Page 1

FALL 2021

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Best of Cache Valley

Best of Cache Valley

2021

Eat Like a Local Cache Valley's Gift of Community Theatre Our Schools Need YOU

IT'S LIKE TAKING CARE OF FAMILY:

Discount Tire's Visionary Commitment to Business and Service


4 | Fall 2021

2021

Best of Cache Valley Awards Congratulations to Cache Valley's 2021 Best of Cache Valley winners and many thanks to our readers who participated in the voting process.

BEST BREAKFAST

BEST EVENT VENUE

BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION

BEST GARDEN CENTER/NURSERY

Herm’s Inn

The Vineyards at Mt. Naomi Farms

America First Credit Union

Anderson’s Seed and Garden

BEST LUNCH

Firehouse Pizzeria BEST DINNER

Beehive Grill BEST BURGER

Morty’s Café BEST FAST FOOD

Chick-fil-A BEST PIZZA

BEST CATERER

Iron Gate Grill

BEST FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT

BEST PEST CONTROL

BEST MORTUARY

White Pine Funeral Services BEST EMPLOYER

Crumbl Cookies BEST BAKERY

Shaffer House Bakery BEST ICE CREAM

Aggie Ice Cream BEST FOOD TRUCK

Karie Anne’s Frozen Desserts BEST SODA SHOP

Swig BEST SALON/SPA

Young Skin Care at Rocky Mountain Dermatology

Daniel Sandgren, DO, Intermountain Healthcare BEST DERMATOLOGIST

Robert Young, MD, Rocky Mountain Dermatology

Utah Theatre

BEST FAMILY DOCTOR

BEST SPORTS CAMP

BEST FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHER

Logan Music Academy

Kylee Ann Studios

BEST CHILDREN’S PLAY PLACE

BEST CHILDREN’S PHOTOGRAPHER

Cache Valley Fun Park

Kylee Ann Studios

BEST PRESCHOOL

Happy Place Preschool BEST CHILDCARE CENTER

Heritage Animal Hospital

BEST PET CARE BEST SPORTING GOODS STORE

Al’s Sporting Goods BEST REALTOR

Daren Gehring, DDS, Cache Valley Pediatric Dentistry

Isabel Jones, Keller Williams Cache Home Realty

BEST ORTHODONTIST

BEST HOME MORTGAGE

Glo Mobile Tanning

BEST OBSTETRICIAN

BEST CAR SALES

BEST MUSIC PROGRAM

BEST DENTIST

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST

BEST CAR WASH

Judge’s Car Wash

Basketball and Beyond Camp

Kiddie Kove Daycare

Dave Gordon, DDS, Logan Peak Dental

BEST AUTO CARE

Wilson Motor Company

Bruce Isaacson, MD, Intermountain Healthcare

BEST TANNING SALON

Foxy Nails

My Mobile Mechanic

Pickleville Workshops

Brady Thomson, DDS, Thomson Family Orthodontics

BEST NAIL SALON

BEST DATE NIGHT VENUE

BEST GROCERY STORE

BEST PEDIATRICIAN

BEST COOKIE

Elevate Pest Control

BEST SUMMER CAMP

BEST ETHNIC FOOD BEST DESSERT

Four Seasons Theatre Company

Malouf

Firehouse Pizzeria

Karie Anne’s Frozen Desserts

BEST LANDSCAPER/YARD CARE

Distinctive Landscape

Lee’s Marketplace

Tandoori Oven

BEST LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Utah Festival Opera

BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER

Jackie Siggard Photo + Video BEST VIDEOGRAPHER

Jackie Siggard Photo + Video BEST LITTLE KID ENTERTAINMENT

Cache Valley Fun Park BEST BIG KID ENTERTAINMENT

Cache Valley Fun Park BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY VENUE

Cache Valley Fun Park BEST RAINY DAY FUN

Guild Mortgage

Cache Valley Fun Park

BEST INSURANCE AGENT/AGENCY

BEST APPAREL

Quality 1st Insurance

Roolee

BEST HOME BUILDER

BEST HOME DÉCOR

Visionary Homes

Locals

Boneyard Barbering

David Kirkman, MD, Cache Valley Women’s Center

BEST HOME REPAIR

BEST CHILDREN’S STORE

BEST HEALTH AND FITNESS CENTER

BEST EYE DOCTOR

JB’s Handyman Services

The Book Table

BEST CARPET CLEANER

BEST FURNITURE STORE

Chem-Dry of Northern Utah

8th and Main

BEST BARBERSHOP

Sports Academy and Racquet Club

David Smith, OD BEST CHIROPRACTOR

Highpoint Gymnastics

Brett Murdock, DC, Murdock Family Chiropractic

BEST DANCE STUDIO

BEST PHARMACY

BEST GYMNASTICS/TUMBLING

Dance Illusion

Spence’s Pharmacy

BEST PLUMBER

BEST ANNUAL EVENT

Lee’s Plumbing

Cache Valley Cruise-In

BEST ELECTRICIAN

BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE-DINING

Kendrick Electric

Angie’s Restaurant

BEST FLORIST

BEST HOTEL

BEST ROOFER

BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE-RETAIL

Plant Peddler Floral

Hampton Inn & Suites

Pace Quality Roofing

The Logo Shop


|5

Publisher & Editor in Chief

IN EVERY ISSUE

EMILY BUCKLEY Copy Editor

Family Matters Our Schools Need YOU • page 6

TARA BONE Cover Photography

Making a Difference Little Lambs Serves Our Community's Most Vulnerable Members • page 9

MIKE JOHNSON Photography

ABBY REAVES Layout Design

WHITE PALM DESIGN Website Design

Healthy Families Stress Incontinence — a.k.a. Leaky Bladder • page 21

cover story PAGE 24

Cover Story

KITE MEDIA Contributing Writers

MARK ANDERSON NATHAN BERTOLDO, MD, OB/GYN TARA BONE EMILY BUCKLEY CACHE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT MICHAEL COLE, OD JENTRIE HALES SARAH LYONS EMILY MERKLEY KATE NEELEY FRANK SCHOFIELD JAMES STEPHENS

PAGE 14

Discount Tire's Visionary Commitment to Business and Service

page 24

Education Update Back to School: Tips for a Successful School Year • page 28 Raising an Adaptable Child • page 29 Good Neighbors Why Condensed Living Matters • page 30 Safe Families My Child is Being Bullied • page 34 PAGE 9

Family Travel Eight Ways to Save Money on Family Travel • page 38 Fact Check Stage Magic in the Making: Cache Valley's Gift of Community Theatre • page 43

Cache Valley Family Magazine is a free, trusted resource designed to inform, serve, and enrich local parents and families throughout Cache Valley. Material in this publication is copyright 2021, Cache Valley Family Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The views expressed in the magazine are the views of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Please send all editorial correspondence to info@cachevalleyfamilymagazine.com or by mail to PO Box 6831, North Logan, UT 84341. All correspondence is sent on a non-confidential basis and Cache Valley Family Magazine shall be free to reproduce, publish, edit and/or use any such communications. All materials become property of Cache Valley Family Magazine.

PHONE NUMBER

(435) 764-0962

MAILING ADDRESS

FEATURED ARTICLES

PO Box 6831 North Logan, UT 84341 EMAIL

Supporting Your Child's Healthy Screen Use • page 14

info@cachevalleyfamilymagazine.com WEBSITE

cachevalleyfamilymagazine.com FACEBOOK

/cachevalleyfamilymagazine YOUTUBE

/cachevalleyfamilymag INSTAGRAM

@cachevalleyfamilymag TO ADVERTISE

call (435) 764-0962 or email ads@cachevalleyfamilymagazine.com

SPONSORS FOR THIS ISSUE

PAGE 43

Eat Like a Local: Exploring Cache Valley's Unique Dining Scene • page 17 Diabetic Retinopathy • page 33 Secrets to a Beautiful, New Lawn • page 36 David Archuleta to Return to Logan for Christmas Concert in November • page 40 Why to Consider Funeral Planning • page 46


6 | Fall 2021

FA M I LY M AT T E R S

Our Schools Need YOU TARA BONE

contributing writer

If you’re a parent, you’ve most likely lived these scenarios: It’s Back-to-School-Night and the Parent Teacher Association (PTA) or Parent Organization (PO) table is set up and they’re asking for support, or an older child brings home a note asking for help with an extracurricular activity. What do you do? Do you avoid the PTA or PO table, or conveniently forget the note? Let’s be honest, time is precious and parents are juggling a lot. But teachers and students just survived a tough COVID year and never before have they needed more support. As membership in parent volunteer organizations declines, now is a perfect time to evaluate the negative myths about volunteering in schools and bust them.

After talking to many parents, PTA and PO leaders, and K-12 teachers, one thing is clear: Teachers and students in Cache Valley schools need parental and community support. This support may look different depending on each family’s circumstance, but every volunteer effort adds up to huge dividends for all children. Though volunteering in classrooms was restricted with COVID last year, Becca Crookston, our area’s Region 21 PTA director says this year Logan and Cache County School Districts are excited to welcome volunteers back into classrooms with a few precautions. MYTH #1: NOT ENOUGH TIME Stacey Mollinet, Utah PTA president says, “Find a way to help where you are at. Maybe it is donating supplies to the

SERVING UTAH FAMILIES FOR 40 YEARS

fresh produce • scratch bakery • custom floral • pharmacy delivery • catering & events

cache valley’s

local grocery store

8 YEARS IN A ROW

online grocery shopping • curbside & delivery • hot & ready deli • in-house butcher block


|7

classroom, maybe it is writing a note to thank the teacher for all they do, maybe it’s finding an hour to volunteer in the class, or maybe it’s joining the PTA board and doing a little more.” There are a variety of things that need to be done in a school; find what fits your schedule and interests. There are volunteer opportunities that can be done at home — talk to your child’s teacher. Remember, just by joining your school’s PTA or PO, your donation supports school-wide activities. PTA membership fees support advocacy in the community and at the legislature. There's no volunteer requirement just to join. Another tip: If you have young children, trade babysitting with other classroom volunteers. You are the master of your schedule! Advice from experienced volunteers: Determine how much time you have, schedule it, make it a priority, and stick to it. If there is a PTA or PO meeting or activity and you can stay 1 hour, make it known at the beginning of the meeting that you’ll leave in 1 hour. MYTH #2: I’M JUST ONE PERSON Every individual who supports schools in any way, big or small, is valuable. Remember the big picture. Stephanie Nixon of Smithfield is a former Salt Lake County social worker with a unique perspective on building strong schools through volunteerism. She started volunteering with PTA six years ago when her son started school and today serves as the Sunrise Elementary PTA President. Stephanie has seen firsthand that schools not only educate but also protect children. “Our schools literally save lives,” Stephanie said. “I’m passionate about enriching our community and our schools because our children — our future — is there.” MYTH #3: QUEEN BEE MENTALITY Stephanie said what she calls the “Queen Bee” mentality made her hesitant to join PTA. “Society makes it seem you have to scratch your way to the top and I wondered if PTA was a power struggle,” Stephanie said. She believes that many wonder, “Is there room for me?” Her answer is a big YES! After volunteering, she realized that PTA was a team effort and those involved were

just grateful for the help. Give your PTA or PO a chance. They need you! MYTH #4: MY BIG KID’S SCHOOL DOESN’T NEED HELP Even in junior high or high school, teachers need support from parents. Newsletters, graduation parties, homecoming help, and teacher meals during parent-teacher conferences are just a few things parent organizations can provide. Multiple extracurricular activities in high schools often require volunteers. Logan Brown has taught for 13 years and coached for 18 years at two local high schools, Logan High School and Green Canyon High School. He believes parent volunteers can really make an impact in the behind-the-scenes work that goes into high school activities, and that parents can help create amazing student experiences. His advice to high school parents: “Don’t be afraid to ask educators or coaches how they can help and/or what they need.” MYTH #5: HAVEN’T BEEN ASKED Becca Crookston believes many parents, grandparents, and community members just haven’t been asked to help or know where to go. Start by talking to your school’s front office, as some schools participate in PTA and others have independent parent organizations. Join PTA at utahpta.org/join or email Becca with PTA questions at region21@utahpta.org.

“The bottom line is ‘we’ are all involved in the business of building great students. We need teachers, parents, and community members to volunteer or support those that can volunteer to assist the future leaders of our communities to reach their goals, and no group can do it by themselves! We need each other to raise the next generation of volunteers who care about their future and feel empowered as they believe their service, in whatever form, makes a difference.” RACHELLE KENDRICK Canyon Elementary teacher of 14 years, mother of four, former PTA member, and Hyrum resident


C A C H E VA L L E Y ' S H I G H E S T VO L U M E C A R D E A L E R



CAR BUYING 

WI LSONM OTOR.COM    

   


|9

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Little Lambs Serves Our Community’s Most Vulnerable Members EMILY BUCKLEY

editor in chief

Ted Chalfant’s mother was a foster parent in the 1970s. He recalls at any given time having up to eight foster children in their home. “They all came into our home the same way,” Ted said. “With just the clothes on their backs, or occasionally with a few small items in a black

trash bag or a paper sack. That’s when the seed was planted. I knew there was something wrong with the system. Even as a child I recognized the injustice … that these kids had nothing.” Fast forward to 2014, Ted and his wife, Stefanee,

of Nibley, founded Little Lambs Foundation for Kids (Little Lambs) with the goal of helping 40 to 50 kids here in Cache Valley each year. “We wanted to provide foster kids with these basic items that I remembered them not having,” Ted said. “They didn’t have a toothbrush, toothpaste, and other hygiene items. They didn’t have a toy or plush animal, they didn’t have their own blanket or socks, coloring books, or crayons … that was our goal, to help local children with those items.” Ted says that the caseworkers that he worked with at the Division of Child and Family Services (DCFS) shared what the newly instituted Little Lambs was doing in Cache Valley with one of the other offices in the state and word spread quickly. continued on next page ...

LEESPLUMBINGINC.COM

|

435.563.0611

|

LOGAN, UTAH

Three Plumbing Tips for Fall

1

Check indoor faucets and plumbing fixtures (sinks, toilets, shower heads, etc) for leaks and get them repaired before fall hits.

2

Disconnect your outdoor water hose to prevent pipes connected to the outside faucet from freezing and possibly bursting. Make sure all outdoor faucets are free of leaks and drips and then turn them off completely and insulate them with a styrofoam insulation kit.

3

Maintenance your water heater as it will be working much harder to provide the same heat during the winter. To keep it running efficiently, have the tank completely flushed to remove buildup.


10 | Fall 2021

Within 30 days they were serving four counties, and within six months they had delivered over 750 comfort kids to foster children in Utah. “Our comfort kits are now available to every DCFS office in the state,” Ted said. Before COVID, Little Lambs distributed between 2,000 and 2,500 comfort kits each year. Last year many of the DCFS offices and schools were closed and many children had to be left in hard situations longer than they should have, but the need was and is still there — maybe more than ever. Ted had built his career as a realtor for over a decade, but two years ago he put his real estate license into inactive status and made Little Lambs his full-time job. “These children need me more than the real estate market.” Stefanee serves as the Little Lambs program director and oversees the creation of every comfort that goes out. In addition to comfort and hygiene kits for foster children, Little Lambs provides backpacks filled with school supplies for children in need at the beginning of each school year. “We were able to distribute 1,000 backpacks this year,” Ted said.

Bank. This is a program for families who fall below the Federal poverty guideline. “We provide them with a supplement of diapers; we don’t provide all of their diapers,” Ted said. “Research by The National Diaper Bank found that many families are short about 10 diapers a week. We provide anywhere between 60 and 80 diapers per child in need each month, along with wipes, and other hygiene items.” Families who qualify can come in once a month. Little Lambs currently serves 407 children with verified diaper need in Cache Valley. Ted says it is not uncommon for families who go through the program and move beyond their need to come back and give as soon as they can. “We have an amazing community,” Ted said. “Our program is lucky to have such amazing support. Our community is very service-based; people are willing to help their neighbors, and it allows us to do what we do.” “The program works because of community

They also have a diaper bank. “In 2017 I started getting calls from families who needed diapers,” Ted said. “Families would offer to borrow and pay us back for the diapers — these families just could not provide the diapers their children needed.” In 2018 they started a Little Lambs Diaper

Logan’s Premier Family Gym & Health Club Your club. Your results. Your life.

support,” Ted said. Little Lambs operates with a volunteer board, an Americorps Vista, and between 1,000 and 1,500 community volunteers each year, including a group of Teen Ambassadors. From financial donations to people making quilts and other handmade comfort items to those who hold in-kind donation drives for hygiene items, school supplies, or diapers, the volunteers make the difference. “These people make it so we don’t have to scramble to provide these kids with comfort kits when they need them,” Ted said. If you would like to donate or support Little Lambs, you can visit littlelambsofutah.org/donate to set up a one-time or recurring donation, or see a list of their most needed items. “A recurring donation, even $5 a month, can make a big impact,” Ted said. You can also follow @littlelambsfoundationforkids on Facebook or Instagram to see posts calling for specific items.


T H E B O O K TA B L E I N T R O D U C E S

Making a Difference One Chapter at a Time Beginning this fall, the Book Table will team up with vendors, schools, libraries, and businesses like Cache Valley Direct, Cache Valley Family Magazine, and Cache Valley Media Group to begin a give-back program for teachers and students! We will do a teacher of the week and month program in which students and parents from Cache Valley schools can nominate a teacher that will receive a door-makeover, as well as a Book Table gift card. Teachers will be nominated weekly to get entered for a monthly drawing. We will be starting “Class Wish” with these student nominations for teachers and then, at the end of the year, select one teacher to get a classroom makeover! We are teaming up with school librarians and local libraries to create a “Book Wish” program where libraries fill out requests of what books they’d like for their library, or even specific books a student might like. We will then have request slips on display in the store for people to make donations toward those books (similar to Sub for Santa). We will host Book Fairs in our store. There are big benefits to hosting your Book Fairs in our store, including a bigger selection of books, no need for parent volunteers, and a percentage of your net sales will be given back to your school. If your school is interested, email us at mainstreetbooktable@gmail.com.

SPONSORS

More information on the teacher nomination process and other events will be posted on social media and included in our newsletters. Enroll in our loyalty program to get updates, as well as an education discount calendar informing you of when all our sales happen.

Instagram @ LO G A N B O O K TA B L E

Facebook PRESENT THIS AD TO RECEIVE

30% off any reading book Excludes all music books and sale items. Cannot be combined with other offers. Limit one per customer. Expires 11/15/2021.

/ LO G A N B O O K TA B L E

If you have any questions concerning these upcoming events or want your school to participate, email us at mainstreetbooktable@gmail.com or call (435) 752-3055.


Scan this code TO N O M I N AT E A T E A C H E R !

A nominated teacher will be featured in each issue of CacheValley Family Magazine this school year!

