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GIVING REPORT 2018


The College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences is investing now in state-of-the-art buildings, technology and programming to meet the global demands graduates will encounter in their chosen professions.


Message from

THE DEAN On behalf of the entire college, thank you for the more than $25 million in donations this past year. With just 40 percent

THIS IS REALITY

In 2018, 1,771 donors helped enhance student learning opportunities, faculty research programs and college facilities.

of our funding coming from the state of California, it is only through your support that we’re able to continue to build for the future, training career-ready graduates ready to think big and make a difference. In 2018 we saw transformative gifts of past years come to life in remarkable ways, from the groundbreaking of the new JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture to the grand opening of the Oppenheimer Family Equine Center. We’ve seen increasing numbers of newer alumni give back as they progress in their careers, sent hundreds of students to experiential learning opportunities throughout the U.S. and world, and started to modernize our teaching and research facilities. Your support is helping to create a more innovative, progressive campus for the students of today and tomorrow. Together, we can take Learn by Doing into the future.

With my warm regards,

Andrew J. Thulin, Ph.D. Dean


ALUMNI SUPPORT

IT’S NEVER TOO SOON TO GIVE BACK. Alumnus Jake Odello, 27, a food safety manager for Foxy Produce in Salinas, California, is giving back to Cal Poly as the chair of the Agricultural Education and Communication Department’s advisory council. Odello, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural science in 2015, is the youngest member of the 13-person council which provides support and advice about the program, its students, curriculum, and other activities. “I feel very fortunate to be involved and think that having young people involved at a department advisory level is very important,” Odello said. “It makes sense on the surface to seek people that have 10 to 15 years of industry experience but as a new person to the industry, I provide a little different perspective.” Robert Flores, head of the department, said he was compelled to ask Odello to serve on the council because of his deep connection to Cal Poly and as a way to inspire other young alumni to continue their commitment to Cal Poly. “Jake was a role model student and he remains a role model as an alumnus of our program,” Flores said. “My hope is that his involvement will inspire others to maintain their connection to our program.” As a student at Cal Poly, Odello assumed multiple leadership roles, including as president of the Ag Ambassadors for the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences and serving on the university’s ASI leadership team. “The 02

“I encourage people of my age to give back in any way they can.” – Jake Odello

student leadership component of the programs offered at Cal Poly helped me build the interpersonal skills that I rely on today,” Odello said. While he originally planned to embrace his passion for the agriculture industry by teaching, an internship sparked his interest in food safety and he has stayed the course since. He now oversees the preharvest pathogen testing program and compliance areas for the ranches, harvesting and cooling systems of the Nunes Company, which includes the Foxy brand of leafy greens. In addition to volunteering his time to serve as chair of the advisory council, Odello has also contributed financially to the college. “Cal Poly provided the foundation and opportunities that have allowed me to enter the professional world prepared,” he said. “There are many ways to express your gratitude but hopefully one of those ways is giving back. I encourage people of my age to give back in any way they can.”


ENDOWMENTS

Greenhouse Production Endowed Professorship When longtime Professor Virginia Walter retired from the Horticulture and Crop Science Department in 2017 after 43 years at Cal Poly, she wanted to ensure that future students would be afforded the same hands-on teaching that she dedicated her career to.

Learn by Going Endowment George P. Johnson, a global creative agency that designs and delivers unique experiences that build brand devotion, donated $100,000 to Cal Poly’s Experience Industry Management Department. It is the largest gift in the department’s history. The gift will be used in two ways: to create a “Learn by Going” endowment to establish a permanent fund for students’ endeavors outside of the classroom and to offer immediate funding for students to participate in experiences outside of the classroom. “We are always trying to give students the extra edge outside of the classroom that is beneficial to them in their professional and academic involvement,” said Bill Hendricks, Experience Industry Management Department head. “These experiences give them direct connections with high level executives and potential employers at events, conferences and symposiums.” The George P. Johnson gift will support students in those endeavors for years to come, he said. The department holds an annual fundraiser to provide such funding — the donation nearly doubles the amount of funding now available to support students. The funds will be used for student professional development trips to the California Outlook Forum; Cal Travel Summit; IMEX America, a worldwide center for travel and events; and Dreamforce, the annual conference held by Salesforce in San Francisco. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the experiential teams at the San Francisco 49ers stadium and the Staples Center in Los Angeles. George P. Johnson has been an integral partner of Cal Poly’s Experience Industry Management Department, offering guest lectures and executive-in-residence offerings to students,

To secure this legacy, Walter launched the Greenhouse Production Endowed Professorship fund, donating $100,000 to kick off the fundraising effort. The Ball Horticultural Company and the G. Carl Ball Family Foundation recently donated a total of $100,000 toward the endowment’s fulfillment. “We are very happy to contribute to the Greenhouse Production Endowed Professorship Fund,” Anna Ball, president of the Ball Horticultural Co., said of the company’s partnership with Cal Poly to grow its horticulture program. “Professor Walter and Cal Poly have been huge supporters of our industry and the department has graduated many who are contributing a lot to our wonderful industry.” An initial amount of $1 million is needed to begin to generate enough interest on the principal of the donated amount to support a full professor’s salary. To date, nearly $250,000 has been raised by generous donors. Walter said of her legacy gift, “I have had the privilege of seeing these students go out into the real world and become successful members of the industry. This endowment will ensure their success.” The endowment will guarantee that greenhouse production classes continue to be part of the fabric of Cal Poly indefinitely. Courses include production of fresh flowers, flowering potted plants, foliage plants and edible greenhouse crops. This endowment will likewise ensure the needs of the greenhouse industry in California and beyond are met by providing well-educated and experienced graduates ready to make an impact.

keynote presentations, and providing more than a dozen internship opportunities for students each year. “Our partnership with George P. Johnson has continued the momentum of reshaping the department to meet the future demands of the industry and exposing students to higher levels of experiential marketing and event planning,” Hendricks said. “Students are able to experience immediate application of what they are learning in the classroom.” CAFES

03


STUDENT IMPACT

IN MEMORIAM A vivacious 26-year-old, Beatrice Lunday was the production manager at Cal Poly Chocolates and a research assistant to Cal Poly nutrition Professor Peggy Papathakis before she died of brain cancer in February 2017. Lunday’s family and Papathakis have partnered together

the department offers a robust master’s nutrition program.

to create the Beatrice Lunday Memorial Scholarship

In March 2017, one month after she died, Cal Poly awarded

Endowment, to provide a lasting legacy in her name.

