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Cleveland High School

Vol. 5, Issue 7 clevelandjournal@gmail.com

5511 15th Ave. S. Seattle, WA 98108

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

2014 signals end for some, new beginning for others DANIEL DOAN Cleveland Publications reporter For video game fanatics, there is nothing worse than the dreaded screen signaling you’ve lost the round. “Game over” looms big on the screen and often indicates an end due to a negative

In This Issue The Journal counts down the top stories of this year. Can you guess what made the list?

outcome. This, however, is not an ending that one would see stretched across their monitor. Instead, Cleveland High School’s version of the game’s end comes in the form of the first class to graduate under all four years of the STEM program, departing teachers

and the last days of school. The 2013-14 school year will go down as the year the Lady Eagles won another state title, but also lost their coach to Oregon. The school’s longest-running teacher heads off into retirement, while others leave to walk a different path.

This issue of the Journal is not so much of a “Game Over” as it is a “Continue” or “Try Again.” And while this may seem like the grand finale for the Class of 2014, the game of life has only just begun. So, slide in your coin, choose your character and let’s play!

Elite Eagles

Top seniors plant victory flag in final year

> PAGES 4-5

T. SCRIBNER / C-PUB

HONG PHUC TRAN

CHRISTIAN CARMEN / C-PUB

ELIJAH “EJ” PINERA

EDNAUH KAMLONDY / C-PUB

TRACY THICH

SOFIA SEN / C-PUB

JOYCE HARRELL / C-PUB

ADAM GRUENBAUM

LOC TRAN

Cleveland’s longest-running staff member retires > PAGE 6

Girls relay team falls short at state > PAGE 14

PRINNCES DONIEGO / C-PUB

ELIZABETH CHUNG

LOUISE PARAFINA / C-PUB

SUNSHINE ARCILLA

ELIZHA FULGENCIO / C-PUB

JORDAN CHAMBERS / C-PUB

TUAN Q. TRAN

JAMIE LEI

Lady Eagles Head Coach leaves Cleveland for collegiate position > PAGE 15

RYAN RABIA / C-PUB

TUAN A. TRAN

ELI LU / C-PUB

WALKER TRELEASE

CHRISTIAN CORPUZ / C-PUB

VINCENT TSAN

ELI LU / C-PUB

TAI MACH

KASSIE VILLARS / C-PUB

PAOLO ELECCION


The Journal

News

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Cleveland

Publications Cleveland Journal & Aquila

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Eyes on the Eagles — June MON

STAFF MANAGER

TUE

WED

THUR

FRI

Izet Mendoza*

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CONTENT MANAGERS REPORTING Daniel Doan*

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Elizabeth Paulson REPORTERS

Kamry Adams

Alice John

Makala Roper

Irina Del Donno

Lisa Le

Jennifer Tran

Monica Elenes

Alexia Me­i

Jennifer Williams *

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Seniors’ last day of classes Teachers: Grades due for seniors

A-Day

16

B-Day

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A-Day

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Moving Up Assembly, 11:15-11:45 Senior Luncheon 12:30-1:30 Poetry Slam 5-8 p.m. CHS Auditorium

Amanda Nguyen CONTENT MANAGERS VISUALS

SENIORS’ LAST DAY

B-Day

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Miguel Laureano Damian ― Presentation Director Renan Visperas ― Design Louise Para­ina ― Photography Myzhanique Ladd ― Video DESIGN, PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO Abdoulie Batchilly

Ednauh Kamlondy

Christian Carmen

Elizabeth Lu

Jordan Chambers

Mohamed Moulid

Michael Chan

Binh Nguyen

Delannah Collins-Wright

Brandon Petitt

Christian Corpuz

Ryan Rabia

Asiyah Davis

Mylena Rodriguez

Prinnces Doniego

So­ia Sen

Elizha-Grace Fulgencio

Eric To

Joyce Harrell

Kassandra Villars

Aileen Isla * student works in both writing and graphic arts ** freelance reporter POLICY Cleveland Publications produces the school newspaper and yearbook for the student body of Cleveland High School in Seattle, Washington. Our right to free speech is guaranteed under the First Amendment of the Constitution. Cleveland Publications will be objective, concise and will not contain unethical or obscene material. The writing staff will report the news fairly and accurately. Letters to the Editor: Readers are encouraged to voice their opinions to the Journal. The paper will publish as many letters as space allows. Letters must include the author’s name, signature and class or position relative to the letter. Typed or legible, hand-written letters are acceptable. The Journal reserves the right to edit letters for grammatical errors, accuracy and spelling though every attempt will be made to preserve original content. Address letters to the editor to: Cleveland Journal Adviser Cleveland STEM High School 5511 15th Ave S. Seattle, WA 98108 Students and staff of Cleveland High School may leave submissions in the school mailbox of Teresa Scribner, publications adviser, or e-mail the Journal at clevelandjournal@gmail.com. Editorials: The editorial section of the Journal serves as a forum of expression. Views printed herein are meant to be opinionated and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the Journal staff, the student body, faculty, administration or school board. Opinions, commentaries and perspectives are the views of the writer, not Seattle Public Schools or Cleveland High School. Advertising: The Journal will not accept any advertising that is deemed to be factually inaccurate, designed to mislead, deceive or defraud or services illegal for teens to possess, buy or use.

Friends of The Journal Thank you to our loyal donors and subscribers SUBSCRIBERS Han Eckelberg Alexander Anthony Silas Morrow Donna Wong DONORS Phil & Kimberly Petty Anonymous Donor

LAST DAY OF SCHOOL 1 hour early release

GRADUATION Memorial Stadium 5 p.m.

LAST DAY OF SCHOOL (teachers)

rehearsal, 9:30 a.m.

2014-15 school calendar announced From District news reports

Students will have a lot less time for that break in February. The Seattle School Board eliminated the week-long mid-winter break for the 2014-15 academic year. The calendar was approved on May 21. Mid-winter break will be reduced from a full Monday-Friday to four days over Presidents Day weekend – including Monday, Feb. 16 for Presidents Day, which is already a holiday and a non-school day, and Tuesday, Feb. 17. As a result of the shorter mid-winter break, the last day of school in 2014-15 will be earlier – Monday, June 15, 2015, assuming no snow make-up days. Key dates for 2014-15 include:

Announcements Don’t get comfortable

Wednesday, Sept. 3: First day of school for students Nov. 11: Veterans Day Nov. 27-28: Thanksgiving holiday Dec. 22, 2014 - Jan. 2, 2015: Winter break Jan. 19, 2015: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Feb. 16, 2015: President’s Day Feb. 17, 2015: One day off, as part of shortened midwinter break April 13-17, 2015: Spring Break May 25, 2015: Memorial Day Monday, June 15, 2015: Last day of school for students June 16, 17, 2015: Snow makeup days (if needed)

Disney World in Florida to compete in the Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) national health science conference this summer. Christopher Wilhelm, Tran Lam, Cathy Le, Kevin Ho and Joerene Aviles all qualified for nationals after placing in the local competition in Yakima.

The school year hasn’t even ended, and ASB is already preparing for next year. Eagle Day for the upcoming school year has been set for Tuesday, Sept. 2, the day before school starts. Students are encouraged to attend in order to get their ID badges made, pick up their schedBook it, baby! ules and order yearbooks and The Evergreen Teen Book class gear at a discounted rate. Awards has released its nominees Drop in and get your Eagle on! for 2015. The annual book list includes the top 10 most popular Come and get it books for teens in Washington The waiting list has cleared state. CHS Librarian Kathleen and a limited number of year- Dunbar sits on the committee that books are still available for $70. selects the books. Get your copy with Ms. Scribner in Students who read two or more Room 1162. of those books will have the opAlso, if you’re interested in pur- portunity to vote for their favorite chasing old yearbooks from previ- one; the winner is announced next ous years, you may do so for $20. year. Multiple copies of each book See Scribner or Allana Farrar for are available in the library for remore details. turning students to check out for the summer. A picture will last longer For more information about the Want a keepsake from the list of books, go to http://www.evState Championship game? How ergreenbookaward.org/nominees. about that great photo from prom? Did a picture in the yearbook reMovin’ on up ally catch your eye? The Moving-Up Assembly will Pictures featured in the year- be held Friday, June 13 from book and the Journal are for sale 11:15-11:45 a.m. in the gym. This in Room 1162. A 5x7 is $2.50, an is the tradition of underclassmen 8x10 is $5 and 4 wallets are $1.50. ceremonially “moving” up to the next grade by changing seats in The happiest place on Earth the gym. The ceremony ends with Five students are heading to the seniors’ departure from the

gym, symbolizing their exit from high school.

Check out is at noon

Seniors: Wednesday, June 11 is the last day to attend classes. Seniors are expected to attend all classes on their schedule that day. Students must have all teachers sign off on their final grade, and all fines must be paid before any counselor will clear you for graduation. Students may not interrupt classes to get signatures from teachers! There will be finals going on, so please get signatures during class time, during lunch or after school. Payments for fines should be directed to Fiscal Secretary Allana Farrar and must be CASH or MONEY ORDERS only.

Pomp & Circumstance

Graduation rehearsal will take place on Monday, June 16. Two buses will leave Cleveland at 9:15 a.m. to transport seniors to Memorial Stadium. Those who choose not to take the bus from CHS will need to report to the stadium by 9:45 a.m. for graduation practice. Graduation ceremony: Seniors are responsible for getting to Memorial Stadium themselves by 4:30 p.m. on June 16. There will not be any transportation provided by the school for the 5:00 p.m. ceremony. Seniors should be in their caps and gowns as they enter the stadium by 4:30 p.m.


The Journal

News

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Youth Ambassadors meet Macklemore

Macklemore super fan Lashaunycee O’Cain is overcome with emotion as she hugs the rapper during his surprise visit to Roxhill Elementary. Cleveland’s Youth Ambassadors worked with Roxhill’s group to share the message that people can make a difference at any age. Macklemore, whose real name is Ben Haggerty, said he and the YA program “go way back.”

LOUISE PARAFINA / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Summer not so sunny for some BY ELIZABETH PAULSON Cleveland Publications reporter The warm weather is a foreshadowing of the upcoming season: summer. The school year will end soon, bringing the glorious start of a three month break. But it’s not all sun and relaxation for everyone. Some students and staff already have plans that don’t include the beach. Student teacher Matthew Kachmarik will be taking summer courses at Seattle University. “After school ends for high school students, that doesn’t mean I can stop going to school,” he said. “That doesn’t mean I won’t plan on spending as much time at the lake swimming, hiking and playing outside as much as possible.” Kachmarick explained that the break from school is what keeps you from going crazy. “Summertime is what you look forward to all year, so you kind of have to indulge that.” He is scheduled to get his teaching degree in early

taking a family vacation to Disney World. Summer is also a time to visit family. Freshman Thuy Luu puts the “vacate” in vacation. She will spend a month of her summer in Vietnam, taking a road trip with her family. “We have lots of family all over Vietnam, and we plan to visit all of them or at least try to,” said Luu. The three month break does allow some students a chance to chill. Junior Nathan Chong plans on playing a lot of tennis, “League of Legends” and hanging out with his girlfriend. “You don’t want to become super lazy or else during the school year, you’ll just be super lazy and just not doing anything,” Chong reasoned. He believes being lazy during summer break leads to bad habits in the fall. The last day of school is June 19; summer officially begins on June 21. After all the homework, assignments and assessments, students and staff will have a welldeserved break until September 3.

RYAN RABIA / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Student teacher Matthew Kachmarik will be taking summer courses at Seattle University. August and begin teaching in the fall. For some students this summer, learning doesn’t end for them either. Junior Deeqa Roble will be doing the Upward Bound math and science and studying for the SAT. “Ultimately, getting into college, that’s my goal and I’m doing my best to achieve it,” she said. Before graduation, students must complete 60 hours of community service. Freshman Julie Dinh is

working on getting hers this summer through volunteering at the Youth Tutoring Program. “I want to help kids to learn more about reading and learning about comprehension in literature,” she said. Dinh wants to help kids if they struggle in reading, writing and speaking English. “I want to volunteer because first of all, I like to volunteer. Also, I want to be productive and active to earn more service hours.” Dinh will also be

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Benaderet, Proctor won’t return next year From staff reports As the end of the school year approaches, students and staff alike say goodbye to their friends and coworkers as they head off to enjoy their summer break. Most teachers usually return in the fall, but this year, a few teachers will not be returning to Cleveland next year. Technology analyst-turned-teacher Shie Benaderet has taken a job at The Northwest School where he will be the Director of Educational Technology. “I’m excited for Shie Benaderet the new challenges that this position will bring, but I’ll miss many of the students at Cleveland next year,” Benaderet said. “I’ll especially miss my advisory class because we’ve grown close over the last two years.” Benaderet has worked at Cleveland for four years. He started as the on-site network analyst before switching back to teaching in 2012. Students who have been at CHS for a while still remember him as “the computer guy,” but he’s taught everything from Humanities to AP Government. He also works with Youth Ambassadors. When asked what kind of impact he’s had on Cleveland, Benaderet said CHS has had more of an impact on him than he has had on the school. “I’ve learned a lot about what it means to be a good teacher, and what areas I still need to grow in.” Benaderet, who became a father last year, said the new addition to his family didn’t play a part in his decision to leave. “It was a professional decision based on pursuing what I have always dreamed of doing, which is help more teachers use technology effectively in their courses.” Special Education teacher Jeff Proctor will also be departing Cleveland for a job at an elementary school in Sugar City, Idaho. “It’s a different opportunity for me and my family,” he said. Proctor has been on staff for six years. Students who have had him as a teacher were saddened to hear about his departure. With Special Ed Department Head Karen HagJeff Proctor gard’s retirement, Proctor’s leaving was another hard pill to swallow for his team. Proctor encourages the Cleveland community to continue to be powerful in the future. “It’s been a great time here, but stay forever strong.” Both teachers are leaving to pursue jobs that are important to them. Benaderet leaves these words to Cleveland students: “Learn something new every day, find something you are passionate about and pursue it, and practice compassion in all that you do.” Cleveland Publications reporter Kamry Adams contributed to this report.


The Journal

Year in Review

4

the year that was

Free SATs for junior class It may seem like an odd story to have on the list, but taking a college-entrance exam for free is kind of a big deal. On Feb. 26, the junior classes around the Seattle School District’s south end were given the opportunity to take the SATs for free. A group called the Road Map Project, which received the money from federal funding, sponsored the grant money for the free exam. “I think it’s raised awareness about what the SAT is, and in turn, why that’s a good thing is it raises awareness of college admission requirements,” said Academic Dean Catherine Brown. “I think students never get over their fear of registering for the SAT to find out how they’ll do, it kind of forced the question. Now students know how they’re doing and know it in time to do better their senior year.” The free SAT is expected to be offered again next year for the incoming juniors. By Elizabeth Paulson

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The gym gets a makeover

When you walk into your school’s gym, you should feel a sense of pride. Cleveland’s gym lacked that feeling until the walls got some much-needed updates. Athletic Director Annette Duvall felt like there was no visual information of past successes at Cleveland. “When there are no visual accomplishments posted, people begin to make assumptions that the school hasn’t done anything.” That’s when Duvall, along with the alumni association and ASB, decided to give the gym some TLC. All of the banners were designed by the Student Athlete Counsel, a group of sophomores and juniors who participate in athletics. The group stayed after school on early release days to collaborate on ideas for the new signs. All of the new banners were purchased by the CHS Alumni Association. The old ones were auctioned off in April. With each sport having its own banner, the gym looks and feels more unified. When patrons walk through, there’s a sense of history. Duvall said, “You can’t know where you’re going if you don’t know where you came from.” By Makala Roper

Ladd named “Ms. Basketball”

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If her goals were to jump higher, throw harder and run faster, she’s done all of that and then some. Standing at 5’8”, Myzhanique Ladd has not only secured a repeat for the 3A state title, she has also earned her place as Washington’s top girls basketball player. This season, Ladd was named, “2014 Ms. Basketball Washington state” for all classifications, an honor that she humbly accepts. “I earned this award because my teammates constantly pushed me to do my best on the court,” Ladd said. “I had to be the best, though I CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS couldn’t have done it Myzhanique Ladd will be playing alone.” Throughout Ladd’s for San Jose State in the fall. athletic career, her family, coaching staff and teammates helped mold her into the athlete she is today. “Seeing how hard they worked to get me here, makes me want to work ten times harder,” she said. Next year, Ladd is attending San Jose State on a basketball scholarship. Expect her to jump even higher than before as she aims to play for the WNBA. By Daniel Doan

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Counting down the top 14 stories of 2014 Seahawks shut it down Undefeated preseason. Seventeen wins and three losses. Super Bowl Champions. Sound familiar? The Seattle Seahawks. Even with their winning streak, were they a good enough reason to skip school? To a real “12,” that wouldn’t even be a question. After the Seahawks’ stunning Super Bowl win over the heavily-favored Denver Broncos, the city of Seattle prepared for a celebration like no other. On Wednesday, Feb. 5, school administrators’ phones were abuzz with parents excusing their kids to miss school for the victory parade. According to The Seattle Times, more than 700,000 people attended the parade, leaving school and work. The school district eventually relented and ultimately ended up writing “excused” on that pink slip. By Monica Elenes

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JOYCE HARRELL / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch threw his favorite treat, Skittles, to the crowd.

Cheerleaders get the party started

There was a time in Cleveland’s history where the cheerleaders weren’t so cheerful. They showed up late to ballgames – if they showed up at all – and they lacked the enthusiasm one needs to get a crowd pumped. But this year’s cheerleading squad was a different breed. They packed more spirit in their pom poms than most have in their tiny frames. As our student body transforms from apathetic teenagers to enthusiastic supporters, the squad has been a big part of the transition. Led by Coach Shimika Dowlen, the cheer squad encouraged support from fans. In addition to being an essential part of the growth in spirit, the team is reaching out into the community as well through volunteering at the school’s annual auction and the Rock-’n’-Roll Marathon in June. By Jennifer Williams

Cleveland boasts 5 Coaches of the Year

School weathers technical difficulties

For a team to have longterm success or gain any sort of accomplishment, it takes a leader to push them their hardest. This is exactly what the coaches at Cleveland High School are doing, and finally, they are earning recognition. This year alone, CHS has had five leaders earn “Coach of the Year” honors. Jeff Schmidt (football) led the team to their first playoff appearance in 34 years. Volleyball coach Ave Seni was also recognized for her leadership along with swim coach Ryan Kastl, who headed up the best set of swimmers he’s had in three years. But it didn’t stop there. With back-toback state titles under her belt, Lady Eagle Head Coach Stephenie Wheeler-Smith brought the total number of honors to four. Not to be outdone, spring sports followed suit with Roger Yamaguchi earning a nod for tennis. For those naysayers who think Cleveland only churns out winners in girls basketball: think again. The Eagles are soaring to new heights in athletics. By Kamry Adams

Chaos ensued when network analyst Linh Nguyen accepted a job at another school, leaving Cleveland – a technology-based school – with no in-house technical support. Teachers pitched in to learn the job, but it was months before a new tech guy was hired. Patrick Yolian joined the staff in February and quickly established a new system to handle the backlog of laptop repairs. He admitted that on his first day at Cleveland, it was pretty nuts. “Boxes of laptops, 60 machines broken, and they all had to go to students.” Yolian didn’t have time to panic and took care of all the laptops one at a time. He admitted the hardest part of his job was managing all the laptops and making sure they had the proper programs. But he is rewarded with the smile on the student’s face when they realize they can finish their papers on time. His advice for students who run into a technical problem is simple: “Google it. There’s a high chance someone else in the world has run into the same problem.” By Jennifer Tran

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Schmidt

Seni

Kastl

Wheeler-Smith

Yamaguchi

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The Journal

Year in Review

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Cleveland named a “School of Distinction”

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This year Cleveland was honored with the School of Distinction Award. This award came at the perfect time to show how far Cleveland has come in the past few years. The School of Distinction is awarded to schools that are in the top five percentile in improvement of math and reading scores. In 2010, Cleveland had a 60 percent graduation rate, and test scores in math and reading were in the bottom five percent in the state. By 2013, the school’s test scores had surpassed state standards in reading and met the state standards in math. The improvement shows that students are taking their education more seriously. It also shows that teachers are finding different ways to make learning more exciting, which allows students to retain more information. “When [students] come to Cleveland, they know they’re going to get a great opportunity,” said Principal George Breland. By Lisa Le

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Jayde Christopher holds up the Lady Eagles’ championship trophy.

Lady Eagles repeat as State Championships New team; same outcome. That was a big statement made by senior Myzhanique Ladd at the start of the Lady Eagles’ basketball season. The team started the year with high expectations: win another state title. The team was led by Coach Stephenie Wheeler-Smith and seniors Makala Roper, Alexia Mefi, Asiyah Davis and Ladd, who were dubbed the “Fab 4.” The girls left their mark in CHS athletics history by going undefeated in Cleveland’s gym and ended the season on a 53-game winning streak against in-state opponents. In the championship game, Cleveland battled Metro League opponent Bishop Blanchet, winning 54-45. Roper was named Tournament MVP for a second consecutive season. She, along with Davis and Ladd, had a combined total of 35 points, capping off their unforgettable careers at Cleveland. By Irina Del Donno and Jennifer Tran

C-Pub wins big at journalism competition

School-wide theme is wasSUP

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Five years ago, the Cleveland Journal was just a small after-school club with only eight students putting the newspaper together. In 2013, the newspaper and yearbook merged to form Cleveland Publications, a full-fledged media company that produces the Journal, the Aquila and social media posts. CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS With a staff of more than 40 C-Pub staff members hold up their awards people, C-Pub has become one of at the WJEA competition in March. The the most popular clubs at Clevegroup won five awards. land. Under the leadership of Adviser Teresa Scribner, C-Pub won five awards at the Washington Journalism Education Association Competition in March. This was the first time the group had been recognized with any awards. Kassie Villars and Christian Corpuz swept the sports photography categories earning Superior medals, while Kamry Adams earned an Excellent in caption writing and Miguel Laureano earned Honorable Mention in newspaper design. C-Pub also won an Award of Excellence for their growth in social media. By Izet Mendoza

It should come as no surprise that a school with a winning football team is a school with a lot of pride. As our Gridiron Eagles soared higher, they gave Cleveland students something to be proud of and put the school back on the map as a team to be feared. The Eagles made an appearance in the Metro playoffs, the first time since 1979. The team put up a good fight, but fell to Columbia River in the final minutes of the game. Under the leadership of Head Coach Jeff Schmidt, these boys emerged into young men who respect the game. They built a bond based on unity and plan to continue that next year. Schmidt was named Coach of the Year and has committed to keeping Cleveland football in the limelight. His coaching skills have made an impact on the team and Schmidt shows no signs of slowing down. Eagle football is here to stay. By Alexia Mefi

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Breland takes command

After seven years at Cleveland, Princess Shareef hung up her crown last year, retiring from her role as principal. She left visualizing a superman or woman to make CHS a huge resource to the community. Enter George Breland. Even though he is new to Cleveland, Breland fits in as if he’s been here for years. After getting to know the school, the principal has raised the bar and his expectations are high. “I think he was smart about trying to get to know the school first before making decisions to change things,” said math teacher Kate Byers. “As the year is wrapping up, he’s beginning to find his vision for what he wants to make the next steps CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS for the school and really know us well enough George Breland took over as to help plan that.” principal at the beginning of Breland is excited over his plans for Clevethe 2013-14 school year. land. From here on out, he plans on helping students get all the help they need and making sure they enjoy their experience. The principal is here to stay, hoping to remain at the school for as long as he can. “I’m willing to go to the next level.” By Amanda Nguyen

CHRISTIAN CORPUZ / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Football team puts CHS back in the game

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When Sunshine Arcilla ran for ASB Vice President last spring, she stated in her speech that the student body needed to work on three areas: spirit, unity and progress. The school needed more spirit. Students needed to become more involved with the school and not be embarrassed to represent CHS. The academies needed to become more unified with SoLS and SOED coming together as one. After Arcilla won, she came through on her promise and the motto for the school year was born: “That’s wasSUP.” While it took a while for the theme to catch on, most of the students and staff have gotten on board with ELIZHA FULGENCIO / C-PUB the promotion of spirit, unity and progress. More stu- Sunshine Arcilla said dents showed up at sporting events and participated CHS could progress in after-school activities. The school also saw a rise in if it had more spirit test scores. and unity. Arcilla has seen improvements from students all the way to the faculty. “I’m glad I was able to come up with something and have people support it and make CHS better.” By Makala Roper

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Revolving door of subs kept heads spinning

At the start of the school year, an unexpected wave of teachers leaving brought in an unusually high number of substitutes for core classes. Humanities lost Katy Reedy and Jeff Taylor just a few days before school started. Brette Woessner left the math department and the foreign language department was down a Spanish teacher. Not to mention both the SoLS and SoED counselors were on leave. We already went there about the tech guy’s departure. A slew of fill-ins were brought in before new hires were made, and students were bearing the brunt of the departures. At one point, the Spanish class had a substitute for the substitute! The administration moved as quickly as possible to bring in new teachers, but the new hires still had to adjust to Cleveland’s style of instruction. Math teacher Martin Goldman-Kirst and humanities teachers Robin Nider and Jeffrey Eisenbrey were hired at the beginning of the year while Noelle Zentz stepped in for the counselors. Victoria Jones filled the void in the foreign language department, and April Williams took over for Woessner. By Alice John


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The Journal

Features

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

PHOTOS BY EDNAUH KAMLONDY / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

After 37 years of teaching - 32 of those at Cleveland High School - Special Education teacher Karen Haggard is retiring. Haggard is the longest-running teacher at CHS and has seen the school go through several changes over the years.

Haggard will keep the game going in retirement BY KAMRY ADAMS Cleveland Publications reporter Most of the time when a video game ends, it’s abrupt with no warning. Special Education teacher Karen Haggard has known for some time her game at Cleveland was coming to an end. After 32 years at CHS, she’s ready for a new game in retirement. Haggard is Cleveland’s longest-running staff member. She’s had her fair share of experiences as a teacher and has played a huge role in building the school’s special education program. Ultimately, Haggard made the decision to “end game” with retirement. “I thought it was time to do something different,” she shared. Haggard would like to get back into the arts – something she left behind. Working with young adults is a passion of Haggard’s, and her students are what she’ll miss most. She still plans to continue working with youth, even in retire-

Haggard reminisces about her time at Cleveland as she looks through her scrapbook. She said the “Fish and Roses” project is one memory that stands out. ment. “I think the most exciting things is when you watch students have their ‘ah-ha’ moment,” Haggard expressed. “When they get something, or they understand it, or they turn their lives around. Those are really special moments.” Haggard has been the head of the special education department for about five years. Her departure leaves a huge

void. “I’m devastated by her leaving,” said SPED math teacher Jennifer Kekuna, who has worked with Haggard for five years. Kekuna said the department has built a really solid program with Haggard as the leader. Jamil Harding, a SPED instructional assistant called Haggard “Mother Cleveland.” “She cares deeply about

COURTESY OF KAREN HAGGARD

Haggard began teaching at Sharples Jr. High. The school closed then reopened as Aki Kurose Middle School. the well-being of students and staff alike,” he said. Harding, along with other teachers on the SPED team, call Haggard a “dedicated professional” and a “wonderful leader.” “We’ll never be able to find someone who has a vision like she does,” said SPED instructional assistant Linda Sinni.

Although Haggard doesn’t recall any particular moment as a favorite, one past CHS project does stand out: Fish and Roses. With a grant, a large garden was built in front of the school. In addition, large tanks were brought in to raise tilapia. “It’s the project that I was probably most involved with,” said Haggard. According to Kathleen Dunbar, Cleveland’s librarian, Haggard played a pivotal part in the school being able to keep and maintain the memorial garden in Issaquah. Haggard spent countless hours fighting to keep the land in Cleveland’s possession and organizing groups to help with the land’s upkeep. “She is the backbone and heart of our school,” Dunbar said. While she may be retiring as a teacher, Haggard asserts that Cleveland has taught her a few things. “I think I couldn’t ever work in a place that didn’t have a diversity of people,” she said. “I think it’s really taught me about the richness that diversity can bring. And also, that if you work hard, just about anything is possible.” Haggard’s time at CHS has been lengthy and worthwhile, and she will definitely be missed. “I’ve enjoyed all my years at Cleveland.”


The Journal

Seniors

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

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BY DANIEL DOAN AND IRINA DEL DONNO Cleveland Publications reporter

Elite Eagles conquered highs, weathered lows before moving to next phase HONG PHUC TRAN - valedictorian

The objective: race through Cleveland Kingdom, surviving the many obstacles thrown in your path on your way to the flagpole at the end of each level. The kingdom is scattered with coins in the form of good grades, awards and scholarships. You try to collect as many as you can on your way to the finish. This mission will not be easy as there will be obstacles like peer pressure or procrastination coming at you all the time. You must win at all costs. For these 14 Elite Eagles, they’ve had to conquer the highs and weather lows before moving on to their next phase. Though each one of these top seniors made it to the end, they now have to decide if they want to “Play Again.”

seattle university

DANIEL DOAN - REPORTER & DESIGNER

“My goal is first to take off all my stress over the summer, be ready for another four years and enjoy college.”

“I feel so lucky that not many obstacles were in my way during school.” “My junior year was most difficult due to running start, high school classes and getting ready for college application.”

“My decision for running start was risky because I didn’t know if I could make it or not and if I could handle a much higher level than high school.”

ELIJAH “EJ” PINERA - valedictorian “Senior year has been overwhelming being ASB President, a National Honor Society officer, working at Kohl’s parttime, taking AP Bio, AP Government, Running Start Calculus, working with a non-profit organization for my senior project, and leading in two different youth groups. I wanted to make this whole school year about college and scholarship applications, but I’ve been a bit busy with life.”

“My schedule has strongly affected my work. I’ve taken on so many responsibilities to the point where I began to slack off more on homework and lose passion for classes. I tried my hardest, but when I was overbooked here and there, I had to say no to some assignments. But I did it as responsibly as I could.”

TRACY THICH - salutatorian “My most difficult year of high school was freshman year because that year was the first year when STEM got introduced to Cleveland, and I was not used to the idea of projectbased learning.... Everything was brand new for me, and it took a while for me to adapt to the learning environment.”

seattle university

MAKALA ROPER - REPORTER, BINH NGUYEN - DESIGNER

“Getting to perform on stage and lead assemblies [made me feel like a star.] I’m really nervous ... before I get up ... but once I ... start to speak, I know I’m being heard.”

“My wake up call came during my junior year of high school, after ASB elections and the moving up assembly were over, I began to think about senior year. It scared me a lot, honestly.”

university of washington

“All of my teachers have inspired me because each of them has his or her own ways to support me and give me advice on the decisions I make that will influence my future.”

“The thing that made school worth it for me is that it helps me figure out who I am, the ability I have, my strengths and weaknesses, and opens more opportunities for me to pursue my goal, but also to help me grow as a person.”

“Doing Running Start. I was told … that Running Start would be challenging and could affect [the] 4.0 I had ... However, I managed to last two years in Running Start. Although [it] did affect my GPA, I feel much more prepared for the university I’m attending.”

“I plan to attend Seattle University on a full ride scholarship! I’m beyond blessed to say that I was one of the nine incoming college freshman chosen as a Sullivan Scholarship recipient.”

AMANDA NGUYEN - REPORTER, MIGUEL LAUREANO - DESIGNER

“Being fearless and determined made me feel like a star. I was never afraid of making a mistake. Some students always wanted to be right at the first time, to be smart; however all smart people make mistakes because that’s the motivation and lesson that supports the growth of the mindset.”

“My biggest wake-up call [was] to follow what you desire as an individual without having to follow the steps of your friends because each person has his/her own way of thinking about making decisions.”

“I am planning to attend college and … pursue my dream of becoming a doctor.”


The Journal

Seniors

8

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

ADAM GRUENBAUM

university of chicago

“Junior year was the most difficult because … I was taking a full course load here and math after school in Running Start during fall and winter. It was awful; I do not recommend it to anybody.”

ELIZABETH PAULSON - REPORTER, MYLENA RODRIGUEZ - DESIGNER

“I want to do something in the science and engineering stuff. I submitted my deposit for University of Chicago.”

“My biggest wake-up call was getting a 2.6 in my second calculus class last year.” “I like the people, I like school, and I like learning.”

LOC TRAN

“Taking on way too much stuff last year was risky.”

university of washington

KAMRY ADAMS - REPORTER, JENNIFER WILLIAMS - DESIGNER

“Senior year was probably my most difficult. I have to apply for scholarships, college and do well in my Running Start classes. Too much stress!”

“The language barrier used to be an obstacle that affected my school work. I came to the U.S. five years ago without knowing English. It was hard for me to communicate and make new friends in school.”

ELIZABETH CHUNG “Ms. Morton inspired me. She impacted the way I viewed my high school career. She is a strong support system in my decisions that I’ve made in school. She was very good to me.”

SUNSHINE ARCILLA

“When I got asked to homecoming by Paolo [Eleccion] in front of the whole school! I felt like the envy of every girl in school. When I led the clothing drive to benefit the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. I felt proud of myself for putting it together.”

“My riskiest move was to do Running Start because I will have to take challenging classes and not meet my high school friends.”

“My goal is to go to UW, discover new things in mathematics/ physics, attend an SNSD concert, be a professional gamer.”

“Mr. Taylor, Mr. Pratt, Ms. Boly (Woehr), Mr. John and Dr. Wood all inspired me.”

university of washington “Taking the amount of free periods [was a risky move.] I realized that having free time on your hands isn’t always the best thing.” “Senior year was most difficult because it’s busy, and the expectations from teachers are stepped up.”

MONICA ELENES - REPORTER, RENAN VISPERAS - DESIGNER

“Balancing good grades, enough sleep, or a social life. Just finding balance was difficult. I gave up my social life a bit to study and to focus on school. It’s not the worst, but not the best.” “I want to become a dentist because I like to smile a lot, and that can change someone’s entire day. To feel confident in your smile is important.”

university of washington “If I had to choose one [teacher who inspired me] it would be Mr. Pratt. Pratt believed in me, and I didn’t get that a lot, so I capitalized on it. … He inspired me to take on bigger challenges because he believed in me four years ago.”

ALEXIA MEFI - REPORTER, MICHAEL CHAN - DESIGNER

“Senior year [was the most difficult]. I really challenged myself by taking rigorous classes ... . On top of that, I had to balance having work, sports and being in ASB.”

“My next goal is to be the first woman on my father’s side and the first overall on my mom’s side to get a college diploma!”

“Having a lot on my plate definitely affected my school work in some way, especially when I was working. But, I made it work. … I just had to manage my time better.”


The Journal

Seniors

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

TUAN Q. TRAN

university of washington “Freshman year was the most difficult … because it was my first time being introduced to the STEM program and project-based learning. I was not use to the new technology … so it took me a while to adapt to the new learning environment.” “My family moved here just seven years ago, so starting school in a whole new environment was very different ... and since my parents did not go to high school they did not understand some of the work and purposes ... high school.”

JAMIE LEI

“All my teachers have inspired me because each of them had his/ her own way in supporting and advising me to make decisions that seems right to me.”

“Well, I’ve been on the Internet a lot and I’ve read a lot of depression stories and most of the time people just sucked it up and went on and kind of figured out that whatever you’re experiencing at the moment it just gets better later on, it just passes over. [I still feel depressed] from time to time I don’t know. I’m pretty pessimistic.”

“Toughest year? Probably freshman and sophomore year. Those were the years that my depression was the most serious. It was mild but I had trouble doing things.”

university of washington

“At the moment, I’m trying to figure out what I want to do in college. I have an idea of being an environmental science major at UW Seattle, but I haven’t figured it out what my career choice would be and right now I want to deal with helping out my family.”

IRINA DEL DONNO - REPORTER, ABDOULIE BATCHILLY - DESIGNER

“I know that I have a future, and that I received good grades.”

“Mr. Pratt inspired me the most.”

“My biggest wake-up call was when I had to write my personal statement.”

“Keeping my grades up and taking care of my family affected my schoolwork.”

“My riskiest move was when I didn’t study for an exam and I almost failed it.”

WALKER TRELEASE “I genuinely like school because I enjoy it and I get a sense of fulfillment from school.” “My junior year was my most difficult year. I loaded up my schedule as much as I could. I took AP Chemistry, Physics, Calculus II and III at North Seattle Community College and so I had the most demanding classes I’ve ever had.”

KAMRY ADAMS - REPORTER, MIGUEL LAUREANO - DESIGNER

“I’ve been getting more confident over my years, and I realized when you’re more confident everything just feels a little better so over time.”

TUAN A. TRAN “My most difficult year was junior year.”

LISA LE - REPORTER, DELANNAH COLLINS-WRIGHT - DESIGNER

“My goal is to continue my education at a university and … pursue my goal as a doctor with multiple perspectives.”

university of washington

“I faced a lot of depression over the years, and I’m not very good at dealing with my work by myself so I often procrastinate. I just sucked it up.”

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olin college of engineering “Signing up for all those difficult classes junior year was a risk because it could have gone wrong, and I risked my GPA taking those college-level classes.” “Mr. Pratt inspired me. I’ve had him as a teacher for about two or three years. He’s been my baseball coach, my Frisbee coach and he’s been very supportive and has written letters of recommendation for college. He’s been very helpful and inspirational to me.”

“Now that the school year is over, my next goal is to complete my degree at UW Seattle.”

ALICE JOHN - REPORTER, JENNIFER WILLIAMS - DESIGNER

“Getting accepted into Olin and a few other colleges were my top moments. It was the one moment that kind of validates all the work I’ve done…” “I will be attending Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering in Massachusetts so that I can become a mechanical engineer.”


The Journal

Seniors

10

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

VINCENT TSAN

university of washington

JENNIFER TRAN - REPORTER, MIGUEL LAUREANO - DESIGNER

“The riskiest move I have done in my high school career was take a shot for Cleveland. It was known as an underdog school and lacked multiple opportunities for students such as Ivy [League] programs and AP.”

“The most difficult year for me … is senior year.”

“My goal is to travel within the short period of time I have left before going back to school.”

“My biggest wake up call was when I first received a B from Upward Bound. It transcribed to my high school GPA and it made me realize school wasn’t just all about the grades. It was about how you could maintain yourself while doing other extracurricular activities.”

“Mainly after school sports, hobbies and work are what affected my schoolwork.”

TAI MACH

“The Pratts inspired me the most. They both introduced the idea of mindsets. They allowed me to look at myself and to not blame myself for failure, but to attempt to succeed through my attempts of failure.”

university of washington

LISA LE - REPORTER, IZET MENDOZA - DESIGNER

“My goal is to be successful in college and pursue an engineering career.”

“There are a lot of teachers who inspired me, however, I would say Mr. Taylor.” “My biggest wake-up call was when I realized I had less than two months until my senior project was due.”

“Senior year was my most difficult.”

“I guess being on this list [made me feel like a star].”

“My riskiest move was when I decided to take AP Chemistry, AP Statistics and UW Biology in the same year.”

PAOLO ELECCION

university of washington

IZET MENDOZA - REPORTER & DESIGNER

“I think it would just be getting a job because that just adds more to my workload.”

“I think by far the most difficult year would have to be freshman year because … it was the first year for the STEM program. It was really hard … transitioning from middle school to a high school.”

“Well for me I think what made school worth it is the outcome I know that school will have later in life. I’ve always been taught that I need education to get somewhere. And so I’ve always had that in the back of my mind and use that as my driving force to do my best in school.”

“I think for me it was just hard trying to balance everything out. … I have a little bit less time for myself, but overall I think the hardest struggle for me was just balancing out what I needed to do, priorities.”

Senior 2014

00

X

“In the summer, I’m going to kick it, you know have fun, enjoy, don’t do anything stupid. But I’m going to go to UW with an open mind and I’m going to try my best and be a good businessman one day.”

World 6-16

Time 5:00

GAME OVER Continue Retry but never Quit Elite Eagles were selected based on GPAs at the end of Semester 1. Some rankings may have changed.


The Journal

Seniors

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

SENIOR HISTORY First days of school

BY MONICA ELENES Cleveland Publications reporter Pre-school is easy. Kindergarten is scary. Middle school is about transition. High school is the best (and longest) four years of your life. As the Class of 2014 gets ready to embark on a new chapter in their lives, the Journal asked them to take a moment to reflect on their first days of school. “Kindergarten ... all I remember is that I was the only kid with Hazel Ciceron my parents,” said Hazel Ciceron. “I brought them along because I didn’t want them to leave. I was scared.” At age five, all a kid knows is mommy, daddy and the name of their teddy bear. Kindergarten was a time of letting go - for both the kid and the parents - and learning how to cope without having them around. For Ciceron and others, this was hard to do. Once kindergarten ends it’s on to middle school. This is the point where students begin to figure out who they are andwho they want to be. “Middle school for me was nerve racking because I had to take the bus, and I didn’t know anyone,” said Paolo ElecciPaolo Eleccion on. “I walked all the way to the back and sat with the big kids, but I didn’t fit in.” Hieu Phan felt nervous Hieu Phan about middle school because he had “just came out of elementary being the top dog, a fifth grader.” Then he became a sixth grader and was right where he started.

“Being a sixth grader means you start at the bottom,” Phan said. Sami Ayele calls his time in middle school “awkward.” “Honestly, I don’t remember much of it. I remember wearing a big red coat. I knew at that time I didn’t really like my body. I was really skinny. I was uncomfortable with my physical self.” Middle school may be scary, but it’s more of a stepping stone for something even greater. For Ciceron and Sabrina Mohamed, entering high school was déjà vu. Mohamed didn’t know a lot of people because her parents chose her schools. For her, high school was Sabrina about startMohamed ing fresh. Ciceron expressed a similar feeling about her freshmen year. Both believed that high school was a chance to start over. Phan and Eleccion, however, found high school a bit more relaxing. “I was a little scared because what I’ve heard and seen from movies, but it wasn’t so bad,” said Eleccion. “It was better than I expected. I expected it to be upperclassmen versus younger classmen and all this homework, but the teachers made it easy. They helped and supported us. ” All the hard work finally pays off in senior year. It’s the year of breakthroughs, when the quiet ones crack their shell and others realize they weren’t who they were when they first walked in. “When senior year came I was more vocal,” said Ciceron. “I knew more faces.” The final year of high school is the point where students finally realize that adulthood is just around the corner. Without hesitation, Phan explains that senior year is about being on top. “Nothing can stop me.”

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Accident survivor gives new meaning to ‘Super Senior’ Meysam Adibzadeh beat the odds to graduate BY AMANDA NGUYEN AND ALEXIA MEFI Cleveland Publications reporters Being labeled a “Super Senior” has almost become a joke. What’s so super about a high school student flunking and having to repeat a year? While the term may seem ironic, these students can be far more super than people think. “A ‘Super Senior’ is someone who missed out on four years of high school, ending up with five years of high school,” Meysam Adibzadeh said. Adibzadeh is a student who fits this description without meeting its reputation. “A lot of things happened in my life,” Adibzadeh shared. He was unable to attend school for four years. “When I was 11, I was hit by a car. The result of that was me being in the coma for two months.” Over the past nine years, he has had a total of nine surgeries. The student is still struggling to recover, going back and forth between doctor appointments. The Journal chronicled Adibzadeh’s recovery through a series of stories in 2012. Adibzadeh’s injuries kept him from going to school for the year. But the student’s struggles didn’t end there. Afterwards, his family packed their bags and moved to Turkey. “In Turkey, in the specific city we were living in, they didn’t let me go to their schools because I was an immigrant. I missed three years of school.” Even though he wasn’t allowed to attend school, Adibzadeh was determined to continue his studies. “I just bought books and did basically anything so I wouldn’t be behind others.” After having to overcome such obstacles, most people would’ve given up on completing high school. This “Super Senior” stayed motivated, perhaps more so than an average student. Adibzadeh pushes himself to finish high school in order to become the person he dreams to be. “My goal is to be an orthopedic surgeon so I can help others that are in the same situation as me.” Adibzadeh is actively receiving support from his family, teachers and friends. Students in one of Adam Burden’s class are aware of the humiliation that can come with the label “Super Senior.” At the beginning of the school year, the moment a repeater walked into the classroom, the students erupted in laughter. Students in the class can recall the senior being asked, “You didn’t graduate?” and being told “You’re still here?” as if returning was a bad look on him. The student eventually left Cleveland for another

PRINNCES DONIEGO / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Meysam Adibzadeh has survived nine surgeries in nine years, causing him to miss countless days of school. He will finally be able to graduate this year. school. Academic Dean Catherine Brown said students who return for a fifth year shouldn’t be looked down upon. “I don’t call them ‘Super Seniors;’ I call them ‘Veteran Seniors,’” Brown said. “Kids don’t understand how much courage it takes to come back to school and finish it even though they are coming back for a fifth year. It’s great to see someone strive, not caring what others think and what people who see them as ‘Super Seniors’ have to say.”

COURTESY OF MEYSAM ADIBZADEH, 2010

Adibzadeh was in multiple car accidents that left him unable to attend school for long periods of time.

The Last Word | Senior quotes

“I’m going to become famous, and if I don’t, just admire my confidence.”

“You can’t change someone, you can only give them time to change themselves.”

“Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”

“Hard work beats talent when talent fails to work hard.”

“I’m not better than anyone, but no one is better than me.”

“If you believe you can then you’re half way there.”

Jonathan Tornez

Sami Emery

Shaun Bernal

Makala Roper

Javon Walker

Jessica Kolish


The Journal

Seniors

12

The Last Word | Senior quotes

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

red carpet ready

Class of 2014 goes out in style

BY MAKALA ROPER Cleveland Publications reporter

“Do whatever you want in your life, but consider the consequences and trusts because no one knows how everything will turn out.” Paul Solitario

“The Three C’s of Life: choices, chances, changes. You must make a choice to take a chance or your life will never change.” Sofia Sen

“I can only say that I tried to be someone that I’m not, but now I realized who I really want to be. I want to be me, so love me for that.” Patrick Winston

“If you can’t baffle them with your genius, blow them away with your B.S.”

Two major milestones that seniors anticipate are graduation and prom. Senior prom is a night that students will remember for the rest of their lives. The Class of 2014 won’t soon forget their “Red Carpet Affair.” CHS presented their redcarpet themed prom at the EMP Museum in downtown Seattle. As the theme suggested, students came dressed to impress. One couple that stood out was Alexia Mefi and Dale Daniels. Mefi stepped out in a floor-length, hot pink dress with a rhinestone bust. Her date and boyfriend, Daniels, also stunned the crowd with his all-white suite with hot pink details. He added his own flavor by adding a white hat and pink alligator shoes. “I knew we was going to win best dressed because we wanted to think outside the box,” Daniels said. Although Mefi wasn’t sure if they would win best dressed or not, she felt her boyfriend was the flyest one at the prom and stood out from the rest. Outside of finals, prom is arguably one of the most stressful weeks because of the costly preparations leading up to big night and the competition for prom royalty. Although several people were in the running, there could only be one queen and one king. Jennifer Tran and Daniel Doan were voted prom king and queen. Doan never imagined he would go beyond his comfort

PHOTOS BY CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

The Class of 2014 topped off the year with “A Red Carpet Affair” held at the EMP Museum on Saturday, May 24. More photos from prom can be found at facebook.com/clevelandpublications.

Daniel Doan and his girlfriend Jennifer Tran were voted Prom King and Queen. zone to claim the crown. Most students know Doan as the reserved, quiet guy. Without giving him any prior notice, Tran, his girlfriend, signed them up to compete for prom royalty. Tran has only been at CHS for one year, so she thought

not enough people would know her to have her win. “I’m only familiar with people in my classes and those who say hello to me in the hallways,” she said. The couple was shocked when the disc jockey announced them as prom king and queen. Doan said he voted for Paolo [Eleccion] and Sunshine [Arcilla] to win, but when they called his name he felt “happy and blessed to share that moment with his peers.” Doan also said after the DJ called his name he thought, “I hope Jennifer wins; otherwise, this is going to be awkward.” In order to win prom royalty, students participate in Spirit Week by dressing up according to the designated theme. Doan said Tran was his wardrobe stylist. Since Tran will be going to college to study fashion and business, he thought this was the

perfect opportunity for her to showcase her passion. As a whole, the senior class enjoyed prom. They easily said it was the best night they have had in a long time, and if they had to do it again, they would. For those thinking about next year’s prom, the seniors offered some advice. Tran said students should go and have fun. “Let loose and dance as much as you can,” she said. Daniels and Mefi reminded students to take a lot of pictures because those are memorable moments that you can cherish forever. Doan added that people should enjoy themselves and spend as much time with their loved ones as possible. After seeing many girls sitting on the sidelines without their fancy shoes, Tran offered these wise words: “If you’re going to wear heels, wear comfortable ones.”

“It wasn’t an accident; I meant to do that.”

“Like you’re going to remember this anyways.”

Zi Chao Yang

Michelle Le

Gretchen Ancheta

“When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.”

“If life gives you lemons, make apple juice. Then have people wonder how on earth you did it.”

“Do a kind deed for two people and tell them to do the same for two others.”

“In all seriousness, I’m going to be a Pokemon master one day.”

“Who needs friends when you have food.”

“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” ― Beverly Sills

Asiyah Davis

Daniel Doan

Edgar Fernandez

Lisa Le

Christian Corpuz

Ednauh Kamlondy

Duressa Mudde

“Procrastination “I may sound like a machine, is my specialty.” but I am interested in them.” Binh Nguyen

“Seek to understand, not be understood.” Hanna Rossen


The Journal

Seniors

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

And So We Commence

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The Last Word | Senior quotes

BY ASIYAH DAVIS

“SWAG.” Wilson Yip

“We are pressed on every side by troubles, but we are not crushed. We are perplexed, but not driven to despair.” 2 Corinthians 4:8 Ryan Rabia

“Byeeeeee!!!” Hayat Ebsa “When confidence meets insecurity, that equals arrogance.” Jennifer Williams

“Do you have food?” Jennifer Tran “Life is a song; sing it. Life is a game; play it. Life is a challenge; meet it. Life is a dream; realize it. Life is a sacrifice; offer it. Life is love; enjoy it.” Terrence Moore “You good?” Gartiez Darden

“Cookies are great; eat them!”

“Wherever you go, may you go with all your heart.”

“I guess you could say I’m pretty LUCKY!”

“When God is in it, there is no limit.”

Ismael Muro

Muna Ahmed

Lucky Mullarkey

Delannah Collins-Wright

“Is there food?”

“There’s a special place in my heart for the ones who were with me at my lowest and still loved me when I wasn’t very loveable.” - Yasmin Moganes

Alexia Mefi

Chaltu Hussein

“Your worst day may be someone’s best. Cherish every moment in life.”

“The opposite of war isn’t peace, it’s creation.”

“Some of your brightest moments are after your darkest times.”

“Trust can take years to earn and only a matter of seconds to lose.”

“First thing I learned was A-B-C followed by 1-2-3, and I like pizza pie.”

“Everyone is cuterton or doperton in their own way. HELLO ... GOODBYE!”

Paolo Eleccion

Amy Boyer

Mario Siu

Louise Parafina

Clarenze Cruz

Myzhanique Ladd


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The Journal

Sports

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Girls relay team advances to state, falls short in finals BY IRINA DEL DONNO AND JENNIFER WILLIAMS Cleveland Publications reporters “I think this year has the potential of being the best year Cleveland’s had,” Head Coach Hosea Phillips predicted about Cleveland’s track team at the start of the season. Phillips proved to be correct, with six athletes advancing to state. Junior Amonte Phillips qualified for the high jump while Tyresha Jones-Smith, Savannah Daniels, Gianna Kelly and Jennifer Williams competed in the 400-meter relay. Shai’Ree Walker served as an alternate. It was jubilation all around on the first day of the state meet when all of the Cleveland athletes advanced to the finals. Phillips went on to place fifth in the high jump, but a missed handoff in the first leg of the race led to the relay team being disqualified. “Everybody has their pushes and pulls, we’re all individuals and we have different personalities,” said senior Savannah Daniels. “At the end of the day, we all have the same ultimate goal, and that is to be the best athlete possible and to work as a team … that’s what keeps us together.” The girls finished 5th in their qualifying meet and 8th overall.

EDNAUH KAMLONDY CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Clockwise: Relay team members Jennifer Williams, left, Gianna Kelly, Savannah Daniels and Shai’Ree Walker pose with Amonte Phillips after he placed in the high jump. Above: Phillips goes over the bar in his first attempt at the high jump. He finished in 5th place. Coach Hosea Phillips shows his jubilation after the girls relay team advances to the finals.

Eagle athletes have brains and brawn

Boys basketball hires new coach Cleveland has hired Jerry Petty as the new Head Boys Basketball Coach. Petty was an All-City and AllState basketball player at Garfield. In 1998, he led Garfield to a 4A State Championship and was the Tournament MVP. He competed in college basketball at Northern Idaho Community College and the University of Nevada. After graduating, Petty returned to Seattle and led programs at Rainier Vista, Renton Boys and Girls Club and was involved in AAU basketball. He was also the President of APLUS Youth Programs from 2010-2012 and currently works for Seattle Public Schools. “Jerry will bring positive energy, enthusiasm, knowledge and high standards into our boys basketball program,” said Athletic Director Annette Duvall. “He will be a tremendous role model for our young men and contribute to the overall strength of our coaching staff.” Petty replaces Barry Jones who coached the Eagles for two years. From staff reports

CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

2014-15 cheerleaders announced After losing a number of seniors, the cheerleading squad added nine new girls to the roster. The 2014-15 cheerleaders are, front row, left to right: Daisha Abercrombie, Mya Dickerson, Chrissy Castillo, Loni Stubblefield, Elyzha Abella, Promise Lockhart. Second row, left to right:

Cleveland placed 17th in the state in the 3A classification as a combination of the school’s athletic and academic success in a WIAA program called the Scholastic Cup. Eagle Athletics wracked up 350 points. Here’s the breakdown: Athletic State Championships Girls Basketball = 100 points Academic State Championships Girls Tennis = 100 points Academic 2nd Place Boys Swim = 80 points Academic 5th Place Baseball = 40 points Academic 7th Place Girls Swim = 30 points

Five soccer players earn All-Metro honors

Daija Levias, Mikayla Wright, Leilani Sheffey, Shanel Wofford, Allana Jones, Maryssa Jackson, Antoneyah Washington, Yalonda Buchanan. Back row, left to right: Kauleta Dassa, Asha GravesTemo Hernandez, who earned First Dixon. Not pictured: Jade Bowen and Team All-Metro recognition, was invitEmonie Larry. The squad is under the ed to play in the All-Metro soccer game leadership of Shimika Dowlen. on June 2 at Bishop Blanchet. Other Eagles earning recognition: Second Team: Freshmen Han Eckelberg and Lucas King. Honorable Mention: Mohamed Mohamed and Lucas Rumpeltes. Most Inspirational Player Monica Lui For the tennis player whose presence, work ethic or play raised the performance level of his/her teammates during the 2014 season. Most Valuable Player Baseball players Walker Trelease, Joerene Aviles and Minh Tam Matt Sadang, Zack Brown and Chris Pham Wilhelm earned All-Metro Honorable For the tennis player(s) who, with- Mention recognition. The team finout his/her contribution, during the ished the season with a 7-7 record; a 2014 season, would make team suc- huge improvement over the previous cess improbable or impossible.” year.

Tennis team awards top players of 2014 Here are the tennis team award winners for the 2014 season: Rookie of the Year Rudolfo Baba For the most accomplished new tennis player competing on the team during the 2014 season. Most Improved Player Jay Sebial For the tennis player who has shown the most improvement and development as a player the court during the 2014 season.

Baseball players receive recognition


The Journal

Sports

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

15

Wheeler-Smiths headed for greener pastures Lady Eagles Head Coach takes job at University of Oregon

building a dynasty

2010

Lady Eagles win first state title under Stephenie Wheeler-Smith PHOTOS BY KASSIE VILLARS / CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

Lady Eagles Head Coach Stephenie Wheeler-Smith yells at her team during the State Championship game against Bishop Blanchet on March 8. Wheeler-Smith has accepted a job with the University of Oregon as the Director of Basketball Operations. BY MAKALA ROPER AND ALEXIA MEFI Cleveland Publications reporters If ever there were someone to represent the lead character of a video game, Lady Eagles’ Head Coach Stephenie Wheeler-Smith is it. Gobbling up the competition like Ms. Pac-Man, Wheeler-Smith plowed through the Metro League before swallowing the ghosts of the 3A Conference. But now, Wheeler-Smith has gone as far as she can go and is going out on top. She, along with her husband Derrick, is hitting the “Play Again” button, but this time, she’ll be playing in Oregon. Stephenie has been hired as the Director of Basketball Operations for the University of Oregon. She made her way to the Eagles’ nest in 2008, fresh off a stint as an assistant coach at Seattle Prep. She quickly turned the team into a powerhouse, winning three State Championships in five years (2010, 2013, 2014) and a third place finish in 2012. Stephenie has accomplished quite the record at Cleveland; she is considered one of the best coaches in the school’s history. Her trophy case proves it. She’s earned Coach of the Year honors at both the city and state levels. Although she loved coaching high school basketball, Stephenie’s dream has always been to coach at the college level. So when opportunity knocked, she opened the door. “I took this opportunity to be the Director of Basketball at the University of Oregon because it is a great one,” Stephenie explained. “It is very rare that a high school coach jumps from high school to a major D1 organization. Simply, the Lord has opened a door for me.” It also didn’t hurt that Oregon is her home state. Stephenie has always maintained that she would one day coach college basketball. This puts her one step closer.

2012

Lady Eagles fall short in quest for title; finish third in the state tournament

Wheeler-Smith leans in for a kiss from her son, Judah, after her team won the State Championship. Her husband, Derrick, right, served as an assistant coach. Along with the new job, the Wheeler-Smiths are also expecting another baby. While they don’t know the sex of the baby just yet, both she and Derrick are very happy to be adding to their family.

“It is very rare that a high school coach jumps from high school to a major D1 organization. Simply, the Lord has opened a door for me.” Stephenie Wheeler-Smith “This is an absolute blessing!” Stephenie exclaimed. “God has been so faithful to Derrick and [me]. I’ve always wanted Judah to have someone to grow up with.” Before leaving, Stephenie has some tips for the future coach that will step in to fill in her shoes. “Please, please, please coach the “whole” kid! These young ladies are precious gifts and should be treated

accordingly,” she said. Stephenie also said the new coach should “have fun, set the bar high and keep growing.” She advises the new coach to leave their own mark and coach the way they know how. The Wheeler-Smiths’ departure adds to an already-transitioning team. The Lady Eagles lost four key players and will have only two seniors next season: Jayde Christopher and Joyce Harrell. Stephenie left some words of wisdom for the players she will no longer coach. “Be coachable. Don’t settle for second best. Push each other to be better,” she advised. “Continue building upon what you’ve been a huge part of creating.” Stephenie added that she loves each and every one of the players and is sad to leave them behind. Stephenie summed up this new endeavor with this: “Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it. What the world needs is people who have come alive.” The Wheeler-Smiths will leave for Oregon in late June.

2013

The team wins its second state title, beating Seattle Prep, Wheeler-Smith’s former team

PHOTOS BY CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

2014

The Lady Eagles are back-to-back State Champions, going undefeated against in-state team


Eagle’s Nest

16

The Journal Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Class of 2014 N C Y W R T O J L E P C C T M W L G B Z T P Z K S

Prom is over, finals have been taken and graduation is just around the corner. There’s nothing left for seniors to do except sit back and reminisce about the good (and not so good) times. The Journal asked the senior class what was their most memorable moment in high school. Here are their responses: “Playing soccer, basketball and Frisbee were the most memorable moments because I got to bond with a ton of different people, and experience the sports that I always wanted to try out. Senior year was my last opportunity to do it.” Cindy Huynh “My favorite senior moment was having lunch with my Weaver lunch crew.” Tracy Thich

“The playoff tie-breaker for volleyball against Nathan Hale.” Triesté Tialavea

“I think that I would have to say that my most memorable moment was meeting and getting to know all of the students here. I met a lot of SoED students and got to know them really well. I got to see and know who my real friends were.” Devan Rogers

“My most memorable moments of this school year were the times I spent in the Career Center after school. I got “Getting into my first school, WSU.” to know other seniors Chaltu Hussein better and there are A LOT of laughs there.” “The Foss High School game where I scored 40 points.” Muna Ahmed Kai Greene “When I did my “Audience for One” reading for Adam’s. It was kind of like I was writing for myself to forgive myself by saying some stuff out loud that needed to be heard.” Jedric Biddle “Performing my own song at the talent show.” Carlvel Lloyd

“Getting into college. I’m the first in my family to go to college.” Asma Yacoub

H S T R P U J R E Q X A V N G G N Q R G L I C F B

X L S E O D E D A D Y G W T P L A T W Z T S P D O

V D Y H R T B C N C O Q D Z R Z I O D A I A T H G

N G E I V N A J C G P S T D D E R U L N A D B H H

E P V S Y H S T C B G U O C H O O U T U O N G I S

H W G T P S Q H U T L H L T V D T K S N R Z Q K C

Y T Q O L O L P I L R S K V E A C W A R A P P O L

Q A J R I V B P H P A R L R R S I J J V W E L K J

R N T Y R S C M X U I S K G G E D F F A P L H L Y

I Q H M E Y H J O A L M N R S N E Q Z D E K I P Z

N B M L C I K M E F Z O A E G I L Y Z G X H Q Q L

H N I A O K X P Z D C D G J E O A Z E T T P P R N

U L G N R E M M U S U A K J R R V B N D N S O F M

D E U A U D T S J A S R F B M I M P W T E P O R N

L D Q F E G L I T R Z J B E H T L C S K E S X G N

GOALS GOWN GRADUATION GRATEFUL HISTORY INTERNSHIP LEGACY MEMORIES PROM

W N Q Y E O Z I O F Y Q N W K I H S T P T S D F L

E H L S I T O C A P R O M F E S N L O Y R L B E E

N E N Z P N A M M N G M E M O R I E S J U G A C S

T J A Z M J I R R J X D I P L O M A N R O H Z O S

R P P J T L B Y G R K B K Z O A T W D F F I T D A

T X H Z Y O W J E L J W O N K V O T G M O Q W M T

N O I T A R B E L E C K J R I G Q R K T Z S Z F M

SOLUTION ON PAGE 3

SALUTATORIAN SENIORITIS SIGNOUT SUMMER TASSEL TURNT TUXEDOS VALEDICTORIAN

Snap, snap

“My favorite moment of senior year is getting first priority to choose what I want to do in the sports that I had played. Senior year left me with a lot of happy moments.” Jana Chieu

“My most memorable moment was getting into Olin College in Ohio.” Alexander Maki “Getting married.” Marcos Ruiz

T N I O H U E X X P M I H R M T G W H A Y Y O Z W

CAREER CELEBRATION COLLEGE CONGRATULATIONS CORSAGES DIPLOMA FAMILY FOURTEEN

“Becoming the 2014 Metro Champion in girls long jump.” Tyresha Jones-Smith “Performing in Cleveland’s multicultural night.” Hazel Grace Ciceron

I A F K C E U M G M S B N U B J D A O W K O H N D

“Being accepted into the college I wanted to be in and having the opportunity to be a full-time running start student.” Savannah Daniels CLEVELAND PUBLICATIONS

“Spending Fridays rushing to complete scholarship applications and racing to the post office with Chaltu Hussein.” Sami Ayele “My most memorable moment of senior year was when the girls’ basketball team won the state championship.” Aaliyah Williams

“When me, Ali and Hanna performed our original song at the talent show and got third.” Melody Huerta “My favorite memory is being able to perform in the talent show because my expression of rap was showcased.” Aliyanda Harris Cobbinah “Senior project was memorable because when I showed people, they were wowed, and they thought it was impressive; it made me feel good.” Jeffery Leung

“Moon walking in front of everyone at the robotics competition in the gym.” Johnson Nguyen

Congratulations, Class of 2014 “My favorite moment was when us girls went out for a girls day out.” Elizabeth Cachuela

“Its so hard to choose! I love spending time with the people I love most: my family, my boyfriend, my softball girls. My most memorable moment was Adam’s audience of one presentation.” Janice Fernandez

“The robotics competitions were memorable because I had never done them before.” Duressa Mudde

“In general, prom. The memories we made together lasted beyond the dance. But overall, there’s too many moments to count.” Dennis Ho “Senior project and how unorganized the process was. I remember just being really pissed off.” Abdulkadir Warsame

Game Over - Class of 2014  

Video game themed paper reflecting how everything comes to an end.

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