CHECK OUT THESE

classroom makeovers! Book Wish Calendar September 13-18th

November 29-Dec 4th

February 21-16th

A D A M S E L E M E N TA RY

CCID

P R O V I D E N C E E L E M E N TA RY

September 20-25th

December 6-11th

February 28-Mar 5th

L E W I S TO N E L E M E N TA RY

W I L S O N E L E M E N TA RY

N O RT H PA R K E L E M E N TA RY

September 27-Oct. 2nd

December 13-18th

March 7th-12th

H E R I TA G E E L E M E N TA RY

R I V E R S I D E E L E M E N TA RY

THOMAS EDISON NORTH

October 4-9th

January 3-8th

March 14-19th

G R E E N V I L L E E L E M E N TA RY

C E D A R R I D G E E L E M E N TA RY

S U M M I T E L E M E N TA RY

October 18-23rd

January 10-15th

March 21-26th

C A N YO N E L E M E N TA RY

B R I D G E R E L E M E N TA RY

M O U N TA I N S I D E E L E M E N TA RY

October 25-30th

January 17-22nd

March 28th-April 2nd

B I R C H C R E E K E L E M E N TA RY

BEAR RIVER

H I L LC R E S T E L E M E N TA RY

November 1-6th

January 24-29th

April 11-16th

E L L I S E L E M E N TA RY

L I N C O L N E L E M E N TA RY

R I V E R H E I G H T S E L E M E N TA RY

November 8-13th

January 31-Feb 5th

April 18-23rd

W O O D R U F F E L E M E N TA RY

M I L LV I L L E E L E M E N TA R Y

W E L L S V I L L E E L E M E N TA RY

November 15-20th

February 7-12th

April 25-30th

THOMAS EDISON SOUTH

W H I T E P I N E E L E M E N TA RY

N I B L E Y E L E M E N TA RY

February 14-19th S U N R I S E E L E M E N TA RY


14 | Fall 2021

Supporting Your Child’s Healthy Screen Use JENTRIE HALES

community advocate, @techhealthyfam

With so much pressure and responsibility as a parent, aren’t we all just trying our best to raise decent human beings? It's safe to say we want our kids to be successful, kind, have morals, be accepted, and become self-reliant someday. In some ways, technology aids parents in accomplishing these goals. With the development of social media and other apps, individuals are able to connect, share ideas, unite communities, and learn skills, among other things. Still, we also know that unhealthy screen use is correlated with a lower attention span, higher

rates of anxiety and depression, cyberbullying, and increased social interaction issues. A 2019 National Public Radio (NPR) survey reported that 53% of children in the United States own a smartphone. That number rises to 84% in their middle and high school years, with the average screen time for this latter group being over 7 hours per day just for entertainment purposes. Screens are absolutely the norm. Not only are youth facing immense pressure to fit in, but they are also going up against app developers who

CLASSES FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS • OPEN REGISTRATION

435.753.7500 1655 NORTH 200 EAST • NORTH LOGAN


| 15

are doing everything in their power to profit from their screen use. Much of the time, that includes designing apps to be as addictive as possible, which can be detrimental for these impressionable brains. As a parent, your child needs your help to manage this immense power. While it may seem overwhelming at times, there are many ways you can support your child in developing healthy screen habits. A few of them include:

• Create screen-free environments. Promote a setting where your child does not have to rely on their own willpower to create distance from their device. Some ways to do that include designating a phone basket for dinner and other quiet times, setting up a charging station so phones stay out of bedrooms at night, and having a structure in your day so your child's time can be filled doing other pro-social activities. • Be a positive role model. According to the

book Atomic Habits by James Clear, “We don’t choose our earliest habits, we imitate them.” Whether you are conscious of it or not, your child is actively learning from you and your habits. Be aware of what you are demonstrating to your family with your own screen use. Know the answers to questions like “How much time are you using your device and what for?” “What triggers you to pull out your device?” and “Are you putting priority on your device above relationships?” • Help them fill their basic needs in positive ways. If your child does not feel loved, accepted, and valued they will fill that need somewhere else. The internet, gaming, and social media are convenient places to replace shallow versions of these needs. Make sure your child knows their infinite and unchanging value regardless of their successes. Consider having regular oneon-one time with your child. Learn about their likes and dislikes and be an open door that they can communicate with often. Be proactive in having uncomfortable conversations. Remember, you are doing a good job. Your kid doesn’t need a perfect parent, but they do need a present parent.

have fun while learning to play! COME TO THE BEST MUSIC ACADEMY IN CACHE VALLEY!

Meticulous Health Safety Measures In-Person or Online Lessons National Awards Program “Musical Ladder System”

BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIAL SAVE $48.50! Includes

FREE REGISTRATION and

ONE FREE LESSON Expires October 15, 2021

PIANO • VOICE • GUITAR BASS GUITAR • DRUMS VIOLIN • CELLO • UKELELE FLUTE • CHILDREN’S CHOIR

(435) 265-6691

LOGANMUSICACADEMY.COM

3002 N MAIN • NORTH LOGAN, UT 84341


It’s back-to-school... ...and back to normal? We are all so very excited to get back to school and back to life!

We all know the normal routine to get back into things like food prep on Sunday afternoon, or assigning a chore chart to everyone around their extracurricular activities, but here are a few more new tips to think about this year: For older kids, keep several clean masks in separate Ziplock bags to keep them sanitized. Put empty Ziplock bags in their backpack marked dirty for exchanging masks as needed. Send kids with hand sanitizers containing 60% alcohol or more. Have a drop station, either just outside the door or inside where they can leave their shoes and backpacks. If you choose, have a bag or basket just for home to empty school items into while at home. Designate a laundry basket to put in all used fabric masks, backpacks that went to school, and any clothes that should be cleaned. Leave a reminder note for kids to wash their hands. One last thing to think about: at Chem Dry of Northern Utah we use a powerful deep-cleaning carbonation that removes 98% of allergens from soft surfaces and 89% of airborne allergens, using 80% less water. We can also disinfect your homes for up to 90 days with our patented Micro Pro Shield System. This is great for flu and cold season coming up, and proven to kill the Sars Virus that causes COVID-19.

NorthernUtahChemDry.com

Free Pet Odor Evaluation With Any Cleaning

Serving Cache & Box Elder Counties

3 Rooms Carpet Cleaning

$150 ($180 Value)

Expires 11/1/2021

Owned & Operated by Teresa & Darryl

Healthy 3 Rooms Home Healthy Home

- Deep Clean - Hospital Grade Sanitizer - Industry Best Protection - 1 FREE can of World Famous Spot Remover

$270 ($385 Value)

Expires 11/1/2021

Choose from Any of the Following Healthy Home Items:

Any 7 Items Healthy Home

- Carpet - Rugs - Upholstery - Pet Urine - Granite - Tile - Hardwood

($1009 Value)

$399

Expires 11/1/2021

For More Info on the $399 Special, Text HH1 to 435-752-6100


| 17

EAT LIKE A LOCAL:

Exploring Cache Valley’s Unique Dining Scene EMILY BUCKLEY

editor in chief

There’s no shortage of places to grab a bite to eat in Cache Valley, and while we are just as excited as the next person to indulge in an In N’ Out Animal Style Double-Double without heading south on I-15, the real mark of a Cache Valley foodie is becoming familiar with the best-of-the-best specialty foods created right here Cache Valley. When our family travels we make a point of searching out locally-owned restaurants and asking what the “must-try” items on the menu are. It’s a great way to get a true taste of the local culture in any town or city, but sometimes right at home it is easy to overlook

SOURDOUGH MARK

unique dining experiences because you’re in a rut or rush, or maybe just don’t know what to order. We’re kicking off this “eat-like-a-local” series with a roundup of unique, locally-owned fooderies. We’ve done some of the legwork for you — finding out the “chef’s favorite” at each eatery and giving you some of the behind-the-scenes details about why you should give them a try. If you have a favorite local eatery you think we should try and feature, email info@cachevalleyfamilymagazine.com. continued on next page ...

CACHE VALLEY BBQ

HIMALAYAN FLAVOR

THE COCOA CAMPER BLUEBIRD CANDY

ICEHOUSE

Thanks for choosing FIREHOUSE PIZZERIA as the BEST OF CACHE VALLEY — eight years in a row!

682 South Main Street | Logan, Utah | 435.787.4222


18 | Fall 2021

BACK PORCH PIZZA BY SOURDOUGH MARK Neapolitan-style pizza | @sourdough_mark Owner Mark Huntsman has been making sourdough bread for friends and family for about four years. Two years ago, he started cooking and selling unique Neapolitan-style pizza from his back porch, using Instagram to market his sale days. Using only three ingredients for his dough and two in his sauce, Mark keeps his pizzas simple. He grows many of the spices and toppings he uses in his own garden and cooks the pizzas in 3-minutes flat in a locally made Blackstone pizza oven. If you’re lucky you may find Mark’s mobile pizza cart, which he fondly calls Anchovy, at a local event, but for the best chance of snagging one of his trademark pies follow him on Instagram @sourdough_mark and turn your notifications on for announcements of pop-up order days. Must try: Simple margherita (featuring Mark’s unique basil oil), pickle pizza, and the Maureen (chicken, white sauce, arugula, and balsamic).

BLUEBIRD CANDY COMPANY Hand-dipped chocolates | 75 West Center Street, Logan Bluebird Candy is a century-old Cache Valley icon that local restaurateur Justin Hamilton, and his wife, Jocelyn, purchased in 2016. When the Hamiltons took over the business they were committed to preserving its heritage while freshening up the business, and if you walk into the doors of their chocolate factory on Center Street, you’ll see that they’ve done exactly that. From the small step for young customers to stand on and view the candy makers dipping hundreds of chocolates each day and the glass candy display cases, to the gold-stamped blue candy boxes and bluebird wallpaper, charming is the perfect word to describe Bluebird Candy. They still make every chocolate by hand, using the same recipes the company’s original candy makers did in 1914. In addition to chocolates, Bluebird Candy now sells Aggie Ice Cream and baked goods made inhouse, from scratch, daily. Must try: O’Aggie Bar (an original), macaroons (rotating flavors, offered on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday each week), and the Bluebird Brownie (a dense chocolate brownie with cream cheese, marshmallow, and chocolate buttercream frosting).

CACHE VALLEY BARBECUE Authentic barbeque in the heart of Cache Valley | @cachevalleybbq Cache Valley Barbecue is a passion project for owner Josh Cottrell who grew up trying and cooking authentic barbecue with his dad. In 2019 he became “official” and has spent countless hours researching the best barbecue techniques and flavors in the United States, including an 8-day barbecue tour and research trip last spring. A big cook day takes about 30 hours to prepare for, so when you see the Cache Valley Barbecue stand set up for a weekend pop-up or at an Aggie football game, you’ll know the good stuff has been a long time coming. Josh says he has taken the best of Texas-, St. Louis-, Carolina-, and Memphisstyles of barbecue to create his mouth-watering menu. Must try: Burnt ends, brisket, and Josh’s original barbecue and mustard sauces.


| 19

THE COCOA CAMPER Cocoa and cronuts | @thecocoacamper Recent Utah State University graduate Nathan Larsen purchased The Cocoa Camper from another Aggie alum this summer. Nathan sells frozen cocoa from the window of the small, transformed camp trailer in the summer and hot cocoa in the fall and winter. He also offers made-to-order churros and amazing cronuts, unique pastries that resemble a donut but are made from croissant-like dough. Add your favorite topping to frozen or hot cocoa and the fried treats to make them your own. Must try: Cookies and Cream Frozen Cocoa with cookie crumble on top, cronuts with cookie butter, and churros with caramel sauce.

HIMALAYAN FLAVOR Indian and Nepalese cuisine | 132 N. Main Street, Logan Owner Roshan Kumar, a native of Nepal, came to the United States as a student in 2011. After driving to Salt Lake City regularly to find authentic Indian and Nepalese food, he decided to open his own restaurant and market in Pocatello, Idaho. Three months ago he opened his second restaurant in Logan, which is managed by his brother Sanjay Sah. The goal at Himalayan Flavor is to offer authentic food, with hand-made spices, made fresh daily. Must try: Lamb Korma, Chicken 65, and Garlic Naan.

ICEHOUSE FROZEN CUSTARD Frozen custard and treats | 682 South Main Street, Logan Brothers Greg and Neal Chambers started their pizza business, Firehouse Pizzeria, in Logan in 2001. They’ve been regularly recognized as a favorite for their stone-fired pizzas for the last 20 years. Two years ago, the Chambers family opened Icehouse Frozen Custard next door to Firehouse, after more than a decade of preparation. They learned their custard-making techniques from an expert in Las Vegas before developing unique flavor combinations to offer a truly outstanding and delicious product that Greg says is different from anything else served in Cache Valley. Custard differs from ice cream as it is made in a machine that does not allow as much air into the product as ice cream, and includes egg yolk, to make it creamier — you have to try it to truly know the difference. Icehouse Concretes include any choice of custard flavors mixed with toppings like Alvey’s chocolate and Firehouse FH’Zzookies. Must try: The Patriot (vanilla custard with strawberries, blueberries, and cheesecake), Mama Llama (chocolate or vanilla custard with caramel and brownie chunks), Froozzookie (a cookie sandwich with custard in the middle), and Custard Floats made with specialty soda.


| 21

H E A LT H Y FA M I L I E S

Stress Incontinence — a.k.a. Leaky Bladder NATHAN BERTOLDO, MD, OB/GYN

Valley Women's Health

Many women develop something called stress urinary incontinence as they age. This involves involuntary leakage of urine with many different activities such as exercise, laughing, coughing, sneezing, or jumping on a trampoline. This can be caused by the aging process (decreased collagen production with age), genetic impact on health, pregnancies, weight gain, or a change in hormonal levels. These processes can lead to other common issues that affect urinary continence and daily life, as well as moments of intimacy. It is now possible to treat the issue, as well as prevent it without surgery. In the past, the mainstay nonsurgical treatment for urinary incontinence was physical therapy for many years (Kegels). Often times for vaginal dryness or irritation, a prescription for hormones was given to patients with hopes the issue would correct itself. Often some

improvement was noticed, but it required continued application. Some patients are not candidates for hormones due to other health issues, like breast cancer. Surgery was the last chance at fixing the problem and usually was done at the point that it had progressed to a problematic, prolapsing point. Surgery can be very effective but is definitely invasive in nature. This is where FORMA V comes in and provides the best of both worlds with a noninvasive preventive treatment that almost all women are candidates to receive. Whether you are 6-weeks postpartum or entering menopause, this procedure can help improve your feminine health. FORMA V is a simple and quick nonsurgical procedure that is changing the lives of women who have experienced vaginal laxity. This consists of Radio Frequency (RF) treatment to internal vaginal tissues to improve collagen

production for tightening and increased blood flow. Patients report reduction in stress incontinence/urinary leakage, improved vaginal lubrication, improved stimulation, and tightening of the vaginal canal tissues. This is a revolutionary non-surgical approach to restoring internal and external vaginal and vulvar tissues. It rejuvenates tissue and alleviates many common symptoms that women experience after childbirth, menopause, aging, cancer treatments, and more. It is a safe and effective way to restore tissue without added hormones. ​ Vaginal rejuvenation can treat: • Low blood flow and sensitivity • Decrease in sexual interest and self-esteem • Vaginal laxity (stretched out appearance) • Stress urinary leakage with coughing, laughing, or jumping • Vaginal dryness • Sexual dysfunction or pain PREVENTIVE USE Women can use FORMA V anytime in their adult life to alleviate symptoms; however, one of the most effective ways to use this technology is to have a treatment just 6 weeks after childbirth as a preventive approach. Research indicates that having a preventive treatment can lift the pelvic floor by up to 40% and prevent many of the negative symptoms from occurring, such as bladder leakage, loose tissue, itching or burning, and more. By restoring the health of the tissue, the dryness that many women experience after childbirth can be prevented. HOW DO YOU KNOW IF IT'S RIGHT FOR YOU? FORMA V can work well for those who have undergone menopause, those who have given birth, and those who are experiencing symptoms similar to post-menopause because of breast cancer treatments or a hysterectomy. If you are having issues with bladder leakage continued on next page ...


22 | Fall 2021

when you exercise, laugh, cough, sneeze, or jump, then you may be a candidate for this procedure. Many patients will notice a difference within one week and sometimes even a few days following the procedure. WHAT DOES THE PROCEDURE FEEL LIKE? FORMA V uses a radio frequency energy that emits heat so there is virtually no pain. You may feel a mild heat sensation. Most women say it feels like having an annual exam or pelvic ultrasound. There is no downtime with this procedure, which takes about 45 minutes to perform. Many women say they notice improved function right away, with continued improvement over a period of a few months. The full extent of the results can take up to 12 weeks. For more information about this procedure, or to schedule a free consultation, contact Dr. Bertoldo by calling 435-787-7001 or follow him on Instagram @drbertoldo.

Nathan Bertoldo, MD, OB/GYN Women's Health • Aesthetics • Wellness

Caring for women through all generations of life! Accepting New Patients!

Get a complimentary prenatal massage after your initial OB visit!

Early prenatal appointments available.

Accepting all major insurance plans and self-pay options for uninsured. Serving patients at Logan Regional Hospital and Cache Valley Hospital.

@drbertoldo /drbertoldo @BertoldoMD

1515 N 400 E #105 Logan, Utah

435-787-7001

drbertoldo.com


$99

New Patient

Special $421.00 Value!

 Comprehensive exam  Full mouth X-rays  Cleaning  Fluoride  Custom bleach trays

BONUS: Includes FREE lifetime whitening*

*See our office for restrictions and additional details

Call or text to make appointment: (435) 787-0222 • www.LoganPeakDental.com


24 | Fall 2021

IT’S LIKE FAMILY TAKING CARE OF FAMILY:

Discount Tire’s Visionary Commitment to Business and Service EMILY BUCKLEY

editor in chief

Discount Tire on Logan’s Main Street has been part of the cityscape of our community for 45 years, leading the way not only in the tire industry, but also in community service. Larry Nicholls and his wife Vickie opened the store during the nation’s bicentennial celebration, on July 7, 1976, when Logan’s population sat at about 25,000 residents.

used to it and it put us in a good position when COVID-19 hit.”

“We would have opened on the Fourth, but it was a Sunday,” Larry remembers.

“At one point, I was traveling 5-7 days a week,” Larry said. “I ended up in Southern California and the kids were getting to an age that I wasn’t sure that was where I wanted to raise them; so, we came back home and built our first store in Logan.”

In the near half-century since that grand opening, Larry says the building has been through eight remodels, including one this year. This willingness to change and always be planning and preparing for the future is the name of the game for Larry, and his daughter, Christie Stock, who now serves as president of the company. “Dad is a visionary,” Christie said. “He travels the world looking at business concepts in and out of the tire industry and then brings those ideas home to improve our way of doing business.”

Steve and Christie Stock and Mike and Billie Glabe with Larry Nicholls.

Larry grew up in Garden City. Before he opened Discount Tires and Automotive locally, he worked for a major tire manufacturer for 14 years, moving his family 13 times, and overseeing 500 stores nationwide.

In the years that followed, Larry worked sideby-side with Vickie, who passed away in 2013, to build company-owned retail stores in Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming, and at one time had nearly 1,200 franchised locations nationwide. In 2006 they sold the distribution business and Larry “tried to retire,” he said.

One example of their forward-thinking mentality served them well during 2020’s COVID shutdown: Ten years prior to the unthinkable closures and distancing that were required last year, Discount Tire led the industry in “touchless service.” They had invented an app allowing customers to shop for tires, schedule appointments, and bring their vehicles to be serviced without ever entering the store, a concept that had not been used in tire sales prior to their development. “It was a blessing to have that technology in place,” Christie said. “Our customers were Vickie and Larry Nicholls with Steve and Christie Stock in 2013


| 25

Larry Nicholls with his daughters Billie Glabe and Christie Stock

Christie took over as president of the company at that time, and Larry jokes that he is now a low-level advisor — he even made a business card with his title on it — but Christie is quick to refuse that, saying Larry is the true leader of the organization. “I love working with my dad every day,” Christie said. “He is my mentor and has the amazing gift of making everyone want to be the best version of themselves. He has so much vision; he is always looking ahead.”