Lunday a posthumous master of science degree in agriculture

Lunday, who earned a bachelor’s degree in nutrition in

with a specialization in food science and nutrition.

2013 and then pursued a master’s degree in nutrition,

The endowment will be used to provide scholarships in

was diagnosed with stage four glioblastoma in the second

perpetuity to students pursing their master’s degree in

quarter of her graduate studies. Glioblastoma is a fast-

nutrition – and provide a tribute to Lunday’s resilience

growing, aggressive type of tumor of the central nervous

in the face of adversity and passion for nutrition studies.

system that forms in the supportive tissue of the brain. She was experiencing the typical symptoms of persistent and debilitating headaches, nausea, vomiting and weight loss in her first quarter of graduate studies. In spite of this she achieved a 3.7 GPA, while also working part-time at Cal Poly Chocolates and Mama Ganache Artisan Chocolates to support herself. She placed a priority on her commitment to her studies. After her diagnosis, she withdrew from Cal Poly and underwent brain surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. She persevered to return to her dream of a professional career in nutrition and resumed her studies in the fall of 2015. She pressed on to finish taking classes and doing independent study to earn her master’s degree in spite of continuing monthly chemotherapy treatments. “She mentioned that after a few meltdowns after diagnosis and treatments, she decided that cancer was not going to define who she is,” Papathakis said. “In her optimism, she chose to look for a silver lining. This optimism influenced her to use her disease and treatment process to help others by completing her graduate studies and aiming to become a registered dietitian focused on nutritional management of cancer.” In the midst of her studies and treatment, Lunday organized graduate students in the Food Science and Nutrition Department to request that more graduate courses be offered since very few were offered at the time. Today,

04

The $25,000 endowment is only $3,500 away from being fully funded. To donate, contact Kelly Owens-Davalos at 805-756-6235.


Message from

THE DEAN On behalf of the entire college, thank you for the more than $25 million in donations this past year. With just 40 percent

THIS IS REALITY

In 2018, 1,771 donors helped enhance student learning opportunities, faculty research programs and college facilities.

of our funding coming from the state of California, it is only through your support that we’re able to continue to build for the future, training career-ready graduates ready to think big and make a difference. In 2018 we saw transformative gifts of past years come to life in remarkable ways, from the groundbreaking of the new JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture to the grand opening of the Oppenheimer Family Equine Center. We’ve seen increasing numbers of newer alumni give back as they progress in their careers, sent hundreds of students to experiential learning opportunities throughout the U.S. and world, and started to modernize our teaching and research facilities. Your support is helping to create a more innovative, progressive campus for the students of today and tomorrow. Together, we can take Learn by Doing into the future.

With my warm regards,

Andrew J. Thulin, Ph.D. Dean


ALUMNI SUPPORT

IT’S NEVER TOO SOON TO GIVE BACK. Alumnus Jake Odello, 27, a food safety manager for Foxy Produce in Salinas, California, is giving back to Cal Poly as the chair of the Agricultural Education and Communication Department’s advisory council. Odello, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural science in 2015, is the youngest member of the 13-person council which provides support and advice about the program, its students, curriculum, and other activities. “I feel very fortunate to be involved and think that having young people involved at a department advisory level is very important,” Odello said. “It makes sense on the surface to seek people that have 10 to 15 years of industry experience but as a new person to the industry, I provide a little different perspective.” Robert Flores, head of the department, said he was compelled to ask Odello to serve on the council because of his deep connection to Cal Poly and as a way to inspire other young alumni to continue their commitment to Cal Poly. “Jake was a role model student and he remains a role model as an alumnus of our program,” Flores said. “My hope is that his involvement will inspire others to maintain their connection to our program.” As a student at Cal Poly, Odello assumed multiple leadership roles, including as president of the Ag Ambassadors for the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences and serving on the university’s ASI leadership team. “The 02

“I encourage people of my age to give back in any way they can.” – Jake Odello

student leadership component of the programs offered at Cal Poly helped me build the interpersonal skills that I rely on today,” Odello said. While he originally planned to embrace his passion for the agriculture industry by teaching, an internship sparked his interest in food safety and he has stayed the course since. He now oversees the preharvest pathogen testing program and compliance areas for the ranches, harvesting and cooling systems of the Nunes Company, which includes the Foxy brand of leafy greens. In addition to volunteering his time to serve as chair of the advisory council, Odello has also contributed financially to the college. “Cal Poly provided the foundation and opportunities that have allowed me to enter the professional world prepared,” he said. “There are many ways to express your gratitude but hopefully one of those ways is giving back. I encourage people of my age to give back in any way they can.”


ENDOWMENTS

Greenhouse Production Endowed Professorship When longtime Professor Virginia Walter retired from the Horticulture and Crop Science Department in 2017 after 43 years at Cal Poly, she wanted to ensure that future students would be afforded the same hands-on teaching that she dedicated her career to.

Learn by Going Endowment George P. Johnson, a global creative agency that designs and delivers unique experiences that build brand devotion, donated $100,000 to Cal Poly’s Experience Industry Management Department. It is the largest gift in the department’s history. The gift will be used in two ways: to create a “Learn by Going” endowment to establish a permanent fund for students’ endeavors outside of the classroom and to offer immediate funding for students to participate in experiences outside of the classroom. “We are always trying to give students the extra edge outside of the classroom that is beneficial to them in their professional and academic involvement,” said Bill Hendricks, Experience Industry Management Department head. “These experiences give them direct connections with high level executives and potential employers at events, conferences and symposiums.” The George P. Johnson gift will support students in those endeavors for years to come, he said. The department holds an annual fundraiser to provide such funding — the donation nearly doubles the amount of funding now available to support students. The funds will be used for student professional development trips to the California Outlook Forum; Cal Travel Summit; IMEX America, a worldwide center for travel and events; and Dreamforce, the annual conference held by Salesforce in San Francisco. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the experiential teams at the San Francisco 49ers stadium and the Staples Center in Los Angeles. George P. Johnson has been an integral partner of Cal Poly’s Experience Industry Management Department, offering guest lectures and executive-in-residence offerings to students,

To secure this legacy, Walter launched the Greenhouse Production Endowed Professorship fund, donating $100,000 to kick off the fundraising effort. The Ball Horticultural Company and the G. Carl Ball Family Foundation recently donated a total of $100,000 toward the endowment’s fulfillment. “We are very happy to contribute to the Greenhouse Production Endowed Professorship Fund,” Anna Ball, president of the Ball Horticultural Co., said of the company’s partnership with Cal Poly to grow its horticulture program. “Professor Walter and Cal Poly have been huge supporters of our industry and the department has graduated many who are contributing a lot to our wonderful industry.” An initial amount of $1 million is needed to begin to generate enough interest on the principal of the donated amount to support a full professor’s salary. To date, nearly $250,000 has been raised by generous donors. Walter said of her legacy gift, “I have had the privilege of seeing these students go out into the real world and become successful members of the industry. This endowment will ensure their success.” The endowment will guarantee that greenhouse production classes continue to be part of the fabric of Cal Poly indefinitely. Courses include production of fresh flowers, flowering potted plants, foliage plants and edible greenhouse crops. This endowment will likewise ensure the needs of the greenhouse industry in California and beyond are met by providing well-educated and experienced graduates ready to make an impact.

keynote presentations, and providing more than a dozen internship opportunities for students each year. “Our partnership with George P. Johnson has continued the momentum of reshaping the department to meet the future demands of the industry and exposing students to higher levels of experiential marketing and event planning,” Hendricks said. “Students are able to experience immediate application of what they are learning in the classroom.” CAFES

03


DONOR PROFILE

“When I think about rodeo, I think about the generations of families that have been coming to Cal Poly for years.” – Connie Pearce

THE TIES THAT BIND.

Family, Rodeo and Giving Back. For Clint and Connie Pearce rodeo isn’t just a sport, it’s an enduring love story. The husband and wife, both with deep ties to Cal Poly, met on the high school and college rodeo circuit, and have been together ever since.

“When I think about rodeo, I think about the generations of families that have been coming to Cal Poly for years,” Connie Pearce said. “It’s like a family reunion when you go to Poly Royal. It’s a celebration of Western heritage.”

It’s a passion that was passed on to them by their families and one that they have shared with their own children, son Dalton and daughter Audrey (Agricultural Communication, ’16 and Psychology, ’18). “I always knew that was the place where I stayed centered, was mentally at my best and stayed physically healthy,” Connie Pearce said. “I wanted my children to have the same experience. Today, I watch my daughter ride and it is simply beautiful to watch.”

Clint and Connie Pearce started a rodeo team at the local community college, Cuesta College, five years ago when their son attended the school, in part to create a feeder team for the Cal Poly Rodeo program. The team ranked second in the West Coast Region and fourth in the nation at the College National Finals Rodeo in 2018. “Rodeo is what drew me to Cal Poly and what kept me going strong to finish,” Clint Pearce said. “Rodeo is a special part of our culture on the Central Coast and Cal Poly’s history. It has always been very impactful in our lives and I really feel strongly about having a role in helping it continue and flourish in the future to benefit a lot more student athletes.”

Their connection to Cal Poly runs as deep as their love for rodeo. Connie, the youngest of four siblings of Alex and Phyllis Madonna, who built the iconic Madonna Inn in San Luis Obispo, said it has been a long family tradition to support the Cal Poly Rodeo program, something they first started in the 1950s. Clint (Agricultural Business, ’91), whose parents both attended Cal Poly, and Connie, whose siblings all attended Cal Poly, have continued that tradition by providing a space for the Cal Poly Rodeo Team to hold their annual banquet and providing other vital support behind the scenes to the program. Their contributions have allowed the team to focus on gaining additional sponsorships and growing the program.

Clint Pearce said his philosophy is to be where you are needed. “A lot of people can write a check and that can be very helpful,” he said. “The best way for us to help out is by giving our time and helping with the hospitality side of things because that is what we do. We try to contribute where it is meaningful and where there might be a void that we can help fill.”

CAFES

05


BY THE NUMBERS Total gift commitments raised by the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) and Cal Poly in the last six fiscal years.

Year

Cal Poly

CAFES

2012-13

$42,468,045

$20,690,239

2013-14

$44,129,765

$14,618,091

2014-15

$71,848,329

$37,728,514

2015-16

$85,988,889

$16,841,139

2016-17

$141,591,440

$9,346,548

$80 M

CAFES raised

$70 M

$80 M

$60 M

NEW PLEDGES

TESTAMENTARY

GIFT COMMITMENTS

$2,134,984

$10,200,000

$0

$12,334,984

$3,309,894

$800,000

$0

$4,109,894

$1,135,769

$2,017,793

$150,000

$3,303,562

ns

Gift Commitments to of $2,580,354 $0 the College $3,264,234 $1,182,159Agriculture, $52,500 Food and $0 Environmental $1,234,659 Sciences by Constituency and Gift Type $939,658 $0 $0 $939,658

rtia

$47,830

$0

$0

$9,434,173

$15,650,647

$150,000

Corporations

$4,109,984

Foundations

$2,134,984

Testamentary

$3,309,894Other Parents Organizations

NEW PLEDGES

PLANNED GIFTS

GIFT COMMITMENTS

$10,200,000

$0

$12,334,984

Fundraising $800,000 Consortia

$0

$4,109,894

Alumni

$1,135,769

$2,017,793

$150,000

$3,303,562

Other Individuals

$683,880

$2,580,354

$0

$3,264,234

Parents

$1,182,159

$52,500

$0

$1,234,659

$3,303,652

$3,264,234

Fundraising Consortia*

Total

$939,658 $1,234,659

$47,830

$0

$939,658

$0

$0

$47,830

$15,650,647

$150,000

$25,234,820

$0 $939,658

$9,434,173

$47,830

*Examples include charitable funds and community impact funds.

2017-18 GIFT COMMITMENT BREAKDOWN 9

,269,049

06

$5,731,589

WN*

$25.2M

$25,234,820

NEW GIFTS

Other Organizations

334,984

New Pledges

TOTAL GIFT COMMITMENTS

$47,830

CONSTITUENCY GROUP

$16,100,000

dations

New Gifts

$683,880

Corporations Other Alumni Individuals

30.5%

$0 M

NEW GIFTS

2017-18

$38 M

$10 M

CAFES raised

2014-15

raised campuswide $20 M in ďŹ scal year 2017-18

$20.7 M

2011

$0 M

of a total

$30 M

$82.6 million

2012-13

$0 M

$40 M

$11.7 M

$10 M

CAFES

$50 M

2011-12

$10 M

Funds Raised by CAFES

$20 M

$20 M

2015 2014-15 $71.9 M $38 M

$30 M

$30 M

2014 2012-13 $49.2 M $20.7 M

$40 M

CAL POLY

$42.6 M 2013 2011-12 $11.7 M

$50 M

$25,234,820

30.5%

$60 M

$40 M

2012 2010-11 $28.6 M $8.7 M

$60 M

$70 M

$50 M

$24.7 M

Funds Raised by CAFES

Funds Raised at Campus Level

$71.9 M 2015

$49.2 M

$70 M

0

UP

2014

2013

$42.6 M

$82,668,610

$8.7 M

$80 M

2010-11

2017-18

of a total

$82.6 million

raised campuswide in fiscal year 2017-18


Corporations

$3,309,894

$800,000

$0

$4,109,894

Alumni

$1,135,769

$2,017,793

$150,000

$3,303,562

Other Individuals

$683,880

$2,580,354

$0

$3,264,234

Parents

$1,182,159

$52,500

$0

$1,234,659

All donations, whether large have a significant the success Other Organizations $939,658or small, $0 $0 impact on $939,658 of theConsortia* College of$47,830 Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences. Fundraising $0 $0 $47,830 Total

$9,434,173

$15,650,647

$150,000

$25,234,820

*Examples include charitable funds and community impact funds.

$813,504

1,904

360

85

17

5

AVE. GIFT SIZE

$170

$2.2K

$27K

$337K

$3.2M

$1,000-$9,999

$10,000-$99,999

$100,000-$999,999

$1,000,000+

$16,100,000

$5,731,589

$320,678

#OF GIFTS

<$1,000

$2,269,049

2017-18 GIFT COMMITMENT BREAKDOWN

TOTAL RAISED

MONETARY CATEGORIES OF GIFT SIZE

30+ YEARS

2017-18

Milestone Giving Stats:

2017-18 GIFT/DONOR COUNTS

30

$3.1 Million Recognizing the long history of giving to the College TOTAL NUMBER OF GIFTS of Agriculture, Food and 10TH ANNIVERSARY Environmental Sciences

2,371

1,771 FIRST YEAR GIVING

51

TOTAL NUMBER OF DONORS

$663 K

518

TOTAL NUMBER OF GIFTS

4,800 first-year and 1,000 transfer students applied to attend the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences in 2018

TOTAL DOLLARS RAISED

$25,234,820

30TH ANNIVERSARY

11

20-29 YEARS

283

2017-18 MATCHING GIFTS

$1.9 Million

5-9 YEARS

$50.8 Million

75

20TH ANNIVERSARY

10-19 YEARS

$424 K

$46.7 Million

51

NUMBER OF MATCHING GIFTS

5TH ANNIVERSARY

1-4 YEARS

325 $18,611 67 1009

$18.9 Million

508

$5.6 Million

1ST YEAR OF GIVING

518

TOTAL DOLLARS IN MATCHING GIFTS

$15.2 Million

$4.5 Million

$4.5 Million TOTAL NUMBER OF DOLLARS

4.02 The average GPA of incoming freshmen who applied directly from high school

900 freshmen and 185 transfer students comprise the incoming Class of 2018

CAFES

07


BUILDING AND INNOVATION

Oppenheimer Family Equine Center

NOW OPEN TO STUDENTS The College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences celebrated the completion of the first phase of the new Oppenheimer Family Equine Center in June. It is the first of several capital improvements underway by the college, all funded by the generous support of private donors. The now-complete 60,000-square-foot covered riding area,

Cal Poly manages a herd of more than 125 horses, used

foaling barn, stallion barn and hay barn at the northern end

in its riding classes, dressage and equestrian teams, pack-

of Cal Poly’s campus was funded by a $20 million donation

horse enterprise, quarter horse, breeding and colt starting

made to the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental

programs. Students from across campus will benefit from

Sciences from longtime Cal Poly supporters Peter and Mary

the equine center, with programs including a foaling and

Beth Oppenheimer.

breeding enterprise, a quarter horse enterprise, the Cal Poly

“We are grateful to the Oppenheimers for supporting the vision of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences and investing in facilities and

08

Dressage Team, the Cal Poly Polo Team and the Cal Poly Equestrian Team. As many as 200 students will use the new facilities in some capacity daily.

programs that will support generations of students to

A second riding arena, an Animal Health Center and

come,” Dean Andrew Thulin said. “It is partners like Peter

an Agriculture Event Center, all funded in some part by

and Mary Beth Oppenheimer who allow us to reach our full

the Oppenheimers’ donation, are also in various stages

potential in providing the best for our students.”

of planning.


BUILDING AND INNOVATION

The Taylor Farms Food Safety Laboratory Cal Poly has ambitious plans to accelerate food innovation

To honor the $1 million pledge from Taylor Farms, a food

through the development of new, state-of-the-art facilities

safety teaching and research space will be named The Taylor

across campus. In 2019, the university will begin building

Farms Food Safety Laboratory.

a new $123 million Science and Agriculture Teaching and Research Complex that will house culinary, sensory, food safety and product development labs. As the fifth largest undergraduate agriculture and food program in the country, and one of only two International Food Technology (IFT)-approved food science programs in California, Cal Poly is a national leader in educating and training the next generation of chefs, food entrepreneurs, nutritionists, dietitians and food scientists. Cal Poly is finalizing plans for the new, 100,000-square-foot facility, which will be located in the heart of campus. The complex will serve as a hub for students and industry to gather and share knowledge, and will feature open-concept, food-forward facilities designed in consultation with the Culinary Institute of America. Fundraising is 80 percent complete, with lead gifts secured from private industry partners including J.G. Boswell, the Oreggia Family Foundation, and Taylor Farms, a family owned leading producer of fresh foods based in Salinas, California,

Fueling Student Success Agricultural science major and fruit science minor Rafael Pintor, from Mission Viejo, California, and recent food science alumnus Peter Haverkamp from San Juan Capistrano, California, worked with a team of fellow students to launch an innovative food company that is turning Native American superfoods into everyday nutritious snacks and returning value to the Navajo Nation Reservation. These self-driven students partnered with Cal Polyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship to receive the practical training and connection to investors and resources, to help move their business forward. The Pinyon Superfood Bar is available throughout San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties, with an expansion of new products planned for the fall. To learn more about the superfood bar, visit www.atsafoods.com.

with 14 production facilities throughout North America.

CAFES

09


BUILDING AND INNOVATION

Photo credit: Brittany App

The Center for Wine and Viticulture Named in Recognition of Two Key Donors In recognition of the generosity and philanthropic support of two vital donors to the building of Cal Poly’s Center for Wine and Viticulture, the center will be named the JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture.

Lynda and Stewart Resnick, owners of JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery, a familyrun winery that focuses on Bordeaux varieties and syrah in west Paso Robles, donated $2.5 million to Cal Poly’s campaign to build the Center for Wine and Viticulture. Jerry Lohr of J. Lohr Vineyards, an industry icon also based in Paso Robles, also committed $2.5 million in funding. “The local wine community has stepped forward in support of this project, solidifying a partnership with Cal Poly that will not only benefit students for years to come, but provide the rigorously trained talent that the wine industry depends on,” said Andrew Thulin, dean of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences. The JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture’s new winery is anticipated to open in late 2019. To date, more than $14.5 million has been raised. “Cal Poly has demonstrated the university’s commitment to providing future generations of wine makers

10


The JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture is a donor-funded project that will enhance the Wine and Viticulture

MAJOR GIFT DONORS TO DATE Jerry Lohr

program at Cal Poly for years to come. The geographic locale of

JUSTIN Vineyard and Winery

Cal Poly positions it at the heart of California’s Central Coast –

Mike and Suzy Leprino

providing students with hands-on access to vineyards and wineries

Oreggia Family Foundation The Wagner Foundation

to learn first-hand from some of the wine industry’s top leaders and

Trinchero Family Estates

some of the country’s best winemakers. Students, who benefit from

McManis Family Vineyards

Cal Poly’s philosophy of Learn by Doing, have access to thousands of award-winning wineries throughout the state, providing abundant internship and research opportunities.

Dana and Marsha Merrill Bob and Marie Torkelson The Ledbetter Family Peter and Liz McKinley Steven Carter Martinez Orchards Cecile and Richard Kruse Paul and Charles Burkner Harold J. Miossi Charitable Trust Gaylord McCool Rodney and Gayla Schatz Casity Farms

and vintners and its support of the

the countless volunteers who stepped

wine industry at a national level,” said

forward and the leadership and

Stewart Resnick, co-owner of JUSTIN

persistence of our longtime supporters,

Vineyards & Winery. “Our investment

including Jerry Lohr who has been with

in the Cal Poly Center for Wine and

the project since its inception and led the

Compli

Viticulture signifies our commitment

charge in rallying the wine community

Scott Laboratories

to a partnership that will allow the

to support our vision for the future,”

Pellenc

industry to continue to prosper. We are

Thulin said. “The symbiotic relationship

not just giving back, we are investing

that is shared by Cal Poly and the wine

Burt and Virginia Polin Charitable Trust

in the future.”

industry nationwide will now

Peszynski Family

be commemorated brick by brick.”

ETS Laboratories

The JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture will include

The growth of Cal Poly’s Wine and

both a 15,600-square-foot winery

Viticulture program – the largest of its

and a 12,000-square-foot grange hall.

kind in the U.S., is in response to the

The buildings will include crush,

increased demand for wine industry

fermentation, barrel, sensory, bottling,

professionals.

enology and viticulture rooms, as well as teaching and research labs, a bonded winery, offices, and community and industry meeting spaces. Professional partners in the project include TLCD Architecture as the executive architects, Von Raesfeld & Associates as the winery consulting architects, and JW Design & Construction as the contractor.

“I am elated to celebrate the start of construction of the Center for Wine and Viticulture – a vision that I have supported since the beginning,” Lohr said. “With the partnership of JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery, years of planning will now emerge as the preeminent program for wine and viticulture

Hal Huffsmith The Lauchland Trust The Gallo Family

We sincerely thank the anonymous donors who have contributed to the project. We also thank the members of the Cal Poly Wine and Viticulture fundraising committee, comprised of industry professionals, including: Jerry Lohr, chair, Vicki Carroll, Paul Burkner, Steve Burns, Pat DeLong, Dana Merrill and Dennis Stroud.

students in the nation.”

“We would not be where we are today, ready to begin construction, without CAFES

11


A Message from the

FUNDRAISING TEAM Cal Poly Family,

Russ Kabaker

The campus is abuzz with capital projects as years of planning and fundraising efforts are coming to fruition. We celebrated the grand opening of the Oppenheimer Family Equine Center in June – the first of several capital improvements that will benefit our students for years to come. And, we began construction on the Center for Wine and Viticulture this summer, with plans to open the winery by 2019. This is only the beginning. All of these great milestones are due to our supporters – without your generosity, these great achievements being made to support future generations of students would not be possible. This is the reality we face today.

Tim Northrop

Private support and industry partnerships guarantee that the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences continues to offer the best programs available to all of our students. Without private philanthropic support, new buildings and programs would be impossible. Please do not hesitate to reach out to anyone on our team if you have any questions about the varying ways to provide student support. No matter how big or small the donation – it all goes to the merit of what is being achieved. I thank you. Our students thank you.

Russ Kabaker Assistant Dean, Advancement and External Relations Allyson Fischlin

12

#calpolygrown


DONOR PROFILE

“When I think about rodeo, I think about the generations of families that have been coming to Cal Poly for years.” – Connie Pearce

THE TIES THAT BIND.

Family, Rodeo and Giving Back. For Clint and Connie Pearce rodeo isn’t just a sport, it’s an enduring love story. The husband and wife, both with deep ties to Cal Poly, met on the high school and college rodeo circuit, and have been together ever since.

“When I think about rodeo, I think about the generations of families that have been coming to Cal Poly for years,” Connie Pearce said. “It’s like a family reunion when you go to Poly Royal. It’s a celebration of Western heritage.”

It’s a passion that was passed on to them by their families and one that they have shared with their own children, son Dalton and daughter Audrey (Agricultural Communication, ’16 and Psychology, ’18). “I always knew that was the place where I stayed centered, was mentally at my best and stayed physically healthy,” Connie Pearce said. “I wanted my children to have the same experience. Today, I watch my daughter ride and it is simply beautiful to watch.”

Clint and Connie Pearce started a rodeo team at the local community college, Cuesta College, five years ago when their son attended the school, in part to create a feeder team for the Cal Poly Rodeo program. The team ranked second in the West Coast Region and fourth in the nation at the College National Finals Rodeo in 2018. “Rodeo is what drew me to Cal Poly and what kept me going strong to finish,” Clint Pearce said. “Rodeo is a special part of our culture on the Central Coast and Cal Poly’s history. It has always been very impactful in our lives and I really feel strongly about having a role in helping it continue and flourish in the future to benefit a lot more student athletes.”

Their connection to Cal Poly runs as deep as their love for rodeo. Connie, the youngest of four siblings of Alex and Phyllis Madonna, who built the iconic Madonna Inn in San Luis Obispo, said it has been a long family tradition to support the Cal Poly Rodeo program, something they first started in the 1950s. Clint (Agricultural Business, ’91), whose parents both attended Cal Poly, and Connie, whose siblings all attended Cal Poly, have continued that tradition by providing a space for the Cal Poly Rodeo Team to hold their annual banquet and providing other vital support behind the scenes to the program. Their contributions have allowed the team to focus on gaining additional sponsorships and growing the program.

Clint Pearce said his philosophy is to be where you are needed. “A lot of people can write a check and that can be very helpful,” he said. “The best way for us to help out is by giving our time and helping with the hospitality side of things because that is what we do. We try to contribute where it is meaningful and where there might be a void that we can help fill.”

CAFES

05


BY THE NUMBERS Total gift commitments raised by the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) and Cal Poly in the last six fiscal years.

Year

Cal Poly

CAFES

2012-13

$42,468,045

$20,690,239

2013-14

$44,129,765

$14,618,091

2014-15

$71,848,329

$37,728,514

2015-16

$85,988,889

$16,841,139

2016-17

$141,591,440

$9,346,548

$80 M

CAFES raised

$70 M

$80 M

$60 M

NEW PLEDGES

TESTAMENTARY

GIFT COMMITMENTS

$2,134,984

$10,200,000

$0

$12,334,984

$3,309,894

$800,000

$0

$4,109,894

$1,135,769

$2,017,793

$150,000

$3,303,562

ns

Gift Commitments to of $2,580,354 $0 the College $3,264,234 $1,182,159Agriculture, $52,500 Food and $0 Environmental $1,234,659 Sciences by Constituency and Gift Type $939,658 $0 $0 $939,658

rtia

$47,830

$0

$0

$9,434,173

$15,650,647

$150,000

Corporations

$4,109,984

Foundations

$2,134,984

Testamentary

$3,309,894Other Parents Organizations

NEW PLEDGES

PLANNED GIFTS

GIFT COMMITMENTS

$10,200,000

$0

$12,334,984

Fundraising $800,000 Consortia

$0

$4,109,894

Alumni

$1,135,769

$2,017,793

$150,000

$3,303,562

Other Individuals

$683,880

$2,580,354

$0

$3,264,234

Parents

$1,182,159

$52,500

$0

$1,234,659

$3,303,652

$3,264,234

Fundraising Consortia*

Total

$939,658 $1,234,659

$47,830

$0

$939,658

$0

$0

$47,830

$15,650,647

$150,000

$25,234,820

$0 $939,658

$9,434,173

$47,830

*Examples include charitable funds and community impact funds.

2017-18 GIFT COMMITMENT BREAKDOWN 9

,269,049

06

$5,731,589

WN*

$25.2M

$25,234,820

NEW GIFTS

Other Organizations

334,984

New Pledges

TOTAL GIFT COMMITMENTS

$47,830

CONSTITUENCY GROUP

$16,100,000

dations

New Gifts

$683,880

Corporations Other Alumni Individuals

30.5%

$0 M

NEW GIFTS

2017-18

$38 M

$10 M

CAFES raised

2014-15

raised campuswide $20 M in ďŹ scal year 2017-18

$20.7 M

2011

$0 M

of a total

$30 M

$82.6 million

2012-13

$0 M

$40 M

$11.7 M

$10 M

CAFES

$50 M

2011-12

$10 M

Funds Raised by CAFES

$20 M

$20 M

2015 2014-15 $71.9 M $38 M

$30 M

$30 M

2014 2012-13 $49.2 M $20.7 M

$40 M

CAL POLY

$42.6 M 2013 2011-12 $11.7 M

$50 M

$25,234,820

30.5%

$60 M

$40 M

2012 2010-11 $28.6 M $8.7 M

$60 M

$70 M

$50 M

$24.7 M

Funds Raised by CAFES

Funds Raised at Campus Level

$71.9 M 2015

$49.2 M

$70 M

0

UP

2014

2013

$42.6 M

$82,668,610

$8.7 M

$80 M

2010-11

2017-18

of a total

$82.6 million

raised campuswide in fiscal year 2017-18


Corporations

$3,309,894

$800,000

$0

$4,109,894

Alumni

$1,135,769

$2,017,793

$150,000

$3,303,562

Other Individuals

$683,880

$2,580,354

$0

$3,264,234

Parents

$1,182,159

$52,500

$0

$1,234,659

All donations, whether large have a significant the success Other Organizations $939,658or small, $0 $0 impact on $939,658 of theConsortia* College of$47,830 Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences. Fundraising $0 $0 $47,830 Total

$9,434,173

$15,650,647

$150,000

$25,234,820

*Examples include charitable funds and community impact funds.

$813,504

1,904

360

85

17

5

AVE. GIFT SIZE

$170

$2.2K

$27K

$337K

$3.2M

$1,000-$9,999

$10,000-$99,999

$100,000-$999,999

$1,000,000+

$16,100,000

$5,731,589

$320,678

#OF GIFTS

<$1,000

$2,269,049

2017-18 GIFT COMMITMENT BREAKDOWN

TOTAL RAISED

MONETARY CATEGORIES OF GIFT SIZE

30+ YEARS

2017-18

Milestone Giving Stats:

2017-18 GIFT/DONOR COUNTS

30

$3.1 Million Recognizing the long history of giving to the College TOTAL NUMBER OF GIFTS of Agriculture, Food and 10TH ANNIVERSARY Environmental Sciences

2,371

1,771 FIRST YEAR GIVING

51

TOTAL NUMBER OF DONORS

$663 K

518

TOTAL NUMBER OF GIFTS

4,800 first-year and 1,000 transfer students applied to attend the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences in 2018

TOTAL DOLLARS RAISED

$25,234,820

30TH ANNIVERSARY

11

20-29 YEARS

283

2017-18 MATCHING GIFTS

$1.9 Million

5-9 YEARS

$50.8 Million

75

20TH ANNIVERSARY

10-19 YEARS

$424 K

$46.7 Million

51

NUMBER OF MATCHING GIFTS

5TH ANNIVERSARY

1-4 YEARS

325 $18,611 67 1009

$18.9 Million

508

$5.6 Million

1ST YEAR OF GIVING

518

TOTAL DOLLARS IN MATCHING GIFTS

$15.2 Million

$4.5 Million

$4.5 Million TOTAL NUMBER OF DOLLARS

4.02 The average GPA of incoming freshmen who applied directly from high school

900 freshmen and 185 transfer students comprise the incoming Class of 2018

CAFES

07


BUILDING AND INNOVATION

Oppenheimer Family Equine Center

NOW OPEN TO STUDENTS The College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences celebrated the completion of the first phase of the new Oppenheimer Family Equine Center in June. It is the first of several capital improvements underway by the college, all funded by the generous support of private donors. The now-complete 60,000-square-foot covered riding area,

Cal Poly manages a herd of more than 125 horses, used

foaling barn, stallion barn and hay barn at the northern end

in its riding classes, dressage and equestrian teams, pack-

of Cal Poly’s campus was funded by a $20 million donation

horse enterprise, quarter horse, breeding and colt starting

made to the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental

programs. Students from across campus will benefit from

Sciences from longtime Cal Poly supporters Peter and Mary

the equine center, with programs including a foaling and

Beth Oppenheimer.

breeding enterprise, a quarter horse enterprise, the Cal Poly

“We are grateful to the Oppenheimers for supporting the vision of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences and investing in facilities and

08

Dressage Team, the Cal Poly Polo Team and the Cal Poly Equestrian Team. As many as 200 students will use the new facilities in some capacity daily.

programs that will support generations of students to

A second riding arena, an Animal Health Center and

come,” Dean Andrew Thulin said. “It is partners like Peter

an Agriculture Event Center, all funded in some part by

and Mary Beth Oppenheimer who allow us to reach our full

the Oppenheimers’ donation, are also in various stages

potential in providing the best for our students.”

of planning.


BUILDING AND INNOVATION

The Taylor Farms Food Safety Laboratory Cal Poly has ambitious plans to accelerate food innovation

To honor the $1 million pledge from Taylor Farms, a food

through the development of new, state-of-the-art facilities

safety teaching and research space will be named The Taylor

across campus. In 2019, the university will begin building

Farms Food Safety Laboratory.

a new $123 million Science and Agriculture Teaching and Research Complex that will house culinary, sensory, food safety and product development labs. As the fifth largest undergraduate agriculture and food program in the country, and one of only two International Food Technology (IFT)-approved food science programs in California, Cal Poly is a national leader in educating and training the next generation of chefs, food entrepreneurs, nutritionists, dietitians and food scientists. Cal Poly is finalizing plans for the new, 100,000-square-foot facility, which will be located in the heart of campus. The complex will serve as a hub for students and industry to gather and share knowledge, and will feature open-concept, food-forward facilities designed in consultation with the Culinary Institute of America. Fundraising is 80 percent complete, with lead gifts secured from private industry partners including J.G. Boswell, the Oreggia Family Foundation, and Taylor Farms, a family owned leading producer of fresh foods based in Salinas, California,

Fueling Student Success Agricultural science major and fruit science minor Rafael Pintor, from Mission Viejo, California, and recent food science alumnus Peter Haverkamp from San Juan Capistrano, California, worked with a team of fellow students to launch an innovative food company that is turning Native American superfoods into everyday nutritious snacks and returning value to the Navajo Nation Reservation. These self-driven students partnered with Cal Polyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship to receive the practical training and connection to investors and resources, to help move their business forward. The Pinyon Superfood Bar is available throughout San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties, with an expansion of new products planned for the fall. To learn more about the superfood bar, visit www.atsafoods.com.

with 14 production facilities throughout North America.

