Page 1

may 2012

Ru nway Exten sion I m pact Assessmen t Te rrance B. L etts o m e In t e r n a t i o n a l A i rport

Pre p a re d F o r :

British Virgin Islands Airports Authority in association with:

Kraus-Manning, Inc.

Econcerns, Ltd Ricondo & Associates, Inc. St. Jean Engineering, LLC Fairbanks Engineering Corp. Dr. Birney M. Harrigan


Terrance B Lettsome International Airport – Runway Expansion  Impact Assessment Report  Contents 1. Executive Summary  2. Background  2.1 Project Selection  2.2 Project Location  2.3 Project Description & Associated Activities  2.4 Alternatives  3. Approach & Methodology  3.1 General Approach  3.2 Assumptions, Uncertainties & Constraints  4. Environmental Policy, Legislative & Planning Framework Intro.  4.1 Environmental Policy, Legislative & Planning Framework Intro.  4.2 Consultation & Public Participation  4.3 Institutional Capacity  4.4 Relevant Ongoing Projects  5. Existing Environmental Conditions  5.1 & 5.2 Physical & Biological Environment  5.3 Socio‐Cultural & Scocio‐Economic Conditions  6. Assessment Of Environmental Impacts & Mitigating Measures  6.1 Prediction Of Potential Environmental Impacts & Benefits  6.2 Mitigation Of Environmental Risks  6.3 Enhancements  6.4 Significance Of Environmental Impacts  6.5 Economic Evaluation Of Environmental Effects  7. Environmental Management Implementation 


7.1 Environmental Monitoring  7.2 Environmental Management Capacity  7.3 Environmental Management Plan  8. Conclusions & Recommendations  8.1 Statement of Impact  8.2 Conclusions & Recommendations    Appendices  ¾ Ricondo & Associates (Aviation)  ¾ St Jean Engineering & Fairbanks Engineering Corp (Coastal &  Marine Engineering).  ¾ Alan Zundel / Aquaveo (Coastal Modeling)  ¾ Econcerns Limited (Environmental)  ¾ Dr. Birney M Harrigan / Reality Global Inc. (Socio‐Economic)  ¾ Island Resources (Terrestrial)  ¾ Michael D. Kent PhD (Historical)  ¾ Department of Disaster Management HVA Report  ¾ Coastal Model Animations (on separate file)  ¾ Exhibits (separate files, pdf generated images)  ¾ Documents Referred To In Report BY KMI  ¾ Consultant Information / CV’s   


Terrance B Lettsome International Airport – Runway Expansion Impact Assessment Report 1. Executive Summary The present Government made the decision to extend the Terrence B. Lettsome International  Airport (TBLIA) at Beef Island for several stated reasons, including but not limited to (1)  reducing the Territories’ dependence on regional feeder gateways for airlift, which has proven  to be an untenable situation, as has been shown on many occasions by  American Eagle but,  most recently, by its announcement to remove all American Eagle ATR‐72s from its fleet by  March 2013; (2) testimony from visitors that if they had better access to the BVI, they would  visit more often; (3) the inherent conundrum of having to depend on its competitors to sustain  the BVI tourism industry and mainstay of its economy; (4) to stay competitive with the growing  trend of having direct flights to one’s country; and (5) with the charter boat industry, the largest  sector of the tourism industry, now reaching its carrying capacity limit, other opportunities in  the leisure industry such as the development of the mega yacht business needed to be  explored.     In an industry where, increasingly, Caribbean countries have direct flights to their destinations,  the BVI Government reasoned that in order to be competitive it had to invest in the Territory’s  transportation infrastructure, that is, the airport, to create easier access to the Territory with  direct flights from the U. S. mainland.  Following the receipt of the Louis Berger Group’s report,  “Strategic Plan and Master Services for the British Virgin Islands Airport System,” in June 2011,  a Development Committee was appointed comprising the BVI Airports Authority’s (BVIAA)  Operations Team and one BVIAA Board member  to review and evaluate the Plan, especially  with respect to Option 4, the preferred choice of LBG.  The Committee identified serious flaws  in Option 4, including the implementation of modern NAVIADS, risks associated with operating  the runway system, the non‐instrument versus instrument runway, the runway re‐orientation  and runway productivity.  In light of those significant challenges, the Committee recommended  an alternative option, Option 6, a non‐instrument runway extended to a total distance of 7,000 

  1   


feet along the airport’s current orientation that would meet the operational requirements of  such aircrafts as the Boeing 737, Airbus 320 and the Boeing 757.   Consistent with the requirements of the Physical Planning Act and The Land Development  Control Guidelines, an Impact Assessment (IA) was necessary.  Following the receipt of three  bids for the project, Kraus‐Manning Inc was awarded the contract by the BVIAAA to conduct an  Impact Assessment of Option 4 and 6.    It should be understood that whilst the Government have committed to expanding the airport  runway at TBLIA, there is no “done deal” regarding the final layout, length or designs which will  be developed following due consideration of this report and ongoing data analysis.  This report and its appendixes cover in detail, the socio‐economic and environmental impacts  of the proposed runway extensions for options 4 and 6 as presented by the BVIAA. There will be  significant impacts for both options currently tabled and there are mitigating measures that  deserve closer review and development that will in turn provide solutions to problems or  potential issues raised.  Trellis Bay and Conch Bay border the Airport property to the east.  Well Bay borders to the  west.  Wildlife and ocean currents in these areas will be altered by a runway extension. Water  quality in Trellis Bay will be affected by both options and to a significantly higher degree by  option 6. Potential mitigating measures include the use of culverts, piled bridge systems, new  circulation channels and the enlarging of the bay mouth by dredging and removing part of  “Sprat Point”. Diverting current airport drainage away from its current outfall in Trellis Bay will  significantly improve the situation as will controlling the quantity of boats currently mooring in  the Bay.  There are serious warranted concerns raised by the Trellis bay community regarding the Bays  future and their own personal circumstances. Theses impacts are addressed in detail in this  report which concludes that change can be adapted to and accommodated, additionally there  are options and alternatives that are worth exploring in equal measure.  There will be impacts to the beaches in the near vicinity to the runway, namely Long Bay beach  will likely experience quite minor changes to its “sand budget”.  A salt water pond on airport property, immediately north of the runway, is one of the few  naturally remaining ponds in the BVI.  Impacts to the pond will directly affect wildlife. Option 6      2   


has relatively little impact upon the salt pond whereas option 4 completely eliminates the  ecosystem.  The proposed runway extension may result in larger, noisier aircraft overflying populated areas  on the neighboring islands. There is a concern from residents that property prices might be  affected by this form of “pollution”. This aspect is difficult to prove and further financial  research and reporting is recommended in the socio‐economic appendix as a consequence.  Neighboring islands (Tortola, Scrub Island and Great Camanoe) represent terrain obstructions  that impact flight operations into and out of the Airport. These obstructions can be  accommodated and “worked around” as demonstrated in the aviation consultant’s appendix.  Blackburn Highway is the only road access between Beef Island and Tortola, and the main  Airport access road.  Any runway extension to the west will require a realignment of this road.  This is not considered to be a major obstacle to overcome and options and alternatives are  referenced in this report, the simplest being to reroute the road around the extension in to  Well Bay.  Whichever option or final design is approved for the runway expansion, it is essential that we  learn from the experiences and examples in the past. Construction activities must be designed  and managed to reduce negative impacts on the environment beyond the immediate project  footprint. Erosion control must be employed to prevent sediment loss to the coastal  environment. Turbidity curtains must be deployed and maintained to protect the marine  environment and due consideration must be given to the surrounding community.  An environmental monitoring team should be engaged to regularly review the project progress  and associated risks therein. Once the final design is selected by Government, further impact  analysis should be carried out to supplement this report.

  3   


2. Background 2.1 Project Selection Given the global economic challenges and current competitive trends in the aviation industry,  the BVI Government made a decision to expand Terrance B Lettsome International Airport  (TBLIA) runway along with other parts of the aerodrome to “ensure the sustainable  development of the tourism industry, the largest contributor to the BVI economy”.  Its primary  goal is to make the BVI conveniently accessible to its source markets, especially the United  States by having direct flights to the BVI from three of its major gateways: Miami, Atlanta and  New York.  Most of the BVI competitors in the tourism industry within the Caribbean now have  direct flights to their destinations, thereby threatening the sustainability of feeder carriers and,  by extension, the continued survival of those territories such as the BVI that depend on them.   Ease of access to the BVI is designed to accomplish the following:  •

Reduce the number of feeder connections from St. Thomas, Puerto Rico, St. Martin and  Antigua 

Reduce the length of time it takes to get to the BVI.  (For visitors, in particular, they  would spend less time getting to the BVI and more time enjoying the BVI experience.) 

Respond to the changing needs of vacationers.  They are taking shorter vacations,  traveling shorter distances, spending less, and demanding more. 

Increase the number of visits to the BVI by decreasing the length of time it takes to get  to the BVI.   

Currently there is no runway in the BVI long enough to make such flights profitable.  Travelers  instead must connect through San Juan, in Puerto Rico, or other such regional airports with  longer runways.   In 2006 the British Virgin Islands Airports Authority recognized the need for a Master Plan for  the Territory’s Airport System. Tenders were invited to bid for a strategic plan of the three (3)  airports in the Territory including a second phase to study and develop a Master Plan for the  National Airport System.         4   


Louis Berger Group Master Plan  Louis Berger Group (LBG) was the successful tender and in 2007 a contract was signed with  LBG. In summary their terms were as follows:   Phase 1, to develop a Strategic Plan for the Airport System to guide the future development of  airport infrastructure in the British Virgin Islands; and  Phase 2A, following the vision of the Strategic Plan, prepare a Master Plan of the selected  airport for a 20 ‐ 25 year development planning horizon while meeting the business objectives  of the BVIAA.   The primary airport considered for expansion was the T.B. Lettsome International Airport at  Beef Island as the Virgin Gorda airport was severely limited by terrain obstacles in the vicinity of  the airport. According to LBG, shifting the airport in Virgin Gorda would require construction  over aquatic ecosystems such as living coral and this presented insurmountable environmental  issues. LBG stated that the construction of an entirely new runway on Anegada was not  considered significantly more costly than development on Beef Island; however the related  infrastructure such as terminal building, parking ramp, taxiways etc., would substantially  increase the cost of such a development in comparison to options for expansion of the T.B.  Lettsome Airport. In addition, for the following reason, TBLIA remains the most viable and  logical option.  In June 2011 the Louis Berger Group concluded and delivered its Final Report to the BVI  Airports Authority. LBG recommended an upgrade of the current facilities at TBLIA along with 5  runway extension options. The LBG recommended, Option 4, as the favorable option. Option 4  consists of a dual runway system consisting of the current runway 070/25 degrees and a new  runway 6,069.5 ft in length oriented along a 048/228 degree heading, to accommodate regional  jets and large aircraft, such as the Boeing 737‐700, flying directly to and from the Eastern  seaboard of the US mainland. The main advantage of Option 4 is the ability to have a straight in  approach to runway 048/228 degrees.   The Strategic Plan was completed in 2011 and concluded that the existing site of TBLIA would  be the best candidate to implement improvements necessary to accommodate non‐stop flights  to North America.  The Master Plan proposed to upgrade the Airport to be able to  accommodate larger aircraft, such as the Boeing B737‐800, which is used by many airlines.  This  would require a significant runway extension, as well as widening to 150 feet.  Additional      5   


improvements for consideration are a full‐length parallel taxiway, as well as potential terminal  and ramp expansions.  Airport Development Committee  Following the receipt of the Louis Berger Report, the Board of Directors appointed a  Development Committee consisting of the BVIAA’s Operations Team and one board member,  to review and evaluate the master plan submitted by the LBG. The Committee’s purpose was to  evaluate Option 4 and offer recommendations where necessary. The Committee reviewed the  plan submitted by LBG and found that it contained important information that needed further  evaluation and clarification. These areas included; implementation of modern NAVIADS, risks  associated with operating a dual runway system, non‐instrument verses instrument runway,  runway re‐orientation and runway productivity.   After the committee’s evaluation of LBG plan, the committee recommended an alternative  option now referred to as Option 6. Option 6 is a non‐instrument runway extended to a total  distance of 7,000ft along the current orientation. The Committee evaluated Option 6 as  meeting the operational needs of the design aircraft along with the option to use aircraft up to  code 4D; these include aircraft such as the Boeing 737, Airbus 320 and the Boeing 757.   Impact Assessment  It is a statutory requirement that part of this process includes the submission of an Impact  Assessment. The Impact Assessment project was tendered and 3 bids were received from  reputable organizations.   In November of 2011 the BVIAA formally contracted Kraus‐Manning Inc, a local BVI project  management company to conduct an Impact Assessment of the two options; 4 and 6.   The Terms of Reference (ToR) for the Impact Assessment provide for an assessment of;   •

The Physical Impact, including the oceanographic parameters and beach dynamics for  the project footprint and immediate adjacent areas  

A Biological Environmental Assessment, using standard field techniques to permit a  clear description of the potentially affected areas with special emphasis on the project  footprint and immediate adjacent vicinity and       6 


The Human Environmental Impact each of the 2 proposals may have.  

Since the Strategic Plan and Master Plan, the preferred alternatives (4 and 6) have been  enhanced to reflect an ultimate desired runway length of 7,000 feet.  This length is intended to  provide full service range to B737‐800 aircraft and similar models built by Airbus.  In addition,  minor taxiway alignment and land reclamation changes have been made to optimize the plans  and ensure they comply with the latest Overseas Territories Aviation Regulations (OTAR) and  International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards.  Options 4 and 6 are illustrated overleaf. 

  7   


Option 4 

  Option 6 

    8   


In this section we describe the airfield design criteria that apply to all airports under the control  of the BVIAA and that would be required to provide non‐stop commercial air service to North  America.  Aerodrome Reference Code  As determined in the 2011 Strategic Plan and Master Plan, the proposed design aircraft is the  B737‐800, which corresponds to an Aerodrome Reference Code (ARC) of 4C.  The ARC is a  coding system developed by ICAO to relate airport design criteria to the operational and  physical characteristics of the critical aircraft that operates at a particular airport.  The first  component, the number 4, relates to the critical aircraft’s required field length, and the second  component, the letter C, relates to its wingspan.    Exhibit 10 in the appended report by Ricondo & Associates Inc. provides plan and profile views  of the current design aircraft, the ATR‐72, as well as the proposed design aircraft, the B737‐800.   The B737‐700 is also shown, as several airlines expressed interest in operating this aircraft  to/from the BVI.  Both B737 aircraft models are assumed to be enhanced with winglets.  Example: 

    9   


Runway ‐ Instrument & Non‐Instrument  A non‐instrument (or visual) runway can only accommodate landings during visual  meteorological conditions.  Although the weather conditions in the BVI are typically good, there  may be a need for visual, vertical or lateral guidance during the approach phase of a flight.  This  guidance can be provided in the form of an instrument approach procedure.  An instrument  approach may be precision or non‐precision.    A precision approach provides vertical, lateral and range guidance, allowing for landings in  lower weather conditions; however, this requires the approach path to be clear of obstacles.   Numerous terrain obstacles are present in the approach path to Runway 07, preventing  implementation of a precision approach for the existing runway.  However, due to the low  occurrence of weather conditions requiring precision instrument approaches, a non‐precision  instrument approach is considered sufficient during poor weather conditions, and would  increase safety during any weather conditions.  It would provide lateral and visual guidance.  Coordination with US airlines revealed that area navigation (RNAV) procedures, a type of non‐ precision instrument approach, would be acceptable for commercial passenger aircraft similar  to the B737‐800.  Runway Length  Although the proposed design aircraft could take off from the existing runway and reach North  America, it would have to do so with significant passenger payload penalties.  There is a direct  relationship between the number of passengers onboard an aircraft and how much fuel an  aircraft can carry:  the more passengers, the less fuel, resulting in a shorter range.  For instance,  British Airways operates an all‐business class round‐trip flight between New York’s JFK Airport  and London City Airport (LCY), which represents a route approximately 3,472 nautical miles  long, on an Airbus A318.  In order to achieve this flight range, the aircraft is configured to  accommodate no more than 32 passengers, compared to the standard 132; the low number of  passengers translates into additional payload capacity, such as enough fuel for a transatlantic  flight.  Also noteworthy is the fact that the runway length at LCY (4,948 feet) restricts the  maximum take‐off weight of the aircraft, and as a result, limits the amount of fuel that can be  carried; as such, the westbound flight from LCY to JFK has to make a fuel stop in Shannon,  Ireland (SNN).  The longest runway at SNN, which is 10,500 feet, allows the A318 to carry 

  10   


enough fuel for the remaining 2,678 nautical miles flight to JFK.  For the eastbound flight, JFK’s  runway lengths can accommodate the A318 with enough fuel for the non‐stop flight to LCY.  A runway length analysis will determine the required runway length at the Airport in order to  operate profitable flights to North America, in commercial aircraft with mixed passenger  seating, as the ones that are anticipated to/from the BVI.  Runway length, as specified in OTAR Part 139,1 is a function of the longest runway length  required:  •

based on the length of haul or takeoff weight; 

as determined by the performance characteristics of the design aircraft, and; 

corrected for local conditions such as the airport’s normal maximum operating  temperature, elevation, humidity, runway gradient, and runway surface.   

Aircraft operating characteristics of the design aircraft, the B737‐800 according to the Strategic  Plan and Master Plan, were evaluated to determine the length requirements of the proposed  runway.  Operating characteristics of the B737‐700 were evaluated as well, as several airlines  expressed interest in operating this aircraft to/from the BVI.        Range and Payload Analysis  Existing Runway Length  Aircraft operating capabilities were evaluated to determine maximum payload at various  ranges, based on the existing runway length of 4,645 feet . The table below summarizes the  results, which indicate that should the existing runway length be maintained, the B737‐800 may  operate at no higher than a 55 percent load factor, and the B737‐700 no higher than an 85  percent load factor.   

                                                                11   


Anticipated Load Factors with the Existing Runway Length

AIRCRAF T TYPE B737-700

B737-800

DESTINATION

RANGE (NM)

OPERATIONAL TAKE-OFF WEIGHT (LBS) 1/

MAX. SEATS AVAILABLE 2/

NUMBER OF PASSENGERS THAT CAN BE CARRIED 3/

RESULTING MAXIMUM LOAD FACTOR

Miami

980

123,000

128

109

85%

Atlanta

1,402

123,000

128

91

71%

Newark

1,421

123,000

128

86

67%

Miami

980

128,000

162

90

55%

Atlanta

1,402

128,000

162

67

41%

Newark

1,421

128,000

162

65

40%

Notes:  1/ The operational takeoff weights are based on an available runway length of 4,645 feet, and assume  standard day conditions + 15 degrees Celsius (= 30 degrees celsius) at an airport elevation of 0 feet.  2/ The seating configurations are representative of a standard configuration containing first class and  economy seating.  3/ The number of passengers was determined based on an average passenger weight of 220 lbs.  (including luggage) and the available payload based on the specific range.  NM = nautical miles, LBS = pounds  Sources: Boeing Airplane Characteristics Planning Manuals; Ricondo & Associates, Inc., April 2012. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., April 2012.

Optimal Runway Length  The table below summarizes the runway lengths required to operate an aircraft with a 100  percent load factor to various North American markets.  Results show that a B737‐700 aircraft  would need a runway length of approximately 6,400 feet to operate to various markets along  the US East Coast at full load factor.  However, the design aircraft determined in the Strategic  Plan and Master Plan, the B737‐800, would require a runway length of approximately 7,330  feet to operate to the same markets.   

  12   


Required Runway Lengths at Full Load Factor

AIRCRAFT TYPE B737-700

B737-800

REQUIRED RUNWAY LENGTH (FEET)

DESTINATION

RANGE (NM)

OPERATIONAL TAKEOFF WEIGHT (LBS) 1/

NUMBER OF SEATS AVAILABLE / PASSENGERS CARRIED 2/

5,352

Miami

980

127,000

128

6,399

Atlanta

1,402

134,000

128

6,399

Newark

1,421

134,000

128

6,399

Miami

980

146,000

162

7,330

Atlanta

1,402

153,000

162

7,330

Newark

1,421

153,000

162

Notes: 1/ The required runway length requirement was based on a daily maximum average hot  temperature of 33 degrees Celsius at an airport elevation of 15 feet.  2/ The seating configurations are representative of a standard configuration containing first  class and economy seating.  NM = nautical miles, LBS = pounds  Source: Boeing Airplane Characteristics Planning Manuals; Ricondo & Associates, Inc., April 2012. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., April 2012.

  Neighboring Airports Runway Length Comparison  For comparison purposes, the table below compiles a list of neighboring Caribbean airports and  whether they provide non‐stop commercial air service to North America, and if so, to what  market, along with the length of their (longest) runway.  Terrance B. Lettsome International  Airport is also listed as a benchmark.  Airports are listed from longest to shortest runway  length.    Results show that no neighboring airport to the BVI currently provides non‐stop commercial air  service to North America with a runway length comparable to Terrance B. Lettsome  International Airport’s existing runway.      13   


Neighboring Caribbean Airports with Commercial Air Service to North America

AIRPORT NAME

LOCATION

RUNWAY LENGTH (FEET)

NON-STOP MARKETS SERVED IN NORTH AMERICA

Henry E Rohlsen Airport

St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

10,004

Numerous

Luiz Munoz Marin International Airport

San Juan, Puerto Rico

10,002

Numerous

V. C. Bird International Airport

St. John's, Antigua

8,980

JFK, EWR, MIA, CLT, ATL

Robert L. Bradshaw International Airport

Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis

8,002

JFK, MIA, ATL, CLT

Princess Juliana International Airport

St. Marteen, Netherlands Antilles

7,546

ATL, CLT, ORD, FLL, MIA, JFK, EWR, PHL, IAD

Cyril E King Airport

St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands

7,000

ATL, MIA, JFK, EWR, LGA, FLL, ORD, IAD, CLT, PHL

Mercedita Airport

Ponce, Puerto Rico

6,907

JFK, MCO

Clayton J Lloyd International Airport

The Valley, Anguilla

5,462

None

Eugenio Maria de Hostos Airport

Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

4,998

None

Terrance B. Lettsome International Airport

Beef Island, BVI

4,645

None

Antonio Rivera Rodríguez Airport

Vieques, Puerto Rico

4,301

None

F.D Roosevelt Airport

Sint Eustatius, Caribbean Netherlands

4,265

None

Vance W. Amory International Airport

St. Kitts and Nevis

4,026

None

Sources: Various airport and tourism bureau websites; Ricondo & Associates, Inc., April 2012. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., April 2012.

Conclusion As shown by the Range/Payload Analysis and suggested by the Neighboring Airports  Comparison, the existing runway length is insufficient to support profitable non‐stop air carrier  operations to North America.    A runway length of 7,330 feet would allow the design aircraft to take‐off at the Airport’s  maximum average temperature of 33 degrees Celsius, with enough fuel to reach North America  and a 100 percent load factor.  As such, the BVIAA determined that a runway extension to a  total runway length of 7,000 feet (2,134 meters) should accommodate most aircraft operations  to North America in the design aircraft (B737‐800). 

  14   


2.2 Project Location

     Terrance B Lettsome International Airport.  The Terrance B Lettsome International Airport is located on Beef Island, which is separated  from the mainland, Tortola, by the Beef Island Channel. Both islands are connected by the  Queen Elizabeth Bridge, which spans the narrow channel.   Beef Island is sparsely populated. To  the west is a small residential community in Little Mountain, and villas in Well Bay.  Trellis Bay,  a charter boat and business hub, is in the center of the island.  To the northern side of Beef  Island are three bays : Long Bay, Conch Bay, and Trellis Bay.   Long Bay is a long crescent‐shaped  bay approximately ¾ of a mile long, and is used primarily by local residents for recreational  activities. Conch Bay is just over ½ a mile long and is located between Long Bay and Trellis Bay.   Trellis Bay, a popular hub for charter boats, is a crescent‐shaped stretching from Sprat point to  the east to current runway location.  TBLIA runway is positioned 16 feet above sea level, aligned in a northeast‐southwest  orientation.  The airport buildings and facilities are located to the south of the runway. The  Airport is approximately 10 miles driving distance east of Road Town.      15   


Then named Beef Island Airport was built in 1956 by the operator of a boat ramp, in adjacent  Trellis Bay.  The original landing strip was approximately 1,800 feet long and 100 feet wide.   Royal Engineers of the British Army extended the runway in 1960 and added the first airport  traffic controllers.  Similar expansions occurred in 1964 and 1968 to accommodate the evolving  aircraft fleet.  The most recent airport development commenced in 2000 not only to expand the  runway but also rebuild the terminal, to further accommodate advancements in aircraft  technology and performance.  During this latest expansion, the runway was extended to its  current length of 4,645 feet and a new airport traffic control tower was constructed.  The  Airport was also renamed Terrance B. Lettsome International Airport in 2002.   In 2004, the Airport became the first of the Overseas Territories in the Caribbean to be  certificated for the purpose of public transport (passengers or cargo) and instruction in flying.   The OTAR became the regulating standards.  The BVIAA was formed the following year as a  separate entity to oversee the efficient and effective operations of all airports in the BVI.   The Airport property encompasses an area approximately 55 hectares, and is enclosed by a  perimeter fence.  The Airport has one runway and a partial parallel taxiway.  The Airport  reference temperature is 30º Celsius.   A new passenger terminal was completed in 2004 that enhanced how the BVIAA handles  international air travelers.  As part of this development, parking areas, access roads and  administrative facilities were also added. The Airport is certified to provide Rescue and Fire  Fighting Services (RFFS) category 5, which corresponds to aircraft up to 28 meters long and with  a fuselage width up to 4 meters, such as the largest aircraft currently operating schedule  commercial service at the Airport, the ATR‐72.10   A Non‐Directional Beacon on the Airport property provides air navigation throughout the area.                16   


The BVIAA is a limited liability company that owns and operates various helipads throughout  the islands and three airports, which are depicted on the map below:   1.

Terrance B.  Lettsome  International  Airport  on  Beef  Island,  which  is  connected to Tortola. 

2.

Virgin Gorda Airport on the island of Virgin Gorda. 

3.

Auguste George Airport on the island of Anegada. 

  17   


2.3 Project Description & Associated Activities Since completion of the Master Plan, its preferred options 4 and 6 have been enhanced to  reflect an ultimate desired runway length of 7,000 feet (approximately 2,134 meters).  This  length is intended to provide full‐service range to Boeing 737‐800 aircraft and similar models  built by Airbus.  In addition, minor taxiway alignment and land reclamation changes have been  made to optimize the plans and ensure they comply with OTAR/ICAO.  These enhanced  alternatives are referred to hereafter as Options 4 and 6, respectively. A description and  preliminary evaluation of these options is provided in this section.   Option 4   Option 4 is based on Master Plan Alternative A.  It proposes the construction of a 7,000‐foot  (2,134‐meter) long and 150‐foot (45 meters) wide runway with a 06‐24 alignment (magnetic  bearing).  No displaced threshold is anticipated to be required on the west end, and a 197‐foot  (60‐meter) displaced threshold is recommended on the east end, for boat masts clearance.   Because of the proximity of the proposed Runway 06 end and the existing Runway 07 end, the  existing runway would be decommissioned to avoid creating an unsafe environment.  This runway alignment would eliminate the Salt Pond north of the existing Airport property.   The proposed runway would impact both Well Bay and Conch Bay.  Required bay fill would  penetrate Well Bay by approximately 1,148 feet (350 meters) on the west end, and Conch Bay  by approximately 3,773 feet (1,150 meters) on the east end.   The existing access road  would  be realigned around the west runway end.  In an effort to minimize bay fill, this option would  not include a full‐length parallel taxiway.  However, substantial space would become available  for potential terminal development.  The alignment of Option 4 would also alleviate terrain  obstructions in the approach and departure paths, and may allow for the installation of an  Instrument Landing System, providing the Airport with precision instrument approach  capability. This Assessment deals with impacts associated with expanding the airport runway as  defined in the terms of reference. Other phases for the expansion (not part of this assessment)  have been elaborated upon in the LB report.  Option 4 ‐ Construction Phasing  In order to implement the Option 4 improvements with minimal disruptions to airport  operations, a phasing plan is proposed in Exhibit 16 of the Ricondo & Associates appended      18   


report.  Night time construction is recommended for all four phases to avoid daytime impacts  to operations both in terms or airspace limitations and runway length restrictions.  Phase 1  Phase 1 consists of filling Conch Bay and Well Bay.  The bay fill area will accommodate the  proposed realigned runway and its safety surfaces, as well as a partial taxiway on the north end  and the realigned Blackburn Highway on the south end.  No impacts on airport operations are  anticipated during daytime hours.  Phase 2  Phase 2 consists of the following:  •

Construct the northeast portion of the new runway; this will become temporary  Runway 06‐24.  • Construct the taxiway connecting to the Runway 24 end  • Construct a temporary taxiway to access the temporary Runway 06 end  • Realign Blackburn Highway and demolish existing alignment.  No impacts to airport operations are anticipated to the existing runway or to operations.  Phase 3  Phase 3 consists of the following:  • • • •

Relocate operations  from  existing  Runway  07‐25  to  temporary  Runway  06‐24,  built in Phase 2.  This temporary runway is 4,210 feet (1,283 meters) long.  Demolish the west end of Runway 07‐25.  Construct the southwest portion of future Runway 06‐24.  Construct the taxiway extension to the southwest. 

Although the  airport  is  planned  to  be  open  during  daytime  hours,  operation  may  incur  some  payload restrictions as a result of using only a portion of the new runway which will be shorter  that the existing.  Phase 4  Phase 4 consists of the following:  •

Demolish center  portion  of  Runway  07‐25  and  temporary  Runway  06  end  taxiway built in Phase 1.      19 


No impacts are anticipated to the temporary runway as construction is recommended to be  completed at night.  However, operations would still be conducted on the temporary runway,  which is 4,210 feet (1,283 meters) long.  Similar to Phase 3, this may result in payload  restrictions for some aircraft operations.  Option 6 – Construction Phasing     Option 6 is based on Master Plan Alternative F and it depicted in Exhibit 17 of the Ricondo &  Associates appended report.  It proposes to extend both ends of the existing runway to a total  length of 7,000 feet (2,134 meters).  The west runway end would be extended approximately  508 feet (155 meters) and the east end approximately 1,847 feet (563 meters).  The existing  displaced threshold on the west end is anticipated to remain in place for terrain obstruction  clearance, increasing the displacement to 1,001 feet (305 meters), and an 197‐foot (60‐meter)  displaced threshold is recommended on the east end, for boat masts clearance.  The runway  width would be increased to 150 feet (45 meters) to comply with both OTAR and FAA standards  for B737 aircraft.  The proposed runway would impact both Well Bay and Trellis Bay.  Required bay fill would  penetrate Well Bay by approximately 984 feet (300 meters) on the west end and the 1,969 feet  (600‐meter) of bay fill on the east end would significantly restrict boat access to Trellis Bay.  The  existing roadway access would be realigned around the west runway end.  In an effort to  minimize bay fill, this option would not include a full‐length parallel taxiway.   This Assessment deals with impacts associated with expanding the airport runway as defined in  the terms of reference. Other phases for the expansion (not part of this assessment) have been  elaborated upon in the LB report.  In order to implement the Option 4 improvements with minimal disruptions to airport  operations, a phasing plan is proposed in Exhibit 19 of the Ricondo & Associates appended  report. Nighttime construction is recommended for all five phases to avoid runway length  restrictions during daytime operations.    Phase 1  Phase 1 consists of filling Trellis Bay and Well Bay.  The bay fill area will accommodate the  proposed runway extension and its safety surfaces, as well as a partial taxiway and the  realigned Blackburn Highway on the west end.  No impacts are anticipated to the existing  runway or to operations.      20   


Phase 2  Phase 2 consists of the following:  •

Construct the eastern portion of the proposed runway. 

Realign Blackburn Highway and demolish existing alignment 

No impacts are anticipated to the existing runway or to operations.  Phase 3  Phase 3 consists of the following:  •

Relocate Runway 07 and 25 thresholds to obtain temporary Runway 07‐25. 

Construct the  tie‐in  with  the  eastern  portion  of  future  Runway  07‐25  built  in  Phase 2. 

Construct the eastern portion of the parallel taxiway extension. 

Construct the temporary runway entrance taxiway. 

No impacts  are  anticipated  to  the  existing  runway  or  to  operations,  as  construction  is  recommended to be completed at night.  However, the temporary runway is 4,120 feet (1,283  meters) long, which may result in payload restrictions for some aircraft operations.  Also, the  relocation  of  the  Runway  07  threshold  would  require  instrument  approach  procedures  modifications.  Phase 4  Phase 4 consists of the following:  •

Commission the Runway 25 extension 

Relocate the Runway 07 and 25 thresholds.  The resulting runway length is 5,462  feet (1,665 meters). 

Construct the  western  portion  of  the  runway  extension  and  widen  western  portion of existing runway. 

Construct western portion of taxiway extension. 

Demolish existing western taxiway connectors. 

No impacts  are  anticipated  to  the  temporary  runway  as  construction  is  recommended  to  be  completed at night.  However, operations would still be conducted on the temporary runway,  which is 4,120 feet (1,283 meters) long.  This may result in payload restrictions for some aircraft      21   


operations.   Also,  the  relocation  of  the  thresholds  would  require  instrument  approach  procedures modifications.  Phase 5  Phase 5 consists of the following:  •

Widen center portion of Runway 07‐25. 

Relocate Runway 07 threshold. 

Demolish temporary runway entrance taxiway. 

No impacts are anticipated to the runway or operations as construction is recommended to be  completed  at  night.    The  relocation  of  the  thresholds  would  require  instrument  approach  procedures modifications.  It should be noted that under water high voltage electrical cables run in close proximity to the  runway expansion project. These cables will need to be relocated prior to the commencement  of  construction  activities.  The  construction  phasing  plans  do  not  take  this  aspect  in  to  consideration.                              22   


Preliminary Evaluation of Options  The table below lists the characteristics of Options 4 and 6, along with specific impacts.   Preferred Options Characteristics CHARACTERISTICS Runway Length

OPTION 4 Rwy 06 & Rwy 24: 7,000 ft/2,134 m

Rwy 07 & Rwy 25: 7,000 ft/2,134 m

LDA

Rwy 06: 7,000 ft/2,134m; Rwy 24: 6,803 ft/2,074 m

Rwy 07: 5,999 ft/1,829 m; Rwy 25: 6,803 ft/2,074 m

Accommodates Critical Aircraft

Yes

Yes

Terrain Obstructions

Tortola and Scrub Island (minor)

Tortola and Scrub Island (significant)

Existing Navigational Aids Impacts

No impacts to NDB

No impacts to NDB

Additional Navigational Aids

LOC/Glide Path

None

Runway-Taxiway Separation

551 ft/168 m (instrument runway)

315 ft/96 m (visual operations)

Taxiway Width

49 ft/15 m wide (82 ft/25 m with shoulders)

49 ft/15 m wide (82 ft/25 m with shoulders)

Displaced Threshold

Rwy 24: masts

Rwy 07: terrain; Rwy 25: masts

Runway End Access

No taxiway to Rwy 06 end

No taxiway to Rwy 25 end

Implementation Schedule

TBD

TBD

Operational Restrictions

None

No use of parallel taxiway during instrument operations

Salt Pond Impacts

Remove pond

None

Bay Fill

82.8 acres/33.5 ha total

37.6 acres/15.2 ha total

Conch Bay

65.5 acres/26.5 ha of bay fill

None

Trellis Bay

None

22.2 acres/9 ha of bay fill

17.3 acres/7.0 ha of bay fill

15.2 acres/6.2 ha of bay fill

Bay Impacts

None

Limited Trellis Bay boat access

Existing Airport Facilities Impacts

None

Facilities inside runway strip

Apron/Terminal Expansion

Good

None

AOA Expansion Needs

103.8 acres/42 ha (Wells Bay, Conch Bay and Salt Pond)

36.3 acres/14.7 ha (Wells Bay and Trellis Bay)

Non-Aeronautical Facilities

Waterfront Dr. realignment

Waterfront Dr. realignment

Well Bay

NOTES: FT = FEET, M = METERS, HA = HECTARES Source: BVIAA, December 2011; Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2012. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2012.

  23   

OPTION 6

ASDA


2.4 Alternatives In order to remain regionally and globally competitive, it is believed that the Territory has the  following three choices, as outlined in the LBG 2011 report, “Strategic Plan & Master Planning  for the British Virgin Islands:”  • •

Continue the high‐end low density tourism strategy with low to moderate long‐term  growth rates.  Switch to a medium income higher density tourism development strategy similar to  that of St. Thomas and St. Maarten with much higher growth rates and potential  negative impact on the environment and certain market segments.  Utilize a mixed approach that would include higher density development among some  of islands or limit it to one island such as Anegada. 

The LBG reports of 2006 and 2011 analysed in detail the various sites for development and an  extensive variety of alignment options. Options 4 and 6 form the basis of this assessment. This  does not mean that options 4 or 6 will be the final design selected by BVIAA for development.   The socio‐economic impact study appended to the report focuses on the potential impact of  the proposed project on the human environment, including the benefits of alternatives to the  proposed project.  The alternatives to the proposed project are the “without project” scenario  and “alternative project” scenarios which are summarized as follows.                        24   


No Project Scenario  The table below illustrates the potential negative impact of keeping the existing runway.  Negative Impact of Keeping the Existing Runway  Area  Runway 

Issue Maintenance Costs 

Private Jets 

Insufficient parking space for  private jets  Too short a runway 

Pilots

Impending global shortage of  pilots resulting from retiring baby  boomers  Too many long passenger lines at  every turn during the high season  Too few high quality, customer‐ focused concessions   Lack of convenient access to the  BVI   No local jets for charter 

Terminal

Visitors Medical  Emergencies 

Cargo

Taxis Spin‐off  Opportunities for  thriving retail  activity  Regional  Competition  Dependence on  St. Thomas,  Puerto Rico, St.  Marteen and  Antigua 

Dissatisfied customers    Loss revenue, less than optimum customer experience 

Decline in the number of visitors resulting in  unemployment, shorter work week, crime, etc.  Medivac flights to Puerto Rico, Santo Domingo, Miami,  etc., are provided by jets from other destinations, a form  of cabotage that results in loss revenue for the airport  and local carriers.  Lack of increased capacity to  Lost opportunity to create a fast and efficient cargo  transport cargo fast and efficiently  service, resulting in loss revenue and shorter shelf life for  perishable goods  Declining visitor trend  Decreased occupational income stream  Provisioning of flights, hotel  Lost opportunity to make forays into other business  representatives meeting guests,  ventures.   souvenir shops, transportation,  etc.  Competitive disadvantage  Caribbean destinations with direct flights from the US  mainland and elsewhere will surpass the BVI  Becoming more self‐reliant  Without greater control of air services, the Territory  remains vulnerable 

    25   

Impact Investing in maintaining a non‐competitive aviation  strategy  Reduced megayacht activity, loss of revenue and  potential investors  Private charter jets such as Net Jets would not be able to  come to TBLIA under wet weather conditions.  Larger airlines will raid the pilots of smaller airlines  leaving the BVI vulnerable 


Positive Impact of Keeping the Existing Runway  Area  Strategic Investments 

Visitors

Connectivity

Stress on the Capitol 

Housing Market 

Issue Setting Priorities.  Monies  earmarked for the extended  runway could be used to invest  in other critical and urgent  product development areas that  lag behind the current airport  infrastructure in their capacity to  deliver services and improve the  quality of life, namely,  completing the hospital project;  improving water, sewage and  electricity capacity; cleaning up  Tortola, (waste, litter, derelict  vehicles, etc.) restoring the bays  to a healthy state, etc.  The type of visitors that are  attracted  to this high end  destination will continue to  come  The expected net gain in  connectivity from direct flights  from the U.S. mainland could be  offset by the distance visitors  have to travel or connections  they have to make to get to the  three targeted US gateways:  Miami, Atlanta and New York.   Already limited carrying capacity  in other social sectors, especially  in Road Town, namely, health,  education, employment,  housing, and traffic, to name a  few.  BVIslanders compete with  vacation home owners for rental  tenants  

    26   

Impact Enhanced tourism product 

The repeat visitors and others  will continue to visit because of  the unique characteristics of the  BVI that they have come to  enjoy.  Off‐setting connection gains 

By reallocating funds to  improving the existing social  infrastructure, it will keep pace  with the existing airport  infrastructure  The current steady state in the  number of visitors – and  potential investors – would allow  BVIslanders to capitalize on the  rental market.  


Alternate Projects 

An alternative, frequently voiced during public consultation would be to extend the airport  runway in incremental stages and improve the ferry service.  It is suggested by some that expansion be considered in incremental stages of 500 feet with  associated cost points to determine the cost‐benefit of regional jets from the US mainland, in  the first instance, followed at a later stage by larger B‐737‐700 jets.  Incremental Expansion  Area  Runway Length       

Issue Cost‐Benefit   7,000 feet   6,500 feet  6,000 feet 

Impact   Severely impacts Trellis Bay  Moderately impacts Trellis Bay  Less impact on Trellis Bay 

As a corollary to incremental expansion, the interim use of regional jets is an option. Eventually  a national airline could be considered to reduce the Territory’s dependence on US carriers, as  shown in the following table.  Use of Regional Jets and National Airline  Area  Regional Jets  National Airline 

Issue Direct flights to the U.S.  mainland  Direct flights to the U.S.  mainland, as well as within  the Caribbean region 

Impact This service will allow the BVI Government time to test the  market.  This service will allow the BVI Government time to test the  market, while reducing its dependence on U.S. carriers.  

