Page 1

MAY 2018 | $3.50 BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

Junior Achievement

PM42455512

ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME’S 2018 LAUREATES



RISKY BUSINESS

PAGE

22 |

EDMONTON CHAMBER SECTION

PAGE

41


STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 6 | Number 5

REGULAR COLUMNS

9

 The Flaw in Alberta’s Trans Mountain Gambit By Brock Harrison

10 12

CONTENTS COVER FEATURE

28

14 41

 Trudeau Government has Double Standard for Foreign Oil Imports By Colin Craig

 Entry-Level Wages are the Starting Point not the Destination By Amber Ruddy

 The Power of Print Chatterson

 dmonton Chamber of E Commerce

J unior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame’s 2018 Laureates By Nerissa McNaughton

ON OUR COVER: ABOVE: DONALD A. WHEATON SR. , DR. RAY MUZYKA, DR. GREG ZESCHUK AND JIM CARTER.

FIND US ONLINE! B US I N E SS I N E DMONTON.COM BUSINESS IN EDMONTON

@BUSINEDMONTON

BUSINESSINEDMONTON

4

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

45


What does your tomorrow look like? We can help you get there today. As an owner, the sale of your business can be the culmination of a lifetime’s work. Often, this will be a once-in-a-lifetime transaction – with just one opportunity to get it right. KPMG Enterprise can help you prepare so that when the time comes, you are confident in your future plans and in the structure and value of your company. To find out more, speak with an adviser today. Glen Demke KPMG Tax Partner T: 780-429-7395 E: gdemke@kpmg.ca kpmg.ca/enterprise

© 2018 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 19657


STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 6 | Number 5

53

THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

CONTENTS

22 34

By Nerissa McNaughton

The Future in Automated Transportation is now — Are our Industries Ready? By Laura Bohnert

49

COMPANY PROFILES

53 70 73

Risky Business

Edmonton’s Artificial Intelligence Revolution With AI research group DeepMind coming to Edmonton, Alberta is poised to see a boom in artificial intelligence research and application By Zachary Edwards

A  pplied Electronics Celebrates 60 Years

Revington Renovations

59

When technology meets fabric, it creates an entirely new way to dress for success By Nerissa McNaughton

Celebrates 5 Years

Brenex Building Corporation Celebrates 35 Years

Work Clothes: The Next Frontier of Technology

62 66

Making an Easy Getaway With today’s choices, personalized and affordable travel options are at your fingertips. By Susan Hofforth

Alberta’s Economic Edge Is All Natural By Laura Bohnert

73 6

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


OUR VIEW, TOO.

PUBLISHER

Business in Edmonton Inc.

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Brent Trimming brent@businessinedmonton.com

EDITOR

Just like you, we know the opportunities and challenges of doing business in Alberta. Put an Alberta Blue Cross employer benefit plan to work for you. Call us today.

780-498-8500 | ab.bluecross.ca

Nerissa McNaughton

COPY EDITOR Nikki Gouthro

ART DIRECTOR

Jessi Evetts jessi@businessinedmonton.com

ADMINISTRATION

Nancy Bielecki info@businessinedmonton.com

REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Colin Craig Brock Harrison Amber Ruddy

THIS ISSUE’S CONTRIBUTORS Nerissa McNaughton Laura Bohnert Zachary Edwards Susan Hofforth

PHOTOGRAPHY

Cover photo by Epic Photography Inc.

ADVERTISING SALES

Chris MIller chris@businessinedmonton.com Evelyn Dehner evelyn@businessinedmonton.com Bobbi Joan O’Neil bobbi@businessinedmonton.com

DIRECTOR OF CUSTOM PUBLISHING Mark McDonald mark@businessinedmonton.com Gary Caouette gary@businessinedmonton.com

EDITORIAL, ADVERTISING & ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

#1780, 10020 - 101 A Ave. NW Edmonton, AB T5J 3G2 Phone: 780.638.1777 Fax: 587.520.5701 Toll Free: 1.800.465.0322 Email: info@businessinedmonton.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Online at www.businessinedmonton.com Annual rates: $31.50 | $45 USA | $85 International Single Copy $3.50 Business in Edmonton is delivered to 27,000 business addresses every month including all registered business owners in Edmonton and surrounding areas including St Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc/Nisku, Spruce Grove, Stony Plain and Fort Saskatchewan. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement, and all representations of warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not of the publisher. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, in all or in part, without the written permission of the publisher. Canadian publications mail sales product agreement No. 42455512

Health and dental • Life and disability • Wellness • Spending accounts ®* The Blue Cross symbol and name are registered marks of the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans, an association of independent Blue Cross plans. Licensed to ABC Benefits Corporation for use in operating the Alberta Blue Cross Plan. ® † Blue Shield is a registered trade-mark of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. ABC 83751 2018/04. Photo by Joanne Mah, Alberta Blue Cross employee.

Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to circulation dept. #1780, 10020 - 101 A Ave. NW Edmonton, AB T5J 3G2 info@businessinedmonton.com

Business in Edmonton magazine’s circulation is audited twice a year by BPA International.

WWW.BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

8

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


THE FLAW IN ALBERTA’S TRANS MOUNTAIN GAMBIT // BROCK HARRISON

The Flaw in Alberta’s Trans Mountain Gambit BY BROCK HARRISON

J

ust how desperate is Premier Rachel Notley to save the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline? Alberta taxpayers are about to find out.

Notley’s NDP have built their entire fiscal framework on the foundation of Trans Mountain’s eventual construction. In Budget 2018, the province made it crystal clear that its path back to a balanced budget runs parallel to the proposed TMX pipeline route. Without the influx of resource royalties the pipeline would harvest, the government’s balance sheet is doomed. For a moment, let’s set aside the obvious: staking your province’s fiscal sustainability on political actors and other elements beyond your control is just bad policy. Instead, let’s focus on the practical: Alberta simply must have TMX built. Little wonder, then, that after Kinder Morgan announced on April 8 it would stop investing in the project, Notley wasted no time in laying her cards on the table, face up. If Kinder Morgan could no longer carry the risk of ongoing TMX delays, the Alberta government would. Alberta is a $50 billion public corporation with a solid, if deteriorating, credit rating and is better positioned to withstand the onslaught of delay tactics that have stalled TMX than a shareholder-controlled company like Kinder Morgan. Kinder is threatening to nix the pipeline altogether if the B.C. government doesn’t co-operate with construction, and they’ve set a May 31 deadline for them to comply. B.C. Premier John Horgan’s political legitimacy rests almost entirely on opposing TMX, so that deadline is likely to come and go. Enter Alberta.

Notley’s determination is admirable, but her plan to purchase the pipeline lacks certainty. It solves the immediate problem of keeping the project afloat, but offers nothing in the way of actually getting it built. The hordes of protestors currently clogging the route aren’t about to pack up their placards and bullhorns and go home just because the pipeline proponent is a government and not a corporation. Horgan won’t change his tune either and may well be inclined to dig his heels deeper to thwart Alberta’s perceived hostile encroachment. No B.C. Premier ever lost political points standing up to Big Bad Alberta. The real solution to this political and economic quagmire resides somewhere in the Ottawa corridors of powers. The Prime Minister’s Office, to be exact. For months – even after Kinder’s bombshell announcement – Justin Trudeau has clung maddeningly to his favourite bromide, “the pipeline will be built,” while refusing to elaborate on how. He has options. Ottawa could withhold transfers to B.C. until it backs down on the pipeline, as it’s threatening to do with Saskatchewan over a carbon tax. He could ask the Supreme Court to rule on it or declare TMX a matter of national interest under section 92(10)of the Constitution. All three options will likely cost his Liberals seats in B.C., hence his reticence to act. Trudeau’s abdication of responsibility is the paramount reason Alberta is about to become the owner of a paralyzed pipeline. If Rachel Notley wants to resurrect it, she’s going to figure out a way to get the Prime Minister to start caring more about the future of his country than the fate of his government. Good luck to her.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

9


TRUDEAU GOVERNMENT HAS DOUBLE STANDARD FOR FOREIGN OIL IMPORTS // COLIN CRAIG

Trudeau Government has Double Standard for Foreign Oil Imports BY COLIN CRAIG

N

ew documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation show the Trudeau government has rolled out the red carpet for foreign oil imported into Canada while putting regulatory blockades in front of Canadian oil. The situation is not only irrational; it’s costing taxpayers billions – right across Canada. Canadian company TransCanada recently gave up on its Energy East pipeline. The project would have helped offset billions of dollars Eastern Canada spends each year purchasing foreign oil. A 2014 report by the Canadian Energy Research Institute estimated the Energy East pipeline would have contributed $3.5 billion in tax revenue for the federal government alone – money that could have helped pay for health care and other government services across Canada. Not to mention, the project would have created thousands of jobs for skilled labour. But alas, common sense was just not meant to be. After TransCanada spent more than $1 billion planning for the project, and going through the government’s approval process, the federal government announced the pipeline would also be subject to an “upstream and downstream” emissions review. We all know what happened next: TransCanada pulled the plug on the project. Who can blame them? Why would anyone spend another dime dealing with an erratic government that changes the rules halfway through very expensive approval processes? We then decided to file an “access to information” request with Environment and Climate Change Canada for reports and analysis on any “upstream or downstream impacts to

greenhouse gas emissions from foreign oil that is imported to Canada.” The department responded: “After a thorough search, no records were found concerning this request.” We asked Natural Resources Canada, the department of Global Affairs and Transport Canada for the same information. They too informed us they had no such reports. Four departments, four free passes to foreign oil. Why is the government putting up a massive regulatory roadblock in front of Canadian energy companies while giving a free pass for foreign oil? Previously, the Trudeau government helped out Bombardier and Ford with nearly half a billion in financial aid. Considering the two companies produce vehicles that emit significant amounts of carbon dioxide, one might assume those companies would also have gone through an “upstream and downstream” emissions review. But alas, the federal government informed us those companies were also given a free pass. Our country is full of oil – we have the third-largest reserves in the world and yet Eastern Canada is importing 600,000 barrels per day of foreign oil. Why? Largely due to our own government’s immense regulatory hurdles – hurdles foreign oil doesn’t have to jump through. Canadian governments are losing out on billions of dollars in tax revenues from large Canadian oil companies – money the government will still obtain by increasing our taxes. Some people say our country is shooting itself in the foot economically, but what we’ve really done is aim the pistol right at our head.

COLIN CRAIG IS THE INTERIM ALBERTA DIRECTOR FOR THE CANADIAN TAXPAYERS FEDERATION.

10

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


Award Winning, Compassionate Care

Flexible Care Residents of Christenson Communities have access to a variety of onsite medical care services as required, including the option of Alberta Health Services funded care, home care and memory care. Fully Accredited Christenson Communities is committed to providing the highest quality of care and service through: innovation, teamwork, customer satisfaction, best practices and working collaboratively with our healthcare professionals. Our Award Winning Care Provider AdvantAGE Assist won ‘Innovator of the Year’ and ‘Alberta Care Provider of the Year’ in the 2017 Alberta Continuing Care Association (ACCA) Awards.

Learn more at cdlhomes.com or visit the CDLHomes YouTube channel.


ENTRY-LEVEL WAGES ARE THE STARTING POINT NOT THE DESTINATION // AMBER RUDDY

Entry-Level Wages are the Starting Point not the Destination BY AMBER RUDDY

he clock is ticking for Alberta business owners. In less than six months, the province will increase the minimum wage another $1.40 an hour to a nationwide high of $15 per hour.

T

owners effectively earns $15/hr or less, compared to one in five employees. This is in part due to the long hours entrepreneurs regularly put in, with many clocking a 50-plushour workweek.

The government’s campaign, which they call Destination Living Wage, politicizes job creation and frankly promotes a misconception that most people stay in entry-level jobs forever.

So when certain politicians vilify small business owners, casting them as fat cats and scrooges for opposing the minimum wage hike, it hits a big nerve for me.

What’s worse is the move came without any regard for the economic impact this sharp increase would have on the provincial economy.

Many small business owners treat their employees like family. They allow flexibility and personal support that big corporate firms are too bureaucratic and rigid to provide.

Today, almost half of minimum wage earners are young people under the age of 24. For those in our province working in entry-level positions, policies such as tax relief, training programs and education are far more effective than drastically hiking the minimum wage.

In a recent survey of over 1,000 Alberta small business owners, the CFIB asked business owners what changes they have already made as Alberta moves to a $15-an-hour minimum wage.

I remember my first job. I worked at a local coffee shop and was thrilled to be making just over the-then muchlower minimum wage. With this opportunity, I saved for an education and had some pocket money to enjoy leisure activities with my friends. I worked there for four years. In that time, I took on additional responsibilities, earned higher wages, and most importantly, I learned life skills that have stayed with me. With an entry-level wage of $15, it’s hard to imagine someone would have gone through the effort of training me in customer service, time management and even basic skills like organization and being punctual when they could find someone with more expertise at that cost.

Fifty-five per cent have reduced or eliminated hiring plans. Almost half have raised prices. More than 40 per cent have reduced hours, and have cut back on the number of employees. Not exactly a road map to a destination we should be travelling to. Running a small business is not for the faint of heart. Most entrepreneurs will fail in their first year. Many fail more than once. They work incredibly hard, make sacrifices and show the true grit that is part of our Alberta spirit. In the process of chasing their dreams, small business owners are now creating four out of five new jobs in the private sector in our economy. Let’s craft policies that support entrepreneurs not punish them.

Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) analysis shows that almost one in three small business AMBER RUDDY IS THE DIRECTOR OF PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS FOR THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT BUSINESS. SHE CAN BE REACHED AT AMBER.RUDDY@CFIB.CA. FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER @ARUDDY.

12

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


How to Find a REALTOR®

I

t might have taken a little longer this year, but spring has officially started in Edmonton. Spring usually means more people are in the market to buy and sell their homes, which means they’re in the market to find a REALTOR®. A good place to start when choosing a REALTOR® is by asking family and friends for recommendations. You probably have a friend or family member who is a REALTOR®, but you shouldn’t feel pressured to use them just because of your relationship with them. This is a business relationship, and you may not feel comfortable to disclose personal financial information. Or, if you feel you want to change REALTORS® at any point in the process, it may have negative impacts on your personal relationship. You can also use Realtor.ca, newspapers, or social media as you search too. We recommend that you interview at least a couple REALTORS® and make the choice based on the job they can do, not on your relationship. You’re going to be working closely with whomever you choose, so the personality and rapport needs to be the right fit. Some of the questions you can ask are as simple as “tell me about yourself.” You’ll be able to gauge if you’re comfortable with them and their communication style, such as how frequently they will contact you, what method they use most, such as: phone, email, text, etc. Some REALTORS® offer different kinds of services, so ask them to walk you through the process to find out if it’s a good fit for what you’re expecting. Some may also specialize in certain neighbourhoods or style of home (like condo or duplexes). You may also want to find out how many clients they have at the moment, and how much time they’ll be able to spend with you. If you’re a seller, you can also ask them how they would market your property. Knowing how long they’ve been in

Darcy Torhjelm, Chair, REALTORS® Association of Edmonton the business is important, but don’t automatically discount younger, less-experienced REALTORS®, because they may bring a different kind of experience to the table. You need to find the balance for what you’re looking for. This is a job interview for REALTORS®, so don’t be afraid to ask for references, and to check them! The references may be able to answer any lingering questions you might have. Buying or selling your home is probably the biggest financial commitment you’ll ever make so it’s important to work with someone who you trust. You’re looking for a professional to be on your team, someone who understands your needs, who is knowledgeable in the process of buying and selling. Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions until you find the right fit for you.


