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Issue 43 / February 2015

CHINESE SPRING

FESTIVAL 2015 Five Best Tips for Eating Street Food Safely LOMPRAYAH CUSTOMER CARE

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Editor’s Talk Hello, February Hello everyone, how have you been? Our magazine still has the interesting and useful article to offer you. Now it’s February. In this month there has a very important festival, especially for Chinese, that is ‘Chinese Spring Festival’, known as as Chinese New Year. So, we provide many stories about this festival such as the importance of this festival or the traditions. In addition, we still have various column which also useful and give you knowledge, for example ‘Special’, ‘Tips to Trip’ and ‘Top of the World’. We hope that you will enjoy your time with our magazine and see you again next issue. Good bye.

Lomprayah Team Editor in Chief Photjanard Kantiwong

Executive Editor Wanitcha Sukchet Tinn Chacalanuwattanapong

Editorial Staff Vorapong Vongvarothai Juntiya Laoniyomthai Areeya Pichittanabordeekul Jiraporn Boonta Kitthawat Chaisingthong

Art Director Methakritsada Wanngoen

Photjanard Kantiwong

www.facebook.com/lomprayah

Graphic Designer Seattakit Meunnak Annop Sawatdipol


Hilight

CHINESE

SPRING

FESTIVAL

2015 Ref: : http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/special-report/chinese-new-year/


Spring Festival, widely known as Chinese New Year in the West, is the most important traditional festival, and most important celebration for families in China. It is an official public holiday, during which most Chinese have 8 days off work. Chinese New Year 2015 begins on Thursday 19 February, and end on 5 March. It is day one month one of the Chinese lunar calendar, and its date in January or February varies from year to year (always somewhere in the period January 21 to February 20). The Chinese lunar calendar is associated with the Chinese zodiac, which has 12 animal signs: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, Rooster, dog, and pig. Each animal represents a year in a 12-year cycle, beginning on Chinese New Year’s Day. 2015 is a year of the goat. 2015 is a year of the “Goat” according to the Chinese 12-year animal zodiac (Heavenly Stem) cycle. If you were born in a Goat year you should be particularly careful in 2015, according to Chinese astrology. 2015 is furthermore a year of the “Wood Goat”, according to Chinese Five Element (Earthly Branch) Theory. A “Wood Goat” year occurs every 60 years.


CHINA’S NEW YEAR

FESTIVAL IS...


The Longest Public Holiday in China In 2015 most Chinese will be off work from Wednesday, February 18 (New Year’s Eve) to Tuesday, February 24 (the 6th day of Chinese New Year). Officially only the first three days of Chinese New Year (February 19–21, 2015) are statutory holiday. Chinese New Year’s Eve and three more days are always added to give seven consecutive days of holiday. These four extra days are taken from weekends: the weekend closest to the statutory holiday is included, while the Sunday before (February 15, 2015) and the Saturday after (February 28, 2015) are worked.

A Festival for Families to Be Together Chinese New Year is a time for families to be together. Wherever they are, people come home to celebrate the festival with their families. The New Year’s Eve dinner is called Reunion Dinner, and is believed to be the most important meal of the year. Big families – families of several generations sit around round tables and enjoy the food and time together. The importance of reunion during the Spring Festival has caused some difficult situations for China’s increasingly women’s lib. couples in recent years, who want to go to different homes for the festival. Divorce has happened because of disputes over going to whose home for the festival. (In the past a married couple would always go to the man’s home unless the husband joined the wife’s family at marriage.)


HOW CHINESE NEW YEAR IS CELEBRATED TRADITIONALLY


The Longest Public Holiday in China The Spring Festival has a history of more than 4,000 years. It is said that it originated from a belief in deities that had to be sacrificed to every year. When the solar terms changed, dictating farming activities, especially at the end of a year, people would sacrifice to the deities and pray for a good harvest.

Rarely Seen Cultural Activities to See Many cultural activities occur during the festival. Rural areas and small towns retain more traditional celebrations, such as setting off firecrackers, ancestor worship, and dragon dances. Setting off firecrackers and fireworks are common during the Spring Festival season all over China; dragon dances and ancestor worship less so in the city. At temple fairs in many Chinese cities traditional performances can be seen: dragon dances, lion dances, and performances representing palace events like an emperor’s wedding. A great variety of traditional Chinese products are on offer there, and strange Chinese snacks, rarely seen the rest of the year. Beijing’s temple fairs are held in parks from the first day of the lunar year to the Lantern Festival. In North China people perform various versions of the Rice Sprout Song (扭秧歌 Niǔyāng Gē /nyohyang ger/ ‘twist sprout song’), a traditional Chinese dance performed by a group of colorfully-dressed women and men.


Lucky Decorations Everywhere Every street, building, and house is decorated with red. “Red� is the main color for the festival, as it is believed to be an auspicious color. Red lanterns hang in streets; red couplets are pasted on doors; banks and official buildings are decorated with red New Year pictures depicting images of prosperity. As 2015 is the year of goat, decorations related to goats will be commonly seen. There are red goat dolls for children and New Year paintings with goats on.

Red Envelopes — the Most Popular Gifts Like Christmas in the West, people exchange gifts during the Spring Festival. The most common gifts are red envelopes. Red envelopes have money in, and are given to children and (retired) seniors. It is not a customs to give red envelopes to (working) adults.


Foods with Lucky Meanings Are Eaten Certain foods are eaten during the festival because of their symbolic meanings, based on their names or appearance. Fish is a must for Chinese New Year as the Chinese word for fish ( 鱼 yú /yoo/) sounds like the word for surplus (余 yú). Eating fish is believed to bring a surplus of money and good luck in the coming year. Another traditional Chinese New Year food is Chinese dumplings. Because the shape of Chinese dumplings looks like silver ingot - a kind of ancient Chinese money, Chinese people believe eating dumplings during the New Year festival will bring more money and wealth for the coming year. Other New Year food includes spring rolls, glutinous rice cakes and Sweet Rice Balls.


A Season of Superstitions How to be Lucky in 2015… Chinese people believe that, as the Spring Festival is the start of a new year, what you do then will affect your luck in the coming year. There are many taboos for the Spring Festival season. These taboos usually apply up to a month before the festival and continue to the end of the festival (day 15, the Lantern Festival). They are strictly followed in rural areas by the older generations, but the younger generations and people in urban areas may not know them.

Some Chinese people believe that they mustn’t do cleaning and wash their hair in the first three days as that will sweep/wash away good luck. A cry of a child is believed to bring bad luck to the family, so the young are placated fastidiously. To ask for a loan is a big “no-no”. Another interesting thing is the red underwear. You will see red underwear sold at supermarkets and street markets. Red is believed to ward off bad luck and misfortune. For the people born in a year of the goat (1919, 1931, 1943, 1955, 1967, 1979, 1991, 2003), red underwear is a must for 2015. To pray in a temple during the Chinese New Year is said to be blessed, and will lead to a smooth coming year. In Shanghai, China’s biggest city, thousands flock to Longhua Temple, the city’s biggest temple, praying for good fortune. Read more on Things You Cannot Do During Chinese New Year.


CHINESE NEW YEAR NOW MODERN ACTIVITIES


1.3 Billion People Are on the Move — Traffic Is in Chaos It seems the whole nation is on the move during the festival. The festival is the busiest travel season in China, when trains and buses are fully packed. Even flight tickets are hard to get. Chinese people do whatever they can to go home to see their families: buying a ticket from scalpers at several times the price, queuing for three days, fighting for a ticket to stand for more than 20 hours in an over-packed train, or riding a bus with 20 extra passengers on stools down the aisle for 12 hours or more. China’s migrant workers are the main force during this migration. They carry large and heavy bags full of their worldly possessions and gifts, traveling generally from China’s rich east back to their hometowns.


A Rough Time for Singles Rent a Fake Boyfriend? Chinese New Year is a joyful time for most, but for singles above the normal matrimonial age it is not so. Parents and relatives think they should be settled down. In China, females are said to be marriageable before 30, and males before 32. Those who don’t get married before these ages are thought to be the dregs of society. For these singles, parents are extremely anxious. So New Year’s Eve is heighted by embarrassing interrogations of the singles. Parents even arrange dating for their single children. To solve this problem an interesting, and often ridiculous, solution has appeared — renting a boyfriend or girlfriend for the New Year. There are websites and agents specialized in this business. Taobao, China’s largest online retailer, has a section for fake boyfriend and girlfriend rentals. The price is about 100 yuan (16 USD) a day.


Sending Lucky Chinese New Year Cell Phone Messages

— ‘Three Goats Bring Harmony’ Sending cell phone messages has become the main way to greet people on Chinese New Year’s Eve. In the past people sent New Year cards or called each other to express their good wishes during the Spring Festival. Now most people use cell phone text messages or WeChat (微信 Wēixìn /way-sshin/) to greet their friends. There are plentiful messages online for people to choose from when New Year is coming. Long or short, these messages are filled with warmth and good wishes. An old favorite greeting for a year of the Goat is ‘three goats bring harmony’ (三羊开泰 s开 泰onyng k i tti /san yang kigh tigh/). It comes from Taoism. The third month has three yangs (阳 from yin-yang theory), and corresponds to earth-sky (in Eight Trigram theory), meaning harmony. Later the yang (阳) was replaced with the yang (羊) for goat, which sounds the same, giving the saying.


Destination Guide

NAMTOK

TON

NGA

CHANG Ref: http://www.tourismthailand.org/See-and-Do/Sights-and-AttractionsDetail/Namtok-Ton-Nga-Chang--5665


Considered as one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the south, Namtok Ton Nga Chang [Elephant’s tusks waterfall] is located in the Ton Nga Chang Wildlife Sanctuary, just 26 kilometers away from the city. From all seven levels of the waterfalls, the best part located on its third levels where the stream is separated into two akin to the elephant’s tusks which gives name to the waterfall. Treks also provided for more adventurous experience. By driving, follows the Hat Yai – Rattaphum Road for 13 kilometres then turn left at Ban Hu Rae for another 13 kilometres. One can also hire the motorized tricycle (tuk-tuk) or the minibus from the fresh market (Talat Sot Thetsaban Hat Yai) at 300-400 THB which will takes 2-3 hours to the waterfall.


Place Guide

SPA

CENVAREE

Ref: http://www.spacenvaree.com/about-spa-cenvaree.php


Address: Centara Hat Yai, 3 Samehanusorn Road, Hat Yai, SongKhla 90110, Thailand Email: censechy@chr.co.th Telephone: +(66) 074-352-222 Fax: +(66) 074-352-223 Operational Hours : 09:00 - 20:00 hrs daily

A leading luxury Thai spa brand, the ’’SPA Cenvaree Experience’’ is available through an elite network around the world, including over 33 spas in Thailand and overseas destinations in Indonesia, Maldives, Mauritius, Sri Lanka and Vietnam. Harnessing the positive energy of nature with traditional Thai therapies, the guiding philosophy of each spa journey is to deliver holistic well-being to each individual. We believe life force is enhanced through the balance of Body, Mind and Soul, which is achieved through making time for a calm moment and allowing your body to rest and rejuvenate. With over 250 spa professionals highly trained in the industry, the Spa Cenvaree team brings together a range of expertise in Traditional Thai treatments, as well as luxurious range of Facials and Body Care.

Spa Cenvaree has an extensive team of spa trainers offering unsurpassed training programs throughout all branches worldwide, training spa teams to the very highest standards. All of our massage therapists went through rigorous training that includes anatomy, and hands-on massage hours. In addition to regular class hours, our therapists are professionally certified by Thailand Ministry of Labor, to ensure compliance with the highest standards in treatments. Our aim is to make each experience a memorable journey, from the moment we welcome you upon arrival until the time we bid you farewell. Doing so allows Spa Cenvaree to satisfy the needs and tastes of our discriminating customers, and to maintain our position as the region premier luxury spa brand.


Restaurant Guide

Ref: http://www.spa-foods.com/thevegetariancottage.htm


“Homemade Cuisine” is the perfect con-

cept for this restaurant which has operated for more than 17 years. The meat free menu is suitable for both meat lovers and vegetarians, including many delicious realistic meat alternative dishes. Decorated in the “English Country Cottage Style” it is a perfect location for a warm and romantic candlelit dinner enjoyed in an intimate atmosphere for you and your beloved. The Vegetarian Cottage is also a fine venue for your important special occasions, such as Wedding Ceremonies, Birthday Parties or special family gatherings. The Vegetarian Cottage can accommodate up to 200 guests. A choice of international cuisine is available including Thai, Chinese, Japanese and European for you and your special guest to enjoy. Wine, Beer, and hundreds of fabulous cocktails are available at the bar.

ADDRESS: 41/19 Soi. Chokairumit Vibhawadee-Rangsit soi 16/21 Bangkok TEL/FAX: 0-2691-5083 E-MAIL: info@nutritionhouse.co.th OPEN DAILY Mon-Fri: Lunch: 11.30 Am - 2.30 Pm Dinner: 5.30 Pm - 9.30 Pm Sat-Sun: 11.30 Am - 9.30 Pm


Event

THE 16th

THAI INTERNATIONALTRAVEL FAIR

2015

BANGKOK, 2 March 2015 (NNT) – The Thai International Travel Fair 2015 wrapped up over the weekend with a large number of attendees at the Queen Sirikit National Convention Center. The Thai International Travel Fair 2015 completed its 16th annual event on Sunday. The event drew large attention from the public, especially during the weekend.’ Polled attendees were most interested in travelling to Japan and South Korea. These two countries were most favored for their tourist attractions and reasonable travel expenses. Polled travel agencies concurred and said that seasoned travellers tend to prefer Japan, South Korea, and China. ASEAN countries have also enjoyed increased tourism, especially Vietnam and Myanmar. The travel companies attributed this to a downturn in the Malaysian currency and economy. Nevertheless, the tourism sector has called for the government to promote ASEAN and domestic destinations. Address: Queen Sirikit National Convention Center Date : 25 February - 1 March 2015 Time : 10.00- 21.00 Ref: http://news.thaivisa.com/thailand/thai-international-travel-fair-2015-concludes-on-sunday/34052/


Real Story

IN AND AROUND HAT YAI TON NGA CHANG WATERFALL

Ref: http://cornishkylie.com/2013/06/24/in-and-around-hat-yai-ton-nga-chang-waterfall/


We went on this little day trip ages ago but I didn’t realise that I never made a post about it. I have to share how amazing this place is and right on our doorstep too! Ton Nga Chang waterfall is about 20 minutes out of Hat Yai. We went there on the motorbike so I’m not sure what the public transport situation is to get there – I expect you would need to take a tuk tuk or taxi. Annoyingly, as the area is designated a national park we had to pay 200 baht entry fee. This entry fee is only 30 baht if you are Thai, they really hike the price up for foreigners. It’s frustrating when they do that because having lived her for a short while now I am able to read a little Thai; enough to see clearly that on one side of the board it says 30 (baht) and on the other it says 200 baht. I didn’t have my work permit to hand so I wasn’t able to try and get in for cheaper but someone that we had spoken to who can speak a lot of Thai wasn’t able to get in for the Thai price even with his work permit so I think it would be impossible for us to either. I understand the concept of having to make money out of tourists, especially in areas of natural beauty that are no doubt damaged by the tourist trail, but a little recognition that we are actually working over here, teaching the future generations of the country, would be nice sometimes.

After begrudgingly paying the inflated entrance fee (which is only equivalent to around £4.50 but would cover food for 2 days!!) we drove along the meandering road that curled around the base of the mountain. It was peaceful and the air smelt so fresh you could taste the oxygen that the blanket of trees covering the mountain side was kicking out. We parked up (which was free, thankfully) and packed a small bag with a few essentials and made our way towards the information board. Despite being in Thai we were able to make out that they had quite the set up; souvenir shops and food stalls, a homestay area for people wanting to make a full weekend of it, a few marked out footpaths and seven tiers of waterfall scaling the side of the mountain.


The base tier of the waterfall is a short walk away, and consists of a babbling brook (ooh, alliterative) with boulders for scrambling and pools for relaxing. As is usual at a Thai waterfall, the base tier is always the busiest, chocka with families with plenty of kids. Thai people love to visit the waterfalls (as would I considering they get in for so much cheaper – can you tell that it’s annoyed me?!) and take along a picnic and make a real day of it, picking a shaded spot to set up camp while the kids splash about in the shallow water. I guess it’s safer and it doesn’t require walking too far; which, anyone who has spent any time in Thailand will tell you is not a favourite past time of Thai people! So, as usual, we bypassed the base tier and headed for a handy sign that lead the way to the next. After a short and mildly strenuous walk on quite uneven ground (NB: wear proper shoes and NOT flip flops like I did) we reached the second tier, which is wider than the base and has an actual waterfall at the rear. This was pretty busy too, but it had a bridge leading across so I took the opportunity to grab a few pictures. A couple of my students spotted me and came over the say hello; as I was dressed in a very un-teacher-like outfit of Levi cut offs and a crop top this cemented for me that if we were going to de-clothe and

have a dip it would have to be at the next level. Another handy sign lead the way, this time pointing towards a steep incline of hardened mud, boulders and tree roots. Using the tree roots as footholds and the vines hanging overhead for stability, we scrambled up around the side of the waterfall. It was steep, and slippy and hot work, but it was so worth it to emerge at the top to a beautiful, calm plateau with a number of pools and two big waterfalls feeding them with fresh water. This was the most beautiful waterfall I have ever seen, and my hot and sweaty state was soon to be cured. There were a few people, but no children, so it was pretty quiet. A section of rock to the far side had been smoothed out by the constant stream of water and served as a waterslide for the more adventurous. There were a number of pools to choose from so we found one in the sun near the edge of the cliff, overlooking the stunning view beneath us. You wouldn’t know that there were hundreds of screaming kids below at all. I found a crevice where I could lean and feel the water massage my neck as it flowed from pool to pool. It would have been perfect until I raised my hand and saw that it was covered in the one downside of taking a dip – leeches! Luckily they were really tiny and were easily shaken off – I think we know why this wonderful pool has been left alone by the people.


There was another deep pool that had ledges of rock all around to sit on – a bit like a jaccuzi. There were a few people in there so we deemed it to be a leech-free-zone. I realized that everyone was staring at me, and then it struck me that no other girls were in their swim suits. Some of the men were in swim shorts but the majority of people were wearing shorts and t-shirts, some even wearing skinny jeans, even when in the water. I don’t know if it’s a modesty thing or a leech thing or both, but as I was in bikini bottoms and a crop top, my white skin was out for all to see, and they certainly had a good look! I quickly got in and covered my exposed self with water. We had a lovely relax, taking in the view and the beautiful surroundings. Our peace was momentarily interrupted when some screaming Thai girls alerted us to the fact that we were also being joined by a water lizard, but the quick reactions and impressive lizard-catching skills of their male friends quickly rid the pool of its reptilian inhabitant. Ahhh, just writing about this place makes me want to go there again. I would even pay the 200 baht fee. We never made it past the third tier because our time was running out and we didn’t think that any of the next levels could top what we found at tier three, so another visit is in order to explore what lies above. A lot of people who visit Thailand never venture down as far south as Hat Yai but if you ever find yourself stopping over in the area (in transit to/ from Malaysia, for example) I would really recommend visiting Tong Nga Chang waterfall – it will be 200 baht well spent!


Top of the World

Ref: http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-10-richest-nations-in-the-world.htm http://mixtopten.com/top-10-richest-countries-in-the-world/


THE

RICHEST COUNTRIES IN

THE

WORLD

Qatar is the richest nations because of its high GDP per capita of $91,379, which is just $8,621 shy of $100,000. Qatar has a well developed oil exploration industry where the petroleum industry accounts for 70% of its government revenue, 60% of its GDP and 85% of its export earnings. Their main focuses are the commercial and tourist industries. They plan to build a hotel that exceeds the expectations of tourists far more than than the Burj Al Arab in Dubai. Qatar also plans to be the host of the 2018 Fifa World Cup the first Arab nation to ever hold this role. Qatar also has the lowest rate of unemployment in the GCC region at 0.5 percent but experts warn that future trends point towards an escalation rather than a decline.


Special

WORLD

CANCER

DAY

Ref: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1496892/World-Cancer-Day


World Cancer Day, annual observance held on February 4 that is intended to increase global awareness of cancer. World Cancer Day originated in 2000 at the first World Summit Against Cancer, which was held in Paris. At this meeting, leaders of government agencies and cancer organizations from around the world signed the Charter of Paris Against Cancer, a document containing 10 articles that outlined a cooperative global commitment to improving the quality of life of cancer patients and to the continued investment in and advancement of cancer research, prevention, and treatment. Article X of the charter formally declared February 4 as World Cancer Day “so that each year, the Charter of Paris will be in the hearts and minds of people around the world.” The International Union Against Cancer (UICC), an organization dedicated to increasing global cancer awareness, coordinates World Cancer Day and is supported in this effort by WHO and other international organizations. World Cancer Day serves as a formal launching point for the declaration of new themes and the release of new publications for the UICC’s World Cancer Campaign, which functions throughout the year and strives to raise cancer awareness by forming partnerships with health and cancer institutions and by proposing educational activities and creating public service announcements.

In honour of World Cancer Day, many health institutions and cancer centres make available on their Web sites various educational publications and materials about cancer and cancer prevention. In some places World Cancer Day is recognized with a parade or a local fund-raising event, such as a walk, a gala, a concert, or an auction. In addition, some countries air special television broadcasts or radio programs about cancer during the week in which World Cancer Day occurs.


Trend

BEST HAIR

STYLES

7

for

FACE SHAPES Ref: http://hair.allwomenstalk.com/best-hairstyles-for-7-face-shapes


ROUND

FACE SHAPES

RECTANGULAR

FACE SHAPES

PEAR

FACE SHAPES

Round faces can be hard to accommodate, but don’t despair! There is a great ‘do for this face shape as well and I’m going to try to help you find it! What you need to do is to make your face appear longer and leaner, and to do this you’ll need a cut with less volume around the face. A shoulder length haircut with soft graduated layers is your ideal style. You can have bangs if you like, but keep them long and side swept.

A rectangular face is much like the long face, only with a square jawline. The best hairstyle for your face shape is the one with lots and lots of volume. Layers around your chin can soften the harsh lines and a little bit volume on the sides will help you create the illusion of a wider face. That’s your best hairstyle!

The attributes of a pear shaped face are narrow foreheads and wider jawlines with round chins. You can easily give this face shape the illusion of an oval shaped face by creating width at the forehead and temples. Have your stylist add some layers and show you how to tease them to add that luscious volume. There’s your best hairstyle!

Ref: http://www.rd.com/slideshows/8-essential-foods-for-beautiful-skin/#slideshow=slide1


OVAL

FACE SHAPES

SQUARE

FACE SHAPES

LONG

FACE SHAPES

HEART

FACE SHAPES

If your face is oval shaped, lucky you! There is no limit to hairstyles for your face shape! You can pull of nearly any hairstyle or hair shape! I have an oval shaped face and I have had every different hairstyle from long to short lengths, layers, bangs, blunt cuts, angled ends-you name it, I’ve had it! I can personally verify that this face shape can pull of any haircut you want!

If you have a square face, chances are you have a strong, angular jaw. What a gorgeous attribute! The best hairstyle for your facial shape is something with a lot of texture. Curls or choppy ends or even short spiky cuts are right up your alley! Avoid blunt cut bang hairstyles at all costs. You don’t want that disaster on your hands-I mean head!

If you have a long face, you probably desire the perfect hair cut that doesn’t drag down your face and adds length. Right? Well, then you most certainly need to add some brow-skimming bangs. A chin length bob will help create the illusion on width so feel free to head in that direction. Just avoid the pixie cut which will make you look like a little girl!

Of the 7 best hairstyles for 7 best face shapes, I love this one the most! Having a pointy chin is seemingly the demise of some girls, but I think they are adorable! The best hairstyles for your face shape will draw the focus more to your eyes and cheekbones. Try a side swept fringe and a strong part. Keep your layers long and soft and avoid short, blunt cut bangs at all costs!


Global News Four of Asia’s Top Ten Beaches are in Thailand Four of the Top Ten beaches in Asia are in Thailand, including two in Phuket and two in Krabi, according to a viewership-rated Travellers Choice listing compiled by the popular global travel website TripAdvisor.

Korean Air further expands its network in China Starting in June 2015, Korean Air will also be launching a new service between Daegu and Shenyang. The flights depart from Daegu every Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 10:00 and arrive in Shenyang at 11:10.

TAT launches “Taste of Thailand” magazine to promote Thainess in Italy The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) recently launched a magazine called “Taste of Thailand” to promote the kingdom in Italy and help train travel agents and inform end-users about new travel opportunities and events.

Thanks : http://www.tatnews.org/four-of-asias-top-ten-beaches-are-in-thailand-tripadvisor/ http://www.traveldailynews.asia/news/article/58075/korean-air-further-expands-its http://www.tatnews.org/tat-launches-%E2%80%9Ctaste-of-thailand%E2%80%9D-magazine-to-promote-thainess-in-italy/


Tip to Trip

FIVE BEST TIPS FOR EATING STREET FOOD SAFELY

Street food is quite popular among backpackers in almost every corner of the world. It’s cheap, tasty and filling and fits everyone’s budget. But not everyone are keen on eating street food due to the fear of getting sick. But bear in mind that not all street food are created equal. A lot of them are actually prepared with care. But if you’re still afraid of trying it out, check out our list of safety tips. Here’s five tips for eating street food safely:

Ref: http://bestholidaysinasia.com/five-best-tips-eating-street-food-safely/


GO WHERE THE CROWD EATS

Go to the popular ones as their supplies usually gets consumed fast by their customers which means that they have to prepare fresh food every now and then. Their food don’t stale as it gets sold out within an hour or two.

BUY WHILE IT’S

STILL HOT

Buy the food that were just cooked a few minutes ago. Heat kills a lot of bacteria and though while you’ll still wait until your food cools down a bit, it’s safer than the foods that have been sitting on shelf for quite some time already.

AVOID FLY IN FESTED AREAS

we all know where flies usually hangout. And you don’t want to see them in carts or food stalls right. Don’t buy your food in fly infested shops as the flies might contaminate the food that are being sold in that shop.


DON’T DRINK TAP WATER

A lot of local food stalls offer free drinking water to their customers. Unless you know where the water came from, don’t drink it and instead just buy bottled water. Some vendors get their water from the tap and depending on which country you are traveling in, the water may not be that safe to drink.

WASH YOUR HANDS

Sometimes, even if the food is prepared hygienically if you don’t wash your hands then you might be the one that contaminated the food that you bought. This is something that we easily forget especially if we just got off from an overnight bus and the first thing that we could think of is food. Bring a hand sanitizer or a bottle of rubbing alcohol to kill the bacteria off your hands.

Lomprayah in Magazine Issue 43 (02/2015) www.facebook.com/lomprayah  

Now it’s February. In this month there has a very important festival, especially for Chinese, that is ‘Chinese Spring Festival’, known as as...

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