Improve Ferry and Associated Services  Because most visitors to the Territory arrive by ferry, instead of extending the airport runway,  consideration could be given to improving the ferry terminals at West End and Road Town.  Upon their arrival in St. Thomas, BVI‐bound visitors (and residents) are then transported by taxi  to the St. Thomas ferry terminal and from there by ferry to the BVI.    The table  below illustrates the potential impact of an improved ferry and associated services to  the BVI as an alternative to the development of TBLIA.      27   


Improving the Ferry and Associated Services  Area  Issue  Schedules  Ferry schedules are not  compatible with airline  schedules 

Impact Stranded passengers for whom St.  Thomas could become a destination  of choice 

Quality of  Ferries are not well‐kept.  Service  Gas fumes permeate the  ferry cabins; luggage and  goods are taken off the  ferries before passengers  disembark 

Frustrated visitors and residents 

St. Thomas  Airport 

Passengers arrive in St.  Stranded visitors  Thomas often times not  knowing how or what to do  next 

St. John  

Immigration and customs  clearance 

BVI Ferry  Terminals   

Create an immigration and  customs bottle neck   

Frustrating experience. Red Hook  restaurants have had some success  in deterring BVI‐bound yachtsmen  from sailing to Jost Van Dyke and  other BVI destinations because of  the inconvenient US customs and  immigration clearance system   Frustrated visitors and residents   

  28   

Mitigating Measures  Govt. could require ferries to  have online & printed schedules  that are compatible with the  airlines schedule  Govt. could subsidize the  purchase and operation of a  high speed ferry service,  perhaps with a business class  that goes to Virgin Gorda as  well.  The feasibility of pre‐ clearance should also be  explored.  The BVI Govt. could have  leverage in negotiating the  setting up of a customer service  desk at the St. Thomas airport,  since the BVI contributes  significantly to the loads coming  into St. Thomas. The individual  staffing the desk, could  welcome guests and ensure  that they are dispatched to by  taxi to their respective ferries in  an effective, orderly and  seamless manner, as well as  notify the ferries and the hotels  that their guests have arrived  and are on their way to the BVI.  Talks could commence between  the BVI Govt. and the USVI  Govt. about utilizing the Red  Hook ferry terminal for  immigration and customs  clearance as opposed to St.  John.     Plans to improve the ferry  terminals are in progress   


3. Approach & Methodology 3.1 General Approach This environmental  report  summarizes  the  physical  and  biological  conditions  encountered  during numerous site visits to the airport vicinity during the winter and spring months of 2011  and 2012. In addition, efforts were made to assemble all historical data that may be relevant to  the runway extension plans described in this assessment. A historical review was conducted to  document and evaluate previous anthropogenic impacts at the site. Details of human use and  history  of  the  island  are  contained  in  the  Archaeological  /  Historical  Assessment  in  the  Appendix. Much of the information presented here is descriptive in nature.   This is a characterization of the natural and modified terrestrial and marine habitats. A specific  terrestrial assessment was conducted by consultants from Island Resources Foundation and  that report is included in the Appendix. A Water Quality Assessment was conducted during the  survey period. A separate report is included in the Appendix. The marine survey data are  summarized in this report and species lists are presented as a separate appendix. Special effort  was made to identify habitats or organisms that may be adversely affected by the proposed  runway extension plans. Wherever possible, suggestions or recommendations are offered to  mitigate potential negative impacts.   Since the runway extension plans may impact oceanographic processes, such as currents and  sediment transport, detailed engineering studies and computer modeling were employed to  assess the potential risks. These studies are summarized in the IA with detailed reports included  in the Appendix.  The primary purpose of this environmental study is to evaluate the existing ecosystems and to  ensure that the extension plans produce minimal impacts in the immediate airport vicinity and  surrounding environments. Toward that goal, the following general topics were considered:  • • • • •

The environmental setting and relevant issues  The physical, abiotic environment  Terrestrial habitats  Marine habitats  Special environmental concerns  o Species of economic concern  o Rare and endangered species  o Invasive species      29 


o Insect pests and vectors of diseases  o Sewage and water quality issues  Archaeological and cultural resources   

Methodology The historical review was conducted by consulting governmental, non‐governmental and  private sources for documents and other information related to this site. Sources included the  Town & Country Planning Department, Conservation & Fisheries Department, National Parks  Trust, and numerous private individuals. Several photographs were discovered showing the  airport in various stages of development beginning with pre‐development agricultural uses. A  few reports and studies on the airport and surrounding areas provided useful historical data  and perspectives.   The consultant responsible for the Archaeological/historical assessment conducted a similar  assessment for the Beef Island development proposals. Thus, he gathered a substantial  quantity of historical data for Beef Island. Much is relevant to the airport vicinity. Pertinent  information is summarized in that report (see appendix).  An analysis of potential impacts on the oceanographic conditions required data sets on  currents, waves and sediment characteristics. Toward that goal, several hi‐tech instruments  were deployed in the field. The instruments included a wave profiler and current meter. These  gathered data on currents and wave patterns in a variety of locations. A series of sediment  samples were collected at Trellis Bay, Long Bay, Well Bay, and other locations in the airport  vicinity. Samples were one litre and collected by hand. They were shipped to a laboratory in the  US for analysis. Those data were then used as the basis for modeling sediment transport in the  area.   As a part of the socio‐economic assessment, interviews were conducted with individuals  possessing first‐hand knowledge and experience related to historical events at Beef Island. Such  oral recollections proved useful in understanding current conditions and attitudes regarding the  development at the airport. Numerous meetings and focus groups gathered responses from  individuals who may be affected by the current proposals for the runway extension. These  included special interest groups, owners of nearby businesses, and anyone directly or indirectly  impacts by the proposal. Naturally, a project of this magnitude will have far reaching impacts,  and it can be argued that everyone in the Territory will be affected. Thus, given a limited time      30   


frame for the assessment, it was necessary to prioritize the amount of impact any individual  may experience. In the interest of transparency and to give the general public an opportunity to  express their opinions, the Minister responsible for the project scheduled two open meetings  where the project was described and everyone had an opportunity to offer an opinion.   Several environmental assessments, engineering reports, student research projects and  governmental reports have been produced and in the vicinity of the airport. Approximately a  decade ago the previous airport expansion required engineering studies and EIA’s. The  information gathered for that work was most useful in the preparation of the current Impact  Assessment.   In recent years, there have been numerous studies in the area surrounding the airport. The  topics were wide ranging from studies of reef fish distribution by ICLARM to studies of the  yachting and diving industry. Many were studies by graduate students from universities in the  US or UK. Where the studies produced reports with information relevant to the current  assessment, they were included in the analysis of issues affecting this proposal.  An extensive study on the factors affecting fish distribution in the coastal habitats of the British  Virgin Islands was completed by Brian Gratwicke in 2004. The research was in partial fulfillment  of his PhD studies at Oxford University in the UK. The citation for the study is included in the  reference section of the appendix. A portion of the study covering the relationship between fish  distribution and water quality was conducted in Hans Creek. That section of the study is  attached to this Environmental Report. Excerpts of his data and analysis are incorporated into  the habitat descriptions contained in this Environmental Report.   Field visits, surveys, and assessments were conducted during the winter and spring, 2011 and  2012. The terrestrial surveys covered all portions of the airport property and nearby habitats  that may be affected. Species lists of flora and fauna were compiled for major taxa. Underwater  swimming visual surveys utilizing both snorkel and SCUBA were conducted to map and describe  the marine habitats surrounding the project site. While surveys concentrated on the footprint  of the two runway options, additional surveys were conducted further afield in the presumed  indirect impact zones.   Underwater survey techniques were designed to follow accepted protocols for such  assessments. For example, the original intent was to sample the marine habitats in the runway  extension footprint with standard transects. However, frequent strong currents made such      31   


procedures very difficult and hazardous. Thus, survey techniques were modified to point  counts, random quadrat samples and roving fish surveys. Additional survey methods were  adapted to field conditions and the type of information necessary.  Surveys on land and in the sea were primarily qualitative rather than quantitative, although the  underwater transects produced considerable useful data. Photographs of habitats and species  of special interest were taken to provide documentation of existing conditions. They are  included in the appendices.  Field data were reviewed and analyzed to create an assessment of current conditions in the  direct and indirect impact zone. Whenever possible, historical information was combined with  current conditions and findings to improve the final assessment accuracy. The data were then  used to construct a brief narrative describing both terrestrial and marine environments. This  formed the basis for the discussion of additional issues of concern and, ultimately, the  recommendations.  Voucher specimens were collected where possible and practical. Invertebrates were collected  using standard sampling procedures such as blacklight traps, pit falls, sweep nets, and other  appropriate techniques. A few vertebrate specimens were found dead and preserved  accordingly. Specimens were preserved in various preparations of ETOH, to permit future DNA  analysis. All specimens have been or will be deposited in scientific collections or museums for  further study.   A detailed photographic record of species and habitats was made during the surveys. Samples  are included in this report.   Recommendations and suggestions are made to minimize any negative impacts that may be  caused by construction, future operations, or other activities. These are generally made in  appropriate sections of the discussion.   The runway extension development plans have been carefully examined with particular regard  to the location, site characteristics, neighboring land and sea use, and requirements for service.   Socio‐economic conditions were assessed by direct observations, discussions with the business  community, planners, environmental scientist, and literature review.    It was important to observe first‐ hand the activities at Trellis Bay, the airport and surrounding  islands, the purpose of which was to compare the perspectives from an objective vantage point      32   


of others who were either directly involved in the activities or closely aligned with them and  had an emotional attachment thereto.  Observations were carried out as follows:   • • • • • • •

The daily activities at Trellis Bay were observed on numerous occasions.  Several trips were made to Scrub Island  Toured the airside facilities at the airport including VI Airlink’s hangar  Toured within and around Trellis Bay harbor by dinghy  Circumvented Beef Island by sea and Guana Island  Visited Indigo Plantation at Great Camanoe   Visited the Last Resort at Bellamy Cay  

A Scoping Study was submitted to BVIAA and the town & Country Planning Authority for review  on 16th April 2012. Comments from that study have not been received to date. It is the opinion  of the consultant that the terms of reference are unlikely to vary significantly upon receipt of  comments from the TCPA.   

3.2 Assumptions, Uncertainties & Constraints The Airport site presents the following constraints to a runway extension and/or realignment:  Socio Economic   Insufficient information about the proposed runway extension was a primary concern from the  public during this assessment, including interview and focus group participants.    There are limited estimates regarding the number and frequency of flights and the number of  persons to be employed during the construction and operations phases of the project.  A  recurrent question from interview and focus group participants, “what are we giving up, and  what are we getting?”can probably not be fully  answered  until a cost benefit analysis is  completed. A cost benefit analysis will examine whether the BVI society will benefit from  extending the airport runway and also calculates non‐economic benefits that have a value to  people, but do not directly affect the flow of money in the economy.        33   


Environmental There are assumptions related to this Impact Assessment Report. One obvious assumption  deals with predicting negative impacts from certain activities. Any time topography is altered or  natural environments are removed or modified, there can only be predictions of outcomes.  They may be well informed predictions based on previous experience, but they are still  predictions. Thus, there are assumptions regarding the possible outcomes of various activities  associated with this project.  Certainly, assumptions and uncertainties must be considered when environmental conditions  and variables are subjected to assessment by way of computer modeling. It is often impractical,  or impossible, to predict future events. This is particularly true in environments, such as coastal  marine habitats, where there is limited historical information to guide an assessment. Even a  stochastic model that takes account of probability can have a number of possible results from a  given input. While such computer models are frequently criticized for insufficient hard data or  uncertain outcomes, they are often the best that can be achieved unless much more time and  expense are invested in detailed studies. Often, when additional data are acquired, the results  tend to confirm the models. There seems to be a point of diminishing returns where data  collection is concerned.   Therefore, the present study contains a level of uncertainty based on the assumptions that  must be made. It remains the opinion of the consultants that the predictions regarding the  potential impacts are reasonable given the state of knowledge at this time.   There are also assumptions that some proposed mitigation measures will produce the desired  result. There may be issues of degree of success in various efforts. Mitigating loss of mangroves,  sea grass beds, and coral reefs cannot be certain and success is not guaranteed. Very often  success may be partial and improve over longer time periods. Clearly there may be uncertainty  in some proposed measures.  There will also be some level of uncertainty regarding the future water quality in Trellis Bay.  The bay is a complex system with many variables, both natural and anthropogenic, functioning  simultaneously. Some assumptions must be made regarding the proposed mitigation measures  to maintain and improve future water quality. Naturally, the proposals will be constrained by  the realities associated with implementing the recommendations. 

  34   


Any project of this complexity and magnitude must rely on a variety of assumptions. When  dealing with the constraints of fluctuating natural environments and unpredictable socio‐ economic conditions a degree of uncertainty must be expected and accepted. The stochasticity  of the real world will ultimately affect every project regardless of size or level of planning.  Coastal Conditions Study  Full analysis of the information generated by the numeric models could continue for months.   As we incorporate the wave and current data recently gathered in the field, the numerical  models employed for this study will be adjusted to be more accurate and therefore more useful  as predictive tools.  Future modeling efforts may involve additional refinements to the regional circulation model.   It should also include the application of the coupled flow and wave simulations with  coordinated wave states and tidal forcing.  The model results generated as part of this phase of the process predict that any of the  proposed modifications to the airport will produce significant change in the circulation of Trellis  Bay.  The flow trace animations of all of the modified options bear this out in a qualitative  sense.  The quantitative comparison at sample points inside Trellis Bay also bears this out.   Velocity plots for locations inside the bay show significantly decreased velocity of flow inside  Trellis Bay for Options 4 and 6 through the entire tidal cycle giving an indication of reduction in  the circulation of the bay.  These results, while preliminary indicate that maintaining acceptable water quality inside the  bay must be considered as a significant issue as this project moves forward into final option  selection and design.  Extensive study may be required to investigate remediation options and  ensure that environmental impacts to Trellis Bay do not result.  Utility of the bay may also enter  into consideration.  This phase of the project examined circulation in the bay by reviewing flux  across the mouth of the bay and velocities of currents in the bay.  Additional study may  evaluate other water quality measures including average residence time of the water in the bay  and water quality constituent modeling.   As indicated in the preceding sections, based on the initial findings, this phase of the modeling  effort included two additional scenarios related to circulation in Trellis Bay for Option 6.    Specifically, one simulation was generated with a portion of Sprat Point removed and another  with a canal constructed to connect Trellis Bay and Well Bay along the island added.  In addition      35   


to these options, the option of flushing Trellis Bay under the runway using a 492 ft opening  comprised of either a section of piles to support part of the runway, or placing box culverts  under the runway was considered and preliminary costing estimates for these approaches were  made.     The results from the Sprat Point removal and canal additional simulations proved to be  surprising, and therefore warrant further investigation.  The model reported more impact on  the circulation and velocity in many portions of the bay from the canal than from the removal  of Sprat Point.  Since circulation through the canal is driven only by tidal differences across the  island, this was not anticipated and we recommend further evaluation of this finding.  However,  these results also suggests that flushing under the runway, with possibly less than the 492 ft  opening currently presented, by either the pile supported runway or fewer culvert openings  may be an efficient method to provide the needed circulation. 

  36   


4.0 Environmental Policy, legislative And Planning Framework The government of the British Virgin Islands is currently in the process of reviewing all  legislation involving environmental matters. Several years ago, the government formed a Law  Reform Commission. Within that Commission various committees were organized to review  sections of environmental legislation and make recommendations for changes. The purpose  was to discard or modify outdated laws, create new, more appropriate legislation and to  harmonize all environmental laws and enforcement responsibilities across the numerous  agencies currently given those responsibilities. This process shall take some time. Thus, any  decisions made under existing statutes may be subject to review or modification in the future.  Meanwhile The Land Development Control Guidelines, 1972, should be considered a relevant  document to guide aspects of this project. Consideration should also be given to other relevant  existing legislation and best practices regarding any activity that may produce environmental  impacts.   Equally important is the application of standard, industry accepted, Best Management Practices  to guide the planning and implementation of the proposed runway extension. Such BMP’s are  well understood and may be identified and recommended for specific uses. A good example  involves the use of erosion control devices to prevent sediment loss to the sea. There are a  number of available techniques for erosion control. The type of erosion control recommended  will depend on the specific site conditions and the potential risks. Thus, recommendations in an  IA must be somewhat broad and result driven rather than process driven. For that reason,  recommendations are often to apply BMP’s and provide specifics later when more information  becomes available.   

  37   


4.1 Environmental Policy & Legislative Framework There are numerous existing laws that have bearing on a project of this size and scope. These  generally address environmental issues from more than one perspective. For example,  environmental health laws come under the jurisdiction of the Health Department. They may  offer comments on issues such as invasive species, pest control, or waste water and water  quality. These same issues may also be addressed by the Conservation and Fisheries  Department or the Department of Agriculture. Most regulations are more policy than actual  legislation. Presumably one future outcome of the Law Reform Commission review will be to  harmonize policy and clarify responsibilities. Thus, a detailed review of all environmental  legislation may be difficult or impractical at this time. By following accepted industry standard  best practices and the recommendations contained in this report, the runway extension project  should be able to proceed with no serious legislative environmental obstacles.  Since this project is of Territory wide significance, there could be difference of opinion  regarding the degree to which certain laws or regulations may apply. Further, there are legal  proceedings affecting properties adjacent to the airport. Since those proceedings have a  substantial environmental component, there may be issues to be considered. However, since  this is a government sponsored project, any legal opinions should come from governmental  representation and are beyond the scope of this IA.  There are protected areas nearby that may be indirectly affected by this project. In particular,  the Hans Creek Fisheries Protected Area is sufficiently close to the project to warrant  consideration. While, it does not appear the fisheries area will be directly impacted by this  project, issues may appear in the future that could require mitigation.  There are numerous multilateral environmental agreements that have been ratified by the  government of the BVI or by extension, the UK. Some of these deal with biodiversity (CBD),  endangered species trade (CITES), specially protected areas and wildlife (SPAW), wetlands  (RAMSAR), and more. While there does not appear to be a direct conflict with the plans for the  runway extension, these agreements are complex and there may be issues in the future.   The following policy, legislative and planning documents were reviewed to ensure consistency  with guidelines and regulations:  •

Physical Planning Act      38 


Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations 

Land Development Control Guidelines 

National Integrated Development Strategy 

4.2 Consultation & Public Participation As part  of  the  development  approval  process,  there  will  be  ample  opportunity  for  public  participation  prior  to  the  commencement  of  construction  activities.  The  planning  approval  process  requires  that  the  Impact  Assessment  Report  be  available  for  public  inspection  for  a  period  of  time.  That  may  be  followed  by  a  public  hearing  where  there  will  be  additional  opportunity for public input.   As a matter of practice, the consultants made every effort to seek public comments. These are  encouraged throughout the IA process so that comments, where relevant, can be incorporated  into  the  final  report.  During  the  environmental  assessment  period,  two  public  open  forums  were conducted by the Minister of NR&L at the East End Community Centre and the Briercliff   Hall  in  Road  Town.  The  purpose  was  to  present  the  project  to  the  public  and  to  provide  an  opportunity  for  the  local  community  to  ask  questions,  offer  opinions,  and  interact  with  the  government and the consultants. The results of the forums are included in this document in the  Social Impact Assessment in the Appendix.   As  part  of  the  process,  the  consultants  conducted  interviews,  meetings,  discussions,  and  various sessions with individuals and groups of stakeholders.  Additional efforts were made to  involve the wider BVI community and elicit comments and opinions relevant to the proposed  runway extension at the airport.  It is to the advantage of an open and transparent government to receive public comments early  in  the  process  so  that  adjustments  can  be  made  where  necessary.  A  project  will  be  more  successful  when  all  stakeholders  have  an  equal  opportunity  to  be  a  part  of  the  development  approval process.   As the following tables show, individual interviews were conducted with aircraft operators and  regulators;  essential  sectoral  stakeholders  in  transportation  and  real  estate;  hotel  and  resort  owners/operators; provisioning, gift shop, and restaurant owners/operators; and presidents of  charter boat and marine associations.  Focus groups were held with residents of communities      39   


that would  be  directly  impacted  by  the  extension.    Meetings  and  discussions  were  held  with  senior Government officials from essential ministries and departments, as well as directors of  related statutory bodies.      Interviews – Aircraft Operators, Regulators  Area  Airport 

Interviewees Airline Pilots and Managers of VI Link, Island Birds,  American Eagle, LIAT, Cape Air, Fly BVI, and Air  Sunshine. (Could not reach BVI Airways)  Director, BVIAA  Operations Staff, BVIAA  Former BVI pilots 

  Other 

 Interviews – Sector Stakeholders  Sectors  Transportation  Real Estate    Planning 

Category of Interviewees  Taxi drivers  OBM Architect  Smiths Gore   Former Chief Planner 

Interviews – Investors/Managers  Interest  Trellis Bay businesses  Bellamy Cay  Marina Cay  Scrub Islands Resort and Marina  Little Dix Bay Resort  Bitter End Yacht Club  Oil Nut Bay  Peter Island Resort & Spa  Maria’s By the Sea  Treasure Isle Hotel  Surf Song Villa Resort  Nanny Cay Resort and Marina 

Interviewee Business owners/operators  Owner/Operator  Owner/Operator  Managing Director  Managing Director  Chief Executive Officer  Owner  Managing Director  Manager  Owner  Owner  Owner 

    40   


Focus Groups  Area  Beef Island    Great Camanoe  Hodges Creek 

Groups Trellis Bay business community  Little Mountain residents  Indigo and Privateer Plantation residents  Hodges Creek residents 

Meetings/Discussions  Stakeholders  Government          Statutory Bodies    

Positions/Department Financial Secretary  Shipping Registry  Development Planning Unit Statistician  Town and Country Planning  Conservation and Fisheries  Director, Ports Authority  Director, National Parks Trust 

4.3 Institutional Capacity In the British Virgin Islands, the primary responsibility for environmental protection rests with  the  Conservation  and  Fisheries  Department.  This  agency  must  oversee  the  environmental  aspects  of  all  developments  within  the  Territory.  The  Department  has  staff  allocated  to  that  task. They conduct a thorough review of all Impact Assessment Reports and follow up with field  inspections as needs dictate.   Environmental Health has responsibility for protecting public health. They also conduct reviews  of reports and offer comments in areas of their expertise. Much of their effort relates to issues  of disease, pest management or pollution as it might affect the health of the public.   The  Department  of  Disaster  Management  is  charged  with  safeguarding  the  public  in  case  of  disaster  or  accident  whether  caused  by  natural  events  or  human  error.  Some  aspects  of  a  development,  especially  as  related  to  safety  of  life  and  property,  would  become  their  responsibility to regulate.  

  41   


Naturally the  Town  and  Country  Planning  Department  shoulders  the  most  significant  responsibility  for  orderly  development  in  the  BVI.  Their  mandate  crosses  many  boundaries  between Departments. Thus, they share in the oversight of environmental and socio‐economic  issues that result from development projects. They have staff dedicated to the task.   The  Ministry  of  Natural  Resources  and  Labour  is  the  branch  of  the  local  government  with  ultimate  oversight  for  environmental  matters.  Most  issues  related  to  the  environment  falls  within the portfolio of this Ministry.  The Ministry of Natural Resources and Labor is principally responsible for the protection of the  Territories natural resources primarily through its department of Conservation and Fisheries  and the National Parks Trust.  More could be done to better regulate and monitor the charter  boat industry, in order to protect the marine environment.  The Ministry of Communications  and Works that is responsible for roads, electricity, water and sewerage needs to bring about  improvements in these areas to ensure that the capacity to meet rising demand and deliver  high quality services is normative.   The Ministry for Health and Human Services needs to complete the hospital to meet the needs  of the current population, as well as future needs, and should be well prepared to handle major  emergencies should they occur.  The Ministry of Finance and Tourism should embark on the  promulgation of a national economic development strategy including a strategy for the  development of the tourism industry.  The assistance of the United Kingdom and the European  Union could be enlisted to provide opportunities for training and development, should this  become necessary.    