Four generations of Larry and Vickie Nicholls' family celebrated the grand opening of Discount Tire in Providence in 2000, 24 years after he opened shop on Logan's Main Street. CACHE VALLEY LOCATIONS:

Discount Tire Logan 885 N Main Street, Logan

Discount Tire Providence 110 South Hwy 165, Providence

Discount Tire Smithfield 728 Main Street, Smithfield

Christie said both of Larry’s parents, her grandparents, died by the time Larry was five years old. “He has created his own legacy,” she said. “He built this business from the ground up and taught all of us the importance of giving service to others.” That value, of service, is one Larry has developed in his family and his associates at Discount Tire alike. “Our philosophy is to take care of our people,” Christie said. “We believe if we create happiness for our people — our associates — then they are going to create happiness and deliver it to our customers. The more we spread kindness, the better off we will all be.” Christie says it is especially rewarding to see

people they taught driver’s safety courses to, or who they supported when they were on high school sports teams, come back as adults buying tires for their kids. “We’ve been here, playing a part in the community, for a long time and it is really fun to see it come full circle.” The company now employs about 200 people, including three generations of family. Christie and her sister, Billie Glabe, are in corporate leadership positions, while Christie’s son, Josh Stock, is the manager of their Providence location and Billie’s son, Tyler, is his assistant manager. They also have a store in Smithfield. “Doing business in Cache Valley is like family taking care of family,” Christie says. “To provide a service in the place we grew up and raised our kids, to serve our neighbors and friends, is really amazing. This is a community that rallies together during tough times and supports each other. We are proud to be part of it.” Larry and Christie are still looking ahead, with expansion plans to support the ever-growing Cache Valley community. “It’s hard to say what comes next,” Larry said. “But we’ll be ready for it.”


TRACTION SALE


SEPT. 17-25 • 2021

Beauty AND THE

BEAST MARCH 4-12 • 2022

MUSIC

THEATRE

WEST

Don't miss our exciting upcoming shows!

All performances at the Ellen Eccles Theater in Logan, UT. Get tickets today at: www.MusicTheatreWest.org


28 | Fall 2021

P RE S E N TE D BY

E D U C AT I O N U P D AT E

BACK TO SCHOOL:

Tips for a Successful School Year CACHE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

CREATE A PARTNERSHIP WITH YOUR CHILD’S TEACHERS. Take advantage of opportunities such as Back-to-School Night, parent-teacher conferences, and classroom events to get to know your child’s teacher. A good relationship and regular communication will make it easier for both of you to share concerns and celebrate successes. ENCOURAGE HEALTHY HABITS AND HYGIENE. Send your child to school equipped with a good night’s rest and nutritious breakfast. Experts suggest that during their elementary and early middle school years, children should get 9 to 11 hours of sleep each night. Sufficient sleep helps students to be alert and ready to learn. Likewise, a healthy breakfast will boost your child’s attention span, concentration, and memory. Teach your child the importance of frequent handwashing and good hygiene. TAKE ATTENDANCE SERIOUSLY. To help prevent the spread of illness in our schools, we depend on parents to keep their children home when they are sick. However, when they are healthy, it’s important that students arrive at school on time every day, ready to learn. Late arrivals are disruptive and can affect everyone in the classroom. Excessive tardies and absences can result in missed classwork and homework, which can be stressful and interfere with a child's learning. When a child is ill and needs to miss several days, reach out to their teacher and let them know. Ask if you can pick up or be sent any missed work and homework to help your child stay caught up.

HELP YOUR CHILD DEVELOP GOOD STUDY HABITS. At the beginning of the school year, take some time to discuss and set homework expectations with your child. Support their efforts by helping to create an effective study environment: a welllit, quiet, and comfortable workspace with all the necessary supplies. Encourage your child to put away distractions until after their homework has been completed. Make yourself available to offer guidance or review your child’s finished work. TALK TO YOUR CHILD ABOUT SCHOOL. Check in regularly with your child about what’s going on at school. Try asking questions like “What was fun?” “What was the hardest part of your day?” or “What did you learn today?” Then, listen carefully, make eye contact, and avoid multitasking while you talk. Most importantly, demonstrate to your child that you care

and are anxious to support them in their studies and success. VISIT YOUR SCHOOL’S WEBSITE OFTEN. The school website is a great way to stay informed about what’s happening at your child’s school. You’ll find school schedules, upcoming events, staff contact information, curriculum, and program details, recent news stories, and school/ district policies. There are also links to PowerSchool (the parent/student portal), EZSchoolPay for school meals, and other school and district resources. FIND WAYS TO GET INVOLVED. Kids do better in school when parents are invested in their education. There are many ways to contribute: volunteer in your child’s classroom, attend or help organize school events, serve on the PTA, or join your school’s community council. Getting involved allows you to make an impact in the areas which are most important to you and your family, as well as to strengthen relationships with school administration, staff, and community members.


| 29

PR E S EN TE D BY

E D U C AT I O N U P D AT E

Raising an Adaptable Child FRANK SCHOFIELD

superintendent, Logan City School District

Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, all of us have been asked to respond to regular changes in our lives. Rules for personal interaction, time with friends and family, even the basic expectations for going out in public have been modified as our understanding of the virus has evolved. Responding appropriately to these frequent changes has required all of us to become more adaptable, and we have observed on a global scale the challenges that occur when individuals and communities are unable to successfully adapt to the continually evolving situations they find themselves in. So, although it isn’t a new idea, the pandemic has illustrated that adaptability is a skill that helps all of us live more positive, healthy lives. When we are able to readily adjust to different conditions, we put ourselves in a better position to handle those changes successfully and ensure that temporary changes in our

environment do not have an unnecessarily oversized impact on our lives. For example, a family may move to a new home which requires a child to change schools. While every child might experience a bit of apprehension, a child who has been taught solid skills for adapting to the new environment will have an easier time making friends, participating in class, and looking at the new school as a positive opportunity. Understanding the importance of adaptability as a personal skill, how do we help our children develop this skill? The adaptability that will help them appropriately navigate an everchanging world and prepare them with the tools to address challenges they may face in their personal relationships, at school, in the workplace, and throughout their community? Fortunately, there are hundreds of online resources available for parents. The Penfield Children’s Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,

has a brief overview of principles for helping children develop adaptability on their website. Some of the suggestions listed there include: • Create a routine for your child, but make it flexible. Routines help children feel in control and safe. Make sure to allow for extra time for when things don’t go as planned, because let’s face it, sometimes they won’t. Is bedtime typically around 8 p.m.? Bend the rules a bit on Friday nights and let your child stay up late to finish a movie. • Show your children how a change in plans does not mean they won’t have a good time. Did a playdate cancel? Acknowledge that your child might feel sad they cannot see their friend and say something like, “I know you feel bad that Liam can’t play, but now we can have a movie night, just you and me.” This will help them see that making new plans can be just as fun. • Lead by example. If things don’t turn out as planned, how do you react? Control your urge to have a minor meltdown of your own and instead talk through what happened and think of a new idea or solution. Babysitter cancel? Enjoy a dinner out with the family instead and reschedule your dinner date for the following week. • Be your child’s cheerleader. Offer praise and words of encouragement when your child shows adaptability. Did you have plans to play at the park that got rained out? Saying to your child, “I know you’re sad that we can’t go to the park, but I really like your idea for visiting the library instead,” helps them feel confident in their abilities to embrace change and go-with-the-flow. The changes we each may have to manage throughout our lives are unpredictable. However, learning to adapt to those changes will allow our children to practice flexibility, while also maintaining control of their life as they grow older.


30 | Fall 2021

S PO N S O R E D BY

GOOD NEIGHBORS

Why Condensed Living Matters EMILY MERKLEY

association executive, Cache Valley Association of REALTORS®

We’ve all heard that time is a valuable commodity, and that’s true now more than ever when it comes to personal time. One of the biggest perks to living within Cache Valley is that nothing is more than a 30-minute drive away, and having access to what we need, when we need it, allows us to give time and attention to other parts of life. This is where the relatively new idea of 15-minute neighborhoods becomes appealing. Take a moment to imagine cities across the country comprised of neighborhoods in which schools, jobs, grocery stores, gas stations, and other businesses and services are all within a short walk, a quick bike ride, or accessible by transit from the homes of neighborhood residents. The purpose driving the creation of high-density communities is founded on the principle of giving people back their time. Take back the hours and hours of commuting to jobs and driving around to accomplish daily tasks. Along with the time value, these higher-density housing communities can provide improved options for economic mobility while promoting health and increasing access to green spaces.

This kind of smaller, condensed living would provide opportunities for economic stability and growth, ensure racial equity, and allow residents to form a safe, tightknit community. Calvin Gladney, CEO of Smart Growth America, is one of the planners who envisions a country that, “no matter where you live, or who you are, you can enjoy living in a place that is healthy, prosperous, and resilient.” More perks of high-density residences include lower costs to maintain infrastructure for governments, ease of managing school districts, attracting new employers, and increasing property values. When public transportation is readily available and jobs, businesses, and services are within walking distance, higherdensity developments also generate less traffic, which is something this valley can appreciate! In a place that is seeing tremendous growth, the importance of real human interaction in an increasingly digital world has great appeal. These small neighborhoods are built on the power of

community and connection and provide affordable housing for both young and old. With smaller homes and larger common areas, they provide a home size and property that is maintainable, and they provide space for health care services and other businesses that are crucial for older adults who can no longer operate a car. These factors allow seniors to age in-place while simultaneously assisting young buyers to establish roots and have a place to call their own. Local REALTORS® are consistently looking for ways to improve the community at all levels and assist consumers by providing better metrics for making age-friendly real estate transactions. Sustainable development of the valley is a top priority for REALTORS® as they assist in facilitating healthy growth throughout the area. As long as demand stays high, but inventory remains how (not enough homes to meet the demand), housing could continue to become less and less affordable to low and middle income families.

CACHE COUNTY NEW LISTINGS:

CACHE COUNTY AVERAGE SALES PRICE:

2020 (January-June) – 1,088 2021 (January-June) – 779 -28.4%

2020 (January-June) – $285,000 2021 (January-June) – $382,319 +33.7%


SINGLE FAMILY ACTIVE ADULT

142

MULTI FAMILY

Richmond

23

Newton

Fox Meadow s Smithfield

E astview Landing S mithfield

218

The Cove

Active Adult, Hyde Park

Hyde Park

23

Vineyard

Townhomes, Providence

Vineyard

Active Adult, Providence

30

Vineyard Providence

P rovidence Gateway

Woodmore Pointe

Condos, Townhomes, Providence

Townhomes, Providence

Mendon

DESIGN STUDIO

Meadowbroo k Loga n

Ridgeline Park

Mount Vist a

Townhomes, Nibley

Nibley

Ridgeline Park

Active Adult, Nibley

23

Ridgeline Park Nibley

N

Hyrum 101 165

435.228.4702

|

www.visionaryhomes.com


Vision Care for the Entire Family IN A PROFESSIONAL, FAMILY-FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE

If your child is not performing as expected in school, don’t wait until they fall further behind. Schedule your appointment today! (435) 363-2980

Back-to-school tip! Instead of screen time, try outdoor play as a healthier alternative for an after-school pick-me-up. Great for the eyes, body, and mind!

Michael Cole, OD SPECIALIZES IN PEDIATRIC OPTOMETRY AND THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATEMENT OF BINOCULAR VISION DISORDERS

981 South Main, Suite 220, Logan • (435) 363-2980 WWW. CACHECFEC.COM


| 33

Diabetic Retinopathy MICHAEL COLE, OD

Child and Family Eye Care Center

We often see patients in our clinic who have been advised by their primary care doctor to have a diabetic eye examination. Many are not quite sure what that means or why it is necessary. To appreciate the importance of ocular examinations as an integral part of diabetic care, it is helpful to understand how diabetes can affect the eyes. Diabetes is a condition that affects small blood vessels throughout the body. These tiny tubes supplying oxygen and nutrition to our tissues are damaged over time, causing them to become weaker, leaky, and unable to contain the fluid passing through them. With high blood glucose over long periods of time, the fluid, proteins, and blood cells will eventually start to seep into the areas surrounding the blood vessels. This causes decreased blood flow and prevents proper nutrition and oxygen supply to the regions further downstream from the injury, eventually leading to oxygen deprivation, poor healing, and tissue damage. The reason that ocular examinations are so important to monitor diabetic status is that the unique anatomy of the eye allows us to view the tiny blood vessels in the retina. This is the only place where we can see blood vessels in their natural state, as they are covered by skin and other tissues

elsewhere in the body. These views of the internal eye allow us to observe even small changes that may occur. Try an internet search for “retinal photo,” as well as “diabetic retinopathy,” and see if you can notice the difference in the images. As we monitor the blood flow in the retina, we can gain insight into the health of the circulatory system in other areas of the body such as the kidneys and nervous system. If a great deal of damage exists in the retina, we can infer that damage has also likely occurred elsewhere. This type of damage is more likely to occur over long periods of time. Individuals with long-standing diabetes (even those well controlled) are more likely to develop diabetic retinopathy than those newly diagnosed. When retinal tissue becomes deprived of oxygen, it becomes stressed and will eventually permanently lose function. As this process occurs, the neurons send out signals that stimulate new blood vessel growth to supply them with the resources they need. These new blood vessels grow quickly and are poorly formed. The new vasculature is leaky and forms scar tissue among the delicate structures of the eye leading to permanent vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy is unlikely to cause any detectable vision changes

#utahrealestate #idahorealestate #letsgetmovingutah #letsgetmovingidaho

If you are renting, let’s see what you qualify for. If you need to know what your house is worth, give me a call ….. Consult’s FREE! BONNEVILLE REALTY

since 1992!

PATIENCE M FISHER (435)512-1512 patiencefisher@gmail.com

until later stages of the disease, and often goes undiagnosed until permanent damage exists. Due to this slow progression of damage, often without noticeable symptoms, it is imperative that those diagnosed with diabetes have a comprehensive eye exam annually, whether they require glasses or not. In some instances, with very high blood glucose levels, acute vision changes can occur. If glucose levels are high enough, fluid rushes into the lens inside the eye, causing the lens to change shape. This results in a shift in glasses prescription and blurry vision. This often occurs with newly diagnosed individuals before their diabetic status is under control. Usually, when glucose levels return to normal, this transient change in the lens resolves and vision returns to its previous state. While this type of vision disturbance is much more dramatic and noticeable, it is considerably less dangerous when compared with the chronic damage that occurs with diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic treatment with modern methods is safe and effective. Eye examinations are an important part of that treatment and will result in better long-term care when utilized. Schedule a diabetic ocular examination by contacting our office at 435-363-2980.


34 | Fall 2021

S A F E FA M I L I E S

My Child is Being Bullied SARAH LYONS

contributing writer

When parents send their kids to school they hope that they are safe and happy as they learn and grow, but when your child becomes a victim of bullying it can be hard to know how to help them. According to stopbullying.gov between 1 in 3 and 1 in 4 students in the United States say they have been bullied. This is most common in middle school and most often takes the form of social or verbal bullying. Due to recent programs and education, studies have shown the number of kids being bullied is declining. However, it is still a problem that should be taken seriously. Parents can educate themselves in what they should do so they are prepared if their child feels like they are being targeted by a bully. Here are some tips to give your student: JUST SAY STOP. The first thing your child can do when faced with a bully is to say “Stop!” It is healthy for all kids to understand boundaries. If

someone is speaking to them, touching them, or treating them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable, they have the right to say “No!” or “Stop!” If it continues, they can walk away from the situation. Learning to verbalize their feelings and take charge of the situation will benefit them into adulthood. They should never have to feel stuck. Likewise, kids should understand that if someone asks them to stop, they need to respect them enough to change their behavior immediately. WALK AWAY. If your child has asked their bully to stop and the behavior continues, let them know the best choice is to walk away. Ask your child if they have a person they feel safe telling about the bullying behavior at school. Let them know that if they have asked the bully to stop and they did not, they should then walk away and go tell someone they feel safe talking to about the situation. It is never


| 35

a good idea to start a physical fight with anyone. If your child is not comfortable talking to an adult at school or they have reported bullying but don’t feel heard, it may be a good idea for the parent to contact the school directly and come up with a plan to stop any future bullying. By first allowing your child to address the situation, you teach them empowerment. USE THE BUDDY SYSTEM. Often kids who are targeted by bullies are perceived as different by their peers. Bullying often happens with a group of kids targeting a child who is alone. Encourage your child to play with kids with similar interests. A group of kids is less likely to be targeted.

LAUGH IT OFF. It is no surprise that bullies find enjoyment in picking on others because they get a reaction. Sometimes laughing it off or simply not giving the bully the attention they're seeking can stop them in their tracks. This isn’t always easy to do, especially if letting things go doesn't come naturally, or if your child is already upset. But, in some situations, this can turn things around quickly. FIND AN OUTLET. Kids who feel they have been bullied at school may begin to feel angry, depressed, or blame themselves. It is important to let your child know that it is not their fault. Help your child find something they can use as an outlet when they have these feelings — running, drawing, journaling, sports, hanging out with friends, etc. If your child has something they enjoy and are good at, it helps them feel important and boosts their overall happiness. WHAT NOT TO DO. Being bullied creates a wide range of emotions and reactions for the victims. While you have given them positive strategies for handling the situation, you may also want to remind them of the following things not to do: • Don’t blame yourself. It is not your fault. • Don’t fight back. It’s never a good idea to physically hurt someone else. • Don’t bully others. Do not hurt others because you have been hurt. • Don’t keep silent. Remaining silent while you or someone else are being targeted will not help stop the situation. • Don’t avoid school. Everyone deserves to be safe and learn at school. • Don’t hurt yourself. If you feel like you want to hurt yourself or others, talk to someone immediately.

SPOOK-TACULAR HALLOWEEN DECOR & MORE!

10% OFF

ENTIRE PURCHASE One discount per day. Cannot be combined with other coupons or discounts. Expires October 31, 2021.

20% OFF

ONE STORE-OWNED ITEM One discount per day. Cannot be combined with other coupons or discounts. Expires October 31, 2021.

1050 N MAIN STREET � LOGAN � 435.932.2160 � LOCALSGIFTS.COM


36 | Fall 2021

Secrets to a Beautiful, New Lawn MARK ANDERSON

owner, Anderson’s Seed and Garden

For some reason, many gardeners believe that spring is the best time of year to plant a new lawn. In reality, mid-July through September is actually the best time for planting new grass. The warmer the soil is, the faster the seed germinates and gets established. On many occasions, I have planted in the hottest, driest part of the summer, and have had amazing results with new turf. If you want to try some of the newest varieties of grass that resist drought, insects, and disease, and have a deeper, darker green appearance, then I have a few recommendations that will ensure your success: • While preparing the soil for planting, make sure to incorporate a balanced fertilizer for new lawns. Also include a natural, humate-based soil conditioner like HuMic to improve seed germination and speed up its establishment. I never plant without it.

• Before planting, apply a seed coating to your new grass seed like Seed Coat from Soil Moist. This coating contains graphite to warm up the seed and increase germination, and a finely ground polymer that absorbs moisture like nothing else. It will hold over 100-times its weight in water, and it holds that moisture next to the seed to soften the seed’s exterior and allow the germ to emerge. This product is a lifesaver if you are struggling to keep your seed evenly moist. • When planting, make sure to rake the entire area lightly, apply the seed evenly, and then either rake the area again (in the opposite direction as the first rake) or use a lawn roller to lightly compact the seeded soil. Compacting the soil slightly will cover the seed with a very thin layer of soil and aid in retaining moisture and germination. • Don’t overwater. We recommend that you adjust your

Think ahead! 69 West Center • Logan, Utah • 435-752-2345

Plant garlic now for produce this upcoming spring!


| 37

sprinklers or, if you are doing it manually, apply 3 to 8 minutes of water three times a day, at 9 a.m., 1 p.m., and 4 p.m., for example. Make sure that no puddles appear during the watering and adjust accordingly if it is too wet or if it dries out too much in between waterings. Remember: You want it to be slightly damp, not soggy. I’m so impressed with the new section of grass that we planted last summer to fix a problem area of our lawn. It greened up earlier, stayed green when we couldn’t water the lawn in April (when the older lawn was stressing), and looks amazing during this extra hot summer. I’m tempted to redo our entire lawn right now. I think you’ll be surprised how some new grasses will give you the color you’ve been wanting, while decreasing your need to water, fertilize, and prevent insects and diseases. It’s easy and not as hard to do as you may think.


38 | Fall 2021

FA M I LY T R AV E L

AIRFARE TO ACTIVITIES:

Eight Ways to Save Money on Family Travel EMILY BUCKLEY

editor in chief

I have evolved to the point in motherhood that getting a good deal on a bushel of peaches gets me pretty excited. So, you can imagine my thrill when I come across a $250 roundtrip ticket to Hawaii, or enough points on my credit card to pay for a hotel in Manhattan for four nights. Travel, especially travel with the whole family in tow, can get expensive quickly, but is still something we like to do regularly with our large family. Here are a few tried-and-true tips to help you get the most bang for your buck while adventuring with your crew.

• Consider traveling from a different airport than your “home” airport. If you don’t mind a road trip before your flight, departing from a different airport could save you some cash. For example, it is about a 6 hour drive from the Salt Lake City International Airport to Las Vegas and 8 hours to Denver, but the difference in airline ticket prices from one of these airports to far-off destinations, especially international destinations, can often be hundreds of dollars less. You may also make up some of your car travel time by avoiding layovers using this strategy.

• Subscribe to cheap flight-watcher services like Scott’s Cheap Flights or Flights from Home to get notifications on deals to locations you are planning to visit. • Bring groceries to your hotel. Yes, part of the fun of traveling is checking out the local cuisine, but you can save a lot of money by avoiding convenience meals and picking up groceries for at least one quick meal at your hotel each day. Most hotels have at least a minifridge that can accommodate sandwich supplies for lunch on the go or yogurt and fruit for a quick breakfast.


| 39

• Avoid checking bags to save money on checked luggage costs. Consider booking lodging that has laundry facilities so you can do laundry halfway through your trip and pack lighter, in carry-on bags or backpacks.

• Save on airport parking for longer vacations by booking a hotel nearby the airport the night before your flight and taking advantage of their shuttle service to the airport. These hotels often charge much less to leave your

car parked in their lot than the airport parking garages. • Look at alternatives to rental cars. Rental car prices have skyrocketed since the pandemic began, leaving travelers with few affordable options. Consider renting a car through Costco, Autoslash, or Turo (the VRBO of car rentals, i.e., a peer-to-peer marketplace where you can rent cars from owners directly). • Take advantage of multi-day attraction cards. Cities around the world offer things like City Passes that will save money on admission to major tourist attractions, museum admissions, and even ground transportation. Before you purchase, be sure to check at what age kids’ admission is free at these places. Some of your youngest family members may not need to pay for admission at all. • Check your annual passes for reciprocal admission. For example, if you have an annual pass to The Leonardo and Clark Planetarium in Salt Lake City, you can access Association of Science-Technology Centers nationwide through their Travel Passport System.

COOL

LOOK WHEN YOU GO BACK RECEIVE A CHILDS HAIRCUT

FOR ONLY $5

APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

MONDAY

10:45-4:30

10:45-4:30

1:00-7:30

1:00-7:30

9:15-4:00 10:45-4:30

CACHE VALLEY MALL

1300 North Main St. Suite 1136 | Logan Utah 84341

$5

CHILDS

SCHOOL!

TO

All services performed by students under the supervision of an instructor. | Expires 12/17/2021

HAIRCUT


40 | Fall 2021

David Archuleta to Return to Logan for Christmas Concert in November EMILY BUCKLEY

editor in chief

A local favorite performer and 2008 American Idol alum, David Archuleta, will return to Cache Valley for a holiday concert, A Christmas with David Archuleta, on Tuesday, November 30 at the Logan High School Auditorium. “I love performing in Logan,” David said. “It is a great town that has always made me feel at home. I am looking forward to coming back.” David says his Christmas concert will be traditional, full of his original Christmas music, like He is Born, Winter in the Air, and Christmas Every Day, along with songs audiences have known and loved for generations. “I love to sing

O Holy Night,” David said. “It has a beautiful melody, and it just soars.” David released his eighth album, Therapy Sessions, in 2020, a pop record that Billboard magazine dubbed as his “most vulnerable music yet.” The tracks narrate David’s lifelong struggle with mental health. “Whether it was fear, loss, dwelling on the past, or anxiety, there’s a constant battle going on because so much of my mind doesn’t want to budge,” David said. “The songs [on the album] are a sort of back and forth within the inner dialogue I have with myself.”


| 41

After releasing that “deeper” album, David took a lighter turn this summer with the release of his new song Movin’. “I wanted to do something more fun to get people movin’,” David said. David also recently authored a children’s book entitled My Little Prayer, illustrated by Sara Ugolotti, based on his song with the same title. It tells the story of a young boy who discovers that what God wants for him is even better than what he wanted for himself. “I love kids,” David said. “I have a lot of nieces and nephews, and I thought it’d be great to share something that’s important to me with them, which is my relationship with God and how prayer brings me closer to Him … and understanding that He has a plan for me even when things don’t turn out how I hoped they would. If I get to have kids in the future, I’d love to leave that legacy with them.” David’s Logan concert is expected to sell out. Tickets are available at davidarchuleta.com.

A Christmas with David Archuleta Tuesday, November 30, 2021 at 8 p.m.

LOGAN HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM Tickets available at davidarchuleta.com.

CHECK US OUT AT ONE OF OUR THREE CACHE VALLEY LOCATIONS!

78 E 400 N, Logan • (435) 753-6463 | 981 S Main Suite D, Logan • (435) 755-0262 10 South Main, Smithfield • (435) 799-3849

half off

Buy one loaf, get one loaf

Second loaf must be of equal or lesser value. Please present coupon at time of purchase. Coupon not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/1/2021.


Thank you for trusting us for life's most important moments. Our doctors, physicians assistants, midwife, and staff have been committed to your health and safety since 2004.

Dr. Barry Noorda, MD Dr. Gary Fowers, MD Dr. David Kirkman, MD Dr. Anne Blackett, DO


| 43

FA C T C H E C K

STAGE MAGIC IN THE MAKING:

Cache Valley's Gift of Community Theatre KATE NEELEY

contributing writer

The lights go down, you’re in a dark theatre, but then, you’re not. What creates that moment when you are transported from your plush theatre seat to the streets of England, a mid-century living room, or a palace in a far-off land? You might assume the magic happens on stage. But what happens on stage is the product of a massive amount of effort and talent pouring in from every direction. With music, dance, and creative energy filling local stages again, there seems to be a new appreciation for arguably the most collaborative art form. Jump in for a deeper look at how it goes down behind-the-scenes in Cache Valley’s community theatre productions. As a director, Jay Richards of Music Theatre West relates, “I love the creation process! I love pulling together the elements of storytelling — everything from the grand scenic elements to the gestures and vocal

inflections of the actors. When it all comes together and it works, everyone in the room can feel it. It becomes real.” His love for that process goes hand in hand with the challenge — the sheer magnitude of it as “the cast is in rehearsals, the designer designs, the choreographer creates, the costumer sews, the painter paints, and the orchestra practices … and all at the same time!” What a monumental undertaking — and how important it is that every person in that picture does their part. T.J. Davis of Pickleville Playhouse has written and directed several shows and won the hearts of many as Juanito Bandito. “One of the biggest challenges in writing is being able to put yourself in the right state of mind to create something entertaining,” T.J. says. “It’s literally my job every day to have fun. When I’m in a great mood, unstressed, confident, happy, enthusiastic, then writing is easy. The ideas flow and they all seem like the work of a genius as they come out.” He’s certainly up for the challenge and will be releasing a new Christmas show this holiday season. He loves the synergy of a cast who work together to create something great. For the actors, each will have a different experience depending on what part they play. Jessica Mohammed got her master’s degree in professional theatre and has played a huge variety of characters. In summer 2019, you may remember her thrilling Cache Valley audiences with her charm as Marian in Music Theatre West’s The Music Man. She will be on stage again this fall as Sister Berthe in The Sound of Music. Both lead roles and ensemble roles require a lot of study and practice, and according to Jessica, there are great things about both. “As an ensemble member, you get to form a closer camaraderie with other cast members, whereas in a lead role, you’re constantly working on lines, getting ready continued on next page ...

