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JANUARY 2017

Coachella Valley Community Associations Institute Magazine

EDUCATION FOR BOARD MEMBERS 18 Education for Homeowner Leaders 21 2017 Publications for Board Members 22 Thanks to Great Boards and Managers, Community Associations Remain Popular 23 Helping Boards Find the Right Professionals 26 Board Member Education Scholarship 27 CAI-CV’s Education for Board Members 33 Education for Board Members, CAI Webinars 34 Facts About the U.S. Common Interest Development Industry 38 From Homeowner to Board Director: The Added Fiduciary Duties and Responsibilities of Directors

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Quorum January, 2017


Answering the call for the ultimate in security services.

760.341.3593 AMSprotectme.com 74-794 42nd Ave. Suite 1 Palm Desert Lic# 944895 ACO 6917

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS COACHELLA VALLEY CHAPTER 2017 PHYLLIS HARKINS, CMCA, CCAM, AMS PRESIDENT The Management Trust – Palm Desert

A Full Service lAw Firm

GEN WANGLER, ESQ., CCAL PRESIDENT ELECT Fiore Racobs & Powers A PLC

Providing Practical Approaches in:

GERARD GONZALES PAST PRESIDENT Albert Management, Inc.

CC&R Interpretation, Drafting and Enforcement

JOLEN ZEROSKI, CMCA TREASURER Union Bank

Opinion Letters

JOHN WALTERS-CLARK SECRETARY Associa Desert Resort Management

Contract Drafting and Negotiation

CARDINAL AMBROSE, CCAM, CMCA, AMS DIRECTOR Albert Management, Inc.

Civil Litigation Assessment Recovery 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite 120, Palm Desert, California 92260

For inquires contact Jeffrey French www.gbflawyers.com

| 760.346.9310

TAD BLACK DIRECTOR Associa OnCall RHONDA DREWS, CMCA, AMS, PCAM DIRECTOR Associa Desert Resort Management MATT LAWTON, CIRMS DIRECTOR Prendiville Insurance Agency LOUISE STETTLER DIRECTOR Palm Valley Country Club HOA MIKE TRAIDMAN DIRECTOR Mira Vista HOA

42-240 Green Way #B •Palm Desert, CA 92211

Your Local Go-To HOA Contractor HOA SERVICES • Wood

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24hr Emergency Service Mold Remediation

Fire & Water Restoration Slab Leak Repairs

www.VantagePointConstruction.com Phone: (760) 340-5157 • Fax: (760) 340-2576 • License # 473996

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CAI Coachella Valley Office 41-905 Boardwalk, Suite A-2 Palm Desert, CA 92211 Tel: (760) 341-0559 Fax: (760) 341-8443 Website: www.cai-cv.org CAL LOCKETT Executive Director clockett@cai-cv.org

ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS OR ADVERTISING INFORMATION admin@cai-cv.org The materials contained in this publication are designed to provide our members with accurate, timely and authoritative information with regard to the subject covered. However, the CAI Coachella Valley Chapter is not engaging in the rendering of legal, accounting or other professional types of services. The Coachella Valley Chapter has not verified and/or endorsed the contents of these articles or advertising, nor do we have the facilities or the personnel to do so. Readers should not act on the information contained herein without seeking more specific professional advice from legal, accounting or other experts as required.


CONTENTS

ASSOCIATION GOVERNA

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education FOR HOMEOWNER LEADERS

COMMUNITY NEXT

FEATURES

As a community association board member or

volunteer leader, you’re essential to the success 10 338,000 Desert Falls Community 14associations, of nearly 340,000 U.S. homeowners U.S. community associations condominium communities and cooperatives. Associations 2,350,000

By Susan Browne Rosenberg

Community association board and committee members

2020 AND BEYOND

Taking on a position of service and responsibility in your community means that you’re expected to anticipate issues, solve problems, meet the expectations of community residents and protect property values. CAI Homeowner Leader education offers the information, resources and perspective you need to serve your community successfully.

Envisioning the future of community association living, governance and management

14 80,000,000 Community Next - 2020 and Hours of service performed annually by association board and committee members Beyond $1.76 billion

value of time providedFor by homeowner 18 Estimated Education Homeowner board and committee members based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimate of $22.55 per Leaders hour for volunteer time

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2017 Publications for Board Members

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AN INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION LIVING Thanks Great Boards and A free, 54-pageto download at www.caionline.org Recommended for homeowners new to community association living and a great resource for beginning Managers, volunteer leaders, thisCommunity document focuses on the rights and responsibilities of homeowners and volunteer leaders. It outlines the roles and functions of community associations, such as providing services and manAssociations Remain Popular aging physical assets. An addendum includes:

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z Community Association Fundamentals Helping Boards Find the Right z Rights and Responsibilities for Better Communities z Community Association Governance Guidelines Professionals

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Board Member Education Scholarship

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CAI-CV’s Education for Board Members

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New Membership Recruiting Contest

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z Model Code of Ethics for Community Association Board Members

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Win a Weekend Getaway to Anywhere in the U.S.A.!

By Matthew Lawton

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Recruiting Made Easy

By Thomas M. Skiba

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Education for Board Members - CAI Webinars

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Facts About the U.S. Common Interest Development Industry

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CAI-CV 2017 Calendar

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STRENGTH 33 inNUMBERS

CAI Members Know What It Takes

to make community associations preferred places to call home.

32 SEPTEMBER 2016 © COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE

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QUORUM COMMITTEE MEMBERS DEA FRANCK, ESQ. CHAIR Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC RODNEY BISSELL, CO-CHAIR Bissell Design Studios, Inc. PHYLLIS HARKINS, CMCA, AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEX BOARD LIAISON The Management Trust - Palm Desert TARA ABAKUMOFF Roseman & Associates, APCl TIM ALBERT AlliedUniversal CARI BURLEIGH The Management Trust - Palm Desert KIMBERLY BURNETT U. S. Security Associates ALAN J. CARNEGIE, ESQ. Daniels, Fine, Israel, Schonbuch & Lebovits, LLP ERIN FUJIOKA G4S Secure Solutions, USA ANTOINETTE HAMILTON Suntrek Solar JENNIFER JAMES, ESQ. Law Office of Jennifer James ERIN KLINK Pacific Western Bank FRAN MULLAHY Vintage Associates, Inc. SUSAN BROWNE ROSENBERG Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC. STEVEN SHUEY, PCAM Personalized Property Management Co. DAN STITES CBCI Construction, Inc.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & GRAPHIC DESIGNER RODNEY BISSELL Bissell Design Studios, Inc. rodney@bisselldesign.com (714) 293-3749

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

The Coachella Valley Quorum Magazine is a publication expressly prepared for association leaders, managers and related business professionals of the Community Associations Institute. Members are encouraged to submit articles for publishing consideration. All articles accepted for publication in Quorum are subject to editing and rewriting by the Quorum Committee.

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CONTENTS

CHAPTER NEWS

9 13

CAI-CV Chapter New & Renewing Members Meet the Committee Chair

44 48 48

Join a CAI-CV Committee Chapter Upcoming Events Have You Heard?

Dea Franck, Esq., Chair, Quorum Committee By Erin H. Fujioka

28 17 17

CHAPTER EVENTS

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28

Holiday Open House & Charity Event

DEPARTMENTS

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President’s Message Water Wise

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New Landscaper Certification Program Will Help Professionals Encourage Conservation By Katie Evans

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17 Community Spirit 28 Maintenance

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Game Changing Facts You Need to Know about Re-plastering or Acid Washing Your Community Pool or Spa By Alan Smith

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Meet our newest CAI-CV Board Members Mike Traidman By Erin H. Fujioka

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Louise Stettler By Erin H. Fujioka

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Time Honored

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Rodney Bissell By Phyllis Harkins

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37

36 Charity

The Cal State University Associates - A Way to Support the Youth of Our Local Community By Jess Rosenberg

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Trending Now

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Local Resources for Hands-On Computer and Technology Classes and Consulting By Antoinette Hamilton

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ROOF A S S E T M A N A G E M E N T LIC # 677708

Homeowners Association Law

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From Homeowner to Board Director: The Added Fiduciary Duties and Responsibilities of Directors By Dea Franck, Esq.

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Roof Asset Management

43

CLAC Buck-A-Door Campaign

38

Platinum Spotlight

CAI-CV.org

By Alan Smith

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HYH twitter.com/CAI_CV

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FROM THE CHAPTER

President’s Message Phyllis Harkins, CMCA, AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEx The Management Trust – Palm Desert CAI-CV Chapter President

CA I - C V M I S S I O N S TAT E M E N T The mission of CAI-CV is to provide leadership for successful development and operation of community associations through information, research and education.

Dear CAI-CV members, As we kickoff 2017, I want to take a moment to thank CAI-CV members for reelecting me to serve another term on the CAI-CV Board of Directors. It will be an honor to serve on the board for another three years and to serve as your president in 2017. I also want to thank Past President Gerard Gonzales from Albert Management and the 2016 board of directors for their service to the chapter this past year. We had an excellent twelve months celebrating our 35th anniversary and have truly realized our vision of becoming the authority on common interest developments in the Coachella Valley. In 2017, we hope to continue our work to boldly represent the interests of our industry both locally and in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. We will be expanding this effort in some important ways. The CLAC Legislative Support Committee will be renewing its efforts to build relationships between CAI-CV members and elected officials. They will be reviewing legislation and raising funds to support the important educational work of CAI in Sacramento. Be prepared to participate in grassroots efforts in 2017 as we anticipate onerous legislation will once again be introduced. I also want to encourage associations to participate in CAI’s Buck-A-Door Campaign to support CLAC. Also new this year, the Quorum Committee is researching and will publish best practices for building community spirit. CAI National has shown that community spirit is the primary factor found in all of the best communities in the country. Our plan is to bring these ideas to our local communities and to publish what you are already doing to increase community spirit in your associations. We will also be refocusing the chapter on education. We will be assessing all of CAI National’s educational offerings, fine-tuning CAI-CV’s programs, and refreshing our chapter's scholarship program. Our hope is to motivate all CAI members to participate fully in CAI’s educational programs. To that end, we are offering all of CAI National’s courses either here in the desert or within a couple hours drive. We will be offering additional education to managers and board members through our BMW and MOTR programs. Our lineup for the Educational Luncheon Programs & Mini Trade Shows this year is amazing. New

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this year, we will be offering CAI’s Educated Business Partner program to CAI-CV members on March 24th. Our first Educational Luncheon & Mini Trade Show will be Friday, January 20, 2017, at Palm Valley Country Club. We are bringing in guest speaker Rickey Teems from Securitas Security Services to talk about preventing and dealing with violence when it occurs in associations. The program will begin at 11:15 a.m. On Friday, January 27th, we will host our annual Awards Dinner, Winter Nights Dream, at the beautiful Omni Rancho Las Palmas Resort & Spa. We hope you will join us as we recognize all the volunteers who helped CAI-CV during 2016. Our first MOTR event in 2017 will be Friday, February 3rd at Sunshine Landscape in Thousand Palms. Longtime CAI-CV member, Carol Fulton, CIRMS, will be our presenter on insurance issues. In January, the chapter will hold its annual solicitation for volunteer committee members. With only a few hours per month, our volunteers help run every aspect of the chapter. Serving on a CAI-CV committee is the fastest and least expensive way to build relationships with other industry professionals. I encourage you to get on a CAI-CV committee in 2017, especially if you are looking for career growth or to maximize your business potential. I also want to encourage all of you to participate in the 2017 Recruiter of the Year program. If you know of anyone who would benefit from CAI-CV’s educational programs or networking opportunities, please sign them up or send these leads to the CAI-CV office. The Membership Committee will be giving away prizes at each of our nine lunch programs and the grand prize this year is a travel voucher for a vacation to anywhere in the United States. I am looking forward to working with all of you in 2017. Please feel free to contact me directly or through the office with your ideas, suggestions and questions. Onward to a great year for the CAI-CV Chapter.

Phyllis Harkins

Phyllis Harkins, CMCA, AMS, CCAM-LS, CAMEx General Manager, Portola Country Club The Management Trust - Palm Desert


2017 CORPORATE

CHAPTER NEWS

SPONSORS PLATINUM___________ Accurate Leak Locators AMS Paving Asphalt MD's Associa Desert Resort Management Conserve LandCare Diversified Asphalt EmpireWorks Fiore Racobs & Powers KESQ NEWS Channel 3 ABC NPG Asphalt Pacific Western Bank Roof Asset Management Sign-A-Rama Sunshine Landscape Vantage Point Construction Western Pacific Roofing

GOLD________________ AMS Security BRS Roofing CBCI Construction Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Flood Response G4S Secure Solutions Lloyd Pest Control Mutual of Omaha Peters & Freedman, L.L.P. Prendiville Insurance Agency PrimeCo Purified Pool Water Vintage Associates

SILVER_______________ Artistic Maintenance, Inc Automation Pride Blue Sky Landscape Coachella Valley Water District DWI Farley Paving Horizon Lighting Painting Unlimited, Inc. Powerful Pest Management Seacoast Commerce Bank Three Phase Electric Union Bank Homeowners Association Services

BRONZE_____________ Adams Stirling Affordable HOA Law All Counties Fence and Supply Alliance Association Bank Animal Pest Management Association Reserves Bank of Southern California Best in the West Air Conditioning & Heating Dunn-Edwards Paint Corp. FirstService Residential Frazier Pest Control Guralnick, Gilliland & Knighten Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner, LLP LaBarre/Oksnee Insurance Agency Patioshoppers Commercial Furnishings Pro Landscaping, Inc. S.B.S. Lien Services SCT Reserve Consultants SERVPRO of Palm Desert SERVPRO of Palm Springs/Indian Wells Sherwin-Williams Paint Silldorf Law Suntech Consulting & Roofing U.S. Security Associates, Inc. Universal Protection Service Vista Paint Corporation

CAI-CV Chapter New & Renewing Members NEW BUSINESS PARTNERS BEST IN THE WEST AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING, INC. Richard Weaver (760) 343-1002 bestinthewestac@aol.com SHETLER SECURITY Stephen Rolsen (443) 536-9082 srolsen@aol.com RENEWING BUSINESS PARTNERS AMS Stephanie Long (760) 341-3593 admin@amsprotectme.com PACIFIC WESTERN BANK Erin Klink (760) 324-4914 eklink@pacificwesternbank.com RENEWING NATIONAL CORPORATE MEMBERSHIPS MUTUAL OF OMAHA BANK Brendan Concannon (619) 261-6643 brendan.concannon@ mutualofomahabank.com

LESLEE CICOGNA (760) 346-1161 Ext. 145 lcicogna@drminternet.com THE MANAGEMENT TRUST Gary Leobold (909) 425-3972 leobold100@gmail.com RENEWING MULTI-CHAPTER BUSINESS PARTNERS BEAUMONT GITLIN TASHJIAN Tawnee Pena (818) 884-9998 tpena@bgtlawyers.com DURAMAX BUILDING PRODUCTS Viken Ohanesian (323) 728-3023 sales@uspolymersinc.com FIORE RACOBS & POWERS Gen Wangler, ESQ., CCAL (760) 776-6511 gwangler@fiorelaw.com LLOYD PEST CONTROL Howard Jacobs (619) 668-1958

POPULAR ASSOCIATION BANKING Molly Hime (800) 233-7164 mhime@popular.com

MARIPOSA LANDSCAPES, INC. Larry Rudd (623) 764-1488 larry@mariposa-az.com MCDONNELL ROOFING, INC. Lauri Williams (714) 844-2814 lauri@mcdonnellroofing.com ROY PALACIOS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Tina Neubauer (949) 582-0964 tinap@palinsur.com NEW VOLUNTEER LEADERS VICTORIA FALLS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION Sdwen Friscia Bruce Jastramski Michael McDowell Robert Palone Thomas Well RENEWING VOLUNTEER LEADERS PALM VALLEY HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Glenn Bjorklund Pete Browning Art Coulter Neil Machlis

NEW MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT Jodi Pannell (760) 346-1161 jpannell@drminternet.com RENEWING MANAGER MEMBERSHIPS ROXI BARDWELL (510) 693-1620 roxikb3@gmail.com SUSAN PERCIVAL (760) 767-5944 clubcircleeast@gmail.com ALDERWOOD RESORT MANAGEMENT James Crawford (909) 866-6531 Ext. 405 scrawford@lagonitalodge.com ASSOCIA DESERT RESORT MANAGEMENT Carl McCullough (760) 601-3228 carl@woodhavenhoa.com CEASAR LARRACH (760) 345-4349 larrachgroup@yahoo.com

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FEATURE

Desert Falls Community Associations By Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM

D

esert Falls Country Club is one of the most popular two-story townhomes, and the remaining condos are located and friendly gated communities in the desert, boasting in two-story buildings. The Villas residents can choose from nearly 1,100 homes, including condominium villas, townhouses, 25 pools and spas spaced throughout the property, which sursingle family homes, and luxurious custom estate homes. The rounds the golf course. Homes have magnificent mountain, stately entrance focuses on a beautifully renovated waterfall pool, and golf course views. The Links models have up to four that cascades down to a rock pool with desert friendly landscape bedrooms and up to 2,664 sq. ft. on quarter-acre lots (most features. The Desert Falls community is located on five square have their own pools in backyards), and come with three-car miles in Palm Desert bounded by Country Club, Cook Street, garages (or two cars and a golf cart). The Links also has one and Frank Sinatra Drive and is adjacent to Avondale Country community pool/spa. The 23 Estate homes are custom built Club. The main entrance is on Country on lots up to 14,000 sq. ft. Club Drive with two additional gated One of the first in-house manage"The stately entrance focuses on a entrances on the west and north sides. ment teams established in the early beautifully renovated waterfall that The original developer/builder 1990’s in the Coachella Valley was the cascades down to a rock pool with was the J.F. Temple Company, also Desert Falls Property Management desert friendly landscape features." the builder of Mesquite Country Club, Team. The current staff is led by with build-out completed in 1988. CAI member Martha Fogg, CCAM, There are six homeowner associations in the community. General Manager. The association has 65 in-house employThree are under the umbrella of the Master Association (898 ees providing landscape services, tennis/fitness staff, pool members) and include the Villas (807 condominiums), the maintenance, building maintenance, security, accounting, Links (66 single family detached homes), and the Estates (23 and property management services exclusive to the Master exclusive custom homes). In addition, there are the original Association members. The Courtyards (104 homes) and Desert Desert Falls buildings and the Courtyards. Falls HOA (88 homes) are managed by Albert Management. Models in the Villas range from one bedroom (1,061 sq. ft.) When asked what she loves about working at Desert Falls, to three bedrooms (2,236 sq. ft.). There are single-story units, Martha responded that she is most proud of the ability to

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FEATURE

control costs through in-house services and of her great staff include cable from Time Warner, tennis and fitness center, 24/7 and board members. security, pools and spas, landscaping, and more. The fitness The golf course at Desert Falls was designed in 1984 by Ron center has yoga classes in season. There are nine tennis courts Fream, designer of championship courses since 1966 in more and one pickleball court with four more in the planning stages. than 50 countries and six continents, from Finland to Bali, and The fitness center recently added new weights and workout Disney Paris to the Sultan of Brunei. The semi-private 7,057 equipment. Many residents and guests take advantage of yard par-72 championship golf course is owned and operated the rolling, hilly terrain by walking the streets for exercise. by ClubCorp of America out of Dallas, TX. The history of Currently there are five community board members on the Desert Falls Country Club includes being the inaugural course Master Association, five on the Villas HOA, and three on the for the Frank Sinatra Celebrity Open Links HOA. Martha is particularly and in 1992, hosting Don Drysdale's "The history of Desert Falls Country Club proud of all the work that staff and PGA Senior Tour charity event. The includes being the inaugural course for board members have done over the Desert Falls Country Club has served the Frank Sinatra Celebrity Open and last few years to reduce water usage as a Stage I PGA Tour qualifying site. in 1992, hosting Don Drysdale's PGA around the property. As a result of a Desert Falls is within walking Senior Tour charity event." 2008 Coachella Valley Water District distance of a Ralph’s grocery store, audit report, the Cook Street entrance banking, shopping, Morton’s Steakhouse, and the JW was refurbished, and several additional turf to drought tolerMarriott Desert Springs Resort. The Palm Desert campus ant landscaping conversion projects and irrigation upgrades of Cal State University San Bernardino, located across the are in progress. As a result, water usage has decreased by 30 street, is the Valley’s first four-year public college and also percent over the last five years. provides adult classes, theater, and lectures to the general The Country Club entrance was a major project that has public. Neighboring UC Riverside extension offers seasonal been years in planning. Staff had discovered that the enorfree movies, lectures, and educational opportunities. mous fountains on both sides were leaking water and using Monthly HOA assessments ($345 Villas and $191 Masters) excessive electricity to run the pump motors. The fountains CAI-CV.org

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FEATURE

were shut off to investigate repair options. Once the Master the city, we immediately fell in love with the great amenities, board evaluated the cost of repairs of the 30-year-old machin- beauty, and serenity of desert living at Desert Falls. It’s a ery and plumbing, they took a bold move to hire RGA Design pleasure to walk around the property, say hi to our neighbors, Architects to redesign the entrance with energy and water listen to the desert wind, and look at the amazing vistas at efficient features. The work began in October and continued every turn. Plus, we are in the center of the Valley, close to into December. The new LED lights feature a color changing the CSUSB university campus, to shopping and restaurants rainbow at night that is quite beautiful. There is now one on El Paseo, and to fine arts at the McCallum Theatre. Most low horsepower pump running the recirculated water in the importantly, we are fortunate to have, in my opinion, one waterfall. of the best in-house management teams in the Valley. The There have been several famous staff makes our residents feel truly "Residents of Desert Falls enjoy the owners (some back “in the day”), cared for, with top-notch security including Michael J. Fox. Current (including 3 manned gates), a hardsimple pleasures of living in a comowners and past board members working landscaping crew, a thrivmunity where they have no worries include Ned and Gweneth Romero. ing fitness and tennis center, and and don’t have to take care of anyNed (age 90) has starred in dozens of well-maintained pool/hot tub areas thing outside their home." television shows ranging from Adam a short walk from every unit.” 12 to Police Woman and Bonanza. Ned would entertain Martha Bonnie Shanahan, President of the Desert Falls Master and others with Hollywood stories after the board business Association, described her search for a second home in July of was complete. They still live in their Desert Falls home. 2000. She recalls that after many days of looking at a myriad of Residents of Desert Falls enjoy the simple pleasures of options, a friend of hers said, “I have two words for you and that living in a community where they have no worries and is Desert Falls.” The very next day Bonnie and her husband don’t have to take care of anything outside their home. Jess Larry purchased their first condo in Desert Falls. After retiring Rosenberg, Treasurer, Board of Directors, at Desert Falls in 2002, they made Desert Falls their permanent home. Master Association/Villas I HOA has this say: “Moving from Bonnie stated that “Over the last 16 years we have made 12

Quorum January, 2017


MEET THE COMMITTEE CHAIR DEA FRANCK, ESQ., CHAIR, QUORUM COMMITTEE

By Erin H. Fujioka

numerous friends and lasting memories. Desert Falls was definitely the right choice for us. We have sevenday access to a newly renovated fitness center with a friendly, helpful staff along with a very active tennis club. As a board member, it has been an honor and privilege to be involved with our in-house management staff, as they are always ready and willing to help. I am proud to say I am a member of the board of directors at Desert Falls.” Desert Falls Property Management uses CAI business partners for many of their outside services, including Frazier Pest Control, Asphalt MDs, Flood Response, ServPro, Empire Works, AMS, and Desert Cities Indoor Air. Susan Browne Rosenberg, CIH, CIEC, CHMM, and CAI EBP, is president and co-owner of Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC in Palm Desert, CA. Her company assists HOAs in assessing the extent of water damage and mold contamination. She can be reached at 760-902-2545 or sbriaq@gmail.com.

Dea Franck is proud to be the chair of the Quorum Committee for 2017. Dea has been a member of the CAI Coachella Valley Chapter since 2013 and has been a member of the Quorum Committee since 2014. Dea has also served as a member of the Golf Committee since 2015. Dea’s goal for Quorum in 2017 is expansion of the publication. In order to get started on that goal, an increase in the number of Quorum Committee members is necessary. If you are the creative type and are interested in writing, editing, or submitting story ideas for Quorum, please do not hesitate to contact Dea! She is also striving to boost readership of Quorum. Quorum is an excellent resource for all board members, managers and business partners, and it’s available to read online for free! So tell all those who you know will be interested to visit www.cai-cv.org, Resources, Quorum Magazine to check up on the latest and greatest news, events, and features on the HOA industry in the Coachella Valley, California, and throughout the United States. When asked why she volunteers for CAI’s Coachella Valley Chapter Dea said, “Volunteering for CAI-CV is a wonderful way to meet the amazing, hard-working people in our local industry and an invaluable opportunity to build professional relationships. Volunteering for Quorum is a perfect fit for me because writing and communicating effectively is an integral part of what I do for a living. I am also lucky to have experience with editing and publishing because I was the editor-in-chief of my law school’s law review.” When she was little Dea dreamed of being a Radio City Rockette, but alas genetics robbed her of this dream. She is about five inches short of meeting the height requirements. So, she went the next not-so obvious route and became an attorney. Dea works as community association counsel for Epsten, Grinnell & Howell, APC in the firm’s Indian Wells office. She is excited to be working for the firm while it celebrates its 30th anniversary. Dea lives in Indio with her husband Sean and her rescue cats Lola and Lucy. In her copious spare time (just kidding) she enjoys volunteering for Animal Samaritans both as a board member and at their animal adoption center. Dea also loves scouring local antique stores and thrift shops for vintage tiki ephemera -- her tiki mug collection currently boasts more than one hundred. Dea may be reached at (760) 836-1036 or dfranck@epsten.com.

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FEATURE

COMMUNITY NEXT

2020 AND BEYOND Envisioning community association The following the articlefuture containsof the third of four reports published in the Community Next brochureand by CAI National. living, governance management

External Influences

T

oday, an estimated 67 million Americans— about 20.7 percent of the population—live Key Issues in 333,600 homeowners associations, z Demographics and condominiums and cooperatives. In the Attitudes coming decades, these figures are expected to grow, z Economic and giving associations and their leaders increasing Environmental Factors influence and attention. At the same time, community association volz Perception and Reputation unteer board members, professional managers and community business partners will face a number z Influential Stakeholders and Organizations of challenges and factors—largely beyond their control and expertise—that will affect commonz Local and Municipal Trends interest communities. The External Influences Panel discussed some of these influences and what can be done to mitigate the negative and accentuate the positive. The panel predicts that changes in demographSEPTEMBER 2016 ics and attitudes, economic factors, perception and © COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE reputation, influential stakeholders and organizations, local trends and more will combine to affect how associations are operated and governed in the next 15 years. These elements largely are interrelated. For associations to continue to thrive as the preferred places to call home, CAI and association leaders may need to adapt and prepare their communities for the evolution of community association living.

10 x

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COMMUNITY NEXT 2020 AND BEYOND

Quorum January, 2017

» PREPARE FOR MULTIPLE

GENERATIONS AND INCREASING DIVERSITY From millennials and Generations Y and X to baby boomers and the matures, common-interest communities increasingly will serve multiple generations. Associations will need to revise their communications strategies, operations, assessment collections, reserves for deferred maintenance, governance and meeting schedules to accommodate the broadened audience. In general, residents will be more interested in walkability, amenities and activities beyond golf and tennis, and telecommuting. They’re placing a higher value on open space too. There’s likely to be more interest in association-provided maintenance services, such as landscaping, snow removal and other projects traditionally administered by homeowners. Separately, each generation will present different challenges to board members, managers and association business partners. Baby boomers, for example, will be coming to grips with the savings lost during the Great Recession. With the decline in pensions, and 401k and retirement plans hit hard during the recent recession, there will be a greater wealth disparity within retirees. Active boomers will seek more diverse amenities and events that go beyond the typical golf, gates and tennis ethos of today’s retirement communities. Some associations will find themselves evolving into pseudo-assisted living facilities, even though they’re not prepared for the additional burdens of aging residents. Some older residents may require round-the-clock, live-in caregivers—contracted healthcare providers and family members. This may create conflicts with occupancy requirements, parking restrictions and the like. Group homes, for example, typically run afoul of governing documents in community associations. Association CC&Rs may contain restrictions that preclude providing additional services to certain members such as the elderly, but aging residents will expect their communities to make it possible for them to remain in their homes. Future associations may need to depend more on outside services to meet the needs of older residents while looking at physical modifications to the property to accommodate diminished physical capacity. WWW.CAIONLINE.ORG


Meanwhile, millennials and those in the iGeneration, who are saddled with student loan debt, facing a difficult job market and possibly unable to qualify for a mortgage, won’t be as eager to buy a home as previous generations. They will be renting for longer periods of time and will be more likely to move back home and live with their parents after college. In addition, they’re also expected to delay marriage and children and have more interest in living in cities. For that reason, the development of condominiums is expected to boom. As for ethnic and cultural diversity, associations will become less homogenous. Associations also may be counted on to provide multilingual governing documents, rules, newsletters and websites. Alternatively, translators may need to be on hand for association meetings. To bridge the language gap, it also may be beneficial for communities to embed photos and illustrations in governing documents and publications.

» STAY ON TOP OF ECONOMIC AND

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES Delinquencies and foreclosures caused by economic and environmental factors during the Great Recession have battered

water use and abuse among residents and to lead the way through water-wise common area landscaping and amenities. These environmental issues, and possibly a new set in 15 years, could clash with association rules and regulations; they also could impact where and how development occurs. The availability of water is likely to have a significant influence over where development occurs.

» ACCENTUATE THE POSTIVE ASPECTS OF

ASSOCIATIONS CAI chapters and association leaders still will be facing the negative perception of common-interest communities from the media in the next 15 years, and all stakeholders must do more to accentuate the positive aspects. The challenge is exacerbated by the budgetary crunch among traditional news outlets, which are expected to turn more frequently to wire services and away from original reporting. That will make sharing positive association stories a greater challenge than it is today. Association board members and managers need to be better trained and educated on working with news outlets; they need to learn how to frame things positively and proactively share their

While association stakeholders will need to prepare for these coming challenges, seek education and advocate for communities, the primary mission of associations will remain unchanged. association operating and reserve funds. Today, most community associations have recovered financially, and that trend is expected to continue. However, association leaders will need to continue to pay close attention to their accounts and pursue delinquent owners when necessary. In some states, association liens can take precedence over mortgages, but courts may intervene and strip away those priority liens. Meanwhile, the business world increasingly is moving toward virtual offices and home-based employees, and—in the age when small businesses can sprout up overnight with an idea and a website—more residents will be working from home. In addition to economic factors, association leaders will need to receive even more education than they do today on environmental and energy issues. Homeowners are expected to be more interested in water conservation, xeriscaping, artificial turf, solar panels, electric cars and charging stations. Board members and managers in the South, Southwest and West, in particular, will need to get up to speed on things like xeriscaping and recycled water and may need to keep a constant eye on residents’ water consumption. Municipal water providers and local and state governments may count on association leaders to help them monitor

stories. Efforts to change the perception of associations will be critical in coming years. The negative reputation, especially in media coverage, influences legislators and regulators, who then work to create laws and standards to “fix” a problem that may not exist. In general, homebuyers don’t understand what an association does or why it exists in the first place. Efforts must be taken to explain the roles and responsibilities of associations. First-time community association homeowners sometimes confuse who’s in charge of development, transition and architectural review, or why associations have rules and regulations. However, as more people live in associations and have positive experiences, the overall perception of associations will improve.

» CONNECT AND COLLABORATE WITH

STAKEHOLDERS AND ORGANIZATIONS Association leaders also will need to work closely with influential stakeholders and organizations, such as developers, real estate agents and mortgage lenders. The NAHB, NAR and ABA exert an incredible amount of influence over development, sales and mortgage lending for homes in community associations. AARP,

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COMMUNITY NEXT 2020 AND BEYOND

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attorneys, who be are working nefits would improve governing docuFEATURE to portunities s before they’re filed. Initial associations mbers and managers need tion’s documents—and Savvy developers the on process. And managtion is lessened the development process detail, owledge supervises of post-developodiscloses steer the developer to pro-and ng appropriate governing makes a reasonable eveloper control. munity associations has ndous would be ate allbenefits developers ational opportunities to eopers theand quality of associations

The recent growth of rental properties and co knowledgeable in generational dynami condominiums into apartments is another key tre and more. Senior housing communitie renters gain enough equity and begin looking for sider strategicthere partnerships health opportunities, may be a rash with of conversions intowhich homeowners associations and condominium tals, » will benefit their aging resid

with its large, active membership and powerful voice, also impacts the success of associations. Engaging with these organizations is crucial to ensure commoninterest communities continue to be considered preferred places to call home. Another key group to connect and collaborate with is developers and their attorneys, who are working to improve governing documents before they’re filed. Initial board members and managers need to pay close attention to their association’s documents—and the typical checklist—during the transition process. And managers engaged by the developer during the development process should be encouraged to use their knowledge of post-development association operational needs to steer the developer and its attorneys toward drafting and filing appropriate governing documents. The business of developing community associations has become increasingly litigious. Tremendous benefits would be gained from providing enticing educational opportunities to developers to reinforce to both developers and associations that their interests are not mutually exclusive. Savvy developers already understand that the possibility of litigation is lessened when the development team pays attention to detail, supervises contractors and sub-contractors properly, fully discloses to prospective purchasers details of the project and makes a reasonable contribution to reserves during the period of developer control. The goal in this regard should be to help educate all developers regarding these issues and thus greatly improve the quality of new communities coming online. Real estate agents must understand the nuances of community associations. By partnering with NAR and offering education to Realtors, who could then pass their knowledge on to homebuyers, there likely would be fewer owners who don’t understand the responsibilities and expectations of living in associations.

exclusive. Savvy developers ty of litigation is lessened nces of comention to detail, supervises and offering erly, fully discloses to proeir on jectknowledge and makes a reasonable eriod developer ners ofwho don’tcontrol. help educate all developers ns of living in ly improve the quality of

nd the nuances of comwith NAR and offering n pass their knowledge on fewer owners who don’t xpectations of living in

12 x

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COMMUNITY NEXT 2020 AND BEYOND

Quorum January, 2017

UNDERSTAND KEY TRENDS A number of patterns in development and generational desires will combine to impact associations too, but the extent of these influences largely depends on geographical location. For example, the Northeast Corridor and parts of Florida are running out of large tracts of land for development, which is leading to growth in townhome, condominium and small single-family home communities—and a gentrification of existing structures and property. That also may mean fewer amenities, lower assessments, a compact governance structure and a focus on contracting with service providers instead of hiring staff. As previously stated, managers and board members will need to be better versed in high-rise operations and governance with a special focus on maintenance, necessitating more outreach to urban high-rise managers. The recent growth of rental properties and conversions of condominiums into apartments is another key trend. Once these renters gain enough equity and begin looking for ownership opportunities, there may be a rash of conversions from rentals into homeowners associations and condominiums—a cycle that seems to repeat every 10 to 15 years. Meanwhile, as baby boomers opt out of assisted living, they may turn to mother-in-law suites within their children’s homes. Similarly, millennials may be opting to move in to suites attached to their parents’ homes. Associations may need to assess whether they’d accept these new living situations and review and update their governing documents accordingly. Managers and board members will need to be knowledgeable in generational dynamics, communication styles and more. Senior housing communities also may want to consider strategic partnerships with healthcare facilities and hospitals, which will benefit their aging residents.

seems to repeat every 10 to 15 years. Meanwhile, ers opt out of assisted living, they may turn to mo FINAL THOUGHTS suites within their children’s homes. Similarly, mi be opting to move in tostakeholders suites attached to theirne p While association will Associations may need to assess whether they’d a coming challenges, seek education and living situations and review and update their gove ties, theaccordingly. primaryManagers missionand ofboard association ments member knowledgeable in generational dynamics, commu Volunteer board members, managers a and more. Senior housing communities also may even CAI and its chapters—will be foc sider strategic partnerships with healthcare facilit improving property values making tals, which will benefit their agingand residents.

places to call home. That means collec FINAL THOUGHTS ing rules and restrictions, providing qu While association stakeholders will need to prepa more—no matterseek what external forcesf coming challenges, education and advocate

ties, the primary mission of associations will rema FINAL THOUGHTS While association stakeholders will need to prepare for these Volunteer board members, managers and busines coming challenges, seek education and advocate for communities, the primary mission of associations will remain unchanged. even CAI and its chapters—will be focused on m Volunteer board members, managers and business partners— CAI and its chapters—will be focused on maintaining and improving even property values and making communi improving property values and making communities preferred places to call home. That means collecting assessments, enforcplaces to call home. That means collecting assessm ing rules and restrictions, providing quality leadership and more—no matter what external forces influence associations. ing rules and restrictions, providing quality leader more—no matter what external forces influence a

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WATER WISE

COMMUNITY SPIRIT

New Landscaper Certification Program Will Help Professionals Encourage Conservation By Katie Evans

A

new certification program for professional landscapers in the Coachella Valley is aimed at helping them be more efficient at managing water for their customers, including HOAs of all sizes. The online Landscaper Certification Course was launched by Coachella Valley Water District (CVWD) and is offered through College of the Desert. The goal is to reinforce and improve long-term water conservation efforts in the Coachella Valley. The program will focus on teaching professional landscapers the best practices for achieving water efficiency when creating outdoor environments. The cities of Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Indian Wells, Palm Springs, Indio, and Coachella have adopted requirements that any new or existing professionals seeking a landscaping business license first complete the course. The cities of La Quinta, Cathedral City, and Desert Hot Springs are considering similar requirements. This course is free and available in English and Spanish. It includes topics such as soil types, irrigation system efficiency, and evapotranspiration. Program curriculum was developed in collaboration with CVWD, Coachella Valley Association of Governments, and College of the Desert. The course was developed after the State Water Board fined CVWD in fall of 2015 for being unable to meet its water conservation standard. The two agencies collaborated on a way to enhance local conservation in lieu of paying the fine. With the successful completion

"This course is free and available in English and Spanish. It includes topics such as soil types, irrigation system efficiency, and evapotranspiration."

Quorum is Looking for Examples of Community Spirit

"Program curriculum was developed in collaboration with CVWD, Coachella Valley Association of Governments, and College of the Desert." of this program within one year at an estimated cost of $83,400, the $61,000 fine will be suspended. CVWD has committed to investing in the program for five years. CVWD encourages landscape businesses to have as many employees as possible participate in this free, local training, even if business license applications only require one person from a company to be certified. HOA on-site landscapers, general managers, and others interested in knowing more about proper desert landscaping are welcome to take the course. Visit www.cvwd.org/Conservation for more information about the program. The website also provides a complete list of conservation programs, tips for reducing water use, and existing wateruse restrictions. Katie Evans is the Conservation Manager for the Coachella Valley Water District. She can be reached at kevans@cvwd.org or (760) 398-2661. CAI-CV.org

Does your association have community spirit? Quorum wants to know what your community is doing this year to promote community spirit. What is community spirit? Glad you asked. Wikipedia defines community spirit as a group of people who uphold and share similar values and resources and who have a willingness and desire to participate in activities that promote a community. It is a prerequisite for community spirit that individuals are willing to a degree to sacrifice their own interests for the good of the community. Community spirit is typically associated with voluntary work, favors and gestures of goodwill by residents and local businesses. The measure of community spirit is assessed from the achievements resulting from community activities, in addition to the level of contentment expressed by community members. Examples of such contributions could include removing debris from the streets or community parks; organizing a community fair, a school project or a charity event at a local venue; or rallying around when a community member is in need of support. Ask your boards, managers and business partners to help you express community spirit in your association. Send your examples of community spirit to CAI-CV Executive Director Cal Lockett at clockett@cai-cv.org.

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S

FEATURE

B

w education FOR HOMEOWNER LEADERS

338,000

U.S. community associations

2,350,000

Community association board and committee members

80,000,000

Hours of service performed annually by association board and committee members

$1.76 billion

Estimated value of time provided by homeowner board and committee members based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimate of $22.55 per hour for volunteer time

As a community association board member or volunteer leader, you’re essential to the success of nearly 340,000 U.S. homeowners associations, condominium communities and cooperatives. Taking on a position of service and responsibility in your community means that you’re expected to anticipate issues, solve problems, meet the expectations of community residents and protect property values. CAI Homeowner Leader education offers the information, resources and perspective you need to serve your community successfully.

