOGS While California does not have a separate definition for “psychiatric service dog,” a dog that is individually trained to help a person with a mental disability with specific requirements is considered a service dog. That individual would be entitled to the same rights under the law as someone which a physical disability that uses a service dog.

EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMALS

While physical disabilities are more obvious, mental disabilities may be harder to observe. In California, a mental disability includes any mental or psychological disorder or condition, such as intellectual disability, clinical depression, bipolar disorder, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, or specific learning disabilities that limits a major life activity. A major life activity refers to physical, mental, and social activities, and working. California does not, however, consider compulsive gambling, kleptomania, or unlawful substance use disorders to be mental disabilities. 16

Quorum August, 2019

Emotional support animals are also known as “comfort animals” or “animal assisted therapy.” California law, like federal law, doesn't require that emotional support animals be allowed in public places. California does have laws, however, protecting the use of emotional support animals in other settings. For example, in California, the same rules requiring homeowners associations to allow service dogs in the community associations also applies to emotional support animals. A support animal must alleviate one or more identified symptoms or effects of a person’s disability, but there is no requirement that a support animal be individually trained or certified, or that it be a dog.

VERIFICATION OF SERVICE DOG OR SUPPORT ANIMAL When the disability or need for reasonable accommodation is not obvious, a homeowners association may ask the person with a disability for documentation that he or she has a disability and a disability-related need for the service dog or support animal. The owner or resident must then provide


HOA LAW the homeowners association with reasonable medical documentation, typically a letter from a health care provider that confirms the existence of the disability and the need for reasonable accommodation.

DENYING A REQUEST TO KEEP A SERVICE DOG OR SUPPORT ANIMAL In California, a community association may deny a request to keep a service dog or support animal as a reasonable accommodation if the animal poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others, or would cause substantial physical damage to the property of others. However, if the threat or damage can be reduced or eliminated by another reasonable accommodation, the community association must allow the animal to stay. While a community association may deny a request to keep a service dog or support animal if that specific animal poses a threat, the community association cannot reject a service dog or assistance animal just because of breed, size, or weight. The specific animal must adequately demonstrate that it poses a threat. In other words, a determination that a service dog or assistance animal poses a direct threat or would cause substantial physical damage must be based on an individualized assessment that relies on objective evidence about the specific animal's actual conduct. The determination must not be made on mere speculation or fear about the types of harm or damage an animal may cause or because of evidence about harm or damage that other similar animals have caused.

PET DEPOSITS A community association cannot require an owner to pay a pet deposit for a service dog or support animal, even if the rules authorize a pet deposit for other residents. Jennifer James, Esq. is Of Counsel to Green, Bryant & French, LLP and has been providing legal services to common interest communities for more than 15 years. Ms. James can be reached at (760) 565-5889 or Jennifer@JenniferJamesLaw.com.

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HOA LAW

Assistance Animals & Community Associations Definition

Training toTrain Applicable Applicable state/ Registered or Required assist one assi Required state/ Registered federal laws certified training person pe or certified training Definition federal laws

Americans Service animals Specifically with are subject trained to work Disabilities to local or perform Service animals aredog Specifically trained Americans Act with (ADA) licensing subject to local dog and for to work ortasks perform Disabilitiesand Act Fair licensingregistration and regwith tasks for individuals individu(ADA) and Fair Housing Act requirements istration requiredisabilities Housing Act (FHA) als with disabilities ments (FHA)

X

X

Service Animal dogs; in some cases, miniature horses service animal

dogs; in some cases, miniature horses

Therapy Animal any animal

Privides Provides psychoState and logical or physipsychological local laws ological benefit State and local or physiological to individuals or laws groups inbenefit a clinicalto individuals environment or groups in a clinical environment

X

therapy animal any animal

Provides comfort (reliable Fair Housing Act for people with disdocumentation (FHA) abilities Fair Provides comfort from a physician, Housing psychiatrist, etc. for people with (reliable Act (FHA) disabilities may be requested documentation under FHA) from a physician, Emotional Support Animal psychiatrist, any animal (with exclusions) etc. may be *There is no nationally recognized certifying agency and no certification granted to service, therapy,under emotional support, or requested other assistance-type animals. Neither the Federal Housing Administration nor the Americans FHA) with Disabilities Act require

X

X

X

service animal “certification.” A number of reputable agencies certify that an animal has participated in their programs, completed training courses, or otherwise meets the criteria for a service animal. These are legitimate, but not official, and

emotional support animal any animal (with exclusions)

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Quorum August, 2019

*There is no nationally recognized certifying agency and no certification granted to service, therapy, em “certification.” A number of reputable agencies certify that an animal has participated in their programs


HOA LAW Must wear a leash or vest identifying the animal *May be required by a community association

Primary function to provide emotional support through companionship

Allowed by Federal law (Air Carrier AcProvide emotional cess Act) to acsupport and comfort company handler on to many people flights

Allowed by Federal law to accompany handler in restaurants, stores, movie theaters, etc.

Allowed by federal law to stay with people with disabilities in community associations that have "no pet" policies

Check state and local laws

Reasonable accommodations required under FHA.

they offer no guarantee of an animal’s status. Beware of fraudulent service-animal certifications that are easily available for purchase online. To learn more visit www.HUD.gov or www.ADA.gov. Information in this chart does not constitute a legal opinion. Some state and local statutes may differ from the information presented here. Questions regarding pet issues and service animals should always be referred to an attorney when legal advice is needed. Š 2018 Community Associations Institute CAI-CV.org

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CHAPTER EVENTS

THURSDAY

JULY 18 2019

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Quorum July, 2019

DAY AT THE DEL MAR

RACES

THOROUGHBRED CLUB

SIXTH FLOOR il PALIO RESTAURANT PATIO


CHAPTER EVENTS

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Quorum August, 2019


FEATURE

4 Ways to Cut Costs and Keep HOA Assessments Stable By Sierra Carr, CMCA

S

top raising assessments. It’s a universal request, whether you’re part of a high-rise association in Los Angeles or an active adult HOA in Palm Springs. And while there are many good reasons to raise assessments (let’s face it, keeping assessments low at all costs can actually hurt your community’s relevance and cause property values to suffer), no board wants to be the “bad guy.” So before you raise assessments, take a look at these four cost-saving methods.

1

HOA INSURANCE

If you haven’t reviewed your HOA’s insurance coverage recently, you may be paying more than you need to in premiums or deductibles. It’s important to work with a trusted insurance broker or agent that has experience with homeowners associations and can work with yours to get the best rate.

ENERGY

In California (and everywhere else), it’s clear that energy costs are on the rise. And making changes to boost energy efficiency is a reliable way to save money in the long run. Partner with your professional community management company to find ways to boost energy efficiency. For instance, you may install light switches with motion detectors so that no lights can be left on when the room is unoccupied. A long-term solution (like replacing all traditional lighting with LED lighting) may require a bigger investment upfront, but will likely save money in the long run.

2

3

RESERVE FUND INVESTMENTS

Are you getting the most out of your reserve fund investments? Most board members aren’t sure. In fact, in our 2018 HOA budget survey, 72% of board members said that they weren’t completely confident in their returns on reserve funds and/or operating funds. Partner with your association management company and review your current investment plan to see if there are opportunities to increase your returns. One single-family home community association in Dana Point partnered with FirstService Financial and increased their annual interest earned by more than $27,000.

4

VENDOR CONTRACTS

In our 2018 budget survey, over 57% of surveyed board members said they weren’t sure if their property management company asks vendors whether there will be cost increases in the following year’s budget. In fact, by reviewing contracts regularly and communicating with vendors consistently, you may be able to uncover cost savings.

OTHER HOA COST-SAVING OPPORTUNITIES – INVESTMENT POLICY While these four areas of cost savings are a good starting place, it’s important to note that this is not an exhaustive list. A good way to evaluate potential cost savings in your investments particularly is by creating an HOA investment policy. An HOA investment policy is a guide you can use to help you uncover better returns on your reserve funds and potentially save money in the long run.

Sierra Carr, CMCA, is the comptroller for Trilogy at La Quinta and works for FirstService Residential. She can be reached at (760) 702-3038 or by email at scarr@mytlq.com.

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FEATURE

El Presidente Is Not El Jefe By Kelly G. Richardson, Esq. CCAL

T

he office of HOA president is often misunderstood, and very serious dysfunction for associations and their boards, as well as heartburn for the president, can be the outcome. At the outset, it is critical to understand that the role of the HOA president is dramatically different than the forprofit corporate president. The typical for-profit president is hired to be the boss, and can hire and fire, create or terminate contracts, and otherwise run the show. On the other hand, the HOA’s boss is not the president, but its board of directors. Corporations Code 7210 confirms the chain of command in the common interest development – “the activities and affairs of a [nonprofit mutual benefit] corporation shall be conducted and all corporate powers shall be exercised by or under the direction of the board.” In a forprofit corporation, the day-to-day running of the business is typically the responsibility of the president, along with hiring and firing staff. In most associations, day-to-day execution of board decisions is executed by the association’s paid professional manager. The association president has just one vote on the board, and that vote is no more valuable than any other director. Directors who always automatically defer to the president are not fulfilling their responsibility to the association – which needs each director to contribute. A “super-director” does not exist in the HOA world – each director is just as important as the others.

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HOA presidents often feel that it is their responsibility to instruct the HOA’s manager, employees, or vendors on how they should perform their jobs. However, in doing so without express authority from the board, such presidents violate the role and disrespect their board colleagues since the group is the legal authority. Furthermore, most associations with professional managers pay the manager to handle vendors and HOA employees. Such a president will

"HOA presidents often feel that it is their responsibility to instruct the HOA’s manager, employees, or vendors on how they should perform their jobs. However, in doing so without express authority from the board, such presidents violate the role and disrespect their board colleagues since the group is the legal authority." often experience burnout and frustration due to all the extra time they put in the job (unnecessarily, if the HOA has a manager) and worse yet, can be exposed to liability because they are actually not acting as a director any more, but become a manager or co-manager. HOA presidents in associations without managers often take on much of the management function, but this still should involve express board authorization. However, presidents of

professionally managed associations should not need to be involved in dayto-day association business. Good presidents understand the boundaries between board work and management work. Good presidents do not confuse their self-worth with their position as an officer, and are team leaders not dictators. A good president helps the team (the board) stay focused on the decisions at hand, moving deliberations along smoothly and efficiently, but also graciously, fairly, and respectfully. A good president models respect for all directors, even those who disagree, and sets the tone of meeting conduct for all attendees. HOA presidents are appointed by the board, in an open board meeting (no, presidents are not “personnel” so that does not qualify for closed session). Presidents can also be replaced by the board, any time and without cause, in an open and properly noticed board meeting. Good presidents are a key for healthy associations, while bad presidents bring discouragement and frustration to the manager, board colleagues, and themselves. Keep the good ones. Kelly G. Richardson, Esq. is a Fellow of the College of Community Association Lawyers and Senior Partner of Richardson Ober PC, a California law firm known for community association expertise. Submit questions to Kelly@ RichardsonOber.com. Past columns at www.HOAHomefront.com. All rights reserved®.


Welcome Aboard RealManage

By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH

RealManage is a community management company that specializes in homeow ner association management, masterplanned management, condominium management, and townhome management. They offer professional and persona lized service - a firm right Rhonda M. Drews in your neighborhood that is supported by vast national resources. The local contacts for the Coachella Valley area are Rhonda M. Drews, PCAM – Regional Vice President of Operations; Gloria Todisco, PCAM – Senior Vice President, Southern California and Ann Borowski-Bitter, CMCA – Senior Community Association Manager. Rhonda can be reached at 760-202-9880 and by email at Rhonda.Drews@RealManage.com According to Rhonda, “Since our management services are the most advanced in the industry, they will enhance your level of community development. Community development is a concept we define as a community operating at its peak potential in terms of financial and operational aspects as well as a deep sense of community spirit, all of which are deeply affected by the quality of your management services.” The local office of RealManage is located at 75-178 Gerald Ford Drive, STE 1A, Palm Desert, CA 92211 and their website address is: realmanage.com.

CA LIC. #907600 AZ LIC. #286198

www.brsroofing.com

Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM, and CAI EBP, is president and co-owner of Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC in Palm Desert, CA. Her company assists HOAs in assessing the extent of water damage and mold contamination. She can be reached at (760) 902-2545 or sbriaq@gmail.com.