4.4 Relevant Ongoing Projects There are no ongoing projects or activities of any governmental agency, NGO, or any other  organization or individual that would be negatively impacted by the runway extension project  as far as is known by the consultants.  Both the Conservation and Fisheries Department and National Parks Trust conduct research  and educational programmes that may occasionally be conducted near the airport or the  surrounding waters. Some underwater activities may fall in the same category. However, none      42   


are known to be currently ongoing that would be seriously hampered by the activities planned  for this runway extension.  Ongoing surveys of turtle nesting beaches throughout the BVI include all islands and all  beaches. The surveys should be able to continue. It is doubtful this project would seriously  impact turtle nesting beaches.   There are two major developments – Oil Nut Bay and Nanny Cay – the former of which already  has a world‐class mega yacht facility and the other, with a more scaled down version planned  would benefit greatly from the airport expansion. YCCS has hosted two extremely successful  super yacht regattas to date, the first of its kind in the BVI, each of which brought to the BVI 23  yachts and 26 yachts, respectively. YCCS was also the final destination for the conclusion of the  recent transatlantic race that ended with a prize‐giving ceremony.  Oil Nut Bay is an 88 freehold, low density villa community situated on 300 acres of land on the  peninsula of the eastern tip of Virgin Gorda.  Included in home sites are 28 Estate Lots 7 Ridge  Villas, 9 Beach Villas, 4 Stone Villas, 11 Atlantic Villas, 12 Peninsula Lots and 6 Boat House Lots.       Oil Nut Bay              Figure 6: Nanny Cay Development        43   


Nanny Cay   

                 The above image  shows the approved plan for the development of Nanny Cay, which includes  the expansion and modernization of the boatyard to store approximately 100 additional boats,  and the construction of a new marina on the south side of the Cay to accommodate  approximately 120 yachts and mega yachts.  Also proposed is a helicopter pad in close  proximity to the beach, a customs and immigration facility, a club house with a restaurant and  administrative offices, a swimming pool, and a relocated tennis court.     

  44   


5. Existing Environmental Conditions! 5.1 & 5.2 Physical & Biological Environment Beef Island and the airport vicinity have been impacted by human activity for many years. The  flat lowland areas have been transformed from arid agricultural landscapes to the present  developed state. There is virtually nothing remaining of the original “pristine” and natural  habitats either on land or in the near shore waters. The development of the airport and the  Trellis Bay area helped to transform the land uses for the island. That history of construction  has changed the land and modified habitats on land and in the sea. However, any construction,  even in altered environments, may produce unforeseen and negative results.   It is important to place the environments on and around the airport in context. While it is true  that the much of the land has been transformed, it is also true that natural processes have been  at work and ecosystem functions have been rebuilding many habitats. Just because underwater  habitats have re‐colonized disturbed areas recently, does not diminish their usefulness as  marine life nurseries, natural filters, or any other function typical of the ecosystem. Thus, all  habitats, however altered, must be evaluated in their present state and consideration given to  their future potential.  While numerous issues of varying degrees of importance were considered in this review, some  are of greater significance and received more attention. They include:  • • • • • • • • •

Erosion and the consequences to terrestrial and marine habitats.  Impacts to flora and fauna caused by construction and reclamation.  Impacts on rare or endangered species.   Impacts on fisheries and species of commercial importance.  Issues related to pests, exotic and invasive species.   Long term habitat changes, particularly in marine environments.  Impacts of sewage and runoff.  Changes in near shore water quality.  Loss of recreational space and “green” space. 

The requirements in this section are covered in detail in the appendices under separate  headings. Background information, as appropriate, is provided and recommendations are made  when environmental issues become apparent. The results of all surveys produced the data      45   


necessary to make recommendations regarding important environmental issues related to the  runway extension. Recommendations offered generally follow best management practices or  represent suggestions to mitigate unavoidable impacts. Either runway option will have  significant environmental impacts. There are opportunities to reduce many of the impacts,  while others may simply be unavoidable consequences.  Since Beef Island has been inhabited for a long time, the existing environmental conditions  have been continually modified by human activities. Few areas on land or the surrounding  adjacent marine environments have remained unaffected. Thus, the “existing” environmental  conditions must be placed in the context of heavily impacted habitats and are continually  affected by human activities.   The descriptions of the existing environmental conditions must be understood in relation to the  history of Beef Island. It does not suggest that the impacted environments, such as the  mangroves or coral reefs or sea grass community, are without value to the ecosystem. Rather,  it considers the recent history of the habitats in the context of proposed runway extension  plans. Since the existing environments are recently, and continually, disturbed, they may be  more resilient to further changes caused by the expansion and subsequent mitigation efforts.   To understand the environmental impacts caused by either runway option, it is first useful to  consider the condition of the existing habitats. While they have certainly been impacted, they  remain diverse, largely healthy and ecologically significant. With minimal disturbance, they can  continue to function and provide valuable ecosystem services. Areas that have been degraded  by anthropogenic impacts can be restored. In fact, recommendations in this IA are directed to  mitigation efforts that will not only alleviate some of the negative impacts, but actually improve  existing conditions in some areas. For example, the issue of water quality is of great  importance. Human activity near the airport, and especially in Trellis Bay, has resulted in  gradual deterioration of water quality. With reasonable implementation of mitigation  recommendations, the water quality in the bay can be improved over the current conditions.  The following is a brief summary of the terrestrial and marine environments in the footprint of  the two runway options. A more detailed description is provided in the Appendix. Further, this  summary does not describe the habitats beyond the project footprint, although there would  likely be impacts there also.         46   


Physical Environment  The terrestrial environment in the project footprint is characterized as arid coastal scrub. There  is an ecologically important salt pond in the zone immediately north and midway along the  existing runway. Shorelines include mangroves, rock/rubble and sand beaches. The marine  environments in the project footprint and adjacent areas are shallow with depths from the  shore to 10 – 15 meters.   Coastal waters are generally clear and clean, though Trellis Bay suffers from impaired water  quality. Good water quality is maintained by the currents and tidal flows. The area between  Trellis Bay and the Camanoes experiences strong water movement. This provides good flushing  of the coast and bays. The same is true of Well Bay. Strong tidal currents flow through the  narrow gap between Beef Island and Tortola.   Naturally, strong currents have good potential to move sediments. Thus, the issue of sediment  transport is of importance in considering the impacts of either runway option. Detailed studies,  including computer modeling, of currents and sediment transport have been conducted and  detailed reports are included in the Appendices. The results of those studies suggest the  runway extension option should have minimal impacts on current characteristics or sediment  transport in the area.   Site Topography and Drainage  Like most islands in this archipelago, Beef Island has been affected by extensive seismic activity  and sea level changes that spanned millions of years. Tectonic forces at work for thousands of  millennia,  and  still  operating  today,  produced  the  topographic  features  tourists  find  so  appealing  today.  The  Virgin  Islands  are  mostly  steep  sided  with  sheer  cliffs  along  many  shorelines.   Beef  Island  is  located  on  the  eastern  end  of  Tortola.  A  detailed  description  of  the  airport  location and topography, with coordinates and legal description, is provided in another section  of this IA.   Beef  Island  is  similar  to  most  islands  in  the  archipelago.  Tectonic  forces  clearly  produced  the  topographic  features  on  the  island.  The  intrusion  of  granitic  bedrock  above  the  surface  is  evident in many places. Part of the island, occupied by the airport, is flat with little relief. Much      47   


of that  topography  has  been  altered  by  many  years  of  agriculture  and  more  recently  by  the  airport construction.   Since  Beef  Island  is  a  relatively  small  land  mass,  and  contains  little  relief  near  the  airport,  drainage  is  rapid  and  direct.  There  are  no  large  watersheds  with  substantial  ghuts  flowing  through the airport site. Historically, excess water drained towards one of the seven salt ponds  on the island. There the ponds functioned as settlement basins where sediment was deposited.  As part of the airport development, the land was contoured to rapidly drain water into artificial  channels  that  direct  flow  away  from  the  airport  and  directly  to  the  sea  or  indirectly  through  settlement  ponds  or  salt  ponds.  The  “Irish  Crossing”  is  one  such  channel  that  directs  water  through the salt pond at Hans Creek.   More  detailed  site  drainage  descriptions  were  prepared  for  previous  reports  and  are  summarized in the appendices. Additionally, the hydrology is described in more detail in other  reports in the Appendices. The site drainage for either runway extension option is not likely to  be significantly different from what currently exists.   There is some difference between the two options that will affect construction on land where  drainage  issues  may  become  important.  Both  runway  options  consist  of  extensions  into  the  marine  environment.  Thus,  drainage  will  be  directed  and  will  generally  flow  into  the  sea.  However, option 4 involves the re‐alignment of the runway and will include significant works on  land, especially in the salt pond area north of the existing runway. That will require substantial  site grading and change the current drainage patterns in the area. Option 6 will require minor  site work on land.     Geologic History, Geology and Soils  Beef  Island  and  most  of  the  Virgin  Island  group  are  mountaintops  on  a  geologic  structure  known  as  the  Puerto  Rican  Plateau.  During  the  latter  part  of  the  most  recent  ice  age,  about  10,000 years ago, the islands and Puerto Rico formed one huge land mass. That big island was  formed  by  seismic  activity,  mainly  the  type  of  uplifting  caused  by  massive  earthquakes  and  movement of the Earth’s crust. Millions of years of uplifting followed by erosion, and repeated  changes in sea level, formed the shapes we see today. 

  48   


Historically, natural  drainage  along  ghuts  would  carry  sediments  that  would  accumulate  at  lower elevations near the mouth. These accumulations would form alluvial deposits and plains  that  often  continued  into  the  coastal  and  marine  environments.  Presumably,  such  natural  deposits contributed to the formation of the flat portions of Beef Island, especially the deposits  in the vicinity of the salt ponds and coastal area.  The underlying bedrock of Beef Island consists of granitic intrusions of Upper Cretaceous origin.  Details  of  the  bedrock  underlying  the  alluvial  deposits  can  only  be  postulated  based  on  the  surrounding geologic structures and outcrops. Much of the low lying areas of Beef Island now  consist of land fill or Alluvium that is a mix of sediments carried down the ghuts, beach rock and  marine sands of calcium carbonate composition, and possibly some mangrove peat deposits.  Soils on the island are varied and depend on location and degree of development. On much of  low land area, the soils are primarily a mix of eroded rock with some organic matter. Natural  vegetation is restricted to coastal plants and those species tolerant of salty and arid conditions.  In  more  developed  areas,  such  as  the  airport,  commercial  properties  and  residences,  land  fill  trucked in from Tortola contains more organic material and is better suited for plant growth.  The addition of humus and potting soil is evident in many landscaped areas. There is evidence  that many plant species, including some invasives, were probably introduced by accident with  soils and landfill trucked to the island.   The  many  years  of  human  history  on  Beef  Island  have  produced  significant  changes  to  the  topography and soil structure, with subsequent impacts on flora and fauna.   Climate and Hydrology  Weather conditions during the field surveys were usually dry and sunny with prevailing trade  winds  blowing  at  five  to  fifteen  knots.  There  was  considerable  variation  though  generally  consistent with dry winter patterns.  Air  temperatures  were  recorded  in  the  range  of  27  –  30  degrees  Celsius.  Average  relative  humidity  readings  fluctuated  between  68%  and  93%,  and  probably  reached  100%  during  the  torrential downpours.  Beef  Island,  like  most  of  the  surrounding  region,  experiences  a  tropical  maritime  climate.  Rainfall in the area averages about 30 ‐ 40 inches per year. The island is not sufficiently large or  elevated to modify the maritime climatic conditions. However, higher elevations on Tortola do      49   


produce moderate orographic rainfall (approximately 60 inches per year) that affects the ridge  tops and down‐wind slopes. However, Beef Island is not affected by those patterns.   As small oceanic islands, the British Virgin Islands are influenced by the Northeast Trade Winds  and their yearly cycle. This cycle is controlled predominantly by the annual North/South shift of  the mid‐Atlantic Bermuda High. There are two annual wet and dry periods with one longer than  the other. The longer wet season coincides with the local “hurricane season” (the beginning of  June to the end of November) and produces most of the annual rainfall.   The  impact  of  hurricanes  and  tropical  weather  systems  has  entered  a  period  of  increased  frequency. The following hurricanes have had significant impacts on the BVI in recent years:   

Hurricane Hugo – 1989 

Hurricane Luis – 1995 

Hurricane Marilyn – 1995 

Hurricane Bertha – 1996 

Hurricane Georges – 1998 

Hurricane Lenny – 1999 

Hurricane Omar ‐ 2008 

Hurricane Earl ‐ 2010 

Numerous additional  hurricanes,  tropical  storms  and  tropical  depressions  passed  over  or  sufficiently  near  the  islands  to  produce  substantial  impacts.  Recent  scientific  assessments  predict  increased  frequency  of  tropical  storms  as  a  result  of  expected  climatic  shifts  and  elevations of global sea level and temperature. Beef Island and the airport will be impacted by  these predicted changes.  Torrential  rains  associated  with  the  passage  of  tropical  waves  or  storms  exert  significant  influence  on  coastal  and  marine  communities.  The  airport  is  frequently  affected  by  such  conditions and they will likely continue in the future. Water quality issues resulting from these  rain events must be considered and appropriate mitigation implemented.       50   


Oceanography: Tides, Waves and Currents  Understanding the oceanographic conditions that influence Beef Island is necessary to properly  design the runway extensions and ensure the safety of lives and property. Consideration should  be given not only to existing conditions, but also to expectations of increases in storm activity  that  may  accompany  the  predicted  climate  change  of  the  future.  While  such  predictions  of  future  events  may  be  difficult  to  accurately  assess,  and  are  subject  to  vigorous  debate,  prudence  would  dictate  a  conservative  approach  in  all  planning  along  the  coast.  Thus,  engineering studies appropriate to the potential risks should form the basis of designs for either  runway option.   The  airport  is  partly  sheltered  from  open  ocean  conditions  by  Beef  Island  and  the  nearby  islands, including Great and Little Camanoe, Scrub Island and Virgin Gorda at a slightly greater  distance. Prevailing winds and ocean currents in the Virgin Islands generally move from east to  west. The location of the airport exposes it to the generally benign conditions typically found in  Sir  Francis  Drake  Channel.  However,  winter  ground  seas  from  the  north  can  pass  between  Guana Island and the Camanoes and affect the north facing coast.  As a low lying portion of Beef Island, the airport is vulnerable to changes in sea state. Certainly,  waves and currents can exert substantial impacts on any shoreline development. Either runway  extension option will involve substantial land reclamation into areas where strong currents are  common.  Therefore,  some  impact  on  the  oceanographic  processes  should  be  expected.  In  particular,  the  question  of  alteration  of  currents  and  sediment  transport  is  a  major  consideration.  Terrestrial Environments  This IA focuses on the potential impacts associated with the two options for runway extensions.  Details of those two options are presented elsewhere in this report. Most of the work  associated with the options will be in the marine environment where substantial reclamation  will be required. However, the two options differ in the impacts on the terrestrial habitats.  Option 6 consists of an extension into the marine environments on both ends of the runway.  There will be minor impacts on the shoreline on the Well Bay side of the extension. Otherwise,  the terrestrial impact should be negligible. 

  51   


Option 4 requires a complete re‐alignment of the runway in a northeast to southwest direction.  This will have significant negative consequences for the surrounding terrestrial habitats.  Perhaps most significant will be the virtual elimination of the salt pond immediately north of  the runway. Studies suggest this is one of the most valuable and productive wetland habitats  remaining on Tortola/Beef Island. The pond is surrounded by mangroves and contains a rich  and diverse aquatic ecosystem. Underwater vegetation is dominated by Ruppia and algae.  There is an abundance of small invertebrates that feed on the plants. This productive wetland  attracts many birds including rare ducks and waterfowl.   This runway option would also impact the mangroves surrounding the pond and adjacent  coastal habitats. Near the Well Bay extension, additional coastal vegetation and mangroves  would be lost. There would be few opportunities to mitigate the loss of the wetlands with  option 4. The loss of the pond, mangroves and coastal vegetation would be inevitable  consequences of option 4.  Details of the terrestrial environments are provided in several reports in the Appendices.  Coastal Environments  The shorelines in the vicinity of the two runway options consist of mangroves, rock and rubble  shores, sand beaches, and artificial structures. The impacts on these habitats differ with the  options.  Option 6 will produce the least impact because it affects the least amount of shore. The  extension toward Trellis Bay would affect an artificial boulder shoreline that lacks any natural  characteristics. Toward Well Bay, the shore contains a mix of rock, sand, and a few mangroves.  That portion of shoreline is already altered by human use, particularly a concrete boat  launching ramp. Thus, there should be minimal disturbance to the shoreline ecosystem with  this option.  Considerably more impacts would result from the re‐alignment of the runway proposed with  option 4. In the northeasterly direction, the extension would affect a mix of rock and rubble  shore with some sandy beach habitat. All the coastal vegetation, along with mangroves and arid  coastal scrub flora would be lost. Near Well Bay, the impact would be less, but some mangroves  would be lost. 

  52   


Once completed, the shorelines of either option would consist of large boulders. There would  be little relief in topography or opportunity to re‐establish sand beaches or other shoreline  habitats. However, with further study, there may be a few sites, such as along part of the Well  Bay extension, where mangroves might be planted, or where native shoreline plants could be  re‐introduced.  Marine Environments  The greatest impacts of either runway extension will occur in the marine environments. The  footprint of the construction will be most significant underwater. Since the runway extensions  will involve substantial reclamation to create the necessary land, the loss of all habitats in the  project footprint is unavoidable. Mitigation opportunities in the project footprint will be  limited.  The underwater habitats in the impact zone are coral reefs, sea grass beds and sand plains.  There is some variation is these habitats. For example, the coral reefs range from healthy areas  of hard coral reef to scattered rocks functioning as patch reefs. Some reefs consist more of sea  fans, gorgonians, and other soft corals. Typically, reefs are bordered by bare sand areas, or  “halos”, where vegetation has been removed by reef herbivores. With distance from the reefs  these sand plains become progressively vegetated by calcareous green algae, red and brown  algae, and sparse sea grasses. Depending on physical conditions of the site, sea grass habitats  become denser and species compositions gradually change. In areas of sparse grasses,  Syringodium tends to be common. Where conditions are optimal for sea grasses, Thalassia will  grow into thick, dense ‘meadows’ that can extend many meters in all directions. These, in turn,  support a diverse fauna of invertebrates, fish, and marine turtles.   The largest underwater areas that will be impacted by the extensions are to the north and east  of the existing runway. Option 6 extends the current runway toward the east near Sprat point.  This area is immediately north of Trellis Bay and is impacted by activities within the bay. Option  4 takes a more northerly direction, covering much of Conch Bay toward Great Camanoe these  underwater habitats function as an interconnected ecosystem. It is very well understood that  coral reefs and sea grass communities interact and the fauna often spend parts of their life  cycle in one habitat and then move to another. Thus, both habitats must remain intact for the  ecosystem to function properly. Despite the variety of habitats in the impact zone, all are  equally important to the overall environment. Throughout the footprint of both options, sea      53   


grasses cover the largest area of substrate. However, area of coverage and ecological  importance are not necessarily related.  To the north of the runway, Conch Bay contains a mix of sandy, rubble habitat with varying  degrees of sea grass density. Coral reefs and rock patches are also present. Species lists of flora  and fauna in all the habitats are included in the appendices. The Environmental Report also  contains descriptions of endangered species identified and discussion of species of economic  importance.  In Well Bay, there is a relatively narrow zone of bedrock outcrops and rubble near shore. That  gradually changes from rubble to sand plains with algal clumps. Further from shore, toward the  channel, sparse sea grass habitat becomes dense and eventually is dominated by uniform  Thalassia with the associated fauna. Slightly south of the shore, there is an underwater rocky  area with rock outcrops and rubble. Hard and soft corals are common in the vicinity. The  invasive Lionfish was noted on numerous surveys on the site.  Close to shore the direct  footprint includes rubble and sand habitats with mangroves on land. Both option 4 and 6 will  impact sea grass habitat more than any other.   Beyond the immediate footprint of the runway extension options, habitats are similar, though  with considerable variability. The habitats are affected by numerous physical parameters.  Currents are probably the most important. In some areas, such as the cuts between Guana  Island and Tortola, or between Great and Little Camanoe, scouring of the seabed is evident.   In general, all marine habitats in the direct and indirect impact zone may be considered healthy,  though heavily affected by human activity. Surveys in and near Trellis Bay yielded significant  quantities of trash and debris. The reef at Conch Bay also contained an abundance of trash.  Boat parts and sections of hulls were conspicuous in rocky areas, especially reefs. Old tires,  ropes, plastic bottles, cans, and miscellaneous items were abundant. Lost, or ‘ghost’, fish traps  were also common.   Evidence of overfishing, anchor damage to the seabed, chemical pollution and other  anthropogenic impacts are present throughout all the habitats. Despite these previous impacts,  the marine communities contain an abundant and diverse flora and fauna.  While the runway  extension options will add additional environmental impacts to the habitats, effective  mitigation and good environmental management in the future could produce significant  improvements in the health and productivity of the marine ecosystem. Certainly there will be      54   


loss of habitat as a result of either extension option. However, reduction in the discharge of  pollutants, including waste water, should improve water quality. Effective enforced fishery  regulations may restore populations of many commercially valuable species. That would have  beneficial impacts on the health of all habitats. Additional environmental initiatives to reduce  trash dumping in the sea, reduction of storm water runoff, reduced anchor damage to the  seabed, and others would further improve the marine environment.  Clearly, this runway extension will impact the environment. If sufficient mitigation and good  management become effective, then the impact of this project could be decreased and the  environment could remain healthy.   The socio‐economic and cultural conditions surrounding this project are complex. There are  many stakeholders with an interest in the outcome of this project. As expected, there is  diversity of opinion regarding the value of such an undertaking. Reactions are often related to  the stakeholder’s proximity to the impact zone and the economic or social implication to them  personally. Many who reside near the airport, in Trellis Bay or on Beef Island, are skeptical or I  opposition to the project. Others who see personal benefits or general benefits to the Territory  are guardedly optimistic or strongly in favor of the extension. The bulk of the socio‐economic  assessment is presented in the Appendix and covers these topics, and others, in considerable  detail.  