T b e m o ta

li ta a

c id p z z z z z z z z z

»

V

AN INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION LIVING A free, 54-page download at www.caionline.org

Recommended for homeowners new to community association living and a great resource for beginning volunteer leaders, this document focuses on the rights and responsibilities of homeowners and volunteer leaders. It outlines the roles and functions of community associations, such as providing services and managing physical assets. An addendum includes: z Model Code of Ethics for Community Association Board Members z Community Association Fundamentals z Rights and Responsibilities for Better Communities z Community Association Governance Guidelines

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SACRAMENTO, CA

FEATURE

“Board members consistently ‘don’t know what they helps board members learn don’t know.’ CAI education Board Leadership Development

workshop

what they need to know to lead their associations successfully.”

JUDY SILVA, 2017 COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION VOLUNTEERS COMMITTEE CHAIR, SACRAMENTO, CA

COURSE MATERIALS The Board Leadership Development Workshop explains how to be an effective The workshop includes a tool board of directors, communicate with association residents, hire qualified managbox of support materials: z The Board Member Toolkit, ers and service providers, develop enforceable rules, interpret governing docua best-selling book from CA Press ments and more. It provides a comprehensive look at the roles and responsibilities z The Board Member Toolkit of community association leaders and conveys information to help create and susWorkbook Board Leadership Development z Brochures and publications, ain the kind of community people want to call home. such as The Homeowner & The workshop is offered in two formats: as an online, self-study course and as the Community Association and From Good to Great: ive, classroom instruction through CAI chapters. The classroom workshop is often Principles for Community COURSE MATERIALS The Board Leadership Development Workshop explains how to be an effective Association Success The workshop includes a toolaught, supported or hosted by CAI Business Partner members. These professionboard of directors, communicate with association residents, hire qualified managbox of support materials: z A copy of CAI’s award-winz The Board Memberning Toolkit, als specialize serving the unique of community Common Ground™ ers andinservice providers, develop needs enforceable rules, interpretassociations. governing docua best-selling book from CAI magazine ments and covers more. It provides a comprehensive look at themore roles and responsibilities The workshop how your board can become successful and howPress you z Community Association z The Board Member Toolkit of community association leaders and conveys helpof create sus- the presWorkbook Leadership: A Guide for can recruit and support new volunteers. You’llinformation learn thetorole the and board, z Brochures and publications, tain the kind of community people want to call home. Volunteers such as The Homeowner & dent and The other leadership positions, and you’ll identify effective ways to work with z Managing and Governing: workshop is offered in two formats: as an online, self-study course and as the Community Association and From Good to How Great: Community professional managers and service include: live, classroom instruction throughproviders. CAI chapters.Topics The classroom workshop is often Principles for Community Associations Function Association Success taught, documents supported or hosted by CAI Business Partner members. These professionGoverning Each student receives a certif z A copy of CAI’s award-winals specialize in serving the unique needs of community associations. ning Common Ground cate of completion and recog The role of the board magazine The workshop covers how your board can become more successful and how you nition on the CAI website. z Community Association Selecting contractors Leadership: A Guide for can recruit and support new volunteers. You’ll learn the role of the board, the presVolunteers ONLINE TUITION Effective identmeetings and other leadership positions, and you’ll identify effective ways to work with z Managing and Governing: CAI members: $39 How Community professional managers and service providers. Topics include: Financial reserves Nonmember: $59 Associations Function z Governing documents Each student receives certifiThea classroom course is Communicating with residents cate of completionoffered and recogz The role of the board through CAI chapters nition on the CAI website. Finding volunteers and electing board members and tuition varies by chapter. z Selecting contractors ONLINE TUITION z Effective The role of the meetings president, secretary and treasurer CAI members: $39 z Financial reserves Nonmember: $59 Working with a professional manager

workshop

The classroom course is Communicating with residents offered through CAI chapters z Finding volunteers instruction and electing or board and tuition varies by chapter. To register for classroom for members more information, contact your local chapter. z The role of the president, secretary and treasurer Visit www.caionline.org/chapters for details. z Working with a professional manager

»

z

» To register for classroom instruction or for more information, contact your local chapter. Visit www.caionline.org/chapters for details.

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FEATURE

2017 Publications for Board Members CAI offers association board members many ways to stay connected to the common interest development industry. Here is a small selection of publications available online at www.caionline.org for board member education. Contact the CAI-CV office for more information about CAI publications.

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FEATURE

Thanks to Great Boards and Managers, Community Associations Remain Popular 65% of Residents Rate Their Overall Community Association Experience as Positive According to Foundation for Community Association Research

N

ov. 1, 2016—Falls Church, VA— Homeowners associations are preferred places to call home for millions of Americans, according to the "2016 Homeowner Satisfaction Survey," national research conducted by Zogby Analytics for the Foundation for Community Association Research (FCAR). The majority (66%) of respondents said their association's rules protect and enhance their property values, while 84 percent of those surveyed said members of their elected governing board "absolutely" or "for the most part" serve the best interests of their communities. The group of randomly selected association residents were asked to rate their experience on a scale of one to five, with one being very bad and five being very good. Sixty-five percent say they are "very" or "somewhat" satisfied, with 22% neutral and just 13% expressing any level of dissatisfaction.

COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION RESIDENTS EXPRESSED OTHER ASSOCIATION BENEFITS: • Nearly 70% of residents said their community managers provide value and support to residents and their association. • More than 80% of residents who had direct contact with their community manager report a positive experience. • Two-thirds (67%) of residents said community associations provide excellent value. Those residents also believe they pay about the right amount—some even say too little—in association assessments, versus paying too much.

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Quorum January, 2017

• "A large majority of Americans who live in community associations are happy and satisfied in their communities," says CAI Chief Executive Officer Thomas Skiba, CAE. "This is a testament to how much the community association model has evolved in recent years. The concept has grown up, become well established and become an increasingly successful form of community governance and an essential component of the U.S. housing market." • 68 million Americans live in 338,000 commoninterest communities, from city-sized, master-planned communities and multi-building condominium complexes to urban cooperatives and small homeowners associations built into small tracks of open suburban spaces. Survey findings also showed that homeowners want to see less, or at least not more, government oversight and control of community associations. Foundation for Community Association Research conducted similar surveys in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2012, and 2014. Results can be accessed at http://cairf.org/research/survey_ homeowner_past.aspx. For more information about the Foundation for Community Association Research (FCAR), visit www.cairf.org.


FEATURE

Helping Boards Find the Right Professionals Are you putting your most valuable assets in the hands of the most qualified professionals? Search CAI's Directory of Credentialed Professionals to find professionals who have earned a CAI designation or the CAMICB certification!

WHY YOU SHOULD HIRE CREDENTIALED PROFESSIONALS: A community association operates as a government, a community, and a business, making it a truly specialized type of organization. Leading America's 340,000 community associations are more than a million volunteers—homeowners who dedicate their free time to serve on boards and committees. As a board member, trustee or volunteer leader working with your association or cooperative, you have fiduciary responsibilities which compel you to make decisions that can have profound financial and social impact on you and your neighbors. Receiving professional and accurate advice or guidance on issues such as reserves, maintenance, insurance, budgets, governance, contracts, the law, and rules can make the difference between prosperity and distress. Many experts who work in these fields must earn degrees and pass tests to be certified. So why would a board hire professionals who may not be qualified to look after their homes and their community?

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Review the Your Community Deserves the Best Professionals brochure at www.caionline.org. CAI's Bookstore contains several titles that can assist you in your search for qualified professionals. • Management Companies: How to Find the Right Community Association Professional • Attorneys GAP: How to Find the Right Community Association Professional • On-Site Managers: How to Find the Right Community Association Professional • Managing and Governing: How Community Associations Function Visit the online Bookstore for these and other titles on community associations.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: To help ensure that you have the expert guidance you need to manage your community's assets most effectively, look for professionals with the designations and certifications described below. Community Associations Institute's (CAI) designations help ensure that managers have the knowledge, experience, and integrity to provide the best possible service to your association. If your manager holds a CAI designation, he or she has made a substantial commitment and investment in their education and career, and your community's welfare. Information about each designation is listed on the left.

HOW TO FIND A DESIGNATED PROFESSIONAL: Search the Directory of Credentialed Professionals at www. caionline.org or visit CAMICB's site at www.camicb.org. From there, you can search the database for credentialed managers in your area. You may also call CAI at (888) 224-4321 (M–F, 9–6:00 ET) and ask our customer care specialists to assist you in a search. During the hiring process, ask candidates if they hold a professional certification or designation. Look for the certification and designation letters (CMCA, AMS, LSM, PCAM, RS, CIRMS) behind the names of professionals who work for you or whom you might hire. Look for an AAMC when selecting a management company.

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DEC. 1ST OPEN HOUSE

C A I - C V ' S A N N UA L

Holiday Open House & Charity Event

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Quorum January, 2017


DEC.1ST OPEN HOUSE

O

n Thursday, December 1, 2016, CAI-CV held its annual Holiday Open House and Charity Event at Avondale Golf Club to celebrate the holidays and raise money for one of the Valley’s most beloved charities, The Narrow Door. More than 200 toys were donated by CAI-CV members that night and many management companies and business partners further participated in the toy drive by hosting collection boxes at their place of business. The Narrow Door supports three Christmas Stores in the Coachella Valley to benefit needy families identified through social services. Families arrive at a Christmas Store and are assigned a personal shopper while the children play games and sing Christmas songs. The family poses for a portrait while volunteers (many from CAI-CV) wrap presents. Each family departs with wrapped gifts, a family photo, and a box of food for the holidays. Thanks to all the CAI-CV members who brought smiles to these families through their generosity. More information about The Narrow Door can be found at their website at www.thenarrowdoor.org. The atmosphere for the holiday event was amazing. Heather Stanley, a worship leader on staff at Our Savior's Palm Springs played the piano and sang Christmas carols throughout the evening. Heather is a pianist, vocalist, and song writer from the Palm Springs area who is working on her own collaborative of musicians and artists in the Coachella Valley to serve the community and inspire other artists to share their talents and gifts. Heather can be reached at hstanleynow@yahoo.com or by phone at (760) 899-4787. Thanks, Heather, for a truly inspirational evening to kick-off the holidays.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS ANGEL SPONSOR

ELF SPONSORS

Pacific Western Bank

Allied Universal Security Services Asphalt MD’s Dunn-Edwards Paint Corp. Frazier Pest Control PrimeCo U.S. Security Associates, Inc. Vantage Point Construction

SANTA SPONSORS AMS Paving Associa Desert Resort Management Pro Landscaping

ENTERTAINMENT SPONSORS Artistic Maintenance Seacoast Commerce Bank Pacific Western Bank

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SCHOLARSHIP SPONSORS G4S Secure Solutions Pacific Western Bank

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FEATURE

Board Member Education Scholarship Available for CAI National Conference in Las Vegas, May 3-6

I

n honor of longtime CAI member Jerry Fien’s commitment to homeowner involvement in CAI, CAI National provides financial support for select homeowner leaders to attend the CAI Annual Conference and Exposition. Scholarship winners receive paid registration for the conference plus up to $1,000 to cover travel and lodging expenses. Four scholarships will be awarded. The CAI National Conference will be at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, May 3 to 6, 2017. The application is available online at www.caionline.org. If you are interested in applying for the scholarship, please call the CAI-CV office at (760) 341-0559.

REQUIREMENTS • Applicant must be a CAI member in good standing and must have maintained membership for a minimum of two (2) years. • Applicant must have served a minimum of one (1) full term on the board of his or her community association and should not be otherwise employed within the community association field. • The scholarship must be used for the conference, which it is awarded. • Funds may be used only for documented travel, lodging, and meals directly related to the CAI Annual Conference and Exposition and the scholarship winner must stay at the conference headquarters hotel. • Scholarship winners must attend the full conference. • Scholarship winners must be willing to meet with the Community Association Volunteers Committee during the conference. • Each scholarship winner must submit a written summary/report of his or her conference experiences within two weeks of the conference. • Only one scholarship per association per year will be awarded. • Only one scholarship per individual (lifetime) will be awarded. • Preference will be given to first-time attendees of the CAI Annual Conference and Exposition. • Application Deadline: Jan. 27, 2017. Recipients will be notified by March 1.

ADDITIONS TO APPLICATION Applications must include: • A current head-and-shoulders photo. • Essay (500-word maximum) summarizing why you feel you should receive this scholarship, including: • How attendance at the conference will benefit your association and your interest in becoming more involved with CAI at the chapter or national level. • How you have demonstrated leadership through innovative accomplishments, leadership activities, and/or other positive involvement with your association. 26

Quorum January, 2017


FEATURE

ESSENTIALS COURSE

CAI-CV’S EDUCATION FOR BOARD MEMBERS

The Essentials Course is an all-day intense in-depth course covering the basics of board governance. This is one of the most comprehensive courses for board members available in the United States. Every board member who completes the Essentials Course will receive a certificate from CAI National. Friday, April 14, 2017, 8:30 a.m., venue to be determined

CAI-CV’S EDUCATIONAL LUNCHEON PROGRAMS AND MINI TRADE SHOWS CAI-CV’s Educational Luncheon Programs are developed to address the hottest issues and trends impacting common interest developments. These luncheon programs provide valuable information and best practices for community associations specific to the Coachella Valley. Friday, January 20, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Active Shooter/Terrorism/Violence in Associations

CAI-CV’s educational programs for board members and homeowner volunteers in 2017 include: BOARD MEMBER WORKSHOPS Courses are a couple hours in length and cover key topics every board member should know. Course materials are presented by CAI credentialed members and HOA attorneys. There is a minimal charge for attending these workshops and they include free entry to CAI-CV’s wine tasting event in March and the Holiday Open House in December. Friday, March 3, 2017, 4:00 p.m., Shields Date Garden Theater, Indio Friday, December 1, 2017, 3:30 p.m., venue to be determined

Friday, February 10, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Short Term Rentals Friday, March 10, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Ask the Attorney Friday, April 21, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Earthquake & Disaster Preparedness Friday, May 19, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Rules & Regulations, What’s Reasonable? Friday, June 9, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Associations and Coachella Valley Cities Friday, September 22, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Humorist/Motivational Friday, October 13, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Palm Valley Country Club Pools & Title 22 Compliance Friday, November 17, 2017, 11:15 a.m., Sun City, Palm Desert Legislative Update

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MAINTENANCE

Game Changing Facts You Need to Know about Re-plastering or Acid Washing Your Community Pool or Spa By Alan Smith

R

SECOND GAME CHANGER – EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR POOL SHELL

ecent technological advancements in the swimming pool plastering trades and acid washing services are remarkable. Technology has finally caught up to these seemingly basic maintenance and repair needs of community swimming pools and they are financial game changers for many associations.

FIRST GAME CHANGER – EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR POOL PLASTER AND CONSERVE YOUR WATER New technolog y and chemical applications now make it possible to acid wash your pool surfaces without damaging your plaster finish--and you conserve 90 percent of your original pool water. This process involves chemically treating your pool while it is full. This process gently dissolves calcium and metal stains from your pool's plaster surfaces. Once the mineral stains are dissolved into the full pool, a specially developed multiple membrane filtration system can be utilized to remove all the harsh minerals out of the water while retaining most of the original pool 28

Quorum January, 2017

water. This process includes filtering out cyanuric acid, calcium, iron, copper and salt, which returns the pool to drinking water quality. This process extends the pool’s plaster life by not subjecting it to direct and damaging acid washes and it can be done at regular intervals to keep your pool looking pristine.

Most associations reserve for replacing pool plaster, but many don’t consider the damage traditional re-plastering causes to the pool shell. When re-plastering a pool or spa, the surface prep is key to getting the new plaster to properly adhere to the old surface. Much like painting, the prep work is EVERYTHING. For more than 25 years, re-plastering has included stripping off the old plaster using pneumatic air hammers and jack hammers. This method has proven to be very harmful and destructive to the pool shell. Every time a pool is stripped, a certain amount of the structural gunite is removed with it, eventually exposing the reinforcing rebar and leaving a thin, uneven, and weakened gunite structure. Once these issues start occurring, future repair costs to the pool shell will be in the tens of thousands of dollars for replacing the gunite. New technology to correct this harmful practice is now available. High pressure water blasting removal uses a


MEET ONE OF OUR NEWEST CAI-CV BOARD MEMBERS MIKE TRAIDMAN By Erin H. Fujioka

For more information, see Certified Engineering Reports from George Tindall, P.E., MSCE, Tindall Engineering, Inc. and Ron Lacher, P.E., C.B.P., A.C.I. Shotcrete Examineer, Pool Engineering, Inc. at www.alansmithpools.com/hydroblast.

40,000 PSI water blaster to evenly remove or scarify the old plaster surface for a better non-damaging bonding texture. This method also carries extended 10 year warrantees and can be done over and over without the harmful effects of stripping.

THIRD GAME CHANGER – EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR POOL WITH NEW QUARTZ PLASTER One of the most remarkable innovations in pool technology is the advent of quartz plaster. Instead of using the very soluble traditional marble-based plaster, the new white quartz finishes incorporate modified cement strengtheners. These quartz finishes have actually been around and tested for over 15 years with an unbelievable track record of greater durability and serviceability. Quartz is 10 times harder than marble and can resist the everyday chemical environment of the community pool and spa. The average life expectancy of a quartz finish is 40%-70% longer than marble plaster in the same water environment. While the additional cost for a quartz finish is about 25% higher than marble-based plaster, the life expectancy and durability of quartz far exceeds the added costs. Combining both the white quartz finish along with the gentle stain removing regiment discussed earlier will arguably double the life of the traditional acid-washed pool plaster. Incorporating less harmful prep methods when plaster needs replacement will also produce dividends for associations and eliminate future structural repairs. Alan Smith is a charter member of the National Plasters Council (NPC). He has chaired their research committee as well as served on and chaired the NPC board of directors. In 2007, Alan designed and built the National Pool Industry Research Center at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and has chaired its Advisory Board under Cal Poly’s Environmental Engineering Department. Alan is a frequent speaker and lecturer on swimming pool surface subjects. Alan Smith is owner of Purified Pool Water and Alan Smith Pool Plastering. He can be reached at (714) 628-9494 or by email at alan.smith@alansmithpools.com. The local contact for Purified Pool Water and Alan Smith Pool Plastering is Kent Westfall at (760) 399-6428.

Mike Traidman joined the Mira Vista HOA board seven years ago and has served as president and is currently board treasurer. Mike is also chairman of the Desert Cities HOA Council for Board Presidents. In 2015, Mike joined the CAI-CV Public Relations Committee and received CAI-CV’s Community Volunteer Leader of the Year award. Mike has been married for 45 years. The Traidmans have two children and three grandchildren. They have been homeowners in the Valley for 15 years and have been fulltime residents for eight. Mike and his wife volunteer as docents for the Palm Springs Historical Society and they are active at their country club. After receiving a BS in Chemistry and Physics at Bowling Green University, Mike went to work in the pharmaceutical industry. He soon went to work for his first-choice employer, Goodyear Chemical, who allowed him to combine his chemistry knowledge with his love of marketing. After five years in sales, Sun Chemical Corporation recruited Mike to their management trainee program recently started by their president. During that time, the Traidmans moved often as Mike took on more significant management positions. They lived in Chicago, Denver, New Jersey, and Cleveland. After ten years at Sun Chemical, a small Michigan printer, Printco, recruited Mike to be their sales manager and they moved to Grand Rapids. Mike was quickly promoted to vice president of sales and helped them increase sales from $24.5 million to over $100 million. Printco was eventually sold to Treasure Chest, which morphed into Vertis Communications. Mike became vice president of newspaper sales and then West Coast regional vice president that brought them to Rancho Mirage. After leaving Vertis, Mike worked for a wine distributor and then the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Palm Springs. He is now officially retired. Mike said, “I am eager to take my experience to help grow our chapter and help our board excel in 2017.” CAI-CV.org

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TRENDING NOW

Local Resources for HandsOn Computer and Technology Classes and Consulting By Antoinette Hamilton

H

appy Holidays! You are now the proud owner of a new smart phone, PC, laptop, iPhone, tablet or Mac. Whether you are a first-time user of technology or a seasoned techie upgrading your equipment, most of us dread the process of learning how to use our new devises. Thankfully help is available both online and in classrooms around the Valley. Here are a few ideas of where you can get the help you need.

YOUTUBE Download the YouTube app or use your browser. Enter what you want to learn, such as “sharing photos on my smartphone.� Short informative documentaries will appear, sorted by most recent and most watched. You can learn just about anything on YouTube.

DESERT COMPUTER TUTOR Offers local in-home single or group technology classes. Try following the Tupperware concept and invite a group of 8-10 friends. Remote access classes are also available. 30

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Mardi Boettcher (760) 348-867 mardi@desertcomputertutor.com www.desertcomputertutor.com

ITT CONSULTING Cassandra is Apple certified and offers workshops and classes for Apple and Microsoft users. Cassandra Beegle (760) 537-1728 ittcassandra@gmail.com www.Ittcassandra.com

JOSLYN CENTER Offers computer classes to seniors. There is a minimal cost for membership 73750 Catalina Way Palm Desert (760) 340-3220 www.joslyncenter.org

PALM SPRINGS LIBRARY The Palm Springs Library offers free basic computer skills classes; call them for a schedule.

300 Sunrise Way Palm Springs (760) 322-7323 www.palmspringsca.gov/ government/departments/library

APPLE STORE Offers a variety of classes; call them for a schedule. El Paseo Village 73445 El Paseo Palm Desert (760) 862-9710 http://www.apple.com/retail/elpaseovillage Antoinette Hamilton has ten years of experience in solar PV and solar pool heating in the Coachella Valley. She is a frequent guest speaker on energy efficiency solutions for HOAs, hotels, country clubs, apartment complexes and assisted living facilities. Antoinette can be reached at at (760) 808-1128 or by email at info@suntosolar.com.


MEET ONE OF OUR NEWEST CAI-CV BOARD MEMBERS LOUISE STETTLER By Erin H. Fujioka Louise Stettler is a community association volunteer at Palm Valley Country Club HOA in Palm Desert where she resides with her husband, George. Before retiring last May from the law firm of Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC where she worked as a marketing professional, Louise has 17 years’ experience as a volunteer for three CAI chapters, Coachella Valley, San Diego, and Greater Inland Empire. Louise’s first committee was Monte Carlo for the Coachella Valley Chapter. Since then she has served on most committees and chaired several in all three chapters. Here at CAI-CV, Louise chaired the Programs Committee for three years as well as the first Casino Night Committee, the Membership Committee, the Awards Committee and, most recently, the Corks for CLAC Wine Tasting Committee. Louise also serves on CAI National’s CLAC Public Relations Committee and serves on CAI-CV’s CLAC Legislative Support Committee. Last year, Louise was honored with the esteemed Samuel L. Dolnick Lifetime Achievement Award from the San Diego Chapter. CAI-CV has honored Louise with the Chapter Lifetime Achievement Award, Member of the Year Award, Volunteer of the Year Award, and she has received the President’s Award from both CAI-CV and the San Diego Chapter. Louise said, “I am honored to continue serve CAI-CV. It is important to further enhance our footprint in the HOA communities by encouraging the education of homeowner volunteers, manager members and business partners. I look forward to a great 2017.” CAI-CV.org

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FEATURE

New Membership Recruiting Contest

Win a weekend getaway to anywhere in the USA! By Matthew Lawton, CIC, CIRMS, Prendiville Insurance Agency

D

on’t you think it’s time for a quick weekend getaway? Then let the Coachella Valley Chapter of the Community Associations Institute help. We want to send you on a trip to anywhere in the USA! Seriously! One year from now, we want to hear you say, “New York City, here I come!” or “Aloha Hawaii!” or maybe even “Reserve me a seat at the Grand Ol’ Opry – yee haw!” The CAI-CV Membership Committee is having a “New Membership Recruiting Contest” throughout the entire year! All you need to do is recruit a new member to our chapter and you are eligible to win the weekend getaway! Here’s how it all works. If you are a current member of CAI-CV and you enlist someone to join our chapter, then you will be eligible to win a $50 gift card and the new member you recruited could also win a $25 gift card. Then your name will go into a hat with all of the other recruiters and at the end of 2017 one lucky winner will win a Grand Prize Trip to anywhere in the USA (well, as long as that trip costs under $1,000)! The more members you recruit throughout the year, the more chances you have to win! Baseball game in San Francisco? Dinner in New Orleans? Visit family in Texas? You can make it happen simply by recruiting an HOA board member, a manager friend, or a new business partner to join our chapter of CAI! By the way, joining our chapter is super affordable. The annual membership fee for an HOA board member is only $120, a community manager’s membership costs is $132, and a business partner membership costs only $580 a year!

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One thing to remember for our recruiting contest is that in order to receive your recruitment credit, you and your new member must email the CAI-CV office and let them know the names of the recruiter and the new member. That way the Membership Committee can follow-up with the recruiter and the new member and make sure your name gets entered into the Grand Prize Drawing! The Membership Committee’s “New Membership Recruiting Contest” is a fun way to get more people involved in our chapter, so that they too can benefit from the knowledge, friendships, and services that the Community Associations Institute has to offer. Whether you are an HOA board member, a community manager or a business partner – as long as you are a current CAI-CV member, you are eligible to win! So, what are you waiting for? Get recruiting now and start planning that trip to Graceland, or Disneyworld, or the Statue of Liberty! Your weekend getaway awaits you! Matt Lawton, CIC, CIRMS, is a Certified Insurance Counselor and holds CAI’s Community Insurance and Risk Management Specialist designation. Matt is a broker for Prendiville Insurance Agency, Farmers Insurance Group and can be reached at (760) 770-5868, ext. 302, by cell at (760) 774-2099 or email to Matt@PrendivilleAgency.com.


FEATURE

Recruiting Made Easy

I

By Thomas M. Skiba, CAE, CAI Chief Executive Officer

n today's world, word-of-mouth marketing can make or break a business. Whether you post an unflattering review about the new restaurant in your neighborhood or pass along the business card of your trusted plumber, sharing your experiences matters. Although you won't find CAI on Yelp, our growth and success relies heavily on members recruiting members. When members recruit, everyone wins. And CAI is fortunate to have a long list of dynamic and successful recruiters who go into the community and share their personal CAI experience with prospective members. Our goal now through the Strength in Numbers campaign is to recruit even more recruiters to continue spreading the word about CAI. After all, networking is enhanced when new faces share their own unique experiences and personalities. Our ability to advocate for our shared goals is amplified as our voice grows louder. And as each new member takes advantage of our educational opportunities, the entire field is elevated. Recruiters benefit on a personal level, as well. The Recruiter Club rewards members with one credit per new member. Each month, one recruiter will be selected as Recruiter of the Month based on their number of recruits in a one-month period. The Recruiter of the Month with fewer than five recruits receives a prize valued at $100; the Recruiter of the Month with more than five recruits wins a prize valued at $200. Recruiters also are recognized both through their chapters and nationally as they reach recruiting milestones. You could be the next Recruiter of the Year onstage at the 2017 CAI Annual Conference and Exposition. Just like when you recommend your favorite business, there are many ways to spread the word. Tell a colleague about your own membership experiences, bring him or her to an event, pass along a publication or catalog, or forward one of CAI's e-newsletters to someone. We hope you will answer the call and recognize that recruiting is for you! For more information, visit the Recruiter Club page and simply start sharing your experiences with your prospective members. More information about CAI’s Recruiter Club can be found online at www.caionline.org.