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IN LOVING MEMORY

In Loving Memory of Renee Gumbel, PCAM By Rhonda M. Drews, PCAM

O

ur friend and colleague Renee Gumbel, PCAM, from to have the opportunity to learn from her. I have been truly Associa Desert Resort Management, was called home blessed by my time spent with Renee and I will never forget on July 22, 2019. In whatever role we knew her, from whatever this shooting star.” vantage point, she stood apart as someone special! Her charWhen recalling Renee as a friend, CAI-CV Director Micha ismatic personality was readily apparent. She had a true gift of Ballesteros said, “Renee was the funniest person I’ve ever met innovative thinking and a proactive approach that allowed her and always took the opportunity to make sure you received to successfully guide her boards and manage her communities. a personal greeting, not just a wave from across the room. I It was clear to anyone that worked with Renee that she was a pro- will miss her laugh, her grace and fortitude.” fessional manager who took her responsibilities seriously and Renee—a caring and beloved woman, a cherished colleague was always looking out for the community’s and board’s best and friend—will be missed by many, but never will she be forinterests. She was most recently gotten by those who were for"Renee—a caring and beloved woman, a cherpromoted to a Director role overtunate enough to have known ished colleague and friend—will be missed by seeing other managers and had her. Renee leaves behind a many, but never will she be forgotten by those just obtained her Professional who were fortunate enough to have known her." loving husband, Steve, and Community Association Manager two daughters, Nicole and (PCAM) certification. She was passionate about educating Danielle, and a son, Billy, along with several siblings, cousins, newer and younger managers, showing them best practices aunts and an abundance of friends, and of course, her dog in community management. Renee was committed to her Nitro, who misses her very much. profession and had a remarkable work ethic. Drive, strength, It was a privilege for me to have been a part of Renee’s life. commitment, integrity are all words that describe Renee. I was lucky enough to get to work closely with her for many Bobbie Happ, a co-worker said, “Renee Gumbel was my good years. I was always impressed with her skill and ability as a friend and was a great servant leader. She could see all sides manager, but more importantly, she was a great friend who of a conflict and negotiate the best outcome for our clients. always had me in hysterics until tears were rolling down my She could deliver difficult news to a board and would always face. We will all miss you Renee! have solutions to meet the problems. She was respected by Renee’s family has requested that those wishing to honor all who knew her. She was known as being compassionate her memory may do so by contributing to Animal Samaritans and a straight shooter. She was a consummate professional. at www.animalsamaritans.org. Renee had a heart of gold and a unique sense of humor that Rhonda Drews, PCAM, is the Regional Vice reminded me not to take life so seriously. Her smile lit up President of Operations for RealManage in Palm a room, and her laughter was frequently heard throughout Desert. She can be reached at 760.202.9880 or by the office. Our time together was too short. It was an honor email at rhonda.drews@realmanage.com.

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EVENTS

Board Leadership Development Workshop By Steven Shuey, PCAM, CCAM

ATTENTION COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEMBERS! CAI-CV is offering a comprehensive overview of board fiduciary duties and best practices based on CAI’s forty plus years’ experience with thousands of community associations. The best legal and professional minds in the industry developed this course and EVERY board member will benefit from the insights and industry truths that will be taught by ten of CAI’s best faculty. At the end of the event, you will receive a certificate of completion and enjoy a fun “ASK THE ATTORNEY ROUNDTABLE” program where you can throw your toughest HOA questions to our esteemed faculty. Communities depend on the leadership of their boards to thrive. The Board Leadership Development Workshop has you covered! This all-day intensive workshop has five comprehensive modules that include: • Governing Documents and Roles & Responsibilities • Communications, Meetings & Volunteerism • Fundamentals of Financial Management • Professional Advisors & Service Providers • Association Rules and Conflict Resolution

Who should attend? If you are on your board of directors or considering serving on the board in the future, or if you are on one of the association’s committees, this class will give you the tools you need to guide and safeguard your community. The Board Leadership Development Workshop will be held at Palm Valley Country Club in Palm Desert. The class will run from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday, December 6, 2019. A continental breakfast and lunch, and the “Ask the Attorney” wine reception are included. The cost for CAI members is $95 and $140 for nonmembers and can be paid by your association.

SIGN UP BY LOGGING IN TO THE CAI-CV WEBSITE AT WWW.CAI-CV.ORG OR CALL THE OFFICE AT (760) 341-0559. Steven Shuey is the chair of CAI-CV's Education Committee and serves on the board of directors. He is a certified Professional Community Association Manager (PCAM). He serves on the national faculty of CAI and is a past board member of the APCM. He is a community association consultant with Personalized Property Management. Steven may be contacted at IslandMgr@aol.com. You can follow him on Twitter (www.twitter.com/@IslandMgr).

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FEATURE

Can I Park Here? P

arking is a major concern in many associations. Here are some frequently asked questions and thoughtful answers that could help you address parking issues in your community.

Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

28

Q: A:

Why don’t we have enough parking? Developers want to build the most homes possible to make the most money, so they often allot the fewest parking spaces required by law. Unfortunately, that leaves the association to deal with the shortage. Why can’t we park on the street? The association’s roads are subject to local regulations that specify the space needed for access by emergency vehicles. When cars are parked on the street, there isn’t enough clearance for fire trucks to maneuver. Why do we have to park our SUVs and trucks out of sight? Our governing documents were created by people who were unable to anticipate today’s lifestyles. Who knew 30 years ago that SUVs would replace station wagons as the standard family vehicle and trucks would become passenger oriented and even luxurious? Until our documents are amended, we’re obligated to abide by this requirement. Why do I have to register my car with the association? The association’s registration system allows the manager to match vehicles with residents. In case of emergency we can contact you. It also allows the association to identify nonresidents who are parking in our spaces. Be sure your parking pass is clearly visible at all times.

Quorum August, 2019

Q: A:

Q: A:

It seems the parking lot loses another space to handicapped parking every day. Why so many? It may look like a disproportionate number of spaces are reserved for handicapped parking, but for each space there is a resident in need. The Fair Housing Amendments Act makes it unlawful to “discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of sale or rental of a dwelling, or in the provision of services or facilities in connection with such dwelling, because of a handicap of that person.” The “provision of services or facilities” includes providing reserved parking. When a resident requests a handicapped parking space, the association makes every effort to reserve one. Not only does federal and state law require it, but it’s also the right thing to do. What gives the association the right to tell me where and how to park? When you purchased your home, you entered into a contractual agreement with the association to abide by its covenants. Those covenants include bylaws that empower the board to adopt and enforce rules they believe are necessary for everyone’s good. The parking policy explains the parking rules and specifies procedures for enforcing them; not only is the board allowed to develop the policy, it’s legally obligated to do so. Why don’t we just assign reserved parking? Our parking spaces are a type of property called common elements. That means all spaces are owned commonly by everyone, and everyone has the right to use them. Another type of property is called limited common elements. Like parking spaces, limited common elements are owned by everyone, but not everyone can use them. They are limited to one owner. Patios and balconies are examples of limited common elements. By assigning reserved parking, we would


effectively change the property status from common element to limited common element, which goes against our governing documents and our own property rights. Before we could assign reserved parking, we’d have to amend our governing documents. This process is complex, expensive, lengthy and it requires approval by all members.

Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

Why can’t I use my parking pass for an inoperable vehicle? Our parking rules disallow inoperable vehicles for the simple purpose of keeping the community looking nice. Even covered vehicles give the appearance of neglect. Why was I cited for a vehicle that complies with all the association’s parking rules? Sometimes the association tickets vehicles considered a nuisance. These are vehicles that consistently leak oil on the common areas, emit excessive exhaust or gas fumes, are excessively noisy or are otherwise inconsiderate of others. These situations result when your vehicle is in poor repair. Why is the visitor parking area always full? It’s frustrating for my guests. The guest parking area serves as overflow parking for the residents. We regret the inconvenience for your guests, but this arrangement guarantees that you always have a parking space for yourself.

This article is from CAI national and may be found at www.caionline.org.

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FEATURE

Preparing Budgets for Security Guard Services in the Future

O

By Kimberly Burnett

ne of the challenges boards are facing today are rising costs of security guard services. Most boards are seeing budget shortfalls because, like all of us, we didn’t anticipate California’s minimum wage increases, which, starting in 2017 are a steady eight percent each year. From the years 2008 to 2014, minimum wage was $8.00 an hour. This made budgeting easy to plan. In 2014 there was a 12 percent increase to $9.00 per hour. Each year since then, there has been an increase of $.50 to $1.00 per hour. In 2019, minimum wage is $12.00 for most security guard companies. The rate will increase again in January 2020 to $13.00 per hour – that is a $5.00 per hour increase since 2014. Boards must realize that these minimum wage increases will eventually impact community association assessments. Unfortunately, many boards are still waiting to increase assessments. The longer boards wait, the greater the negative impact will be on association residents. There is no way to avoid these increases and boards need to plan now for how they will impact budgets over the next five years. For example, at a gate that has manned coverage 24 hours a day, seven days a week, we are talking

about an annual increase of approximately $8,700 or $1 for every hour worked. In preparing budgets for security, board members will want to also consider associated cost increases that will be reflected in their bill rates like increased payroll taxes and administration costs. Boards are not just seeing an increase

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Quorum August, 2019

of $1.00 per hour but more like $1.30 to $1.50 an hour. Of course, this assumes the lowest pay for all the officers, which is rarely the case for associations. To keep good officers, there must be upward mobility and monetary incentives to stay with a company. Officers will leave for positions that pay more or even for the same rate if there is less work. Since turnover and quality of officers are among a board’s greatest concern, some officers will likely be paid more than minimum wage. As minimum wages go up, so does the incentive pay. To make sure your dollars are being put to the best use, we recommend that boards who are going out to bid for security services, ask that companies include the pay rates of the officers in their proposals. The pay rate including benefits will directly reflect the caliber of the officers and services provided. Reviewing current and future security budgets should include evaluating the quality of officers, current turnover of officers, bill rates, current pay rates and benefits offered to the officers. It is also important to keep in mind that minimum wage increases will continue to go up by $1 per year until 2023. Raising assessments may be unpopular but for most associations, it is required to keep up with minimum wage increases. Take the time to inform residents clearly and often about the impact of California’s minimum wage increases so they can understand and support your budget decisions. Kimberly Burnett is the Business Development Manager for DSI Security Services. She can be reached at (909) 236-3827 or by email at kburnett@dsisecurity.com.


FEATURE

IS IT A

GOOD

RULE?

Renovating Old Rules Checklist

By CAI National

M

ake sure your rules are right. Rules and regulations should clarify provisions in governing documents and help regulate behavior and property use, but many associations adopt rules that conflict with their own documents, are unduly complicated, nearly impossible to enforce, and may even violate laws. Some churn out reams of rules to settle simple beefs between individual owners when no rule is needed. Then there are rules that are so outdated or so vague that compliance isn't possible. Rules can be too general and can embroil the association and its owners in unnecessary disputes. It's OK to create new rules. These days, associations are staying on top of the latest trends by addressing short-term rentals, electric vehicles, owners' external security cameras, drones, and marijuana, and more. In each instance, any new rule must follow a certain set of guidelines to pass muster.

GOOD RULES ARE: • Consistent with applicable laws and governing documents • Objective • Reasonable • Specific, unambiguous, and relatively easy to follow • Put in writing, distributed periodically, and summarized in the association newsletter and on the website • Formulated after getting input from the association attorney and community members • Positive steps that enhance the community and boost property values When you're ready to create a rule, consider using the active voice rather than passive; tell owners what they should do instead of what they shouldn't. Also consider briefly explaining the reason for the rule. For example, a rule on parking could say, "Park your car head in to avoid damage to the landscape," rather than "NO backing of your car into parking spaces." Before adopting a rule, associations should communicate the challenges they are trying to address. Consider polling or surveying residents and holding town hall meetings.

Yes No Does the rule make sense? Is this the least restrictive way to approach the issue? Is the rule still needed? Does it address a current problem? Is it acceptable to residents? Is compliance relatively easy? Is it possible? Does the rule create new problems? Is the rule getting the results you want? Is the rule enforceable? Is the rule legal?

This article is from CAI national and may be found at www.caionline.org. CAI-CV.org

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ABOUT CAI-CV

AI-CV

STANDING EES COMMITT

2019

Board. by the CAI-CV be appointed co-chair will ittee chair. e chair and by the comm be appointed ittee. embers will on each comm CAI will serve es from each ard member representativ to include will strive er of each ting memb p class. non-vo a be director will executive ers in good (CV) memb ella Valley are CAI Coach e members miss two or ittee if they ed from a comm ence call). confer may be remov ar e members available via to three one-ye meetings are ittee for up etings (all on a comm . may serve the board) asked to by ee members d and may be may be grante re of the board ittee at any time. xceptions at the pleasu a comm serve from ers step down tee memb ittee or to o another comm

g ed by the board. budget approv al before signin will have a director approv committee or executive seek board funds. mittees will ding CAI-CV acts or expen training. S ittee chair comm ete NSIBILITIE irs will compl t to the board. and co-cha ives to submi the end mmittee chairs and object calendar by develop goals the master mmittees will meetings on schedule 2019 mmittees will office. h the CAI-CV January 2019. activities throug meetings at actions and will hold their important ommittees the board of e will inform that will includ as needed. ommittees plan board ions the s to l communicat media. written report ish an annua and social notes will establ ary for taking Committees e-blasts, media for mailings, serve as secret out meeting notices a schedule member to sending appoint one tasks, will able of action Committees gs. keeping track ittee meetin at meetings, ance at comm attend g gs. and trackin lead the meetin chairs will able tasks. one-year term. Committee delegate action ittee for a chairs will g on a comm ittee and CAI-CV Committee it to servin of the comm members comm decisions Committee support the members will • Committee if they disagree. Board, even r office.