                  55   


5.3 Socio‐Cultural & Socio‐Economic Conditions  The Development Planning Unit estimates that the BVI population is currently 30,755 of which  83% reside in Tortola from 2012.  Tortola’s population is expected to grow by 26% by the year  2030.  The majority of the population comprises non‐nationals.     Population by Island – 1991‐2030  Islands  Tortola  Virgin Gorda  Anegada  Jost Van Dyke  Other  Islands/Yachts  Total 

1991 13,233  2,437  162  140  144 

2001 19,282  3,203  250  244  182 

2009 24,045  3,994  312  304  227 

2012 25,604  4,253  332  324  241 

2015 27,221  4,522  353  344  257 

2020 29,860  4,960  387  378  282 

2025 32,278  5,362  418  408  305 

2030 34,521  5,734  448  437  326 

16,116

23,161

28,882

30,755

32,697

35,867

38,771

41,466

Source:  Development Planning Unit    The Territory has high literacy and life expectancy rates, and low poverty and employment  rates, as shown in the table below.  Social Development Indicators  Indicator  Population below the poverty line  Adult Functional Literacy Rate  ‐Male  ‐Female  Life Expectancy at Birth (years)  ‐ Male  ‐Female  Total Unemployment Rate 

% of the Population  17.7%    97.8%  98.7%    72.9%  74.8%  3.6% 

Source: The Louis Berger Group, 2011  Nature of the BVI Economy The largest contributor to the GDP is Real Estate accounting for 30% of the total followed by  Hotels/Restaurants, Wholesale/Retail and Transportation/Communication which, together,  account for 38%.      56   


Sectoral Distribution of Current GDP    Sectoral Distribution of GDP (%)  Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry  Fishing  Mining & Quarrying  Manufacturing  Electricity, Gas, Water  Construction  Wholesale & Retail Trade  Hotel & Restaurant  Transport and Communications  Financial Intermediation  Real Estate, Renting & Business   Activity  Government Services  Education  Health & Social Work  Other Community, Social  &Personal Services  Taxes on Products  Less: FISIM    GDP (at current market prices US  $ 000  Annual Rate of Growth  Actual Change 

2001re 0.50  0.66  0.04  3.35  1.64  9.56  13.47  15.38  11.87  5.09  27.74 

2003re 0.57  0.76  0.05  3.81  2.04  6.91  13.38  14.17  11.37  5.42  28.82 

2005e 0.47  0.62  0.04  3.13  1.94  6.89  13.88  15.13  11.97  5.27  29.29 

2007e 0.41  0.53  0.04  2.70  1.85  7.76  13.62  14.23  11.50  6.13  29.50 

2009e 0.47  0.61  0.04  3.10  2.23  7.16  13.16  13.44  10.99  4.36  28.91 

2011e 0.45  0.59  0.04  2.97  2.38  5.81  13.54  13.53  11.18  5.69  30.13 

5.52 2.20  1.52  2.69 

6.46 2.57  1.78  3.06 

5.93 2.36  1.64  2.51 

6.68 2.66  1.85  2.16 

7.80 3.11  2.15  2.49 

7.52 3.00  2.08  2.39 

2.97 (4.22)  100  810,096 

3.36 (4.53)  100  711,622 

3.39 (4.45)  100  870,033 

3.58 (5.21)  100  1,010,870 

3.71 (3.74)  100  876,811 

3.64 (4.92)  100  915,592 

7.92 59,479 

(9.49) 16.61  8.11  (74,606) 123,915  75,828 

(11.60) 2.37  (115,045)  21,155 

The BVI has a high GDP per capita whose estimate by the Development Planning Unit for 2011  was $30,326.    Selected Per Capita Indicators    Population  GDP Per Capita  Consumer Spending Per Capita  Gross National Income Per  Capita   

2001e 23,161  34,977  13,991  32,522 

2003e 24,432  29,127  11,241  26,609 

2005e 25,940  33,540  12,577  30,988 

2007e 27,518  36,735  13,466  34,160 

2009e 28,882  30,358  10,934  27,743 

2011e 30,192  30,326  10,587  27,669 

  57   


Patterns of Employment Employment has increased steadily with an average annual growth rate of 5.4%.  Growth has  been strongest in Transport and Communication, followed by Financial Intermediation  industries.  Distribution of Employment by Industry  Sectoral Distribution of GDP  (%)  Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry  Fishing  Mining & Quarrying  Manufacturing  Electricity, Gas, Water  Construction  Wholesale & Retail Trade  Hotel & Restaurant  Transport and  Communications  Financial Intermediation  Real Estate, Renting &  Business  Activity  Government Services  Education  Health & Social Work  Other Community, Social  &Personal Services  Private Households with  Employed Persons  Extra‐territorial organizations  and bodies  Not Stated  Total 

2001re

2003re

2005e

2007e

2009e

2010e

19 12  35  340  0  1209  1747  3133  636 

28 7  27  357  0  1251  1781  3122  652 

43 12  24  409  0  1332  2074  3316  693 

64 12  21  474  0  1635  2212  3587  641 

73 13  24  475  0  1810  2207  3534  662 

67 18  24  470  0  1559  2279  3530  658 

327 1370 

321 1455 

365 1616 

408 1942 

421 2093 

426 2060 

4533 156  101  359 

4772 201  107  381 

5150 239  116  475 

5495 332  160  527 

5734 355  141  576 

5721 367  146  560 

312

348

359

387

411

405

1 14290 

5 14815 

9 16232 

34 17931 

191 18720 

183 18473 

The public sector employs about one‐third of the labor force.  The Hotels and Restaurants sub‐ sector of the industry is the largest source of employment in the private sector, but has the  lowest growth rate. 

  58   


Tourism and Economic Development Tourism is the mainstay of the BVI economy, contributing 30% of the GDP.    Tourism Gross Domestic Product at Current Prices    GDP at current market price  Tourism GDP at Current Basic  Prices (US$’000)  Tourism GDP/GDP (%)  Growth in Tourism GDP (%)    

2001e 810,096  242,479 

2003e 711,622  209,422 

2005e 870,033  262,599 

2007e 2009e  1,010,870  876,811  309,877  264,875 

2011e 915,592  277,893 

29.93 8.97   

29.43 ‐1068   

30.18 18.82   

30.65 8.95   

30.35 2.62   

30.21 ‐12.73   

Within the hospitality industry, the demand for charter boats is much higher than the demand  for hotels, as the BVI is renowned for its beautiful sailing conditions – pristine waters, perfect  wind, sheltered channel, archipelago of islands, and so forth. The year 2009 showed a decrease  in the number of overnight visitors across the five types of accommodations below, which  began to increase in 2011.    Overnight Visitors by Place of Stay  Type of Overnight Visitors   Year  Hotel  Charter boat  2001  74,399  180,838  2003  61,148  213,862  2005  102,611  171,502  2007  108,978  182,144  2009  93,985  157,084  2011  102,732  171,704       

Rentals 19,927  23,772  33,851  35,952  31,005  33,891   

Own 156  75  282  300  259  302   

Friend 21,603  21,600  28,889  30,682  26,460  28,923   

Total  296,922  320,458  337,135  358,056  308,793  337,551   

Most visitors come to the BVI by sea, even when cruise ships are excluded.  There has been a  dramatic increase in the number of passengers coming through St. Thomas primarily because of  the lower airfare and accessibility to the BVI.                59   


Visitor Arrivals by Air and Sea  Year    2001  2003  2005  2007  2009  2010 

Visitor  Arrivals  By Air  144,425  390,686  158,407  147,449  104,729  109,076 

Total   535,111  657,505  820,767  948,425  856,864  842,497 

By Sea  153,391  504,114  662,360  800,976  725,135  733,421 

The cruise ship industry has also  seen a dramatic increase in the number of passengers since  2001.  From  all  indications,  this  upward  trend  will  continue,  as  there  are  plans  underway  to  lengthen the cruise ship dock and develop the contiguous land side facilities.   Types of Visits  Year 

Overnight Visitors  Day Trippers 

2001 2003  2005  2007  2009  2010 

296,922 320,458  337,135  358,056  308,793  330,343 

35,672 36,621  34,480  15,158  17,744  10,703 

Cruise Ship  Passengers  202,517  300,426  449,152  575,211  530,327  501,451 

Total 535,111  657,505  820,767  948,425  856,864  842,497 

Beef Island Airport According to the LBG report, there were 6,889 aircraft operations in 2006, with an average of  574 operations per month.   The airport is used for commercial and private operations.  According to the LBG report,  commercial operations comprise 40% of the total air traffic at the airport, general aviation  activity 59.6%, and air cargo 0.4%.   The airport site ‐‐ which is approximately 136 acres and  includes the airfield, related facilities, and surrounding area ‐‐ is enclosed by a perimeter fence.  The LBG report also states that the runway has a parallel taxiway that is 2,000 feet in length  with three right angle connectors.  A partial taxiway holds departing aircrafts while others are  landing.  The apron is made up of two areas for commercial and business aviation and can  accommodate up to eight Dash 8‐type aircrafts and 14 small aircrafts.  It is also used for  overnight aircraft parking.  Aircrafts are refueled by trucks. The maintenance area, which has      60   


four hangars for General   Aviation aircrafts, is connected to the main apron by a short taxiway.  Aircrafts follow Visual  Flight Rules (VFR) when approaching the airport.  Edge lighting along the runway permits night  operations.  The table shows that most of the air traffic to the BVI goes to the Beef Island Airport, the  plurality of which comes from Puerto Rico, and makes it the most suitable choice of the three  BVI airports for runway expansion.  Aircraft Arrivals to BVI Airports in 2011    Total    Scheduled  Service    Charter  Service 

Private

Total

Points of   Arrivals  Embarkation  Beef Island    No  Pax  Pax  Down Island  92  1,469  USVI  63  727  Puerto Rico  383  4,387  Total  490  5,080  Down Island  362  345  USVI  417  176  Puerto Rico  341  226  Other  159  92  Total  1,089  723  Down Island  449  151  USVI  482  65  Puerto Rico  718  145  Other  428  366  Total  1,636  721  Down Island  903  1,965  USVI  962  968  Puerto Rico  1,442  4,758  Other  587  458  Total  3,894  8,149 

Virgin Gorda  No  Pax  Pax  1  7  ‐  1  2  8  1  7  28  121  131  442  16  237  12  77  163  730  4  8  2  9  4  3  2  5  8  22  33  136  133  452  22  248  14  82  202  918 

Anegada No Pax  Pax  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  6  24  2  4  28  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  6  24  2  4  36 

‐ ‐  ‐  ‐  2  26  11  2  37  1  2  1  1  3  3  28  12  3  46 

Total  No  Pax  93  63  385  491  396  572  359  175  1,280  453  484  722  430  1,644  942  1,119  1,466  605  4,132 

Pax 1,476  728  4,395  5,087  468  644  474  171  1,490  160  76  149  372  746  2,104  1,448  5,018  543  9,113 

Source: Development Planning Unit, Government of the British Virgin Islands 

Table 23 in the Socio Economic appendix shows that most visitors to the Territory – Day  Trippers and Overnight Visitors – arrive by boat.  Of the 8,946 Day Trippers who visited the  Territory in 2011, 62% came by sea.  Of the   337,773 overnight visitors – those who stayed in  hotels, on charter boats, rented accommodations, own residence, or friend’s residence ‐‐ 73%  arrived by sea compared to 27% who arrived by air.       61   


Airlines There are currently eight airlines operating at TBLIA: Three 9‐seat private charter airlines, two  9‐seat scheduled commercial airlines, and three larger scheduled commercial airlines Scheduled  commercial flights go to San Juan, St. Thomas, and the Caribbean.  Scheduled Commercial Airlines and Private Charters Operating from TBLIA  Private Charter  (9 Seats)  VI Airlink  Island Birds 

Fly BVI 

Commercial Schedule  (9 Seats)  Cape Air  8 flights/day to San Juan  Air Sunshine  4 flights/day to San Juan  4 flights/day to St. Thomas    

(More than 9 Seats)  BVI Airways  American Eagle  4 flights/day to San Juan  LIAT  3 flights/day M‐Th, Sat and Sun to the  Caribbean  6 flights on Friday to the Caribbean 

Noise Pollution Aircraft noise and the impact on communities under or adjacent to the flight path are of  environmental concern.  As air traffic grows with runway expansions, new areas are exposed to  aircraft noise. Currently the aviation navigational aid at TBLIA is a non‐directional (radio)  beacon situated at Mansion Hall that is used to guide aircrafts within or above the clouds to a  level below the clouds where they can safely proceed with their approach using visual cues –  hazard lights, runway lights, and ground markers ‐‐ to align the aircraft with the runway.   Residents  of  Hodge’s  Creek  –  where  the  terrain  is  hilly  ‐‐  report  that  pilots  do  not  follow  the  designated  flight  path  commensurate  with  the noise  abatement  protocol;  rather, they  fly  the  path that they are most comfortable with which, invariably, is over Hodge’s Creek.   They  indicated  that  they  report  these  violations  to  the  BVI  Airports  Authority,  but do  not  get  clear information back regarding corrective measures and disciplinary action.   

  62   


Hodges Creek 

Trellis Bay is located within walking distance to the east of the airport and is rimmed by a  crescent‐shaped sandy coastline stretching about 1.55km from the Government dock to Sprat  Point.  Trellis Bay is a hub of economic activity on Beef Island, the driver of which is its use as a  popular anchorage for stopover and overnight chartered and private yachts.  It is also  considered a hurricane shelter for yachts. Recreational activities that take place in the Bay  include windsurfing, snorkeling, diving, swimming, and water skiing.    Within a section of the bay is a mooring system.  An April 2012 survey of the moorings at Trellis  Bay by the Survey Department shows that there are 35 registered moorings and 37  unregistered moorings.                   63   


Moorings at Trellis Bay   Registered Owners  Trish Bailey  Ben  Bamford  Timothy Penn  Total 

Registered Moorings  2  12  21  35 

Unregistered Moorings  37      37 

  Survey of Moorings at Trellis Bay                        Source: Survey Department  Registered and Unregistered Moorings are shown in table below.  Because Trellis Bay is also the closest transit point for travelers to and from Virgin Gorda and  the northern cays, workers, residents and visitors are ferried back and forth on a regular basis.  

  64   


Single‐storey buildings house a few small but varied shops which are located in a linear fashion  along the shoreline.    Much of the land bordering Trellis Bay is privately owned.   That which is owned by the Crown  has several facilities:   • • • • • • • •

A public pier used by fishermen and ferries  A barge ramp  A small gift shop – Many Splendid Tings  A small grocery store with other ancillary services  ‐ Trellis Bay Market  A ferry office – North Sound Express   Two piers and a dock  A solid waste facility  Undefined parking area 

Most of the privately‐owned land is undeveloped, except for the following beach front facilities:  • • • • • • •

A coffee shop – Virgin Island Café  A clothing boutique – HiHo  A cyber shop – Cyber Café  A board sailing shop  ‐ Boardsailing BVI  An art studio – Aragorns Studio  A small guest house and restaurant – de Loose Mongoose  Parking lots 

  65   


Despite its close proximity to the airport, Trellis Bay offers a tranquil and serene atmosphere.  The spectacular views of Scrub Island and Marina Cay against the backdrop of the undeveloped  hillside of Beef Island contribute to the sought‐after charm of the Bay.    Sea Port Facilities  The Bay has several piers that are used by several boat operators.  The Government pier is used  by boat operators from Virgin Gorda and other sister islands, dinghy operators, light cargo  vessels and fishermen, but is too high for dinghies and tenders to berth.  Adjacent to the  government pier is barge ramp.  The other piers in the Bay are privately owned wooden piers,  with seabed leases from the Government. The wooden pier by the Trellis Bay Market is in  serious disrepair and is not safe for use.  Solid Waste Facilities  Two solid waste receptacles are located at the northern end of the Bay, and are operated by  the Solid Waste Department.    Bellamy Cay  In the center of the Bay is Bellamy Cay, a tiny island surrounded by a coral rock formation.  The  Last Resort restaurant is located in the center of the island and is a popular dining attraction for  the yachting community.  The owners of the restaurant lease the Cay.  One of the Trellis Bay      66   


piers belongs to the restaurant owners and, for a fee, is also used by Little Dix Bay Resort and  Spa among others.  The restaurant also owns 12 of the mooring buoys in the Bay for which it  collects a usage fee.   Marina Cay  Marina Cay is a small island surrounded by Beef Island, Great Camanoe, Little Camanoe, and  Scrub Island.  It provides a myriad of services for yachtsmen including mooring buoys in the  protected area behind the island and reef, fuel, ice, water, showers, laundry facility, trash  facility, dinghy and ferry dock.  Marina Cay also has cottages, Pusser’s Porch restaurant,  Pusser’s Company store, etc.  and is a popular area for snorkeling.   Scrub Island Resort, Marina and Spa  Scrub Island accommodations include rooms, suites and villas. Its large marina also  accommodates mega yachts.  It has two restaurants, a fitness center, dive shop, gourmet  market, and café and boutique.   The  Camanoes   The Camanoes are  located to the north of Beef Island. Little Camanoe is a small uninhabited  island and a popular stop for yachtsmen and snorkelers. Great Camanoe is developed on one  end with several residential homes and villas owned mostly by expatriates.  The northeastern  part of the island remains undeveloped and in its pristine state.           Little Mountain  Little Mountain is a residential hill top overlooking the airport and the Caribbean Sea from its  southern side and the Atlantic Ocean from the northern side.  There are a number of rental  villas as well.  Little Mountain is within walking distance to Long Bay Beach, which is used  mostly by local residents.   Surfsong Villa Resort  This secluded beach front villa resort is located in Well Bay on the southern side of Beef Island  and minutes away from Trellis Bay. Guests can choose from 6 one or two bedroom villas or  reserve the entire resort for up to 22 guests.         67   


Dawson’s Villas  This villa compound is adjacent to Surfsong in Well Bay.  Guests can rent any or all of the five  villas.   Fisherman  A  Conservation and Fisheries official reports that while there is no commercial fishing in the  bay ‐‐ or organized fishing expeditions ‐‐ individual fisherman fish the waters surrounding the  Bay and also procure whelks and conch.  Access  The paved public road provides access to the Bay.  Within the Bay, a walk along the sandy area  immediately in front of the shops provides easy access to all of the shops and seaport facilities 

  68   


6. Assessment of Environmental Impacts & Mitigating Measures There are two options considered for the runway extension. They differ significantly in the  ecological and socio‐economic impacts they will have. Option 4 consists of a realignment of the  runway. Thus, it will have a much larger footprint, both on land and in the sea. This option will  eliminate the existing runway salt pond, have greater impacts on offshore coral reefs and cover  much more of the seabed. In addition, it will extend further into an area of strong currents and  tidal flows, producing greater potential for effects on oceanographic conditions. However, it  will be further from Trellis Bay, thus reducing the potential impact on water quality. It will also  produce less impact on the community in the bay.  Option 6 is just an extension of the existing runway on both ends. The ecological impacts should  be considerably less. However, the extension north of Trellis Bay will terminate near Sprat  Point. That will create a barrier to the north of the bay considerably reducing water flow and  flushing. That will likely impact the water quality in the bay. Further, the restriction of the  entrance to the bay will force all vessels to enter and leave through the same narrow opening  at Sprat Point. That will create some challenges to maintain orderly navigation in the area.  Based on the socio‐economic assessment, the impacts on the community in the bay are  perceived as largely negative.  While option 6 is considered to produce more negative impacts on Trellis Bay, a benefit would  be to create a more sheltered anchorage during times of storms.   The impacts on Well Bay would be similar for both options, though option 4 would extend  further south and potentially affect the Well Bay beach to a greater extent. Both options would  cover portions of the seabed that contain corals and sea grasses.  The predictions of impacts for different aspects of the project are described in much detail in  specific reports contained in the Appendices. Both options will produce significant impacts on  the environment and on the society. Some impacts can be mitigated, either directly or  indirectly, while others must be accepted as a consequence of development and growth of the  Territory.  

  69   


Loss of marine habitats can be partially, and indirectly, mitigated. Habitats in the footprint of  the runway extensions will be eliminated. While it may be possible to relocate a few corals and  some sea grasses, such measures are not likely to produce worthwhile results, except in limited  circumstances. However, that does not preclude some efforts in habitat rehabilitation at the  site or in other areas. Additional mitigation could be considered following the approach used in  the concept of “mitigation banking” employed elsewhere. Briefly, that concept suggests that  where successful mitigation at a development site is not possible, or practical, mitigation could  take the form of restoration in other more distant areas. Or, perhaps setting a monetary value  for the loss, ecological or social, and then applying that figure to environmental education or  conservation efforts somewhere else.   The impact on water quality in Trellis Bay can be addressed several ways. Various possibilities  are presented in the computer modeling for the oceanographic impacts. The options  considered include culverts or bridges under the runway extension, widening and reconfiguring  the Sprat Point area and headland, and various other ideas. Additional options to improve  water quality may involve reducing the sources of the pollutants. For example, the waste water  treatment plant at the airport could be expanded to include all developments at Trellis Bay.  Rather than using septic tanks that leach semi‐treated water into the bay, all waste could be  treated and reused for irrigation and other uses. Storm water that currently drains into the bay  could be diverted to a more distant location. A pump out station could be provided for the  yachts to reduce that source of waste. Such measures could do much to improve water quality.  The socio‐economic measures are complex and will likely be reduced to a case by case  assessment of impact and mitigation necessary. The affected stakeholders vary greatly in the  degree to which they are affected. In some cases the airport expansion will be seen as a  benefit, not as a liability. Obviously, in such cases no mitigation will be required. It may be that  some individuals or businesses will deserve some level of compensation, financial or otherwise.  These must be individually assessed at the time of compensation.  A full anlaysis of the socio economic effects is contained within the appendix section of this  report.            70   


6.1. Prediction of Potential Environmental Impacts and Benefits The perimeter of the airport requires a stone revetment structure for both options to protect  the area from scour and loss of material due to wave and current forces.  The existing airport is  protected by a stone revetment system.  The proposed revetment section presented herein is  similar  to  the  existing  structure  with  some  minor  changes.    The  proposed  airport  expansion  construction  requires  about  9650  lf  and  7200  lf  of  revetment  structure  to  support  Option  #4  and Option #6, respectively.    A typical section of the revetment section is provided below to demonstrate the likely extent of  construction on the seabed.     

 

  71   


The revetment structure can be used to help control turbidity and sedimentation during the fill  placement.  Constructing the revetment before placing the sand backfill in the runway area will  create a natural barrier to fill against and should allow a more controlled backfilling operation.   The  revetment  stone  (especially  the  inner  core  and  geotextile  fabric)  will  provide  filtering  as  water passes through the structure.  If it is necessary to keep an area open to accommodate the  backfilling  (needed  if  a  dump  bottom  barge  is  being  used  to  place  fill)  floating  booms  can  be  used across the opening.  This approach should be effective to control the release of suspended  sediment into the adjacent waterway.       The following possible impacts have been identified as requiring consideration. Additional  comments are offered.  Changes in Land Use. Clearly any development will change the environment. The runway  extension will alter existing uses of the area. While the changes will differ according to the  option selected, Option 4 will most likely produce the greatest changes in existing land use.  Compatibility of Land Use.  The airport already exists so the proposed runway extension would  be compatible with the existing airport. However, there are compatibility questions with other  nearby  uses.  The  land  uses  at  Trellis  Bay  would  be  substantially  affected,  particularly  with  option 6. The degree to which the compatibility will be affected is considered in detail in this IA.  The greatest question of compatibility will involve the social issues in the bay.   Loss of unique physical features and loss or creation of open space.  Option 4 would result in  the loss of the runway salt pond. Given the significant ecological value of that pond, its loss  would be a negative impact. The extension toward Trellis Bay by option 6 would entail the loss  of open space used for recreation and vessel transit. The loss would be considered negative by  the users of that space. The same could be argued for the loss of fishing areas. In the Well Bay  vicinity, the extension of the runway, especially by option 4, would impact the users of the  beach. It would also restrict access to the beach. Certainly, users of that beach would consider  it a loss of their open space and detract from the physical features of the site.  Intrusion into sensitive visual landscapes or improvement of landscape quality. Some  individuals will consider any further development of the airport to be an intrusion into a  sensitive landscape. Whether or not the landscape quality is improved will be a matter of  personal opinion. Certainly, a new runway extending into the sea would alter the visual      72   


landscape. The airport and much of Trellis Bay is a developed area. The existing visual landscape  in the bay is one of sailboat masts, docks and shoreside facilities. It would be reasonable to  consider the extension of the runway to Sprat Point and altering the view of islands and  seascapes an intrusion into the visual landscape. The question will be whether or not the  change in the visual landscape is worth the benefits from the expansion.  Risk of erosion.  Erosion on land is a very real risk and one of the more serious environmental  issues related to this project. Care must be taken to prevent any land based sediments from  entering the sea. Techniques to accomplish the task are readily available and part of best  management practices. The reclamation of the seabed should proceed with adequate  safeguards to prevent loss of sediments beyond the immediate footprint of the project. Silt  curtains and other techniques can be used to accomplish the goal. The erosion risk would be  greater with option 4 than option 6. Option 4 will require significant topographic alteration of  the land. Such site work adjacent to the coast increases risk of erosion and requires mitigation.  Modification of coastal processes and coastal stability.  This issue is relevant to this project.  Both options involve considerable reclamation of the seabed with potential impacts on coastal  processes. There are risks of modifications on both the Trellis Bay and Well Bay extensions. The  concerns include possible alterations of localized currents that may change sediment transport  and deposition characteristics. For example, the runway extension toward Trellis Bay could  impacts currents so that parts of Trellis Bay, or even more distant locations like Long Bay, may  be affected. The result could be erosion and scouring of portions of the seabed or shore.  Alternatively, changes to currents could result in sand deposition in new areas or increased  deposition in existing areas. That could impact vessel navigation and require future dredging or  other maintenance. Similar questions would apply to the Well Bay area where strong currents  are influenced by tides. Computer models included in this IA, and described in detail in the  Appendix, suggest such problems are unlikely to be serious.   Changes in drainage patterns. There should be minimal changes in drainage patterns on the  airport grounds from either option. There will be increases in land area that will increase  quantities of runoff, but the pattern should remain nearly the same. Storm water retention  areas and discharge locations will be recommended to minimize negative impacts. Rain water  capture and retention should be incorporated into the runway design wherever practical.  Recommendations include the adoption of site specific best management practices to prevent 

  73   


the loss of sediments or pollutants into the sea. Stormwater runoff should be diverted away  from Trellis Bay to reduce the negative impact on water quality.    Changes in surface and ground water quality. Water quality issues will emerge at the airport  just like any developed area. Runoff from surfaced roads (runways) and parking areas can  contain oil, fuel and other contaminants. There are numerous ways this can be mitigated. Using  clean technologies, and careful site planning, should reduce risk of ground water  contamination. Mechanisms to capture the first inch of surface runoff should be adopted to  lessen discharge of pollutants into nearby coastal environments. Any other sources of  contaminants that may enter the surface waters should be minimized to maintain good water  quality.  Changes in marine water quality. All land based pollutants should be controlled and prevented  from entering the marine environment. Stormwater runoff from the airport should be collected  and treated before discharge to the sea. Boats using Trellis Bay should follow good  environmental practices. This includes use of holding tanks for sewage and not discharging  other pollutants into the coastal environment. Maintaining good water flow through the bay  will be necessary to maintain water quality. All activities at the airport should be carefully  monitored and managed to prevent water quality deterioration. Unfortunately, many factors  beyond the control of Airport Authority presently impact the surrounding marine water quality.  Modification of oceanographic conditions.  Computer modeling associated with this IA suggest  minimal modification of coastal oceanographic conditions. The impact of either runway option  on currents and sediment transport or deposition is predicted to be insignificant. However,  impacts on water quality, especially in Trellis Bay, may be subject to significant variation.  Depending on the option selected, the design mitigation strategies adopted, and the  management plan implemented, there could be large differences in resulting water quality in  the bay.  Air pollution.  Air pollution is not expected to be a significant issue at the airport as a result of  the runway extension. The only sources of air pollution would be those normally associated  with airport operations and construction activities. Presumably these will be temporary and  within an acceptable range. Dust may be a problem during some construction, particularly  during site work. Best management practices should be followed to minimize and control dust.      74   


Careful scheduling of activities that may generate dust or excessive noise will reduce the  annoyance to the public. The rapid dispersal of pollutants by the ever present trade winds  should minimize any local impact. Nevertheless, care should be exercised during construction  and long‐term operations to minimize discharge of any contaminants into the air.  Changes in terrestrial species, populations, and habitats of flora and fauna. The impacts on  terrestrial flora and fauna will vary depending on the option selected. Option 4 will eliminate  the salt pond and significantly alter adjacent terrestrial environments. Little useful mitigation  would be possible. Option 6 would minimally impact the salt pond and nearby terrestrial  habitats.    Creation of new habitat.  New habitat would be created along the rock slope of the new  runway. The large boulders along the shore would create new substrate for encrusting marine  organisms. That would include algae, sponges, corals, worms, tunicates and other marine life.  Those creatures would attract mobile invertebrates, such as urchins, starfish, crabs, lobster and  more. Of course, fish would find refuge and food among the rock boulders. However, the new  habitat would come at a loss of existing underwater habitats.   Loss of rare plant or animal species and introduction of exotic species. The loss of the salt  pond, with option 4, would negatively impact rare wetland species, both plants and animals.  Additional rare terrestrial flora and fauna may be lost in adjacent habitats. Certainly the loss of  mangroves and the associated fauna would be negative. The introduction of exotic species is  always a risk with development. Such introductions are often inadvertent and a consequence of  human activity. In the marine environment, there is risk of loss of rare species, like Acropora  corals, conch, and others. There are limited opportunities for mitigation for the loss of rare  species with either option.  Impacts due to visitor access to sensitive areas. Here should be minimal issues related to  increased visitor access to sensitive areas. There are not likely to be problems in the terrestrial  environments. However, increases in visitor numbers may have detrimental effects in the  marine environment. Improving access to sensitive coral reefs, especially in shallow areas, will  usually increase damage and injury to the habitat. Increased disease risk to corals is one of the  possible outcomes.  

  75   


Impacts resulting from measures to deal with problems of insect pests. This will become a  management issue for the future. All pest control measures must consider safety of humans  and the environment. Such measures are well established and vary according to the target  species and the environmental sensitivity of the site. As a developed site, the airport (and  surrounding Trellis Bay) already deals with insect pests and will continue to do so in the future.  Changes in coastal and marine species and habitats. The runway extension options both  involve considerable reclamation of the seabed. The size of the extension will result in the loss  of considerable habitat. This is unavoidable and a consequence of development. While  everything in the footprint of the runway extension will be lost (except for what may be  relocated) the underwater habitats are widespread and much more exists beyond the direct  impact zone. Coastal mangroves in the Well Bay area will also be affected.  Impacts on fish nurseries and traditional fishing grounds.  There has been traditional fishing in  the offshore waters around the airport and all of Tortola. The area is overfished. Any activity  that might reduce fishing pressure without harming the marine environment would be a good  thing. The marine surveys discovered nursery habitat for juvenile reef fish and invertebrates of  commercial importance. Thus, there will be loss of such habitat with either option. However,  some mitigation is possible. Such options will be site specific and depend on the runway option  selected and various parameters involving actual construction. Habitat creation and  improvement could offset some of the losses.  Demands on infrastructure facilities in relation to existing capacities.  The basic infrastructure  existing at the present time appears to be adequate for the current demand. Roads, parking,  and utilities seem sufficient to meet the demand. Since the economy is dependent on tourism  that fluctuates seasonally, demands for infrastructure and services will fluctuate accordingly. At  present, the capacity appears adequate.  Demands on infrastructure facilities in relation to proposed improvements.  The expansion of  the runway is expected to generate additional activity that will require additional services and  support. Such growth and expansion will stimulate the economy and create the kind of climate  desired by government. Increases in tourist arrivals in large jets will be pulsed. Thus, there will  be sudden, and temporary, increases in demands for infrastructure and services. Details are  provided in the social assessment in the Appendix. 

  76   


The risk of occurrence of potential hazards as a result of development.  Increased risks to  hazards often accompany increased human use. There are no expected hazards associated with  this project that differ substantially with any other similar project in a similar location. Natural  risks might include hurricanes and earthquakes. Certainly, storm flooding and tsunamis are a  risk in low lying areas. Man‐made hazards might include fire, construction accidents, and  numerous others typically associated with airport developments. They are a recognized part of  life by most people. However, safety precautions and first aid or provision for appropriate  assistance should be a part of the operations at the airport. Such plans and provisions already  exist and are part of required airport procedures. A Hazard and Vulnerability Assessment and  an Emergency Response and Contingency Plan are referenced in the Appendix.  Coastal Model Any  coastal  modeling  project  begins  by  simulating  the  existing  conditions.    This  allows  the  scientists and engineers to get a feel for the validity of the models.   In other words, before the  model can be trusted, it must show that it produces results that match what is going on in the  real  world.    In  addition  to  the  existing  conditions,  a  model  can  be  used  to  predict  how  adjustments to the system impact the system.   For this project, several proposals were considered as alternatives for the airport modifications.   From these alternatives, two candidates (option 4 and option 6) were chosen for more in depth  review.  These were included in the modeling study.   

  77   


Option 4 Runway Alignment 

Option 6 Runway Alignment  As the review process has progressed, the advantages of option 6 have made it the front runner  from some perspectives, however, it was observed that this option significantly impacted the  opening of Trellis Bay, and therefore, could significantly impact the circulation in that bay.  In  anticipation  of  the  need  for  more  circulation,  two  local  modifications  for  option  6  were  also      78   


included in the numerical modeling study.  These included the addition of a canal through the  island and the removal of a section of Sprat Point from the East side of Trellis Bay.  This resulted  in five alternatives to be considered in the numerical modeling study.  Trellis Bay   Flushing Impacts   The 2 proposed runway alternates have been studied to determine the anticipated impacts on  Trellis  Bay.    This  location  was  studied  in  more  detail  because  of  the  impacts  the  runway  expansion, especially associated with Option 6, will have on reducing the existing bay opening  and the resulting flushing impacts.    Option  4  at  7,000  ft  is  not  expected  to  significantly  affect  the  flow  of  water  and  currents  in  Trellis Bay.  However, Option 6 at 7,000 ft reduces the opening into Trellis Bay to about 475 ft.   Option 6 is considered to have impacts on the ability of water to flow in and out of Trellis Bay,  therefore, impacting flushing.  If the area cannot flush properly it could result in future water  quality issues within Trellis Bay.    There will be a noted change in the circulation of Trellis Bay.  The flow trace animations of all of  the modified options bear this out in a qualitative sense.  The following image shows a snapshot  of  the  flowtrace  of  Trellis  Bay  for  Option  6.    The  speckles  inside  Trellis  Bay  indicate  relatively  stagnant  water  inside  the  bay.    This  is  true  throughout  the  tidal  cycle.    The  quantitative  comparison at sample points inside Trellis Bay also bears this out.  The graph below shows the  velocity in the horizontal direction for a typical point inside the bay.  The other sample points  show similar plots.  The yellow curve represents the higher velocity associated with this point in  the bay for existing conditions.  The other four curves show the marked reduction in velocity.   The canal option does show some improvement compared to option 6 by itself or the option to  remove Sprat Point. 

  79   


Flowtrace of Trellis Bay with Option 6. 

Velocity at point 139, typical of results for points inside of Trellis Bay.          80   


Changes In The Sediment Budget – Movement of Sand  The analysis reveals that Trellis Bay will be depositional in terms of sediment transport  potential under all of the proposed development schemes.  There is some minor potential for  sediment movement at the eastern end near Sprat Point, especially if a portion of the point is  removed.  There is also a potential for sediment to move around and redeposit near the  government dock and at Bellamy Cay (the Last Resort) if there is a canal from Well Bay.  This  movement will be in one direction only rather than a typical orbital movement based on tides.   This potential is very modest since the existing currents are low.  Both Options 4 and 6 create a  basin that limits existing flow.  The two “mitigation” schemes, the opening of Sprat point or a  canal to Well Bay will not provide enough flow to allow the currents to reach the existing  velocity conditions.  While not part of this portion of the analysis, sediment is more of an issue  for water quality and storm water management rather than sediment transport.  Long Bay  The potential impacts to the existing sediment transport scheme in Long Bay vary based on the  development option.  The potential impacts due to Option 6 are little change to the sediment  budget and stability however there is a slight potential for erosion.  The velocities are low and  the potential impacts are likely to manifest themselves as some isolated shifting of sand at the  out‐shore ends with no net loss in the bay.  This is based on the grain size that shows the  majority of the sand is between the #40 (0.4mm) and #100 (0.15mm) sieve.  The potential impacts due to Option 4 will change the area from one that is stable to one that is  slightly depositional.  The area will still have a similar current scheme so accumulation of fine  grain material in the bay will be limited.  These potential changes to the existing sediment  transport scheme are greater at the “ends” of the bay where the beach is not as wide and the  sand is mainly in the #40 (0.4mm) to #60(0.2mm)  sieve size.  This sand is not easily moved by  the currents that were measured at the site or those velocities calculated by the model.  The  impacts of the canal and the changes at sprat point can be seen in Figure 27.  These changes are  modest and will have less impact than Option 6 and if there are any impacts they will be  isolated to the end areas.  Well Bay  As would be expected other than the areas that will be covered by fill due to the runway  extension there are no anticipated changes in the sediment transport scheme in Well Bay.  The      81   


currents measured in Well Bay are very low and the sediments are sand in the #20 (0.85mm)  and #40 (0.42mm) size.  There will be little impact to the existing sediment transport schemes  due to any of the options.  The proposed canal from Well to Trellis Bay does have some  potential to alter the transport compared to the existing conditions.  This potential is very low  when the actual current velocities are analyzed.  Even with a four to five fold increase  (anticipated change) in the current at the mouth of the canal the absolute currents are still well  below that which is needed to move sand of this size.  There is likely to be some movement of  the sediments at the canal entrance which will reach equilibrium without loss of sand in the  overall area.   It shall be pointed out that these predictions and conclusions are based on normal tidal driven  current conditions.  Storms are anticipated to have a more profound impact on erosion and  deposition of bottom sediments. Each storm is expected to have a unique direction, wave  height and storm surge which will result in different impacts. The study of these impacts is  complicated and is beyond the scope of this study.  Hydrology  Beef Island can be broken into roughly 15 small drainage areas (see attached plan of drainage  areas in the computations).  Three of the drainage areas, are predominately influenced by the  airport runway, aprons, buildings and parking lots (see drawing below).  The attached  computations center on these three drainage areas.   The airport drains to the Trellis Bay to the  southeast, Long Bay to the northwest and to Wells Bay to the South.   Trellis Bay is the largest  recipient of stormwater runoff leaving the airport.   It should be noted that Trellis Bay is also  impacted by stormwater runoff from a small number of homes along the coast of the bay , a  small developed island, and two additional drainage basins consisting of mostly undeveloped  wooded land to the east.  Presently stormwater leaves the site via overland flow along the northwest airport border to  Long Bay and a small impoundment at the southwest corner of the airport.  Stormwater is  collected south of the runway in drainage ditches/swales within the airport proper.   Stormwater collected in the ditches/swales is directed to point discharges.  The largest point  discharge is in the vicinity of the southeast corner of the runway and consists of 3 culverts, 32  inches in diameter, emptying into Trellis Bay.  The western point discharge consists of a single  24 inch in diameter culvert emptying into Well Bay.  Some infiltration is assumed to occur in the  existing swales but was not modeled since it would skew the comparisons to the considered      82   


options, since a drainage plan is not available for the options at this early stage of proposed  expansion plans.  It should be noted that many methods could be employed to reduce  stormwater leaving the site and entering coastal waters. These include the incorporation of  retention basins, infiltration trenches, low impact development methods, best management  methods (BMP) and careful site design.  The Hydrology model used for this study is based on the United States Department of  Agriculture Soil Conservation Service Engineering Technical Release 55 (TR‐55).  The model  employs a curve number to account for hydrologic soil group, cover type, hydrologic condition,  and antecedent runoff condition.  Infiltration rates vary widely and are affected by subsurface  permeability as well as surface intake rates.  The cover types range from bare soil to dense  forested areas with heavy forest litter and consider the condition of the cover from good to  poor.  The antecedent runoff condition is an attempt to gage the runoff potential of a site from  storm to storm.  Another consideration is if the impervious areas are connected through a  stormwater drainage system or if they are un‐connected and allowed to flow unto pervious  areas.  It is reported in several sources that annual rainfall in the BVI is in the range of 40 to 45 inches.   Paraphrasing most drainage design manuals in publication today: The highest peak discharges  from small watersheds are usually caused by intense brief rainfall that occurs as a distinct event  or as a part of a longer storm.  Due to the high variability of rainfall intensity distribution during  a storm event the USDA has developed synthetic rainfall distributions using U.S. National  Weather Service data for typical storms.  The twenty four hour storm, while longer than that  needed to determine peaks for small drainage areas, is appropriate for determining runoff  volumes.  A single storm duration associated synthetic rainfall distribution can be used to  represent not only peak discharge but also runoff volumes.   This is of particular interest in  modeling the intense short duration storms that can occur at any time in the BVI.  Annual  maximum 24 hour rainfall events and the probability of reoccurrence were taken from data for  the U.S. Virgin Islands (reference 4).  In addition the following figures were used to estimate the  annual rainfall and monthly distribution: 

  83   


84  


NCDC 1981‐ 2010 

Jan

Feb Mar  Apr  May Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov Dec

Annual

Average   3.13  1.90  1.62  3.23  3.97 2.64 3.43 3.74 5.87 5.64  7.32  4.23 46.72  

  NCDC  1981‐ 2010 

Jan

Feb Mar  Apr  May Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov Dec

Annual

Average   3.01  1.77  1.70  3.09  4.07 2.77 3.49 3.84 5.50 5.23  5.93  3.50 43.90   Computations were prepared to evaluate the effect on stormwater runoff rates and anticipated  stormwater volumes due to the increase of impervious area as a consequence of the expansion  of the Terrance B. Lettsome International Airport.  As previously mentioned two scenarios were      85   


evaluated, referred herein as Option No. 4 and Option No. 6, for the three drainage areas most  influenced by activities at the airport.  The computations compare the rates of runoff  and  runoff volumes generated during 1, 2, 10, 25 and 100 year storm events.  The computations are  meant to provide an order of magnitude comparison to the existing build out of the airport  facility.  In order to make a straight line assessment routing through existing or proposed  channels, pipes and detention facilities was not considered.  This allows the computations to  gage the change in potential stormwater leaving the site for the existing facilities, and the  proposed options without attenuation.   

  86   


87  


88  


89  


The following summary of changes to the drainage areas were used in the hydrology model:

Drainage Area 1 Existing Condition

Option No. 4

Option No.6

Acres

Acres

% Change

Acres

% Change

Total Area

58.32

58.82

+0.86%

70.74

+21.30%

Impervious Area

7.72

9.81

+27.07%

11.00

+42.49%

Curve No.

77

78

+1.30%

78

+2.60%

Drainage Area 2 Existing Condition

Option No. 4

Acres

Acres

% Change

Acres

% Change

Total Area

78.73

145.90

+85.32%

90.90

+15.46%

Impervious Area

42.25

55.4

+31.13%

45.7

+8.17%

Curve No.

89

86

-6.74

89

0.0%

  90   

Option No.6


Drainage Area 3 Existing Condition

Option No. 4

Option No.6

Acres

Acres

% Change

Acres

% Change

Total Area

33.49

52.16

+55.75%

45.60

+36.16%

Impervious Area

2.6

6.74

+159.23%

4.86

+86.92%

Curve No.

72

74

+2.78

74

+2.78%

As can be expected, the resulting increase in total area and increase of impervious surfaces  resulted in an increase in peak flow (rate of discharge) and in the volume of total stormwater  generated by the proposed development.  A summary of the overall results are shown in the  following tables: 

     Reoccurrence 

DRAINAGE AREA 1

Projected 24Hr.  Rainfall 

Existing   Runoff Area 58.32  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 77  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume 

Option No. 4  Runoff Area 58.82  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 78  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume 

(Inches)

(cfs)

(acre‐feet)

(cfs)

(acre‐feet)

(cfs)

(acre‐feet)

1 Year 

2.8

47.01

4.135

55.45

4.427

61.53

5.318

2 Year 

3.9

90.9

7.766

104.88

8.188

116.42

9.838

10 Year 

6.6

212.29

18.187

239.79

18.865

266.41

22.669

25 Year 

8.8

315.72

27.422

353.83

28.267

393.33

33.969

100 Year    

10.5

396.17

34.782

442.28

35.743

491.82

42.954

 

 

 

 

  91   

Option No. 6  Runoff Area 70.74  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 78  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume 

 

 

 


Reoccurrence

DRAINAGE AREA 2

1 Year  2 Year  10 Year  25 Year  100 Year    

Projected 24Hr.  Rainfall  (Inches) 

Existing  

Option No. 4 

Option No. 6 

Runoff Area 78.73  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 89  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume  (cfs)  (acre‐feet) 

Runoff Area 145.90  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 86  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume  (cfs)  (acre‐feet) 

Runoff Area 90.90  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 89  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume  (cfs)  (acre‐feet) 

130.22 204.33  386.34  532.86  645.13 

210.84 346.15  686.01  961.64  1172.97    

151.24 237.27  448.57  618.65  748.98 

2.8 3.9  6.6  8.8  10.5    

 

10.548 16.83  32.937  46.24  56.537    

16.863 27.941  57.11  81.593  100.632    

 

12.179 19.433  38.03  53.389  65.278    

DRAINAGE AREA 3

     Reoccurrence 

 

1 Year  2 Year  10 Year  25 Year  100 Year    

 

Projected 24Hr.  Rainfall  (Inches) 

Existing   Runoff Area 33.49  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 72  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume  (cfs)  (acre‐feet) 

Option No. 4  Runoff Area 52.16  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 74  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume  (cfs)  (acre‐feet) 

Option No. 6  Runoff Area 46.56  acres  Adjusted Curve No. 74  Runoff  Runoff  Rate  Volume  (cfs)  (acre‐feet) 

17.69 39.25  102.72  158.97  203.37 

32.45 67.96  169.58  258.17  327.67 

28.97 60.66  151.37  230.45  292.49 

2.8 3.9  6.6  8.8  10.5    

 

1.731 3.539  9.038  14.079  18.153    

 

3.074 6.064  14.939  22.961  29.407    

 

2.744 5.413  13.335  20.496  26.25    

As shown in the result summary above Option 4 causes the largest jump in runoff rate and  increase of volume of storm water entering the adjacent coastal waterways.        92   


To put these numbers into perspective the stormwater volume associated with each storm  reoccurrence for the existing condition, and both options being considered, are tabulated  below in relation to the depth it would fill a 80 yard by 120 yard soccer field (1.98 acres in size)  if the sides of the soccer field were contained:   

Storm Reoccurrence 

Existing Condition Drainage Area 1 

Drainage Area 2 

Drainage Area 3 

to Long Bay 

to Trellis Bay 

to Wells Bay 

 

Depth of Water

 

within 1.98 ac  

Depth of Water   

Depth of Water 

within 1.98 ac  

 

within 1.98 ac  

Volume

Impoundment

Volume

Impoundment

Volume

Impoundment

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

4.14 7.77  18.19  27.42  34.78 

2.09 3.92  9.19  13.85  17.57 

10.55 16.83  32.94  46.24  56.54 

5.33 8.50  16.63  23.35  28.55 

1.73 3.54  9.04  14.08  18.15 

0.87 1.79  4.56  7.11  9.17 

1 Year  2 Year  10 Year  25 Year  100 Year 

Storm Reoccurrence 

Option No. 4

1 Year  2 Year  10 Year  25 Year  100 Year 

Drainage Area 1 

Drainage Area 2 

Drainage Area 3 

to Long Bay 

to Trellis Bay 

to Wells Bay 

 

Depth of Water

 

within 1.98 ac  

Depth of Water    within 1.98 ac  

 

within 1.98 ac  

Volume

Impoundment

Volume

Impoundment

Volume

Impoundment

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

4.14 8.19  18.87  28.27  35.74 

2.09 4.14  9.53  14.28  18.05 

16.86 27.94  57.11  81.59  100.63 

8.52 14.11  28.84  41.21  50.82 

3.07 6.06  14.94  22.96  29.41 

1.55 3.06  7.54  11.60  14.85 

  93   

Depth of Water 


Storm Reoccurrence 

Option No. 6 

1 Year  2 Year  10 Year  25 Year  100 Year 

Drainage Area 1 

Drainage Area 2 

Drainage Area 3 

to Long Bay 

to Trellis Bay 

to Wells Bay 

 

Depth of Water

 

within 1.98 ac  

Depth of Water   

Depth of Water 

within 1.98 ac  

 

within 1.98 ac  

Volume

Impoundment

Volume

Impoundment

Volume

Impoundment

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

(acre‐feet)

(feet)

5.32 9.84  22.67  33.97  42.95 

2.69 4.97  11.45  17.16  21.69 

12.18 19.43  38.03  53.39  65.28 

6.15 9.81  19.21  26.96  32.97 

2.74 5.41  13.34  20.50  26.25 

1.39 2.73  6.73  10.35  13.26 

As shown in the above charts and figures Option No. 4 produces the largest increases of  stormwater discharge rates and runoff volumes.  Additional detail can be found in the Appendix  which contains the preliminary hydrology computations.   

6.2 Mitigation of Environmental Risks Mitigation measures to address environmental issues can be presented as a separate report to  this project when the plans progress beyond the conceptual stage. In general, most mitigation  recommendations  will  follow  accepted  standards  that  are  appropriate  to  the  potential  risks  assumed  to  occur  with  a  project  of  this  type.  Detailed  comments  on  mitigation  will  be  more  appropriate once the preferred runway option is determined.  Some  mitigation  measures,  such  as  silt  fences  to  prevent  erosion,  are  standard  and  well  accepted  parts  of  any  construction  project.  These  mitigation  measures  are  recommended  as      94   


general actions to take. The details and specific directives will vary according to site conditions.  Certainly,  they  would  be  more  necessary  with  option  4.  Without  much  more  detailed  information,  not  available  at  the  present  time,  only  general  comments  can  be  offered.  The  suggestions will be driven more by the results desired rather than the techniques to employ.   In some situations, there are no practical mitigation measures to suggest. For example, habitat  loss  or  change  is  a  consequence  of  development  and  must  be  accepted  as  such.  Once  a  development plan is approved by government and construction begins, environmental impacts  are inevitable and unavoidable. Any mitigation that is practical would have only indirect bearing  on  the  specific  issue.  An  example might  include  alternate  habitat  repair  or  the  relatively  new  concept of mitigation banking.   Habitat  repair  refers  to  a  replacement  of  habitats  for  the  ones  lost.  If  ten  acres  of  sea  grass  must be lost to the runway extension, then the Project becomes obligated to construct, repair,  or replant a similar, or greater, acreage of habitat at another location. This approach has not  been consistently or successfully applied in the BVI. However, this report recommends habitat  repair  and  expansion  as  one  part  of  the  commitment  to  environmental  health  and  sustainability. Perhaps the expansion of the runway may consider such an approach as part of  the mitigation plan.  Mitigation banking is a concept where the damaged or lost habitat is assigned a monetary value  that  is  contributed  by  the  Developer,  in  this  case,  the  government.  The  fund  is  then  used  for  environmental  repair  projects  or  environmental  education.  Numerous  opportunities  exist  for  this approach at Beef Island, near the airport, and at other locations.  Hydrology Mitigation Measures  Mitigation of impacts relating the stormwater runoff to receiving water bodies is typically  broken into two components.  The first component involving issues with water quality and its  effect on receiving water bodies , and the second to address increases to the rate of runoff and  volume which directly affect erosion and the transport of sediment.    Stormwater should be recharged within the same subwatershed within the drainage area to  maintain baseflow at pre‐development recharge levels to the maximum extent practicable.   Recharge volume is determined as a function of annual pre‐development..Some exemptions to  the recharge are necessary to ensure public safety, avoid unnecessary threats of groundwater  contamination, and avoid common nuisance issues, a physical limitation that would make      95   


implementation impracticable or where unusual geological or soil features may exist such as  significant clay deposits, ledge, fill soils, or areas of documented slope failure. The objective of  the groundwater recharge is to protect water table levels, stream baseflow, wetlands, and soil  moisture levels.  Infiltrating stormwater may also provide significant water quality benefits such  as reduction of bacteria, nutrients, and metals when infiltrated into the soil profile. Maintaining  pre‐development groundwater recharge conditions may also be used to reduce the volume  requirements dictated by other sizing criteria (i.e., water quality, channel protection, and  overbank flood control) and the overall size and cost of stormwater treatment practices.   Recharge must occur in a manner that protects groundwater quality   Water Quality  Stormwater runoff should be treated before discharge.  Unmitigated release of stormwater via  culverts or direct discharge outfalls to coastal waters is looked upon unfavorably in today’s  scientific and ecologically conscious community.  The amount that should be treated from each  rainfall event is known as the required water quality volume (WQv) and is the portion of runoff  that carries the highest pollutant load.   The measure is intended to remove the majority of  pollutants in stormwater runoff at a reasonable cost by capturing and treating runoff from  small, frequent storm events that account for a majority of the annual pollutant load, while  bypassing larger, infrequent storm events that account for a small percentage of the annual  pollutant load.  This approach is based on the “first flush” concept, which assumes that the  majority of pollutants in urban stormwater runoff are contained in the first half‐inch to one‐ inch of runoff primarily due to pollutant washoff during the first portion of a storm event.   Studies and Florida determined that the first flush generally carries 90% of the pollution from a  storm.  Reference should be made to the hydrology appendix for further detail regarding water quality  volume.  To provide adequate treatment of stormwater, the WQ volume should be treated by at least  one of the structural best management practice (BMP) at each location where a discharge of  stormwater will occur.  Structural BMPs are generally required to achieve the following  minimum average pollutant removal efficiencies:  85% removal of total suspended solids (TSS),  60% removal of pathogens, 30% removal of total phosphorus (TP) for discharges to freshwater  systems, and 30% removal of total nitrogen (TN) for discharges to saltwater or tidal systems.       96   


Based upon results published in the scientific literature, the structural measures listed in the  appendix will meet these standards when properly designed, constructed, and maintained. BMPs targeted to remove other pollutant(s) of concern and/or to achieve higher pollutant  removal efficiencies may be required for impaired receiving waters, drinking water reservoirs,  bathing beaches, and shellfishing grounds.   In Myrtle Beach, a community that relies heavily on  beach resources for its tourist dependent economy, an ultraviolet (UV) light system was used to  treat stormwater to reduce bacteria and pathogens prior to discharge into the ocean.  Another  solution, that has been implemented in numerous coastal cities in the U.S and at numerous  airports, is to collect and store stormwater in tunnels below ground during the storm event and  then treatment of the stormwater at nearby sewage treatment facilities during off peak periods  prior to discharge to the receiving water.  The existing on‐site sewage treatment facility would  likely need to be up graded to accommodate this method of achieving the desired water quality  results.   

  97   


98  


Stormwater Rate of Discharge and Volume Mitigation   There are many simple proven methods for regulating the rate at which stormwater is  discharged and its volume after being conveyed to suitable area for collection.  Primary  methods include the employment of retention basins which capture all of the runoff, wet  and/or dry detention basins which detain the water for a period of time allowing it to be  metered out at a slower rate, and infiltration practices.  Several measures that have come into  vogue over the last decade revolving around what is referred to as “low impact development”  techniques, otherwise referred to as LID.  LID measures seek to reduce the volume by managing  the runoff as close to the source as possible by directing it to slight vegetative depressions in  the terrain, tree wells, groundwater recharge areas, vegetative lined channels with high level  overflows, and so forth.  LID strategies are favored for small sites since they incorporate water  quality improvements in their design.  Use of LID techniques does not necessarily completely  supplant the use of end of pipe technology, particularly on large developments like the airport  expansion being considered.  LID methods should be used in conjunction with other measures  on large sites.    The volume of water anticipated in the computations, generated by selected storm events,  along with the lack of extensive suitable permeable soil reduces the consideration of infiltration  as a complete solution for stormwater management on the site.  Infiltration however, could  possibly be employed to mitigate the water quality volume thereby reducing the overall volume  directed to an end of pipe solution.   Eliminating untreated direct discharge stormwater  solutions, particularly the existing outfalls at Trellis Bay and at Wells Bay, would go a long way  in improving the water quality in the coastal waters surrounding the airport.  Due to the large  volume of stormwater, outfalls would still be required but only after the stormwater is suitably  treated, the water quality volume removed from the waste steam, and outfalls are relocated to  areas that provide an opportunity for greater dispersion into receiving waters.  Of the two  options being proposed Airport expansion option number 6 presents the least intrusive overall  impact to the surrounding water quality with the exception of the waters within Trellis Bay.   Pre‐treatment of the stormwater prior to discharge and relocation of the Trellis Bay stormwater  outfall to the northeast end of the runway (the Conch Bay side of the runway) is worth  considering as an approach for  further study to ensure continued health of Trellis Bay.          99   


Regardless of which option is decided upon to facilitate the expansion of the airport it is likely  that it will require a hybrid solution to stormwater management, both for water quality and to  mitigates the large discharges anticipated to the receiving coastal waters.  Engineering firms  engaged to design the improvements will need to carefully study the existing soils, geology,  hydrology and available vegetation to properly design soil erosion and sedimentation plans for  the construction phase of the project.   Additionally, best management practices will need to be  incorporated into the long term improvements to safeguard against potential harmful effects of  unmitigated stormwater discharge directed to coastal resources.  

Dry Extended Detention Basin

  100   


Wet Extended Detention Basin

  101   


102  


Mitigation of potential harmful impacts on the surrounding landside and coastal environment,  due to the increase in stormwater runoff, is of paramount importance to a successful expansion  of the existing airport runway.  Due to the potential of short duration high intensity storms in  the BVI properly designed construction stormwater management practices must be employed  and diligently maintained throughout the construction phase of the airport expansion.   Construction managers, contractors and their subcontractors should be informed as to the  potential for dire consequences to the coastal environment should sediment laden runoff be  allowed to flow un‐checked into coastal resources.     Careful design of measures to protect the long term water quality of surrounding coastal waters  and associated coastal wetlands from the harmful effect of sediment and pollutants carried by  stormwater should be designed into the final stormwater management system by professionals  specializing in this field.  Pretreatment of the water quality volume by infiltration or  interception and UV disinfection and/or treatment at the sewage treatment facility should be a  top priority to ensure that most of the pollutants are removed from the waste stream prior to  discharge.  Retention or detention basins should be incorporated into the design to limit the  discharge rate, the sediment and the volume of stormwater leaving the site.  Excess water  stored underground or in retention basins could be used for irrigation within the airport  complex.      Although option number 6 presents the least environmentally intrusive alternative, when  compared to option number 4, there is a real concern that constricting the entrance to Trellis  Bay could lead to impairment of the bay’s water quality.  Relocating the existing three 32”  outfalls that discharge in Trellis Bay to the end of the proposed runway with outfalls and  diffusers located in Conch Bay would appear to be a positive step in maintaining the water  quality in Trellis Bay.  The diffusers should be carried far enough into Conch Bay to disperse  conveyed stormwater and allow optimal mixing in order to protect the pristine beach to the  west, at Long Bay.  In addition, due to the small watershed involved, the outfall to Wells Bay  could possibly be eliminated and replaced with a bottom infiltrating retention pond, within the  drainage area, with an overflow to accommodate the more severe rainfall events.  Further  detailed study is recommended to develop best management practices for mitigating the effect  of stormwater discharges to Trellis Bay, Well Bay, and Conch Bay.   

  103   


With regard to option number 4, preliminary computations indicate that there will be a 78%  increase in stormwater runoff to Trellis Bay, assuming a normally crowned runway with sheet  flow being the primary stormwater conveyance mechanism.  One advantage for Trellis Bay is  that this option does not constrict the entrance.   Also, should the Airport Authority decide to  exercise this option a portion of the stormwater could be collected in a drainage system and  split between Conch Bay and Trellis Bay.  This advantage would have to be weighed against the  overall impact to all the surrounding coastal waters since option no.4 generates significantly  more stormwater runoff due to its increase footprint.  The outfall to Wells bay could be  similarly treated as discussed for option number 6 above.    Design Options  Preliminary investigations of several alternates were performed to promote increased flow and  flushing at Trellis Bay for the Option #6 construction alternate.  These include supporting a  portion of the runway on piles, installing culverts below water through the runway fill material,  removing a portion of Sprat Point, and constructing a canal from Trellis Bay to Well Bay. The  benefits and preliminary costs for each of these are outlined below.  We performed a preliminary investigation into using a pile supported, bridge type structure  along a portion of the runway to promote better flow and flushing in the bay (see table below).   The overall structure is 492 ft long by 492 ft wide.  The Option 6 alternate requires about 1926  ft of fill to be placed across the opening to Trellis Bay.  About 25% of the runway fill length is  supported by a pile supported reinforced concrete slab type structure.  A steel sheetpile  bulkhead is also required at the transition from the pile supported structure to the earth fill at  each end.  It may be possible to locate the pile supported structure at the end of the runway to  eliminate the need for one of the bulkheads but the flushing impacts on the bay are not  expected to be as effective.  Refer to Proposed Bridge / Pile Supported Runway Option 6A Overleaf  The bridge approach provides about 45% of the opening that exists currently at Trellis Bay.  This  includes the opening at the end of the runway near Sprat Point and the area below the bridge  section.  This approach would provide a reasonable length for normal tidal cycles to create flow  and flushing within the Trellis Bay.  It is recommended that monitoring be conducted through a 

  104   


summer season to determine baseline readings before and after construction to verify there is  sufficient flow to maintain adequate water quality in the Trellis Bay.     A pile supported structural slab is considered costly and will have long term future maintenance  implications.  However, this is not an unprecedented approach to support a runway.  There are  several airports around the world that utilize this type of construction.  A few examples include  runway D at Tokyo Haneda Airport (Figures 2 and 3), the runway extension at LGA Airport in  New York, USA, and the expansion at London City Airport (Figures 4 and 5). Costs were not  available for the LGA or Haneda projects but the cost for the LCA airport structure completed in  2003 and 2007 ranged from $140 to $260/ft2.  This equates to a cost of between $34 and $62  million dollars for the 242,000 ft2 section required at this site. These are USD costs.   

Haneda Airport Pile Supported Runway     

  105   


Haneda Airport Stainless Steel Pile Jackets   

London City Airport Pile Supported Extensions        106   


London City Airport  Using  a  pile  supported  structure  to  support  a  portion  of  the  runway  is  considered  to  be  a  technically feasible alternate to provide increased flow and flushing into and out of Trellis Bay.   However, the cost of this approach is considered high and other alternates may accomplish the  same goal at lesser cost.  This approach will also result in increased maintenance and inspection  costs in the future due to corrosion of the steel piles and concrete in the marine environment.  This  approach  may  also  have  security  risk  implications  to  the  airport  due  to  providing  access  from  the  water  to  the  area  below  the  runway.    Borings  are  required  to  determine  soil  and  bedrock conditions at the proposed bridge area to support design.    The second alternate investigated to promote flow and circulation in Trellis Bay is to install a  series of reinforced concrete box culverts across the filled area below the runway (Figure 6).     Refer to Proposed Bowed Culvert Runway Option 6B Overleaf    The intent is to create flow across the runway fill from Trellis Bay to the water on the north side  of  the  runway  fill.  The  culverts  are  installed  just  below  the  MLW  elevation.    A  series  of  49  culverts about 10 ft wide (490 ft flow length) are installed to create the same flow length as the      107   


pile supported alternate discussed above.  The culverts do not provide the same flow volume as  the bridge alternate, however, because they are only about 10 ft deep.  Installing the culverts  requires a cofferdam structure and dewatering system to allow construction to be undertaken  in the dry.   Borings are required to support design of the culvert alternate.  It is necessary to confirm that  the  culvert structures  can  be  constructed  without  experiencing  damaging  settlement.    If  soft,  compressible  soil  exists  at  the  bottom  of  Trellis  Bay  it  may  be  necessary  to  remove  these  materials or to install piles to support the culverts which will substantially increase costs.  The  borings  available  from  the  geotechnical  report  (GAL  1999)  indicate  existing  conditions  of  shallow bedrock with reasonably competent surficial soil at the bottom of Trellis Bay in the area  anticipated for these culverts.   The estimated preliminary additional cost for the culvert construction is estimated to be about  $8 ‐ $10 million dollars (USD).  This alternate is expected to require additional maintenance and  inspection costs similar to the bridge.  The concrete culverts may be subjected to blockage by  marine growth and/or debris and require cleaning.  Maintenance inside these culvert structures  is  not  easily  performed.    This  approach  may  also  create  a  security  risk  to  the  airport  due  to  access from water to the area below the runway.  The  third  alternate  investigated  to  improve  flow  and  flushing  into  Trellis  Bay  is  to  remove  a  portion of Sprat Point.    This approach has an added benefit of allowing for a wider entrance for vessel passage into this  popular  and  heavily  used  bay.    The  wider  entrance  allows  vessels  to  more  easily enter  Trellis  Bay without crossing close to the end of the runway.  The alternate includes removing between  394 and 492 ft of Sprat Point and dredging the channel to ‐16 ft.  The excavation and dredging  is estimated to result in about 140,000 to 170,000 cyds of spoil materials which may be suitable  for  use  as  backfill  for  runway  construction.  Test  pits  and  borings  are  required  to  determine  whether the material is suitable as backfill for the project.  This approach creates a 787 to 885 ft  wide channel (outside the no boat zone) which is anticipated to provide significant water flow  and flushing during a normal tidal cycle.  The cost of the excavation and dredging is estimated  at  about  $2  to  3  million  dollars  (USD)  depending  on  access.    However,  there  may  be  a  corresponding  reduction  in  borrow  material  costs  (compared  to  trucking  from  quarries)  because of the close proximity of Sprat Point to the runway fill area.       108   


Refer to Proposed Sprat Point Demo Option 6C Overleaf  The fourth alternate investigated is to construct channel about 4034 ft long to connect Trellis  Bay to Well Bay to promote better flushing.  The channel would generally parallel the runway and extend between the terminal building and  the runway.  The location requires access bridges and retaining walls in areas near the terminal  building  or  at  points  where  the  channel  must  be  crossed  by  pedestrians  or  vehicles.    The  channel proposed is trapezoidal with a width of about 32 ft at the bottom and 2:1 side slopes.  The invert of the channel is at elevation ‐16 ft.  The construction of this channel results in about  500,000 cyds of spoil material that may be suitable to be used as fill for the runway.  Test pits or  borings  are  necessary  to  confirm  the  soil  and/or  bedrock  is  suitable.    Based  on  available  information  bedrock  is  anticipated  to  be  encountered  along  the  excavation  area  west  of  the  terminal  building.    The  cost  of  this  approach  is  estimated  to  be  about  $6  ‐  $8  million  dollars  (USD).    The  length  of  the  channel  compared  to  its  cross  sectional  area  is  considered  an  inefficient  means  to  convey  water  between  Trellis  Bay  and  Well  Bay.    This  channel  may  develop  into  a  maintenance concern and possible debris trap.  If insufficient water volume may pass through  the channel during a normal tidal cycle it may lead to future water quality issues in Trellis Bay.    Refer to Proposed Channel Option 6D Overleaf         

   

  109   


6.3 Enhancements Enhancements are  generally  considered  to  be  actions  designed  to  improve  upon  an  existing  condition. The options for realistic and practical enhancements related to this project include  expansion of habitats, like mangroves, or prevention of current shoreline erosion. The adoption  of methodologies and technologies to reduce discharge of pollutants into the sea could also be  viewed  as  an  enhancement.  Improved  waste  water  treatment  and  stormwater  management  are examples.  The  issues  of  environmental  benefits  are  also  rather  problematic  because  of  the  subjectivity  involved.  Possible  benefits,  or  enhancements,  might  include  control  of  invasives.  If  invasive  plants  could  be  controlled  and  if  rats  could  be  reduced  in  number,  it  would  be  a  definite  enhancement.   Most  enhancements,  or  benefits,  would  be  possible  in  the  areas  of  public  awareness  and  education.  Creating  more  environmental  awareness  of  the  importance  of  the  mangroves  and  corals so individuals would exercise more care near coastal areas might enhance that portion of  the environment.   Education efforts related to the marine environment and protection of coral reefs might lead to  an enhancement of those habitats.   The positive impact of Option 4 is that it saves Trellis Bay, and provides a direct approach to the  airport runway. On the negative side, this option is less safe because of cross winds and wind  shear.  Marina Cay and Scrub Island will be directly under the flight path of the aircrafts, which  will also be closer to Great Camanoe.  The noise pollution for these three areas will increase  dramatically.  In addition, Long Bay Beach, which is frequented by residents for recreational  purposes, will be impacted, as well as boats crossing the waterway, and fishermen. With the  exception of the foregoing, all other factors in Option 6 apply.   

6.4 Significance of Environmental Impacts An assessment of the significance of the potential impacts is largely subjective in nature. It is  clear that there will be some impacts as a result of the runway extension plans. It is only  necessary to look at the Master Plan for the proposed extension and compare it to the existing  habitats to realize that there will be changes to the environment. It is the primary intention of  this report to comment upon those probable changes. In most cases, the recommendations are  intended to minimize collateral damage. That is, to keep the environmental impacts within the      110   


boundaries of the footprint of the reclaimed area. These have been commented upon  previously.   The ultimate significance of the potential environmental impacts is dependent on how the  runway extension project is carried out and if the recommendations for mitigation are  considered and correctly implemented. For example, erosion issues can be resolved so there is  little or no negative environmental impact. Conversely, without proper erosion control  measures, sediment can pour into the sea and devastate the marine environments turning the  offshore coral reefs and sea grasses into a barren underwater wasteland. There are numerous  options to reduce impacts, beyond the footprint of the extension. Improving water quality in  Trellis Bay can have a significant beneficial impact. Some of those benefits can be realized as  part of the extension project.   The significance of the environmental impacts on the human environment is documented in  Table 27 of the socio economic appendix as the level of impact ‐ low, medium and high – the  most significant of which – in order of priority are the impact on:  •

The Last Resort at Bellamy Cay will be impacted by the some obstruction to the view,  the noise, and a potential reduction in business activity if the charter boats do not come  to Trellis Bay 

Trellis Bay business community will also be impacted by potential view obstruction,  noise pollution, and the potential loss of some charter boats from which it derives its  business.  Little Mountain – especially those dwellings on the south side of the mountain – who  will experience high noise levels on aircraft landing and takeoff, as well as the noise  from aircraft activity while on the ground.   Great Camanoe which will be impacted by the noise on aircraft departure, the lights,  and more turbulent waters to navigate on approach to and departure from Trellis in  tenders and dinghies.  Hodges Creek and Well Bay will be impacted by the noise on arrival of the aircrafts. 

•    

  111   


TBLIA Runway Expansion ‐ Classification of Environmental Impacts    Impact   Degree of Impact  Area of Impact 

Duration of Impact 

Probability of  Residual Impacts    Moderate without  mitigation 

Option 4  Impairment of water  clarity and quality in  Trellis Bay  Loss of near shore  marine habitats  Erosion on land 

moderate 

Trellis Bay and area  south of runway 

Long‐term if not  mitigated 

certain

Loss of open space  Loss of terrestrial  habitat  Stormwater runoff 

high high 

Runway footprint  Construction areas 

permanent in project  footprint  Short‐term during  construction  permanent  permanent 

high

moderate

Area of construction  and project footprint  Construction areas 

Moderate to high 

Loss of mangroves 

Potentially high 

Discharge sites and  down current  Well Bay 

Potentially long‐term  without intervention  permanent 

High without  mitigation  High without  mitigation 

           

low high  high 


TBLIA Runway Expansion ‐ Classification of Environmental Impacts    Impact   Degree of Impact  Area of Impact 

Duration of Impact 

Probability of  Residual Impacts    high without  mitigation 

Option 6  Impairment of water  clarity and quality in  Trellis Bay  Loss of near shore  marine habitats  Erosion on land 

high 

Trellis Bay  

Long‐term if not  mitigated 

certain

Loss of open space  Loss of terrestrial  habitat  Stormwater runoff 

high minimal 

Runway footprint  Construction areas 

permanent in project  footprint  Short‐term during  construction  permanent  temporary 

high

moderate

Area of construction  and project footprint  Construction areas 

Moderate to high 

Loss of mangroves 

moderate

Discharge sites and  down current  Well Bay 

Potentially long‐term  without intervention  permanent 

High without  mitigation  High without  mitigation 

low high  low 


Terrance B. Lettsome International Airport

Runway Extension ‐ Impact Assessment Options Evaluation Matrix ‐ Option 6 6

Option Mitigation

None

Description

A

B

Piled Section

Culverts Section

C

D

Relocate Existing  Remove Sprat Point,  Storm Water Drainage  Install Breakwater  Outfall

E Water Channel

Ocean Current /  Circulation 

‐5

5

3

4

5

2

Marine Wildlife  Impact

‐5

4

2

5

4

1

Vegetation Impacts

na

na

na

na

0

na

na

na

na

na

na

na

Aeronautical Impacts

na

‐3

‐2

0

na

‐1

Socio‐Economic Impact

‐5

5

3

‐2

4

0

5

‐5

‐2

‐1

‐1

‐1

‐5

0

0

5

0

0

‐15

6

4

11

12

1

Salt Pond

Cost Vessel Navigation Overall Score

Based on a scale of ‐5 to +5 where +5 makes the most positive mitigation measure The above matrix should be considered in addition to policing the number of mooring vessels in Trellis bay Refer to Appendix Reports & Main IA for other mitigating measures 5/28/2012


6.5 Economic Evaluation of Environmental Effects, Adverse and Beneficial An economic analysis of environmental effects related to this project is difficult since there  remain numerous aspects of the runway extension details yet to determine. There are  numerous issues that will be resolved once the extension option is selected and plans are  finalized. Evaluating the monetary value of environmental impacts would be extremely  subjective, and probably inaccurate, given the current state of information and planning.  Further, this is a project by government to improve the infrastructure of the Territory. Thus,  there are numerous intangible considerations and results that are difficult to predict or to  which a monetary value can be assigned.  Developing a cost analysis for monitoring and mitigation measures is also premature. Those can  only be produced with any degree of accuracy once more project details are available. Until  then, such analysis would depend on very general assumptions and any conclusions would run  the risk of being labeled as little more than fanciful speculation.   With respect to compensation for the potential reduction or loss of business, as well as  depreciation in property values, some “developed” countries have some type of compensation  act.  Where devaluation could be demonstrated, valuations are carried out and compared with  those of properties in unaffected areas.  One anomaly to the UK Land Compensation Act 1963  now requires an amendment that “Land Compensation will become payable one year after the  completion of the approved facilities or on the achievement of the associated passenger  throughput, which ever arises first.”  Norman Reed “A Short History of Land Compensation  Matters,” 2006.    While the worst‐case‐scenario suggests that the value of the businesses at Trellis Bay could be  negatively impacted in the first instance, the risk could be mitigated by redirecting their  business to the type of visitors who will be frequenting Trellis Bay from the airport. In many  ways, it could be an opportunity for the Trellis Bay community to thrive beyond levels  previously experienced.  

Option 6 ‐ Airport’s Immediate Vicinity The Last Resort.  The economic impact on the Last Resort at Bellamy Cay will be very  significant, because of its close proximity to the proposed runway, both in terms of the noise  level and the possibility that Trellis Bay could lose its attractiveness and value as a popular  anchorage of great strategic value, and charter boats will no longer go there.  The owner of The      112   


Last Resort restaurant believes that the business will no longer be financially viable and asked if  the Government would compensate him for this perceived loss.  Alternatively, instead of  seeking compensation for the restaurant, or even a buyer for the same, the owner could  perhaps change his business model to target the increase number of visitors who would be  coming to the airport.  Because the property is leasehold, the economic impact is not as  burdensome as one that is freehold.  The demonstrable goodwill of the Government could be  to provide assistance in mitigating the noise pollution by offering to cover the cost of  retrofitting the restaurant with sound proof materials.  Trellis Bay Business Community.  This community will be impacted as well if the charter boats  stop coming.  As suggested above, the additional demand from the expected increase in the  number of visitors may require those businesses to rethink their old strategies and find new  ways to capture this new market.  Most of the structures at Trellis Bay are leasehold, thereby  reducing the economic shocks of the proposed runway extension.     The Loose Mongoose.  Unlike most of the structures at Trellis Bay which are leasehold, The  Loose Mongoose guest house is freehold and currently on the market for US$3.5 million. While  one could rightly argue that the global economic downturn might be affecting the sale of  properties today, it also calls into question the extent to which the proposed airport extension  will further complicate the sale of properties under or close to the fly path of the aircrafts.   Surf Song. This villa resort situated in Well Bay is also listed for sale at US$4.8 million.  Again,  the extent to which property values depreciate because of the proposed extension of the  runway should be monitored closely.  Outer Islands    •

Great Camanoe.  Great Camanoe will be impacted by aircraft noise, light, and impeded –  and perceived unsafe – access to Trellis Bay.  There are currently three properties for  sale at Great Camanoe,  and there may be more.    Marina Cay.  Marina Cay will experience noise pollution on aircraft departure.  It is also  likely that any change in charter boat traffic in Trellis Bay could increase or decrease the  current boat traffic congestion at Marina Cay.  Scrub Island.  Scrub Island will be impacted by noise pollution on the departure of  aircrafts.      113 


Virgin Gorda and the other Outer Islands.  Some persons interviewed expressed concern  that Tortola will have to deal with the collateral impact of the runway extension, while  Virgin Gorda – especially the North Sound ‐‐ will reap the benefits.  The collateral impact  envisaged to be the increased demands from the visitors and imported labour on traffic,  parking, water and sewerage, electricity, litter, housing, health services, education, and  criminal activity, to name a few.   

Noise and dust levels must be contained during the construction phase.  The socio‐economic  impact of this phase of the project will be far reaching, especially with regard to the influx of  labour necessary to build the runway extension and reinforce the existing runway to  accommodate the B737‐ 700 and B737‐800 jets.  Scott Wilson’s assessment of the impacts  during the construction phase in his 1999 EIA report on the Beef Island Development are as  relevant for this runway extension today as they were for the last extension.  Reference should  be made to the table below:  Construction Phase Socio‐Economic Impact Probability Matrix  (appendix).                                114   


Construction Phase Socio‐Economic Impact Probability Matrix  Short Term Impacts (Construction Phase)  Direct 

Effect +/‐  Noise and disruption from construction activities  ‐  and boats/vehicles in the immediate vicinity of  the airport – Little Mountain, Well Bay, Long  Bay, Trellis Bay, East End of Tortola, Little  Camanoe, Great Camanoe       

Congestion and disruption through the  transportation of materials for construction by  sea and land         Sea 

     Land 

Disruption for yachts and shipping from dredger  and from transportation and in‐fill activities 

Enhance income earning opportunities for local  labour depending upon the involvement of local  contracting firms  Congestion and restriction of read access for  inhabitants of Beef Island and local people  wishing to use recreational facilities  Restriction of parking and road access for taxi  drivers and employees working at the airport  Restriction of sites for informal traders stationed  outside the airport and at beaches at Trellis Bay  and Long Bay   

+

Disruption for small businesses in Trellis and  residents of Little Mountain and Well Bay 

Increased coastal traffic, congestion and loss of  access for recreational yachts and ferry boats  around Beef Island  Congestion and strain upon roads and other  infrastructure along the route from Road Town,  through East End to Beef Island  Potential long‐term environmental change to  Trellis Bay if sand is taken from there; change to  the character and coastal environment of the Bay,  making it less attractive to visitors  Improved income‐earning opportunities for small  businesses in East End, servicing site workers and  providing construction materials  Potential access problems for local workers at the  airport and Trellis Bay who rely upon hitching lifts  to their places of work  Loss of income‐earning opportunities 

‐ ‐ 

Loss of income‐earning opportunities at the  airport, but potentially enhanced business from  construction site 

115 

Effect +/‐  ‐ 

Increased volume on roads and pressure on local  ‐  infrastructure  Loss of  areas known for their tranquil atmosphere  ‐  Potential curtailment of visitor access from the  airport and sea and subsequent loss of income  earning opportunities   

Indirect Impacts 

+

‐ +/‐ 


Partial of the eastern entrance to Trellis Bay for  recreational yachts and ferry operators to  neighboring islands 

Possible restriction of access to Bay for some  yachts during hurricanes 

Source:  Scott Wilson, 1999     

                               

  116   


The extended runway will significantly increase the Territory’s able to provide convenient  access to current and prospective visitors.  Extension of the terminal building, other buildings  and associated facilities commensurate with the runway extension will facilitate enhanced  processing of visitors and luggage, among a myriad of other benefits. The Table below was  reproduced here largely in its entirety from Scott Wilson’s 1999 EIA report on the Beef Island  Airport Development, because of the significant relevance it has for the proposed runway  extension as well.                 Immediate Post Construction Phase Socio‐ economic Impact Probability Matrix  Immediate Post Construction Phase Impacts  Direct Impacts 

Effect +/‐ 

Larger runway and  capacity terminal building  +/‐ 

Improved conditions for visitors and airport  staff    Increased noise and visual intrusion for  businesses and recreational users in Trellis  Bay    Increased noise and visual intrusion for  visitors/owners of properties in close  proximity to the airport 

+

Increased noise and visual intrusion for  recreational beach users in Long Bay 

Effect +/‐ 

Potential increase in the number of passengers  arriving in the BVI, through increased  processing capacity  Enhanced income earning opportunities for  local people, development of small businesses  serving enhanced passenger flow such as  baggage handling, hotel accommodation  representatives, catering, souvenirs, transport  Increased employment in the formal sector  within the airport such as security guards,  customs and airline staff  More contented employees 

+/‐

+

+

+

‐ 

Enhanced “experience” for visitors  Potential increase in income through more  visitors from the airport 

+ + 

‐ 

Loss of “character” of the Bay  Possible loss of attractiveness of the Bay to  yacht users, and a decline in their numbers.  Consequent impact upon small businesses  decline in “quality of life” and loss of value of  properties  Loss of desirability of Beef Island as a  destination for visitors  Decline in popularity and use of a popular  recreational location with local people and  youth, community and church groups. 

‐ ‐ 

  117   

Indirect Impacts 

‐ ‐ 


7. Environmental Management Implementation 7.1 Environmental Monitoring An environmental monitoring plan can be prepared as the runway extension option is chosen  and construction plans are finalized. It should be recognized that the monitoring plan is a  response to specific site conditions and the project parameters as they emerge. Additionally,  the monitoring plan will be dependent upon the acceptance of the mitigation measures.   Reference should be made to section 6. of Ricondo & Associates report in the appendix. 

7.2 Environmental Management Capacity The environmental management capacity should be incorporated into the environmental  management plan. This deals with the requirements for and resources necessary to implement  the environmental management plan. It also involves the field data collection, analysis, and  report preparation and submission. This can be developed as part of the project plan once the  option is chosen and other decisions are made. Reference should be made to section 6. of  Ricondo & Associates report in the appendix. 

7.3 Environmental Management Plan An EMP is included in section 6. of Ricondo & Associates report in the appendix. The  environmental management plan can be adjusted as more information becomes available. It  covers mitigation measures during the construction phase, mitigation measures that are long  term and extend beyond the construction phase, and the management requirements to  implement the mitigation measures.                   118   


8. Conclusions & Recommendations 8.1 Statement of Impact The statement of impact would vary with the option chosen and the priorities assigned. The  environmental impact of option 4 would be substantial while the socio‐economic impact would  be moderate. The opposite would be true for option 6. Both options will produce impacts on  the environment and on the society. Whether or not those impacts are acceptable is highly  subjective, as was clearly demonstrated by the comments during the two open public forums.  

8.2 Conclusions and Recommendations The current proposal calls for significant runway extension and upgrade to airport. The size and  scope of the project will produce significant impacts. Erosion control measures during and after  construction will be very important to prevent sediments and pollutants from washing into the  sea. Control and management of stormwater runoff will help prevent deterioration of coastal  water quality. Control of noxious pests and invasives will be important. Impacts from the  reclamation at Trellis Bay and Well Bay will be significant but may be partially mitigated in  numerous ways.  Government has decided that the expansion of the airport is necessary to promote the future  economic growth of the Territory. Expansion of the existing airport has been the option of first  choice. Thus, any discussion of impacts and mitigation must be considered in view of those  decisions.  Negative environmental and social impacts will require mitigation in the context of the  extension plans. The following recommendations are offered to reduce, as much as possible,  any negative impacts this runway extension project may create:   

Silt fences and other safeguards should be employed to prevent sediment runoff into  the sea. More appropriate with option 4. 

All pollutants should be managed so that there is no loss to the environment, especially  into the sea.      119 


Stormwater management plan should prevent contaminants from entering the sea,  especially Trellis Bay. 

Wastewater treatment should include all establishments at Trellis Bay. 

Water quality issues in Trellis Bay should become part of the management plan. 

Existing vegetation should be preserved as much as possible, especially in the salt pond. 

Conduct dredging and reclamation so damage to adjacent areas is prevented. 

Mitigate habitat loss by replanting mangroves in new habitats. 

Relocate sea grasses and coral where possible onto new substrates or selected new  areas. 

As much as possible, the coral reefs should be protected from degradation by boats and  human activity, primarily through the education of visitors. 

Fair compensation should be considered for those individuals and businesses displaced  by this project. 

Mitigate loss of existing recreational space by creating new attractive areas. 

Any project will impact the existing environment. This runway extension project, as proposed,  will produce an impact on the environment and community. There are opportunities to  mitigate the impacts of the reclamation and effects on Trellis Bay water quality. The economic  benefits to the local community and the Territory could be sufficient to outweigh the  environmental and social consequences provided the recommendations are followed.   Reference should be made to the socio economic appendix to this report which concludes as  follows:   The informants for this study varied along a preference continuum about what they  passionately believe should be the driving force(s) for the runway extension. Those directly  impacted were as animated as those who were indirectly impacted, the former being deeply  concerned about they perceived to be a negative impact on them, personally, and the latter  more concerned about the development of the Territory.  Few of the persons consulted liked  either of the two runway expansion options primarily because of the many physical constraints      120   


such as topography; ecologically sensitive areas; air space penetrations such as residences and  boats; access by water and roads; as well as the impact on business and recreational activity all  juxtaposed with the type of air service sought.   When asked to choose the better of the two,  the plurality of participants selected Option 4, with the expectation and hope  that requisite  measures will be taken to protect Trellis Bay.   The option to install culverts in the eastern  extension of the runway above the sea floor to flush the Bay was viewed very favorably.  There were others who believe the timing of the expansion may be misguided, and that the  monies could be better spent on improving the quality of the BVI product by ensuring the  capacity of the Territory to deliver essential quality services commensurate current demands.   Those services include health, housing, education, vehicular traffic, parking, water and  sewerage, electricity, control of immigration, and crime prevention.  The re‐ordering of those  priorities is based on the assumption that the BVI does not need to have direct flights to the  U.S., as greater exposure will degrade the high end market the Territory seeks. The proponents  of this view believe that the Territory would be better served by effective and efficient regional  airlift.  Along this same line of reasoning, others argue that the Territory should have its own  regional airline to move passengers between San Juan, St. Maarten, Antigua and Barbados –  and perhaps, Guadeloupe, to reduce its dependence on other carriers and give the Territory  control over its own flight schedule with a view towards ensuring that passengers make their  connections seamlessly.  The St. Barths model is frequently invoked as one to emulate.      Still others would like to see incremental extensions.  They worry about whether the planes will  be full; whether there will be enough work for airport staff  between flights; where all of the  visitors will stay; what will happen in the slow season; what will happen were an aircraft  accident to occur; how flight cancellations will be handled and so forth.  A very small minority still believe that Anegada is the most suitable location for an international  airport, which could then become a hub for the rest of the Caribbean.  This is a very ambitious  and expensive proposition that perhaps conjures up images of the aviation industry becoming  the third pillar of BVI economy.  Others dismiss the idea primarily because of cost, logistics of  distance, and impact of hurricanes, and tsunamis.   While everyone understood that the Government had already made the decision to extend the  runway, participants took strong positions about whether or not to extend the runway.           121   


Stakeholder Positions   

Stakeholders Positions

     

Moderate Development 

Low Development 

       

Protective ƒ

 

ƒ

Vacation Home  Owners  Trellis Bay Business  Community 

Guarded   ƒ

ƒ

Cautious ƒ

Smaller Accommodation  Properties  Real Estate Brokers 

Some BVIslanders 

Progressive ƒ ƒ

Developers Some  BVIslanders 

On close inspection of those spirited discussions, the differences came down to two  fundamental questions that require different responses:     1) How do we move people to the BVI?  2) How do we create greater access to the BVI?   

If the issue is moving people to the BVI, then the regional aircraft alternative is a logical step  forward.  Alternatively, if the issue is creating greater access to the BVI, then the expansion of  the runway is a step in that direction.  However, this begs the question, “if we build it, will they  come?”.      122   

Airport EIA  

The environmental impact assessment for the proposed runway expansion project

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you