C

Education for Board Members CAI WEBINARS

AI webinars offer specialized, professional training without leaving your home or office. Conducted via internet and audio teleconference, the programs are hosted by industry experts to keep you up to date on the latest legislative activity, management trends, industry best practices and subjects of special interest to board members and community managers. More than 200 on-demand webinars are now available, and new live webinars are added every month.

UPCOMING WEBINARS Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 2-3 p.m. ET - A Stitch in Time Saves Nine: Identifying Maintenance Issues During a Property Walk

Many maintenance issues can be identified early, before they become disasters, by a manager or homeowner volunteer during a property walk. This webinar will tell you what to look for during a property walk to help prevent unanticipated expenses, homeowner complaints, and other unpleasant surprises. You'll learn how to track issues to make sure the responsible party is accountable–so the issues don’t fall back on you, especially if you are the entire maintenance staff. Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 2-3 p.m. ET - Help Wanted: Employment-Related Issues Involving Community Associations

Many community associations have a handy-man, day porter, or other individual who provides services to the association. Some community associations have a large staff of employees. This webinar discusses the federal laws that apply to community associations when they employ individuals or pay individuals for services. Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 2-3 p.m. ET - Diving in: Lake, Pond and Stormwater Facility Transitions from Developer to HOA

STRENGTH inNUMBERS

Ponds, lakes and stormwater facilities can have great cost and legal ramifications in communities that transition from developer to HOA control. Federal, State and local stormwater regulations require that a stormwater device be installed and maintained in most new HOAs. The purpose of this presentation is to teach you how to minimize problems as a result of these transitions.

to make community associations preferred places to call home.

For more information about CAI’s Webinars, go to www.caionline.org.

CAI Members Know What It Takes

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FEATURE

Facts About the U.S. Common Interest Development Industry

2,350,000 Community association board and committee members.

80,000,000 Hours of service performed annually by association board and committee members.

$1.76 BILLION Estimated value of time provided by homeowner board and committee members based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimate of $22.55 per hour for volunteer time.

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21.1 Percent of U.S. population in community associations.

$5.28 TRILLION Value of homes in community associations.

$85 BILLION Assessments collected from homeowners. Assessments fund many essential association obligations, including professional management services, utilities, security, insurance, common area maintenance, landscaping, capital improvement projects, and amenities like pools and club houses.


$23 BILLION Assessment dollars contributed to association reserve funds for the repair, replacement and enhancement of common property, e.g., replacing roofs, resurfacing streets, repairing swimming pools and elevators, meeting new environmental standards and implementing new energysaving features.

50,000–55,000

CA LIC. #907600 AZ LIC. #286198

www.brsroofing.com

Community association managers (includes onsite managers and those who provide part-time support to a number of communities).

6,000–9,000 Large-scale associations, i.e., those meeting at least two of the following three characteristics: a single, contiguous community with a general manager; a minimum of 1,000 lots and/or homes; and a minimum annual budget of $2 million.

30–40 Percentage of community associations that are selfmanaged, meaning they may use professional assistance for specific projects, activities and services, but do not employ a professional manager or management company.

7,000–8,000 Community association management companies.

95,000–100,000 Individuals employed by management companies. Excerpts from CAI National’s 2016 statistical report developed by Clifford J. Treese, president of Association Data, Inc., in Mountain House, California. A member of CAI almost since its inception, Treese is a past president of CAI and the Foundation for Community Association Research. We are grateful for his continuing support of both organizations. Additional statistical information published by the Foundation for Community Association Research is available at www.cairf.org/factbook.

GURALNICK GILLILAND & KNIGHTEN _________________________________________________________________________________________________

• Corporate Counsel •

• Legal Opinions

• Assessment Lien and Foreclosure

• • Fees Paid by Delinquent Homeowner • Detailed Monthly Status Reports

40004 Cook St. Suite 3 Palm Desert, Ca www.gghoalaw.com Phone: (760) 340-1515 Fax: (760) 568-3053 For a Copy of our Legal Update Contact Melissap@gghoalaw.com CAI-CV.org

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35


CHARITY

The Cal State University Associates - A Way to Support the Youth of Our Local Community By Jess Rosenberg

I

have been a member of the Cal State University Associates at Cal State San Bernardino’s Palm Desert Campus for six years, since coming to the campus to see former NFL Coach Tom Flores speak as part of the Associates’ "An Evening with…" series. That evening I learned much about Coach Flores and also a great deal about the CSUSB satellite campus in Palm Desert. I also learned of the Cal State University Associates and its mission. I joined shortly afterwards and have been a member ever since. Last year I was asked to serve on the organization’s board of directors. I also serve on my homeowners association board of directors at Desert Falls, right across the street from the campus.

The Cal State University Associates is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that raises money primarily through the taxdeductible yearly dues of its members to provide scholarships for deserving students at the CSUSB Palm Desert Campus. Many of these students are the first in their family to attend college and it is through scholarship programs like this that they can obtain their secondary education without accumulating significant debt. The Cal State University Associates has already donated more than $100,000 to the campus’s scholarship program! Our community benefits greatly by providing a path for our local young people to prepare for their future armed with an outstanding state university degree. In doing so, critical regional and state employment needs can be supported, while creating responsible and creative leadership for the future of our Valley. Much has changed at the CSUSB Palm Desert Campus over the years. The school moved to its permanent location on Cook Street in 2002 and this year it is celebrating its 30th anniversary of offering classes in the Coachella Valley. CSUSB Palm Desert 36

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Campus is our Valley’s first four-year public university and is the only state university in the country to be built entirely without state funds. In the past year, the City of Palm Desert donated to the campus an additional 114 acres, equivalent to the total area of the UCLA and USC campuses combined, bringing the total campus to 169 acres. Currently, more than 1,400 students strong, the school offers students the resources of a large, comprehensive university through the San Bernardino Campus as well as the supportive environment of a small campus with small classes and more opportunities for contact with instructional faculty. Plans are underway to grow the CSUSB Palm Desert Campus into a true destination university with additional curriculums, residence halls, student center, athletic fields, and much more. Such a grand campus will draw students both nationally and internationally, which will increase our talent pool and spurring college-town tourism. Cal State University Associates members have the opportunity to attend monthly events that take place on the second Tuesday of the month from October to May, excluding December. The evening begins with a one hour meet and greet at the Indian Wells Theater on campus with beverages and appetizers followed by topical presentations, intimate memoirs, and discussions with outstanding citizens, local personalities, celebrities, and faculty. Last year we had a cybersecurity expert discuss today’s global threats; a famed economist discussing the jobs-skills disconnect facing our nation; and a panel of experts including John Benoit, Brian Nestande and Bruce Wilcox briefing our audience with developments concerning the Salton Sea. A Cal State University Associates membership is not only a great way to support our local students -- it’s also a way for Valley residents to keep abreast of a variety of relevant topics and mingle with like-minded residents. CAI members are urged to let their homeowners know about this wonderful opportunity to connect with their neighbors and support our local four-year public university. For more information, visit www.CalStateUniversityAssociates.com or contact Mike Singer at (760) 341-2883, ext. 78107, or msinger@csusb.edu. Jess Rosenberg is a board member of Desert Falls Master Association and Villas I HOA, and partner at Desert Cities Indoor Air, LLC. He can be reached at contactus@dfmaster.com or 714-747-3774.


Contractors Lic. # 235717

WESTERN PACIFIC

TIME HONORED

Roofing Corporation

Rodney Bissell By Phyllis Harkins Whenever the name “Rodney” is mentioned in the CAI-CV Chapter, there is instant recognition of who he is and his importance to the chapter. Rodney Bissell has been in the design industry for more than 20 years. He provides graphic design and layout work for our monthly Quorum magazine, and he also provides many of the brochures and mailers for our membership. His company, Bissell Design Studios Inc., has been in business for 14 years and his work with our chapter spans over five years. In addition to his graphic design work, Rodney is also our professional chapter photographer, capturing the spirt and enthusiasm at our chapter events. Although Rodney calls Oceanside, CA his home, he has life -long roots in the Coachella Valley. Since a young child, his extended family has celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday in the Valley. Rodney and his wife, Angela, have been married over 15 years, and their children are Ashley, age 12, and Ethan, age 8. Recently the family journeyed together through Angela’s cancer treatment; Rodney is grateful that she is now cancerfree, and during his interview for this article, he commented that he often goes to his Bible for support, especially Proverbs 3:5-6. Both Rodney and his children are avid skateboarders, and often the children accompany him to the Valley where they skateboard in both the Palm Springs and Palm Desert parks. Surfing is also an important part of the Bissell family life and Rodney can often be found at the ocean before his work day begins. Rodney graduated from Biola University with a BS in graphic design and a minor in Bible. After graduating in 2000, he began work with Outreach, Inc., and it was through this connection that he met Dionne Pettipas; she introduced Rodney to our chapter in 2011. He enjoys audio books and podcasts, and he describes his music choices as eclectic. Rodney said that his father, uncles, and cousins have inspired him; they all own businesses in the creative design field. He mentioned that there is lots of “shop talk” at their family events. If he wasn’t the owner of his company, he most likely would have entered the interior design field. Rodney has served as the Quorum co-chair for the past two years, and in 2017 he plans to start the Educated Business Partner curriculum for his designation. It was clear in his interview that he loves the graphic design field and he is grateful for the opportunity to work with our chapter. Rodney, we too are grateful for your spirited enthusiasm and your eye for design. Thanks to your efforts, this year we received the award for best member services, due to the quality of your Quorum editions every month. We are honored to share your story.

Since 1949

“Complete Roofing Services” Repairs • Re-roofing Roof Inspection • Maintenance Programs Polyurethane Foam • Built-up • Tile • Patios 3462 La Campana Way, Palm Springs, CA 92262 Phone (760) 416-5877 Fax (760) 320-8912 FIND US ONLINE AT www.westpacroof.com

•Landscape Management •Arbor Service •Landscape Design •Landscape & Hardscape Installation •Water Conservation Specialist •Growers of Exotic Palms & Desert Accents

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Phone: 760- 343-0162 • Fax: 760-343-4804 P.O. BOX 265 Thousand Palms CA 92276 Email: office@proland-inc.com

www.prolandscapingca.com

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37


HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION LAW

From Homeowner to Board Director: The Added Fiduciary Duties and Responsibilities of Directors By Dea C. Franck, Esq.

S

o you just got elected to the board of your community association? Congratulations and thank you for volunteering your time in an effort to make your community association a great place to live. As you are likely already aware, being a board director is more than just having the title. You now have various responsibilities and fiduciary duties that come with that position. There are many questions presented to me as a community association attorney by newly elected directors. The following are my responses to some of those questions.

How should I perform my duties as a director in order to minimize the risk of personal liability? Corporations Code section 7231, commonly known as the “Business Judgment Rule,” requires a director to perform his or her duties as follows: (a) A director shall perform the duties of a director, including duties as a member of any committee of the board upon which the director may serve, in good faith, in a manner such director believes to be in the best interests of the corporation and with such care, including reasonable inquiry, as an ordinarily prudent person in a like position would use under similar circumstances. (b) In performing the duties of director, a director shall be entitled to rely on information, opinions, reports or statements, including financial statements and other financial data, in each case prepared or presented by: 1. One or more officers or employees of the corporation whom the director believes to be reliable and competent in the matter presented; 2.

Counsel, independent accountants or other persons as to matters which the director believes to be within such person’s professional or expert competence; or

3.

A committee upon which the director does not serve that is composed exclusively of any or any combination of directors, persons described in paragraph (1), or persons described in paragraph (2), as to matters within the committee’s designated authority, which committee the director believes to merit confidence, so long as, in any case, the director acts in good faith, after reasonable inquiry when the need therefor is indicated by the circumstances and without knowledge that would cause such reliance to be unwarranted.

(c) A person who performs the duties of a director in accordance with subdivisions (a) and (b) shall have no liability based upon any alleged failure to discharge the person’s obligations as a director, including, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, any actions or omissions which exceed or defeat a public or charitable purpose to which assets held by a corporation are dedicated. 38

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If directors meet this standard, they are protected from individual liability even if their decisions are later proven to be erroneous or flawed. Be aware, however, that the business judgment rule is not a blanket protection from liability. Its protection does not extend to the “willful ignorance” of directors who fail to make reasonable inquiries into “matters as basic as the provisions of the CC&Rs and Bylaws of the Association” before making a decision. See Palm Springs Villas II Homeowners Association v. Parth (2016) 248 Cal.App.4th 268, 285.

Do I as a director of a community association owe a fiduciary duty to the membership? Yes. Having a fiduciary duty to another involves being in a position of confidence and trust. A director owes a fiduciary responsibility to the association and to all of its members. The director’s personal needs and desires must be put aside in favor of the director acting in good faith and in the best interests of the association and the entire membership.

Am I as a director responsible for the actions of the other board members if I am not at a meeting where those actions were taken? Failing to attend a meeting will not shield a director from liability. A director has a duty to participate in the affairs of the association, including attending meetings. A director can only protect himself or herself by attending the meetings and voting against actions which he or she cannot support.

How can I fulfill my responsibility as a director if I am not an expert in all of the issues being considered? No director can be knowledgeable about every subject which confronts the board. Frequently, the best directors are those people with good general knowledge. Directors must often rely on advice and information provided by experts or other professionals in the field being considered. The board need not always


HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION LAW accept the advice given by the chosen expert. However, if professional advice is not going to be followed, the board should have good reasons for rejecting the advice, and should carefully document its decision.

How much time should I spend on association business? Enough to do the job properly. A director should attend all meetings of the board, should prepare for the meetings in advance and be knowledgeable on the issues to be discussed and decided. An association is not a social organization; it is a business, often involving assets in excess of several million dollars, and annual budgets that exceed hundreds of thousands of dollars. Protecting these assets and fulfilling a director’s fiduciary duties requires spending sufficient time to enable the director to make informed decisions on the issues being decided.

Am I individually liable for my acts as a director? Provided a director does not intentionally act wrongfully, the acts of a director will be considered the acts of the association, and not the personal acts of the individual director. Under such circumstances, only the association can incur liability, if any, for the director’s actions. Acting in good faith and with the interests of the association in mind will protect a director from individual liability. Subject to certain exceptions, Civil Code section 5800 also provides that a director will not be personally liable for any personal injury or property damage in excess of the association’s insurance, if: (a) the association has at least $1,000,000 in general liability and directors & officers insurance ($500,000 if there are 100 or less units in the development);

(d) the act or omission was performed in good faith; (e) the act or omission was not willful, wanton or grossly negligent.

Can I also perform services to the association for which I am paid? Although it is not necessarily improper for a volunteer director to agree to provide paid services to the association, such a relationship is unwise. The protection against liability afforded by section 5800 of the Civil Code, discussed above, could be lost. The director will often be accused of having a conflict of interest and the homeowners may never be satisfied that the director is not taking unfair advantage of his or her position as a director in order to improve his or her financial situation. If a director does offer a compensable service to the association, the association should endeavor to comply with Corporations Code section 7233. That section states that a transaction may be valid even if a director has a financial interest in the transaction, if there is full disclosure of all material facts and if the transaction is approved by either the membership of the association or the board, excluding the vote of the interested director. Also, many governing documents expressly preclude compensation to directors without a vote of the members.

Does the board need to maintain minutes of its board meetings? What information should those minutes contain? Yes, Corporations Code section 8320 requires corporations to keep board meeting minutes. The minutes

are an excellent source of protection for a board, as they provide a written record of the actions taken. Over time, the minutes become the association’s historical record. Minutes should not be lengthy dissertations of everything that was said at the meeting, but they should contain all motions made at the meeting, and the results of the vote on each motion. It is not necessary to indicate how each individual voted, although a director may ask that his or her specific objection to the motion be recorded. The minutes should also include a summary of the factors considered by the board in passing or rejecting each motion.

What sort of protection should the association provide its individual directors? The members of the board are volunteers. Every association should provide the board with broad indemnification rights in the governing documents and should also provide adequate directors and officers insurance coverage. No director should be asked to place his or her personal assets in jeopardy for performing a volunteer service. Dea Franck is an associate attorney at Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC’s Coachella Valley office. With offices in the Coachella Valley, San Diego and the Inland Empire, Epsten Grinnell & Howell provides common interest developments with corporate counsel, assessment recovery services, construction defect and other civil litigation counsel, interpretation of fair housing issues, and alternative dispute resolution assistance. You can reach Dea at (760) 836-1036 or dfranck@epsten.com.

(b) the director is a volunteer; (c) the act or omission performed by the director was within the scope of the director’s duties;

CAI-CV.org

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39


CAI-CV

2017 PLATINUM SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT

ROOF A S S E T M A N A G E M E N T LIC # 677708

Roof Asset Management Inc. is a local, family-owned, full-service roofing company serving the entire Coachella Valley. Specializing in homeowners associations, we provide everything from leak repair service to complete large-scale re-roofing programs. Our success is attributed to our core beliefs: act with integrity, treat people like family, and “do the right thing.” The Winkle family has been in the roofing industry here in the Valley for over 35 years and serves on several boards of directors for prominent industry organizations. Although the roof is one of the most important components of a building, it is often “out of sight out of mind." Roofs not only protect the building itself from the elements, they protect the contents of the home from sustaining water damage. Our harsh desert climate is particularly hard on roofing systems with the extreme temperature changes. Roof Asset Management Inc. provides maintenance programs that extend the serviceable life of all roofing systems. The minor cost of a well-designed and professionally implemented program can help roofing systems exceed their original expectations. Many leaks can be prevented from ever developing. When interviewing a roofing contractor for any project remember that you are “buying a promise.” As opposed to shopping for goods at different stores and finding the best price, roofing systems are built-in-place by journeyman roofers on the top of the building. There is truly no such thing as “apples to apples." There are wide variances between materials, amounts of materials used, and installation techniques that separates roofing contractors. Hire a roofing professional that you trust will provide you with the highest level of quality and customer service. The personnel at Roof Asset Management Inc. prides itself in “doing what we say.” The relationships that have been established are built on caring about our customers’ needs and addressing them with true professionalism. Our employees are well trained and very knowledgeable. As qualified installers of most major material manufactures, we can install the right roofing system designed specifically for each project. Our family looks forward to continuing our support of CAI and other local organizations. We are thankful for the tremendous support that we have received from the community.

Thank you to Roof Asset Management Inc. for their generous support of CAI-CV! 40

Quorum January, 2017


SAVE THE DATE - CORKS FOR CLAC

Wine Tasting AT S H I E L D S D AT E G A R D E N FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 2017, 5:30 P.M. HWY 111 & JEFFERSON IN INDIO

• CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION • WINE TASTING

• HEAVY HORS D’OEUVRES & BARBEQUE • SILENT & LIVE AUCTIONS

REAL ROOFING KNOWLEDGE FOR REAL ROOFING SOLUTIONS

Inc.

Spray Polyurethane Foam Systems Roof Repairs

Tile Systems

Roof System Maintenance

Shingle & Shake Systems

Budget Reserves

Consulting

760 813 9999 w w w . R A M R O O F. c o m

C OAC H E L L A VA L L E Y C H A P T E R

A SS O C I AT I O N S I N ST I T U T E

760-250-6232

Peggy@PeggyRedmonLaw.com

CAI-CV.org

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41


STOP DRAINING POOLS!

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We clean the plaster without an aggressive acid wash. We use the most technologically advanced industrial grade reverse osmosis system in the pool industry today.

Call today for a free poolside evaluation and quote! Purified Pool Water is a division of Alan Smith Pools, Inc. CA Lic# 571196

Use Less Chemicals The Water Feels Incredible!

PurifyYourPool.com

760.399.6428

79345 Country Club Dr. Unite B Bramuta Dunes 92203

Water Wise Tips For Coachella Valley residents

Plant a waterefficient landscape. Desert-friendly plants use 50 to 75 percent less water than grass or tropical plants. Irrigate efficiently. Prevent water waste. Repair broken sprinklers CVWD offers a rebate for replacing nozzles with new water-efficient ones.

Find and fix indoor and outdoor leaks. Download copy of Water Wise at Home: A Guide to Finding Leaks at www.cvwd.org Learn more about CVWD’s rebate & discount program at www.cvwd/org/rebates

www.securitas.com/us/en

Securitas Security Services USA, Inc.

Stay connected with us! (760) 398-2651 www.cvwd.org

42

For more information on how we can exceed your expectations, contact Reginald St. Germaine, Palm Desert Branch Manager at (760) 779-0728.

Quorum January, 2017 CAI-CVad.indd 1

11/29/12 2:02 PM


CLAC PLEDGE FORM YES, I’D LIKE TO SUPPORT CAI-CLAC WITH A PLEDGE!

PLEASE LET US KNOW WHICH CAI CHAPTER(S) YOU ARE DONATING TO:

HOA PLEDGE

CLAC Buck-A-Door Campaign

Number of Doors

X

A Buck a Door or More

=

Bay Area Central

Total Pledge

California North

PROFESSIONAL’S PLEDGE Professional Hourly Rate

X

Channel Islands

Number of People in Firm

Coachella Valley

=

Greater Inland Empire

Total Pledge

Greater Los Angeles

FLAT RATE PLEDGE

Orange County Regional

Total Pledge

San Diego

NAME

TITLE

FIRM/COMPANY NAME

ASSOCIATION NAME

ADDRESS

Join other CAI-CV associations in supporting CLAC.

CITY

STATE

PHONE

E-MAIL

METHOD OF PAYMENT - Return this completed form to the address below Check enclosed payable to CAI-CLAC

• Desert Braemar, Inc.

• Palm Desert Country Club Villas

• Indian Creek Villas HOA

• Palm Desert Resorter HOA

• Laguna de la Paz HOA

• Palm Springs Deauville HOA

• Las Colinas HOA

• Palm Valley Homeowners Assoc. Inc

• Master Association of Rancho La Quinta • The Springs Community Association • Montage at Mission Hills HOA

• Village Traditions at Palm Springs

• Palm Desert Country Club Association

• Villorrio Village Inc.

Please consider joining other CAI-CV associations with a voluntary Buck-A-Door contribution to the California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC). CLAC asks each CAI association to contribute one dollar for every household to support our legislative activities in Sacramento. Every dollar helps! Donations can be sent to 1809 S Street, Suite 101-245, Sacramento, CA 95811. Checks should be written to CAI-CLAC and have CAI-CV in the note section. CLAC’s mission is to safeguard and improve the community association lifestyle and their property values by advocating a reasonable balance between state statutory requirements and the ability and authority of individual homeowners to govern themselves through their community associations. CLAC is a non-profit, statewide committee of the Community Associations Institute (CAI) that works to educate legislators about Common Interest Development (HOA) living and governance. CLAC serves the interests of approximately 13,000,000 homeowners residing in over 50,000 community associations throughout California. CLAC is not a PAC (Political Action Committee) and makes no political contributions.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CLAC, PLEASE GO TO WWW.CAICLAC.COM.

ZIP

Credit Card – Amex

Visa Mastercard Discover (circle one)

NAME ON CARD

BILLING ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

CREDIT CARD NUMBER

SECURITY CODE

EXPIRATION DATE

SIGNATURE

DATE

CAI California Legislative Action Committee (CLAC), is a 501(c)(6) not-for-profit organization. Contributions or gifts to CAI California Legislative Action Committee are not deductible for federal income tax purposes.

888.909.7403 | 916.550.9488 fax | www.caiclac.com 1809 S Street | Suite 101-245 | Sacramento, CA 95811

SAVE THE DATE

BECOME A CAI DESIGNATED EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER

Friday March 24, 2017

THE CLASSIC CLUB 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

$99

INCLUDES LUNCH, CAI WORKBOOK, CAI NATIONAL TESTING, CAI DESIGNATION CAI-CV.org

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43


VOLUNTEER FOR A 2017 CAI-CV COMMITTEE

JOIN A CAI-CV COMMITTEE 2017 VOLUNTEER FORM Join CAI-CV’s volunteer leadership team by becoming a member of a committee. Committee members have the opportunity to build lasting relationships with CAI-CV members from every membership class. Committee members help raise funds, promote education and work to make CAI-CV the best place to network in the Coachella Valley. If you are enthusiastic, energetic, a good team player and have the time to volunteer, we want you on one of our committees! MEMBER INFORMATION

2017 CAI-CV COMMITTEES MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE Chair: Jolen Zeroski, Union Bank Co-Chair: Rich Cech, Western Pacific Roofing PROGRAMS COMMITTEE Chair: Dan Stites, CBCI Construction Co-Chair: Mary Walker, MW Consultants/The Management Trust

Name Company/Association Name Street Address City

Raise your visibility with other CAI-CV professionals by volunteering for one of our chapter committees. Committee volunteers improve their careers, build their businesses and establish lifelong relationships with other CAI-CV members. To join a CAI-CV committee, all you need to do is fill out the 2017 Volunteer Form and return it to the CAI-CV office at admin@caicv.org. Volunteers typically donate two to four hours per month to CAI-CV. Committees meet once a month at the CAI-CV office and volunteers can attend any meetings via conference call if they are unable to attend in person. Join a CAI-CV Committee today!

State

Zip

CLAC LEGISLATIVE SUPPORT COMMITTEE Chair: Sue Anderson, Adams Stirling Co-Chair: Gloria Kirkwood, PCAM, Palm Valley Country Club/ Associa DRM BUSINESS PARTNER COMMITTEE Chair: Julie Frazier, Frazier Pest Control Co-Chair: Brittany Smith, Vantage Point Construction

Work Phone Cell Phone E-Mail Address

QUORUM COMMITTEE Chair: Dea Franck, Esq., Epsten Grinnell & Howell, APC Co-Chair: Rodney Bissell, Bissell Design Studio

COMMITTEE SELECTION Please list the committee(s) where you believe your service can be most beneficial to you and the chapter. You may request to serve on more than one committee. Please provide a back-up committee in case the committee you request is full.

EDUCATION COMMITTEE Chair: Steven Shuey, PCAM, Personalized Property Management Co-Chair: Cardinal Ambrose, Mountain View Country Club/Albert Management, Inc. PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE Chair: Christy Majors, Bank of Southern California Co-Chair: Chet Oshiro, EmpireWorks

SPECIAL SKILLS OR QUALIFICATIONS If you have special skills that you want considered by the committee chairs, please list them here: 1. 2.

WINE TASTING (CORKS FOR CLAC) Chair: Louse Stettler, Palm Valley Country Club HOA Co-Chair: Lori Fahnestock, Powerful Pest Management GOLF COMMITTEE Chair: Cameron Bridges, Horizon Lighting Co-Chair: Micha Ballesteros, Flood Response

3.

I understand the two-hour per month time commitment required to serve on a CAI-CV committee(s) and I have read and understand the responsibilities of committees and their members. Signature Date

Please return this form to the chapter office via fax (760) 341-8443 or email to admin@cai-cv.org. 44

VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE Chair: Jennifer James, Esq., Law Office of Jennifer James Co-Chair: Brittany Smith, Vantage Point Construction

Quorum January, 2017

OKTOBERFEST COMMITTEE Chair: Ronda Henry, SERVPRO Palm Desert Co-Chair: Holly Falco, Accurate Leak Locators BOWLING COMMITTEE Chair: Micha Ballesteros, Flood Response Co-Chair: Julie Frazier, Frazier Pest Control AWARDS & MONTE CARLO NIGHT Chair: Jerod Pannell Co-Chair: Eric Angle, Trilogy at La Quinta


Advertisers ACCOUNTANTS & BOOKKEEPERS BRABO & CARLSEN, LLP................................................. 46

ASPHALT AMS PAVING.................................................................... 20 ASPHALT MD’S................................................................ 31 DIVERSIFIED ASPHALT...................................................... 2 NPG ASPHALT.................................................................. 46

ATTORNEYS EPSTEN GRINNELL & HOWELL.......................................... 6 FIORE RACOBS & POWERS.............................................. 31 GREEN BRYANT & FRENCH, LLP........................................ 4

pick the right tools for your next project. With community association lending expertise like ours, you’ll get the job done right.

take that to the bank.

GURALNICK & GILLILAND, LLP........................................ 35

Brendan Concannon Regional Account Executive 619-961-6346 Toll Free 866-800-4656, ext. 7480 brendan.concannon@mutualofomahabank.com

LAW OFFICE JENNIFER JAMES....................................... 46 LAW OFFICE OF PEGGY REDMON.................................... 41 PETERS & FREEDMAN, LLP............................................. 37

BANKING MUTUAL OF OMAHA BANK.............................................. 45

CONSTRUCTION CBCI CONSTRUCTION...................................................... 42 VANTAGE POINT CONSTRUCTION.................................... 31

ELECTRIC & WATER

mutualofomahabank.com

Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender

AFN46055_0913

EQUAL HOUSING

LENDER

COACHELLA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT........................... 42

GATES & GARAGE DOORS AUTOMATION PRIDE........................................................ 46

LAKE MANAGEMENT DWI................................................................................... 3

LANDSCAPING CONSERVE LANDCARE.................................................... 41 PRO LANDSCAPEING INC................................................. 37 SUNSHINE LANDSCAPE................................................... 42 WATERRITE - VINTAGE ASSOCIATES, INC......................... 9

PEST CONTROL LLOYD PEST CONTROL.................................................... 47 POWERFUL PEST MANAGEMENT.................................... 35

POOL WATER PURIFICATION PURIFIED POOL WATER................................................... 42

ROOFING BRS ROOFING.................................................................. 35 ROOF ASSET MANAGEMENT........................................... 41 SUNTECH CONSULTING & ROOFING................................ 46 WESTERN PACIFIC ROOFING........................................... 37

SECURITY ALLIED BARTON.............................................................. 45 AMS SECURITY.................................................................. 3 SECURITAS...................................................................... 42

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45


Licenses #664779

Asphalt Concrete Seal Coating Striping ADA Compliance Grinding & Pulverizing

NPGASPHALT.COM So-Cal: 951.940.0200 Desert Division: 760.320.9600 Proud Members of: BIA,BOMA,CAI,IREM,CACM,CREW

AAU UTTO OM MAATTIIO ON N PPRRIID DEE Custom Gates ® Access Control Traffic Spikes ® Barrier Arms ® Phone Units ® Garage Doors ®

Operators ®Troubleshooting

Desert Office: 41-905 Boardwalk, Suite P, Palm Desert, CA 92211 Phone: 760-423-6567 Fax: 760-423-6581 www.automationpride.com

Jennifer James Attorney HOA Legal Services since 2003 75100 Mediterranean Palm Desert, CA 92211 Jennifer@JenniferJamesLaw.com www.JenniferJamesLaw.com (760) 834-8913

46

Quorum January, 2017


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BED BUG ELIMINATION • Dedicated eradication team providing heat and chemical options. • Canine inspections, legal documentation & Bed Bug Clearance Certificates.

GOPHERS, PIGEONS AND NUISANCE PREDATORS • Coordination of wildlife trapping, dispersal & removal.

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47


41-905 Boardwalk, A-2 Palm Desert, CA 92211

CAI-CV 2017 CALENDAR CHAPTER PROPOSED EVENT DATES – BLUE CAI COURSES/EVENTS – GREEN HOLIDAYS – RED SPECIAL EVENTS – BROWN JANUARY 2 MONDAY 16 MONDAY 19-20 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 20 FRIDAY 23 MONDAY 26-28 THURSDAY—SATURDAY 27 FRIDAY FEBRUARY 3 FRIDAY 9-10 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 10 FRIDAY 20 MONDAY 23-24 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 24 FRIDAY MARCH 3 FRIDAY 3 FRIDAY 9-11 THURSDAY—SATURDAY 10 FRIDAY 23-24 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 24 FRIDAY 27 MONDAY APRIL 7 FRIDAY 14 FRIDAY 21 FRIDAY 23-24 SUNDAY-MONDAY 26 WEDNESDAY 28 FRIDAY MAY 1 MONDAY 1-2 MONDAY—TUESDAY 2 TUESDAY 3-6 WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY 18-19 THURSDAY – FRIDAY 19 FRIDAY 22 MONDAY 29 MONDAY JUNE 2 FRIDAY 8-9 THURSDAY-FRIDAY 9 FRIDAY 22-23 THURSDAY-FRIDAY 22-23 THURSDAY-FRIDAY 23 FRIDAY 26 MONDAY JULY 3-4 MONDAY—TUESDAY 13-15 THURSDAY—SATURDAY 14 FRIDAY 20-21 THURSDAY-FRIDAY 24 MONDAY AUGUST 4 FRIDAY 10-11 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 17-19 THURSDAY—SATURDAY 18 FRIDAY 24-25 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 28 MONDAY SEPTEMBER 4 MONDAY 7-8 THURSDAY-FRIDAY 14-16 THURSDAY-SATURDAY 22 FRIDAY 25 MONDAY OCTOBER 6 FRIDAY 9 MONDAY 12-14 THURSDAY—SATURDAY 13 FRIDAY 19 THURSDAY 19 THURSDAY 20 FRIDAY 27 FRIDAY 30 MONDAY NOVEMBER 2-4 THURSDAY—SATURDAY 10 FRIDAY 13 MONDAY 16-17 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 17 FRIDAY 23-24 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 30-1 THURSDAY—FRIDAY DECEMBER 30-1 THURSDAY—FRIDAY 1 FRIDAY 1 FRIDAY 8 FRIDAY 18 MONDAY 25 MONDAY JANUARY 2018 26 FRIDAY

NEW YEAR'S – HOLIDAY (OBSERVED) MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY – HOLIDAY CAI NATIONAL LAW SEMINAR – LAS VEGAS PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CAI-CV BOARD MEETING CAI’S M100 COURSE – SANTA ANA CAI-CV’S 2017 ANNUAL AWARDS NIGHT MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) CAI’S M201 COURSE – LOS ANGELES PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW PRESIDENTS’ DAY – HOLIDAY CAI’S M202 COURSE – RIVERSIDE CAI-CV’S COMMITTEE TRAINING FOR CHAIRS/CO-CHAIRS & CAI-CV BOARD MEETING – COMBINED BOARD MEMBER WORKSHOP (BMW) CORKS FOR CLAC WINE TASTING CAI’S M100 COURSE – OXNARD PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CAI’S M203 COURSE – SANTA ANA CAI-CV’S EDUCATED BUSINESS PARTNER COURSE - NEW CAI-CV BOARD MEETING MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) ESSENTIALS COURSE FOR CAVLS PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CLAC DAY AT THE CAPITOL CAI-CV BOARD MEETING CAI-CV’S SPRING GOLF TOURNAMENT CAI’S M100, 201, 202, 203, 204 205 AND 206 – LAS VEGAS CASE STUDY – LAS VEGAS CAI’S M400 COURSE – LAS VEGAS CAI NATIONAL CONFERENCE – LAS VEGAS CAI’S M205 COURSE – SANTA ANA PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CAI-CV BOARD MEETING MEMORIAL DAY – HOLIDAY MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) & SUMMER SIZZLER CAI’S M206 COURSE – SANTA ANA PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CAI’S M202 COURSE – PALM DESERT CAI’S M203 COURSE – SAN DIEGO CAI-CV’S BOWLING TOURNAMENT CAI-CV BOARD MEETING INDEPENDENCE DAY – HOLIDAY CAI’S M100 COURSE – RIVERSIDE CAI-CV’S CID LAW COURSE - NEW CAI’S M360 COURSE – LOS ANGELES CAI-CV BOARD MEETING MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) CAI’S M201 COURSE – SANTA ANA CAI’S M100 COURSE – LOS ANGELES CAI-CV’S DAY AT THE RACES – DEL MAR - NEW CAI’S M206 COURSE – SAN DIEGO CAI-CV BOARD MEETING LABOR DAY – HOLIDAY CAI’S M202 COURSE – SANTA ANA CAI’S LARGE SCALE WORKSHOP PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CAI-CV BOARD MEETING MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) COLUMBUS DAY – HOLIDAY CAI’S MANAGEMENT CO. CEO RETREAT PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW CLAC BENEFIT DINNER FUNDRAISER CAI’S COMMON INTEREST DEVELOPMENT LAW COURSE CAI STATEWIDE LEGAL FORUM CAI-CV’S OKTOBERFEST CAI-CV’S ANNUAL BOARD MEETING CAI’S M100 COURSE – PALM DESERT VETERANS DAY – HOLIDAY CAI-CV’S STRATEGIC PLANNING & BOARD MEETING CAI’S M204 COURSE – SANTA ANA PROGRAM LUNCH & MINI TRADE SHOW – LEG UPDATE THANKSGIVING – HOLIDAY CAI’S CASE STUDY – SANTA ANA CAI’S CASE STUDY – SANTA ANA BOARD MEMBER WORKSHOP (BMW) CAI-CV’S HOLIDAY MIXER MANAGER ON THE RUN (MOTR) CAI-CV BOARD MEETING CHRISTMAS – HOLIDAY CAI-CV’S 2017 AWARDS & MONTE CARLO NIGHT

CAI-CV UPCOMING EVENTS

GREEN IS FOR LOCAL EVENTS

SIGN UP FOR LOCAL EVENTS AT CAI-CV.ORG AND FOR CAI NATIONAL EVENTS AT CAIONLINE.ORG

JANUARY CAI’s National Law Seminar (for attorney members) WHEN: Thursday-Friday, January 19-20, 2017 WHERE: Las Vegas CAI-CV’s Educational Program Lunch & Mini Trade Show (for all members) WHEN: Friday, January 20, 2017, 11:15 a.m. Registration WHERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CAI-CV’s 2017 35th Anniversary Awards Night

HYH HAVE YOU HEARD

(for all members)

WHEN: Friday, January 27, 2017, 5:30 p.m. WHERE: Omni Rancho Las Palmas Resort & Spa, Rancho Mirage

CAI’s M100 Course (for managers & board members) WHEN: Thursday-Saturday, January 26-28, 2017 WHERE: Santa Ana

FEBRUARY CAI-CV’s Manager on the Run (MOTR) (for managers) WHEN: Friday, February 3, 2017, 8:30 a.m. WHERE: Sunshine Landscape, Thousand Palms CAI’s M201 Course (for managers) WHEN: Thursday-Friday, February 9-10, 2017 WHERE: Los Angeles CAI-CV’s Educational Program Lunch & Mini Trade Show (for all members) WHEN: Friday, February 10, 2017, 11:15 a.m. WHERE: Palm Valley Country Club, Palm Desert CAI’s M202 Course (for managers) WHEN: Thursday-Friday, February 23-24, 2017 WHERE: Riverside

MARCH CAI-CV’s Board Member Workshop (BMW) (for homeowners & board members)

WHEN: Friday, March 3, 2017, 4:00 p.m. WHERE: Shields Date Garden Theater, Indio CAI-CV’s Corks for CLAC Wine Tasting (for all members) WHEN: Friday, March 3, 2017, 5:30 p.m. WHERE: Shields Date Garden, Indio

In August, AlliedBarton Security Services and Universal Services of America announced a merger to form Allied Universal, a new security services and solutions company. The new organization has more than 140,000 employees and is the largest security services company in North America. Allied Universal, www.AUS.com, will maintain headquarters in Santa Ana, CA, and Conshohocken, PA. Along with Allied Universal Security Services, additional service lines include Allied Universal Security Systems, Allied Universal Janitorial Services and Allied Universal Staffing Services. Questions about the merger may be directed to Tim Albert, Business Development Manager at (951) 233-9476 or by email at tim.albert@AUS.com.

Profile for CAI-Coachella Valley Chapter

Quorum January 2017  

Desert Falls Community Associations Education for Board Members • Education for Homeowner Leaders • 2017 Publications for Board Members • Th...

Quorum January 2017  

Desert Falls Community Associations Education for Board Members • Education for Homeowner Leaders • 2017 Publications for Board Members • Th...

Profile for cai-cv