E

to the rn this form

STANDING COMMITTEES

chapte

Please retu

er Valley Chapt Coachella Suite 102 d Ford Drive, 75410 Geral t, CA 92211 ai-cv.org Palm Deser .org • www.c • info@cai-cv V 341-8443 .com/CAI_C 559 • F (760) www.twitter P (760) 341-0 V /CAIC unity ok.com senting Comm www.facebo iation repre gers of ssional assoc teers, Mana CAI is a profe ers and Volun Partners. Board Memb Business and s, Association Association Community

ip team by -CV leadersh mittee. Join the CAI CAI-CV com way to ring for a voluntee ee is the best a committ . As a Serving on hip with CAI bers s your mem relationship maximize d lasting buil will you educate and volunteer, and help bers mem r . with othe communities our en strength CV

CAI-CV

2018 L NATIONA AWARDS

Board and ient CAI-CV’s are the recip Committees Chapter onal of 15 Nati and, ent Awards Achievem CV won CAI in 2018, CAI- llence Exce ’s National of recognition lic Award in work in Pub exceptional bership, Affairs, Mem ent & Managem Chapter t, Member Developmen Leadership. and Services, nteers are ities! CAI-CV volu er commun building bett

Who Me? Serve on a CAI Committee? By Michael Traidman

C

ing on CAIs about serv Question cted to the may be dire 9. committees ) 341-055 e at (760 CAI-CV offic

ks Than June 28, 2019

AI-CV committees are the lifeblood and improving the quality of life for HOA of our Chapter. Before becoming residents. president, I was asked to volunteer on the The Homeowner Leader Committee Homeowner Leader Committee. We met is led by Bruce Latta, president of Parc once per month and I, along La Quinta HOA. They with the rest of the commithave (working with the tee members, usually left the Membership Committee) meeting with a couple of helped double the Chapter’s LIVING action items to follow up on homeowner leader membefore the next meeting. Not bership. They won an a big deal. The advantage for award for their collaborame is that I was meeting a tive project with the City of diverse group of commitPalm Desert that produced tee members and getting to "HOA Living," a brochure to know them. They included help residents understand other homeowner leaders, "They won an award how to navigate HOA management company services vs. city services. for their collaborarepresentatives and execu- tive project with the Other desert cities are tives, and various business City of Palm Desert following suit and our partners. I was impressed that produced "HOA next brochure will be for TOURNAMENT TITLE SPONSOR Diversified Asphalt Products that the committee’s efforts Living," a brochure to Cathedral City. They are GOLF BALL CANNON SPONSOR Securitas to increase education to help residents under- also working on a broGOLF CART SPONSORS Allied Universal stand how to naviUgMO boards and to make CAI chure to help Realtors. SWAG BAG SPONSOR gate HOA services Flood Response events more meaningful The Public Relations GOLF TOWEL SPONSOR vs. city services." AMS Paving to board members were Committee under the GRAND PRIZE SPONSORS BRS Roofing having immediate results. Months later, leadership of Karen Tillotson, CMCA, FirstService Residential HOLE BOOTH SPONSORS Advantage Painting Solutions I was informed that our committee was AMS, from FirstService Residential is Asphalt MD’s Automation Pride being recognized with an award from CAI tasked with raising CAI’s visibility in the Ben’s Asphalt Conserve LandCare national, as well as being recognized at community. They have introduced CAI Diversified Asphalt Products Dunn-Edwards Paint theEmpireWorks Chapter’s annual awards event. There to local media and provided media trainFrazier Pest Control, Inc. Asphalt Products isGoldstar nothing more motivating than success, ing to management company CEOs and NPG Asphalt Roof Asset Management particularly when you are volunteering in a separate class to manager members Securitas Sunshine Landscape United time. Paving your of CAI. On their radar for 2020 is the posVantage Point Construction Vista Paint Corporation I’m now president and serving on four sibility of a newspaper column, a radio Western Pacific Roofing FOURSOME PHOTO SPONSOR committees. I know, it sounds time con- program, and they are exploring a CAI Cartwright Termite & Pest Control BREAKFAST AND LUNCH SPONSORS suming billboard. They have put a stop to the Adams Stirling PLCand sometimes it feels that way. Green Bryant & French, LLP Spectrum Who knew retirement could be so busy? ongoing negative articles and newscasts The Inspectors of Election Vantage Point Construction With that said, CAI is unique because about HOAs and provided a place where WATER SPONSOR Western Pacific Roofing our committees are really making a dif- media can come – CAI – to get the truth GREEN SIGN SPONSORS AMS Paving ference about HOA issues as they arise. EmpireWorks and elevating the HOA industry

HOA

LEARN MORE ABOUT LIVING IN A HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION (HOA) OR OTHER COMMON INTEREST DEVELOPMENT What are my responsibilities as a homeowner or renter in an HOA? How do I get a copy of the rules? Who governs what?

Who do I call when I need help?

75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert, CA 92211 (760) 341-0559 | admin@cai-cv.org | cai-cv.org

CAI-CV Annual Spring Golf Tournament

G LFING WITH THE ST RS WITH THE ST RS FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 2019

7:30 AM SHOTGUN START – REGISTRATION OPENS AT 6:30 AM

Desert Princess Palm Springs Championship Golf Course in Cathedral City 28555 Landau Blvd, Cathedral City, CA 92234

Golf Foursome: $600

Golf Individuals: $150 Luncheon Only: $40

GOLF | AMAZING FUN AT EVERY HOLE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST | LUNCHEON | DOOR PRIZES AUCTION | AWARDS | PHOTOS | GRAND PRIZE GIVEAWAY

FOR ALL CAI-CV MEMBERS – FIRST-TIME GOLFERS WELCOME

DAY AT THE DEL MAR

RACES 32

THOROUGHBRED CLUB

SIXTH FLOOR il PALIO RESTAURANT PATIO

SAVE THE DATE Quorum August, 2019 THURSDAY JULY 18

PRICE $45.... Members & Guests $65.... Nonmembers

SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE @ WWW.CAI-CV.ORG

Fiore Racobs & Powers

CLOSEST TO THE PIN – WOMEN Union Bank CLOSEST TO THE PIN – MEN Allied Universal LONGEST DRIVE – WOMEN LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance Agency LONGEST DRIVE – MEN

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN

The City of Palm Desert & The Community Associations Institute – Coachella Valley Chapter (CAI-CV)


Welcome Aboard

The Awards Committee is an awesome group of members who plan our annual awards event that takes place every January. Under the leadership of Loni Peterson, PCAM, they are tasked with adequately recognizing all of CAI-CV’s 150+ volunteers. They meet all year, as this is one of our largest and most complex events. As a group, they are incredibly creative, and we are excited about what they have planned for the 2019 Annual Awards and Monte Carlo Night (ATLANTIS) scheduled for January 17, 2020. I am also on the board’s ad hoc strategic planning committee. This small group of senior CAI members has been given the task of developing a long-range plan to present to the board of directors at the end of the year. We are putting our collective noses to the grindstone under the leadership of Steven Shuey, PCAM, from Personalized Property Management. So far, we have developed a new tag line, “Better HOA Living,” that will be added to our logo to quickly describe what CAI is all about. We have also mapped out recommendations for a new mission and vision statement that will take us into the next decade. As we proceed, we will be dealing with our need for financial growth to keep pace with the educational needs of our members, and to develop long-range goals for each of our membership classes – managers, homeowner leaders and business partners. The bottom line is that CAI committees are amazing opportunities for personal and professional growth. If you are not on a committee, I urge you to fill out a volunteer form found on our website at www.cai-cv. org or by contacting the CAI-CV office at (760) 341-0559. Volunteers are always needed and we never turn away a helping hand. Mike Traidman is president of CAI-CV and president of the Mira Vista at Mission Hills HOA. He also serves as president of the Desert Cities HOA Council that is now affiliated with CAI-CV and has meetings in Palm Desert and Palm Springs. You may reach Mike at mtraidman@ yahoo.com.

Eric Mosser with Edward Jones By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH The financial services firm Edward Jones was established in 1922, and now has over 14,000 branch offices and 17,500 financial advisors in North America. The firm's investment philosophy — investing for the long-term in quality investments aligned with goals and risk tolerance — appeals to both the serious, longterm individual investor and business entities. Edward Jones most commonly assists individual investors with Eric Mosser retirement strategies, college savings plans, wealth management, insurance and annuities. Edward Jones offers competitive rates on certificates of deposit (CDs), which is great for community managers interested in maximizing the returns of their HOA cash reserves. One striking difference between Edward Jones and other financial services firms is that Edward Jones does not have high investment minimums. Edward Jones will provide education, seminars and investment options to all clients regardless of how much money they have. It’s no wonder that Edward Jones has ranked highest in investor satisfaction, according to the J.D.Power Full Service Investor Satisfaction Study, for 2019 and eight of the previous 17 years. The local Coachella Valley representative is Financial Advisor Eric Mosser, who holds a Series 7, Series 66, and a California Health and Life Insurance license. Eric is active in the community serving as an ambassador for the Greater Coachella Valley Chamber of Commerce, a board member of the La Quinta Chamber of Commerce, member of the Indian Wells Chamber of Commerce, Alzheimer's Association Advisory Council and BNI - Success Professionals chapter. Eric lives in north La Quinta with his wife, two daughters, a dog and a bunny. He attended Palm Desert Middle School, Newport Harbor High, Orange Coast College and Long Beach State. His hobbies include offroading, soccer, golf, poker, and enjoying the beach, river and mountains. You can reach Eric at (760) 333-5193 | ERIC.MOSSER@EDWARDJONES.COM 74-911 Highway 111, Indian Wells, CA 92210 www.edwardjones.com/eric-mosser

Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM, and CAI EBP, is president and co-owner of Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC in Palm Desert, CA. Her company assists HOAs in assessing the extent of water damage and mold contamination. She can be reached at (760) 902-2545 or sbriaq@gmail.com. CAI-CV.org

facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

33


CAI-CV 2019 PLATINUM SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT

42-240 Green Way #B •Palm Desert, CA 92211

Your Local Go-To HOA Contractor HOA SERVICES

Vantage Point Construction was is becoming involved with CAI-CV on We value our relationship with CAI started in 2000 to fill the much needed its Volunteer and the Business Partner and its members. At VPC we recognize demand for local contractors to service Committees and is a valuable asset to the need for support in the Valley as a • Wood • Pool Deck Coatings • Fence • Carport the HOA/property management con- our company. Francisco Estrada started business and are proud to be a part of Repair/Replacement Repair/Replacement Repair/Replacement struction needs in the Valley. ARepair/Replacement year as a laborer for VPC in 2007, he is now our a great community like CAI. We have later Tom Thorman joined VPC as their project manager adding new business to gained many business rela• Concrete • Club/Guard House • Block Wall • Drywalland&personal More!!! Insurance Restoration Manager adding VPC working with property managers tionships with members the years. Repair/Replacement Repair/Remodel Repair/Replacement Contact us over today to the Valley's need for a local insurance as well as maintaining relationships Our main goal at VPC is to give our restoration company. Tom and his wife, with all business partners. Tom's oldest customers a local, go-to, family-owned Dona, bought the company in 2005 and daughter, Tawny, joined the team in service that responds to each individual continued to fill the need for a local go-to 2015. She works in the front office; her need. Our motto is the customer is Contractor. Our newest member VPC, husband, Leo, also joinedFire the VPC team always right and we don't just say that, 24hr toEmergency Service & Water Restoration Cami Staviski, comes to us with over 20 when they made the move from Long we try and live by that motto "customer Mold Remediation Slab LeakisRepairs years of construction knowledge and Beach to the desert. always right."

INSURANCE SERVICES

www.VantagePointConstruction.com

VPC OFFERS COMPLETE INSURANCE WE ALSO ARE YOUR GO-TO CONTRACTOR FOR HOA/ Phone:SERVICES (760) 340-5157 • Fax: (760)MANAGEMENT 340-2576 • MAINTENANCE License # 473996 RESTORATION AND WORKS PROPERTY AND REPAIR WITH ALL INSURANCE COMPANIES SERVICES FOR THE COACHELLA VALLEY SUCH AS: SERVICES INCLUDE: • Fire damage • Water and flood damage • Car vs. building • Tree vs. building We have restored over 50 homes and businesses from fire damage and hundreds of homes and businesses from flood damage. VPC also has repaired over 100 structures due to vehicles driving into the building (which unfortunately happens quite frequently in the Valley).

• Concrete replacement • Deck replacement • Pool deck recoating • Wood repair/replacement • Carport repair/replacement • and many other services including handyman services.

AT VPC WE WORK WITH MANY PROPERTY MANAGERS OR MANAGMENT TO PROVIDE THE BEST LOCAL CONTRACTING SERVICES We are a family business and work hard to provide top quality service. And if things do not work out perfectly, we do our very best to fix the issue and achieve our goal of making every customer satisfied. We take pride in our personalized service, quality workmanship, and our professionalism.

Thank you to Vantage Point Construction for their generous support of CAI-CV! 34

Quorum August, 2019


CAI-CV

EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

Choose Educated Business Partners Micha Ballesteros, Flood Response Rodney Bissell, Bissell Design Studios, Inc. Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC Kimberly Burnett, DSI Security Services Linda Cardoza, Alliance Association Bank Will Cartwright, Cartwright Termite & Pest Control, Inc. Rick Cech, Roof Asset Management Todd Chism, PatioShoppers Tiffany Christian, Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Adam Eves, EmpireWorks Lori Fahnestock, Powerful Pest Management Dea Franck, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Julie Frazier, Frazier Pest Control, Inc. Elaine Gower, Naumann Law Firm, PC Michael Graves, SCT Reserve Consultants Amanda Gray, O'Connell Landscape Maintenance Matthew Hills, Securitas Security Services USA, Inc. Tim Hoss, BEHR & KILZ Paints & Primers Jennifer James, Esq., Green Bryant & French, LLP Megan Kirkpatrick, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Jared Knight, Vista Paint Corporation Katy Krupp, Fenton Grant Mayfield Kaneda & Litt, LLP Matt Lawton, CIC, Prendiville Insurance Agency Larry Layton, Kirkpatrick Landscaping Services Alison LeBoeuf, Sherwin-Williams Mike Mastropietro, OCBS, Inc. Chris Meyer, Asphalt MD's Greg Morrow, Eagle Roofing Products Fran Mullahy, Vintage Associates Mike Murrell, Farmers Insurance - Mike Murrell Agency Matt Ober, Esq., Richardson Ober, PC Chet Oshiro, EmpireWorks Mallory Paproth, SCT Reserve Consultants Elisa Perez, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Jay Powell, Ben's Asphalt Dana Pride, Automation Pride Kelly Richardson, Esq., Richardson Ober, PC Brent Sherman, Animal Pest Management Services, Inc. Brittany Smith, Vantage Point Construction, Inc. Kymberli Taylor-Burke, NPG Asphalt Liz Williams, AMS Paving Taylor Winkle, Roof Asset Management Bevan Worsham, AMS Paving Jolen Zeroski, Union Bank Homeowners Association Services

Become an Educated Business Partner Call the CAI-CV office or go to www.cai-cv.org for more information.

Time Honored Fran Mullahy Vintage Associates, Inc. (aka: Vintage Landscape) By Grace Paluck, CMCA, CamEx, CCAM Fran Mullahy joined Vintage Associates, a full service professional landscape company, in 2003 as its business development manager. Fran specializes in determining the client needs and is the account manager for the maintenance division. She is responsible for servicing existing contracts with the client representative and identifying new business opportunities. Fran has 25 years of experience managing commercial properties in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley. After moving to the Coachella Valley, Fran spent eight years managing community associations in the Coachella Valley including, The Citrus, Rancho La Quinta and Chaparral Country Club. Fran has been a member of CAI for over 20 years. She says she joined for business and educational opportunities. She, like many of us, has made a lot of friends along with the way. She served on the Quorum committee which she says is “the best one.” When asked about her mentor, Fran had this to say, “my father, who recently passed away at 91. He always had a kind word, sharp mind and loved to tell jokes and make others laugh.” Fran has been married to Buddy (one of the nicest people on the earth) for over 27 years. Her one and only daughter (who makes her laugh all the time), lives in Austin, Texas and is getting married in October. She hopes there will be grandchildren soon so she can be a grandma who spoils her grandbabies. Her favorite sayings are, “It is what it is” and “Build a bridge and get over it.” In her free time, she likes to do yoga, hike, bake sourdough bread and blend essential oils for personal wellbeing and aromatherapy. Grace Paluck is the Division Executive, Vice President for The Management Trust. She can be reached at (760) 776-5100 or by email at grace.paluck@managementtrust.com. CAI-CV.org

facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

35


WATER WISE

CVWD Increases Rebates for Two Landscape Programs By Coachella Valley Water District

C

oachella Valley Water District (CVWD) is offering increased rebate incentives for two landscape programs benefitting homeowner associations and commercial customers. The new rebate levels went into effect July 1 for the current fiscal year. All projects must be pre-approved. The HOA and Commercial Irrigation Upgrade Program incentive has increased from $0.25 to $0.50 per square foot of converted irrigated area for replacing overhead spray and adjustable bubblers and emitters with subsurface/ in-line drip tubing and non-adjustable, pressure compensating bubblers and emitters. Project sizes can range from 1,000 to 20,000 square feet equaling rebates from $500 to $10,000.

"THE PROGRAM INVOLVES INSTALLING SMART, WEATHER-BASED IRRIGATION CLOCKS THAT AUTOMATICALLY ADJUST THEIR IRRIGATION SYSTEM’S RUN TIME BASED ON WEATHER DATA." The second rebate assists HOA and commercial customers in reducing their landscape irrigation water consumption. The program involves installing smart, weather-based irrigation clocks that automatically adjust their irrigation system’s run time based on weather data. CVWD has increased its contribution from 50% to 75% of the cost of the controller(s), up to $10,000 per project. Use of a smart controller automatically reduces the amount of water in the cooler months and increases the amount in the summer. “By increasing the rebates, we hope to encourage more HOA and commercial customers to take advantage of our programs,” said Katie Evans, director of Communications and Conservation for CVWD. “We look forward to working with these customers to become more water efficient.” Applications for the rebate programs are available online at www.cvwd.org/rebates or they may be picked up at CVWD’s Water Management Office, 75-525 Hovley Lane East, Palm Desert.

36

Quorum August, 2019


We can help you meet your CVWD "Efficient" budget!

REAL ROOFING KNOWLEDGE FOR REAL ROOFING SOLUTIONS

Inc.

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fernandof@thevintageco.com Spray Polyurethane Foam Systems Roof Repairs

Tile Systems

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NPGASPHALT.COM So-Cal: 951.940.0200 Desert Division: 760.320.9600 Proud Members of: BIA,BOMA,CAI,IREM,CACM,CREW CAI-CV.org

facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

37


Our Services:

• Asphalt Repair, Patching & Crack Seal • Asphalt Removal & Replacement • All types of Slurry Seals, Pavement Coatings & Striping • ADA Compliance

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CREATIVE | BRAND | CONSULTING Proud to be a part of the 2018 award winning CAI-CV team!

(714) 293-3749 BissellDesign.com 38

Quorum August, 2019


•Landscape Management •Arbor Service •Landscape Design •Landscape & Hardscape Installation •Water Conservation Specialist •Growers of Exotic Palms & Desert Accents

We value and respect your landscaping investment and are dedicated to you and your satisfaction.

Phone: 760- 343-0162 • Fax: 760-343-4804 P.O. BOX 265 Thousand Palms CA 92276 Email: office@proland-inc.com

www.prolandscapingca.com

GURALNICK & GILLILAND _________________________________________________________________________________________________

• Corporate Counsel •

BILL FITZGERALD PRESIDENT SUNTECHROOF@GMAIL.COM SUNTECHROOFING.NET

CELL PHONE # 760.275.4749 42215 WASHINGTON ST, SUITE A #350 PALM DESERT, CA. 92211 OFFICE # 760.343.0091

CONTRACTORS LIC. #1010435

• Legal Opinions

• Assessment Lien and Foreclosure

• • Fees Paid by Delinquent Homeowner • Detailed Monthly Status Reports

40004 Cook St. Suite 3 Palm Desert, Ca www.gghoalaw.com Phone: (760) 340-1515 Fax: (760) 568-3053 For a Copy of our Legal Update Contact Melissap@gghoalaw.com

ADVANCED RESERVE SOLUTIONS, INC. ROXI K. BARDWELL, PCAM, CCM Regional Vice President 7 7 - 5 64 B Country Club Drive, Suite 3 1 0 Palm Desert, CA 9 2 2 1 1

C 510.693.1620 • O 760.295.1864 CAI-CV.org

facebook.com/CAICV

@CAI-CV

39


PRESORTED STD US POSTAGE

PAID PALM DESERT, CA PERMIT NO 149

75410 Gerald Ford Drive, Suite 102 Palm Desert, CA 92211

CAI-CV UPCOMING EVENTS

TURQUOISE IS FOR LOCAL EVENTS

SIGN UP FOR LOCAL EVENTS AT CAI-CV.ORG AND FOR CAI NATIONAL EVENTS AT CAIONLINE.ORG AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

CAI’s M100 Essentials of Community Management

CAI’s M203 Leadership (for managers) WHEN: Friday, September 6, 2019 W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom

(for all members)

WHEN: Thursday – Saturday, August 1-3, 2019 W HERE: Los Angeles CAI-CV’s Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) WHEN: Friday, August 2, 2019, 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom CAI’s M204 Governance (for managers) WHEN: Thursday – Friday, August 8-9, 2019 W HERE: San Francisco CAI’s Educated Business Partner Course (for business partners)

WHEN: Friday, August 16, 2019 W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom

CAI’s M-203 Leadership (for managers) WHEN: Friday, September 27, 2019 W HERE: Santa Ana

CAI-CV’s Board Basic Training (for board members) WHEN: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom CAI’s Large-Scale Workshop WHEN: Wednesday – Friday, September 11 – 13, 2019 W HERE: Houston, TX CAI-CV’s Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show (for all members)

WHEN: Friday, September 20, 2019, 11:15 a.m. Registration W HERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert

CAI’s M206 Financial (for managers) WHEN: Thursday – Friday, August 22 – 23, 2019 W HERE: Santa Ana

CAI-CV’s Assistant Manager on the Run WHEN: Friday, September 27, 2019 W HERE: CAI-CV Classroom

MARK YOUR CALENDARS Friday, October 11, 2019 Educational Lunch Program & Mini Trade Show NEW DATE Friday, October 18, 2019 California Statewide Legal Forum (Irvine Marriott) NEW Friday, November 15, 2019 CAI’S LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Friday, January 17, 2020 CAI-CV’s Atlantis Awards & Monte Carlo Night NEW DATE

2019 CORPORATE SPONSORS PLATINUM______

AMS Paving Asphalt MD's Associa Desert Resort Management Bissell Design Studios, Inc. Cartwright Termite & Pest Control, Inc. Conserve LandCare Diversified Asphalt Products Fiore Racobs & Powers, A PLC NPG Asphalt Pacific Western Bank Prendiville Insurance Agency Roof Asset Management Sign-A-Rama Sunshine Landscape Vantage Point Construction Western Pacific Roofing

GOLD________

AMS Connect Automation Pride Ben’s Asphalt, Inc. BRS Roofing Delphi Law Group, LLP Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Flood Response Frazier Pest Control Green Bryant & French, LLP Horizon Lighting PrimeCo PWLC II Sherwin-Williams Paint Company Vintage Associates

SILVER________

Advanced Reserve Solutions Albert Management Animal Pest Management Barcode Automation, Inc. C.L. Sigler & Associates Dunn-Edwards Paint EmpireWorks Flanders Painting Lloyd Pest Control Mutual of Omaha O'Connell Landscape Maintenance Patrol Masters Powerful Pest Management Pro Landscaping, Inc. Richardson | Ober PC Roseman Law, APC SCT Reserve Consultants Seacoast Commerce Bank Three Phase Electric Tinnelly Law Group

BRONZE______ Adams Stirling, PLC All Counties Fence and Supply Alliance Association Bank A-Rising Builders Artistic Maintenance, Inc. Association Reserves Bank of Southern California Brabo & Carlsen, LLP Coachella Valley Water District DWI Farley Interlocking Pavingstones First Foundation Bank FirstService Residential Flock Safety Frontier Communications G4S Secure Solutions Guralnick & Gilliland, LLP Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner, LLP

LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance Agency Leon's Landscaping & Tree Service Millennium Community Management Painting Unlimited, Inc. PatioShoppers Commercial Furnishings Powerstone Property Management S.B.S. Lien Services SERVPRO of Palm Desert SERVPRO of Palm Springs/Indian Wells Shetler Security Silldorf Law, LLP Suntech Consulting & Roofing The Management Trust Union Bank Homeowners Association Services United Paving Vintage Group Vista Paint Corporation

Quorum Magazine is printed at the CAI-CV Office on a Xerox Versant 180 Press. Discounted printing is now available to CAI members. Call Bissell Design Studios, Inc. at (714) 293-3749 or the CAI-CV office for more information, (760) 341-0559.

Profile for CAI-Coachella Valley Chapter

Quorum August 2019