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2021 NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

The BIOSCIENCE

BIOECONOMY BONANZA

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING:

Driving a New Smart-Tech Paradigm

ENERGY: Fossil Fuels Relevant to Energy Independence of U.S. EXPANSION OPPORTUNITIES CALIFORNIA • CONNECTICUT MINNESOTA • NEW HAMPSHIRE NORTH CAROLINA • RHODE ISLAND ONTARIO, CANADA


is a life science business campus accelerating new therapeutics, medical devices, diagnostics and other innovations to patients by co-locating genomic R&D, workforce training, startups and established bioscience enterprises.

Find a building site along the double helix park on the 152-acre biotech campus Lease premier lab and office space with flexibility for growth Access leading-edge research talent, sequencing team and a skilled life sciences workforce

Learn more about the advantages of locating your bioscience company to the HudsonAlpha campus by scheduling a visit to Huntsville – a top 10 tech town, visit hudsonalpha.org/innovate or call our Economic Development team at 256.327.9591.


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

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FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK: The bioscience bioeconomy bonanza A positive post-COVID outcome: Proliferation of new concepts in bioengineering accelerating huge business development By David Hodes

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Alan Reyes-Guerra areyes@bxjmag.com 205-862-5175

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS David Hodes CREATIVE DIRECTOR Clint Cabiness

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INNOVATION AND STRATEGIES: New goals and new internet tech help build base for advanced manufacturing Gathering and sharing data more efficiently driving a new smart-tech paradigm. By David Hodes

clint@dialedinmediagroup.com 205-613-5910 EDITORIAL OFFICE King Publishing, Inc. 1000 Stafford Court Birmingham, Alabama 35242 Tel: 205-862-5175 ONLINE MEDIA ASSISTANT Sonia Buchanan

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: New ideas emerge for both sustainable and fossil fuel technologies

SUBSCRIPTION CHANGES & REQUESTS 205-862-5175 or www.bxjmag.com

Sustainable energy developments continue, but fossil fuels stays relevant to the energy independence of the U.S. By David Hodes

EXPANSION O P P O R T U N I T I E S 17 CALIFORNIA: 5th Largest Economy

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RHODE ISLAND: Optimal Location, Talent Rich

20 MINNESOTA: First In Five-Year

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NEW HAMPSHIRE: Live Free

in the World

Survival Rate

22 NORTH CAROLINA: Experience the Momentum

ONTARIO, CANADA: The Province Offers Unprecedented Support for Business

24 CONNECTICUT: Connected to the

King Publishing, Inc., 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242; www.bxjmag.com. Advertising rates are furnished upon request. Subscriptions are free to those who qualify. Non-qualified subscriptions are $69 in the U.S.; $89 in Canada and Mexico; elsewhere outside the U.S. is $99 for 10 issues. Back issue rate is $6 when available. Payment must accompany order. The views expressed in all articles and advertisements appearing in the Business Xpansion Journal magazine are solely those of the author and advertiser, respectively. © Copyright 2021, King Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No partof this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notification to Business Xpansion Journal, 1000 Stafford Court, Birmingham, AL 35242. Subscribers can make address changes by calling 205-862-5175 or by e-mail at www.bxjmag.com.

World

1000 Stafford Court, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35242

34 2020 National Directory of Economic Developers

TEL: 205-862-5175 2001

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INDUSTRY

OUTLOOK

BIOSCIENCE

Transmission electron microscopic image of an isolate from the first U.S. case of COVID-19, formerly known as 2019-nCoV. The spherical viral particles, colorized blue, contain cross-section through the viral genome, seen as black dots.

The bioscience bioeconomy bonanza B Y: D AV ID HO D ES

A positive post-COVID outcome: Proliferation of new concepts in bioengineering accelerating huge business development

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he amazing world of bioscience, also called life sciences, has been thrust onto center stage as a result of COVID-19 after years of below-the-radar business development and process commercialization essentially coming from various labs associated with academic institutions. .................................................................................................. The lab discoveries are making their way into practical applications that, in the case of this pandemic, are saving lives and providing medical assistance at a rate never seen before. The nation’s bioscience industry employs 1.87 million across more than 101,000 U.S. business establishments, according to “The Bioscience Economy 2020” report by the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO). Since 2016, the industry has grown its employment base by 7.2 percent, which is more than twice the growth rate for the overall private sector.


possible, she wrote. The bioscience industry Strychalski’s group is wages now reach nearly also working on the NIST two times the overall U.S. Genetic Sensor Foundry average—the average project, designed to make bioscience worker earns the engineering of living more than $107,000, or measurement systems $50,000 more than the predicable, scalable, and nation’s private sector routine, and allowing people average. The bioscience to remake or redesign raw industry’s total economic living materials into new impact on the U.S. economy products. totaled $2.6 trillion dollars in It allows researchers 2018, according to the BIO to experiment with cells, report. adjusting their genetic codes In a study published A volunteer and lab scientist doing COVID vaccine research at a and molecular machinery to by the American Chemical Pfizer lab. predictably engineer a cellular Society, a major challenge system to do exactly what remains in overcoming the they want it to do. In effect, difficulties associated with it’s a project to help automate biology, and create cells that could translating the laboratory research quickly into commercially act as sensors. These cells could be placed in a patient and be viable prototypes by industry, and addressing the complex autonomous, acting to cure diseases or treat recurring problems regulatory issues required for clinical settings, especially during as they happen. pandemics. “The good news is that slowly the technology transfer investments from government and industry is on the rise,” the study reported. “In addition, regulatory policies from States leading life science business the government in many countries are becoming increasingly development business friendly with the academics.” One of the states that has quickly become a center of life sciences Well-known companies such as Pfizer, Moderna and others research and development is Georgia, where Atlanta is the home have found ways to develop vaccines faster than ever, astounding of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Georgia the industry watchers with not only their speed to market but their has 1,960 life science establishments employing 15,500 people in innovative method for creating the vaccine that has its roots in the research, testing, and medical laboratories; medical devices; and emerging bio-economy. biopharmaceuticals. “Right now, the bio-economy means different things to different groups of people,” wrote Elizabeth Strychalski, a physicist and the group leader in the Cellular Engineering Group (CEG) for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in an email responding to original questions from Business Xpansion Journal. Her group works to enable better measurements, by providing measurement assurance and building new measurement tools for biological systems. “For the CEG, that means developing workflows for precision engineering, genetic sensors, and control engineering for biological systems,” she wrote. The NIST Biosystems and Biomaterials Division (BBD) works to support the scientific study of measurements for the bio-economy broadly, in a way that cuts across many of the definitions of bioeconomics, she wrote. “Arguably, all include biology as a central component of the manufacturing process or product.” In one project, the CEG is advancing measurements around workflows for directed evolution, to streamline the production Elizabeth Strychalski and David Ross program the movements of biological sensors to monitor the quality and performance of the main robotic arm in the NIST Living Measurement of those processes and products. These “genetic sensors” Systems Foundry. Biofoundries like this make it possible to are typically encoded in DNA or RNA, giving, for example, engineer living cells so that they produce specific medical measurement “handles” directly inside cells, to help build a treatments. bio-economy that delivers controlled, safe, and effective applications of biotechnology for as many people and applications as bxjmag.com

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Pfizer released its mRNA COVID-19 vaccine in mid-December, 2020. The mRNA teaches cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies, which produces antibodies.

The CDC supports 27,800 jobs, contributes $18.6 billion to the state’s gross domestic product (GDP), and is an economic driver for Atlanta’s emerging life sciences cluster. The state has five universities, with nearly 9,000 people working in life sciences research and activities. In 2018, institutions based in Georgia received $549 million in National Institutes of Health (NIH) research funding. Over the last five years, Georgia has consistently ranked 15th nationally in average annual NIH funds received by states; NIH funding to institutions in Georgia has grown by 20 percent since 2010. Another concentration of bioscience businesses is both in and near the Chicago metro area, including Batavia, Illinois, employing 1,750 working at the 6,800-acre Fermilab site, an organization specializing in high-energy particle physics in partnership with the University of Chicago and a consortium of 89 other research universities; and the Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois, a science and research center spun off the University of Chicago’s famous work with the first atomic weapon in the 1940s, working with an annual budget of over $800 million. One recent bioscience move in the Chicago area was when Switzerland-based global healthcare company Novartis bought Chicago-based AveXis, a biotech company that develops treatments for rare neurological genetic disorders, for $8.7 billion in 2018. Research by Caldwell Banker Richard Ellis (CBRE), a real estate services company, showed that few institutions in the U.S. have increased their NIH funding as rapidly as Northwestern University, a private research university in Evanston, Illinois. Over the past decade, the university built the 600,000 square foot Simpson Querrey Biomedical Research Center. A second, similarly-sized phase of this project will follow. There is also new collaboration between the University of Illinois-Chicago, the University of Chicago and Northwestern University for a new bioscience innovation center; the potential for the 560-acre Illinois Medical District in Chicago to be designated a 6 |

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federal opportunity zone; and a new state government administration expected to be more aggressive in courting the life sciences industry.

Other bioscience hotspots Bioscience success stories like these are coming rapid-fire from all over the U.S. The CBRE research report found that venture capital funding to the life sciences industry has surged 86 percent over the past year, driving employment growth, new construction and increased attention from investors. Other new hotspots for life sciences include the BostonCambridge area, the San Francisco Bay area, followed by San Diego, New Jersey, Raleigh-Durham, and Washington, D.C.-Baltimore. The Washington, D.C.-Baltimore region had the largest percentage increase in life sciences venture-capital funding over the past 18 months of any major market in the country, mostly going to biotech companies. Major investments in this region were made in Viela Bio in Gaithersburg, Maryland, a biotech company working to commercialize medicines for people with autoimmune and severe inflammatory diseases; NextCure in Beltsville, Maryland, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company working on cancer treatments; and Personal Genome Diagnostics in Baltimore, developing an innovative portfolio of regulated tissue-based and non-invasive liquid biopsy genomic products for laboratories worldwide. The CBRE report also highlights significant industry momentum in New York City, which is the seventh-ranked life sciences cluster in the nation with more than 1.5 million square feet of lab space under construction. Here, three life sciences incubators will open this year, and a significant uptick in venture-capital funding began in 2018. Demand has been driven by companies involved in biotech, medical devices, and cell and gene therapy. Other cities with emerging life sciences hubs include Seattle, Houston, Austin, Minneapolis, Denver, Dallas-Ft.Worth, and Pittsburgh.


Within the NIST Living Measurement Systems Foundry, an automated liquid handler transfers samples between 96-well plates for testing.

The future Genome-scale engineering holds great potential to impact science, industry, medicine, and society. Recent improvements in DNA synthesis have enabled the manipulation of megabase genomes (megabase is the measure of the length, or number of base pairs, of a genome segment). The business of organizing bioengineering efforts is gaining momentum. The bio-engineering buildup has led to the creation of the so-called biofoundry, such as the one at NIST that can run thousands of experiments in a short amount of time, providing the data needed to determine if a complicated piece of biological experimentation will work predictably every time. There are at least 25 other biofoundries across the world today, designed to be engines for accelerating the bioeconomy. Abraham Lee, a biomedical engineer and director of the Center for Advanced Design and Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics (CADMIM) at the University of California-Irvine (UCI) Samueli School of Engineering, is focusing his work on the development of integrated microfluidic systems for precision medicine, including liquid biopsy, cell sorting and profiling, micro-physiological systems, point-of-care molecular diagnostics, cell therapy, and immunotherapy. CADMIM is an industry/university cooperative research center supported by the National Science Foundation. He says that UCI and the University of Illinois-Chicago are working with other universities to help identify the current technical bottlenecks in production or commercialization. “We cover the whole range of life technologies, in a sense, working with a wide variety of various companies,” Lee says. “That includes

livestock companies, plant agriculture biotech companies and human health companies, including pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. Basically anything that has cells, DNA, and tissues, we have projects with them.” Life is all intertwined and interconnected, he says. “We do genotyping for plants but the same technology can be used for mammalian cancer diagnosis, for example. That is the big picture.” The vision of some of their research is to develop a disease targeting a multifunctional therapeutic device to help the body’s defense mechanisms combat disease. “We already have pacemakers and defibrillators and other implants,” Lee says. “These new therapeutics will go in and trigger the body to strengthen and defend itself, work with it for a period of time, then dissolve and get disposed of by the body. We are also developing artificial cells, and other components based on synthetic biology that directly have the transducer interfaces with the body’s owns sensors, in terms of receptors. So those things are coming.” Lee says he is fascinated by the immune system and their synapses—how they recognize an invader then trigger multiple levels of defense. “The more we understand how the body works, the more we can work with the body to maintain health as well as hopefully prevent diseases,” he says. “And if they get the disease, we can fight them off more target-specifically. “In the future, these health-maintaining chip technologies will democratize the healthcare system so you don’t have to have the bottleneck of going to centralized hospitals. We want people to have much more access to advanced medicine as they develop. I think that is where microchips will play a role in the future.” X

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Public-private collaboration aims to find a new treatment for pancreatic cancer

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t the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, casual gatherings can lead to incredible research opportunities. A fortuitous encounter at a HudsonAlpha mixer led to a collaboration that is searching for new ways to treat pancreatic cancer. HudsonAlpha Faculty Investigators Sara Cooper, PhD, and Rick Myers, PhD are working together with CFD Research Principal Investigator AJ Singhal on a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health. The group is working to find a more effective target for pancreatic cancer drugs, illustrating the power of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology’s unique approach to public-private collaboration.

After his talk, Singhal found Institute President Rick Myers, PhD, who noted there might be an opportunity for Singhal’s group to work with researchers at HudsonAlpha. “It was an incredible moment,” Singhal said. “You could just feel it all coming together. This collaboration will define our research into pancreatic cancer drugs, and one day, it might even lead to a new treatment. A better treatment.” Myers put Singhal in contact with Cooper, and the collaboration began in earnest. Cooper’s Lab had a number of novel target proteins identified through their work. CFD Research had the tools to model those proteins and predict drugs that might target them.

An Idea over Drinks

A Search for Treatment

For this project, collaboration between the Institute’s Cooper Lab and CFD Research started last year at Science on Tap, a monthly campus event sponsored by HudsonAlpha where people get together to talk research over pizza and beer. Singhal spoke at the event, and he told the crowd about strides he and his team were making in modeling and targeting proteins. They just needed some ideas for new proteins to target.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. According to Johns Hopkins, more than 44,000 Americans will receive a pancreatic cancer diagnosis this year; more than 38,000 Americans will die from the disease.

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While pancreatic cancer is more treatable when found early, most cases are not found until far too late, leaving patients without curative treatment options.


“I study many kinds of cancer,” Cooper said. “Pancreatic cancer is particularly dangerous and cruel.” The Cooper Lab previously discovered a number of genes were linked directly with patient survival in pancreatic cancer. One example from that study identified a gene that, if it becomes overactive, makes cells more resistant to drugs by limiting normal stress response that would trigger cell death. Other genes studied by the Cooper Lab control different aspects of the body, like how closely packed cells are or how cells metabolize drugs. Through its non-profit research work, the Cooper Lab generated a trove of data on genes and proteins related to patient survival for people with pancreatic cancer. The lab’s collaboration with CFD Research allows them to use this knowledge for testing potential treatment options.

A Way Forward Not only has the Cooper Lab developed a list of potential targets for pancreatic cancer treatment, but they’ve also developed the means to test outcomes for those targets. In this case, Cooper and Singhal have honed in on a particular protein—the one that affects cellular stress response. Using the three-dimensional structure of the protein determined by the team, they can predict which existing chemical compounds might be able to attach to it and render it non-functional. If the protein can be turned off, it could increase the effectiveness of traditional cancer therapies. The first stage of the NIH grant focus was on finding potential drug molecules. For the collaboration, CFD Research has tested a variety of molecules that could potentially inactivate the protein in question; the Cooper Lab has since tested those molecules to see if they work on pancreatic cancer cells. Based on the results thus far Cooper Labs and CFD Research have a couple of candidates that they are continuing to characterize to determine 1) do these compounds kill cells the way they think (by inhibiting our gene target), and 2) do the compounds kill cancer cells more effectively than healthy cells. This project has been delayed a few months by time away from the lab this spring due to COVID, but they anticipate having answers to these important questions by the beginning of 2021. “Collaborating with outside experts is an important way to advance our non-profit research,” Cooper said. “We’re lucky at HudsonAlpha that we have highly specialized experts right here on campus with us.” “If everything goes the way we plan,” Cooper added, “We could walk away from this with a new drug.”

HudsonAlpha: A Place for Collaboration The HudsonAlpha campus is designed to be a place of scientific advancement and collaboration. As an active part of Huntsville, the fastest-growing city in the state and one of the

most lauded cities in the country, HudsonAlpha strengthens and diversifies the region’s economy and workforce. For our companies’ partnerships or the shipment of their products, HudsonAlpha and Huntsville positions their organizations for success. X

About HudsonAlpha: HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology is a nonprofit institute dedicated to developing and applying scientific advances to health, agriculture, learning, and commercialization. Opened in 2008, HudsonAlpha’s vision is to leverage the synergy between discovery, education, medicine, and economic development in genomic sciences to improve the human condition around the globe. The HudsonAlpha biotechnology campus consists of 152 acres nestled within Cummings Research Park, the nation’s second largest research park. The state-of-the-art facilities co-locate nonprofit scientific researchers with entrepreneurs and educators. HudsonAlpha has become a national and international leader in genetics and genomics research and biotech education and fosters more than 40 diverse biotech companies on campus. To learn more about HudsonAlpha, visit hudsonalpha.org.

About CFD Research: Since its inception in 1987, CFD Research has worked with government agencies, businesses and academia to provide innovative solutions within the Aerospace & Defense, Biomedical & Life Sciences, and Energy & Materials industries. Over the years CFD Research has earned multiple national awards for successful application and commercialization of innovative component/system technology prototypes, multi-physics simulation software, multi-disciplinary analyses, and expert support services. CFD Research is an ISO9001 and AS9100 registered company and is appraised at CMMI Level II for services. Learn more at www.cfdrc.com. bxjmag.com

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ADVANCED MANUFACTURING

The first meeting of the Natonal Space Council, October 5, 2017, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA. The council is investigating manufacturing operations in microgravity environments

New goals and new internet tech help build base for advanced manufacturing B Y: DAV ID HO D ES

Gathering and sharing data more efficiently driving a new smart-tech paradigm

T

he further application of digital technology, and the connections provided by the Internet of Things (IoT), have defined advanced manufacturing for the last decade, creating a more efficient process that has inspired a steadily increasing drive to innovate using the data analytics these manufacturing processes generate day after day. ....................................................................................................

Today, robotics, augmented reality and artificial intelligence are becoming commonplace within the advanced manufacturing processes; all are evolving rapidly. For example, there are now many different types of robots being used in all kinds of manufacturing, including: cartesian robots (used for packaging, picking and placing); articulated robots (used for welding); and cylindrical robots (used for semiconductor manufacturing). 10 |

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There is even more coming in advanced biotechnology manufacturing, as newly developed biochips are being used to create micro-miniature implants the size of a grain of rice that can be inserted into a human hand and provide such things as access to office or gym, unlocking a computer, or monitoring a health condition. Advanced manufacturing is being pursued in space. Space Tango, Inc., based in Lexington, Kentucky and doing research and commercial manufacturing in microgravity environments, worked with artificial retina manufacturer LambdaVision, Inc. in 2018 to evaluate protein-based retinal implant production using the International Space Station’s microgravity assistance to improve the quality of protein-based retinal implants used to treat currently incurable retinal degenerative diseases. More financing firepower for advanced manufacturing development is coming from many sources, including the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), which has been investing $250 million a year in advanced manufacturing to fund research in areas such as computer-aided design and 3D printing. In October, the NSF awarded funding for 24 projects for future manufacturing development that will bring together partners throughout the United States exploring three primary areas: eco-manufacturing, biomanufacturing and cyber-manufacturing. The NSF award included more than $40 million in the form of seed grants, research grants and network grants to support research and education at 44 institutions in 18 states and the District of Columbia. The goal of the research is to drive the creation of entirely new methods and means of manufacturing, or expand the capabilities of existing processes which are now conducted at too small a scale to be commercially viable. One of those projects will address the use of physics-based models with machine learning approaches, using big data and cyber-physical systems (systems that are integrations of computation, network and physical processes). In this project, machining will be made more efficient with augmented reality tools and enhanced computer integration

across the entire design and manufacturing chain.

manufacturing, and electronic waste treatment manufacturing operations.

The microfactory concept

The advanced manufacturing future

As reported in Future Bridge, a future industries analysis company, the concept of the microfactory is based on having a technologically advanced, small-to-medium-sized manufacturing facility located very near to the customer, acting as a retail outlet and eliminating the need for a costly distribution network. The microfactory concept has been percolating inside tech research centers in both Japan and Germany since 1990, with development quickening as a result of 3D printing plus other digital-based technologies. It was first demonstrated in the U.S. in 2009 at Local Motors in Phoenix, Arizona to manufacturer their Rally Fighter car. Advanced manufacturing coupled with the unique microfactory concept will be used to manufacture electric vehicles for Arrival, a London-based technology company, which is planning to open their microfactory by the second quarter of 2021 in Rock Hill, South Carolina. The manufacturing operation is being hailed as “the beginning of a paradigm shift in the electric vehicle space,” according to Arrival CEO of North America, Mike Ableson. This will be a $46 million dollar investment to include the creation of 240 new jobs. Arrival will join the $27 billion auto manufacturer landscape of South Carolina that includes over 500 auto-related manufacturing operations for BMW, Volvo, Mercedes Benz and others. Arrival’s planned manufacturing operation to build electric vehicles for United Parcel Service (UPS), Hyundai and Kia will utilize “plug-and-play” core components they design and build themselves. The Arrival microfactory will feature a cell-based assembly method (multiple zones or areas of specific assembly operations in a sort of assembly line) to produce vehicles, instead of the traditional automotive production line. It will allow the production of any vehicle from Arrival’s portfolio. In addition to automobile manufacturing, other applications for the rapidly scalable microfactory include garment manufacturing, consumer appliances

According to a study published in Engineering magazine, the factory of the future will be a system of hybrid systems of robots and humans, additive and subtractive manufacturing, composites and metals, digital and analog processes, cyber and physical systems, nano and macro scales. More coordinated studies and practical application demonstrations about these new technologies are happening now. For example, the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (AMP) report pointed out that effective public–private partnership models are needed to accelerate technology development and time to market. One recommendation was to create a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) composed of 15 Manufacturing Innovation Institutes (MII). The goals of the MII is to create a shared facility for all participating members, create translational development of new technologies, and function as a training ground to develop a skilled workforce. In a report about accelerating innovation in advanced manufacturing, the Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute outlined the importance of the benefits of manufacturing in the U.S. with the following statistics: 70 percent of U.S. exports consist of manufactured goods; one manufacturing job produces up to six additional jobs in the general economy; 66 percent of U.S. scientists and engineers are employed in manufacturing; more than 50 percent of the national research and development expenditures are made in manufacturing; and 90 percent of patents are credited to the manufacturing sector. The report recommended that one of the strategies going forward in advanced manufacturing is the “Invent Here-Build Here” methodology, using a manufacturing ecosystem built on a skilled workforce, a robust infrastructure, a friendly business climate, and a good investment community that creates a hot bed for innovations. These manufacturing ecosystems will provide a cluster of localized,

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Forward-facing progress.. with help

S I D E B A R

interdependent businesses that offer design, production, distribution, workforce, infrastructure, and investment capabilities to help a business thrive.

How the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), the Cloud and other emerging technologies impact manufacturing is

Indian River County, Florida – Central to Where Your Business Needs to Be Indian River County – Vero Beach, Sebastian, Fellsmere - strikes a perfect balance between business and pleasure. Those who live, work or visit the area find that the local communities are safe and loaded with ecological, cultural, educational and technological amenities. Many corporate-level executives have located their companies to the area because of the executive’s positive vacation experience, or perhaps they own a winter home on Vero’s barrier island. Located on Florida’s east coast, midway between West Palm Beach and Cape Canaveral, Indian River County is within three hours of over 17 million consumers, or 90% of Florida’s population. It has easy access to markets but is far from urban sprawl, traffic and congestion. Visitors from other parts of Florida are amazed, and pleasantly surprised, at the county’s lack of traffic. The area is rich in history and natural resources, with 26 miles of unspoiled beaches and scenic lakes, plus some of the best bass fishing available in Blue Cypress Lake. It is also the center of the world-famous Indian River Citrus District. Indian River County is a cost-competitive location for new or expanding businesses. It has hundreds of acres of low-cost land available for development, much of it located near I-95, a major north-south transportation route along the east coast. The county offers competitive property tax rates, and Florida has no state income tax. 12 |

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The Opportunity Zone initiative offers investors an even greater reason to consider Indian River County, FL. All properties west of I-95 in Indian River County are designated as an Opportunity Zone and zoned for industrial use, including two shovelready industrial parks. State and local incentives are also available to relocating and expanding companies, including property tax abatement, tax refunds, and job training grants. An available and trainable workforce of approximately 638,000 within an hour’s drive time adds to the county’s appeal as a desirable location. Indian River State College (IRSC) has five campuses located throughout the region, offering 2-year and 4-year degrees as well as several industrial and technical certifications. IRSC is very successful in securing training grants for local employers. They can develop specially-designed training programs in a matter of weeks rather than months. Because location is central to success, Indian River County isn’t just where you want to be – it’s central to where your business ought to be. It has the perfect blend of everything the Sunshine State has to offer. For more information on locating your company to Indian River County, Florida, contact Helene Caseltine, Economic Development Director with the Indian River Chamber of Commerce, at 772-567-3491 or helenec@indianrivered.com. Or, visit their website at www.indianrivered.com.

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the focus of John Dyck, CEO of the Clean Energy Smart Manufacturing Innovation Institute (CESMII). Dyck holds a number of patents for the application of IIoT and analytics in manufacturing workflows and business processes. He says that there is an aspirational vision for advanced manufacturing about how to use these new digital tools, but those aspirations run up against the general state of the industry. “There has been discussion of the U.S. being at Industry 4.0, which broadly encapsulates the notion that we are in a fourth industrial revolution that has the potential to truly change the way we make products and bring them to market,” Dyck says. “The reality is that, from a readiness perspective, American industry is probably somewhere closer to Industry 3.0., meaning manufacturers in general struggle, at least in their plant floor operations, to adopt these new technologies. They are struggling to engage with the strategic element of how to move toward the factory of the future,” he says. “We have a lot of work to do to get going in that direction.” One way of getting to that point faster is through the Open Platform Communications (OPC) United Architecture (UA) data exchange standard for secure, reliable, manufacturer-independent and platform-independent industrial communications. The standard was created under the auspices of the non-profit OPC Foundation. These standard’s specifications define the interface between clients and servers, as well as servers and servers, including access to both real-time and meta data, monitoring of alarms and events, access to historical data and other applications. The OPC UA data exchange standard operates on all operating systems, and enables data exchange between products from different manufacturers and across different operating systems. Volkswagen, LG, Samsung, Miele, L’Oréal, and hundreds more have adopted the OPC UA technology for its secure, standardized information and interfaces. Google Cloud is using the OPC UA open standard to incorporate machine data into analytics and artificial


intelligence solutions to ultimately drive new capability and performance within a factory. In an effort to identify common data in machines and processes to accelerate innovation in data science and application development, CESMII is working with the OPC and leveraging the OPC UA as an industry standard interface. It is expected that this collaboration will help drive innovation. But there’s more to do on workforce readiness as well. Dyck says that if the next generation of smart manufacturing can be engaged, along with a digital transformation the way it is anticipated, then over the next decade, “the plant floor will once more become an attractive place for our young people and the entire ecosystem to engage in.” For the most part, all the workforce on the plant floor today have smart phones with them, he says, but don’t use them in connection with the operations of their jobs. “That computer surface, those platforms from Apple or Android, represent a well-adapted use of those

An Arrival-built transit bus. Arrival is a startup backed by Hyundai and Kia with deals to build delivery vans for UPS from its microfactory in South Carolina. various applications, with technology that could serve those workers well on the plant floor,” Dyck says. “But the plant floor is not ready for them yet.” He says that the vision for smart manufacturing is to create an entire plant floor full of citizen technologists. “Our vision is to drive the democratization, to reduce the cost and complexity

of how these technologies are deployed, so you can use consumer grade technologies on a plant floor.” “Advanced manufacturing” will be what all manufacturing will be called in five years, Dyck says. “Somewhere between 2024 and 2030, smart manufacturing is manufacturing. These new ideas will have been adopted at scale.” X

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY IS EMERGING AS THE FLORIDA HUB, A LOCATION THAT’S SEAMLESSLY BLENDED THE BEST OF EVERYTHING THAT FLORIDA HAS TO OFFER

Because location is central to success •

Within 3 hours of 90% of Florida’s population

Skilled pool of available workers North-south and east-west transportation connections

Vibrant cultural mix including Florida’s largest teaching museum

Sebastian

Indian River County Vero Beach West Palm Beach

Miami

Central to where your business needs to be. Visit: IndianRiverED.com Call: 772.567.3491 or email: helenec@indianrivered.com

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

ENERGY

New ideas emerge for both sustainable and fossil fuel technologies B Y DAV ID HO D ES

Sustainable energy developments continue, but fossil fuels stays relevant to the energy independence of the U.S.

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he search for longer-lasting resources of energy that are more easily attainable, and more sustainable, has been one of industry’s biggest challenges for decades. Today, there are more choices than ever: hydropower, biomass, solar power, wind power, fossil fuels, nuclear energy. Each choice has its advantages and disadvantages. All mean more energy independence for the country. ............................................................................................. American industry today has been struggling to keep fossil fuels in the mix as more and more U.S. states are working to phase out fossil fuels in favor of sustainable sources that are more environmentally friendly. Yet, technological innovations continue to advance both types of energy in the country, even as the methods used for the generation of energy bumps up against both sociological and political forces at work to either guide or force the choice.

Renewable renaissance

NASA has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors.

Headquarters of the California Energy Commission in Sacramento, CA

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There have been movements inside some states to develop a totally renewable energy plan. For example, the Natural Resources Defense Council, a non-profit environmental advocacy group, reports that the proposed Illinois Clean Energy Jobs Act will help Illinois get to 100 percent clean energy by 2050, and drive growth in jobs for solar installers (averaging $21.58 an hour with a high school diploma) and wind turbine technicians (averaging $25.44 an hour with vocational training). The Act is also expected to create more than $30 billion in new private investment in the state. California is another state going for a 100 percent clean energy future. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), California ranked first in the nation as a producer of electricity from solar, geothermal, and biomass resources in 2018; and fourth in the nation in conventional hydroelectric power generation. With the California Energy Commission (CEC), the state is developing the Building Initiative for Low-Emissions Development (BUILD) program to provide incentives for the deployment of near-zero-emission building technologies in low-income residential buildings. Another California program, Renewable Energy for Agriculture (REAP), offers grants for the development of renewable energy technologies. That program is funded through the California Climate Investments (CCI) that puts billions of cap-and-trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving public health and the environment, particularly in low-income and disadvantaged communities. Another CCI investment program, the Food Production Investment Program, established in 2018, encourages California food producers specifically to reduce


greenhouse gas emissions. The program’s initial budget of $57 million ($60 million more was added in 2019) has been used to help accelerate the adoption of advanced energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

A transitioning dominance Even amidst all of their sustainable energy work, California was still the seventh-largest producer of crude oil in the U.S. in 2018, according to the EIA. As of January, 2019, California ranked third in oil refining capacity. But in general, in the United States, the sources of electricity generation have been shifting from coal to natural gas and renewables since the mid-2000s. Changes in New York’s electricity generating mix have contributed to this trend. Coal’s share of New York’s electricity generation fell from 14 percent in 2005 to less than 1 percent in 2019, and natural gas-fired electricity grew from 22 percent to 36 percent, according to the EIA. Electricity generation from renewable energy technologies collectively grew from 19 percent to 29 percent in the same period in New York. New York adopted a renewable portfolio standard in 2004, followed by the Clean Energy Standard (CES) in 2015. The CES currently requires New York to generate 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2040, and attain economy-wide net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The EIA reported that, in 2019, more electricity was generated from renewable sources in New York than in all but three states. New York’s 39.4 million megawatt hours (MWh) of renewable electricity generation was more than any other state east of the Mississippi River and accounted for 30 percent of the state’s total electricity generation in 2019. The EIA reported that as of the beginning of 2019, 41 states had at least one installed wind turbine. Of these 41 states, Texas had the largest number of turbines, with more than 13,000, and the most installed wind capacity, at 24.2 gigawatts (GW). States where wind adoption occurred early, such as California, have a high

number of turbines relative to their wind generation capacity, compared with states where wind was adopted later, such as Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Illinois. Solar energy electricity generation, meanwhile, is expected to experience steady growth, around 6.8 percent over the next decade, according to the EIA.

The fossil fuels factor Fossil fuels are beginning to experience a slow and steady decline as the transition to sustainable energy gains traction. For now, the mix of both has become the norm. Coal is still a big energy producer in the country, but coal consumption has been declining since its peak in 2007 of 1.1 billion tons. In 2019, U.S. coal consumption totaled just 590 million tons. The EIA Annual Coal Report (ACR) shows that U.S. coal mining productive capacity, or the maximum amount of coal that mines can produce in a year, totaled 1,009 million tons in 2019. This amount represents a 28 percent decrease from the peak productive coal mine capacity of 1,407 million tons as reported in 2009.

The EIA also reported that U.S. coal production declined by 35 percent during the same period because many coal mines closed and the remaining mines produced less coal.

Tapping technology for both Technological developments for the use or recovery of renewable energy and fossil fuel have both ticked up recently in a sort of tandem development cycle not seen before. One interesting application of sustainable energy technology is in Peachtree Corners, part of the Atlanta metro area and the country’s first smart city environment. The area installed the first ever road surface system using solar panels to produce energy for a solarpowered EV charging station located at city hall. The solar power is generated by a specially-formulated tempered glass solar panel roadway surface able to withstand the weight of a semi-truck. The Peachtree Corners system will produce more than 1,300 kilowatt-hours of electricity annually for the charger at city

NEW MEXICO is making RENEWABLE ENERGY more affordable than ever. In 2020 the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported that NEW MEXICO has the LOWEST COST of RENEWABLE ELECTRICITY in the U.S. at the grid intersection point and is 19.79% below the national average.

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

ENERGY

New Mexico: Home to Some of the Lowest Renewable Energy Costs in the U.S.

ALBUQUERQUE – According to the RE100’s 2020 annual report, 75 percent of member companies are looking to go 100 percent renewable by 2030. A growing number of other are seeking renewable energy options that are both good for business and the environment. In 2019, New Mexico signed off on the landmark Energy Transition Act which increases the state’s overall Renewable Portfolio Standard target to 100 percent of electricity sales from carbon-free generation by 2045. Concurrently with that passage, the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), the largest electrical utility provider in the state, committed to holding a zero-carbon portfolio by 2040. These efforts are paying dividends. According to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s reporting, New Mexico has the lowest cost of renewable electricity in the U.S. at the grid intersection point and is 19.8 percent below the national average. The U.S. Energy Information Administration states New Mexico’s climate is one of the top three in the nation with the best energy resource. Additionally, land acquisition costs are substantially lower in New Mexico than other Rocky Mountain region states. The average pasture per acre in New Mexico is $4.17 compared with neighboring states’ average of $6.83. Companies such as Kairos Power, which develops advanced reactor technologies for use in the energy sector, have expanded in New Mexico to take advantage of savings as well as join the vibrant renewable energy ecosystem of Albuquerque’s 12,700 acre master-planned community, Mesa del Sol - the state’s first foray into smart grid technology and efficient energy systems through the partnership of Japan’s NEDO organization and Los Alamos National Labs. For more information about AED, visit www.abq.org. 16 |

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hall at no cost to electric vehicle motorists. The demonstration project at Peachtree Corners, plus other demonstrations in the U.S. using similar technology that is being funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation, is just the beginning of what could be more solar road panels charging cars parked on solar panels in parking lots, then later, being used on roadways across the country. Other features of the solar glass panels include the ability to make the roadway snow and ice free; using LED lights for traffic lines and signage; and being impervious to potholes, according to Solar Roadways, a solar road development company based in Sandpoint, Idaho. The hope is that this new, clean technology will eventually modernize the country’s infrastructure. On the fossil fuel side is a new technological developing in hydraulic fracking, or fracturing, which is being investigated as a relatively new method of extracting natural gas and oil from large shale basins located in the Appalachians, the Rocky Mountains, and in large areas of Texas using horizontal drilling following deep vertical drilling. Hydraulic fracturing is an oil and gas well development process that typically involves injecting water, sand, and chemicals under high pressure into a bedrock formation inside a drilled well. This process is intended to create new fractures in the rock as well as increase the size, extent, and connectivity of existing fractures. Complaints of ecological damage being caused by fracking, plus an increase in earthquakes especially in Oklahoma attributed to fracking, have become the impetus for new technology development to limit these problems. Engineers from U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) are drilling a nearly 10,000-foot-deep well in the Paradox Basin of Utah late this year, with the goal of trying out new fracking strategies to extract oil from unconventional shales in the region. The Utah Geological Survey estimates undiscovered recoverable oil reserves in the

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Paradox Basin of at least 471 million barrels. The well will be used to collect core samples, images and other information to develop fracture network and geomechanical models that will be used to predict where natural fractures and faults are located, leading to maximized oil production. This 4.5 year project, scheduled for completion in March 2024, received $8 million in federal funding, and approximately $3 million from project partners. A 3D seismic study of the project area previously completed by project partner, U.K.-based Zephyr Energy (with U.S. operations in Parker, Colorado), and will be used to complement the current effort. The Paradox resource project started about a year ago, according to Stephen Henry, project manager and member of the NETL team. “They’ll spend the first year trying to find an opportunity for a characterization well,” he says. NETL has recently broken ground on the project, working with Zephyr. The well is located in a thermally mature and structurally complex region of the Paradox Basin, which is likely to lead to higher density of natural fractures, Henry says. “That data and analysis will be used to develop some strategies about how to best drill and stimulate or not to stimulate wells in the Paradox basin,” Henry says. They are looking at how to best target natural fractures or use tactical smaller scale strategies that wouldn’t cause some of the usual issues with hydraulic fracking. “By year three of the project, once there is a better handle on how to better drill the wells and stimulate them (ie, enhance their oil production), they will give that data to an operator for them to implement it in a horizontal well to generate production,” Henry says. “This is a longer term project but it will continue to enable us to have us a self-sustainable oil supply moving forward, which is great for energy security and the economy.” X


EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

CALIFORNIA:

5TH LARGEST ECONOMY IN THE WORLD C alifornia handles over $580 billion in exports and imports; relies on the skills and talents of 40 million residents including 11 million immigrants; and leverages its leading position in the world to propel the economy forward. California is a leader in the U.S. for two-way trade, agriculture exports, and foreign-direct investment. These numbers translate to millions of jobs across the state.

........................................................................ Whether your goods move through ports, trucking companies, airports, railroads, or warehouses, California has some of the best logistics infrastructure in the world. The supply chain runs deep, driving one-third of the State’s economy creating millions of direct and indirect jobs. A wealth of nationally and internationally recognized universities and colleges are preparing the workforce needed to keep California businesses competitive. California has nearly 3 million currently enrolled students, is home to the nation’s largest 4-year public university system, and accounts for half of the nation’s top 10 public universities. Maintaining a skilled labor force is paramount for the continued success of California. As a leader in emerging innovations in everything from clean technology to agriculture, California’s available workforce is a world-class asset for business. For more information visit www.business.ca.gov or call 877-3454633.

CALIFORNIA: CITY OF ONTARIO, WE THINK BUSINESS ...................................................................... The City of Ontario, located in Southern California, continues

to create development opportunities and urban lifestyle districts that provide sustainable places to live, work and play. Just 35 miles east of downtown Los Angeles, the City of Ontario is ideally situated as the gateway to Southern California. With 182,000 residents, Ontario is San Bernardino County’s fourth-largest city – and growing. Ontario’s population is set to double in the next 20 years, and local leaders have their sights set firmly on the future. At the center of the City is the Ontario International Airport, a full-service airport. UPS and FedEx have hubs are located at the Airport, making Ontario one of the top markets for outbound cargo shipments in the nation. Ontario is centered on a transportation corridor that extends throughout Southern California and across the continental United States and sits 45 miles from the two largest ports in the country –the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Ontario provides strategic access to the ports through its interconnected freeway and rail systems. The Ontario Opportunity Zone is an ideal location for opportunity fund investments, utilizing privately sourced funds into eligible economic development and community reinvestment projects. Ontario also offers the advantage of being in the Foreign Trade Zone, which allows companies to reduce the costs associated with International Trade. The ability to increase international sales, realize greater importing and exporting opportunities, and succeed in global markets is often a deciding factor for location, relocation and expansion in Ontario. The mass of freight transport – via both rail and road – run through the City of Ontario. Three major interstates crisscross the City and the surrounding areas: Interstate-15 from San Diego to Las Vegas and beyond; Interstate-10 from west coast to east coast; as well as State Route 60 for easy regional access. bxjmag.com

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

Ontario has a vast business infrastructure in place, and their leaders continually work to improve the City’s pro-business environment. With a highly skilled and trained workforce, and more than 110 million square feet of industrial, manufacturing and distribution space, Ontario is the best place to grow develop your business. To find out more information about the advantages of doing business in Ontario, California, visit www.ontariothinksbusiness.com or call 909.395.2005. You can also follow @OntarioEDA on Twitter.

CALIFORNIA: CITY OF TRACY

...................................................................... Approximately two of every three North American manufacturing companies surveyed by Thomas reported COVID-19 business disruptions. Interrupted supply chains and delayed product deliveries have increased significantly during the last nine months. Business executives across the country are reevaluating cost savings strategies like offshoring in the current environment. For four decades, companies have offshored manufacturing operations overseas in order to save costs. The COVID-19 crisis has essentially reversed the race to cut costs as onshoring has been increasingly embraced to reduce the risk of future disruptions and supply chain delays. Though not every company looks to return entire operations to the United States at once, gradual reopening of the U.S. manufacturing facilities has increasingly taken place. In addition to companies onshoring directly, an increased number of suppliers are seeking domestic sources, which has created

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expansion opportunities for U.S. manufacturers. Tracy, a community of 90,000, is strategically located as the gateway to the Northern California megaregion. It has a readily available and diverse commercial real estate supply, large and affordable labor force, business friendly environment, new infrastructure, and high quality of life. Tracy is uniquely positioned to accommodate the reshoring trend and enable business growth. Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, Tracy had already built significant momentum drawing new businesses like Thermo Fisher Scientific and Medline. City leaders had planned for the future with a 30-year infrastructure master plan, providing a roadmap for water, sewer, drainage, roads, parks, and other public facilities. The City also streamlines the entitlement process with zoning permits approved at staff level. These advantages allowed Tracy to conceive a bold vision for one of the largest industrial parks in the nation, which is now about half built out. Another eight million square feet are in the planning process over the next couple of years as the business community has recognized Tracy’s unique ability to enable business growth. With the COVID-19 reality settling in, Tracy has become an increasingly recognized location for strategic location advantages and onshoring. Tracy is situated just an hour from San Francisco, San Jose, and Sacramento. A diverse supply of available commercial space and build to suit opportunities exist in Tracy with many in the International Park of Commerce and Northeast Industrial area. Both major master planned industrial parks are some of the largest in the


region and take advantage of Tracy’s central location in northern California with the Port of Oakland and Port of Stockton nearby. The City has invested in truck-friendly infrastructure to connect both business parks to access major transportation routes like I-5, I-205, I-580 and Hwy 99. With strategic investment into transit, Tracy is also integrating into the regional Valley Link light rail service that will enable connection to the Silicon Valley and the East Bay via a downtown station. A large, dedicated, and affordable labor force resides in the local area, with a significant portion of employees skilled in Industrial/Manufacturing sector. Tracy’s strategic location offers the opportunity to draw on the broad skills of 1.7 million regional workers. Tracy is also highly regarded for its exceptional quality of life. Businesses operating in Tracy know their employees will experience a safe community with high-quality schools, ample recreation amenities, lively restaurant and shopping scene, and affordability. WalletHub ranks Tracy in the top 40 best places to live in California for families, as well as being in the top 20 for affordability. Local schools rank consistently high in terms of graduation rates and college readiness. Additionally, culture and recreation can be found everywhere in the City. Those interested in the arts find a lively environment, highlighted by the Grand Theatre Center for the Arts. The location offers live theatre, art galleries and classrooms all in one location. Tracy offers an unmatched dining scene with a cluster of restaurants in downtown and elsewhere. Establishments such as

ACTIVE

the Morgan Territory Brewing and Ramon Rios Winery are examples of local beer and wine scene. The City places a high priority on supporting local businesses. COVID-19 has demonstrated the scope and scale of the impact a global pandemic can make, but it is not the only disaster that can disrupt supply chains. Environmental factors are another one. The world has suffered an increase in severe hurricanes, earthquakes, and fires, all of which are unpredictable natural disasters. Unfortunately, many of the same countries with U.S.-based manufacturing operations have been hardest hit by these catastrophes, highlighting the unreliability of their infrastructure. For example, the 2001 earthquake and tsunami in Japan and floods in Thailand had crippling effects on the electronics and automotive manufacturing sectors. Put simply, the global supply chain is fragile. Businesses seeking lower risk have increasingly started prioritizing the total cost of doing business over the cost of production. The former reflects the value of protected supply chains and risks associated with pandemics and natural disasters. Tracy is committed to a strong, growing business climate. While business relocation process may seem daunting, the City staff understand business needs like site selection, permit processing, data collection, entitlements and construction, financial incentives, and hiring and training. The City has collaborated with the business community to enable success across all of these categories. Whether capitalizing on onshoring or generally seeking site locationenabled business growth, Tracy advantage has proven to be a winning strategy for large and small businesses alike. X

INNOVATIVE

CONNECTED

“Moving to Tracy gave the company the ability to expand. We could purchase acres and build a few buildings. And, a large number of our workforce and team were driving over the hill [Altamont Pass] to our office. It has worked out great for us here.” - John Petlansky, President & CEO Pacific Medical, Inc.

You think you know Tracy? Call us today! (209) 831-6493

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

MINNESOTA:

FIRST IN FIVE-YEAR BUSINESS SURVIVAL RATE

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innesota ranks first in the nation in its five-year business survival rate (2015-2020), based on data from the U.S. Bureau of labor statistics. The state’s rate was 55.3%. In comparison, the national rate for the same period was 50.0%.

................................................................................... “This ranking confirms something we know to be true – people who start things in Minnesota tend to stick to it. It’s part of that Minnesota work ethic that we’re known for,” said DEED Commissioner Steve Grove. “This ranking bodes well for our economy, as we know that small businesses account for 47% of the jobs in our state.” In the third quarter, business starts in Minnesota were up nearly 60% compared to a year ago. Since the pandemic began, Minnesota is above the national average in incorporated business starts. Supporting the state’s strong economy is a modern 20 |

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transportation network that includes marine shipping, road, rail, air and digital infrastructure. The state has nearly 4,500 of freight railroad miles operated by 21 railroad companies. MinneapolisSt. Paul International Airport serves 167 non-stop markets, 137 domestic markets, and 30 international markets. For more information, please call 651-259-7432 or email economic.development@state.mn.us

MINNESOTA : CITY OF LAKEVILLE, THRIVING IN THE TWIN CITIES METRO

................................................................................ The City of Lakeville experienced a record year of growth in 2020 with over $400 million in total building permit valuation and over 600 single-family home permits issued. With a population of approximately 65,000, Lakeville is one of the fastest growing cities in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul metropolitan area and is a place where businesses and families thrive! Lakeville is conveniently located along I-35 in Dakota County, in close proximity to


Minneapolis and Saint Paul, as well as the Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport and Mall of America. Encompassing 38 square miles, Lakeville is home to one of Minnesota’s largest industrial parks, which has over 500 acres of land ready for development and is home to Airlake Airport, which expanded in 2020 with new hangars and a runway extension is planned for 2023. Lakeville has an active and growing business community with more than 1,300 businesses that employ over 17,000 people and the industrial park is home to approximately 150 manufacturing and industrial business which employ over 4,000 people. Lakeville’s vision for the future is to increase economic sustainability through diversified economic development. In the last five years, the city experienced growth across all sectors with the addition of retail, healthcare, breweries, restaurants and manufacturing. The private sector invested over $61 million into industrial park development - including a new 750,000-square-foot Amazon XL facility - and over $8 million into commercial development in the City of Lakeville in 2020. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the City of Lakeville infused nearly $1 million public grant dollars into local small businesses and nonprofit organizations who were negatively impacted by the challenging economic conditions in 2020. The Lakeville labor shed (30-minute drive-time area) has seen its population increase by 4% over the last five years, growing to a total population of 953,135. The community is predicted to increase in population by 20,000 within the next 20 years, and the labor shed population is expected to increase by 31,000 as of 2022. Lakeville has led the metro area in single-family home permits for the last eight years (2012-2020). As of November 2020, the city issued 579 single-family home permits which exceeds the 2019 total of 521. In addition, the city saw

628 market-rate apartment units and 215 senior housing units constructed or permitted in 2020. Lakeville combines a peaceful and safe small-town atmosphere with big city opportunities. Lakeville has over 1,600 acres of public park and open space, including 100 miles of pedestrian and bike trails and a 5-acre dog park. The city also has five recreational lakes for

fishing, boating, swimming, and motorized water sports. The community offers three award-winning school districts within its boundaries. The Lakeville Area Arts Center, a city owned and operated facility, provides a variety of options for live music, entertainment, theater, art, pottery classes and more. Lakeville, Minnesota is certainly Positioned to Thrive - making it a great location for any project. X

Lakeville, MINNESOTA

A community of over 65,000 and growing

Located along I-35 and in the southern Twin Cities Metro

Home to 1,300+ businesses with room to expand

Close to MSP International Airport

A large industrial park (with over 500 developable acres)

Over 1,500 acres of public park and open space-including 100 miles of pedestrian and bike trails

Leading the Twin Cities metro in single-family home permits since 2012

Award-winning schools and a highly educated workforce

We invite you to thrive with us in this place of opportunity for your business, your family and your future.

For more information: 952.985.4420 | lakevillebusiness.com

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

NORTH CAROLINA:

EXPERIENCE THE MOMENTUM

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orth Carolina’s state of momentum is propelled by low business costs, groundbreaking university research, superior infrastructure, and a pace of life that attracts talented people and encourages them to refuel.

strengthening of business courts in the state have earned North Carolina accolades and rankings among the best legal climates in the U.S. With less red tape and litigation, your business can reach new heights faster. For more information, visit www.edpnc.com or call 919-447-7777.

................................................................................... North Carolina has a proven track record of reducing and streamlining business taxes. At 2.5%, this state has the lowest corporate income tax rate in the country. They are committed to helping businesses grow. North Carolina’s business costs rank among the lowest in the nation with building costs 16% below the national average; electricity costs 7% below the national average; and cost of living up to 11% below the national average in major metropolitan areas. North Carolina businesses lead the nation in innovation with 70% patent growth over the past 10 years. Their ample resources, highly skilled workforce, and renowned education systems all contribute to the state’s future-minded ingenuity. Recent tort reform, streamlined practices and the 22 |

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NORTH CAROLINA: PTI MEGA-SITE IS READY FOR NEW TENANTS ................................................................................... The Piedmont Triad International Airport, located in the center of North Carolina, which is at the center of the East Coast, is aggressively making room for more tenants to join the growing group of international companies already thriving at the airport. To that end, the airport has acquired and cleared more than 1,000 acres, all with direct access to the airfield and served by numerous interstate highways. The airport sites have been graded, received preliminary environmental approval and are ready for development either in parcels or as one large site. “We understand that when aerospace companies decide to


develop a new location, they want the site ready yesterday,” says the airport’s executive director, Kevin Baker. “Airports must move at the speed of business in order to be competitive. And the speed of business is getting faster all the time.” Companies such as Federal Express, Honda Aircraft Company, HAECO Americas and Cessna have discovered the advantages of PTI and have located major operations at the airport. Since locating at the airport, these operations have consistently added infrastructure and employees. Honda Aircraft Company, maker of HondaJet, has located its world headquarters at the airport. HAECO, one of the world’s largest maintenance and repair organizations, has its North American headquarters at the airport. FedEx operates its Mid-Atlantic hub at the airport. “Our airport has twin missions,” says Baker. “One is to provide a safe and efficient operation for our passengers. The second is to drive local economic development and job growth. We take both of these missions very seriously.” The airport’s central East Coast location has given it a natural advantage in recruiting companies like Honda and FedEx, Baker says. But the Airport Authority is not taking its natural advantages for granted. The Authority wants to be ready when industry comes calling. In anticipation of growth in the aerospace industry, the Piedmont Triad Airport Authority has embarked on an ambitious program to prepare industrial sites that are tailored to the industry’s specific needs, which include an inside the fence location with runway and interstate access. The result is an aerospace “mega-site” on the PTI campus that is perfectly suited for aerospace industry purposes. Regional government and business leaders have supported the Airport’s Authority’s efforts. And with good reason.

Aerospace industry growth in the central North Carolina region is not confined to the airport campus. Nearly 200 aerospace companies that also include Collins Aerospace, Honda Aero and Triumph Aerospace, are located in the Piedmont Triad, a 12-county region anchored by the cities of Greensboro, High Point and Winston-Salem. These companies are providing thousands

of jobs to skilled aviation workers. The companies have invested heavily in the region and are responsible for a significant expansion in the tax base. “Aerospace growth is good for the airport, but more important, it’s good for the community,” Baker says. “A big part of our mission is to support that growth in every way that we can.” X

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OPPORTUNITIES

CONNECTICUT:

CONNECTED TO THE WORLD

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trategic location is key to Connecticut with access to major markets, financial centers and universities – in the heart of America’s Northeast corridor. Positioned within 500 miles of 30% of the total U.S. population and two-thirds of the total Canadian population, Connecticut puts you and your business closer to millions of customers. This proximity is optimized by the state’s bold multi-modal, multi-billion-dollar transportation infrastructure investment strategy, which is working to improve highways, bridges, airports, rail and bus systems, freight and ports ............................................................................ In addition to a network of international airports and deepwater ports, the ease of global travel and freight movement by rail and highway makes the entire state a prime location for domestic and international trade. Connecticut’s interconnected ports, railways and highways expedite the transportation of goods as well as people. The state has three deepwater ports (Bridgeport, New Haven, and New London) – and a commitment from the Connecticut Port Authority to continue investing in those ports – making it ideal for national and international exports. 24 |

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For more information, please call 860-500-2300 or email decd@ ct.gov or visit www.ctforbusiness.com

CONNECTICUT: BRISTOL, IS THE PLACE TO BE TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS

................................................................................ Bristol is a community of approximately 61,000 residents with a talented workforce and a unique package of development incentives for new and existing businesses. Bristol enjoys the important advantages of a central location close to several major metropolitan markets: New York and Boston each lie within 100 miles of Bristol; Hartford is 16 miles away; and New Haven is 25 miles south. Connecticut’s Interstate 84 is less than five miles south of Bristol off CT Route 229. CT Route 72 through Bristol connects Interstate 84 with Interstate 91, providing access to Fairfield County, New Haven County, and New York City to the south.

Economic Development The City of Bristol fosters an environment that is supportive of economic development and growth. The City manages a number of economic development incentive programs to encourage the retention, relocation, or creation of new businesses. Manufacturers and/or distributors building in Bristol are eligible for a 5-year, 80% tax abatement on the new construction. Other


business and projects – from large retail to multi-family – are also eligible for tax assistance. Additionally, business owners are eligible to apply to local grant programs offering sizeable funds to assist with building renovations, workforce expansions, and for the purchase of manufacturing equipment.

Available Properties Located on CT Route 229 just minutes from Interstate 84 and ESPN’s world headquarters, the Southeast Bristol Business Park is attracting manufacturers and other companies interested in building state-of-the-art facilities. It is ideal for manufacturing, warehouse/distribution, biotech companies, and other corporate headquarters. Nearby lies a17-acre building site at 894 Middle Street (CT Route 229) across from ESPN ideal for a large manufacturing, medical, or distribution project. Downtown Bristol’s Centre Square development offers new construction opportunities for large multi-family, medical, or office uses.

Ready to Learn More? Contact the Economic & Community Development Office at 860-5846185 or visit bristolallheart.com for more information. Let them draft an incentive package that can put your business where it needs to BE: Bristol! X

DON’T TAKE OUR WORD FOR IT. HERE’S WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT DOING BUSINESS IN BRISTOL: “The City of Bristol’s assistance in allowing an expansion of our facility here along with the availability of a highly trained technical workforce has allowed LAB Security to continue as a Bristol business for over 60 years.” – Thomas Martucci, General Manager, LAB Security Systems Corp. “We chose to develop PODS’ Connecticut headquarters in Bristol because of the City’s optimal location between Boston and New York and a supportive business environment. We develop projects throughout the country, and Bristol’s progressive attitude toward development has been a welcome change.” – Glenn Couch, Developer of PODS Portable Storage Company

Bristol, CT

The place to BE

to grow your business!

Located in central Connecticut, Bristol is a community of approximately 61,000 residents with a talented workforce and a unique package of development incentives for businesses. Available properties include the Southeast Bristol Business Park, Centre Square in downtown, and a 17-acre property on Middle Street (CT Route 229) across from ESPN world headquarters.

Ready to Learn More?

Call the Economic & Community Development Office at 860-584-6185 or visit bristolallheart.com Let us draft an incentive package that can put your business where it needs to BE: Bristol! 111 North Main Street | Bristol, CT 06010 bristolallheart.com | www.bristolct.gov bxjmag.com

City of Bristol AD for Business Xpansion Journal: January/February 2021 Issue Size = Half Page Horizontal: 6.875”x 4.5”, Color

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

RHODE ISLAND:

OPTIMAL LOCATION, TALENT RICH

R

hode Island’s location along the Northeast I-95 corridor means easy access to major metropolitan areas. You can reach Boston in under 45 minutes and New York City in under three hours; nearby airports and shipping terminals serve international markets.

................................................................................... Rhode Island’s companies draw top talent at all levels from across Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. In fact, 11% of workers in Rhode Island commute from other states. Companies nearer to Massachusetts, like CVS, report that 43% of their tech workforce commutes from out of state. (For some of Boston’s most desirable suburbs, the Providence commute is often quicker than the Boston commute). Skills training programs, job-creation initiatives that focus on small business, universal computer science education in public schools are just a few of the ways Rhode Island is building a pipeline of workers who are ready to bring their skills and talents to the state’s businesses. A great quality of life is synonymous with Rhode Island. Natural beauty, innovative arts, and a diverse mix of cultures blend with numerous dining options, exciting outdoor activities, and unmatched pride of place make living in Rhode Island a place to be. For more information on the opportunities in Rhode Island, please call 401-278-9100 or email info@commerceri.com 26 |

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RHODE ISLAND: QUONSET BUSINESS PARK: SMALL STATE, BIG IMPACT.

................................................................................... Since its creation in 2005, Quonset Development Corporation has created an environment for businesses to succeed. Once home to a naval base, the park has been transformed into the leading engine of economic development in Rhode Island that supports over 200 companies and 12,000 jobs. The Park has been a leader in job creation and economic growth in the state, attracting over $2 billion in private investment and creating nearly 7,000 new jobs. The Park is also home to 17% of the manufacturing jobs in Rhode Island. So what is it about Quonset that creates a climate for success? Growth Mindset: The remaining available land at Quonset can accommodate up to 3.6 million square feet of new construction, and they make it easy to make you their newest company. Their site readiness program makes pre-permitted and pre-engineered parcels available that allow businesses to get shovels in the ground within 90 days of site control. World Class Infrastructure: Quonset’s greatest strength has always been in the variety of facilities and world-class infrastructure available to companies. Their industrial spaces have the capacity to support large, high-tech, operations like Electric Boat and Toray Plastics while the Commerce Park section accommodates some of the state’s most successful corporations like Ocean State Job Lot. Their state-of-the-art Flex Industrial Campus gives new and expanding companies room to grow in a move-in ready


and affordable space, adaptable to the needs of their business. This includes flexible manufacturing, or warehouse space between 10,000 and 40,000 s/f. These are equipped with office spaces, restroom facilities, and high bay space for manufacturing, assembly or warehouse use, with ceilings up to 24 feet. Quonset also offers modern, customizable, state-of-the-art office space for start-ups, small businesses and professional service companies in the Gateway Office Complex. With the four existing office buildings fully leased, construction of the fifth building is nearly complete. The Gateway Offices provide companies with affordable rates and the option of flexible shorter-term leases. Each facility includes wireless high-speed Internet, a shared kitchen and break areas (including an outdoor courtyard), a conference room, and an abundance of natural light, and multiple restrooms. Location: Their location in North Kingstown, Rhode Island places businesses in the heart of the Northeast, giving them broad access to the East Coast’s largest customer markets. Situated halfway between Boston and New York, companies can have a stake in both of the region’s densest population centers. They are also minutes from major highways such as I-95; manage the Port of Davisville, Rhode Island’s only public port, at the Park; and are adjacent to Amtrak’s New England Connector. Transportation: Quonset’s location places Their companies at the heart of major shipping and travel routes in the region. The onsite Port of Davisville provides public access to a world-class port facility. The park also affords access to 14 miles of freight rail lines through the Park and both RI Rte. 4 and I-95 highways. With additional proximity to three airports – T.F. Green (RI), Logan International (MA), and Bradley International (CT) and train routes

like the MBTA and Amtrak, businesses and employees alike have the options they need to access new markets. Superb Public Amenities: To attract the best talent, it’s essential to be a place where people want to work. The Park is home to an 18-hole golf course, four public beaches, a bike path, a daycare facility and a free express bus shuttle service that connects us to Providence in partnership with the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority. Our Gateway Plaza also includes shopping options like Dave’s Marketplace grocery store and Kohls. These amenities create an environment for success for their employees and are a benefit to their neighbors, as well. Cleaner and Greener: Access to the Port of Davisville has made their park a magnet for clean energy development. The park has hosted the construction of some of the nation’s most ambitious wind energy

projects, including the nation’s first offshore wind farm off the coast of Block Island. They look forward to serving as a hub for the growing industry. Quonset was also recently recognized by the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources for their commitment to investments in energy efficiency, and they’re proud that the Quonset Development Corporation’s offices are run 100% on clean energy generated by solar power. Quonset Business Park is the premium location for businesses of all sizes and stages of development. Their top-notch facilities, centralized location, and institutional support not only give businesses at Quonset an edge in the competitive Northeastern markets but also the resources they need to grow. For more information about starting your next venture at Quonset, visit them at http://www.quonset.com. X

OUR CONNECTIONS LAND • SEA RAIL • AIR PROPEL YOUR SUCCESS

NORTH KINGSTOWN, RHODE ISLAND Centrally located in the Southern New England business region Home to the Port of Davisville, ranked as one of the Top Ten auto importers in North America

The Port of Davisville has been instrumental in the development of the offshore wind industry, including the first wind farm in the United States.

To learn more visit quonset.com bxjmag.com

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

NEW HAMPSHIRE:

LIVE FREE

N

ew Hampshire’s low taxes and high-income levels motivate entrepreneurs to start and grow business here in the Granite State.

................................................................................... Companies and manufacturers operating in New Hampshire also have access to the many services offered by the Division of Economic Development, including: • Business and technical assistance for manufacturers • Grant assistance for recruiting and training employees • Subsidized technical assistance from the University of New Hampshire and Dartmouth College • Permit Assistance • Customized reports and personal tours of available industrial and office real estate • Prompt responses to questions related to state government • Site selection • Assistance with employee retention/layoff aversion Go to www.selectnh.com for a comprehensive look at available commercial and industrial properties, as well as the data you need as you consider New Hampshire for location or expansion. Email to info@nheconomy.com or call 603-271-2591.

NEW HAMPSHIRE: KEENE

................................................................................... Keene, New Hampshire, pop. 23,056, is the largest town in the Monadnock Region of the Granite State and one of the most charming and endearing in all of New England. It is just far enough from the hustle and bustle of the coast and continues to be prosperous and sustainable…an ideal environment for employment and recreation. Keene is so endearing that Boston.com 28 |

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recommended it as weekend road trip destination for Boston families; it is an idyllic stay-cation. Where impressively preserved history meets modern development, Keene’s Main Street is the heart of the community with its shops, restaurants, businesses, residences and… beauty. Central Square has been part of the fabric of life here for more than two centuries. Named one of the Great Places in America by the American Planning Association, Keene is a perfect all-seasons destination with easy access to snowy slopes in the winter and one of the best trail systems in the northeast for hikers and bikers. Residents and visitors treasure the exceptional quality of life enriched by arts and culture. Initially settled in the 1730s, Keene was a manufacturing center in the mid-1800s. Their manufacturing legacy continues to be a mainstay of the local economy with advanced manufacturers such as AMETEK, Inc. (ultra-precision machining solutions), Timken Aerospace Super Precision (mini and precision bearings) and Smiths Medical (one of three companies enlisted to manufacture 78.6 million syringe-and-needle units in the nation’s fight against COVID 19). Workforce development is well-suited to the 21st Century economy with easy access to multiple local colleges and universities including excellent resources in town: Keene State College, River Valley Community College and Antioch University. The City’s focus on simplifying the development process together with its recognized commitment to environmental sustainability is evidenced by recent modern residential and commercial development projects. Keene is also fortunate to be the home of the active and successful business incubator, the Hannah Grimes Center for Entrepreneurship. Their economy is diverse and includes organizations such as C&S Wholesale Grocers, the largest wholesale grocery supply company in the U.S. with its home office in Keene and easy access to the Keene Dillant Hopkins Airport, and the Main Street America


Insurance group that started in 1923 with the founding of National Grange Mutual Insurance. “It’s a diverse group of internationally relevant, high tech manufacturers and high quality employers that consistently lead their peers in both innovation and social responsibility,” says Medard Kopczynski, Director of Economic Development for the City. Is it time to escape to a better life?

NEW HAMPSHIRE: PORTSMOUTH

................................................................................... Year after year, Portsmouth is named one of the best places in New England to live, work and visit. Situated on the banks of the Piscataqua River, the quintessential New England town offers a high quality of life with abundant opportunities for employment, commerce, education, and recreation. Dating back to 1623, Portsmouth is home to the state’s only deep-water port and marine terminal. The scenic harbor is bustling with large international commercial ships, as well as the local commercial fishing and whale watching vessels and recreational boats. While the town has a long and storied maritime history, it also has a longstanding history of arts and culture. “As a historic community, we have a robust cultural tourism industry,” says Portsmouth Economic Development Manager Nancy Carmer. “With historic Strawbery Banke Museum and dozens of historic homes on quaint streets, Portsmouth is known as the best place in New Hampshire to visit for architecture, arts, and culture.”

Portsmouth, NH: Where Community, Commerce and Culture Thrive

Just as diverse as its cultural opportunities, Portsmouth’s economic profile includes a broad range of industries, from financial and manufacturing to government, transportation, hospitality, health and retail; many which benefit from being located in one of the City’s Foreign Trade Zones. Some of the town’s top employers include the United States Consular Center, Liberty Mutual Insurance, Bottomline Technologies and Portsmouth Hospital. Lonza Biologic, a pharmaceutical manufacturer selected to manufacture one of the COVID 19 vaccines, is on track to expand its Portsmouth manufacturing facility from its 17 current acres to a 54-acre campus. “We’re really proud of the city’s economic base and the quality and educational attainment of our workforce,” Carmer says. “Forty-eight percent of Portsmouth residents have advanced degrees and no one business sector makes up more than 19% of our economy. We feel that these factors have contributed to a resilient local economy.” Portsmouth’s Great Bay Community College works with local companies like Lonza Biologic, Northeast Rehab Hospital and local precision manufacturers on workforce training programs to better train and equip potential workers—just another step community leaders are taking to expand upon the town’s already attractive business climate. “We hope to remain resilient and maintain our economic vitality and vibrancy,” Carmer adds. “We plan to continue to position the city to attract a diverse business profile and the workforce needed to make those businesses successful.” X

EVERYTHING YOU NEED IS HERE

People choose Keene for their business, their family, their pleasure, their lifetime.

iStock Images-Sean Pavone

DISTINCTIONS INCLUDE: 2020 “Best Place for Young Professional in New Hampshire” – Niche.com 2020 “2nd Best Place to Retire in New Hampshire” – Smartassest.com 2020 “Best Place to Live in New Hampshire” – Niche.com 2020 “NH’s Best Weekend Getaway Location” - MSN.com

NANCY CARMER,

Economic Development Manager 1 Junkins Ave., Portsmouth, NH 03801 Phone: 603-610-7220

CITY OF KEENE

3 Washington Street, Keene, NH 03431 603-757-1875 • med@choosekeene.com

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EXPANSION

OPPORTUNITIES

ONTARIO, CANADA:

THE PROVINCE OFFERS UNPRECEDENTED SUPPORT FOR BUSINESS

V

ic Fedeli, Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade, issued the following statement regarding monthly employment release by Statistics Canada:

................................................................................... “Employment in Ontario increased by 36,600 in November, including 1,700 in the manufacturing sector, marking the sixth straight month of overall employment gains. During this period, employment increased by more than 905,000, including 13,200 more men and women working in the manufacturing sector than pre-COVID. However, we know that people all across the province continue to struggle during the challenging period, and that not every worker is back on the job. Now more than ever, we must continue to support small business and families as we plan our economic recover. 30 |

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In addition, our government is providing tax relief for small businesses, including a proposal to provide municipalities with the ability to cut property taxes for small businesses, reducing business education taxes and permanently increasing the Employer Health Tax payroll exemption to $1 million. This would mean 90% of employers would pay no EHT. The people of this province have continued to step up and demonstrate the best of the Ontario Spirit throughout the course of this pandemic. It is this spirit that will inspire us during the holiday season, the 2nd wave of the pandemic, and into our economic recovery. Our government will continue to support all Ontarians as we work together to emerge from this pandemic stronger than ever before.� For more information, call 416-326-8475 or visit www.ontario.ca X


X

Middlese

Marks the Spot for Success

we appreciate your business

www.investinmiddlesex.ca


Join Middlesex County’s thriving Advanced Manufacturing Community A prime location with affordable land prices, educated workforce, multi-level government support and key quality of life elements. Middlesex County checks all the boxes for site locators and corporate managers. Find out how a savvy industrial community is already investing, building, and benefiting from the region’s outstanding opportunities. Conveniently Located Middlesex County is a rich rural-urban landscape in the heart of southern Ontario complete with all the must haves for multi-nationals and domestic businesses looking to launch or expand. If your company relies on ‘on time’ deliveries, you’ll appreciate the access to three border crossings within a two hour drive. Our 401 and 402 series highways are vital in transporting goods to destinations across the globe. Rail and air transport are locally available with both Canadian National and Canadian Pacific traveling through the County and the London International Airport offering a central location for both cargo and people. Also located about an hour from here is port access to the Great Lakes’ shipping channels.

private and municipal and the steady growth of new investment speaks volumes about how firms are responding to what they find. Manufacturers already on board include Armatec Survivability, Catalent, Ideal Pipe, Algonquin Bridge, and Dashwood Industries. Each company has its own reasons for making Middlesex home but the municipality’s business-friendly approach definitely plays a role. As the county boasts three Ontario Investment Ready Certified Industrial Sites, companies primed to locate here can be confident that the upfront work of gathering property information; mapping; and completing the environmental, heritage, archaeological and species assessments will reduce risk and advance construction. Employable Local Workforce With a population nearing 400,000, the City of London serves as an advantage to Middlesex County given the access to established economic sectors, and the skilled graduates of Western University and Fanshawe College. Both education institutions rank high as leaders in research and public/private partnerships so it’s no wonder why Statistics Canada (2016) identified Middlesex County residents as possessing education levels higher than the national average. Best of Both Worlds The quality of life in Middlesex is enhanced by the celebration of arts and culture and the vibrant shopping and entertainment options. As well, short commutes, traffic that moves, fresh air, safe spaces, and active living options can all be accessed by families in our intimate communities. This is a place where front porches are used, street hockey is played, and children walk to school. Come see for yourself why businesses call Middlesex ‘home.’

A Strong and Supported Industrial Community The county’s economic development plan is perfectly suited to manufacturers looking to put down roots in one of its many business parks. Site ownership is a mix of

investinmiddlesex.ca


Clarington Board of Trade and Office of Economic Development


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

ALABAMA Tuscaloosa County Industrial Dev. Auth

Cullman Economic Development Agency

Dale Greer P.O. Box 1009 Cullman, AL 35056 256-739-1891 daleg@cullmaneda.org www.cullmaneda.org ...................................................................

Etowah Economic Alliance

Marilyn Lott 800 Forrest Avenue Suite 220E Gadsden, AL 35901 256-456-9938 mlott@eeaalabama.org www.eeaalabama.org ...................................................................

Sissie Browning, Assistant Director P.O. Box 2667 Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 205-349-1414 info@tcida.com www.tcida.com ...................................................................

ARIZONA

Arizona Regional Economic Develoment

Mignonne Hollis, Executive Director 750 E. Bartow Drive Suite 16 Sierra Vista, AZ 85635 520-458-6948 hollism@aredf.org www.aredf.org ...................................................................

City of Flagstaff Economic Development

Gadsden Industrial Development Authority

David Hooks, Executive Director 1 Commerce Square Gadsden, AL 35901 256-543-9423 davidhooks@gadsdenida.org www.gadsdenida.org ...................................................................

Elmore County Economic Development

Cary Cox P.O. Box 117 Wetumka , AL 36092 334-514-5843 cary.cox@elmoreeda.com www.elmoreeda.com ..................................................................

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Amy Sturdivant 601 Genome Way Huntsville , AL 35806 256-327-9591 asturdivant@hudsonalpha.org www.hudsonalpha.org ...................................................................

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John Saltonstall, AZED Pro Business Retention & Expansion Manager Economic Vitality Division City of Flagstaff 211 W. Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Office 928-213-2966 Cell 928-606-9430 jsaltonstall@flagstaffaz.gov www.flagstaffaz.gov ...................................................................

Pinal Alliance for Economic Growth

Patti King, Executive Mgr. 17235 N. 75th Avenue Suite D-145 Glendale, AZ 85308 520-836-8686 pking@pinalalliance.org www.pinalalliance.org ...................................................................

Ouachita Partnership for Economic Development

James Lee Sillman Executive Director 625 Adams Aveune Camden, AR 71701 870-836-2210 870-836-8899 (f) director@teamcamden.com www.teamcamden.com ...................................................................

City of Siloam Springs

Don Clark Community Development Director P.O. Box 80 Siloam Springs , AR 72761 479-238-0927 dclark@siloamsprings.com whysiloam.com ...................................................................

CALIFORNIA

City of Eastvale

Kimberly Wright Economic Development Manager 12363 Limonite Ave. Suite 910 Eastvale, CA 91752 951-703-4480 kwright@eastvaleca.gov www.eastvaleca.gov ...................................................................

City of Moreno Valley Economic Development

Mike Lee Economic Development Director 14177 Frederick Street Moreno Valley, CA 92553 951-413-3460 edteam@moval.org www.morenovalleybusiness.com ...................................................................

ARKANSAS Chaffee Crossing

Ivy Owen, Executive Director 7020 Taylor Avenue Fort Smith, AR 72916 479-452-4554 479-452-4566 (f) property@chaffeecrossing.com www.chaffeecrossing.com ...................................................................

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City of Ontario Economic Development

Tanya Spiegel Executive Director Ecnomic Development 303 East B Street Ontario, CA 91764 909-395-2081 tspiegel@ontarioca.gov www.ontariothinksbusiness.com ...................................................................

Greater Irvine Chamber

Linda DiMario 36 Executive Park Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-502-4124 ldimario@irvinechamber.com www.irvinechamber.com ...................................................................

COLORADO

City of Fountain Economic Development Commission

Kimberly A. Bailey Economic Development/ Urban Renewal Director 116 S. Main Street Fountain, CO 80817 719-322-2056 kbailey@fountaincolorado.org www.fountaincolorado.org ...................................................................

Grand Junction Economic Partnership

Robin Brown, Executive Director 122 N. 6th Street Grand Junction, CO 81501 970--245-4332 robin@gjep.org www.gjep.org ...................................................................

DELAWARE

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-540-0994 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

FLORIDA City of Kissimmee

Belinda O. Kirkegard, Economic Development Director 101 Church Street Kissimmee FL 34741 407-518-2307 BKirkegard@kissimmee.org www.Kissimmee.org ...................................................................


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City of Sanford

Bob Turk Economic Development Director 300 North Park Ave. Sanford, FL 32771 407-688-5015 bob.turk@sanfordfl.gov www.sanfordfl.gov ...................................................................

City of St. Cloud

Antranette Forbes Economic Development & Special Projects Manager 1300 9th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769 (407)957-7234 antranette.forbes@stcloud.org www.stcloud.org/926/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Titusville

Lisa Nicholas 555 South Washington Avenue Titusville, FL 32796-3584 321-567-3774 lisa.nicholas@titusville.com www.YEStitusvilleFL.com ...................................................................

Elevate Lake Economic Development

Tracy Garcia CEcD, EcDMP Director 20763 US Highway 27 Groveland, FL 34736 352-343-9647 352-801-7498 (f) tgarcia@lakecountyfl.gov elevatelake.com ...................................................................

Greater St. Petersburg Area Economic Development Corporation

J.P. DuBuque President and CEO 100 2nd Ave N Ste 130 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727-388-2906 jpdubuque@stpeteedc.com StPeteEDC.com/BurgBiz ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

Haines City Economic Development Council, Inc.

Cyndi Jantomaso, President Post Office Box 3845 Haines City, FL 33845-3845 863-422-2525 863-206-0007 cyndi@hainescityedc.com www.hainescityedc.com ...................................................................

Hernando County Offfice of Business Development

Valerie M. Pianta Economic Development Director 15800 Flight Path Diver Brooksville, FL 34604 352--540-6400 vpianta@hernandocounty.us www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Holmes County Development Commission

Joe Rone, Executive Director 106 E Byrd Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-6154 jrone@westflorida.coop hcdc1978@gmail.com www.holmescountyedc.com ...................................................................

Indian River Chamber of Commerce

Helene Caseltine Economic Development Director 1216 21st Street Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-567-3491 helenec@indianrivered.com www.indianrivered.com ...................................................................

Osceola County

David Rodriguez, Economic Development Manager 3 Courthouse Square, 2nd Floor Kissimmee, FL 34741 407-742-0620 407-742-4202 (f) david.rodriguez@osceola.org www.greaterosceola.org ...................................................................

Forward Forsyth

Pasco Economic Development Council

Bill Cronin, President & CEO 16506 Pointe Village Drive Suite 101 Lutz, FL 33558 813-926-0827 813-926-0829 (f) bcronin@pascoedc.com pascoedc.com ...................................................................

James McCoy, President & Ceo P.O. Box 1799 Cumming GA 30028 770-887-6461 770-842-1170 jmccoy@focochamber.org www.forwardforsyth.org ...................................................................

Putnam Development Authority Pinellas County Economic Development

Mike Meidel, CEcD, Director 13805 58th Street North, Suite 1-200 Clearwater, FL 33760 727-464-7332 mmeidel@pinellascounty.org www.pced.org ...................................................................

Tallahassee-Leon County Office of Economic Vitality

Cristina Paredes, Director, OEV 315 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 450 Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-300-7559 Cparedes@OEVforBusiness.org www.oevforbusiness.org ...................................................................

GEORGIA City of College Park

Artie Jones III Director of Economic Development 3667 Main Street College Park, GA 30337 404-305-2052 404-305-2057 (f) artiejones@collegeparkga.com www.collegeparkga.com/ ...................................................................

City of East Point

Maceo Rogers CECD 1526 East Forrest Avenue Suite 400 East Point, GA 30344 404-270-7057 jmrogers@eastpointcity.org www.eastpointcity.org ...................................................................

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Terry Schwindler Econmical Devleopment Director 117 Putnam Drive, Eaton, GA 31024 706-816-8099 tschwindler@putnamdevelopmentauthority.com www.putnamdevelopmentauthority.com ...................................................................

ILLINOIS

Champaign County Economic Development Corporation

Carly McCroy, Executive Director 1817 S. Neil Street, Suite 100 Champaign, IL 61820 217-359-6261 carly@champaigncountyedc.org www.champaigncountyedc.org ...................................................................

City of Highland Economic Development

Mallord Hubbard 1115 Broadway, P.O. Box 218 Highland, IL 62249-0218 618-654-9891 618-654-4768 (f) mhubbard@highlandil.gov www.highlandil.gov ...................................................................

City of Litchfield Ecnomic Development

Shelly Herman 120 E. Ryder Street Litchfield, IL 62056 217-324-8146 Sherman@cityoflitchfieldil.com www.litchfieldil-development.com ...................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

INDIANA City of Marshall

Jennifer Bishop Economic Development Director 201 S. Michigan Ave Marshall, IL 62441 217-826-2034 jbishop@marshall-il.com www.marshall-il.com ...................................................................

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Dodge City/Ford County Development Corporation

Joann Knight, Executive Director Alexis A. Fitzsimmons 101 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd. Director of Economic & Business Dodge City, KS 67801 Development 620-227-9501 1111 Schrock Rd. 620-227-2957 (f) Columbus, OH 43229 jknight@dodgedev.org 614-540-0994 www.dodgedev.org afitzsimmons@amppartners.org ................................................................... www.searchampsites.com ...................................................................

City of Vandalia

Amber E. Daulbaugh, Director of Economic Development 431 W. Gallatin St. Vandalia, IL 62471 618-283-1152 618-335-9510 (Mobile) vandaliaed@vandaliaillinois.com www.vandaliaillinois.com ...................................................................

KENTUCKY

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson. CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

Village of Arlington Heights Business & Economic Development

Charles Witherington-Perkins Director of Planning & Community Development 33 S. Arlington Heights Arlington Heights, IL 60005 847-368-5220 cperkins@vah.com www.vah.com ...................................................................

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Jill Fraley Dotson, Executive Economic Development Director 773 Hambley Boulevard Pikeville, KY 41501 606-437-5128 info@whypikeville.com www.whypikeville.com ...................................................................

Greater Topeka Partnership Huntington County Economic Development

Mark Wickersham Executive Driector 8 West Market Street Huntington, IN 46750 260-356-5688 mark@hcued.com www.hcued.com ..................................................................

Molly Howey, CEcD 120 SW 6th Ave. Topeka, KS 66603 785-231-6040 mhowey@gotopeka.com www.gotopeka.com ...................................................................

Miami County Economic Development Auth.

Jim Tidd 1525 W. Hoosier Boulevard Peru, IN 46970 765-689-0159 jtidd@miamicountyeda.com www.miamicountyeda.com ...................................................................

Russell County Eco Devo & CVB

Mike Parsons, Director 331 E. Witchita, Russell, KS 67665 785-483-4000 785-324-0126 rced2@russellks.org www.russellcountyks.org ...................................................................

KANSAS

City of Parsons Economic Development

Jim Zaleski Economic Development Director 112 S. 17th Street Parsons, KS 67357 620-421-7030 jzaleski@parsonsks.com www.growparsons.com ...................................................................

Coffey County Economic Development

Ronda Truelove, Interim Director 110 S. 6th St., Room #5 Burlington KS 66839 620-364-8780 620-364-3608 rtruelove@coffeycountyks.org www.coffeycountyks.org ...................................................................

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South Western Kentucky EDC

Carter Hendricks, Executive Director 2800 Fort Campbell Blvd. Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-885-1499 chendricks@southwesternky.com www.southwesternky.com ...................................................................

LOUISIANA

Intersect Illinois

Brent Case Senior Vice President Business Development 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 312-667-6013 brent.case@intersectillinois.org intersectillinois.org ...................................................................

City of Pikeville

Shawnee Economic Development

Ann Smith-Tate, President CEO 15100 W. 67th Street Suite 202 Shawnee, KS 66217-9344 913-631-6545 asmithtate@shawneekschamber.com www.shawnee-edc.com ...................................................................

Wyandotte Economic Development Council

Greg Kindle, President 727 Minnesota Avenue Kansas City, KS 66101 913-371-3198 gkindle@wyedc.org www.wyedc.org ...................................................................

Louisiana Economic Development

Anya G. Hudnall 1201 N. Third Street Suite 7-210 Baton Rouge, LA 70802 225-342-5396 Anya.hudnal@la.gov www.la.gov ...................................................................

SWLA Economic Development ALLIANCE

George Swift 4310 Ryan Street Lake Charles LA 70605 337-433-3632 gswift@allianceswla.org www.allianceswla.org ...................................................................

St. Mary Parish of Economic Development

Frank Fink, Director 500 Main Street, 5th Floor Courthouse Franklin, LA 70538 337-828-4100 ffink@stmaryparishla.gov www.stmaryparishdevelopmant.com ...................................................................


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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

MAINE

MISSOURI Kent County Economic Development

Town of Richmond Community, Economic, & Business Development

Darryl Sterling, Director 26 Gardiner Street Richmond, ME 04357-0159 207-737-4305 x 331 207-737-4306 (f) director@richmondmaine.com www.richmondmaine.com ...................................................................

MARYLAND

Calvert County Economic Development

Kelly Robertson-Slagle, Director 205 Main Street Prince Frederick, MD 20678 410-535-4583 kelly.slagle@calvertcountymd.gov www.ecalvert.com ...................................................................

Carroll County Economic Development

Jamie L. Williams, CEcD, Director 400 High Street, 3rd Floor Chestertown MD 21620 410-810-2168 jlwilliams@kentgov.org www.kentcounty.com/business ...................................................................

Maryland Department of Commerce

Montgomery County Economic Development

Kristin O’Keefe 1801 Rockville Pike, Ste. 320 Rockville, MD 20852 240-641-6703 kristin@thinkmoco.com www.thinkmoco.com ...................................................................

MICHIGAN

Cecil County Economic Development

The Right Place, Inc.

Susan Banks, Director 104 Tech Park Drive Cambridge, MD 21613 410-228-0155 sbanks@choosedorchester.org www.choosedorchester.org ...................................................................

Doug Kulper, SVP Business Marketing & Communication Director 300 North Washington Square Lansing, MI 48913 www.michiganadvantage.org ...................................................................

Andria Romkema 125 Ottawa Avenue, Suite 450 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-771-0563 romkemaa@rightplace.org www.Rightplace.org ...................................................................

MINNESOTA

City of Lakeville Community & Economic Development

David Olson, Director 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 952-985-4421 dolson@lakevillemn.gov www.lakevillemn.gov ...................................................................

Sheldon Mudd, Executive Director 1500 College Pkwy McMullen Hall #103 Elko, NV 89801 775-738-2100 775-738-7978(f) smudd@nnrda.com www.nnrda.com ...................................................................

NEW JERSEY

Taney County Partnership

Michigan Economic Development Corporation

Dorchester County Economic Development

Steven S. Johnson, CEO One Metropolitan Square Suite 1300 St. Louis, MO 63102 314-444-1105 sjohnson@alliancestl.com alliancestl.com ...................................................................

Tom Riford 100 Community Place Crownsville, MD 21032 877-634-6361 www.maryland.gov ...................................................................

Paige Sunderland, Director 225 N. Center Street, Ste. 101 Westminster, MD 21157 410-386-2070 psunderland@carrollbiz.org www.carrollbiz.org ...................................................................

Chris Moyer, Director 200 Chesapeake Blvd., Ste 2700 Elkton, MD 21921 410-996-8465 cmoyer@ccgov.org www.ccgov.org ...................................................................

Alliance STL | St. Louis Regional Economic Development

Northeastern Nevada Regional Development Authority

Jonas Arjes Executive Director 269 State Highway 248 Branson, MO 65616 417-334-4084 jarjes@taneycountypartnership.com www.taneycountypartnership.com ...................................................................

NEVADA

Gloucester County Department of Economic Development

Tom Bianco, Director 1480 Tanyard Rd., Sewell, NJ 08080 856-384-6930 tbianco@co.gloucester.nj.us www.gloucestercountynj.gov ...................................................................

NEW YORK City of Henderson Economic Development

Ken Chapa, Acting Director City Hall Annex 280 Water Street MSC 512 P.O. Box 95050 Henderson, NV 89009-5050 702-267-1650 702-267-1651 (f) Ken.Chapa@cityofhenderson.com www.hendersonnow.com ...................................................................

Las Vegas Global Ecnomic Alliance

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Craig Clark, Executive Director CrossRoads Center 6087 State Route 19N Suite 100 Belmont, NY 14813 585-268-7445 585-268-7473 (f) clarkcr@alleganyco.com www.acida.org ...................................................................

The Agency-Broome County IDA/LDC

Perry Ursem Vice President, Business Retention + Expansion 6720 via Austi Parkway Suite #330 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702-791-0000 www.Ivgea.org ...................................................................

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Allegany County Industrial Development Agency

Stacey Duncan, Deputy Director of Community & Economic Development Five South College Drive Suite 201 Binghamton, NY 13905 607-584-9000 607-584-9009 (f) smd@theagency-ny.com www.theagency-ny.com ...................................................................

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NORTH CAROLINA

Beaufort County Economic Development

Martyn Johnson, Director 705 Page Road Washington, NC 27889 252-946-3970 252-946-0849 (f) martyn.johnson@beaufortedc.com www.co.beaufort.nc.us ..................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

NORTH DAKOTA

American Municipal Power, Inc. Bismarck Mandan Chamber EDC

Nathan Schneider CEcD-Vice President 1640 Burnt Boat Dr. Bismark, ND 58503 701-223-5660 nschneider@bmcedc.com www.bismarckmandan.com .................................................................

OHIO

Harnett County Economic Development

Debbie Taylor, Marketing & Business Recruitment Manager 200 Alexander Dr. or PO Box 1270 Lillington, NC 27546 910-814-6891 919-814-8298 (f) dhtaylor@harnett.org www.harnettedc.org ...................................................................

North Carolina Global Transpark

John W. Rouse Executive Director 2780 Jetport Road Kinston, NC 28504 252-775-6183 252-522-1765 (f) jwrouse@ncdot.gov www.ncgtp.com .................................................................

PENNSYLVANIA

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Blount Partnership

Bryan Daniels CEcD, CCE, IOM President and CEO Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 201 S. Washington Street St. Maryville, TN 37804 1111 Schrock Rd. 865-983-2247 Columbus, OH 43229 865-984-1386 614-540-0994 bdaniels@blountpartnership.com afitzsimmons@amppartners.org www.blountchamber.com www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... ...................................................................

RHODE ISLAND

City of Cranston

Lawrence DiBoni, Director of Economic Development 869 Park Avenue Cranston, RI 02910 401-780-3166 401-780-3179 (f) ldiboni@cranstonri.org www.cranstonri.com ...................................................................

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development 1111 Schrock Rd. Columbus, OH 43229 City of Warwick 614-540-0994 Department of Tourism, afitzsimmons@amppartners.org Culture, and Development www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... Karen Jedson, Economic Dev. Director 3275 Pos t Road OKLAHOMA Warwick, RI 2886 401-921-9712 401-732-7662 Karen.Jedson@warwickri.com movetowarwickri.com .................................................................. Bartlesville Development

Authority

Jared Patton, Vice President 201 SW Keeler Bartlesville, OK 74003 918-337-8086 918-337-0216 (f) jpatton@bdaok.org www.bdaok.org ...................................................................

TENNESSEE

Quonset Development Corporation

Steven J. King, Managing Director 95 Cripe Street North Kingstown, RI 2852 401-295-0044 sking@quonset.com www.quonset.com ...................................................................

SOUTH CAROLINA

Bristol Tennessee Essential Services

April Eads Business Development Manager 2470 Volunteer Parkway Bristol, TN 37620 423-793-5532 423-793-5545 (f) aeads@btes.net www.btes.net/index.php/economic-development ...................................................................

City of Lebanon

Sarah Haston Economic Development Director 200 North Castle Heights Ave. Lebanon, TN 37087 615-443-2839 EXT. 2120 Sarah.Haston@lebanontn.org www.lebanontn.org ...................................................................

NETWORKS – Sullivan Partnership

Clay Walker PO Box 747 Blountville, TN 37617 (423) 279-7681 cwalker@networkstn.com www.networkstn.com ...................................................................

TEXAS Stanly County Economic Development Commission

Candice Boyd Lowder, Director 704-986-3682 704-986-3685 (f) clowder@stanlyedc.com 1000 North First Street, Suite 11 Albemarle, NC 28001 www.stanlyedc.com ...................................................................

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Ponca City Development Authority

David Myers, Executive Director 102 S. Fifth Street Suite 3 Ponca City, OK 74601 580-765-7070 580-765-7070 (f) dmyers@goponca.com www.goponca.com ...................................................................

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Lexington County Economic Development

Sarah J. Johnson Department Director 212 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 803-785-6818 sjjohnson@lex-co.com www.LexingtonCountyUSA.com ...................................................................

Cedar Hill Economic Development

Kim M. Buttram, CEcD 285 Uptown Boulevard, Bldg. 100 Cedar Hill, TX 75104 972-291-5132 chedc@cedarhilltx.com www.cedarhilledc.com ...................................................................


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City of Development Corporation of El Campo

Carolyn Gibson Executive Director 707 Fahrenthold El Campo, TX 77437 979-543-6727 979-320-7727 (f) cgibson@elcampoeco.org www.elcampoeco.org ...................................................................

NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

LCRA

Mark Willis Economic Development Manager 3700 Lake Austin Blvd. Austin, TX 78703 512-578-3291 mark.willis@lcra.org www.lcra.org/economic-development/pages/default.aspx ...................................................................

Laredo Economic Development

Olivia Varela, President & CEO P.O. Box 2682 Laredo, TX 78044 956-722-0563 ovarela@laredoedc.org www.laredoedc.org ...................................................................

Mansfield Economic Development Corporation City of Fort Worth

Robert Sturns, Director 1150 S. Freeway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-392-2663 Robert.Sturns@fortworthtexas.gov ...................................................................

City of Leander

Evan Milliorn Economic Development Director 201 N Brushy Leander, TX 78641 512-528-2852 emilliorn@leandertx.gov www.leanderbusiness.com ...................................................................

Conroe Economic Development Council

Danielle Scheiner, Executive Director 505 West Davis Conroe, TX 77301 936-538-7118 scheiner@conroeedc.org www.conroeedc.org ...................................................................

DeSoto Economic Development

Joe Newman, CEO 211 E. Pleasant Run Road DeSoto, TX 75115 Ph: 972-230-9611 jnewman@dedc.org www.dedc.org ...................................................................

McKinney Economic Development Corporation

Peter Tokar III, President/CEO 5900 S. Lake Forest Drive McKinney, TX 75070 972-435-6953 ptokar@mckinneyedc.com www.uniquemckinney.com ...................................................................

Odessa Economic Development Corporation

301 S. Main Street Mansfield, TX 76063 817-728-3652 www.mansfield-texas.com ...................................................................

Marble Falls EDC

Christian Fletcher 801 Fourth Street Marble Falls, TX 78654 830-798-7079 cfletcher@marblefallseconomy.com www.marblefallseconomy.com ...................................................................

Wesley Burnett 700 N. Grant Ave. Odessa, TX 79761 432-333-7880 wburnett@odessaecodev.com www.odessatx.com ...................................................................

Mount Pleasant EDC

Gainesville Economic Development Corp

New Braunfels EDC

Audrey Schroyer 311 S. Weaver Street Gainsville, TX 76240 940-665-5241 aschroyer@cogtx.org www.gainesvilleedc.com ...................................................................

Jacksboro Economic Development Corporation

Lynda Pack Executive Director P.O. Box 610 Jacksboro, TX 76458 940-567-3151 lyndapack@jacksboroedc.com www.jacksboroedc.com ..................................................................

Nathan Tafoya, Executive Director 1604 N. Jefferson Ave. Mount Pleasant, TX 75455 903-572-6602 nathan@mpedc.org www.mpedc.org ...................................................................

Chester Jenke 390 S. Seguin Avenue New Braunfels, TX 78130 830-608-2811 holly@innewbraunfels.com www.newbraunfelsedc.com ...................................................................

Ruth Jackson Customer Eng. Specialist 107 Chapel Lane New Boston, TX 75570 903-223-9841 ruth.jackson@texamericascenter. com www.texamericascenter.com ...................................................................

Whitesboro Economic Development Corp.

Lynda Anderson Director P.O. Box 340 or 111 W. Main Whitesboro, TX 76273 930-564-3311 landerson@whitesborotexas.com www.whitesborotexas.com ...................................................................

UTAH

Eagle Mountain Economic Development

Aaron Sanborn City Administrator 1650 E. Stagecoach Run Eagle Mountain, UT 84005 801-789-6621 asanborn@emcity.org www.eaglemountaincity.com ...................................................................

VIRGINA

Alexandria Economic Development Partnership

Pflugerville Community Development

Veronica Ramirez 3801 Helios Way Suite 130 Pflugerville, TX 78660 512-990-3725 veronicar@pfdevelopment.com www.pfevelopment.com ..................................................................

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TexAmericas Center

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Adrianne Griffith Marketing & Communications 625 North Washington St. Suite 400 Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-3820 730-739-1384 (f) griffith@alexecon.org www.growALX.com ...................................................................

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NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF

ECONOMIC DEVELOPERS

WASHINGTON Mingo County Redevelopment Authority

American Municipal Power, Inc.

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Business Development City of Lakewood Economic 1111 Schrock Rd. Development Columbus, OH 43229 Becky Newton, 614-540-0994 Manager afitzsimmons@amppartners.org 6000 Main Street SW www.searchampsites.com Lakewood, WA 98499 ................................................................... 877-421-9126 bnewton@cityoflakewood.us www.buildyourbetterhere.com ...................................................................

Arlington Economic Development

Telly Tucker, AED Director 1100 N Glebe Rd Suite 1500 Arlington, VA 22201 703-228-0808 703-228-0805 (f) ttucker@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtoneconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

Bedford County Office of Economic Development

Traci Blido Economic Development Director 122 E. Main St. Suite 202 Bedford, VA 24523 540-587-5670 540-586-0406 (f) tblido@bedfordcountyva.gov www.bedfordeconomicdevelopment.com ...................................................................

City of Maple Valley

Tim Morgan Economic Development Manager P.O. Box 320 Maple Valley, WA 98038 425-413-8800 tim.morgan@maplevalleywa.gov www.maplevalleywa.gov ..................................................................

Try-City Development Council

Carl Adrian President & CEO 7130 W. Grandridge Blvd #A Kennewich, WA 99336 509-735-1000 cadrian@tridec.org www.tridec.org ..................................................................

WEST VIRGINIA

American Municipal |Power, Inc. County of Gloucester

Sherry A. Spring Director of Economic Development 6489 Main Street Gloucester, VA 23061 804-693-1414 sspring@gloucesterva.info www.gloucesterva.info ..................................................................

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Leasha Johnson, Executive Director 1657 East Fourth Avenue Williamson, WV 25661 304-235-0042 304-235-0043 (f) ljohnson.mcra@suddenlinkmail.com www.developmingo.com ...................................................................

WISCONSIN

New North, Inc

Barb LaMue, Executive Director 600 N. Adams Street Green Bay, WI 54115 920-336-3860 barb.lamue@thenewnorth.com www.thenewnorth.com ...................................................................

Portage County Business Council, Inc. PCB

Todd Kuckkahn, Executive Director 5501 Vern Holmes Drive Stevens Point, WI 54482 715-344-1940 715-344-1940 (f) tkuckkah@portagecountybiz.com www.portagecountyconnects.com ...................................................................

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Sandy Trudel Director of Eocnomic Development Main Floor, 410 9th Street Brandon, Manitoba, Canada R7A 6A2 204-729-2131 s.trudel@brandon.ca www.economicdevelopmentbrandon.com ...................................................................

City of Mississauga Economic Development

Bonnie Brown Mississauga City Hall 300 City Centre Drive, 3rd Floor Mississauga, ON L5B 3C1 Canada 800-456-2181 905-896-5931 bonnie.brown@mississauga.ca www.TheFuturelsUnlimited.ca ...................................................................

City of Guelph

Christine Chapman 1 Carden Street Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 3A1 519--822-1260 ext. 2823 Christine.chapman@guelph.ca www.guelph.ca/business ...................................................................

WYOMING County of Elgin Cheyenne LEADS

Betsey Hale, Chief Executive Officer One Depot Square 121 W. 15th St. Suite 304 Cheyenne, WY 82001 307-638-6000 betseyh@cheyenneleads.org cheyenneleads.org ...................................................................

Alan Smith, General Manager, Economic Development 450 Sunset Drive St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada N5R 5V1 519-631-1460 ext. 137 asmith@elgin.ca www.progressivebynature.com ...................................................................

CANADA

Alexis A. Fitzsimmons, Director of Economic & Town of Ajax Business Development Don Terry 1111 Schrock Rd. Manager, Economic Development Columbus, OH 43229 & Tourism 614-540-0994 65 Harwood Avenue South Ajax, Ontario, Canada L1S 2H9 afitzsimmons@amppartners.org 905-619-2529 ext. 3252 www.searchampsites.com ................................................................... don.terry@ajax.ca www.ajaxfirstforbusiness.com ...................................................................

BXJ JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

City of Brandon

Vaughan Economic and Cultural Development

Dennis Cutajar Vaughan City Hall, Level 200 2141 Major Mackenzie Drive Vaughan, Ontario, Canada L6A 1T1 905-832-8526 ext. 8274 dennis.cutajar@vaughan.ca www.vaughan.ca ...................................................................


ADVERTISER & EDIT INDEX Advertiser

AD Edit

Alabama HudsonAlpha

8

18 17 19 18 IBC

Keene Portsmouth

29 28 29 29

New Mexico

Albuquerque 15 16

North Carolina

Connecticut Bristol

AD Edit

New Hampshire 1

California Ontario Tracy Moreno Valley

Advertiser

25 24

Piedmont Triad Airport

BC

22

27

26

Clarington 33 Middlesex County 31

32

Rhode Island

Florida Indian River County

13

12

Maryland Port of Baltimore

Ontario, Canada IFC

Minnesota Lakeville

Quonset Development

21 20

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RATE

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Inland Empire

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