CAFES

09


BUILDING AND INNOVATION

Photo credit: Brittany App

The Center for Wine and Viticulture Named in Recognition of Two Key Donors In recognition of the generosity and philanthropic support of two vital donors to the building of Cal Poly’s Center for Wine and Viticulture, the center will be named the JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture.

Lynda and Stewart Resnick, owners of JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery, a familyrun winery that focuses on Bordeaux varieties and syrah in west Paso Robles, donated $2.5 million to Cal Poly’s campaign to build the Center for Wine and Viticulture. Jerry Lohr of J. Lohr Vineyards, an industry icon also based in Paso Robles, also committed $2.5 million in funding. “The local wine community has stepped forward in support of this project, solidifying a partnership with Cal Poly that will not only benefit students for years to come, but provide the rigorously trained talent that the wine industry depends on,” said Andrew Thulin, dean of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences. The JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture’s new winery is anticipated to open in late 2019. To date, more than $14.5 million has been raised. “Cal Poly has demonstrated the university’s commitment to providing future generations of wine makers

10


The JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture is a donor-funded project that will enhance the Wine and Viticulture

MAJOR GIFT DONORS TO DATE Jerry Lohr

program at Cal Poly for years to come. The geographic locale of

JUSTIN Vineyard and Winery

Cal Poly positions it at the heart of California’s Central Coast –

Mike and Suzy Leprino

providing students with hands-on access to vineyards and wineries

Oreggia Family Foundation The Wagner Foundation

to learn first-hand from some of the wine industry’s top leaders and

Trinchero Family Estates

some of the country’s best winemakers. Students, who benefit from

McManis Family Vineyards

Cal Poly’s philosophy of Learn by Doing, have access to thousands of award-winning wineries throughout the state, providing abundant internship and research opportunities.

Dana and Marsha Merrill Bob and Marie Torkelson The Ledbetter Family Peter and Liz McKinley Steven Carter Martinez Orchards Cecile and Richard Kruse Paul and Charles Burkner Harold J. Miossi Charitable Trust Gaylord McCool Rodney and Gayla Schatz Casity Farms

and vintners and its support of the

the countless volunteers who stepped

wine industry at a national level,” said

forward and the leadership and

Stewart Resnick, co-owner of JUSTIN

persistence of our longtime supporters,

Vineyards & Winery. “Our investment

including Jerry Lohr who has been with

in the Cal Poly Center for Wine and

the project since its inception and led the

Compli

Viticulture signifies our commitment

charge in rallying the wine community

Scott Laboratories

to a partnership that will allow the

to support our vision for the future,”

Pellenc

industry to continue to prosper. We are

Thulin said. “The symbiotic relationship

not just giving back, we are investing

that is shared by Cal Poly and the wine

Burt and Virginia Polin Charitable Trust

in the future.”

industry nationwide will now

Peszynski Family

be commemorated brick by brick.”

ETS Laboratories

The JUSTIN and J. LOHR Center for Wine and Viticulture will include

The growth of Cal Poly’s Wine and

both a 15,600-square-foot winery

Viticulture program – the largest of its

and a 12,000-square-foot grange hall.

kind in the U.S., is in response to the

The buildings will include crush,

increased demand for wine industry

fermentation, barrel, sensory, bottling,

professionals.

enology and viticulture rooms, as well as teaching and research labs, a bonded winery, offices, and community and industry meeting spaces. Professional partners in the project include TLCD Architecture as the executive architects, Von Raesfeld & Associates as the winery consulting architects, and JW Design & Construction as the contractor.

“I am elated to celebrate the start of construction of the Center for Wine and Viticulture – a vision that I have supported since the beginning,” Lohr said. “With the partnership of JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery, years of planning will now emerge as the preeminent program for wine and viticulture

Hal Huffsmith The Lauchland Trust The Gallo Family

We sincerely thank the anonymous donors who have contributed to the project. We also thank the members of the Cal Poly Wine and Viticulture fundraising committee, comprised of industry professionals, including: Jerry Lohr, chair, Vicki Carroll, Paul Burkner, Steve Burns, Pat DeLong, Dana Merrill and Dennis Stroud.

students in the nation.”

“We would not be where we are today, ready to begin construction, without CAFES

11


A Message from the

FUNDRAISING TEAM Cal Poly Family,

Russ Kabaker

The campus is abuzz with capital projects as years of planning and fundraising efforts are coming to fruition. We celebrated the grand opening of the Oppenheimer Family Equine Center in June – the first of several capital improvements that will benefit our students for years to come. And, we began construction on the Center for Wine and Viticulture this summer, with plans to open the winery by 2019. This is only the beginning. All of these great milestones are due to our supporters – without your generosity, these great achievements being made to support future generations of students would not be possible. This is the reality we face today.

Tim Northrop

Private support and industry partnerships guarantee that the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences continues to offer the best programs available to all of our students. Without private philanthropic support, new buildings and programs would be impossible. Please do not hesitate to reach out to anyone on our team if you have any questions about the varying ways to provide student support. No matter how big or small the donation – it all goes to the merit of what is being achieved. I thank you. Our students thank you.

Russ Kabaker Assistant Dean, Advancement and External Relations Allyson Fischlin

12

#calpolygrown


want to be part of the

FUTURE OF FOOD?

Join Cal Poly in creating the culinary, sensory and food labs that will train the next generation of industry leaders. To learn more about becoming our partner in the new Science & Agriculture Teaching and Research Complex, and working with us to create, innovate, and discover our food futures, please contact Tim Northrop at tnorthro@calpoly.edu or call 805-756-2166.

this future requires your participation

GIVING OPPORTUNITIES: • Culinary Teaching Lab • Sensory Analysis Teaching & Research Lab • Teaching & Research Instrumentation Lab • Nutrition & Food Studies Lab • Food Safety Teaching Lab


Cover photo credit: Brittany App

1 Grand Avenue, 11- 211 San Luis Obispo, CA 93407-0250

www.cafes.calpoly.edu

Giving Report 2018  

The Cal Poly College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences annual Giving Report.

Giving Report 2018  

The Cal Poly College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences annual Giving Report.