CHATTERSON // THE POWER OF PRINT

Chatterson: The Power of Print W e’re Chatterson; a boutique research, strategy and marketing firm focused in the niche of real estate building and development. Our hyper-specialized skill set helps us solve challenges and seize opportunities for a wide roster of clients from all sides of the real estate industry including many of Western Canada’s top builders and developers. With offices in both Calgary and Edmonton, we offer in-house research, strategy, creative and videoproduction services to help solve marketing challenges across a number of real estate verticals from homebuilding and land development to seniors’ housing and commercial real estate, and everything in between. That being said, we’re no stranger to printed materials; from sales folders and brochures to various forms of advertising, print is still an important marketing medium in our industry. For most people, a home is one of the biggest purchases of their life, and there is a certainty and security within the sales process when a customer leaves a sales centre or show home with printed information in hand regarding their future community or home. Additionally, it may be surprising to you how many different demographics still pick up a magazine or the homes section in the newspaper to learn about what’s available in their city. We understand the world is changing, but we don’t look at it from a perspective of print versus digital – instead, we look for innovative ways to combine the two to create better marketing tools for our clients, and better experiences for their customers. A recent example of a collaboration of digital and print would be our newest software offering, HOMI. The HOMI application allows customers to choose, build and customize their home, whether single-family or multi-family, in an engaging, intuitive and interactive format. Customers make choices and customizations using a touch screen. However, the pinnacle of the experience takes place via print, when a custom brochure is printed on

the spot, showcasing the customer’s choice of specific floor plan, selection options and price. The power of print is front and centre – without overspending on production costs, or having to deal with unnecessary waste. We believe in continuing to innovate and create the best of both worlds when it comes to print and digital. There is power in utilizing print not only in our industry but also many others. To be innovators, it really is all about looking outside of the box – which we delight in doing at Chatterson.

Likelihood to  No=ce  or  Read  Print  Adver=sements  

Likelihood to Notice or Likelihood to  No=ce  or  Read Read Print Advertisements

Always

8% Always/Oien   35%  

Always Oien  

27%

Oien

Some=mes

82 Rarely

8%

%

47%

16%

Some=mes

Rarely/Never 19%  

OF READERS NOTICE OR READ Never 3%   PRINT ADVERTISMENTS Rarely  

16%

Base: Respondents  who  read  Business  in  Calgary  (n=195)   R3.  How  oUen  would  you  say  you  read  or  take  noGce  to  the  adverGsements  in  Business  in  Calgary?  

14

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM CALGARY // //BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Never

3%


Prime Capital Group has an easy to remember mo�o.

“We’ve Got Your Back” #WGYB It takes moxie to live up to that mo�o – but that’s the kind of person that really thrives at Prime It’s how they live, work, and act every day. It’s also a key reason why for 18 consecu�ve years they’ve con�nued to grow from their Edmonton‐based headquarters, with clients stretching across Canada. Prime specializes in nancing and leasing of equipment— Prime’s clients become more protable and produc�ve. A lease could be used to upgrade older model transporta�on equipment that’s seeing too much shop �me and not enough road �me. Or, for a fabrica�on shop that needs a computerized CNC unit to increase produc�on capacity to support new business. How about an audiologist adding state of the art tes�ng technology equipment? These are all real life scenarios, for real Prime clients. What does #WGYB mean for Prime’s clients? They get the right solu�on, at the right price, with though�ul business advice and service, that makes a difference.

Responsiveness & Transparency. Compe��ve & Crea�ve. These are today’s business tablestakes. Add to this a two decade long reputa�on of going above and beyond for their clients, and you have a winning partnership.

Money is everywhere— but business owners know that accessing capital isn’t SIMPLE Prime’s team have the know‐how to build a solu�on, and the resources to get it over the nish line. Prime’s philosophy of #WGYB isn’t just outward facing—it ’s their 4 word culture deni�on. Based on that kind of culture, it’s no surprise that Prime’s team work, live and give back in their communi�es. Their team’s #WGYBackpack ini�a�ve, launching in May 2018, will ll backpacks with per‐ sonal essen�als to be delivered to local shelters in fall/winter 2018—with a goal to ll 200 backpacks in 2018 and many more in 2019.

Having a nance partner that’s got your back adds value and certainty to your business. Find out how Prime’s team can have YOUR back too.

www.pcclease.com


OFF

THE

Cineplex Expands and Ramps up VIP Treatment in Edmonton Cineplex entertains more than 70 million guests annually across 163 theatres in addition to operating location-based entertainment, such as The Rec Room in Edmonton. In 2012, the brand opened the city’s first Cineplex VIP experience in the new development of Windemere. Recently, it was announced that a second VIP experience would be coming to the Capital City, thanks to the renovation and expansion of Cineplex Odeon North Edmonton Cinemas. “We are always looking for new ways to enhance the movie-going experience and ensure that guests of all ages have a variety of entertainment options to choose from,” says Ellis Jacob, president and CEO, Cineplex. “Our VIP Cinemas are a great way for adults to take time out of their busy lives for a well-deserved break, and with the addition of a brand new menu we just rolled out nationally, it’s safe to say the north Edmonton community is in for a real treat.” Construction on the new theatre is expected to be completed this fall. “The VIP Cinemas experience features specially-designed auditoriums where guests can relax in luxury recliners and have their food and beverage orders delivered right to their seats,” says Cineplex in a press release. “In addition to Cineplex’s famous popcorn, guests can select from an expanded food and beverage menu that features fresh salads and bowls, burgers, artisan pizzas, and indulgent desserts, along with a wide selection of handcrafted cocktails, wines, and premium craft beers. The addition will also feature a new, fully licensed lounge where guests can socialize with friends and enjoy food and drink before or after a movie. The new VIP Cinemas experience will add to a variety of entertainment options offered to movie-lovers at Cineplex Odeon North Edmonton Cinemas, including RealD 3D, UltraAVX, and D-BOX motion seats. The theatre will remain open to the public during the VIP Cinemas renovation and will be renamed once construction is complete.” Cineplex is a publicly traded company (TSX:CGX) and is very proud of its corporate presence. The brand employs more than

12,000 people in North America and is recognized as having one of the Most Admired Corporate Cultures in Canada. Cineplex exercises corporate responsibility by supporting local community initiatives, providing employment opportunities for people with special needs, and by demonstrating environmental leadership with biodegradable and recycled products (food trays, waste bags, film print, etc.). The brand’s root stretches back to 1912, when it launched as the Famous Players Film Corporation. With rebranding and expansion, evolution, and reinvention, the brand now boasts a robust portfolio that includes: Cineplex Odeon, SilverCity, Galaxy Cinemas, Scotiabank Theatres, Cineplex Cinemas, Cineplex VIP Cinemas, Famous Players, and Cinema City. Cineplex also has joint venture interests in a number of subsidiary and joint-venture businesses, including Cineplex Digital Networks, Cineplex Starburst Inc., and SCENE LP. Currently, Edmonton has seven Cineplex theatres, ensuring premium entertainment in every corner of the city. Cineplex looks forward to enhancing Edmonton’s entertainment experience when its latest theatre in the city opens in the fall.

ABOVE: CINEPLEX PATRONS ENJOYING A VIP EXPERIENCE. PHOTO SOURCE: CINEPLEX

16

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


Breaking Away

Mud, Sweat and Gears Opens Edmonton Store

I

n changing times for many retail landscapes, stiff competition for consumers, and a tough economy, one thing remains constant for success: providing a great service, having a great team, and having great products. At least for Mud, Sweat and Gears’ owner Paul Burgess, that’s the mantra that clearly seems to be working as he opened his fourth location in late March. The Edmonton store is now the largest of the privately held group of stores, but the small shop feel still resonates with the service staff provide. “Without question, the single most important reason for our success is the team of people that lead the charge for Mud, Sweat and Gears, many of whom have been with us for the last decade,” says Burgess. “In an industry that is constantly innovating with new products and expanding user options, having a team dedicated to sharing their knowledge and experience to help customers is essential.” Having the right mix of products for all riding styles is also important for having a one-stop experience. With well-known industry brands like Trek, Kona,

Sherwood Park 133 Main Blvd 780-449-2453

Norco, Electra, and Rocky Mountain bikes on hand, and premium boutique brands like Santa Cruz, Pivot, Transition, and Evil Bikes, there is certainly something for every consumer. With the new location, having a good supply chain has also challenged the growth of the company; however, with increased warehousing space and an extensive inventory ready for the spring rush, the business is well placed for success. What started out as a love for cycling has grown into a passion for seeing the business grow and succeed. Burgess feels the challenges of growth energizes the staff and it becomes a real team building endeavour to figure out the logistics. With these challenges many of the senior staff have advanced into management roles, which provides each of them a great long-term opportunity. The new location, located at 15007 Stony Plain Road, and with the original location in Sherwood Park, and stores in Spruce Grove and Red Deer, there is good market coverage for the growing business.

Spruce Grove 124 1st Ave 780-571-2855

Red Deer 7121-E 50th Ave 403-340-2463

www.mudsweatandgears.ca

Edmonton 15007 Stony Plain Rd 780-483-2188


OFF

THE

Virtual Reality Opens Up Shaw Conference Centre’s Accessibility

T

he Shaw Conference Centre (SCC) is owned by the City of Edmonton and managed by Edmonton Economic Development. More than 650 events, attracting half a million guests, take place at SCC each year. SCC events generate more than $40 million in annual spending across the province. Previously, event planners traveled to SCC to see what the venue had to offer and tour the rooms. Now, planners across the world can experience SCC without stepping foot inside the venue – thanks to Full Circle Visuals’ fully immersive 360° virtual reality tour. Full Circle Visuals is a local company that produces high-end 360° video and virtual reality experiences for businesses and media organizations. The company was founded by Ryan Jackson, an innovator and pioneer in 360° video technology and one of the most awarded multimedia photojournalists in Canada. Full Circle Visuals is also a Startup Edmonton launch party featured company. With the virtual tour, guests, event planners, or anyone that would like to experience SCC and its view of the River Valley can simply don custom-branded Google Cardboard glasses, access the SCC app, and “step” inside the venue. “The tour allows planners from anywhere in the world to see what the venue’s event spaces look like from a variety of vantage points and setups, including banquets, meetings, and weddings. Additionally, planners who are visiting the convention centre will be able stand in an empty hall and experience the space as if an event were occurring,” SCC promoted in a media statement. The glasses will be provided to regional, national, and international meeting and event planners by SCC and Edmonton Tourism. “We are thrilled to be leading the way and to be one of the first convention centres in North America to fully leverage this technology,” says Richard Wong, general manager, SCC. “The 360° experience enhances the ability of our sales team

to showcase Edmonton as a meetings and conventions destination.” “This is a great practical use of VR technology,” says Ryan Jackson, president and creative director of Full Circle Visuals. “We hope to save event planners time by allowing them to virtually look around and see what the SCC actually looks like instead of viewing traditional still images and floor plans.” The new virtual reality experience is expected to positively increase the use of, and engagement with, SCC. The Edmonton Economic Development Corporation, SCC, Urban Economy (Startup Edmonton) and Edmonton Tourism will continue to work together on initiatives that generate economic impact and increase awareness of what the city of Edmonton has to offer. The tour is accessible through the Shaw Conference Centre App in the Apple and Google Play store. An immersive and interactive web tour is also available at https://bit. ly/2HfPJLx. Learn more about SCC at shawconferencecentre.com, Full Circle Visuals at fullcirclevisuals.com, Edmonton Economic Development at eedc.ca, and Startup Edmonton at www. startupedmonton.com.

ABOVE: VIRTUAL TECHNOLOGY KITS DEVELOPED LOCALLY FOR SHAW CONFERENCE CENTER GIVES THE WORLD A MUCH CLOSER LOOK AT THE VENUE.

18

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


Ï€ OVER 165 GLOVE STYLES ALWAYS IN STOCK

COMPLETE CATALOG

1-800-295-5510

GET AN EXTRA BOOST FROM THE BACKYARD WITH

A LUSH MIX OF FRESHLY JUICED LEMONS, GINGER, KALE, APPLES AND SPINACH! FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY AT

CANADIAN BORN, BLENDED WORLDWIDE

BOOSTERJUICE.COM BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

19


EPCOR RiverFest Returns After Making Its Inaugural Splash

R

eturning for its second year, EPCOR RiverFest will take place on August 11 (Edmonton) and 12 (Devon and Fort Saskatchewan).

Last year was EPCOR RiverFest’s first appearance on the festival city’s scene, with an event designed to highlight the many ways people can safely enjoy the river valley. Created by the River Valley Alliance (RVA) – a non-profit organization established to coordinate the planning, funding and development of the river valley trail system through a balanced approach of preserve, protect, and enhance – and with EPCOR as the festival’s title sponsor, the inaugural EPCOR RiverFest won an Edmonton Event Award for best non-profit/community event. Last year EPCOR RiverFest attracted 2,700 people to its Edmonton, Devon, and Fort Saskatchewan events, with more than 1,500 of the participants enjoying the river for the first time on an organized raft float. This year, the organizers are hoping to attract 3,000 people to join them on the river. At EPCOR RiverFest, participants will enjoy activities on and off the water, including: paddling, interactive nature and science activities, introductions to land sports like cycling, and a variety of exhibitors with a connection to the river valley. The highlight of the event again this year is a float down the North Saskatchewan River that participants register for online in advance.

resources. The RVA is thrilled to be working with the title sponsor in such a hands-on way. “EPCOR provides some unique and integral bandwidth when it comes to executing the event,” says Brent Collingwood, executive director, River Valley Alliance. “We’re a small non-profit and we work closely with strong partners, like the municipalities that border the North Saskatchewan River, and now with EPCOR, who care about the river and the river valley and making it accessible for everyone to enjoy.” “As Edmonton’s water, wastewater, and drainage provider, we care passionately about our river,” explains Gillian Adams, senior manager, corporate marketing for EPCOR. “This event is something we really believe in. The North Saskatchewan River is where our drinking water comes from and we want to protect it. The more people get the chance to experience our river and love it, the more they will help us protect it.” Opportunities for corporate sponsorships are still open for this year’s EPCOR RiverFest. To learn more about how your company can get involved, or how you can enjoy the festivities, visit epcorriverfest.ca. To learn more about the RVA, visit rivervalley.ab.ca.

As part of the sponsorship, EPCOR is providing 250 inflatable RiverFest branded rafts and helping to plan and execute the Edmonton event. The North Saskatchewan River is at the core of EPCOR’s business and they believe it is critically important for people to understand the need to protect water

epcorriverfest.ca


Edmonton August 11 Proudly brought to you by:

Fort Saskatchewan August 12 HOSTS City of Edmonton City of Fort Saskatchewan Town of Devon

WE’LL SEE YOU ON THE RIVER

Devon August 12 SUPPORTERS Leduc County Parkland County Strathcona County Sturgeon County

For more information visit epcorriverfest.ca


RISKY BUSINESS // RISK MANAGEMENT

Risky Business BY NERISSA MCNAUGHTON

NEARLY 50 PER CENT OF NEW BUSINESSES FAIL BY THEIR FIFTH YEAR. THE CAUSE, SAYS TOM CASTONGUAY, CFP, SHELTER BAY FINANICAL, IS A LACK OF PLANNING.

The Biggest Risk – Failure to Plan Nearly 50 per cent of new businesses fail by their fifth year. The cause, says Tom Castonguay, CFP, Shelter Bay Finanical, is a lack of planning. “Businesses exist to make money, but the drivers behind the profit are multifaceted,” says Castonguay. “One has to consider all the factors that could affect your business. Risks include: the owner becoming disabled; a falling out with or the sudden death of a shareholder; the death of a person that is key to the business, such as a top salesperson or someone with a specialized skill; etc. Demand for your product may be high, but risks management largely determines your success or failure.” He’s provided plenty of small business owners with disability, critical illness, key person, and other insurance policies that are vital to the self-employed, and for business owners. Castonguay affirms, “The only way to beat the odds is to anticipate risks and plan for them.”

22

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


DEVLIN CONSTRUCTION LTD AND ICON READY MIX LTD PRESENT

4TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT

THURSDAY JUNE 21, 2018 BROADMOOR PUBLIC GOLF COURSE, SHERWOOD PARK, AB This event has raised more than $112,035.00 in just three years to support The Stollery Children’s Hospital. Moving forward in 2018 100% of all net proceeds will go to funding and expanding Strathcona County Community Hospital.

Please join us in this event as we raise funds and continue or mission to bring Hope, Faith and Love to those children and families needing a brighter day in their darkest hour of need.

CONTACT SCLYNE@GOLFDEVLIN.COM TO REGISTER OR VISIT WWW.GOLFDEVLIN.COM

DO BUSI NESS ACROSS

T H E DI N N E R TA B L E, NOT THE CONFERENCE TABLE.

PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR LUNCH & DINNER When you book a private party at Ruth’s Chris, know that every detail, every nuance, every request that you and our team plan together will be executed flawlessly.

Edmonton • 780.990.0123 • 9990 Jasper Ave.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

23


RISKY BUSINESS // RISK MANAGEMENT

CASTONGUAY AFFIRMS, “THE ONLY WAY TO BEAT THE ODDS IS TO ANTICIPATE RISKS AND PLAN FOR THEM.”

Risk Management and Risk Managers Teresa R. Costouros, MBA, FCIP, CRM, associate professor, Insurance and Risk Management at MacEwan University, teaches students how to manage risks. “A risk manager makes and implements decisions to minimize the detrimental impact of losses on an organization,” says Costouros. “Risk assessment is a fundamental step within the risk management process. Loss exposures must be first identified and then assessed. Identified loss exposures are assessed to determine the likely frequency and/or severity to determine how often each particular exposure might occur and how small or large it may be. Then, decisions can be made on how to protect the organization against such occurrences. “To decide on the best strategy, a proper risk assessment must be made. Following that, decisions can be made on whether to prevent or reduce the occurrence, and what steps one should have in place to pay for occurrences that do happen. This could include paying for losses from the company’s own resources or an agreement to transfer the risk to someone else, often an insurance company.

“Once the decisions are made on what techniques should be in place, it is the role of a risk manager to implement, monitor and modify the stratagems. A risk manager should be part of the senior management team so that the objectives of the risk management department are informed and aligned with the organizational objectives.” Costouros points out common risks that businesses often overlook. “Companies with employees using their own personal vehicles for work activities can be held liable for losses caused by the employee while on the job. Companies may assume that, since it is the employee’s vehicle, the employee’s car insurance would pay the loss. While it is true that the employee’s insurance would come into play, what if they didn’t have auto insurance? Or if the limit of liability was not high enough to cover the loss? A person injured in an automobile accident has three sources to sue: the owner of the vehicle, the driver of the vehicle, and the driver’s employer if the driver was operating the vehicle in the course of their employment. “Cyber crime is on everyone’s minds now, but another important coverage that might be overlooked is an extension under a crime insurance policy called social engineering

ABOVE: TOM CASTONGUAY, CFP, SHELTER BAY FINANICAL.

24

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


fraud coverage. Without this extension, an insurer might deny a loss where the insured company’s employee is tricked by a convincing fraudster to wire or transfer funds to them by impersonating a legitimate company. An insurer could argue that it wasn’t direct fraud since the employee willingly sent the money.” When should a risk manager be hired? Costouros explains, “Smaller organizations often consult with their insurance broker or agent for risk management advice, and this brings value to the organizational risk management in a cost-effective way. However, this focus may be more on insurance than on all other aspects of risk management, primarily the loss prevention and control functions. “It is not uncommon for a financial executive, such as a comptroller or VP of finance, to handle the risk management functions. Since they are responsible for purchasing insurance protection, they are often assigned this responsibility as well. Whatever the case may be, it is ideal if someone well versed in the field of risk management is responsible for this role. If not, it may concentrate only on the purchase of insurance and not be inclusive of all the other components of risk management. “As a company grows to midsize and beyond, having a risk manager as part of the executive team is crucial for the success of the company.”

NEW ADDED SERVICE OF TEAM COURIER!! Team Courier now has the “EasyShipNTrack” delivery web application.

This allows you to: • Schedule – select date/time when deliveries are required • Track – know the status of your deliveries (with electronic proof of deliveries if required) • Manage – electronic waybills / paperless invoices • 10% off on first 30 day trial

Contact Pat today and we will email you the Team Courier Manual to get you started. Totally transparent, encrypted website for safe usage, fast and very user-friendly. Locally created, custom program.

Ph: 780.446.0886 • Email: teamcourierservices@shaw.ca BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

25


RISKY BUSINESS // RISK MANAGEMENT

RISK MANAGEMENT DOESN’T STOP WHEN THE THREATS ARE IDENTIFIED. THE PROCESS EXTENDS THROUGH AN INCIDENT AND CLAIMS PROCESS. Risk management doesn’t stop when the threats are identified. The process extends through an incident and claims process. “When making an insurance claim for something very challenging, company owners must be prepared to fully cooperate with their insurance provider,” advises Costouros. “Be prepared to provide many details about the loss and be fully transparent. A good relationship with the insurance carrier is beneficial and should be fostered throughout the time the relationship exists. Remember that the claim will be settled on the basis of the contract wording. Do not view the insurer in an adversarial perspective, but rather as the party who will indemnify you for a legitimate claim, as contractually promised.” Like Castonguay, Costouros knows that planning ahead is vital. “Due diligence for the risk manager does not happen once the loss occurs, but should take place pre-loss. Before purchasing insurance coverage, be sure you understand fully what your loss exposures are, what protection you need, and what you expect your insurance policy to cover. When communicating and negotiating with your insurance broker or agent and/or the insurance company, get all your questions answered about what is and what is not covered. “Keep complete and accurate documentation about these conversations so your file will provide appropriate background supporting your expectations and understanding. Also, make sure you comply with all requirements following a loss, usually clearly stated in the policy. Whether the claim is complex or simple, be prepared by understanding what coverage you have purchased and how the claims process works.”

26

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

Risk Management in Action Providing an excellent example of risk management in action, Trinus is a busy computer repair and service provider celebrating 20 years in business. The company’s mission is to provide reliable, client-focused, stress-free IT solutions and services. Dave White, president and co-founding partner, notes, “As Trinus grows, it becomes added responsibility as more families are depending on our business acumen to keep staff healthy and happily employed. Each day brings new challenges, but I view them as opportunities, especially in light of our vision, mission, and values. For example, we are undertaking a $500,000 expansion this year to improve our facilities and data center.” In his experience, he sees that business owners don’t often have a clear and concise vision, mission, and set of values (VMV) as part of their planning process. “While our VMV are intrinsic to the founding members of the company, as the business grows, new staff do not always know them – and it takes time for them to learn them by understanding the culture of the company. Having VMVs keeps the business on track; new initiatives and business ventures can be measured against the original vision and mission.” In addition to managing risks with the VMVs, Trinus has identified and mitigated threats to its operations. “Trinus identified [the loss of a key person risk] three years ago,” confirms White. “We now have plans in place where we have redundancy in key positions. We accomplished this by cross-training key staff members, and many of the key management decisions are made in ‘committee’ so more


RISKY BUSINESS // RISK MANAGEMENT

than one person is aware of the corporate background that leads to a management decision. “Trinus purposely built and implemented a succession plan that protects the core operations of the business. It also allows for a smooth transition as part of the ownership group retires or moves out of active operational roles. “Disaster recovery is part of our operational plans, especially with our client data center and cloud hosting operations. “We also have shareholder’s agreement in place. However, the key to integrating new ownership is to thoroughly understand the motivations and integrity of any potential partner. Over the past six years, we have successfully integrated two new business partners, but more importantly,

we’ve rejected one possible applicant as being unsuited to Trinus’ culture and long-term goals.”

Take Charge Business owners cannot escape risks, but they can plan for and mitigate them. Should disaster strike, having an established plan of action that takes into account the financial and stability impacts to your company will see you through. Risks are damaging, but with careful planning, they don’t have to be devastating.

ANNOUNCEMENT Ray Pisani, President and CEO of Alberta Blue Cross, is pleased to announce the appointment of Scott Thon as Chair of the Board of Directors of ABC Benefits Corporation, effective March 13, 2018. Scott has served on the Board of ABC Benefits Corporation since 2012. He is President and CEO of AltaLink, a Berkshire Hathaway Energy Company, and has over 30 years of leadership experience in the electricity industry. Scott’s strong record of prior service includes serving on the board of the Canadian Electricity Association, Northview Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust and Calgary Stampede Foundation. He’s also a member of the City of Scott Thon Calgary’s 2026 Olympic Bid Advisory Council. He is a recipient of the Business in Calgary Magazine Leader’s Award, Bow Valley College Distinguished Citizen Award, Calgary Chamber of Commerce Sherrold Moore Award and the Alberta Centennial Medal. Alberta Blue Cross is the largest health benefits provider in Alberta and one of the largest in Western Canada, serving more than 1.7 million Albertans and Alberta-based employers with coverage through over 5,700 small and large group benefit plans, individual health plans and government-sponsored programs. As a not-for-profit organization with a unique Legislative mandate to support and promote the health and wellness of Albertans, it is ranked as one of Alberta’s most loved brands and as one of Alberta’s most respected organizations.

ab.bluecross.ca ®* The Blue Cross symbol and name are registered marks of the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans, an association of independent Blue Cross plans. Licensed to ABC Benefits Corporation for use in operating the Alberta Blue Cross Plan. ® † Blue Shield is a registered trade-mark of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. ABC 81514 2018/04

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

27


JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME // COVER

Junior Achievement ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME’S 2018 LAUREATES

BY NERISSA MCNAUGHTON

N

ow in its 38th year, Junior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame continues to honour the leaders that enhance our business

28

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

landscape while being active in the community and mentoring others. This year’s inductees are: Donald A. Wheaton Sr., Dr. Ray Muzyka, Dr. Greg Zeschuk, and Jim Carter.


JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME // COVER

Donald A. Wheaton Sr. The Wheaton Group of Companies started with a General Motors dealership in 1955. Today, the family owns one of the largest dealership networks in Canada and has diversified into the financial services business, aviation services, and real estate sectors. Donald A. Wheaton Sr. joined the family business after graduating from university in 1975. “The thing that stands out the most to me was starting our finanical services side of our business,” says Wheaton, “specifically, our starting of our bank. We have a bank called The General Bank of Canada. Until recently, no individual in Canada could own more than 20 per cent of a bank. That’s why there is a limited number of banks in Canada. They changed those rules about 12 years ago. At that time, our family decided to make an application for a bank charter and became (and remain) the first and only privately held bank in the country.” The Wheaton Group is adamant about contributing to the communities in which it operates. We want to give back, not just dollars, but by getting personally involved in making the communities better places to live,” Wheaton says of the company’s support of United Way, University of Alberta Hospital Foundation, YMCA, educational initiatives, and more. “I’ve been living in Edmonton virtually all my life,” Wheaton continues. “I’ve brought up my family here. It’s a wonderful and safe place to raise a family and do business. Our family is entrepreneurial; in Edmonton, we have the benefit of being a part of the resource-based economy. Business for us in Edmonton is quite good, even though the city goes through the economic cycles. It’s my view that one of the most important things in growing and operating a successful business is challenging yourself to the question of how to keep your business young. We work hard at that.” In addition to being thrilled about the Junior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame induction, Wheaton has a personal reason for being excited about the

“WE WANT TO GIVE BACK, NOT JUST DOLLARS, BUT BY GETTING PERSONALLY INVOLVED IN MAKING THE COMMUNITIES BETTER PLACES TO LIVE.” honour. “My father was an inductee and a laureate in 2000. My father was there 18 years ago, and now I’m a part of it.” Wheaton thanks his wife Kim, his business partners, and all those that support the Wheaton Group from coast to coast. “In my case, I’m a second-generation entrepreneurial family, and we are integrating in the third generation,” he concludes. “We are really fortunate to be living in the part of the world that we do and we have much to be thankful for.”

PHOTO SOURCE: EPIC PHOTOGRAPHY INC.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

29


JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME // COVER

Dr. Ray Muzyka Dr. Ray Muzyka, BMedSci, MD, CCFP, MBA, is the founder and CEO of ThresholdImpact and the co-founder and former CEO of BioWare. While in medical school, Dr. Muzyka, Dr. Greg Zeschuk, and Dr. Augustine Yip collaborated and successfully sold two medical education projects (an acid-base physiology simulator and a gastroenterology patient simulator). “We realized through the development and sale of those projects that we enjoyed business and developing software, but the medical education market was challenging at that time to find paying customers – so we decided to form, of all things, a video game developer, as that was a hobby for Greg and myself growing up,” says Dr. Muzyka. “After two years of full time rural locum tenens, I worked part time as a medical doctor for a decade in rural ER and family medicine while also serving full time as BioWare’s CEO – my career became my hobby and my hobby became my career. Greg and I jointly ran the company for the next two decades through our first external financing in 2005 via private equity group Elevation Partners, and our later acquisition by Electronic Arts (EA) in 2007. We both retired in 2012 after five years at the BioWare division of EA.” BioWare is a major brand known globally for games such as Dragon Age and Mass Effect, along with partnerships with Hasbro and LucasArts. Dr. Muzyka continues, “After a decade in medical practice and, overlapping with that, two decades helping to grow BioWare, I was ready for something new. In my third career chapter at ThresholdImpact, I’m focused on angel investing and providing mentorship to entrepreneurs in technology, medical innovations, and social enterprise.” He is proud to live, and have grown BioWare, in Edmonton. “Edmonton, Alberta and Canada are all great places to grow a business and build a life. We’re lucky to have strong social support systems in health care and education, a diverse and tolerant society, and a strong rule of law that enables entrepreneurs to thrive.”

30

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

“It’s humbling,” he notes about the Junior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame induction, “to be named to such an auspicious list amongst so many legendary business people. I’m honoured to be inducted and feel lucky to have been able to work with so many great people at BioWare and ThresholdImpact over the past three decades. “I’d like to thank my wife Leona De Boer for her years of support and love, as well as my parents, Alexander and Adelle Muzyka, for helping instill in me a strong work ethic and life-long passion for learning, as well as their parents for inspiring me to become an entrepreneur. Also, I want to thank my fellow co-founders of BioWare – Augustine and especially my long-term business colleague and great friend Greg, and all the great teams across all of BioWare’s studios and Electronic Arts. I’d also like to thank BioWare’s and BioWare EA’s publishing and business partners, and all the amazing entrepreneurs and exemplary fellow investors I’m privileged to be able to work with since 2012 at ThresholdImpact.”


Everything Counts PRIVATE ENTERPRISE With new rules around passive investment income and income sprinkling, you need to make sure your tax strategy is up to date and working for you. At MNP we look at every detail. We know the requirements and will customize a strategy that effectively minimizes your tax obligations with solutions that are practical for your specific business - putting more revenue to your bottom line.

CANADIAN BUSINESSES

are Facing More Challenging Tax Environments To see how even the smallest details in your tax strategy can really add up, contact Mark Bernard, CPA, CA, at 780.453.5388 or mark.bernard@mnp.ca

MNP.ca


JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME // COVER

Dr. Greg Zeschuk Dr. Greg Zeschuk is the co-founder of BioWare and the CEO of Blind Enthusiasm Group. When Dr. Zeschuk went into medicine, he didn’t realize that he preferred to build things. He did know, however, that he and his friends were very much into video games. “It was making medical education software that led to the creation of BioWare,” says Dr. Zeschuk. “This was before computers were a career. Today, I would have gone into computer science, but you didn’t see that in the 80s in Edmonton, so we went to medicine. However, Ray and I flipped our hobby and career and started making software. Then we decided to give video games a shot. I joked that we could fall back on medicine if we needed to. It was a wonderful ride. The experience at BioWare was unbeatable and I’m very proud of the product we made. At the end of the day, when it came to making games, hundreds of people worked on the projects. Ray and I are really proud of working with all these teams. Many people [from BioWare] have gone on to do amazing things. Some have started their own companies, some work at videogame companies all over the world, and some work in film at places like Pixar and ILM.” Dr. Zeschuk continues, “Ray and I sold BioWare to Electronic Arts in 2007, but stayed on for five years. In the end, however, we didn’t like working for a big corporation; we wanted to be entrepreneurial. We left BioWare in 2012. When I knew I was leaving BioWare, I started thinking about my next career; I wanted to try something different.” Since making a career out of a hobby worked the first time, Dr. Zeschuk decided to build his third career around another favourite pastime: beer. “Not just drinking beer, but the science and creation of it,” he points out. “My goal was to create something in a neighbourhood, not in an entertainment district or in an industrial area. I discovered that, for zoning, I had to have a restaurant, not just a brewery.” That’s how Blind Enthusiasm brewery, and the restaurant Biera was born. Professional highlights for Dr. Zeschuk include the creation

of Baldur’s Gate (at BioWare) as the game’s success was the point he knew he could quit his day job in medicine. Another milestone was receiving a game of the year award from the International Game Developers Association for Star Wars: The Old Republic. He concludes, “I love the mindset, energy, and excitement of the people in Edmonton. I was born here and grew up here. I lived in the States for short stints but see and love Edmonton’s can-do, entrepreneurial spirit. I also love the outdoors; Edmonton is a great place to play and a great place to work.” When Dr. Zeschuk learned about the Junior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame induction, he was fly fishing in Chile. “It feels like I have to retire now,” he jokes about his surprised reaction to the news. “I’d like to thank BioWare,” he concludes. “Everything we did there was a team effort, just as now at the restaurant and brewery, it is a team effort.” I’d also like to thank my wife, who has been very patient with my antics over the years and very understanding of my need to build and make things. I also thank my business partner and great friend, Ray Muzyka.”

PHOTO SOURCE: EPIC PHOTOGRAPHY INC.

32

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT ALBERTA & NWT ALBERTA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME // COVER

Jim Carter Jim Carter is the former president and COO of Syncrude Canada, and now in retirement, he sits on the boards of five major corporations: Finning International, ATB Finanical, EllisDon Construction, Irving Oil Ltd., and Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services. He is also on the board of SureHire Occupational Testing Services and Crestwynd Exploration Ltd. “I started at Syncrude in 1979, after being recruited to start the truck and shovel operation to remove overburden,” says Carter. “I worked there for 28 years, retiring in April 2007.” He has many fond memories and milestones about his time at Syncrude. “The foundational milestone for me was the success we had in bringing big trucks and shovels into the oil sands; that became the foundation for future mining methods.” Carter continues, “The idea of trucks and shovels led us to the development of double roll crushers and hydro transport (mixing product with water and pipelining it into the plant instead of conveying it). This reduced the amount of energy required for transport and lowered the temperature of the extraction process for the bitumen to free itself from the sand. Once we lowered the temperature, we could have mines located further away from the upgrader. “Syncrude’s success helped to refine and develop Alberta’s opportunities in the oil sands. We were the largest early player in the business. We were involved in what needed to happen to make oil sands an economically viable opportunity.” Carter has lived in Alberta since 1974 and thinks, “It’s a wonderful province with a very good history of entrepreneurship and a pioneering spirit. Albertans need to be more vocal in approaching the value that is created in the province. The silent majority should speak out and be proud of what Alberta has done and should declare to the world that we develop our resources in an environmentally responsible way. Hold your head high and do not to go around apologizing for having a resource economy.” He was surprised and very humbled by his Junior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame

“THE FOUNDATIONAL MILESTONE FOR ME WAS THE SUCCESS WE HAD IN BRINGING BIG TRUCKS AND SHOVELS INTO THE OIL SANDS; THAT BECAME THE FOUNDATION FOR FUTURE MINING METHODS.” induction. “When I look at my colleagues this year and in the past, I am very honoured. I was delighted to hear about [the induction] and it is something I’m very proud of.” Carter thanks the people he has worked with in the past and present, and those that nominated him for the Junior Achievement Alberta & NWT Alberta Business Hall of Fame honour.

PHOTO SOURCE: EPIC PHOTOGRAPHY INC.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

33


THE FUTURE IN AUTOMATED TRANSPORTATION IS NOW // TRANSPORTATION

THE FUTURE IN AUTOMATED TRANSPORTATION IS NOW — ARE OUR INDUSTRIES READY? BY LAURA BOHNERT

W

e’re in a world full of innovations that are shifting our technological landscape from easy to automatic: from automated banking apps to cars that can park themselves—but are we ready for our vehicles to drive for us, too? The potential is becoming a reality, one that carries a new range of possibility for Alberta’s industries. “Like many sectors, there is a huge future for autonomous machinery in agriculture,” says Renn Breitkreuz, chair of

Alberta Canola, an organization that is governed by a board of directors consisting of 12 farmers from across the province. Breitkreuz is also a farmer near Onoway, Alberta. “Currently,” he continues, “many agricultural field machines use auto-steer technology, which allows the machine to use GPS signals to drive itself down the field. The operator is in the seat and monitors the machine, oversees the task it is doing, and assists with maneuvering around obstacles. The

ABOVE: TRANSPORT CANADA RESEARCH VEHICLE.

34

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


YOUR NEW OFFICE SPACE

COMFORT SEATING COMPLIMENTARY ONBOARD WI-FI CHARGING STATIONS AT EVERY SEAT FOLD DOWN TRAY TABLES

MAKE TRAVEL TIME PRODUCTIVE TIME. ASK ABOUT OUR CORPORATE ACCOUNTS!

www.redarrow.ca 1-800-232-1958


THE FUTURE IN AUTOMATED TRANSPORTATION IS NOW // TRANSPORTATION

next generation, currently at the early prototype stage, is fully autonomous machines that don’t require a human operator.” Breitkreuz continues, “Current auto-steer technology assists with reducing operator fatigue and reduces overlap, allowing for more precise and efficient application of crop nutrition and protection products. The reduction in overlap reduces the environmental load of crop inputs and saves farmers money. The next generation of autonomous machinery will assist in mitigating the labour shortage that affects many industries in Canada. Furthermore, as sensor technology continues to improve, there are anticipated opportunities for autonomous machines that can self-maneuver around a field, and when they sense a weed, they can apply a targeted stream of herbicide. Alternatively, these machines may be able to mechanically cultivate a weed when it is sensed.” Canola is more than a successful industry. Breitkreuz points

out, “Canola has surpassed wheat to be the most important crop for western Canadian farmers. There are 43,000 canola farmers in Canada, and the entire canola industry is worth $26.7 billion per year to the national economy, providing about 250,000 jobs.” A big part of canola’s success boils down to its ability to innovate. “The early commercialization and adoption of new agricultural techniques is our competitive advantage,” he explains. “Relative to our global competitors, we have a short growing season and are a long distance from markets. Our grain products need to travel on a long train trip through the Rocky Mountains in the heart of winter to get to export position. Despite these commercial difficulties, our ability to innovate allows us to achieve a productivity per farmer that is second to none. Consequently, Canadian farms have been able to survive

ABOVE: SAMPLE INTERFACE DESIGNED TO SHOW MESSAGES THAT CAN BE COMMUNICATED TO THE DRIVER INSIDE THE VEHICLE.

36

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


When you’re not moving, you’re not making money. We want to help you get where you need to go, without unexpected downtime. That’s why Fountain Tire takes extra time to find the right tire to fit your needs, so you can save time down the road. Email corporatesales@fountaintire.com for more information.

Featured Tires KELLY ARMORSTEEL MSD

GOODYEAR G282 MSD

Mixed Service Drive tire for all-around on/off road performance.

Traction drive tire for enhanced all weather performance for long and short hauls in both on and off road applications.

DUNLOP SP881

GOODYEAR G741

Durable on/off road drive tire with long original tread life and retreadability.

Aggressive self-cleaning tread design for premium traction in all terrain.

®™ Trademarks of AM Royalties Limited Partnership used under license by LoyaltyOne, Co. and Goodyear Canada Inc.


THE FUTURE IN AUTOMATED TRANSPORTATION IS NOW // TRANSPORTATION

automated vehicles could make up a large part of the vehicles on the road within 15 to 20 years. If the pace is slower, it could take 30+ years for fully automated vehicles to make up the majority of cars on Edmonton roads,” McCabe adds. However, regardless of the time frame, the future of driverless transportation has already begun to take hold in Edmonton. McCabe points out, “Some automated vehicle technologies, such as adaptive cruise control, are already available on the market. Other more advanced technologies are still being developed. Vehicles that can drive themselves in any situation with no human intervention may be decades away, but they could emerge sooner, and less advanced but still powerful technologies will emerge more quickly.

Innovative machinery may have enabled farming industries like canola to take on a new competitive edge, but the possibilities for driverless technology don’t stop there. As Stephanie McCabe, branch manager, corporate strategy, City of Edmonton explains, “Automated vehicles will almost certainly be part of the future of transportation.”

“The City is currently partnering with the University of Alberta, who is testing connected vehicle technology in a few locations across Edmonton. Connected vehicles use wireless mobile devices to exchange information in real time with roadside equipment like traffic lights or message signs, and with other vehicles. Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) use new and emerging technology to reduce congestion, save money, improve safety, and reduce environmental impacts in all areas of transportation.”

“Simple models based on Edmonton vehicle statistics suggest that, if adoption of automated vehicles is very rapid, fully

“In many aspects, today’s vehicles are already connected devices,” agrees Dr. Tony Qiu, associate professor and director

and thrive in the crucible of the global marketplace, even against lower-cost producers. Furthermore, our reputation for producing high quality and affordable food serves us well in the global marketplace.”

ABOVE: MAP OF ACTIVE TEST BED LOCATIONS IN EDMONTON. PHOTO SOURCE: ALBERTA TRANSPORTATION

38

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


THE FUTURE IN AUTOMATED TRANSPORTATION IS NOW // TRANSPORTATION

of The Centre for Smart Transportation at the University of Alberta. “In the near future, vehicles will interact or ‘talk’ directly with each other and the road infrastructure (such as traffic lights). This interaction will allow road users and traffic management agencies to share information and use it to coordinate their actions and responses. This cooperative element—enabled by digital connectivity among vehicles and among vehicles and infrastructure—is expected to significantly improve road safety, travel efficiency, and the driving experience.” “Our flagship project in the field of connected vehicles is *ACTIVE-AURORA (ACTIVE: Alberta Cooperative Transportation Infrastructure and Vehicular Environment; AURORA: Automotive test bed for Reconfigurable and Optimized Radio Access), Canada’s first connected vehicle test bed network,” Qiu explains. “ACTIVE-AURORA is a unique collaboration among Transport Canada, Alberta Transportation, City of Edmonton, University of Alberta, University of British Columbia, and several industry partners.” Currently, ACTIVE has real-world test beds in various locations in Edmonton, including sections of Anthony Henday Drive, Whitemud Drive, and 23rd Ave. “The test bed network affords a unique opportunity to address capacity constraints and bottlenecks on the transportation network to improve Alberta’s and Canada’s international trade flows; to advance knowledge and understanding of multimodal transportation systems; and to enhance the capacity, safety, security, efficiency and environmental performance of provincial and national transportation networks,” Qiu explains. “Connected vehicle (CV) technology is one of the latest and most exciting developments within intelligent transportation systems (ITS),” adds Qiu. “CV technology enables vehicles to communicate critical, potentially life-saving, real-time information (e.g. location, speed, inclement weather, adverse road conditions) with other vehicles and surrounding infrastructure via wireless networks. Because of its ability to receive, predict, and communicate real-time road and weather condition information, CV technology has the potential to greatly improve operational safety and efficiency on Alberta’s

and Canada’s transportation networks, impacting not only the agencies that manage these networks, but also the travellers who use them. “Connected and automated vehicle technologies will also have a transformative impact on ride sharing and car sharing operations, in light of the rise of companies such as Uber and Lyft. Cooperative transportation systems utilizing innovative technologies and strategies will enable Canada to remain globally competitive in technology development and trade. With ACTIVE-AURORA and the collaboration of several different organizations, Edmonton is at the forefront, playing an active role in the evolution of transportation.” “All of these technologies could impact the way people move in Edmonton,” McCabe observes—and that could also mean changing the cityscape. “Automated vehicles may make our roads safer by drastically reducing the number of accidents caused by human error,” suggests McCabe, thereby “reducing the number of accidents, leading to less traffic congestion and, in turn, improving fuel efficiency and reducing carbon emissions. Automated vehicles may also increase vehicle capacity on some roads, reducing parking requirements. This would support more compact, efficient development because less space would be needed for parking lots and roads could be narrower. Automated buses could significantly improve the frequency and capacity of transit. This could lead to increased mode share for transit and reduce private vehicle use.” McCabe points to the City’s Smart Transportation Action Plan. “Right now, the City is planning ahead so that we are prepared when full automation arrives. We are building an interconnected, multi-modal transportation system where citizens can walk, bike, drive, and ride transit efficiently and conveniently. Automated vehicle technology is one tool that can help us get there.” In other words, the future of transportation has already begun, and driverless technology may be a lot closer to Edmonton’s horizon than you think.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

39


2018 Board of Directors Board Executive

Chair: Len Rhodes President & CEO, Edmonton Eskimo Football Club Vice Chair: Dawn Harsch President & CEO, Exquisicare Inc. Treasurer: Bryan DeNeve Senior Vice President Finance & CFO, Capital Power Past Chair: James Merkosky Partner, Tax Services Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP

Board Directors

Dr. Glenn Feltham President & CEO, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology Crystal Graham Partner & Licensed Interior Designer, Kasian Architecture Interior Design & Planning Ltd. Elan MacDonald President, Impact Consulting Scott McEachern Vice President, Engineering & Projects, Enbridge Pipelines Inc. Dennis Schmidt Legal Counsel and Associate Development Manager Alldritt Land Corporation LP Craig Thorkelsson Head of Tax PCL Constructors Inc. Dr. Jenelle Trenchuk-Saik President & CEO, Parker Ford and MacKay

Chamber Executive

Janet Riopel President & CEO Edmonton Chamber of Commerce Tim Ferris Director, Member Services Edmonton Chamber of Commerce Ian Morris Director, Organizational Excellence Edmonton Chamber of Commerce Danuta Woronowicz Director, Advocacy and Outreach Edmonton Chamber of Commerce

Contact

Edmonton Chamber of Commerce #600 – 9990 Jasper Avenue Edmonton, AB T5J 1P7 T: 780.426.4620 • F: 780.424.7946

Disruption or Opportunity? Automated Future Poised to Change Future of Work This article and report was provided by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. Read the full report online at www.chamber.ca.

A

utomation, artificial intelligence and advanced robotics have the potential to either take over jobs or be the key to increased productivity and competitiveness, according to a new report from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Skills for an Automated Future. Only by bracing for the changes to come in the next decade can Canadian business take full advantage of the automation revolution. There is nothing new about machines replacing human labour. Machinery for that purpose dates back to the industrial revolution, and so do concerns about skilled craftsmen being put out of work. The current generation of automation has been called the fourth industrial revolution as a means of distinguishing the use of digital technology, AI, software and robotics from stages that were previously defined by technologies such as steam power, electricity and electronics. Globally, labour markets are adapting to the impact of new technology, and the demand for skills is changing to match. This change was described by one participant at a Canadian Chamber of Commerce roundtable as, “moving from a knowledge economy to a wisdom economy.” Between one-third and one-half of workers will be affected by automation in the next decade. However, those changes do not have to be negative. By investing right now in skills development and lifelong learning, businesses can ensure their workers will have the tools to face these disruptions. Automation will change the way we work, but it also represents significant opportunity for the businesses that are ready. Waiting until after workers lose their jobs to automation and relying on traditional training programs could represent a significant cost to the Canadian economy, between $6 and $18 billion each year. By mapping out core, essential skills, making training programs more flexible and by starting now, Canada can make that amount more manageable. What the Canadian Chamber of Commerce found in preparing their report is that much of the retraining infrastructure is already in place. By leveraging on-the-job training and focusing on shorter programs, we can ensure Canada leads the way in adapting to automation and the changes it will bring. Properly harnessed, automation can represent greater production capacity, GDP growth and even job creation. This will require a concerted effort between workers, business, educational institutions and government. Continued on next page... BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

41


Some economic sectors are seeing a decline in employment, while other sectors are struggling to find the workers with the skills they need to grow. This report examines the impact of technology and the implications for training systems and skills development including: • What workers will be replaced • How many people will be affected • The upsides of automation.

“Employees can build essential skills that are resistant to automation in advance and adapt to rapidly changing technology by accessing new learning mechanisms.” Employees can build essential skills that are resistant to automation in advance and adapt to rapidly changing technology by accessing new learning mechanisms, like short duration programs, micro-credential certification of work experience and selfdirected learning. Businesses need to view employee development as a competitive edge for attracting and maintaining the best talent and raising productivity at all levels. By supporting a wide range of skills pathways, businesses can develop a culture of ongoing skills development. Educational institutions need to build on new learning pathways, expand recognition of prior experience, support self-directed learning and work in partnership with business. Collaboration models, such as program advisory committees and sector councils, can ensure technical skills taught by programs remain relevant to the workforce and support the adoption of new technology.

42

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

Finally, government support for employee development requires updating funding mechanisms for training to recognize the various educational pathways and ensure quality and access. The measurement of the skills and competencies needed in the workforce, the transferability of qualifications and more flexibility for educational institutions can all support the workforce adaptation for future technology. The Edmonton Chamber would like to hear from you as it develops an innovation policy in 2018. How will automation affect your business? You can contact us by email: policy@edmontonchamber.com.


Let’s get you back out on the road faster! To view our inventory, visit drivingforce.ca

AMVIC Licensed

It’s all about the experience. BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

43


Momentum Walk-In Counselling Society Member profile Kimberly Knull, Registered Psychologist, Co-founder, Executive Director

walkinedmonton.org This month, the Momentum Walk-In Counselling Society will be hosting the inaugural Momentum Mental Health Awards. This event celebrates Edmonton’s mental health community, recognizing both individuals and organizations in our city who have championed mental health initiatives, and are making a difference in our community. Discover more about this unique and valuable Edmonton business, and how they are addressing the gap in support services for mental health. What’s your story? Five and a half years ago there was a gaping hole in our mental health system. There were long wait lists for services, people’s insurance plans were not covering the cost of therapy, and people were not getting the help they needed. People turned to their doctors and emergency rooms for help, and our medical system was not equipped to handle these issues. Recognizing the gap for this valuable health service within the community, 40 mental health therapists came together to find a solution to reduce the barriers that Edmontonians were facing. In 2013, we created Momentum Walk-In Counselling Society. We operate like a walk-in doctor’s office for mental health. We are solution focused, people pay as they can for services, and they take home a plan to move forward. What are three things people are surprised to learn about your business? 1. People are surprised to learn that our therapists volunteer their time at Momentum, while maintaining a private practice or full-time position elsewhere. 2. It is often surprising to learn that our average wait time is only 15 minutes. 3. People are also blown away by the fact that a solution focused session can make a big difference in a person’s life, and it’s sometimes all people need. Did you know that half of all

44

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

Kimberly Knull, Registered Psychologist, Co-founder, Executive Director, Momentum Walk-In Counselling Society.

people only go to counselling once? Knowing this, we make the most of each session! What has surprised you in the last 12 months? Local businesses are upping their game. Customer service is really improving in this City! What has been your biggest challenge in the last 12 months? Learning to say ‘no.’ I don’t have enough time or energy to do everything that I would like to do. Therefore, I have had to figure out what my priorities are in my personal life and in business, and measure every opportunity against my priority list. The trouble is, when I say ‘yes’ to one thing, I have to say ‘no’ to something else. I have to ask myself, ‘Is taking on a new project in line with our mission and vision?’ ‘Is an afterwork engagement worth sacrificing family time?’ I work on this every day.


What do you think is the biggest issue impacting Edmonton’s small businesses at this time? Burnout. In the beginning we often have to do everything and be everything. The cost is that we sacrifice ourselves in the process. Technology makes it possible for us to work outside of the office, and outside of business hours, and it can be hard to know where to draw the line. Take care of yourself. There is no business without you. What’s your secret to keeping your employees engaged? I’m the leader. It’s my job to do the tough things and have the tough conversations. My team appreciates that I deal with issues as they come up, and they know I will take their concerns seriously. I’m not happy if they’re not happy. In addition, I no longer do everything. I give my team the opportunity to take the initiative. Sometimes they need my support, and sometimes they do a way better job than I ever could! Do you have a personal mantra? You will find what you are looking for. As a new Chamber member, what have your first impressions been? I have met a lot of talented business owners

in this city. They have creative and unique business ideas, and I love the diversity of culture and talent. The work ethic and passion among our business owners is unparalleled. Our Chamber mandate is to create the best environment for business in Edmonton. If you could make one substantial improvement to Edmonton’s business environment, what would it be? Treat your staff like you want them to treat your clients. On the flip side, if your clients are treating you or your staff poorly, get new clients. What is your favorite thing to do in Edmonton? Taking a Segway tour through the river valley! Apple or android? Apple. Your most favorite place in the world? Turks and Caicos. Coffee or tea? Tea. Have you tried Block 1912’s lavender London fog? Amazing! To find out more about the upcoming Momentum Mental Health Awards on May 10, 2018, please visit www.momentumcounselling. org/momentum-mental-health-awards-2018.

Connecting Business 2018 Provincial Budget Luncheon

Minister Deron Bilous addressed Chamber members and guests, taking the opportunity to announce $2.5 million in funding to Edmonton’s new regional economic development company, Edmonton Global.

A post event media scrum provided an opportunity for Minister Bilous and Chamber President & CEO Janet Riopel to communicate their respective positions on the Budget, and also pose for a quick photo evocative of the desire to continue to work towards common ground on these issues.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

45


Canadian Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting - Edmonton

We were pleased welcome representatives from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce to Edmonton for their annual Board Meeting on March 20. Leaders in attendance included Premier Rachel Notley, Edmonton Chamber President & CEO Janet Riopel, Alberta Chambers President & CEO Ken Kobly, and Canadian Chamber attendees: President & CEO Perrin Beatty, Board Chair Christiane Bergevin, and COO Jackie King.

After Business Mixer & Trade Show at the Radisson Hotel and Convention Centre

Chamber members and the Edmonton business community enjoyed the opportunity to engage and connect with the many trade exhibitors on hand.

Guests took the opportunity to grow their network and share knowledge and insight with other business professionals.

Members in this Issue City of Edmonton and University of Alberta in The Future in Automated Transportation is now — Are our Industries Ready? on page 34 University of Alberta in Edmonton’s Artificial Intelligence Revolution on page 49 University of Alberta and Edmonton International Airport in Alberta’s Economic Edge Is All Natural on page 66

46

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


Western Business Outlook 2018: Edmonton

LtoR: Alf Sailer, ATB Financial; Janet Riopel, President & CEO, Edmonton Chamber; Doug McLean, EEDC; Glen Vanstone, EEDC; Pedro Antunes, Conference Board of Canada.

A Conversation With Former First Lady Michelle Obama

Edmonton Chamber of Commerce CEO & President Janet Riopel pauses to capture the moment of thousands of Chamber members eagerly awaiting the appearance of Former First Lady Michelle Obama.

Arriving Chamber members took advantage of the opportunity to shoot a quick selfie to commemorate the event.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

47


May 24

My Chamber

helps me stay informed about decisions that may impact the future of my business.

Mayor’s State of the City Address Presented by

Capital Power

June 14

My Chamber

provides me with opportunities to build business relationships outside the office.

49th Annual Edmonton Chamber Golf Tournament Presented by

Grand Villa Casino Starlight Casino

May 24

My Chamber

connects me with other professionals and businesses so I can grow my network.

Mixer & Trade Show at The Oasis Centre

My Chamber advocates, educates, and connects me to the greater business community in Edmonton.

Register or learn more about these events @

EdmontonChamber.com

Advocate. Educate. Connect.


EDMONTON’S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

EDMONTON’S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE REVOLUTION WITH AI RESEARCH GROUP DEEPMIND COMING TO EDMONTON, ALBERTA IS POISED TO SEE A BOOM IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE RESEARCH AND APPLICATION. BY ZACHARY EDWARDS

L

ast year one of the world’s leading research groups in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) announced their first international expansion to Edmonton. The announcement was met with bewilderment by much of the tech news blogosphere, that a company famously bought by Google for $500 million was heading to a northern Canadian city most famous for its connections to the oil and gas industry. For people on the ground, however, the decision made perfect sense. The University of Alberta, after all, is home to one of the world’s most prestigious and important departments for the research of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

49


EDMONTON’S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

“ONE OF THE AREAS THAT WAS FUNDED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA [IS NOW] CALLED THE ALBERTA MACHINE INTELLIGENCE INSTITUTE. THIS WAS STARTED WITH PROVINCIAL FUNDING THAT THEY HAVE SUSTAINED FOR ALMOST TWO DECADES NOW.“ ~ DR. MIKE BOWLING

The expansion is DeepMind’s first international AI research office, one that will see existing professors working with DeepMind researchers to push the science of AI forward, all while seeking practical applications and connections to local industries and international companies. It has been hailed as a first step in Edmonton becoming a tech centre but the truth is that Edmonton, and Alberta, have been building the perfect home for leading research into AI and machine learning (ML). “You can point to a critical, distinct moment, which was in 2002, when the province, under the umbrella of Alberta Ingenuity at the time, had a fund to invest in basic science,” Dr. Mike Bowling, one of the university’s professors who will now split his time between his professorship and work with DeepMind, explains. “One of the areas that was funded at the University of Alberta [is now] called the Alberta Machine Intelligence Institute. This was started with provincial funding that they have sustained for almost two decades now. Since then, we’ve been able to almost double in size the number of faculty members doing AI and ML research.” With sustained, reliable funding from the province, the University has made significant impacts on AI research, famously creating a program that learned how to play heads-up no limit Texas Hold’em poker and then beat human

professionals. About a dozen graduates from the program ended up at DeepMind in London but now, with Edmonton’s rising AI profile, students and experts are starting to stay and move to Edmonton instead.

AI and Talent Retention One of the challenges Edmonton has faced with creating renowned AI researchers is convincing those people to stay. “Historically, the students that would graduate would go to Silicon Valley, to London, to New York,” Dr. Bowling explains. “They were going to Microsoft, Google, and Facebook and there was no way they could stay in Edmonton. There weren’t jobs that were going to use the talents that they had. It was hard to stay in Canada and even harder to stay in Edmonton.” Cynthia van Sundert, executive director of The A100, an Albertan tech entrepreneur and executive group, agrees and says that Edmontonians who left the city are now coming back. “We are starting to see a trend where Edmonton [and] Alberta residents who left home to work have come back to Edmonton,” she says. “These individuals are now building new startups and working on ventures that they intend to keep growing right here. In order to attract, retain and bring back talent, we have to be able to offer interesting and challenging

ABOVE: DR. MIKE BOWLING, PROFESSOR OF COMPUTING SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA AND NOW RESEARCHER WITH DEEPMIND ALBERTA.

50

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


EDMONTON’S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

“IN ORDER TO ATTRACT, RETAIN AND BRING BACK TALENT, WE HAVE TO BE ABLE TO OFFER INTERESTING AND CHALLENGING WORK, AND HAVE INTERESTING PEOPLE WORKING ON THEM.” ~ CYNTHIA VAN SUNDERT

work, and have interesting people working on them. DeepMind will help bring that to Edmonton.”

graduates, but also as a destination for companies seeking to invest in innovation,” he says.

Van Sundert also says talent retention is just one piece of the puzzle. “Three things are most important right now for Edmonton: talent, capital and profile – not only to help create new ventures but also to help existing ventures scale,” she explains. “Funding is always needed and, thankfully, we have an organization like the Alberta Enterprise Corporation, which was founded specifically to bring venture capital to Alberta [but] Edmonton needs to build its profile as a technology hub. We need to celebrate these successes and let people know that we’ve been here doing all of this for at least a couple of decades now.”

Amii originated with the funding packages made available in 2002 and has since transformed from a purely researchfocused initiative to one that connects Alberta’s AI talent with local industry and projects, all while helping researchers secure their funding and forward their research. The strategy, according to Amii’s communications lead Spencer Murray, is threefold: attract and retain talent, find ways to commercialize research, and train companies in AI. “We want to take Edmonton’s AI ecosystem up to the next level,” he says. “We are already seeing successes with people like RBC’s Borealis AI and Mitsubishi Electric, who have established a presence here. We want to increase Alberta’s competitiveness but also to ensure there are diverse receptor sites for the students that are graduating from our schools.”

Putting Edmonton on the World Stage Raising Edmonton’s profile is one of the many jobs for the Alberta Machine Intelligence Institute (Amii). Its executive director, Cameron Schuler, is excited by Edmonton’s potential in AI. “With the resurgence of global interest in AI, we have the potential to build a robust local AI ecosystem and ensure Edmonton is known not only for our excellent research and

Connecting Research to Commercialization Research impact on Edmonton and the world will be easier with DeepMind, Dr. Bowling says, because it is a bridge between the two. “When I think about research impact, I

ABOVE: CYNTHIA VAN SUNDERT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE A100.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

51


EDMONTON’S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

“WITH THE RESURGENCE OF GLOBAL INTEREST IN AI, WE HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BUILD A ROBUST LOCAL AI ECOSYSTEM AND ENSURE EDMONTON IS KNOWN NOT ONLY FOR OUR EXCELLENT RESEARCH AND GRADUATES, BUT ALSO AS A DESTINATION FOR COMPANIES SEEKING TO INVEST IN INNOVATION.” ~ CAMERON SCHULER

think about the problems that matter 10 years from now. We need people who are thinking about the long-term game. Largely, that has been academic researchers and institutions,” he explains. “One of the nice things about being part of DeepMind is there are always groups of people internally that are looking at these technologies and applying them to individual places. My goals are to be thinking 10 years ahead, and we now have people looking for the more immediate impacts that we can have.” The impacts are already happening and more are on the way. Google is using DeepMind’s AI to more efficiently cool its servers, saving on energy costs and reducing environmental impact. Similarly, Amii’s recent partnership with ISL Engineering will lead to new efficiencies at the Drayton Valley Water Treatment Plant, where reinforcement learning is helping the plant use its filters to their maximum potential before being cleaned. DeepMind’s move to Edmonton was ultimately about

Alberta’s prestige in the field, but it decided to expand here in part because of the department’s commitment to education as well as research. Dr. Bowling and his fellow professors are passionate about teaching tomorrow’s superstars. “I love the chances I have to train the next generation of students,” he says. “For all the impact that I can have with pushing the science of AI forward with DeepMind, it would be a shame to lose the other impact I can have, which is to train the next generation of researchers that are going to carry that torch forward.” DeepMind’s arrival in Edmonton is another step in the city’s growing presence in the world of AI and ML. Their presence will help the many companies and initiatives raise the city’s profile, attract new partners and, just as crucially, help the city retain the talent it is producing. But DeepMind’s arrival is not a story of luck or happenstance, or even the beginning of the story. It is signaling the next act in a story that has been developing for decades.

ABOVE: CAMERON SCHULER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALBERTA MACHINE INTELLIGENCE INSTITUTE (AMII).

52

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


Utilities and transportation operations control centres for network monitoring of video feeds and mission-critical data. Images courtesy of utilities and transportation clients.

Applied Electronics a 60-Year Leader in Broadcast and Audio Visual Technology by Rennay Craats

T

he past 60 years has seen an explosion of technological developments in every area of business affecting every industry and changing the ways in which we do things. Applied Electronics’ significant role in this explosion was thanks to Michael Stechly’s fascination with technology. “He got his inspiration when he saw his first television set in the barber shop at the end of the street, and he decided right then and there that that was what he was going to do with himself,” says Paul Stechly, Michael’s son and current president of Applied Electronics. Michael studied to become an electronics technologist and after five years working for others he started his own company in 1958, Applied Business Systems (renamed Applied Electronics Limited in 1961), in Toronto, Ontario. He operated this fledgling business with a secretary as the only other employee, but his drive, knowledge and ability to foster incredible relationships soon saw the company flourish. As the Canadian broadcast industry grew, so did Applied Electronics. Michael Stechly built a reputation for quality, service and integrity, making his company a leader in the television-

Carrying on their father’s legacy: Paul Stechly, President, with John Stechly and Susan Stechly, Vice Presidents of Applied Electronics Limited.

broadcasting industry before successfully expanding into and quickly gaining prominence in the audiovisual industry. By the time of Michael Stechly’s death in 1985, he had diversified and expanded his business into four markets across the country – the head office in Toronto and regional offices in Montreal, Vancouver and Calgary. He had built his dream into

Applied Electronics Limited • 60 Years • 1 53


More accurately, Applied Electronics has stayed ahead of the times. The company’s team of systems designers and solutions architects have been trailblazers in developing innovative systems for unique applications. Backed by a highly-skilled group of in-house technical experts and strong partnerships with industry’s technology giants, Applied Electronics is able to develop systems that push the envelope of innovation to keep their clients on the leading edge. HD live production control room at the CrossRoads Church in Red Deer. Image courtesy of CrossRoads Church.

business world. Utilities and energy companies across Canada have turned to Applied Electronics to design and build state-ofthe-art control centres. Educational institutions employ Applied Electronics to design and equip lecture halls, build media production studios and simulation labs, and provide mobile production trucks for live-event broadcasts. Corporations and health-care authorities enhance their meetings with videoconferencing, unified collaboration systems, and record and live-stream solutions for training purposes. Federal, provincial and municipal governments across Canada have also selected Applied Electronics to design and build complex media systems for various applications and government spaces. With a presence in everything from broadcasting to health care to emergency response, Applied Electronics has evolved along with the times.

“We’ve been involved in quite a few firsts,” says Paul, with Applied Electronics being credited with selling one of the first data projectors in Canada, some of the first uses of recording in medical operating fields, the first launches of legislative television and automated-voting systems, and the first real-time distance-learning link for teaching hospitals. Since the company became established in Alberta in 1967, the western operation has grown significantly. While not a separate business unit, the area has regional management with a level of autonomy to do business in a way that makes sense for the western provinces. “It’s a sign of our growth to have a specific focus to each of the eastern and western regions,” says Cheryl Bruley, western regional manager for Applied Electronics. And growth has been swift. In 2014, the Calgary operation outgrew its space and moved into a 16,000-square-foot

Captivating audiences for 60 years Panasonic wishes to congratulate our valued partner, Applied Electronics, on the occasion of their 60th anniversary. Together, we’ve pushed the boundaries of the audio visual experience, developing unique AV systems that captivate, inform and entertain. Take your event or production to the next level. Learn more about our leading-edge, audio visual solutions for professionals at na.panasonic.com/ca/audio-video-solutions.

Applied Electronics Limited • 60 Years • 4


Utilities and transportation operations control centres for network monitoring of video feeds and mission-critical data. Images courtesy of utilities and transportation clients.

facility. The Edmonton office also sought out a larger space in 2007, moving into the 5,000-square-foot warehouse and office space on Winterburn Road. This expansion allows ample space for its customer service and project administration staff and technical installation team to serve Applied Electronics’ Alberta customers. Through these offices, Applied Electronics has been part of many impressive projects over the years.

The company has designed high-definition live-production control facilities for houses of worship like Celebration Church in Edmonton and CrossRoads Church in Red Deer. The upgraded production facilities enable staff to create higher-quality – broadcast-quality – worship videos for multiple large-screen displays around the church and stream live to remote audiences around the world, while recording, editing and making sermon videos available on demand through the churches’ websites. A large video wall linked to a video over IP matrix switching system was recently designed and installed by Applied Electronics for an emergency operations centre in Edmonton. Video feeds and mission critical data from multiple operators’ workstations can be displayed on the control room video wall as well as in the adjacent meeting rooms. Similarly, Applied Electronics completed a security control operations centre in Edmonton that allows operators

Crestron Mercury™

PRESENT. CALL. VIDEO CONFERENCE. ANY PLATFORM.

Visit crestron.com/Mercury All brand names, product names, and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Certain trademarks, registered trademarks, and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products. Crestron disclaims any proprietary interest in the marks and names of others. Crestron is not responsible for errors in typography or photography. ©2018 Crestron Electronics, Inc.

CONGRATULATIONS ON 60 YEARS!

From your vehicle leasing and broadcast partners! Applied Electronics Limited • 60 Years • 5


to view their workstations on a large 2x2 LCD video wall, enabling them to work collaboratively when there is a security alert for their clients. Applied Electronics has also helped NorQuest College achieve a new modern state-of-the-art simulation healthcare centre. The NorQuest Interdisciplinary Simulation Centre at the Singhmar Centre for Learning provides student experiences that emulate real-life health-care situations using multiple cameras, in-ceiling microphones and simulation mannequins – all controlled by an instructor in the adjacent simulation control room. Projects like these have put Applied Electronics on the international radar. The company recently joined the Global Presence Alliance, which is a consortium of audiovisual and collaboration technology integrators aligned through a common methodology, operational infrastructure and bond of trust to deliver and support collaborative workflow solutions as one to global customers. This association of 28 companies selected Applied Electronics as the sole Canadian representative for its reputable quality, technical ability and innovation in the field.

“The ability to collaborate in real-time with regional locations across the globe has become a mandate for many of our multinational clients in Canada,” says Mike Dalton, vice president, audio visual systems division for Applied Electronics. “As a member of the GPA, Applied Electronics will facilitate Canadian deployments and support global deployments with a continuity of quality to help people work better.” Quality and service have been Applied Electronics’ mantra for 60 years. Through all the changes, Applied Electronics has remained true to Michael Stechly’s philosophy of steady growth, commitment to the communities in which they do business and treating staff like family. Now, as the third generation enters the company to learn the ropes, it will continue to honour the founder’s vision. “We’ve been one of the few companies that has been able to prosper and grow in a rapidly-changing business where the speed of that change has become faster and faster,” says Paul Stechly. The Stechlys have come a long way since that barber-shop television set sparked a passion in Michael. The generations that have come after him are ready to meet these rapid changes, forge change of their own, and continue to make Applied Electronics the largest media-solutions specialist in the country for years to come.

APPLIED Sharp’s Award-Winning, 4K Ultra-HD PN-L705H AQUOS BOARD® Interactive Display System Brings New Dimensions to Your Communication

Visit www.sharp.ca for more information.

ad_Applied Electronic_ThirdPg.qxp_QSC v3 2018-04-03 4:01 PM

11442 Winterburn Rd NW, Edmonton, AB T5S 2Y3 Tel: (780) 462-8275 • Fax: (780) 462-8238 www.appliedelectronics.com Page 1

Applied Electronics Limited • 60 Years • 6


WORK CLOTHES: THE NEXT FRONTIER OF TECHNOLOGY // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

WORK CLOTHES:

THE NEXT FRONTIER OF TECHNOLOGY WHEN TECHNOLOGY MEETS FABRIC, IT CREATES AN ENTIRELY NEW WAY TO DRESS FOR SUCCESS

BY NERISSA MCNAUGHTON

D

ress for success. What does that mean to you? It conjures up the image of the power suit, the high heel, the silk tie – all the elements that speak to influence and confidence. However, there’s a quiet but powerful revolution sweeping the clothing retail landscape, bringing with it clothing that does far more than project a successful image. These are clothes that are infused with technology and designed to work as hard as you do. These are clothes will push your performance, on and off the job.

A Second Skin Hexoskin’s biometric smart shirts monitor heart rate (heart rate recovery), breathing rate (minute ventilation), activity intensity, calorie burn, peak acceleration, cadence, steps, and sleep. The in-garment Bluetooth connects to your smartphone, and the shirt has a 14-hour battery life. “Hexoskin can be worn under daily living clothes and monitors your health. It’s a convenient way to follow your fitness level all day,” says Pierre-Alexandre Fournier, coFounder and CEO of Hexoskin. He sees the biometric shirt as just the beginning of a movement. “There will, for sure, be more technology-infused clothes because people are more curious about their own health and vitals than ever.” The biometric shirt is a new and exciting way to gather and analyze feedback for healthy lifestyle enthusiasts, athletes

THE BIOMETRIC SHIRT IS A NEW AND EXCITING WAY TO GATHER AND ANALYZE FEEDBACK FOR HEALTHY LIFESTYLE ENTHUSIASTS, ATHLETES AND COACHES, RESEARCHERS, AND MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS. HEXOSKIN IS MACHINE WASHABLE, AND THE SLEEK STYLING ALLOWS FOR WEAR UNDER A SPORTS JACKET OR BLAZER, ON ITS OWN WITH JEANS, OR AS PART OF GYM-GOING ATTIRE.

ABOVE: HEXOSKIN WOMAN’S AND MEN’S SHIRT. PHOTO SOURCE: HEXOSKIN

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

59


WORK CLOTHES: THE NEXT FRONTIER OF TECHNOLOGY // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

WELL, VIBRANIUM ISN’T REAL, BUT VIBRAM IS, AND IT’S A HUGE HELP TO THE THOUSANDS OF WOMEN COMMUTING AND WORKING OUTDOORS IN ALBERTA’S ICY WINTER. DON’T WORRY GENTLEMEN! THERE ARE “SUPERHERO” BOOTS FOR YOU AS WELL, THANKS TO THE INFUSION OF GREEN DIAMOND.

and coaches, researchers, and medical professionals. Hexoskin is machine washable, and the sleek styling allows for wear under a sports jacket or blazer, on its own with jeans, or as part of gym-going attire.

Vibram Arctic Grip sole, featured on Sperry Powder Arctic Grip Winter Boots, is a state-of-the-art technology that uses entirely rubber material without the addition of metal components to provide grip on icy surfaces.

Hexoskin can be purchased online at www.hexoskin.com.

“Our Tarantula Anti-Slip™ on Ice with Green Diamond Technology is exclusive to Mark’s in Canada and is featured on WindRiver Bivy Winter Boots. This patented technology uses tiny silica carbide crystals embedded throughout the rubber sole, providing maximum safety, grip and traction control. As the sole of the boot wears, more crystals are exposed so it will continue to provide traction on ice, snow and slush.”

The Real World Answer to Vibranium Those that follow the Marvel Cinematic Universe are no strangers to the magical properties of vibranium, a powerful metallic ore that gives Captain America his indestructible shield and the Black Panther his bulletproof suit. Well, vibranium isn’t real, but vibram is, and it’s a huge help to the thousands of women commuting and working outdoors in Alberta’s icy winter. Don’t worry gentlemen! There are “superhero” boots for you as well, thanks to the infusion of green diamond.

60

This anti-slip technology is the result of years of research, Stephens explains.

Dave Stephens, footwear buyer, Mark’s, talks about the Sperry Powder Valley Arctic Grip winter boot for women and the WindRiver’s Bivy winter boot for men.

“Many Canadians visit the emergency room every year due to injuries related to falling on ice or snow. In an effort to keep Canadians safer throughout winter, a team of researchers at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute used their innovative WinterLab to build evidence-based ratings on footwear and their ability to grip on snow and ice. The WinterLab recreates typical Canadian winter conditions, for example sub-zero temperatures, snow and ice-covered surfaces, and winds up to 30 km per hour. It also has the ability to create slopes and can be moved suddenly to challenge a participant’s balance.

“Vibram is known for providing innovative technologies in shoe soles for winter’s slippery surfaces, such as wet ice. The

“The team developed the first test of its kind in the world – the Maximum Achievable Angle (MAA) Testing Method

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


WORK CLOTHES: THE NEXT FRONTIER OF TECHNOLOGY // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

– to validate slip resistant footwear on icy surfaces. These ratings can be found on www.ratemytreads.com and are denoted using a ‘snowflake’ scale. With the help of the WinterLab, researchers have tested the slip resistance of a number of winter boots and rated them on a scale from zero to three snowflakes. “Innovation is very important to us, and developing solutions for Canadians drives the purchasing team. This year at Mark’s, we have over 15 styles of footwear that have achieved a Snowflake rating on ratemytreads.com. “Mark’s has a full line of slip-resistant boots that are sure to fit anyone’s lifestyle. The boots are available in various styles, each of which provide everyone, from daily commuters to outdoor construction workers and ranchers, with the footwear they need to walk safely.” These boots can be purchased in store or online and start at a regular price of $150.

Climate Change Now that you’re headed to work with a shirt measuring your health and your feet firmly planted on the ground, what’s next? How about a coat that gives you your own personal, comfortable climate? “JobSite Workwear is proud to carry the largest selection of Carhartt’s Force Extremes collection that uses their new 37.5 technology – active particles permanently embedded at the fiber level to capture and release moisture vapor and prevent liquid sweat from forming. This helps keep you cool when you’re hot,” explains Marc Poirier, head buyer at JobSite Workwear. “The same active particles trap infrared energy to warm you up as you start to get cold. The technology uses your own body’s energy to create a micro climate that allows you to stay on the job when you need to – not too hot, not too cold!” He’s a fan of workwear that…well… works. “For most workers, they’re on the job for the majority of their day. What they wear is important, and getting the right gear has repercussions on the job. Without sounding too theoretical, the right gear can create a safe environment

where your focus can stay on work. On a worksite with hazards all around, if you’re thinking about how cold you are, how your feet hurt, or if you’re overheating and dehydrated, the consequences can be dramatic. Your work gear should be tuned and fitted to work with you, not against you. “With the technology available in workwear in 2018, the traditional cotton tee, jacket, and pant have been replaced with products that are actually designed to improve everything, from movement and durability to personal climate.” It looks like this is just the beginning of a more focused and comfortable workforce. “We’re seeing more and more technical innovation in fabrics,” confirms Poirier. “Workwear is catching up to technical outerwear like North Face and Patagonia, with the mindset based around ease of movement. Our work outerwear increasingly has additional stretch, gussets, and panels that are designed to move with you while you work, and we use lighter weight materials. “Because it’s still the work category, our manufacturers are testing lighter weight materials that not only wick, stretch, and move, but that are actually more durable and tougher than traditional work gear, too. This means you can get a jacket or pant that feels lighter, has a more modern fit, and will actually last longer than old school workwear. “Carhartt is using Quick Duck, which is tougher and 30 per cent lighter than their traditional cotton; Wall’s uses Kevlar® in a new line of jackets and bibs; and Helly Hansen has a four-way stretch polyamide pant that we think is the future of work pants. These innovations allow the wearer to focus on their job and actually be safer on the jobsite; all of that means a successful day at work.”

Dress for Success The power suit will always have a place in our closets as a way to dress for success, but thanks technological innovation, it becomes just one of the many ways Alberta’s hard working men and women can put on clothes and be more successful, on and off the job.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

61


MAKING AN EASY GETAWAY // TRAVEL & TOURISM

MAKING AN EASY GETAWAY WITH TODAY’S CHOICES, PERSONALIZED AND AFFORDABLE TRAVEL OPTIONS ARE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

62

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

BY SUSAN HOFFORTH


MAKING AN EASY GETAWAY // TRAVEL & TOURISM

H

ave you been able to take a vacation lately? How about a quick break, or even a business trip? It isn’t always easy to get away from it all, especially for younger people with families or for businesses watching their budget. Travel across this country can be expensive and complicated; a spontaneous break isn’t always an option, but there is change on the horizon. Do-it-yourself vacations have been available online for a long time now, but they haven’t really made booking flights and hotels easier, or that much cheaper. Websites like Travelocity or Airbnb may have put the travel industry at our fingertips but finding the right flights and accommodations can take a lot of time, and Googling

for a cheap flight will take you through hundreds of paid links. Sorting through them all is time consuming and frustrating. Then you have to decide if you want to stay in a stranger’s Airbnb bed, or splurge and rent out an entire condo for your family or team. Choices haven’t made DIY travel any easier! The thing that is missing from booking travel online is personalized service from someone who gets where you are coming from. “People now understand that there are no better deals online,” explains Hidar Elmais of Edmonton’s award-winning local travel agency, Travel Gurus. “Everyone has the same prices, and the competition rules mean that no one is allowed to sell the flight for more or less money.”

PHOTO SOURCE: FLAIR AIRLINES

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

63


MAKING AN EASY GETAWAY // TRAVEL & TOURISM

Putting the human service back into traveling is what booking with a travel agent can do. Without one, it’s guesswork. Have you booked to the right hotels? Is the transportation reliable? It’s hard to know if you haven’t been there before. The Travel Gurus have been there. They have firsthand knowledge about what is going on in the destination and what might go wrong. “Things happen all the time. It’s not just flight problems. There are hotel mix-ups to weather delays, to bigger things like political uprisings or attacks,” says Elmais. “We get calls sometimes at 4 a.m. from people in their resort and in trouble. If they need out, we can get them out of the hotel, or out of the country, and get them back home. As you can see, there are a lot of reasons why a good travel agent, one who works directly with you and knows the location, is a great asset.” One of the things that holds people back from travel is the cost of airfare, but Elmais predicts that that domestic flights in Canada will dramatically drop within the next year or two, as more low-cost airlines come into play. Flair Airlines, an ultra-low cost carrier (ULLC) currently flies to seven Canadian cities, and plans to add more locations in the coming months. “We started out with the understanding that in the Canadian marketplace, airfare was too expensive,” says Julie Rempel, communications and marketing representative at Flair

64

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

Airlines. “When it’s cheaper to fly from here to somewhere in Europe than it is to travel from Halifax to Vancouver, well, that’s a shame, because it means that many Canadians are missing out on everything that Canada has to offer.” Rempel says the goal of Flair Airlines has always been to connect people to each other. “We want to connect families, to connect workplaces, to connect Canada.” For a long time, those living in Europe and Asia were able to find flights on their continent for costs so low, Canadians could only gasp in envied surprise. Flair Airlines studied what made ULCCs work overseas, and what made them less cost effective in Canada. Flair decided that despite the greater distances between Canadian cities, and lower population density, the model would still be feasible here. “Edmonton to Toronto is considered a long-haul flight,” says Rempel, “so the ability to offer cost-per-mile is more difficult, but after two years in the business, we have honed in on what makes this model work.” However, this new way of traveling hasn’t always gone smoothly as tourists adjust to new expectations and the airlines refine how meet their costs. “We have some scars on our back, some lessons learned,” she laughs, “but a smile doesn’t cost anything, and we know that it is important that the booking and boarding experience be a pleasant one for the customer. We continue to make improvements as we go.”


MAKING AN EASY GETAWAY // TRAVEL & TOURISM

PUTTING THE HUMAN SERVICE BACK INTO TRAVELING IS WHAT BOOKING WITH A TRAVEL AGENT CAN DO. WITHOUT ONE, IT’S GUESSWORK. HAVE YOU BOOKED TO THE RIGHT HOTELS? IS THE TRANSPORTATION RELIABLE? IT’S HARD TO KNOW IF YOU HAVEN’T BEEN THERE BEFORE. THE TRAVEL GURUS HAVE BEEN THERE. THEY HAVE FIRSTHAND KNOWLEDGE ABOUT WHAT IS GOING ON IN THE DESTINATION AND WHAT MIGHT GO WRONG. Flair Airlines regularly offers flights from Edmonton to Vancouver for only $69. Although people jump on that deal, they need to know that that price only gives them a seat on the airplane and a seatbelt. Everything else costs more. Having to pay for extras may not be something people are used to, but it is what is going to bring about that abovementioned change on the horizon. “It’s not about what you ‘don’t’ get,” says Rempel. “It’s about choice and only paying for the services that you choose to use. If you are thinking that you don’t get a free meal, you don’t get coffee, you don’t get priority boarding, you don’t get a free baggage allowance, well, yes, these things cost extra as they do on other airlines, but the difference here is that you don’t pay for it unless you want it.” Traveling with ULCCs can be inexpensive because not all the extras are necessary. For example, as travel becomes more frequent for weekends, business trips, or trips home to see parents and grandparents, perhaps not as much luggage is necessary. Or, is an airplane meal really required for a quick jaunt between two neighbouring cities? “A lot of young people are the untraveled generation,” notes Rempel. “They haven’t been on a plane before. They are firsttime travelers and young families who, with ULCCs will now be able to take their children to visit grandparents or other family more frequently.”

However, it’s not just young families who are struggling to travel, or to whom ULCCs will be the most appealing. Jared VanderMeer, director of operations at Magnolias Consulting, says that budget airlines are also welcomed by businesses looking to expand across Canada. “While access to things like video conferencing makes it easier to connect with potential clients or business opportunities across the country, there is significant value in face-to-face meetings, which are not always economically feasible with the high cost of travel. Budget airlines will create a healthy balance between digital and face-to-face transactions, allowing business owners to now consider travel as an option – especially for start-ups with small budgets.” One thing is certain, if people aren’t spending as much to get to their destination, they can spend a lot more at their destination, and that is good for everyone involved. Connecting Canada with affordable, personalized, low-cost travel used to be a grand dream, but with companies like Travel Gurus and the rise of ULCCs, every day that dream becomes more of a reality. If you’ve been longing for a getaway, take another look at your options. Where you want to travel for work or for pleasure may be closer than you think.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

65


ALBERTA’S ECONOMIC EDGE IS ALL NATURAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

ALBERTA’S ECONOMIC EDGE IS ALL NATURAL BY LAURA BOHNERT

A

lberta is an economic powerhouse when it comes to Canadian industry—but is its true advantage simply a matter of “nature”?

The forest industry is a primary example of the impact natural resources have on sculpting Edmonton’s economy. One of Canada’s oldest industries, the forest sector supports approximately 211,075 direct jobs and 95,000 indirect jobs across Canada. It also accounted for seven per cent of Canada’s total exports and brought $23 billion into Canada’s economy in 2016. In Alberta, the forest industry contributes approximately $5.5 billion to the provincial economy. Marty Luckert, professor, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology (REES) at the University of Alberta, explains that for Edmonton, the forest industry is, “Potentially more important than the forest products it produces (i.e. pulp, lumber, OSB). The forest industry offers a means of looking after a large percentage of Alberta’s land

66

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

base since over half of Alberta’s land base—approximately 80 million acres—is forested.” Those forests have an important role to play. “A few things happening now seem to point in new directions,” Luckert describes of the industry. “With electronic substitutes for paper, pulp has been relatively flat and will probably not be increasing. The biggest growth sectors are likely to come from products and production processes that are still being developed. There is potential for a host of products, including cellulosic biofuel, nanocrystalline cellulose, and many others. Nobody can predict all of the uses that we will put our forest resources to in the future, but it is reasonable to assume that technology will seek out and find new valuable uses for such a large renewable resource that will have ongoing, and potentially increasing, value in the economy.” Edmonton’s forests aren’t the only natural resource that are accelerating in economic momentum right now. Solar,


ALBERTA’S ECONOMIC EDGE IS ALL NATURAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

geothermal, and other renewable resources are also gaining impact—and affordability. As Karl Andriuk, president, Threshold Renewable Energies, explains, “In Edmonton and Alberta, leading the charge is solar photovoltaic, but geothermal exchange is close on its heels.” “There has been fairly focused attention on solar technology with the Alberta government providing incentives, and also a lot of media coverage,” Andriuk continues. “Solar PV will reduce your electric bill and, depending on the size of system you build, allow you to contribute back into the grid and eliminate your power bill completely. While Andriuk admits that it’s great that Solar PV is getting its recognition, he’s surprised that other technologies—like geothermal and solar hot water—are not getting the attention they deserve. “Geothermal exchange offers a heating and cooling solution that is four- to five-times more efficient than your conventional systems; you can eliminate an entire utility bill, the payback is as competitive as any other solution, and it is an electric-based heat source, therefore reducing the carbon footprint. Interestingly, the asset of the bore field will not depreciate for generations. Once in place, the bore field will

continue to provide a source of energy from the earth for hundreds of years. It has been estimated that the life span of the high-density pipe is at around 700 years.” Threshold has already installed 110 functioning and efficient systems in the Edmonton area. “Solar hot water, as of yet, is still relatively unknown,” Andriuk adds. “It offers an opportunity to contribute to the domestic hot water needs of a house or business with an exceptionally low amount of maintenance and cost. Once a system is in place, users can see a reduction of 60 to 70 per cent of their domestic hot water costs.”

ABOVE: SOLAR PANELS AT EIA PHOTO SOURCE: EIA

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

67


ALBERTA’S ECONOMIC EDGE IS ALL NATURAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

Alexander Polkovsky, CEO, President of NuEnergy, agrees that renewable energies have a lot to offer. “The largest benefit to end users we are seeing today is in intelligent adoption of on-site renewable energy in combination with high building envelope strategies. Striving for buildings that are more resilient from the energy side and target goals, such as PassivHaus, NetZero, or Energy+, are proving to have a better business case today than conventional buildings applying conventional energy strategies, such as furnaces, air conditioners, and grid-purchased power. “From a technology perspective, we are seeing a larger uptake in solutions, such as solar PV and cogeneration for on-site power production; GeoExchange (geothermal)

and air source heating and cooling systems; enthalpy and heat recovery ventilation strategies (ERVs/HRVs); shared and district-type energy systems (SES/DES); intelligent automation and data logging; and a wider use of 3D, BIM, and virtual modeling, among many other arrays of technological combinations. Commercial, institutional, and residential sectors are all receiving benefits, in both new construction and retrofit applications. “When compared on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis over the life of the building, the combination of these technologies with appropriate building envelope and energy efficiency strategies will yield a better overall return on your investment than codecompliant conventional systems, more often than not. After ABOVE: NORTH GLENORA NETZERO TOWNHOUSES (CANADA’S FIRST NETZERO AFFORDABLE COMMUNITY HOUSING COMPLEX. PHOTO SOURCE: NUENERGY

68

MAY 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


ALBERTA’S ECONOMIC EDGE IS ALL NATURAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

building), Mosaic Center (Canada’s first net-zero commercial building) and Westmount Presbyterian Church and North Glenora net-zero townhouses (Canada’s first net-zero affordable community housing complex, church, and district energy system) have led the way in innovation. “We have literally pioneered an industry that is shaping the new code, reducing our carbon footprint, and reducing overall costs of living for everyone,” says Polkovsky. “[Edmonton] has a great convergent ecosystem of top-notch academic institutions, a very entrepreneurial private business sector, and an open-minded government. Properly focused and supported, this ecosystem can greatly flourish and set the path forward.” The Edmonton International Airport is already on that path and ready for take-off. Steve Rumley, VP, infrastructure & energy, Edmonton International Airport, explains that, “Over the last 20 years, we have progressively improved the energy efficiency of our terminal, and you can see the difference among a LEED building and our older buildings.”

taking applicable grants into account, any building owner and operator that intends to own the building for more than 10 years should seriously consider adoption of on-site renewables and energy efficiency.”

“When we expanded,” he continues, “we knew that we wanted to make use of best practices and knowledge on sustainable industry. We were the first Canadian airport with a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) gold certification for our terminal and tower, and that is because of our investment in things like efficient HVAC systems, water faucets, natural lighting, low VOC emitting paints and floors, a recycling program, and a green cleaning and recycling program. As well as the LEED Gold awards,” Rumley points out, “we also have Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Best Level 2, BOMA Building of Excellence and Outstanding Building of the Year, Corporate Knights Future 40, Airports Council International (ACI) Green Concessions, and other awards.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Edmonton is already starting to see so many of the advantages renewable resources have to offer. “Edmonton has developed a unique leadership position as net-zero capital of Canada,” Polkovsky explains. “There has been more innovation and for a much longer period of time in our region in production of high-performance, coldclimate buildings and building systems than anywhere else in Canada. Projects such as the zero-carbon laneway home in Westmount (Edmonton’s first zero-carbon residential laneway

“Green energy and sustainability make good business sense because they will provide our business with energy independence, lower emissions, and will offer long term cost savings,” he notes, adding that “Sustainability is of growing importance to our stakeholders, business partners, our passengers, and our employees. It is crucial to stay in line with what is important so we can collaboratively invest in projects that are mutually beneficial. However, we don’t just want to stay aligned. We also want to lead and innovate.”

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // MAY 2018

69


The Revington team is always ready to provide expert service with a smile. Photo by Ian Grant Photography.

Revington Renovations

Celebrates the First Five Years Before, during, and after – it’s a successful journey every step of the way By Nerissa McNaughton

S

tarting out as a handyman, then gaining years of experience in the industry, Ken Wurtak felt he could bring more of a personal touch to renovations. With his affable personality and exceptionally organized wife and business partner, five years ago, the decision was made to launch a company of their own. Today, Wurtak and Katie Iafolla helm a thriving renovation company that was a huge success from its first month in business. “It was very exciting right out of the gates. We had to grow quickly and hire employees. It got out of control. I was running around like a chicken with its head cut off!” says Wurtak Iafolla, the detailed organizer, told Wurtak, the creative idea man, they had to slow down, reorganize, implement processes, and regroup. “Now it’s controlled growth,” smiles Wurtak. An equal opportunity employer with male and female carpenters on staff, Revington and its highly skilled team have created a great work culture. Determined to give each client an outstanding experience, Revington’s employees maintain clean and safe work sites. They also pay close attention to the little things from the topics of conversation to the music they listen to. (“Sometimes there are kids present,” Wurtak admonishes). They always go above and beyond, be it rushing to shovel a client’s walk during a heavy snowfall or Wurtak getting up in the wee hours of the morning to fix a client’s faulty furnace. It’s not uncommon for the couple and the carpenters to be invited to stay for dinner at a client’s house when they are working late, or to enjoy the beautiful new kitchen they created.

“When clients sign on, Ken is involved from the initial meeting, through the sales process, and stays connected to the project and will often be found onsite swinging a hammer alongside his crews. Throughout the process, we are in direct and daily contact with our clients. They never get shuffled down the line to someone else,” Iafolla says of Revington’s personal touch. Revington’s outstanding work recently caught the eye of Scott Brothers Entertainment, the network that brings the Property Brothers, and other popular renovation shows to life. “It was really neat!” exclaims Iafolla. “They had followed our Instagram and reached out to us! We did some interviews with them, and while a show has not materialized yet, it was nice to be noticed.” The company is also proud of their Kitchen Design awards, Houzz. com accolades, and client testimonials. As one of the youngest companies to be awarded a JELD-WEN® Windows & Doors dealership, they also topped JELD-WEN’s sales charts, not only selling directly to clients but to other renovation and construction companies. The couple looks forward to expanding that side of their business. “A lot of contractors say they treat every house as if it was their own,” concludes Wurtak. “But with Revington, it really is personal. We always have, and always will, go above and beyond.” Follow us on Instagram: @revingtonrenovations.

10718 181 St NW, Edmonton, AB T5S 1K8 (780) 487-8488 • www.revingtonrenovations.com 70


C U S T O M

C A B I N E T S

Bringing Traditional Workmanship to the Modern Day Home • Painting • • Stain & Lacquer • • Refinishing •

• New Homes • Renovations • Repainting • Contractor Services • Designer Friendly • Fully Trade Equipped •

Ph: (780) 984-6343 traditionpainting@hotmail.com

Ed Dick, Design Consultant 780 236 0507 • edick@huntwood.com

Congratulations Revington Renovations!

Plumbing • Heating • Gas

15913 112A Street NW, Edmonton, AB • 780-619-0558

Cucina Bella would like to congratulate Revington Renovations on 5 years of excellence. We look forward to another successful year together creating beautiful kitchens. 2nd Floor, 16010-118 Avenue | 780.451.2550

www.cucinabella.ca

Congratulations to Revington Renovations! Here’s to many more years of business excellence! 780.425.5175

www.cfmmechanical.ca


Nominations are now closed; thank you to all who have nominated, and to the nominees who are part of this year’s program. We look forward to assembling another group of influential people from our business community who will be honoured for their contributions towards making Edmonton a great place to live and work! Business in Edmonton will celebrate the 2018 winners at our 6th Annual Awards Gala, and our July issue will feature the Leaders and their companies.

Save the Date Thursday, June 21st | 6pm To stay informed on details for our event, visit www.businessinedmonton.com/leaders or email leaders@businessinedmonton.com

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


BRENEX BUILDING CORPORATION

Exceptional Service and Outstanding Results We build buildings and we build relationships by Nerissa McNaughton

B

renex is a commercial building corporation providing general contracting, design builds, and construction management. The company has worked on several high-profile eateries in Edmonton, fast food franchises, arenas, industrial facilities, and much more. “There are two types of people,” says Kim Rolheiser, principal. “Businessmen in construction and contractors in business. We are contractors in business. We are builders in business. Our clients appreciate our level of detail and experience. With our oversight on projects, we minimize most of the standard issues in construction. For us, construction is sorting out problems.” This year marks Brenex’s 35th anniversary, and unlike most family owned and run businesses that start with a clear

vision for succession among the children and grandchildren, Brenex’s trajectory is very unique. It all started when Kim answered an ad, which led to being hired at Brenex. He was a natural fit and, by 1990, had bought 50 per cent of the ownership. During this time, Brenex had won a bid to work on a large project in Fort McMurray. Coowner Rob Roy and Kim needed to scale up on employees. Kim’s dad was a construction worker in Fort McMurray and was one of the people hired. He would continue on with Brenex for the next 25 years. “My father was a natural in the field,” smiles Kim, who had actually worked for his father’s company when he was younger. “It was really special that we could work together again.” Brenex | 35 Years | 1 73


In 2010, Kim became the company’s sole owner. In 2014, his son, Jorden Rolheiser, was making a career move from his role as an advertising executive. Despite not having previous plans to join the business, a closer look revealed that, although the projects and products differed, a role as project manager in the company had the basics he excelled at. There was already an opening in the Brenex office; Jorden applied and was accepted. Today, Kim’s daughter has also joined the company in an administrative role.

Corpro, 2013.

The family is close, personally and professionally, but there is a clear distinction between work and family life. Each employee, regardless of who they are and where they come from, earns their place, and absolute professionalism is a mandate at all times. This, along with Brenex’s vision and mission, is what enables their decades-long success. “One of the secrets of Brenex is to work closely with our clients and provide personal service,” says Kim. You can’t do that if you are far removed from the operation. If I sit in my office looking down on my employees and people, we can’t provide the service that we do. Brenex maintains a certain size so we can provide direct oversight with the company. That is one of the secrets of our success. He adds, “Every client, big or small, we want to make a repeated client. We want them to decide to make Brenex

Congratulations Brenex Building Corporation on 35 years of constructing beautiful and safe spaces

Lockwood Valves Canada, 2014.

CONGRATULATIONS Brenex

on celebrating your 35th business anniversary! All types of mechanical construction from plans and specification to design/build projects. For any plumbing or heating service needs, please visit

www.lehmannplbg.com

P: 780-465-4434 • F: 780-465-4595 • 3645 - 73 AVE, Edmonton, AB, T6B - 2T8

INDEPENDENT BROKERS, SINCE 1913

PROUD TO BE PARTNERS IN PROTECTING ALBERTA BUSINESSES Brenex | 35 Years | 2


Beaverhill Senior’s Lodge, 2017.

their construction consultant for the future. A lot of our customers have been with us for 5-20 years, and one for 29 years! We take the decision to use Brenex very, very seriously. Clients need us to perform better and better. We will do what we need to fulfill their trust in us.” Jorden adds, “We treat our clients as we would like to be treated. We take their concerns and needs very seriously. We build for our clients as if we were building our own structures. That is why we have not advertised for 35 years. The business is built on word of mouth, referrals, and repeated customers. Integrity and honesty are important. We don’t play games. We do what we say we are going to do. We don’t make excuses. If we do something wrong, we admit it.” “Construction,” Jorden continues, “is cyclical. Problems are inherent in construction even when the project is running smoothly. Problems are not a bad thing, just a challenge. Brenex solves problems and knows that, at the end of the day, we will be proud to stand by the finished product.”

Midwest Caissons would like to congratulate the whole team at Brenex on 35 years of leadership and excellence in the construction industry.

10373 – 279 St Acheson, AB • 780-960-8330 Beaverhill Senior’s Lodge, 2017.

www.midwestcaissons.com

Brenex | 35 Years | 3


One such challenge was when a client needed a 30,000 square foot warehouse on an oddly shaped piece of land. The client chose Brenex because they knew the company would not say no and would figure out the logistics. “We went to our engineers,” says Kim. “It took three or four attempts and us needing to build a 400 x 16 foot retaining wall, but we did it!” Kim and Jorden are quick to point out that the company’s success is a team effort. “We don’t do this by ourselves. If we are a cog in the wheel, there are other cogs as well. We surround ourselves with likeminded professionals, such as subcontractors, architects, engineers, etc. Together, as a team, we approach our clients and build outstanding projects. We may be the quarterbacks, but we can’t do this without the proper team.” “Being able to work under someone that has such an experience and knowledge is very inspiring,” says Jorden. “Yeah, he’s my father, but I don’t think many people at my age have the opportunity to work so closely with a mentor this way.” “I love building buildings. I love that,” smiles Kim. “Walking a project through conception to permitting, design to

Congratulations to Brenex on 35 years in business!

Encore Trucking & Transport, 2015.

completion, makes me very happy. When it is turned over on time and under budget and the client is thrilled, I know we have done a great job. “There are no secrets in building. Big or small, buildings get built from the ground up the same way they have forever. Products and materials change, but it’s not like a larger company has a trade secret or a special way of building. The difference is in the people and the processes of the people involved. Brenex pays attention and applies a high level of integrity, honesty, and care in everything we do. We build buildings and we build relationships.”

Congrats Brenex on 35 Years of excellence! Full service irrigation contractor providing services throughout the full range of landscape irrigation applications.

16089-132 Ave. • 780.991.8600

goliathconcrete.ca

Congratulations Brenex on 35 years of business excellence!

www.demkovent.ca Brenex | 35 Years | 4

#205, 10520‑178 Street, Edmonton, AB, T5S 2J1 Phone: 780‑489‑1013

52150 R.R. 221, Suite 169 Sherwood Park, AB T8E 1C8 (780) 922-6701 | www.hydro-tec.ca

Congratulations Brenex on 35 years! WWW.PROSPECWOODWORK.CA 1220 70 Ave NW, AB T6P 1P5 PH 780.438.2896


Westar Drywall

21210 97 Avenue NW • 780-455-5054

Congrats Brenex on 35 years of Business Excellence!

Supreme Concrete Cutting congratulates Brenex on their 35th Anniversary. We wish you many more years of success. Concrete Cutting Services You Can Count On

11318 – 269 Street, Acheson, AB T7X 6E1 Phone: (780) 489-0151 | supremeconcretecutting.com

Congratulations Brenex on 35 years! We are proud to be a part of your success. Garden Concrete Services Ltd. is an approachable, quality oriented and safety conscious company whose experience, professionalism and independence will give you, the General Contractor, peace of mind and concrete work completed safely, correctly and on time. 7267 18 Street | Phone: 780.818.7591 | gardenconcrete.ca Brenex | 35 Years | 5


“We are happy to continue to provide construction services,” concludes Jorden. “We appreciate the fact that our clients look to us to fill a role. Brenex fills that piece of your puzzle.”

1235 70th Ave Edmonton, AB T6P 1N5 Ph: (780) 467.8784 | Fax: (780) 467.2789 http://brenex.com

Brenex wishes to thank its employees, trade partners, clients, and all those that have been instrumental in the company’s 35-year history.

Congratulations Brenex on 35 years! Providing municipal survey services to the Edmonton area for over 50 years. 8929 - 20th Street Edmonton AB, T6P 1K8 Ph: (780)464-5506

www.hagensurveys.com

Congratulations to Brenex on 35 Years of Success!

Wishing you many years of continued success.

IMPERIAL

MARBLE & TILE LTD.

13103 – 156 STREET AB NWT5V 1V2 13103 156 St NW, Edmonton, EDMONTON, AB T5V 1V2 Phone: (780) 973-7150 PHONE (780) 973-7150 FAX (780) 973-7155 Email: imptile@shaw.ca Contractors for Tile & Marble Work

Congratulations Brenex on your 35 years!

M o r e

t h a n

5 0

y e a r s

i n

t h e

d o o r

i n d u s t r y

14820 Yellowhead Trail NW, Edmonton, Alberta, T5L 3C5

780-452-7140 • www.barcol.com

Brenex | 35 Years | 6


FOR EVERYTHING THAT CAN GO WRONG UNDER YOUR ROOF, THERE’S THE NUMBER THAT LIVES UNDER OURS. Fifty percent of businesses may never re-open after a disaster. That’s why knowing the easiest way to contact SERVPRO® is so important. Because the sooner you get in touch with us, the quicker we can start to minimize the damage, as well as the cost. Just contact SERVPRO of Calgary South or SERVPRO of Edmonton Southside to activate the cleanup team that’s faster to any-sized disaster. We’re a leader in giving control back to homeowners, property managers and even entire communities after the ravaging effects of water and fire. So whether you’re responsible for 1,000 square feet or 100,000 – it’s your decision to call on the very best. Your trusted, local SERVPRO professional. Services in Canada provided by independently owned & operated franchises of SERVPRO International, LLC.


SHARING YOUR VISION. BUILDING SUCCESS. We are Alberta’s construction leaders. We look beyond your immediate needs to see the bigger picture, provide solutions, and ensure that we exceed your expectations. PCL is your builder of choice, no matter what type of project you are planning. Watch us build at PCL.com

Bie may2018 web  
Bie may2018 web  
Advertisement