$25 REBATE FOR EVERY MOTOR ORDERED THIS MONTH ONLY

At Mountain Valley Blinds you always receive FREE Clearview upgrade on all plantation shutters All military, teachers & law enforcement receive additional discounts

435-232-9425

FREE Routless/Privacy Upgrade

@MTNVALLEYBLINDS

BRETLARSEN691@GMAIL.COM

FREE In-Home Consultation

BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIAL!

50% OFF! Includes all 2- and 2 1/2-inch composite blindes, 2-inch 100% bass wood blinds, and all roller shades, including honeycomb coverings. Free cord-free options on roller shades and honeycombs. Must present coupon by 11/1/21. All products made in the USA.


44 | Fall 2021

for the next scene, and getting into character and don’t get as much opportunity to socialize.” What makes a lead role amazing for Jessica is the experience of becoming someone else in the process of character development. “You gain a greater understanding of other people because you get to ‘walk in their shoes’ so to speak.” Getting ready to play the part of Maria in The Sound of Music this fall has already been a journey of learning for Jamie Younker. She’s been reading the autobiography of the actual Maria Von Trapp and said, “I spend as much time outside of formal rehearsal as I do in formal rehearsal” becoming the character of Maria. Keep in mind, this is all volunteer. Sound crazy? For Jamie, the joy, connection, and treasured relationships she gains are well worth the time. “I feel incredibly blessed to be a part of it,” she said, with heart.

Theatre West’s 2019 production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. She is currently costuming the cast of The Sound of Music showing this September. Even “the play clothes we are making for each child are worn briefly, but they are an important part of the storyline. Along with all the other outfits they wear, I have put in more hours on them than I did on Joseph’s coat.” For Four Seasons Theatre Company’s artistic director Kody Rash, creating a cohesive theme for costumes and set design is a labor of creativity and passion. He envisions, sketches, and makes the costumes and sets for every show. If you’ve ever been to a Four Seasons show,

The dance numbers are a moving work of art. Pickleville Playhouse’s choreographer Sharli King absolutely loves the process of envisioning, teaching the cast, and then seeing the dances come together on stage. As a dancer growing up, her director and choreographer mom would ask Sharli for help, and now she says, “I’ve been choreographing shows for 15 years. I wasn’t an expert at first, but over time I’ve come to know the process and I enjoy it so much!” See some killer dance moves in Pickleville’s fall production of The Addam’s Family. Quiet and somewhat hidden, an essential part is a person backstage with a headset making sure everything happens on cue — lights, sounds, flight system, set pieces, scene changes, and more. These unsung heroes are called stage managers. “The stage manager is like the nervous system of a production — the director is the brain — and the stage manager makes sure all the messages get sent to the right place on time to produce the director’s vision,” Cyndi Ford, who managed Cache Theatre’s Matilda, said. Stage managers attend nearly every rehearsal so they have a good understanding of where the actors will be on stage and how that’s going to fit in with set pieces, lighting and backdrops, which actors need to wear mics, and more. It’s a big job. Music Theatre West’s stage manager Anissa Potts, who is currently working on The Sound of Music puts it this way, “From an audience perspective, it just looks like magic.” The stage manager’s organizational skills and dedication to production from start to finish certainly make them a magic maker. The cliché phrase “the show must go on” depends on a stage manager’s quick thinking when an actor has a medical emergency, or if a set piece goes missing or malfunctions. To quote Anissa, “I like to think of it as an adventure.” Even with the possibility of unexpected mishaps, both Anissa and Cyndi have a passion for the job. Honestly, the success of a production depends on these administrative geniuses. When you applaud a production, keep these angels in the wings in mind. Have you ever considered the details of costume design that begin months or years before a dress or coat appears on stage? Imagine watching your favorite show by actors dressed in whatever they could find that day. Even with a cast full of talented actors who know their parts, a lack of costumes would totally kill the vibe, don’t you think? Costume design is a massive undertaking from the sketches to the fittings down to the little stitches, zippers, and buttons. Music Theatre West’s costume designer Maren Lyman took years collecting fabric, designing, and piecing together Joseph’s Coat for Music

We're Hiring Full-Time, Part-Time, Day, Swing, Grave, Weekend Jobs Available

Weekly Pay | Benefits

$15- $23 Per Hour Logan, Brigham, Tremonton, Preston Office Work, Production, Warehouse, Assembly, Trades, Food Service + More

Unlimited Referral Bonuses

Stop by Today! Walk-ins Welcome!

Call or Text us at: Apply In Person (435) 313-3399

¡Hablamos Español!

1476 Main St. Logan, UT 84341 Monday- Friday 8AM-5PM


| 45

you’ve certainly been awed by the lively and unique costumes. Cinderella will hit the stage this fall. “The fun part is coming up with the ideas and the vision for a production,” and part of the magic is “making a beautiful masterpiece within a budget.” He also relies on the help of others. Since this is community theatre, hundreds of hours are put in by regular people who fit into their busy schedule sewing on buttons and altering things to fit — and this is merely a snippet of the sacrifice that makes the stage come alive. Why does Kody do it? “There is a certain pride that comes from creating something beautiful and seeing what it does for other people … when people go to a theatre production, it gives them a chance to escape the hard things in life and let their hearts heal.” That is certainly a beautiful thing in more ways than one. Chrissy Webster, Cache Theatre’s Miss Honey in Matilda knows as a vocalist what it takes to get ready for those big solo numbers. The powerful notes and lulling melodies may sound effortless to you, but it takes courage to get out there even after years of training and practice. Chrissy relates, “I almost never feel ready to do it, but I mostly remind myself that I’ve done this hundreds of times and I can do it again.” What’s more, is that it’s a gift she gives to the audience. “I think about what I can give the audience by going out there and doing it, whether it’s hope, inspiration, or something else.” There’s really something special about community theatre in Cache Valley. What happens on the stage is merely a part of a collective labor of love, ingenuity, creativity, and a lot of hard work. To truly capture the soul that comes together as a collection of so many talented people in the community is nigh unto impossible, but from a few perspectives, you get a glimpse of the collaborative tip of the iceberg that creates such a stunning work of art.

“Your Health is Our First Concern!”

We are proud to be locally-owned and to have served Cache Valley for over 35 years. Specializing in serving our community with fast, friendly, professional service. As Cache Valley’s most experienced Compounding Pharmacy, we offer: • Compounding • Medication reviews • Refill reminders

• Diabetes products & services • High-quality CBD products • Vitamins and supplements • Diabetes Consulting

• Hormone Therapy • Drive-Thru • Mail Services • Medicare Part D

435-753-8500 550 EAST 1400 NORTH • LOGAN, UT 84341 Mon-Fri 9am-6:30pm Sat 9am-1pm

“In theatre, there is a standard that is virtually impossible to attain. That term is ensemble. Artists who work together without pride or conceit create an enchantment that rarely takes place,” Manuel Leybas, Cache Theatre Company artistic director, said.


46 | Fall 2021

Why to Consider Advanced Funeral Planning JAMES STEPHENS

funeral director, White Pine Funeral Services

Planning your own funeral may not be something you want to spend time considering, but advanced funeral planning benefits you and your family tremendously. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF ADVANCED FUNERAL PLANNING? Primarily, you and your family receive peace of mind. You can rest easy knowing that your plan is in place and your family is relieved of having to make emotional and financial decisions. Following an individual’s passing, there are over 100 decisions to be made within the first 48 hours. Advanced funeral planning allows family members to focus on their feelings and the grief process, knowing that the vast majority of decisions have already been made. Additionally, you control the costs. By making selections at the funeral home and providing funding for them in advance, you control the cost, and funeral expenses are locked. Your surviving family will not need to make stressful and emotionally driven decisions regarding finances, and they can be certain you are receiving exactly what you want, without overspending.

without funding is appropriate. For those who believe it’s in their best interest to fund in advance, plans range from singlepay plans and multi-year plans, which may be paid monthly, quarterly, or annually. Plans are also transferable. Should you decide to move out of the area, your plan travels with you. CAN I MAKE CHANGES TO MY PLAN? Even if you have made decisions and paid for your funeral, you have the freedom to call any mortuary you’d like when the time comes. For example, if you’ve heard great things about White Pine Funeral Services and would like to switch, you certainly have the freedom to do so. You may lose a portion of your money, but White Pine will provide a discount to cover any fees or losses associated with switching. White Pine Funeral Services focuses on serving families with excellent customer service, compassionate care, and integrity. Please call us or stop by for a visit. We are confident you’ll feel a difference.

Prefunding is a must for those who may need to qualify for government assistance, such as Medicaid. Prepaid plans may be irrevocable to ensure funds are protected for the specific purpose of final expenses. WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO PREPLAN? No one really knows when their time will come. There are situations where advanced funeral planning doesn’t make sense. However, I would urge anyone approaching or beyond their retirement to consider advanced funeral planning.

WHITE PINE F U N E R A L

S E R V I C E S

J A M E S S T E P H E N S

M A R K T H U R S T O N

There are options for everyone. For some, simply planning

Service • Compassion • Integrity Funeral & Cremation Services Pre-Planning & Aftercare Headstones & Memorials 4 3 5 - 7 0 9 - 6 8 0 0 | w h i t e p i n e f u n e r a l s . c o m 7 5 3 S o u t h 1 0 0 E a s t , L o g a n , U T 8 4 3 2 1


No apologies necessary. Whether at our Glo Studio or in the comfort of your own home, we are dedicated to giving you the best spray tan you've ever had. Hours are by appointment only • Closed on Sundays Book your appointment at glomobiletanning.com or by calling or texting 435-932-5642.


WHAT MAKES YOU

smile ALL DAY?

smile all day @ THOMSON FAMILY

ORTHODONTICS Brady Thomson, DDS • Jeffrey Johnson, DDS 435.752.1320 • Logan • Providence • tfobraces.com

Thomson Family Orthodontics @tfobraces

Profile for Cache Valley Family Magazine

Cache Valley Family Magazine Fall 2021  

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded