Process Book: The Odyssey Book Jacket

Page 1

1 process book Project 3: Setting the Stage

Miles “Bread” Lee Typography 2 September 2019


contents 2 research

04

discovery

16

refinement

26

criticism

39


objective

3

Design an expressive and eye-catching book jacket in three dimensions. The emphasis for this will be on the physical generation and conceptual development of dimensional type as it translates into a photograph for your book jacket. By creating a “stage” upon which type becomes three-dimensional characters, you will find opportunities for investigation and exploration both in type as meaning and as material employed to support your ideas. You will use this image for the cover of your book. You are given a selection of classic fiction book titles from which to choose.

dimensions

Vertically-oriented book. Jacket flaps must be 3 to 4 inches wide. color & type

Unlimited content

Book title, author, appropriate content (barcodes, publisher’s mark, etc.)


research 4

book options:

Homer’s The Odyssey, Zadie Smith’s White Teeth, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar, Haruki Murakami’s Wind Up Bird Chronicle, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club, Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis, William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I chose The Odyssey because it was the one I was most familiar with—I’d read it for summer reading before freshman year of high school, a decision which I used to regret because it was so long and we read parts of it for English class anyways. The Odyssey and Greek Mythology still have a special place in my heart. Because it had been several years since I last read it, I researched The Odyssey online, looking at summaries, quotes, videos, and the full text. Some themes I considered were hubris, cycles of violence, war, double standards, misogyny, divine intervention, and the journey home. I thought about visual motifs such as the “winedark sea,” mazes, wood, oceans, and weaving.


5

Word map

“The Odyssey is about what we do after war—how we put war away.” “Humans have never been particularly good at leaving war behind them.”

—John Green on Crash Course’s “A Long and Difficult Journey, or The Odyssey: Crash Course Literature 201”


6 For typographic research, I explored typefaces that I could draw from to create the title. I looked at more modern typefaces as well as those that evoked Ancient Greek lettering.

Argon

the ody ssey

Bell MT

the odyssey

Adobe Garamond

the odyssey

Bodoni

the odyssey

Didot

the odyssey

Miller

THE ODYSSEY the odyssey

Museo Slab

the odyssey the odyssey

Bodoni Egyptian

Amboy Klavika

Adamas

Kings Caslon

the odyssey the odyssey the odyssey

THE ODYSSEY The Odyssey


7

SentyTang

Gelio

The Odyssey The Odyssey

Marathon

The Odyssey

Norse

The Odyssey

The Odyssey

The Odyssey

The Odyssey

Sea Gardens

The Odyssey

The Odyssey

Roman SD

The Odyssey

Poseidon AOE

The Odyssey

Caligo

The Odyssey


8 I began to compile visual research, which included existing covers of The Odyssey and themes or motifs I wanted to pursue. I ended up thinking about how I could incorporate type into string, mazes, and wood.

Notes on the interview “The Jacket Designer’s Challenge: To Capture A Book By Its Cover” between Peter Mendelsund and NPR My brief stint with Shakespeare’s The Tempest Preliminary sketches for The Odyssey


9


10

I was heavily inspired by Greek black-figure pottery. Luckily, I was able to view some in real life at the tail end of this project thanks to one of my classes, Myths and Monuments. I wanted to emulate the red-orange, white, and black of the pottery in my book jacket to set it in an Ancient Greek context (The Odyssey is, after all, the oldest existing work in the Western world).

Marian Maguire



12


13 One part of The Odyssey that stood out to me was that while Odysseus is away fighting monsters, sleeping with women, and sailing overseas, his wife Penelope is at home with their son Telemachus. Both must deal with a rowdy bunch of suitors who have essentially taken over the home. All this time, Penelope has been weaving a tapestry. She promises the suitors that she’ll choose one of them to marry once she finishes her tapestry, but is actually unweaving parts of the tapestry each night because she has a gut feeling that Odysseus is still alive out there (correct) and is waiting for him to come home. With my jacket, I wanted to explore this part of the Odyssey. In high school, we read this poem by Dorothy Parker called “Penelope” from her point of view, a view not often considered in most portrayals of The Odyssey. Penelope By Dorothy Parker In the pathway of the sun, In the footsteps of the breeze, Where the world and sky are one, He shall ride the silver seas, He shall cut the glittering wave. I shall sit at home, and rock; Rise, to heed a neighbor's knock; Brew my tea, and snip my thread; Bleach the linen for my bed. They will call him brave.


14 In his Crash Course video, John Green discusses misogny and double-standards throughout the Odyssey, with female characters such as Circe, Calypso, Odysseus’ maids, and Penelope. I didn’t really want to make yet another book cover that emulates the ocean, or a cyclops, or a boat. I wondered, “What if I just made a loom and wove The Odyssey onto it?” The last time I wove anything was in fourth or fifth grade in art class on a cardboard “loom.” I considered making a loom out of wood, or a branch shaped like a wishbone, or even a wooden chair. While I still considered my other options (lasercutting a maze, using twigs, or using string wrapped around nails), I thought weaving would bring a different lens through which to view The Odyssey. I watched a lot of youtube videos on weaving and looms in preparation. At one point, I stumbled across an article titled “The first English translation of ‘The Odyssey’ by a woman was worth the wait” by the Washington Post and thought, “Oh, that’s cool” but didn’t look into it until much later (stay tuned). The article I found. I hadn’t noticed it was written by Madeline Miller, an author I like


The videos

15

Video on making a loom out of a wooden frame using nails and string


discovery 16 Long story short: I made a loom. It was Fall break, I didn’t have class for a few days, and I’m pals with the shop monitors, so I went to the 3D Shop and made a loom. Right before that, I found an abandoned wooden chair and poked a hole in it to gauge whether or not I could poke more holes in it to create a loom using nails. It would make a cool photograph. I felt bad about poking holes in a perfectly good chair though, so decided to make something from scratch. I cut pieces of wood I found using a chop saw, then cut grooves along the sides every 0.25 inches with a band saw for the string to go through. I used wood glue and a brad nailgun to assemble it.

The assembled loom (measures about 24 x 17 inches)


17

Yarn and string choices. The blue is for the ocean, the orange for black-figure pottery.

The loom with string (aka: the weft)


18

Loom design with woven letter estimate

Handwritten typeface exploration


19

Book jacket thumbnails exploring weaving, circles, mazes. Sketches of wraparound jackets (my favorites) Splitting up “The Odyssey” into “The / Ody/ Ssey”

I discovered that I would probably need to split up “The Odyssey” into parts because “Odyssey” is so much longer than “The” and fitting them into a vertical cover proved very difficult if they were both on one line. I ended up going with “The / Ody / Ssey.” At this point, I was also considering how to treat “Homer”—whether it should be written or typed out.


20 I began weaving. At this point, I still wasn’t sure which direction I should go typographically, so I tried to emulate the “Ancient Greek” typefaces I found as well as a sans serif uppercase. I disliked my attempt at an “Ancient Greek” typeface and felt that the loom would restrict me to create mostly blocky letters (think rectangles).

“Ancient Greek” letters and sans serif letters


21 Another option I made on the wall with thumbtacks and yarn in case the loom didn’t work out

First full weave attempt


22

First full weaving attempt

For my first weaving attempt, I made sure each letter spanned the same number of strings (6). I wanted to connect the letters (ie: T to H, H to E, and so on) in order to imitate Odysseus’ long journey. This forced me to think strategically about how to weave and connect each letter. It ended up being a long and painstaking process, but I wanted to go through with it.


23

After finishing this attempt, I realized there needed to be more space between the letters. For my next weave, I wanted to make each letter span a larger number of strings (to increase the size), put more spacing between letters (who knew I would be tracking letters on a loom?), and try to create rounder shapes for the O, D, and S to make them more legible.


THE ODYSSEY

24

Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home.

HOMER

HOMER

Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the secondoldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, the cycle of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.

T H E O DYS S E Y

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the secondoldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, the cycle of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.

THE ODYSS E Y

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home.

THE ODYSS E Y

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the secondoldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, the cycle of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.


25 I created these book jackets using a frontal photograph of my first weaving attempt. I ran into the problem of trying to fit “Homer” on the cover even with the loom strings, and debated between weaving “The / Ody / Ssey” or “The / Odyssey.” I ultimately settled on “The / Ody / Ssey,” but didn’t solve the “Homer” problem until later. I was also worried by the high contrast of the white string on a black background. I explored solutions to these problems as I began to refine my book jacket. I used one typeface for the whole jacket: Miller Text. I received feedback that this typeface didn’t fit well with the woven letters, which didn’t have serifs.

TH E O DYS S EY Miller Text


refinement 26

On my second (and final) weaving attempt, I wanted to create more accurate letter shapes than before, especially the O, D, Y, and S. This ended up taking much longer than my original weaving attempt, but I was more satisfied with the result.


27

Final weave


HOMER

28

Tell me, O Muse, about the man of many turns, who many ways wandered when he had sacked Troy’s holy citadel; He saw the cities of many men, and he knew their thought; On the ocean he suffered many pains within his heart, striving for his life and his companions’ return.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, the cycle of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.

THE ODYS S EY

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

Miller Text with hand

HOMER

Tell me, O Muse, about the man of many turns, who many ways wandered when he had sacked Troy’s holy citadel; He saw the cities of many men, and he knew their thought; On the ocean he suffered many pains within his heart, striving for his life and his companions’ return.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the secondoldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, the cycle of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.

T HE ODYSSE Y

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

Miller Text with hand and new black-figure pottery colors

HOMER

T

ell me, O Muse, about the man of many turns, who many ways wandered when he

had sacked Troy’s holy citadel; He saw the cities of many men, and he knew their thought; On the ocean he suffered many pains within his heart, striving for his life and his companions’ return.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, the cycle of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.

THE ODYSSEY

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

Pluto Sans and Adelle with hand and lines

HOMER


HOMER

HOMER is the legendary author of

29

the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are central to ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being

THE ODYSSEY

that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

TELL ME, O MUSE, about the man of many turns, who many ways wandered when he had sacked Troy’s holy citadel; He saw the cities of many men, and he knew their thought; On the ocean he suffered many pains within his heart, striving for his life and his companions’ return.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems a ributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest surviving work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home a er the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca a er the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home a er the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, cycles of violence, and what humans do a er the war ends.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

Pluto Sans and Adelle with hand and lines HOMER

TELL ME, O MUSE, about the man of many turns, who many ways wandered when he had sacked Troy’s holy citadel; He saw the cities of many men, and he knew their thought; On the ocean he suffered many pains within his heart, striving for his life and his companions’ return.

THE ODYSSEY is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest surviving work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the Trojan War. In his absence, his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must house a group of unruly suitors who compete for Penelope’s hand in marriage. The Odyssey examines a man’s journey as he tries to return home after the war. It explores themes of divine intervention, homecoming, cycles of violence, and what humans do after the war ends.

THE ODYSSEY

HOMER is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are central to ancient Greek literature. Many accounts of Homer’s life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey. Modern scholars consider these accounts legendary.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

HOMER

Pluto Sans and Athelas with hand and clearer photo

For these jackets, I used a photo I took of my friend’s hand holding the yarn. I meant this to evoke Persephone unravelling hehr tapestry, but the hand felt detached from the loom itself and was more of a nod towards divine intervention. I also considered adding scissors for Fate (the Fates—who are above mortals and gods alike), but I decided against it. Throughout this process, I was constantly printing these out to wrap around my book (a 6x8.5 book) to see how it looked.


30 At this point, I had been using a (slightly modified) 1967 translation by a man named Albert Cook on the back: Tell me, O Muse, about the man of many turns, who many ways wandered when he had sacked Troy’s holy citadel; He saw the cities of many men, and he knew their thought; On the ocean he suffered many pains within his heart, striving for his life and his companions’ return.

One of my friends saw this and suggested I instead use the 2017 translation by Emily Wilson, the first female translator of The Odyssey. Her translation is more critical of the misogyny present in previous translations and is written using the same number of syllables as Homer, in iambic pentameter. This translation is what the article I previously glossed over was about. I was extremely impressed by her translation and felt that it better fit the Penelope-focused theme of my jacket. Tell me about a complicated man. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy, and where he went, and who he met, the pain he suffered in the storms at sea, and how he worked to save his life and bring his men back home.


31 “In her talk last week, Wilson joked, “I doubt that anyone asked how the other translators’ ‘male perspectives’ affected their translations.” But maybe they should have. When evaluating her translation, it may not be important that Wilson is a woman, but it is important that she attacks the poem from a critical, politicallyengaged lens. Wilson’s translation is radical, not only because it humanizes disenfranchised characters, but also because it invites the reader to critically engage with the poem’s complicated legacy as both a classic hero’s journey and a horrific patriarchal fantasy. Like its slippery protagonist, Wilson’s Odyssey is many things rolled into one.” The Complicated Radicalism of Emily Wilson’s The Odyssey, written by Janey Tracey

The cover


HOMER & WILSON

EMILY WILSON’S Odyssey, wri en in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, sings with a voice that echoes Homer’s music. Matching the number of lines in the Greek original, the poem sails along at fascinating, informative introduction explores the Bronze Age milieu that produced the epic, the poem’s major themes, the controversies about its origins, and the unparalleled scope of its impact and influence.

32

Tell me about a complicated man.

Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy,

“Wilson’s language is fresh, unpreten-

and where he went, and who he met, the pain

tious, and lean…It is rare to find a

he suffered in the storms at sea, and how

translation that is at once so effort-

he worked to save his life and bring his men

lessly easy to read and so rigorously considered.” —Madeline Miller, author of Circe & The Song of Achilles

back home. He failed to keep them safe; poor fools, they ate the Sun God’s ca le, and the god kept them from home. Now goddess, child of Zeus, tell the old story for our modern times.

rosy-fingered dawn of world literature almost three millennia ago, is a poem about violence and the a ermath of war; about wealth, poverty and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning

THE ODYSSEY

Homer’s swi , smooth pace. A

THE ODYSSEY, composed at the

for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

Find the beginning. PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

HOMER Translated by Emily Wilson

PENGUIN

HOMER & WILSON

EMILY WILSON

TRANSLATED BY

Yarn box behind “Homer” as suggested by my friend

EMILY WILSON’S Odyssey, wri en

THE ODYSSEY, composed at the

in iambic pentameter verse and a

rosy-fingered dawn of world literature

vivid, contemporary idiom, sings with

almost three millennia ago, is a poem

a voice that echoes Homer’s music.

about violence and the a ermath of

Matching the number of lines in the

war; about wealth, poverty and power;

Greek original, the poem sails along at

about marriage and family; about

fascinating, informative introduction explores the Bronze Age milieu that produced the epic, the poem’s major themes, the controversies about its

Tell me about a complicated man. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost

origins, and the unparalleled scope

when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy,

of its impact and influence.

and where he went, and who he met, the pain he suffered in the storms at sea, and how

“Wilson’s language is fresh, unpretentious, and lean…It is rare to find a translation that is at once so effort-

he worked to save his life and bring his men back home. He failed to keep them safe; poor fools,

lessly easy to read and so rigorously

they ate the Sun God’s ca le, and the god

considered.”

kept them from home. Now goddess, child of Zeus,

—Madeline Miller, author of Circe & The Song of Achilles

tell the old story for our modern times. Find the beginning.

travelers, hospitality, and the yearning

THE ODYSSEY

Homer’s swi , smooth pace. A

for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

HOMER

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England

& EMILY WILSON

PENGUIN

penguinclassics.com

“Translated by Emily Wilson” vertically along the weft

HOMER & WILSON

HOMER THE ODYSSEY, composed at the

EMILY WILSON is the first female translator of the Odyssey. Wri en in

rosy-fingered dawn of world litera-

iambic pentameter verse and a vivid,

ture almost three millennia ago, is a

contemporary idiom, her translation

poem about violence and the after-

sings with a voice that echoes Homer’s music. Matching the number of lines in

A fascinating, informative introduction explores the Bronze Age milieu that produced the epic, the poem’s major

tious, and lean…It is rare to find a trans-

math of war; about wealth, poverty

lation that is at once so effortlessly easy to read and so rigorously considered.” MADELINE MILLER

themes, the controversies about its

Author of Circe & The Song Of Achilles

origins, and the unparalleled scope of its impact and influence.

Tell me about a complicated man. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy,

and power; about marriage and fam-

THE ODYSSEY

the Greek original, the poem sails along at Homer’s swi , smooth pace.

“Wilson’s language is fresh, unpreten-

ily; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

and where he went, and who he met, the pain he suffered in the storms at sea, and how he worked to save his life and bring his men back home.

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

PENGUIN

Reviews on the back instead of the flap

Translated by E M I LY W I L S O N


HOMER & WILSON

EMILY WILSON is a classicist at the University of Pennsylvania and the first female translator of the Odyssey. Written in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, her translation sings with a voice that number of lines in the Greek original, the poem sails along at Homer’s swift, smooth pace.

“This translation will change the way the poem is read in English.” —CHARLOTTE HIGGINS Chief culture writer for The Guardian

TELL ME ABOUT A COMPLICATED MAN. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy, and where he went, and who he met, the pain

“Wilson’s language is fresh, unpreten-

he suffered in the storms at sea, and how

tious, and lean…It is rare to find a

he worked to save his life and bring his men

translation that is at once so effort-

back home.

lessly easy to read and so rigorously

THE ODYSSEY

echoes Homer’s music. Matching the

33

THE ODYSSEY, composed at the rosy-fingered dawn of world literature almost three millennia ago, is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

considered.” —MADELINE MILLER Author of Circe & The Song of Achilles

HOMER

PENGUIN CLASSICS

Translated by

London, England

PENGUIN

penguinclassics.com

E M I LY W I L S O N

Reviews on the flaps with text highlighted in Pluto Sans

HOMER &

WILSON THE ODYSSEY, composed at the

EMILY WILSON is a classicist at the University of Pennsylvania and

rosy-fingered dawn of world litera-

the first female translator of the

ture almost three millennia ago, is a

Odyssey. Written in iambic pentame-

poem about violence and the after-

ter verse and a vivid, contemporary

math of war; about wealth, poverty

idiom, her translation sings with a Matching the number of lines in the Greek original, the poem sails along at Homer’s swift, smooth pace.

“This translation will change the way the poem is read in English.” —THE GUARDIAN “Wilson’s translation is radical, not only because it humanizes disenfranchised characters, but also because it

TELL ME ABOUT A COMPLICATED MAN. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy, and where he went, and who he met, the pain he suffered in the storms at sea, and how

invites the reader to critically engage

he worked to save his life and bring his men

with the poem’s complicated legacy

back home.

as both a classic hero’s journey and a

and power; about marriage and fam-

THE ODYSSEY

voice that echoes Homer’s music.

ily; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

horrific patriarchal fantasy.” —JANEY TRACEY

HOMER

PENGUIN CLASSICS

Translated by

London, England

PENGUIN

penguinclassics.com

E M I LY W I L S O N

Different hand and yarn photos

HOMER &

WILSON THE ODYSSEY, composed at the

EMILY WILSON is a classicist at the University of Pennsylvania and

rosy-fingered dawn of world litera-

the first female translator of the

ture almost three millennia ago, is a

Odyssey. Written in iambic pentame-

poem about violence and the after-

ter verse and a vivid, contemporary

math of war; about wealth, poverty

idiom, her translation sings with a Matching the number of lines in the Greek original, the poem sails along at Homer’s swift, smooth pace.

“This translation will change the way the poem is read in English.” —THE GUARDIAN “Wilson’s translation is radical, not only because it humanizes disenfranchised characters, but also because it

TELL ME ABOUT A COMPLICATED MAN. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy, and where he went, and who he met, the pain he suffered in the storms at sea, and how

invites the reader to critically engage

he worked to save his life and bring his men

with the poem’s complicated legacy

back home.

as both a classic hero’s journey and a

and power; about marriage and fam-

THE ODYSSEY

voice that echoes Homer’s music.

ily; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated” hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

horrific patriarchal fantasy.” —JANEY TRACEY

HOMER

PENGUIN CLASSICS

Translated by

London, England penguinclassics.com

Jacket without hand

PENGUIN

E M I LY W I L S O N


34

HOM

&

WILS EMILY WILSON is a classicist at the University of Pennsylvania and the first female translator of the Odyssey. Written in iambic pentameter verse and a vivid, contemporary idiom, her translation sings with a Matching the number of lines in the Greek original, the poem sails along at Homer’s swift, smooth pace.

“This translation will change the way the poem is read in English.” —THE GUARDIAN “Wilson’s translation is radical, not only because it humanizes disenfranchised characters, but also because it

TELL ME ABOUT A COMPLICATED MAN. Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost when he had wrecked the holy town of Troy, and where he went, and who he met, the pain he suffered in the storms at sea, and how

invites the reader to critically engage

he worked to save his life and bring his men

with the poem’s complicated legacy

back home.

as both a classic hero’s journey and a

THE ODYSSEY

voice that echoes Homer’s music.

horrific patriarchal fantasy.” —JANEY TRACEY

PENGUIN CLASSICS London, England penguinclassics.com

Final book jacket

PENG


35

MER

&

SON

GUIN

THE ODYSSEY, composed at the rosy-fingered dawn of world literature almost three millennia ago, is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home. This fresh, authoritative translation captures the beauty of this ancient poem as well as the drama of its narrative. Its characters are unforgettable, none more so than the “complicated� hero himself, a man of many disguises, many tricks, and many moods, who emerges in this version as a more fully rounded human being than ever before.

HOMER Translated by

E M I LY W I L S O N


36

Front

Right flap


37

Left flap

Back


38

Book with loom


criticism

39

I received mostly positive feedback on my final book jacket. Peers commented that they enjoyed the woven book title and saw how it fit into the theme of “journey.” My professor noted that my type choices, Pluto Sans and Adelle, worked well together. Some disliked that my inside flaps contained “too many” “unecessary” hyphens. While I agree that hyphens can distract from reading, I included hyphens when very carefully typsetting because I wanted a clean and non-distracting rag. Others commented on inconsistent colors on my photo, which I edited in order to print on the Matte Plotter. In the future, I will make sure I uniformly edit colors when printing on the Matte Plotter. If I continued working on this project, I would try to find another way to more seamlessly integrate “Homer” and “Translated by Emily Wilson” into my cover. I am overall pleased with my finished product, and enjoyed creating a book jacket for the first time.


40

Miles “Bread” Lee Project 3: Setting the Stage Typography 2, Fall 2019 Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts