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MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA EDITION OCTOBER 20 19

Most sustainable countries in the Middle East and Africa

Innovation in supply chain Transforming the supply chain to thrive in the digital era

City Focus

Nairobi

Clean energy investment and wind farm innovation


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FOREWORD

W

elcome to the October edition

will underpin the organisation’s entire

of Business Chief Middle East

procurement function. “We are

and Africa. In this month’s cover feature we discover how global real estate investment trust, American Tower, is digitally transforming its supply chain operations in order to maintain its

applying international standards,” he explains,” and we have plans to be part of the new Fourth Industrial Revolution, implementing a strategic plan, known as ‘HCT 4.0 Employability & Beyond’.”

leading position in the market. Collin

In our leadership feature we find out

Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain

the progress of the ambitious new

(EMEA), has worked in the supply

Orange Digital Centre from Asma

chain industry for close to 20 years,

Ennaifer, Chief External Relations,

yet he believes that the “unique pro-

CSR and Innovation Officer at

cesses and systems” that American

Orange. The centre, situated in Tunis

Tower uses are key to its competitive

and opened in April 2019, offers sup-

edge and will drive its ambition to

port to startups and young people.

expand into new markets.

Do you have a story to share? Please

Also, in this edition we speak with the

don’t hesitate to get in touch and you

Higher Colleges of Technology, the

could be featured in our next issue.

largest higher education institution in the UAE. Here, Director of Procurement and Contracts, Mahmoud Al Alawi, is driving forward a dedicated

Enjoy the read! Georgia Wilson georgia.wilson@bizclikmedia.com

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MEA EDITION

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

GEORGIA WILSON MANAGING EDITOR

MATT HIGH CREATIVE DIRECTORS

DANIEL CRAWFORD STEVE SHIPLEY

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CONTENTS

12 Transforming supply chain into the digital era

30 42 Orange: digital transformation in Africa

Making a success of digital transformation


56

Airswift:

AUTOMATION AND HUMAN CENTRICITY IN RECRUITMENT

66 FIVE STEPS TOWARDS A MORE SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN

74 City Focus

NAIROBI

Most sustainable countries in the Middle East and Africa

84


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100 Higher Colleges of Technology

112 Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority

126 Kinross Gold


12

American Tower: transforming supply chain into the digital era WRITTEN BY

GEORGIA WILSON PRODUCED BY

K ANE WELLER

OCTOBER 2019


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AMERICAN TOWER

Business Chief speaks to Collin Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain, American Tower, to discover how the business is digitally transforming its supply chain

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merican Tower’s global portfolio of approximately 171,000 sites is composed of towers in advanced, evolving and

developing wireless markets, in various stages of wireless network deployment. It has selectively expanded internationally to complement its core US operations, as it believes that the network development trajectory seen in the US will ultimately be replicated overseas. Established in 1995, American Tower is one of the largest global Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) that operates and develops wireless and broadcast communications. Its portfolio includes: 171,000 communications sites with 41,000 properties in the US and 130,000 properties internationally. American Tower does not think in the short-term, it is here for the long haul, with ambitions to make wireless communication possible everywhere through its innovation, efficiency, growth and leadership.

OCTOBER 2019


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AMERICAN TOWER

“We’re still way behind to digitalise the systems and this isn’t good because lack of digitalisation causes a lot of inefficacy and increases cost” — Collin Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain EMEA, American Tower

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Collin Mugisha, Head of supply chain (EMEA), American Tower, has worked in the Supply Chain industry for almost 20 years. In that time, he has had a broad scope of experience across procurement, logistics, warehousing, P2P processes, management of contractors, contracts, relationships, partnership building and use of technology in supply chains. After seven years of working at American Tower, Mugisha still loves his work with the company. He believes that American Tower’s “unique processes and systems” are key to its comOCTOBER 2019


E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Collin Mugisha Mugisha is a self-motivated individual currently working with American Tower Cooperation as Head of Supply Chain (EMEA) in charge of procurement, logistics and warehousing and facilities. By the time of this appointment, Mugisha worked with ATC Uganda as the Head of Supply Chain Manager, Airtel Uganda Limited (Bharti Group) as the Head of Procurement, Hima Cement limited (Lafarge group) as Procurement Manager, Shell Uganda Limited, now VIVO Energy (Royal Dutch Shell group), in the roles of Logistics Coordinator, Secondary distribution manager and Project Team Head, VMI (Vendor Management Inventory) responsible for country distribution, planning, forecasting, reporting and performance management and monitoring, with a special focus in Strategic Planning and distribution. Previously, Mugisha had worked with British American Tobacco (BAT) as a Management Trainee, Procurement Officer and Leaf Export Supplier Account Manager in charge of all leaf planning, sales, outbound logistics and exports to various BAT sister companies and other clients in the international tobacco industry. Mugisha has 19 years’ experience in supply chain. He has a master’s degree in supply chain management, is a member of the Chartered Institute of Supplies and Procurement and a Certified International Procurement Professional CIPP.

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CLICK TO WATCH : ‘AMERICAN TOWER - 24/7 COMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE’ 19

petitive edge, along with its process

break into new markets to “double its

across multiple cultures, its ambition

portfolio and double its possibility,” he

to expand into new markets and its

continues. “With this expansion,

long-term vision.

American Tower aims to give back to the African community by developing

VISION FOR AFRICA

community initiatives.” Nigeria is

American Tower – headquartered in

American Tower’s largest market in

Boston, Massachusetts – “has always

Africa and although there is significant

had the strategy to grow over a period

potential within the African market, it

of time,” says Mugisha. The company

is a sector that is not without its

now operates in countries such as

challenges. For example, current

India, Mexico, France, Germany and

power availability in Africa remains a

Brazil. In 2015, it opened its office in

limiting factor, due to technical sites

Nigeria, Africa, with the ambition to

needing 24/7 power. As a result, says

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“I would like to have a scenario where we don’t even have to come into the office and are able to do all tasks from wherever” — Collin Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain EMEA, American Tower

form in order to integrate its targets into one platform for performance management, and has since been modifying its capabilities to best suit the company. “Performance management helps you identify goals, attributes and characters that you need to improve on. This is an incredibly important process,” explains Mugisha. “Whether its digitally or manually, performance management helps you become better at what you do, so if you do not evaluate your performance against what you are doing it becomes difficult to improve.” Mugisha asserts that the business continuously looks to digitise any inefficient processes: “The manual

Mugisha, “management of this side of

process of who does what, when they

the business is required at all times to

did it and why they did it is inefficient,”

ensure the company is in line with its

he explains. “Digitalisation of this

service level agreements.”

process will streamline operations in Africa and leave a trail to track for

DIGITALLY TRANSFORMING AMERICAN TOWER’S SUPPLY CHAIN

analysis of outcomes to help further

At American Tower, analysis and

far, Mugisha has implemented the

performance management is an

supply chain functions of the ERP

integral part of the supply chain

system to help with this process, with

process. From inception, the company

further changes being implemented

has rolled out the Oracle ERP plat-

when required to help foster improve-

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develop and grow the business.” So

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$1,813mn+ Approximate revenue

ficient for cost management. To further digitalise supply chain, Mugisha wants to eliminate office space entirely for tasks that can be done from any location, such as mak-

1995

Year founded

5,200

Approximate number of employees

ing approvals for orders. “I would like to have a scenario where we don’t even have to come into the office and are able to do all these tasks from anywhere. I don’t have to be in the office to make approvals about an order or a purchasing position for example,” says Mugisha. Additionally, he wants to “be able to automate each and every process” that is in supply chain, not only just in performance evalua-

ment, development and growth. With

tion. Over the years, American Tower

the help of technology such as Oracle,

has worked with a number of valuable

American Tower has standardised its

partners such as Galooli POWER,

processes across the world, imple-

which has assisted American Tower to

menting guidelines and policies that

develop software for site monitoring:

are cost-effective and efficient. “If you

“Working together in the last seven

go to Nigeria, you’ll find that it is the

years, Galooli brings a true value and a

same process as in Uganda as op-

strong relationship to American Tower

posed to making it different for every

and emphasises the importance of

supplier everywhere.” Without a doubt,

us as a real partner,” Says Leehu

Mugisha believes American Tower

Hacohen. Other companies American

will 100% benefit from the company’s

Tower has worked with include Incell

efforts towards digitalisation, but only

Engineering, which provides American

if all processes and systems are ef-

Tower with batteries, and iEngineering

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“Comprehensive procurement process plus improved technology and innovation will give you enhanced value and potential savings” — Collin Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain EMEA, American Tower

25

Group, which assists with developing

implement the best security and pro-

prototypes and upgrading commu-

ductivity practices towards both remote

nication towers. These partnerships

assets and workforce management.

are mutually beneficial for American

Acsys hardware along with its web-

Tower and its partners as they work

based software, gives us a holistic view

to grow with each other, and evolve

of the entire remote infrastructure’s

solutions to help other businesses in

security status, both during planned

Africa in the future.

servicing and idle hours. This has

A sturdy locking solution and a smart

enabled us to reduce the theft of sought-

autonomous access control is the first

after commodities like batteries, fuel,

line of defence to protect cell towers

starters and other critical telecom

critical infrastructure. ATC, has

installations. Its OTP-enabled smart keys

strategically partnered with Acsys to

& mobile apps allow ATC to assign

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“If you go to Nigeria, you’ll find that it is the same process as in Uganda as opposed to making it different for every supplier everywhere” — Collin Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain EMEA, American Tower

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27 access privileges in real-time, thereby

Eaton Towers in an approximately

reducing the number of round trips in

US$1.85bn deal. The signing is yet to

field necessary to retrieve and return

take place, however, due diligence is

access keys resulting in substantial

being carried out to assess Eaton

OPEX reductions‘’

Tower’s portfolio prior to the takeover, focused on five key areas: Uganda,

THE FUTURE OF AMERICAN TOWER

Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso and

Looking to the future, Mugisha sees

Niger. The merging of American Tower

digitalisation and standardisation as

and Eaton Towers is a response to

being a key trend in the African

American Tower’s mission to “get into

market, “we’re still way behind to

new markets and new operations.”

digitalise operational systems and this

Merging with Eaton Towers will help

isn’t good because it creates a lot of

expand its site portfolio in Africa, grow

inefficiency and increase cost.” In

its experience of different markets,

addition to this, American Tower is

and offer new technologies. As a

currently in the process of acquiring

result, these benefits will help with

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AMERICAN TOWER

“Innovation will continue to be a very important aspect for our business moving forwards” — Collin Mugisha, Head of Supply Chain EMEA, American Tower 28

OCTOBER 2019


American Tower’s goal to be even more cost effective and efficient. Alongside the benefits of the company’s merger with Eaton Towers, Mugisha does foresee that there will be challenges such as software integration of the two companies, receptive customers to each other’s products, standardising company processes and training employees on new system changes. For Mugisha, American Tower’s capacity to maintain relationships with network operators, ability to provide high quality products and its focus on providing real estate wireless and broadband solutions is paramount. “Innovation will continue to be a very important aspect for our business moving forwards,” he says. As American Tower aims to continuously evaluate its processes and develop innovative solutions for its customers, it seems certain that these goals will be achieved.

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LEADERSHIP

Orange: digital transformation in Africa 30

Business Chief speaks with Asma Ennaifer, Chief External Relations, CSR and Innovation Officer for Orange, to discuss the progress of the Orange Digital Centre WRITTEN BY

AMBER DONOVAN-STEVENS

OCTOBER 2019


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LEADERSHIP

O

range is one of the largest global

telecommunications operators in the

world, and is recognised for its expertise in the field of innovation. With over 5,000 employees across its international research labs, the Orange Digital Centre in Tunis, Tunisia was launched in April 2019. Providing a wide range of activities, the Orange Digital Centre is a support system for startups and offers training to young people, with its unveiling recognised as the first of its kind in the Middle East and Africa. Asma Ennaifer, Chief External Relations, CSR

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and Innovation Officer for Orange, has held her role for almost 10 years. “From training young people in coding, prototyping to startup support, acceleration and finally investment in budding entrepreneurs, these new sites are intended for all kinds of different people,� she says. The Orange Digital Centre has four strategic programmes which target various types of individuals, such as:

1. THE CODING SCHOOL The coding school is a facility that is free of charge. It is aimed at students, young graduates and young entrepreneurs.

2. THE FABLAB SOLIDAIRE This is a digital workshop that allows users to

OCTOBER 2019


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“The success of digital transformation inevitably relies on inclusion” — Asma Ennaifer, Chief External Relations, CSR and Innovation Officer for Orange

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LEADERSHIP

“The African continent must become more digitalised, so that the fintech market will grow”

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— Asma Ennaifer, Chief External Relations, CSR and Innovation Officer for Orange

create prototypes and leverage 3D printers, milling machines and laser cutters. The centre is open to all young people regardless of their educational background.

3. ORANGE FAB Orange Fab is a startup accelerator that is designed to build upon relationships with the Orange Group. This programme is tailored toward entrepreneurs to assist them with the development of management skills, and commercial capabilities within startups.

4. ORANGE DIGITAL VENTURES AFRICA This is a $55.6mn investment fund for startups in the Middle East and Africa. This programme is also aimed at entrepreneurs.

TUNISIA: AN EMERGING DIGITAL HUB Ennaifer believes Africa is a lucrative region to export fintech to. “Africa is a virgin area for the fintech market,” affirms Ennaifer. “In fact, the fintech landscape has grown at an annual rate of approximately 24% over the last 10 years. If we compare it with the developed region, the African continent must become more

OCTOBER 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘ORANGE IN AFRICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST’ 35 digitalised, so that the fintech market

has established partnerships with 27

will grow. This makes it a very attractive

universities throughout Tunisia and has

market to invest in.”

deployed five subsidiaries of coding

Ennaifer notes that technological

school – the “Orange Tech Clubs” – in

leapfrogging in Africa has led Orange

universities in the regions of Kef,

to fight digital exclusion and pushed the

Sousse, Nabeul, Tunis and Sfax. “With

company to provide accessible innova-

the support of the Orange Foundation,

tions to the largest number of people

Orange has deployed five FabLabs

through “inclusive innovation,” across

Solidaires, including one mobile

the 19 countries in the Middle East and

FabLab, with the aim of covering the

Africa where it operates. When ce-

entire territory,” she explains. “Thanks

menting the success of Orange’s new

to these programs, Orange Tunisia was

programmes, Ennaifer emphasises:

able to accompany and train more than

“The success of digital transformation

16,000 young students in the coding

inevitably relies on inclusion!” Orange

school.”

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LEADERSHIP

CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Young people are important for Orange, and reinforcing their preference for Orange is crucial for Orange’s business. “Youth unemployment is a worrying problem worldwide,” explains Ennaifer. “According to the World Bank, the global youth unemployment rate in 2017 was around 13.4%. The majority of African countries are struggling with significantly higher rates (e.g. 36

Tunisia 36.3%; Ivory Coast 25%).”

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘ROGERVOICE - STARTUP STORIES’

OCTOBER 2019


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Ennaifer points to the fact that young adults in higher education are facing the same unemployment rates, yet the services offered by the Digital Centre will assist in combating this issue. “The Orange Digital Centre is the place where the youth can be trained to get ready for their first job or professionally reconvert if needed,” she explains. “They also can develop their ideas by putting at their disposal machines that are not affordable, and also coaches to accompany them.” mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

“The fintech landscape has grown at an annual rate of approximately 24% over the last 10 years” — Asma Ennaifer, Chief External Relations, CSR and Innovation Officer for Orange

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LEADERSHIP

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Yet despite a large pool of

international ‘Technovation’ competi-

potential recruits, Ennaifer shares

tion, where they would compete with

that the initiative has struggled to

girls from all over the world. “This

reach a maximum of young people,

collaborative approach helps to

particularly girls. “At launch, the

create an entrepreneurial dynamic,

coding school existed only in the

generate new ideas and incubate

capital. We were quickly solicited

innovative startups. The project will

by the universities with which we

thus contribute to building local digi-

enter into partnerships to provide

tal ecosystems outside the capital.”

training on the latest technological trends.” With a determination to

LOOKING AHEAD

overcome this challenge, the centre

“Orange’s objectives of supporting in-

pushed to encourage younger girls

clusive economic development, youth

to take an interest in ICT through the

employment, and accelerating Africa’s

OCTOBER 2019


39

digital transformation are in line with

trained to enter the market as both the

the development goals formulated in

public and private sector are involved.

the Agenda 2030.” As Orange em-

“As Orange continues to build on the

ploys 18,000 people in Africa and the

Orange Digital Centre, its expanding

Middle East, who are mostly locally

network will allow the exchange of

recruited and trained, the Group has a

experience and expertise between

direct interest in creating local “pools”

the beneficiaries to address interna-

of well-trained young people.

tional markets,” she concludes.

According to Ennaifer, the challenges of the future for Orange aren’t related to the size of a country, but the economic and political climates. This is because the economy of the country needs to be able to support those mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

a f r ic a . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m


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TECHNOLOGY

42

MAKING A SUCCESS OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION Nancy Hammervik, Executive Vice President, Industry Relations at IT trade association CompTIA, discusses the work the organisation does to enable digital transformation WRITTEN BY

OCTOBER 2019

MARCUS LAWRENCE


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TECHNOLOGY

T

ell us a bit about yourself and your role as Executive Vice President of Industry Relations at CompTIA.

I have been in the tech industry for nearly 35 years, starting on the media side (selling advertising, sponsorships, and staging events around the world that bring vendors, distributors and partners together). Eight and a half years ago, I joined CompTIA as Executive Vice President, Industry Relations. A big part of my role is managing our

44

membership programme, providing value to members to both grow their businesses and have a positive impact on the industry. I am responsible for growing our membership numbers, member engagement and value, and expanding our reach and relevance in the tech ecosystem. CompTIA has 10 member-led communities (in vertical markets like Managed Services and Security, demographic markets like Advancing Women in Tech and Future Leaders, and geographic markets like the UK and Benelux) and five industry advisory councils that serve as the headlights for our organisation and industry. The part of my role that I enjoy the most is providing members with the tools and resources they need to stay relevant in a fast paced, evolving industry while harnessing the power of our OCTOBER 2019


“YOUR TEAM SHOULD BE AS DIVERSE AS YOUR CUSTOMER BASE” — Nancy Hammervik, Executive Vice President, Industry Relations, CompTIA

45

membership to be true advocates for the industry and its workforce, driving the adoption of emerging technologies and having a positive, palpable impact on the business of tech. In your own words, what does CompTIA offer firms around the world with regards to enabling successful digital transformations? CompTIA’s mission is to advance the adoption of technology and the growth of the tech industry. That’s why we offer an unparalleled selection mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

a f r ic a . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m


TECHNOLOGY

of resources related to digital trans-

sharing. We offer industry leading,

formation and other tech topics.

vendor-neutral skills training and skills

The vast majority of these resources

validation. CompTIA is the largest

– greater than 90% – are available at

provider of vendor-neutral skills

no cost, whether you are a dues-pay-

certifications for technology

ing member of the association or not.

professionals around the world.

We have comprehensive, world-

46

When compared to other organisa-

class research reports and staff, how-

tions, what makes CompTIA unique

to guides, whitepapers, and other

is our member communities. As men-

educational materials developed with

tioned, we offer member-led commu-

the collective expertise of thousands

nities across a variety of markets, all in

of IT professionals and executives

the business of influencing and ena-

around the world. We also have webinars,

bling digital environments for them-

podcasts, conference sessions, semi-

selves and their clients. We hear all the

nars and networking forums that offer

time that these communities offer a

peer-to-peer insight and best practice

trusted, safe haven where all players

OCTOBER 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘LAUNCH YOUR CAREER WITH COMPTIA CERTIFICATIONS’

in the ecosystem can gather and learn

world do to ensure they can capitalise

from each other.

on the opportunities afforded by

Our UK Channel Community has

upcoming and ascendant solutions?

750 members. They meet face-to-

A great starting point for any organi-

face at least three times a year to

sation – large enterprise, mid-sized

share strategies and best practices,

firm or small business – is to inspire

and members have built such strong

and invest in their employees with

relationships that they can rely on

ongoing skills training. Encourage

each other throughout the year as a

staff to join CompTIA, even at the free,

resource to grow their businesses.

registered user level, to stay close to industry trends and dynamics and

Based on the recent CompTIA Top

make important contacts they that can

10 Emerging Technologies report,

build a solid network from. Attending

what can enterprises around the

industry events, conferences, and

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TECHNOLOGY

other meet-ups in the industry is invaluable when it comes to being in the know and being prepared. Second, invest in updating infrastructure. All emerging technologies will need sound and secure platforms and systems. Third, make sure everyone in the organisation is on board with moving forward. Build a culture conducive to change and progress. Articulate the benefits of automating processes, saving dollars, operating more efficiently, and recognise and reward 48

“TECHNOLOGY IS DRIVING ALL BUSINESSES, INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENTS” — Nancy Hammervik, Executive Vice President, Industry Relations, CompTIA

efforts. Bring on external partners, business and technology consultants, and leverage their expertise. Make sure to bring line of business managers

you serve, and the short and long-

into the process.

term goals you have for business

Build diversity into your staff. Your

growth. Equipped with these insights,

team should be as diverse as your

a technology provider can make

customer base. Seek new and diverse

informed recommendations on the

perspectives and experiences to

technology options that make the

foster a culture of innovation.

most sense for a business, today

Finally, when it comes to innovation

and into the future.

and new and emerging technologies, consult with your trusted technology

Aside from the tech mentioned in

partners. The best tech partners are

the Top 10 report, what do you view

the ones that truly understand your

as the most influential established

business – the products or services

technologies at present?

you sell, the customers and markets

For me it’s all about IoT and Big Data –

OCTOBER 2019


49

capturing data and building programs

automate your shopping experiences

to analyse the data can have a tre-

and allow home healthcare solutions.

mendous impact on both businesses

Managing fleets of trucks and trains

and consumers. While IoT and Big

more efficiently can allow us to reduce

Data are improving businesses and

our carbon footprint, and smart buildings

lives, they are also solving world

in a city can help to better manage

problems. Having insight on your

renewable resources.

operations, workflow and customers

I met a young lady at a conference

– and doing something with it – can be

last week who invented the world’s

the catalyst for cost savings, improving

first smart white cane for the blind

efficiency, mitigating risk, maximising

and sight impaired, which allows them

sales and driving new revenue.

to have a greater understanding and

For consumers, IoT can monitor and regulate the climate of your environment, mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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TECHNOLOGY

and centre of balance, the development

global security market for IoT alone

team realised it could also be used by

is a £30bn market. Small and medium

the frail and elderly to help predict and

businesses (SMBs) are still relatively

avoid a traumatic fall three weeks

unaware and unprepared for the level

before it happens. The implications

of security that should be protecting

for healthcare and quality of life are

their – and their customers’ – security.

tremendous.

Working with a professional consultant or service provider is recommended.

In a general sense, what are the

50

We are also dealing with significant

most significant challenges facing

workforce skills gaps. In Q2 2019

a successful digital transformation?

employers across the UK were seeking

Security and the workforce. With mul-

to fill more than 140,000 core IT job

tiple components and “access points”

openings. That represented 9% of all

in every advanced digital solution, the

UK job postings in the quarter.

need for comprehensive and advanced security solutions is imperative. The

OCTOBER 2019

Not only do we have skills gaps, we have a confidence gap where many of


the next generation do not see them-

In general, most small businesses,

selves in a technology role. As we

across all industries, are lagging.

continue to introduce new technologies,

Without the internal skill and talent to

we create new roles – like data scien-

deploy and implement a digital strategy,

tists, drone service providers, AI

they are left to collaborate with external

ethics leads and more. CompTIA is

partners, business and technology

focused on building programs that will

consultants. While there are many

encourage, train and certify the next

solutions and service providers available

generation of the workplace. Digital

to support them, many of them are

transformation is defining the

small businesses themselves and on

business of the future.

the long tail of the learning curve. We are seeing the greatest advances

Are there any particular industries

at the enterprise level being deployed

that appear to be lagging in terms

by larger system integrators and

of technological implementation/

global consultants. CompTIA is working

innovation?

hard to equip smaller solution providers with the insight, education, tools and resources needed to drive the adoption

“THE BEST TECH PARTNERS ARE THE ONES WHO TRULY UNDERSTAND YOUR BUSINESS” — Nancy Hammervik, Executive Vice President, Industry Relations, CompTIA

of emerging technologies into the SMB. We are also focused on building the tech workforce through education, training and certification so more companies can staff and skill up with relevant talent. In your view, which industries are leading the charge with the most successful digital transformations? Digital transformation has taken hold in virtually every industry, but there are clear distinctions in the degrees and

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TECHNOLOGY

pace that different industries are embracing these changes. The advances in healthcare have been tremendous. The use of electronic health records got off to a relatively slow start, but the pace of adoption has increased in recent years. Digital records help contribute to better care and treatment, especially as patients see multiple doctors or are transferred to different care units or facilities. Care givers have instant access to the latest patient information, delivered in a way that’s more secure and allows 52

for better data organisation. Another digital innovation that’s taking hold is wearable technology, from Fitbit and similar devices that allow patients to monitor and record their daily activities to more advanced technologies for realtime monitoring of symptoms and vitals, medication reminders and status reports for medical staff. From hospital mattresses that measure and manage the patient’s vitals, through to robotic surgeries, insightful patient portals and AI-empowered diagnostics, the healthcare industry has been revolutionised by digital transformation. Retail is also pushing forward quickly with customer-centric data OCTOBER 2019


management, IoT store cameras managing inventory and shopping patterns, and enhanced security solutions managing mobile payments. McKinsey forecasts the retail IoT market will hit £28.6bn this year, with healthcare coming in at £130bn. Cloud computing, analytics and robotics are among the most innovative digital tools revamping the core of banking and finance. People have financial management at their fingertips via mobile banking apps, smart ATMs, virtual assistants and chatbots, and internet-based virtual banks. To whatever extent, technology is driving all businesses, industries and governments. Whether it be hospitality, back office, construction or even agriculture, the use of technology, along with the internal staff and/or external teams to develop and manage it, is quickly becoming the single most compelling factor contributing to an organisation’s ability to compete, provide value, grow and succeed.

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PEOPLE

Airswift: 56

AUTOMATION AND HUMAN CENTRICITY IN RECRUITMENT Business Chief talks to Janette Marx, CEO of Airswift, about the effects of digital transformation on recruitment and retention, and what the future holds WRITTEN BY

HARRY MENEAR

© Albert Robida / Wikimedia Commons OCTOBER 2019


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I

n 1899, French artist Jean-Marc Côté was among a team of illustrators commissioned to create a series of drawings to commemorate the 1900 world’s fair in Paris. The series,

originally printed as inserts for cigar boxes (and

then later reprinted, but never sold, as postcards – science fiction author Isaac Asimov reportedly owned the only surviving set) took the artists’ best guess at how technology would change our lives by the advent of the 21st century. The subject matter of En L'An 2000 is, for 58

the most part, spectacularly off the mark. Firefighters battle flames while flying through the air on bat wings, deep sea divers ride giant seahorses through the ocean and students have the contents of history books transferred directly into their brains via psychic helmets. Endearingly hopeful and bizarre, Côté and his fellow artists’ work does betray just how hard it is to predict where the next wave of technological developments will take us. In 1995, renowned astronomer and author Clifford Stoll wrote in an article for Newsweek that “the truth is no online database will replace your daily newspaper, no CD-ROM can take the place of a competent teacher and no computer network will change the way government works.” He also vociferously argued that there OCTOBER 2019


59

© Jean-Marc Côté / Villemard / Wikimedia Commons

was no such thing as a future where people would buy things over the internet, or read books and magazines online. “Discount the fawning technoburble about virtual communities,” he continued. “Computers and networks isolate us from one another. A network chat line is a limp substitute for meeting friends over coffee.” seventeen years after the article’s publication, Newsweek became an exclusively mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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PEOPLE

“THERE IS A LOT OF AUTOMATION IN SOURCING NOW… THE PIECE THAT’S OFTEN MISSING IS THE PERSONAL TOUCH” — Janette Marx, CEO, Airswift

tion (and digitalisation in general) only highlights the continued need for the human element in business. “There is a lot of automation in sourcing now, a lot of technology that companies use within their applicant tracking systems to interact with people applying for jobs, and engage with them via automated responses,” says Janette Marx, CEO of Airswift.

60

online publication. Obviously, the future

“The piece that's often missing is the

is not something to be predicted lightly.

personal touch.” Founded in 1979,

However, one or two predictions

Airswift is an international workforce

made by En L'An 2000 came partly

solutions provider within the energy,

true. Several of the illustrations por-

process and infrastructure industries.

tray a world in which a single worker

Headquartered in Houston, Texas,

sits, comfortably pushing buttons, as

the company has operations in 71

automated machinery does the work

countries with 58 office locations, and

of a dozen laborers. In this respect, at

employs 700 staff and 6,800 contrac-

least, Côté was entirely on the money.

tors. “We're specialists in industries

Automation has completely changed

where companies, no matter what

the way in which people work, reaching

country they're in around the world,

further and further into aspects of our

have the challenge of trying to source

jobs and changing the culture of work

the right talent,” Marx explains. “We're

forever. While organisations like the

not only experts in identifying the right

Office for National Statistics predict

talent for our clients, but also experts

that, in the UK, as many as 1.5mn jobs

in mobilising that talent wherever it’s

are at risk of being eliminated by auto-

needed. Whether it's locally, nation-

mation, a greater number of thought

ally or globally, we do everything from

leaders believe that increased automa-

making sure people have a place to

OCTOBER 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘OPPORTUNITIES WITH AIRSWIFT IN MOZAMBIQUE’ 61 live, feel that they are welcomed into

digital transformation will change the

a new country and understand the

interaction between employer and

culture, to helping find schools for

future employee,” she says. “From a

their kids.”

sourcing point of view, the medium

Airswift partners with some of the

has changed so much, from ads in the

largest companies around the world to

newspaper to online job boards to the

solve talent sourcing, recruitment and

invention of LinkedIn and so on. There

retention challenges in any number of

are a lot of different ways to attract

new and existing markets. In terms of

candidates to different companies.”

the ability to comment on the effect of

The increased digitalisation of the

digital transformation and innovation

recruitment space, according to Marx,

on the modern workforce, few are

has radically altered the size of the net

in a better position than Marx. “The

that companies can cast. This is where

biggest change in the talent sourcing

automation becomes so important.

world is, if you take a step back, how

“We can use chatbots and other types

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of automation to make sure that we're reaching the right audience. There are companies using chatbots to prescreen candidates to make sure they are qualified before doing an actual interview,” elaborates Marx. “It's really broken down a lot of barriers and globalised our outlook, especially if the skill you’re sourcing is niche, specific or hard to find.” However, at the heart of recruitment is still the human relationship. “When a person decides to leave a job to 62

go to another job, that's a really big decision. Facilitating and navigating

© Jean-Marc Côté / Wikimedia Commons

the thought process surrounding that change is where real recruiters come in to help connect the dots between

“Retention is a really important piece,

the employer and the job seeker,” Marx

especially with where the unemploy-

explains. “The digital world is coming

ment levels sit around the world right

into it, but you still need a human ele-

now,” she says. “There are a lot of

ment in the recruitment process.”

measures companies can take to

Digital transformation is not only

increase their retention and employee

changing the way that companies

engagement, to really train and

attract talent. Marx notes that, as the

develop their people.” More and more,

human capital space is increasingly

Marx finds, career progression is the

reshaped by the accelerating pace of

number one reason people switch

innovation, the strategies and values

jobs, with opportunities for training and

companies use to retain their talent are

development coming a close second.

becoming increasingly people–centric.

The global workforce is as aware of

OCTOBER 2019


“THE TRUTH IS: NO ONLINE DATABASE WILL REPLACE YOUR DAILY NEWSPAPER, NO CD-ROM CAN TAKE THE PLACE OF A COMPETENT TEACHER AND NO COMPUTER NETWORK WILL CHANGE THE WAY GOVERNMENT WORKS” — Clifford Stoll, (Newsweek, 1995)

63

the pace of change as anyone, and

interaction with technology and how

prioritises personal development in

the technology will support that overall

order to keep up.

experience,” she enthuses. “I can’t wait

In the same way that Côté and

to see where the next five years take us,

Stoll struggled to accurately envision

particularly in terms of communications.

where technology would take human-

It would be nice to have holograms,”

ity, the next five to 10 years are a time

she says, somewhat wistfully.

shrouded in mystery, brimming with the possibility of rapid advancements and new challenges to face. Marx herself is filled with optimism. “The future is going to be really, really interesting with regard to how we balance human mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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66

FIVE STEPS TOWARDS A MORE SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN John Perry, Managing Director at SCALA, a leading provider of management services for the supply chain and logistics sector, shares the processes businesses should undertake to become more sustainable WRITTEN BY

JOHN PERRY

OCTOBER 2019


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68

S

ustainability is becoming

their supply chains are as sustainable

increasingly crucial to both con-

as possible – the question is, how?

sumers and key stakeholders

alike, with research from Unilever find-

DEVELOPING A BUSINESS CASE

ing that one in three consumers now

The first step towards achieving a

choose brands based on their social

more sustainable supply chain is to

and environmental credentials. This,

build the business case for action.

combined with the UK having recently

This will help to identify the highest

become the first major economy in

priority supply chain issues for the

the world to legally commit to net-zero

company, evaluate opportunities and

emissions by 2050, means that busi-

risks, and build the internal support

nesses are now having to ensure that

needed to move forward.

OCTOBER 2019


69

The business case for a particular

reducing the costs of material inputs,

company depends on a variety of

energy and transportation, increas-

issues, including: industry sector,

ing labour productivity, and fostering

supply chain footprint, stakeholder

growth by meeting evolving customer

expectations, business strategy and

and business partner requirements.

organisational culture. However, in most cases, supply chain sustainability

ESTABLISHING A VISION

offers a number of significant benefits.

Once the business case has been suc-

This can include minimising business

cessfully put forward, it’s important

disruption from environmental, social

to then establish a clear vision for the

and economic impacts, protecting a

company’s sustainable supply chain

company’s reputation and brand value,

programme. Defining the objectives at

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“A key element of supply chain sustainability is efficiency” — John Perry, Managing Director, SCALA

the outset of the project will prove invaluable when it comes to devising the strategy. Having a vision in place also makes it easier to evaluate the success of the programme and identify areas for continued improvement. In order to ensure full support from the business’s senior executives, which will be crucial for success, they should be actively involved throughout the creation of the vision. In addition to the c-suite, representatives from across the business including sales, marketing, finance, IT systems, manufacturing and

70

procurement should be consulted, as each of these functions will have a role to play in the implementation of the sustainable supply chain programme.

STRATEGIC PLANNING A key element of supply chain sustainability is efficiency, which is best achieved through careful planning. Sophisticated digital modelling tools can provide end-to-end supply chain perspective, enabling businesses to pinpoint inefficiencies and design a more sustainable supply chain and logistics network going forward. By assessing all potential options OCTOBER 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘CATHERINE WEETMAN - FUTURE-FIT LOGISTICS’ 71

and analysing a range of future ‘what

network, and reduce emissions by

if’ scenarios, companies can ensure

directing inventory to serve demand.

not only that their supply chain and logistics networks are resilient to

SOURCING RESPONSIBLY

future changes, but also that they can

While it’s impossible for businesses

benefit both the environment and their

to fully control the practices of every

bottom line by eliminating wastage

third party they deal with in their supply

and overspending.

chain, they should work to ensure that

For example, modelling software can

wherever possible they only partner

help supply chain professionals to min-

with companies that share the same

imise physical space used by identify-

goals, sustainability values, and envi-

ing redundant facilities or opportunities

ronmentally-conscious supply chain

to rebalance storage, avoid empty

processes as themselves.

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businesses they interact with directly accountable for the products or services that are delivered. So, if it is discovered that products contain parts manufactured unsustainably that have come from an external supplier, it won’t be the supplier that faces the backlash and suffers the consequences. Qualifying the right sourcing partners is a critical piece of the sustainability puzzle, and it requires businesses to enforce the same high sustainability standards to which they hold them72

selves. Establishing and communicating expectations through a supplier code of conduct is an effective way for businesses to involve suppliers in their sustainability efforts.

whether their fleet’s size, type and geographic spread remains optimal,

OPTIMISING DISTRIBUTION

whether their distribution centres are

When looking to improve sustainability,

in the right places, whether customer

logistics is one of the areas where the

order profiles and delivery require-

biggest difference can be made. With

ments have changed since the original

a large number of vehicles moving high

transport operation was designed,

volumes of goods to diverse and dis-

and whether a dedicated transport

persed locations, there is a significant

operation is even still needed, or if

risk of inefficiency when it comes to

it could be more economical and

transport operations.

environmentally-friendly.

In order to optimise their logistics network, businesses should look at OCTOBER 2019

This will not only help to ensure that the supply chain can operate as


“Businesses are now having to ensure that their supply chains are as sustainable as possible” — John Perry, Managing Director, SCALA

73

smoothly as possible, but also reduce empty miles and carbon emissions, which has a significant positive effect on a business’s environmental impact. In addition to helping the environment and satisfying public demand for ethical and environmentally sound business practices, sustainability can drive significant business value both now and long into the future.

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NAIR City Focus

74

OCTOBER 2019


ROBI Clean energy and investment industries in Nairobi and Europe are taking part in the biggest wind farm project in Africa WRITTEN BY

GEORGIA WILSON

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CITY FOCUS | NAIROBI

H

aving been founded by colonial authori-

ties in 1899 as a railway settlement, Nairobi is a fast-growing city and cur-

rently has a population of 4,556,381 (2019). This young city is situated 300 miles from

North West Mombasa (Kenya’s major port on the Indian Ocean) and covers a total of 696km2 of land that has been transformed, from the uninhabitable swampland it was prior to 1899, into a modern hub of Kenya’s rail freight, commerce and manufacturing industries. 76

Having developed at a considerable rate, Nairobi continues to make strides in the renewable energy sector. In July 2019, President Uhuru Kenyatta unveiled the Lake Turkana Wind Power project — Africa’s largest facility of its kind, with offices based in Nairobi. The farm consists of 365 wind turbines with a capacity of 850KW and is situated within a valley that serves as an effective wind tunnel for the site that covers 40,000 acres. The project will also include the upgrade of an existing road, approximately 204km long, to the wind farm site, as well as access road networks. Meanwhile, The Kenya Electricity Transmission Company Ltd (Ketraco) is constructing a double circuit 400kV, OCTOBER 2019


‘The Lake Turkana Wind Power project aims to boost Kenya’s electricity supply’

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‘In July 2019, President Uhuru Kenyatta unveiled the Lake Turkana Wind Power project, Africa’s largest facility of its kind’

OCTOBER 2019

transmission line covering 428km, in order to deliver electricity from Lake Turkana Wind Power or any other future plants to Nairobi and the rest of Kenya. The Lake Turkana Wind Power project aims to boost Kenya’s electricity supply, move away from depending on fossil fuels and provide “reliable, low cost energy to Kenya’s national grid” in the hope of achieving it’s goal of 100% green energy by 2020. According to CNBC, Uhuru Kenyatta, President of Kenya, is “pleased to note that Kenya is without doubt on course to be a global leader in renewable energy.”


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘LAKE TURKANA WIND POWER – POWERING THE NATION’ 79 To ensure that professional behaviour

rounding the project area. Key focuses

and activities reflect their philosophy,

for the foundation include enhancing

the project upholds core values that

employability via educational and voca-

include being “collaborative”, “accessible”

tional support, enhancing access to

and “respectful”, as well as “always work-

health services by supporting health edu-

ing to a high standard of excellence in

cation and facilities, and providing water.

a manner that is safe.” Alongside the aim to boost Kenya’s

The Lake Turkana Wind Power project has been funded by an assortment

electricity supply, the farm has been

of African and European companies

keen to ensure that the surrounding

such as; KP&P Africa B.V, Aldwych

community benefits from the project,

International, Investment Fund for

which has caused Lake Turkana Wind

Developing Countries, Vestas Eastern

Power to establish “The Winds of

Africa Limited, Finnish Fund for Indus-

Change” foundation to help enhance

trial Cooperation Ltd, KLP Norfund

the livelihoods of the communities sur-

Investments AS and Sandpiper Ltd.

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KP&P AFRICA B.V – THE NETHERLANDS Established in 2006, the objective of this Dutch company is to invest in renewable energy projects in Africa. KP&P Africa B.V is one of two companies involved with the co-development of Lake Turkana Wind Power.

ALDWYCH INTERNATIONAL – NAIROBI Aldwych International (formed in 2004) develops, owns and oversees the generation, transmission and distribution of power in Africa. Aldw80

ych International is the second company involved with the co-development of Lake Turkana Wind Power.

INVESTMENT FUND FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (IFU) – NAIROBI IFU is a commercial investor that offers advice and risk capital to companies doing business in developing countries. The Norwegian company invests in 143 countries, has 203 active projects to date and has 1083 completed projects, all of which have contributed to economic and social development. To date, IFU has invested approximately $3.5mn in the Lake Turkana Wind Power project. OCTOBER 2019


40,000 Acres of effective land

365

Wind turbines Producing

850kw of energy

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‘The Lake Turkana Wind Power project has been funded by an assortment of African and European companies’ VESTAS EASTERN AFRICA LIMITED – SOUTH AFRICA Vestas is a global company that was established in 1898. The firm works to delivery sustainable energy solutions by designing, manufacturing, installing and servicing wind turbines across the world. Currently, Vestas has “101GW of wind turbines in 80 countries”, one of which is, North of Nairobi. For the Lake Turkana Wind Power project Vestas transported “parts for 365 wind turbines across 1,200km OCTOBER 2019


of road in a country that has never undertaken an energy project of this magnitude.”

FINNISH FUND FOR INDUSTRIAL COOPERATION LTD (FINNFUND) – FINLAND Finnfund is a development financing company that strives to build a sustainable world by investing in responsible and profitable businesses in developing countries. The company was formed in 1980 with Finnfund generating 6,065 GWh of clean energy for developing countries.

83

KLP NORFUND INVESTMENTS AS – WEST AFRICA Established in 1998, Norfund has five regional offices, one of which is located in Nairobi. Norfund aims to invest in countries where it can achieve the greatest possible impact through the development of sustainable businesses. Norfund has currently invested around $1.4mn into the Lake Turkana Wind Power project.

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84

Most sustainable countries in the Middle East and Africa Yale’s Environmental Performance Index (EPI) ranks 180 countries on their environmental performance. We take a closer look at the 2018 EPI to set out the top 10 most sustainable countries in the Middle East and Africa WRITTEN BY

SHANNON LEWIS

OCTOBER 2019


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10

United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates

77th on the EPI rankings is the United Arab Emirates, with an environmental health score of 67.88 and an ecosystem vitality score of 52.92. Since it began to export its oil reserves in 1962, its economy has boomed. According to the UN, sustainability is at the core of what UAE visualises for its future. It established a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) committee in 2017.

OCTOBER 2019


87

09

United Arab Emirates Lebanon

The major industries of Lebanon are banking, jewellery, and food processing. Lebanon received an EPI ranking of 67th in the world, with an environmental health score of 83.25 and an ecosystem vitality score of 46.30. According to a Voluntary National Review of Lebanon by the UN, water and air pollution in conjunction with waste management are Lebanon’s greatest struggles when it comes to environmental sustainability. Its government created strategies to respond to said impediments with a mid-term infrastructure investment that seeks to increase usage of renewable energy sources.

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08

United Arab Emirates Egypt

As part of Egypt’s aim to towards become more sustainable, it has rolled out a programme that intends to affirm local accountability for water supply and sanitation service, end plastic use and air pollution, and become more dependent on renewable energy by the year 2020. With an environmental health score of 68.61 and an ecosystem vitality of 56.28, it ranks 66th in the world in terms of EPI. Air pollution and water pollution in the Nile are some of Egypt’s primary environmental concerns.

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07

United Arab Emirates Jordan

One of Jordan’s greatest assets is the biodiversity available to it due to its unique geography. Starting in 2005, the Jordanian government developed a plan of action to ensure the survival of this biodiversity through sustainable development initiatives. Jordan ranks 62nd in the world through the EPI, with a score of 86.69 for environmental health and of 45.87 for ecosystem vitality. One of the greatest environmental threats in Jordan is water scarcity. The country recently put in place the ‘Red Sea-Dead Sea’ project, with the ultimate goal of providing 99% of the population with safe potable water, according to EcoMENA.

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06

United Arab Emirates Kuwait

Kuwait ranks 61st in the world’s EPI ranking, with an environmental health score of 70.55 and an ecosystem vitality score of 56.77. The primary industries in the country are the government sector and the oil industry, Kuwait being in possession of approximately 7% of the world’s oil reserves, according to export.gov. Due to being limited in resources such as land and water, Kuwait’s environmental focus relies on reducing the impact of global warming as well as air, land, and water pollution.

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The kitchen revolution

As operators add more digital channels to their restaurants, it creates new complexity and challenges. Restaurants have been used to controlling the transaction flow. Now, with the rise of delivery marketplaces, mobile applications and in-store selfservice, restaurants need to compete at a higher level and adapt to a digital-first ordering environment. This means ensuring proper routing of orders into the kitchen, a focus on food quality and distribution at the right time and data/analytics to measure and improve the performance of the kitchen. Key trends impacting kitchen optimisation and production, include: • The rise of off-premise ordering & delivery To meet this growing consumer demand, restaurants need robust kitchen production systems to accommodate the flow of orders into the restaurant from multiple channels. • Speed of service Consumers no longer have any patience for waiting in lines or waiting for food. They essentially want to “speak” directly to the kitchen. • Growing dependency on kitchen data Real-Time production metrics are fast becoming a requirement. Operators need to be able to gauge order volume, production status, progress order times and manage staffing levels within their kitchen in real-time.

© 2019 NCR Corporation Patents Pending

Successful brands we work with are investing in kitchen optimisation and production technology to stay ahead of the curve. NCR Kitchen Operations solutions enable restaurants to plan and prepare for anticipated spikes in order volumes and manage the production of orders coming from all channels to improve the customer and staff experience. Brands that are leveraging NCR Kitchen Operations and Digital Signage are also improving the customer experience by providing guests with accurate quote times and order status notifications via text paging and in-app notifications. Large quick-service chains using our technology have increased their speed of service by as much as 15% with improved visibility into order volume, production status, order times and staffing levels. Over 30,000 restaurants around the world use NCR Kitchen Operations to manage their kitchen production. While not visible to consumers, kitchen optimisation and production technology reduce errors, reduce waste and have a tangible impact on the customer experience.

Find out more. Visit www.ncr.com/restaurants and see how our technology can help your business thrive.


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05

United Arab Emirates Tunisia

Tunisia is 58th in the world EPI rankings, with a score of 81.12 for environmental health and 49.83 for ecosystem vitality. The Tunisian Association for the Protection of Nature and the Environment, a non-profit founded in 1971 and united to Friends of the Earth in 1995, has been an active force in the promotion of healthy environmental habits in Tunisia. It was key in setting the Water Code and Urban Planning Code and helped develop the Forestry Code and maritime resource regulations.

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04

United Arab Emirates Morocco

With a world EPI ranking of 54th place, Morocco has an environmental health score of 67.43 and an ecosystem vitality score of 60.82. According to Social Watch, it is the second richest country in the Mediterranean in terms of biodiversity. Among the green policies of Morocco, are efforts to conserve its underground aquifers, the treatment of the ocean as an important natural resource, and the lifting of all subsidies for diesel and petroleum fuel to encourage the development of alternative energies.

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03

United Arab Emirates Seychelles

Seychelles ranks 39th in the EPI’s world rankings, with an environmental safety score of 77.72 and an ecosystem vitality score of 58.22. The oldest oceanic islands on Earth, Seychelles is home to several thousand endemic species of flora and fauna, according to Nature Seychelles. As a result, its efforts in the conservation of these - removing the Seychelles magpie-robin and the Seychelles Scops Owl from the highest extinction threat category have been globally-renowned success stories. In 2018, the Seychelles government initiated a marine spatial plan, designating a 210,000 square kilometre area of ocean as it’s responsibility to protect and manage.

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02

Qatar

Despite Qatar’s heavy reliance on the oil industry, in terms of EPI ranking, it comes 32nd in the world in terms of sustainability, with an environmental health score of 74.18 and an ecosystem vitality score of 63.54. The country has established national targets to reduce flaring emissions. The Second National 96

Development Strategy (2017-2022) to be implemented by the Qatar government has been confirmed by the Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics to assimilate the 17 Sustainable Development Goals established by the UN.

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Israel

The most sustainable country in the Middle East and Africa, Israel places 19th in the EPI world rankings, with an environmental health score of 94.14 and an ecosystem vitality score of 62.25. One of the primary concerns for Israel was a drinking water shortage, which was solved by Mekorot, Israel’s national water company. The 98

company’s desalination and water recycling practices are used as models worldwide, from India, Cyprus and Uganda, to Southern California. With strong economic growth, Israel’s investment in innovation, both on home soil and internationally, has been key to its sustainable development, according to the UN.

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PROCUREMENT TRANSFORMATION AT THE HIGHER COLLEGES OF TECHNOLOGY WRITTEN BY

WILLIAM SMITH PRODUCED BY

K ANE WELLER

OCTOBER 2019


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HIGHER COLLEGES OF TECHNOLOGY

MAHMOUD ALALAWI, DIRECTOR OF PROCUREMENT AND CONTRACTS AT THE UAE’S HIGHER COLLEGES OF TECHNOLOGY, DETAILS THE PROCUREMENT TRANSFORMATION UNDERWAY AT THE ORGANISATION

W

ith 23,000 students and 16 campuses spread across the United Arab Emirates, the Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT) is

one of the largest applied higher learning institutions in the country. Facing the supply chain challenges 102

presented by such a sizeable institution is Mahmoud Al Alawi, Director of Procurement and Contracts. Since joining the organisation in November 2018, Al Alawi has renewed the focus on having a dedicated and streamlined strategy underpinning HCT’s procurement function. “We’ve discussed how to best ensure procurement is engaged with the strategy of HCT,” says Al Alawi. “Now, we are part of the strategic decision making of HCT, and I am involved in committees responsible for strategic initiatives.” With the strategic structure clarified, HCT has embarked on a number of progressive and transformative initiatives involving the procurement department. “We are applying international standards, and we have plans to be part of the new Fourth Industrial Revolution, implementing a strategic plan, known as ‘HCT 4.0 Employability & Beyond’. We are OCTOBER 2019


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1988

Year founded

16

Campuses

23,000 Students

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HIGHER COLLEGES OF TECHNOLOGY

“WE HAVE PLANS TO BE PART OF THE NEW FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION”

involved in the management of strategy, from the academic side to the technical or technological side, and we also provide the facilities and the equipment.” Technology has played a part in ensuring that the procurement department can achieve its goals. Existing systems are undergoing enhancement, with Al Alawi targeting a new enterprise resource planning (ERP) platform. “We are floating a tender in the market

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Mahmoud Alalawi, Director of Procurement and Contracts, Higher Colleges of Technology

OCTOBER 2019

for a new ERP system that’s integrated between procurement, finance, HR and our SIS. This was one of the decisions


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘HIGHER COLLEGES OF TECHNOLOGY – HCT’ 105 that we took after I joined and we’re

having our team check all the activities

expecting the tender to be closed by

and the trade licenses, the system

the end of the year.” Currently, HCT

does it instead. It will do the necessary

is undergoing a programme of digital

matching before advising us whether

transformation to decrease existing

the company in question complies with

manual efforts. “As of now, we handle

the requirements and with the activities

about 50% of our processes manually,

that they have mentioned in the

with the other 50% automated – but that

registration form.”

is not enough for us.” HCT is also engaging with emerging

Such innovations have required a change in culture, and Al Alawi has

technologies to improve its capabilities,

taken a considered approach to getting

with a particular focus on artificial

stakeholders on board with the changes.

intelligence, which is being put to work

“I believe that engaging the end users

with an AI system able to register and

with us in the process is the best way to

categorise suppliers. “Instead of

overcome any in-built resistance that

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they might have. We expected a certain amount of resistance, so we thought that we’d involve them with making the changes, instead of just having them apply it.” Obtaining HCT management approval for the changes wasn’t an issue for Al Alawi. “The leadership was very helpful and supportive. They really believe in what we are doing to

“I BELIEVE THAT ENGAGING THE END USERS WITH US IN THE PROCESS IS THE BEST WAY TO OVERCOME ANY CULTURAL RESISTANCE”

transform procurement, and with their support, we’ve managed to change. For example, we’ve reduced the vendors’ payment term from 60 days to 30 days,

Mahmoud Alalawi, Director of Procurement and Contracts, Higher Colleges of Technology 107

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Mahmoud Al Alawi Mahmoud Al Alawi holds the Procurement Transformation file at the Higher Colleges of Technology in line with the national agenda of the UAE and the HCT 4.0 Strategy. He has held various positions as Contracts Manager at the IAT, then Director of Operations, and has overseen the IT Department as well as acting as the Director of Support Services in ADVETI. Al Alawi is a member of several international committees and associations such as the CIPS, the IFMA and the BSI. Al Alawi has received awards from organisations such as: “Rashid Award for Scientific Excellence” in 2007, “Best Supervisor Award” from ACTVET 2017 and “Best Employee” from the UAE Armed Forces in 2006 and 2008. He holds an MBA in International Business from the UOWD and a Degree in e-commerce from the HCT. Currently, he is a candidate for the DBA programme in Derby University in the UK.

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C O M PA N Y FACT S

• Reduced the vendors payment from 60 days to 30 days • 50% of processes are automated, with the percentage increasing

OCTOBER 2019


which was much appreciated by our vendors.” The change in approach has reaped tangible rewards. “The traditional, paperwork-based process of procurement used to take a long time,” says Al Alawi. “We used to float some tenders and out of the 50 or 60 invited, we would have two or three participants. Now we have more than 70% participation in our floated tenders. Since our partners are part of our success, we are inviting them for an open forum next month to be part of our planning for our 2020 Annual Procurement Plan”. To reinforce the culture, HCT has systematised what might previously have been a verbally-based approach. “We’ve established four sections to the department,” says Al Alawi. “We have the procurement section, contracts, procurement operations, and vendor management. The whole team knows their responsibilities both within their section, and between the sections within procurement. In this digital age we don’t want to purely depend on people, so we’ve built a system and gained approval of all the policies and procedures from senior management. mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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“WE’VE DISCUSSED HOW TO BEST ENSURE PROCUREMENT IS ENGAGED WITH THE STRATEGY OF HCT”

Everything is documented and clear – we even made them illustrated via presentations to make them very easy for anyone to understand.” The future for HCT holds plenty of promise. Aside from the aforementioned HCT 4.0 strategic plan, the ‘InnCuVation’ spaces project has seen the creation of state-of-the-art innovation

Mahmoud Alalawi, Director of Procurement and Contracts, Higher Colleges of Technology

labs in three campuses, with more to come. New approaches to procurement are being developed, with a move to leasing and managed services instead

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111

of purchasing. Students are also

working on putting in place a two-year

benefiting from the new approach,

plan, then a three-year plan, then a

with private sector procurement

five-year plan. That’s going to make the

partnerships leading to employment

implementation of our strategy much

post-graduation, as well as being able

easier and more controllable in terms

to open companies licensed by HCT,

of budgeting – it’s among the biggest

which is aligned to the HCT 4.0

initiatives and projects that we are

foundational pillar of Graduating

working on.”

Companies. Al Alawi, meanwhile, is looking to add more rigour to HCT’s planning in order to unlock the potential in the procurement function. “Instead of an annual plan, we’re mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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SEWA

112

Digital disruption in the energy industry WRITTEN BY

AMBER DONOVAN-STEVENS PRODUCED BY

CAITLYN COLE

OCTOBER 2019


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S H A R J A H E L E C T R I C I T Y A N D W AT E R A U T H O R I T Y

Afra Alowais, the Chief Efficienology Officer of Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority, shares the company’s digital transformation driving enhanced sustainability

T

he government-owned Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority (SEWA) became a profitable organisation in 2015 and has

seen gradual expansion in conjunction with Sharjah 114

Emirate ever since. It has won several awards in the United Arab Emirates and across the globe, including the ‘Best Energy Efficiency Solution C&I’ at the Asian Utility Innovation Awards, Asian Utility Week 2018 in Thailand; the ‘UAE Energy Management Insight Award 2017’ from the Ministry of Energy and industry; and the ‘Sustainability Innovation Award 2017,’ awarded by Oracle. The role of Chief Efficienology Officer was explicitly created for Afra Alowais, who is responsible for driving the initiatives relating to efficiency and technology. Alowais joined SEWA having graduated as a Sustainable and Renewable Energy Engineer only six months prior. She became fluent in English – less than three years after joining SEWA – so that she could better represent the organisation as an official spokeswoman, speaking at global events not only OCTOBER 2019


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S H A R J A H E L E C T R I C I T Y A N D W AT E R A U T H O R I T Y

on behalf of SEWA, but for Sharjah Emirate as a whole. Her diligence and dedication to sustainability in Sharjah earned her the autonomy to create her department: Energy Management and Audit. This department is charged with implementing a programme called ‘Energy Efficiency and retrofit’. Alowais shares that her team is a group of

“Energy efficiency must be more 116 than a slogan” — Afra Alowais, Chief Efficienology Officer of Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority

female engineers who also share passion and motivation. “Efficiency and conservation are key components of energy sustainability: the concept that every generation should meet its energy needs without compromising the needs of future generations,” she says. The Pareto principle is at the centre of her leadership ethos. She believes that a leader should be self-motivated to inspire those within the team to accomplish the strategy. “A team member believes in promoting environmental stewardship and green growth, and whole-heartedly contributes to the policy and research in energy efficiency,” says Alowais, “As Chief Efficienology Officer, I promote the use of new and renewable

OCTOBER 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘HIGHLIGHT ON 22ND JULY 2019 THE 11TH ANNUAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT CONGRESS WEEK’ 117 energy sources and encourage sound

designed around knowledge manage-

environmental policies and practices.”

ment and aligned with the vision of the Ruler of Sharjah Emirate H.H.Dr.

THE PATH TO SUSTAINABLE ENERGY

Sheikh Sultan Al Qassimi for Sharjah to

“Sustainability is at the core of SEWA’s

become the UAE ‘City of Conservation’.

pathway,” says Alowais. “With the

“As a Government utility we have these

widespread support of the Paris

four stages: generation, transmission,

Agreement on climate change, we are

distribution of power, and electricity

finally seeing a great momentum

and gas. More importantly, we wish to

building up to tackle climate change.”

build a strong sense of trust with the

She says that SEWA plays a crucial

customer. We are beyond being a

role in decarbonising the UAE econo-

normal utility, so this is the transforma-

my by switching to cleaner fuels and

tion happening under our leadership.

adopting renewable energy. SEWA has

Most companies across all industries

a sustainability pathway which is

are moving to digitalise these services,

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We’re creating a smart future for all kinds of facilities. How does improved comfort, safety, performance and energy efficiency throughout the lifecycle of your project or building sound? We have the solution – design, HVAC maintenance and repair, retrofits, system integrations and even financing options – no matter the type, age or size of the facility.

Solutions for virtually all facilities

Unlocking the power potential in cities All over the world, people are migrating to cities. Such growth brings greatly increased energy demands and infrastructure pressures. How can cities integrate best practices into sustainability planning and policymaking?

aves

$

$2 32%

in avoided Buildings power generation costs.

are responsible for

of global energy consumption and

$

1/4

of global human induced CO 2 emissions.

The pace of digitalization in energy strengthens the relationship between all energy leaders, Electricity and Water Authorities across the Middle East & Africa and Johnson Controls (JCI) to drive a broad range of energy solutions including designs and implementation of energy savings projects includes retrofitting and energy conservation of existing buildings. At all times, our innovations are focused on optimizing and reducing energy consumption that are striving to become more energy efficient, sustainable and healthful environment.

Developing countries can cut growth in energy demand invested in in avoided

$2half $1 moreSAVES than building efficiency

power generation costs.

Source: World Resources Institute - In partnership with Johnson Controls

Our digital technologies enable saving opportunities in all areas of the building. The cutting edge Central Plant Optimization solution takes in future weather data to maximize savings and performance. The Johnson Controls Enterprise Management System (JEMS) provides a holistic monitoring and control to provide actionable insight, that drive operational savings to the bottom line. Retrofitting of cooling and building controls solutions in existing buildings offers significant opportunities for reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

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Johnson Controls innovations that drive smart, safer and sustainable cities.

Qanat Al Qasba

(*Left to right)

• • • •

Baseline Analysis Energy Audit Energy Modeling Bench Marking

Petrofac

Sharjah, UAE - The senior leadership of Sharjah Investment and Development Authority (Shurooq) and Johnson Controls International celebrated their partnership upon the successful completion of the Energy Efficient Retrofit for Central Chiller Plant serving Qanat Al Qasba, a landmark destination in Sharjah that is extremely popular with tourists and residents. • • •

Energy Efficient Equipment Central Plant Optimization Measurement and Verification

Saving % 70.0%

55.2%

60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0%

33.19%

20.0%

0.0%

0.0% 2009

• •

40.2%

44.2%

49.1%

17.4%

10.0%

33.8%

8.0%

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Measurement and Verification Central Plant Optimization Insulation Improvement

2016

2017

• • • •

Johnson Controls partnered with Petrofac Sharjah, to save around 3,400 tons in annual greenhouse gas emissions, earning an energy management award. Reducing energy consumption by 55% over the 8 year program. Thermal Imaging Energy Modeling Energy Audit Baseline Analysis

His Excellency Marwan bin Jassim Al Sarkal valued the lead taken by Johnson Controls in extending their global Energy Service (ESCO) Solutions expertise to Shurooq with the York and Metasys brand and in retrofitting with high efficiency systems for better energy performance. *Left to right: His Excellency Marwan bin Jassim Al Sarkal - Shurooq CEO, Claude Allain - Vice President and Managing Director - Johnson Controls Middle East & Africa, Marcus Schumacher - Vice Presidenct and General Manager GCC - Johnson Controls Middle East & Africa

For further advanced technologies, energy-efficient and sustainable equipment. Please visit our website or call +971 4 309 9999. Johnson Controls Middle East and Africa Headquarters P.O. Box 31065, 13th Floor, API Tower, Sheikh Zayed Road, Dubai, UAE middleeast.johnsoncontrols.com


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“Efficiency and conservation are key components of energy sustainability” — Afra Alowais, Chief Efficienology Officer of Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority

so we are trying to leverage AI to streamline the energy sector to be more cost-effective and accessible in line with the growing expectations of customers.” One example she gives of this digitalisation is the app available to customers, enabling them to track their bills, usage, and carbon emissions. This is part of the Green Billing Initiative that was launched in 2018 to combat paper waste. “Energy efficiency must be more than a slogan,” asserts Alowais.

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A large part of this programme is the drive to retrofit buildings across Sharjah. “Retrofitting buildings in Sharjah city will facilitate the reduction of consumption and will support our commitment as a utility to meet the

CO MPAN Y FACT S

• In 2017, SEWA reached 2.5mn people through various channel strategies consisting of social media, emails, SMS and training.

demand. Experience from projects already done shows that we can easily save around 25-30% of the annual consumption in buildings, bringing significant cost savings.” The project was started in 2018 and covers two aspects: in-house facilities and mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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S H A R J A H E L E C T R I C I T Y A N D W AT E R A U T H O R I T Y

“Sustainability is the core of SEWA’s Pathway” — Afra Alowais, Chief Efficienology Officer of Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority

122

during the past year, and reviewing how best to appeal to SEWA employees.” In addition to this, SEWA hosts an annual meeting for partners to attend to strengthen relationships. This event is open to various market players and includes stakeholders such as suppliers, contractors, customers, government authorities. SEWA makes

consumer’s facilities. It’s very impor-

its partners aware of its strategies,

tant to walk the talk and show consum-

plans, and goals and how it intends to

ers that we are committed to retrofit-

improve its sustainability performance.

ting our own facilities too. From the

“We place our stakeholders’ needs,

consumers side, the programme

expectations, and happiness at the

focuses on the greatest consumers in

core of our strategy, providing the

the city, ‘The Top 100’, which utilise

reliable electricity and water infrastruc-

most of the electricity and water in the

ture required to support Sharjah’s

SEWA’s network.”

economic growth.”

A vital component of the energy transformation is the Energy Manager

THE JOURNEY CONTINUES

Association. Last year, professors from

As SEWA moves forward with its

the UK visited SEWA’s Academy in the

energy transformation journey, it will

UAE to provide “intense training on

continue to support the optimisation of

energy” to the SEWA team, advising on

energy and water consumption at

energy management, energy auditing,

customer facilities with a goal of

efficiency, renewables, and behaviour-

eventually introducing and integrating

al change. “Last year, our team was

renewable power to the grid. Alowais

chosen as a core participant in this

believes that society is influenced by

programme, and now, one year on, we

being engaged and persuaded to

are carrying out a review of progress

understand the value of energy

OCTOBER 2019


E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Afra Alowais Afra Al Owais leads the Energy Management and Audit Department of Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority (SEWA). She joined SEWA in 2016 after qualifying with a degree in Sustainable and Renewable Energy Engineering from University of Sharjah. Afra was specially selected for her current role after distinguishing herself with strategic projects. She is passionate about environmental stewardship and promoting green growth; one of SEWA’s key goals. Performing as a Sustainable and Renewable Energy Engineer, Afra contributes to policy and research in energy efficiency. Her vision is to bring about a sustained change in consumer behaviour and energy efficiency practices. Achieving the consequent reduction in resources used underpins everything that she does. She quickly recognises opportunities to translate strategy into action. To this end, she created the SEWA Sustainability Pathway as a permanent high-impact installation in the head office to illustrate the organisation’s vision. This foresight also drove her to commission an innovation project to explore changing customer behaviour using the FORTH Innovation Method, which is new to the region. Most recently, Afra has championed a building retrofit programme targeting a reduction of 30% in each premises –­­­­ an initiative to advance the position of Sharjah as City of Conservation. The title of Chief Efficienology Officer was recently bestowed in recognition of her determination and commitment to develop Green Growth.

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S H A R J A H E L E C T R I C I T Y A N D W AT E R A U T H O R I T Y

900,000+ Sharjah’s population

1995

Year SEWA was founded

4,000

Approximate number of employees 124

OCTOBER 2019


125

efficiency, not by being pushed by policy. “It’s about highlighting the gain value from SEWA to the customer, not only the other way around. Customer loyalty can be delivered through excellent service, and we intend to continue to deliver this.” She concludes: “SEWA’s goal is to bring about a sustained change in consumer behaviour and energy efficiency practices, and achieving the consequent reduction in resources used.”

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Kinross Gold is utilising IT as the backbone of its innovation strategy WRITTEN BY

DAN BRIGHTMORE PRODUCED BY

RICHARD DEANE

OCTOBER 2019


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KINROSS GOLD

A flexible IT strategy is helping Kinross Gold plan for the future of its diversified operations

F

ounded in 1993, Kinross Gold (Kinross) is a senior gold mining company with a diverse portfolio of mines and projects in

the United States, Brazil, Chile, Ghana, Mauritania, and Russia. Headquartered in Toronto, Canada, Kinross employs approximately 9,000 people worldwide. The company is focused on delivering value through operational excellence, balance sheet strength, disciplined growth, and responsible mining. 128

Kinross’ diverse portfolio of mines stretches from Africa to Russia. The senior gold mining company has embraced the challenge of developing its operations at remote locations across the globe where it has a strong track record of either meeting or exceeding production guidance targets for the past seven years, while regularly meeting or coming in under annual cost and capital expenditures guidance. A key component to delivering on its goals is a flexible IT strategy capable of planning for the future of Kinross’ operations. Regional IT Projects Manager – Africa, Néstor Alemán Esteban has been working for the company for almost seven years. Alemán is based in the Canary Islands at the company’s Las Palmas program management office (PMO) for IT Projects in Africa, where he oversees all projects; also taking OCTOBER 2019


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KINROSS GOLD

“There needs to be an IT strategy behind advances in mining. To make the most of the features available from the latest software and automated hardware the technology can’t exist in silos” 130

— Néstor Alemán Esteban, Regional IT Projects Manager – Africa, Kinross Gold

responsibility for the financial control of the capital budgets of the IT department. “Much of my work has been focused on the expansion of the Tasiast mine in Mauritania,” explains Alemán. “We also run projects in the main office of Kinross in Mauritania’s capital city, Nouakchott, where we’re working on connectivity for employee accommodation.” What challenges does the company face to develop and support communications infrastructure when establishing mining projects in such remote areas? “When you’re examining the status of the mining industry everybody is talking about innovation and automation but nobody speaks about IT,” laments Alemán. “It’s the communication behind the technology initiatives that makes them work. In developed countries IT is taken for granted, but what if you are in the middle of a remote area with zero coverage from any telecom provider? In most cases that’s the story with a new mining operation and the company has to find a way of working around this. It’s important that IT and cybersecurity are not left behind, because without them you can’t support innovation safely. It’s a big risk.” Kinross was fortunate that when

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CLICK TO WATCH : ‘KINROSS PROCEEDING WITH TASIAST 24K PROJECT’ 131 it acquired Tasiast from Red Back, a

to achieve the installation of a 60km

telco provider had infrastructure in the

aerial fiber optic, plus a 1km buried fiber

area. However, it was necessary to

optic, to get the site connected to the

start from scratch and negotiate with

underground main fiber connection of

the provider to boost bandwidth at the

Mauritania, connecting the south with

site. “We started with a 25mb micro-

the north.” Alemán believes satellite

wave connection with around 1,000

communication offers a viable reach-

people on site,” recalls Alemán. “When

back approach, but it’s typically more

activity at the site ramped up we were

costly than microwave or fiber. While

hosting around 2,500 employees with

satellite can solve the connectivity

a 45mb connection and then man-

problem from day one, communica-

aged to get that increased to 90mb

tions infrastructure offered by local

when the workforce reached 4,000.

providers over time may provide more

We now have a fiber optic connec-

cost-effective alternatives.

tion of 155mb+. It was challenging mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

Meanwhile, the corporate office a f r ic a . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m


KINROSS GOLD

132

headquarters of Kinross in Toronto

and from across Mauritania, carrying

handles the perimeter security of the

with them old and unsecured devices

company’s network bubble. “We are

being connected to the network.

responsible for the security of the mine

Alemán believes innovation should

site. We have Las Palmas, Ghana, and

be about much more than modernisa-

Mauritania connected together via

tion with equipment. “There needs to

Toronto, so when somebody enters our

be an IT strategy behind advances in

network through the perimeter secu-

mining,” he urges. “To make the most

rity of Toronto it’s our responsibility to

of the features available from the latest

ensure they don’t behave maliciously in

software and automated hardware the

our network,” adds Alemán. The chal-

technology can’t exist in silos.” Alemán

lenge for his team is maintaining those

champions the concept of interoper-

levels of security when contractors are

ability to ensure value reaches across

arriving from Morocco, Mali, Senegal

the operation. “Mine management

OCTOBER 2019


need to ask themselves where they

chasing new systems and machinery

see operation two years from now in

that might not be compatible with each

terms of innovation and modernisa-

other.” He argues IT should have a seat

tion. Long-term strategies are im-

at the decision-making table, they’re

portant. For example, to implement

not just the guys providing WiFi but the

autonomous vehicles you need to set

team who ensure systems can commu-

your goals by changing mindsets and

nicate with each other.

processes way before you start pur-

Kinross has made big steps forward

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Néstor Alemán Esteban Néstor Alemán Esteban has been an IT Project Manager at Kinross, the world’s fourth largest gold mining company, for almost seven years. Prior to that he worked for NXP Semiconductors (formerly Philips Semiconductors) and Blacktrace Holdings (a world leader in productising science). A PMP and PRINCE2 certified Project Manager, Alemán holds an MSc in Telecommunications Engineering as well as completing multiple postgraduate courses in Technology, Business and Project Management. “One of the things I’ve discovered during many years working in Africa is that I have learned more about project management, people management and communication protocols, by working every day on the field of battle than I have from any academic certificates,” says Alemán. “I’ve worked in the chemicals and microelectronics industries but what fascinates me about mining is the crossover in specialties and the need to keep up with all of the new innovations with technology each department, from geology to operations and processing would like to implement.”

mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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KINROSS GOLD

$3.3bn+ Approximate revenue

1993

Year founded

9,000

Approximate number of employees

2-3

GUIDED SPOTTING RESULTS:

100

Billion additional TONS of optimized haulage*

* Achieved at customer sites

4

DECADES of value-driven results

ADDITIONAL Loads per Hour*

150 INCREASE

%

Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF)*

Doing More to Deliver More


135 to alert IT of new business cases that require its supervision with a telematics process. Alemán sees further room for improvement with communication protocols. “The mine operation should be understood as a unique entity,” he says. “This is why a holistic approach is so important. If you upgrade one part of a system then it needs to be connected to the rest. It’s an issue that needs to be addressed in the industry.” He believes, when it comes to innovation, while mining is keen to catch up with other industries like aerospace

“The mine operation should be understood as a unique entity. This is why a holistic approach is so important. If you upgrade one part of a system then it needs to be connected to the rest” — Néstor Alemán Esteban, Regional IT Projects Manager – Africa, Kinross Gold

there has been a pressure to adapt quickly which heightens the need for mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

a f r ic a . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m


KINROSS GOLD

workarounds. “The problem with mining is that it’s a mission critical operation so the pressure to make things work regardless is greater,” he says. “The extreme costs associated with exploration, production and operation mean that network downtime can destroy profitability.” Tasiast is undergoing major expansion in two phases to increase the size of the operation. IT plays a vital role in the execution of all projects and one that Alemán notes could be enhanced in the mining industry by making it a 136

part of the early stages of the decisionmaking process. “Vendors need to collaborate more in our industry, because in others like aerospace or the military they have solved the interoperability puzzle,” he says. “They have standardisation with protocols so any vendor that wants to sell any equipment or hardware systems to these industries has to work to those requirements which enhances collaboration.” Kinross has a longstanding partnership with Modular Mining. The global leader in the delivery of real-time computer-based mine management solutions for surface and underground mining operations supplies the OCTOBER 2019

“Vendors need to collaborate more in our industry, because in others like aerospace or the military they have solved the interoperability puzzle” — Néstor Alemán Esteban, Regional IT Projects Manager – Africa, Kinross Gold


gold miner with its DISPATCH Fleet Management System (FMS). “It has optimised operations at Tasiast, saving time and reducing costs,” confirms Alemán. The system gives mines automated, real-time monitoring, management and visibility of their operations whether above or below ground. “We connect the data received to our mobile maintenance workshop,” explains Alemán, highlighting the use of predictive analytics to drive efficiencies across the fleet. Kinross also deploys Caterpillar’s Terrain applications for precision drilling, while guidance and tracking tools are used to control the stability of the slopes. “All of this is running wireless so we have to ensure all the machinery is connected across our IT network,” he says. While innovative applications are helping deliver huge operational improvements, Alemán points out that mines are traditionally run on controlled, isolated networks which, though the technology was old, made them safe. “Now with the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud applications the temptation is to connect the mine all the way to the internet,” he says. “It’s a big security risk for mining operations opening up the control network to the mid dl e e a s t . b u s in e s s c hie f. c o m

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KINROSS GOLD

S TAT I S T I C S

Tasiast local network

138

• +30,000 devices connected • 10 GB backbone network • +100 Km of fiber optic pulled • +110 radio frequency links • 360 WiFi access points • 280 Switches • Six telecommunication towers +45m • Nested mine wireless network • Nested ICS/SCADA Network • Nested digital radio network Tasiast servers infrastructure • • • • •

4TB RAM memory 408 logical processors +450GHz CPU +330 TB storage +12 servers hosting +210 virtual machines • P roviding services to +1000 IT users • T wo sites in high availability +hot-site mode

OCTOBER 2019

Mining communications requirements •A  ccess to corporate business applications • Access to real-time communication • The importance of well-being – keeping on-site personnel connected • D ealing with medical emergencies • Large file transfer • A sset tracking and management • Onsite (cyber) security • D ata storage, back up and redundancy – insuring against power outage and extreme weather


world via the vendors.” Kinross is partnered with Cisco, described by Alemán as “among the best in the market” when it comes to networking. “All our main station network, our business network, is on Cisco. At Tasiast we are completing the migration for everything involving our WiFi infrastructure to Cisco’s industrial networks and we’re very happy with the process.” He stresses the choices made with innovations should be site specific, based on studying the weaknesses of your operations and weighing those against the opportunities to add value and should be made before committing to any hardware/ software purchases. “Mining is a complicated industry,” he concedes. “At the end of the day, the objective with things like automation and driverless trucks is to remove people from dangerous areas.” The result at Tasiast is a challenge for Alemán’s team in managing the workarounds required for a mix of technologies that may lack standardisation when it comes to communication protocols, but will offer significant advances for Kinross in its most remote operations.

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