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AUGUST 2018 | $3.50 BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

More Than a Bank PM42455512

CURTIS STANGE PICKS UP THE TORCH AND CONTINUES TO LEAD THE CHARGE IN BANKING INNOVATION



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DIRECTORS EDUCATION PROGRAM

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 6 | Number 8

REGULAR COLUMNS

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 The Real Casualties of Tariffs and Trade Wars By Terry O’Flynn

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CONTENTS COVER FEATURE

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13 53

 Talk to Your Friends About Alberta’s Debt By Colin Craig

 The Alberta Government is Meddling with Workers’ Compensation By Amber Ruddy

 Steel and Aluminum Trade War has Local Impacts By David MacLean

Leading Business

More Than a Bank Curtis Stange picks up the torch and continues to lead the charge in banking innovation By Nerissa McNaughton

ON OUR COVER: ABOVE: CURTIS STANGE, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF ATB FINANCIAL. PHOTO SOURCE: EPIC PHOTOGRAPHY INC.

FIND US ONLINE! B US I N E SS I N E DMONTON.COM BUSINESS IN EDMONTON

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 6 | Number 8

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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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2018 Business in Edmonton Leaders Awards Gala Highlights

CONTENTS COMPANY PROFILES

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A  . Clark Roofing And Siding Celebrates 65 Years

Celebrates 40 Years

AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

Edmonton’s Head Offices Edmonton: Canada’s Prime Headquarter Location Sponsored by KPMG

How One Area is Revitalizing and Keeping its Heart With all eyes on ICE District, Edmonton has been slowly building up another area: The Quarters Downtown. By Zachary Edwards

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Usual Business in Unusual Spaces There are a lot of unique options in the city’s commercial leasing scene. By Nerissa McNaughton

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#ItsaMess Is social accountability in the workplace a corporate or personal responsibility? The lines are, unfortunately, blurred. By Laura Bohnert

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THE REAL CASUALTIES OF TARIFFS AND TRADE WARS // TERRY O’FLYNN

The Real Casualties of Tariffs and Trade Wars BY TERRY O’FLYNN, CHAIRMAN, ALBERTA ENTERPRISE GROUP

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n July 2nd, while much of Canada was enjoying a post-fireworks stat holiday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters that “[America has] been very nice to Canada for many years, and they’ve taken advantage of that.” She was speaking to Canada’s retaliatory tariffs, created in response to America’s tariffs on steel, aluminum and automobiles put into effect the week before. Huckabee Sanders’ sentiment is consistent with the Trump Administration’s stance on international trade: that America has been too generous and not aggressive enough in their trade deals. President Trump hopes to change those deals, starting with these tariffs and ending with a stronger American-focused economy. His tactics can be labelled “unconventional,” too, which include accusations and namecalling online. While the barbs and tweets make the headlines, it’s the lives of everyday people that are already being affected by the tariffs. Take, for instance, America’s tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum. They may already be increasing housing costs in Canada’s previously strained markets, and steel companies like Tenaris in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario have laid off workers in an effort to cut costs. Similarly, Canada’s retaliatory list of tariffs targets Republican strongholds explicitly because the resulting layoffs will hurt the President politically. Paul Ryan’s home state of Wisconsin now faces tariffs that will affect its numerous frozen pizza producers. Likewise, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had to tell his constituents in Kentucky that bourbon has been hit with a tariff. Canada’s purchasing power may be small compared to other countries and America itself, these tariffs are already being felt by the first casualties of the trade war: people.

CANADA IS ALSO HAVING TO FOOT THE BILL FOR THESE TARIFFS. TRUDEAU ANNOUNCED A $2 BILLION RELIEF FUND FOR COMPANIES AFFECTED BY THE TARIFFS. One estimate from the Petersen Institute for International Economics estimates that up to 195,000 American workers could lose their jobs as a result of the steel, aluminum, and auto tariffs, the latter of which sees a 25 per cent tariff put on cars made in Canada and shipped to the States. If that turns into an international trade war, job losses could jump to over 600,000. Canada is also having to foot the bill for these tariffs. Trudeau announced a $2 billion relief fund for companies affected by the tariffs. It is not enough to cover the losses but, hopefully, it can keep people employed while Canada heads to the negotiating table. An international trade war with the United States is already hurting everyday families in multiple countries around the world. It may be time for Canada to look elsewhere and inwards, like Mexico, who renegotiated agricultural deals with Argentina and Brazil last year, moving some of their economic attention to faster-growing countries. Canada and Canadians may also need to look inwards and decide that the “Made in Canada” label means solidarity with people who do not have a seat at the negotiating table, but are affected nonetheless.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // AUGUST 2018

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TALK TO YOUR FRIENDS ABOUT ALBERTA’S DEBT // COLIN CRAIG

Talk to Your Friends About Alberta’s Debt BY COLIN CRAIG

W

e all know someone who doesn’t pay attention to ballooning government debt. How can we help them understand the consequences of irresponsible spending? First, ask your friends to reflect on the old expression – “if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Rising government debt is no different; it ultimately means higher taxes.

for permanently closing the doors. How many businesses shut down or avoided Alberta because of the government’s 20 per cent business tax increase? It’s hard to say: businesses don’t usually alert the media when they choose to invest somewhere else – they just do it. The third thing people need to keep in mind is that if governments run into debt problems, the services people care about most are eventually impacted.

Premier Notley is currently on pace to take our province’s debt from about $12 billion (when she started as premier) to $53 billion in just four years. Her government is increasing the province’s debt by a staggering $344 every second.

Premier Notley routinely refuses to get spending under control, claiming she’s “protecting” education and health care. On the surface, her claim sounds valiant, but in reality, she’s doing more to put those services at risk than anyone else.

What’s the consequence of all that new debt? Well, just like if you quadrupled your credit card debt, the government’s minimum interest payments have also increased.

When Greece ran into debt problems a few years back, the Guardian ran the following headline “Greek Debt Crisis: Of all the damage, health care has been hit the worst.” Eventually, even the most sacred of government spending cows are impacted.

And guess what happened as interest costs rose over the years? The government increased income taxes, business taxes and the premier has now set her sights on higher carbon taxes as well. Her debt explosion is already hurting taxpayers in the pocketbooks. Next comes the employment angle. Ask your friends what they think happens when businesses see a government rapidly increasing its debt? The answer of course is businesses start to worry about governments raising taxes to address the debt problem. And if businesses worry about tax increases, some will decide to build their new factory somewhere else – taking all kinds of jobs with them. We’ve also heard stories of existing businesses shutting down because of rising taxes and costly government decisions. Just ask the former owner of Abruzzo Ristorante in Calgary, who cited rising property taxes as a key reason

To be clear, Alberta isn’t likely to run into a Greece-like debt problem any time soon. But it’s reckless for the government to be stepping on the gas towards such a problem. What we need to see is for the government to get its spending problem under control – and doing so wouldn’t result in the sky falling. Next door in British Columbia, we find a government that is providing similar services but at significantly lower costs. They’re simply a lot more cost-effective. If Alberta merely got its spending levels down to what B.C. spends per person, our government wouldn’t have a deficit right now … nor would it have piled on the extra $56,656 in debt since your started reading this column. Don’t forget to tell your friends.

COLIN CRAIG IS THE ALBERTA DIRECTOR FOR THE CANADIAN TAXPAYERS FEDERATION.

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THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT IS MEDDLING WITH WORKERS’ COMPENSATION // AMBER RUDDY

The Alberta Government is Meddling with Workers’ Compensation BY AMBER RUDDY

A

few years ago, then MLA now premier, Rachel Notley, told the Canadian Injured Workers Association of Alberta that our province’s Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) “is an incredibly cheap insurance system for employers,” and that “we don’t even have a system of even keeping the WCB accountable to the crappy-ass legislation we have in this province.” Well, that certainly sets the stage for the rough ride employers are now in store for. Effective September 1, 2018, ideologically-driven changes will fundamentally alter Alberta’s WCB, shifting the system from one that balances the interests of businesses and workers to one that is “worker-centric.” The Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) tracks business owner concerns over time. Survey findings from over a thousand business owners show the WCB has become a concern for entrepreneurs. In fact, 26 per cent of businesses reported workers’ compensation as a serious issue for their business in 2014, compared to 42 per cent now. Concern about having fair and balanced provincial labour laws went from 15 per cent in 2014 to 48 per cent today. The WCB system is 100 per cent funded through employer premiums. For many years, the board’s policy has been to refund employers the excess moneys over and above what is needed to properly fund the workers’ compensation system. When the WCB’s funding position (assets versus liabilities) exceeds 128 per cent, an automatic distribution is triggered. To put that into perspective, about $2 billion has been returned to Alberta business owners in the past five years.

This policy helps workers. Entrepreneurs report using the refunds to invest in newer safer equipment, offer training opportunities and to stay afloat by paying down debt. Government meddling with this policy is problematic because the workers’ compensation system is supposed to be independent from government. During a government mandate review, the minister of labour rejected a recommendation from the review panel to redirect the surplus moneys to other areas. Yet in a recent letter, the minister directed the board to conduct a consultation and to change their policy. The Alberta government seems to be trying to minimize political fallout: getting their desired outcome for the labour movement while trying to avoid public uproar from the small business community. Quite frankly, business owners will see through this thinly-veiled scheme to redirect the funds. Policy-makers should instead be talking about lowering the threshold at which a refund is triggered, to put more money back into businesses. According to a research report by CFIB, an Alberta business with five employees would receive a $4,960 rebate this year if monies over a 110 per cent threshold were refunded, instead of at the overly-cautious 128 per cent level. Yet, this policy is not even on the table for discussion. Job creators will soon be paying the price for the government’s ideological agenda under the guise of WCB reform.

AMBER RUDDY IS THE DIRECTOR OF PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS FOR THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT BUSINESS. SHE CAN BE REACHED AT AMBER.RUDDY@CFIB.CA. FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER @ARUDDY.

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STEEL AND ALUMINUM TRADE WAR HAS LOCAL IMPACTS // DAVID MACLEAN

Steel and Aluminum Trade War has Local Impacts BY DAVID MACLEAN, CME ALBERTA VICE PRESIDENT

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anadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) member Argus Machine is an Edmonton-based company that operates an engineering and design facility servicing oil and gas clients from across North America, and they’ve been doing it successfully since 1958. They are caught up in the ongoing trade dispute over steel and aluminum with United States. Argus and their clients bring raw materials from American suppliers into Canada, where premium threading is applied to drill pipe, casing and tubing in their 100,000 square foot manufacturing facility. Proposed countervailing tariffs imposed by the Canadian government – a retaliation to identical tariffs imposed by the Trump administration – could make it 25 per cent more expensive to do that work here in Alberta. Argus already faces stiff global competition every day. A stiff tariff will mean they are fighting with one arm tied behind their back. Additionally, the retaliatory list includes a range of manufacturing inputs – like Argus Machines’ – that are not readily available from Canadian sources. Changing suppliers to firms in Asia or Europe isn’t as easy it sounds. Argus has strategically invested in a North American supply chain – a process that takes years. Argus and their 195 employees face possibly their biggest threat since the oil and gas downturn began, and countless companies in Alberta face the same uncertainty. As my CME colleague, Mathew Wilson, told the Parliamentary Standing Committee on International Trade at the end of June, the current tariffs on steel and aluminum and the specter of a global trade war represent an existential threat to Canadian manufacturing and to the entire Canadian economy.

OUR NATION’S TOP PRIORITY MUST BE TO SUCCESSFULLY CONCLUDE NAFTA NEGOTIATIONS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. The federal government was right to impose retaliatory tariffs. They are a just response to the frankly absurd and insulting premise with which the U.S. administration levied steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada. Most manufacturers support the counter tariffs and they understand the political necessity to do so. However, they are also concerned Canadian counter tariffs will have a major impact on their businesses, especially if the tariff fight drags on. There will be pain. The question is “how do we reduce that pain?” Our nation’s top priority must be to successfully conclude NAFTA negotiations as soon as possible. NAFTA instability is the true threat to manufacturing and to the entire Canadian economy, while tariff fights are distractions designed to take our eye off the ball. The government must be careful to not inflict irreparable economic harm on Canada and its most important and trade exposed sector: manufacturing, and the government must take action to support potentially distressed companies to spur investment and weather the storm. The only way to look at this is situation is “short term pain for long term gain.” Our federal officials need to ignore the distractions and negotiate a new, modernized NAFTA that will boost Alberta exports in the long term. It won’t be easy, but it can be done. CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS & EXPORTERS (CME) IS THE VOICE OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURING. CME REPRESENTS MORE THAN 2,500 COMPANIES WHO ACCOUNT FOR AN ESTIMATED 82 PER CENT OF MANUFACTURING OUTPUT AND 90 PER CENT OF CANADA’S EXPORTS.

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // AUGUST 2018

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2018 LEADERS AWARDS GALA // LEADERS

Highlights

From Business in Edmonton’s 2018 Leaders Awards Gala

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2018 LEADERS AWARDS GALA // LEADERS

Platinum Partner

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Boldness in the Boardroom: Preparing for the Next World Order with ICD In addition to critical business skills like leadership, strategy, risk management, flexibility and sound judgment, the familiar but valid cliché that nothing is as constant as change may be the most enduring. Few know that better than the 13,000 coast-to-coast members of the Institute of Corporate Directors (ICD), the voice of Canadian directors and boards. The distinguished not-for-profit association provides top-quality education, advocacy and thought leadership in conjunction with improving trust and confidence in Canadian organizations by developing and activating directors.

Vancouver was the host city of the ICD National Conference and Fellowship Awards Gala this past May – one of Canada’s most influential business events, bringing together seasoned directors, executives and industry leaders for two days of thought leadership, networking and celebration. It was an invaluable opportunity to provide insights on emerging governance issues in and outside the boardroom to prepare directors to lead their organizations to success. The conference speakers and panellists focused on this year’s theme: Boldness in the Boardroom, Preparing for the Next World Order – underscoring the importance of leadership in a world of disruption.

THIRTY YEARS OF DISTINCTION

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AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

The relevant agenda included timely topics such as the future of Canadian trade and touched on the nature of Canada’s future trade relationships, from NAFTA and beyond, with a concentration on the implications of supplymanagement reform, global security issues, integration of transportation systems and the flow of goods across our borders. The conference examined the thorny issue of social licence in volatile times, suggesting that a “business as usual” strategy will no longer work, and instead urged engagement with stakeholders in an evolving and multifaceted landscape. The ICD conference discussed maintaining a competitive advantage while balancing risk


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and innovation in the boardroom and what boards may consider about affecting strategic decisions around innovation. The panellists recommended that boards be willing to invest in four or five projects at once and become comfortable with failure, even reward it. And although the conference focus was corporate and management, the discussions got personal! On the vital topic of leader character in the spotlight, the panellists emphasized that in the era of #MeToo, board oversight of leader character has never been more critical and that boards must address characterrelated issues pre-emptively. With the crucial and multifaceted impact of technology, the ICD conference stressed various aspects of governance in the blockchain age, one of the most transformative technologies since the Internet. The panellists urged the importance of directors being prepared for the effects it will have on their organization’s business models and to evaluate and use blockchain to drive growth and create long-term value. Directors were encouraged make sure their organizations have accurate data which is a prerequisite for building successful blockchain solutions, and the conference panellists also asserted that blockchain may have the potential to provide solutions for non-traditional risks caused by poor governance, market failures and bad data. Overall, the ICD conference underscored that, particularly in today’s unpredictable business world, leadership in the boardroom is not an option, but a necessity! Boards and directors must be bold, embrace risk and enable innovation to thrive. ABOVE: STEWART BECK, PRESIDENT & CEO, ASIA PACIFIC, LAURA DAWSON, DIRECTOR, CANADA INSTITUTE AT THE WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR SCHOLARS, HONORABLE DAVID L. EMERSON. PHOTO SOURCE: CALEY TAYLOR

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Karen Stone is the New Habitat for Humanity Edmonton President and CEO On July 1, 2018, Karen Stone joined Habitat for Humanity Edmonton, replacing the 13-year and now retired president & CEO, Alfred Nikolai. Stone brings more than 25 years of leadership to the position, including positions at Alberta Interagency Council on Housing and Homelessness, Family Violence Prevention and Homeless Support Services, BC Non-profit Housing Association, and BC/Yukon Society of Transition Housing. She was also an advocate for housing as a socio-economic right in South Africa, when she spent time practicing as a human rights lawyer. Affordable housing is a passion for Stone, making her the ideal candidate for the Habitat for Humanity Edmonton president & CEO position. “Habitat for Humanity Edmonton is a wonderful organization that has been transformed under the leadership of Alfred Nikolai,” said Karen Stone in a media release. “It is with great enthusiasm that I look forward to stewarding the next phase in the work of this organization and to serving and empowering many more families. I feel honored and humbled to have this opportunity to work with the amazing staff, volunteers, and partners that believe in the work of Habitat, as together we realize housing as a fundamental human right.” Affordable housing in Canada is a critical need for many families. Currently, 1 in 10 families in Edmonton are in need of affordable home ownership. The charity works to eliminate barriers to home ownership, providing a “hand up, not a hand out” to families so they can afford their first home, and subsequently, have more independence and a better future for themselves and their families. The Habitat for Humanity Edmonton affiliate opened in 1991 and serves Edmonton, Fort Saskatchewan, Slave Lake, and Rocky Mountain House. In 2017, the organization served 51 families in the Edmonton region.

Habitat for Humanity Edmonton is part of Habitat for Humanity Canada, which opened in 1985 and spans 58 affiliates over 10 provinces and 2 territories. Habitat for Humanity also operates 101 ReStores across Canada. Habitat for Humanity ReStores resell new and gently used building materials to economic and environmentally conscious consumers. ReStores keep tons of usable materials out of landfills each year. On the broader scale, Habitat for Humanity International, which was founded in 1976, has served over a million families worldwide to date, distributing keys to a new home every 5.5 minutes in more than 70 countries. The fact that “Decent shelter is something we all need to thrive” is one of the organization’s values. Stone will continue moving Habitat for Humanity Edmonton forward as a non-profit organization so it can continue to have a measurable impact on affordable housing here in the city and, through its affiliates, around the world. “As the largest Habitat affiliate in Canada, based on the number of families served annually and having served over 600 families to date, the board, management, and staff of Habitat for Humanity Edmonton look forward to welcoming Karen Stone to the ‘Habitat Family’” said Ian MacDonald, Habitat board Chair.

ABOVE: KAREN STONE, HABITAT FOR HUMANITY EDMONTON PRESIDENT & CEO.

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MORE THAN A BANK // COVER

ABOVE: CURTIS STANGE, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF ATB FINANCIAL. PHOTO SOURCE: EPIC PHOTOGRAPHY INC.

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MORE THAN A BANK // COVER

More Than a Bank BY NERISSA MCNAUGHTON

CURTIS STANGE PICKS UP THE TORCH AND CONTINUES TO LEAD THE CHARGE IN BANKING INNOVATION

C

urtis Stange is a prairie boy. He moved to Regina in the late ’70s a teen and always had a lifelong love for agriculture. After he graduated from university, he headed to the world of finance because, as he explains, “Banking was a way I could work and stay connected to prairie roots and help out farmers with financial services. That sentiment grew into how financial services and banking can make people’s lives better and happier. I know that sounds cliché, but banking can be very personal and a real accelerator for personal lives and entrepreneurs to live the lives they want.” Stange’s 30+ year banking career took him to various opportunities in Canada, but it was when he was working in Calgary for a national bank that his life took an unexpected turn. “I had a phone call from Dave Mowat. He wanted to have dinner and talk about ATB.” At the time, Mowat was president and CEO of ATB, a position he held and excelled in for more than 10 years. A banker getting a call from Mowat is akin to a recording artist getting a call from a major record label. Stange says, “I enjoyed my job and loved what I was doing, but after having dinner with Dave and meeting the board, there was no doubt that I wanted to be part of ATB. It’s a purpose-driven organization that focuses on team members first. That is very much what ATB is all about.” On July 1, 2018, Stange became the president and CEO of ATB Financial. “If you were to ask me as a teen or young adult, ‘would you envision yourself as the CEO of ATB Financial?’ I would not have even known what ATB was! But I always had high aspirations to lead, inspire, and enable people to be the best they can be. I was always keen to take on more responsibility and always wanted to progress.” His aspirations and experience made him a natural fit for the job. Stange has been married for 30 years, has two grown boys, is a grandfather, and loves the great outdoors. And he came very near to not being any of that, thanks to an incident that completely ruined his first possible career path. “I don’t think anybody knows this, but when I was five or six, I wanted to be a stunt man!” Stange divulges. “But I fell out of a car in Thunder Bay.”

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MORE THAN A BANK // COVER

His mother was driving and the young Stange felt like getting some fresh air. Instead of rolling down the window, he accidently opened the door.

OFF TALL BUILDINGS IN THE NAME

“I went tumbling out of the car!” he remembers. “I was just lying on the highway. Mom was frantic. She picked me up, dusted me off, and we kept on going. That was the end of me wanting to be a stuntman!”

OF ENTERTAINMENT, AND HE’S

Stange isn’t taking giant leaps off tall buildings in the name of entertainment, and he’s a lot more careful about differentiating between window rollers and door handles. However, the feats he performs daily for ATB are equally daring; he and his team take banking to a place it’s never been before.

ROLLERS AND DOOR HANDLES.

For example, a new banking model initiated at NorQuest College has shaken up the industry – this is not how banks usually behave. NorQuest College now has a full-service ATB location on its Edmonton campus. It’s operated by college staff and is for the students, college employees, and general public.

PLACE IT’S NEVER BEEN BEFORE.

“What makes this more than just another banking location, what makes it innovative and bold, is that it not only caters to students, but it also gives back,” says Dr. Jodi L. Abbott, president and CEO of NorQuest College. “Profits support scholarships, awards and bursaries, or the growth of the college’s programming and infrastructure.” You did not misread that line. The profits from the ATB at NorQuest College go to the college to support the college and its students’ education. Another ground-breaking initiative is in force at Boyle Street Community Services. The branch, called Four Directions Financial, uses biometric identification to make banking more accessible, and it’s the first institution in Canada to do so. Thanks to biometrics, the city’s most vulnerable clients do not have to have carry ID or a credit or debit card to access their money. “This unprecedented partnership with ATB has resulted in removing a significant barrier to banking, which has enabled our clients to take control of and protect their financial resources,” says Julian Daly, executive director, Boyle Street Community Services.

22

STANGE ISN’T TAKING GIANT LEAPS

AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

A LOT MORE CAREFUL ABOUT DIFFERENTIATING BETWEEN WINDOW HOWEVER, THE FEATS HE PERFORMS DAILY FOR ATB ARE EQUALLY DARING; HE AND HIS TEAM TAKE BANKING TO A

“We heard community members say they needed access to money every day; they needed it in small amounts every day; they wanted direct deposit for cheques, whether from the government or not; they wanted people who didn’t judge them; and they wanted all of this in a professional-looking, community-first, tradition-honouring place,” said Dave Mowat in a press release. For Stange, these initiatives are all about ATB’s drive to stay ahead of the industry’s disruptors while focusing relentlessly on removing barriers to banking for all. “People believe banking is all about profit and money, but it’s actually a people business,” smiles Stange. But sometimes those people aren’t very happy. Last year, shocking allegations were leveled at several major banks as service representatives admitted to shady tactics that allowed them to meet huge, imposed, and rigorously enforced product quotas. “We watched that very closely,” says Stange soberly. “ATB was not implicated, but we took it very seriously. Our difference is that we have always focused more on the experience of the customer than on the number of products we sell them. We did some deep reviews of our practices and were confident that our approach was the right one for us.”


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MORE THAN A BANK // COVER

As the new president and CEO of ATB Financial, Stange is proud to carry on the institution’s traditions of putting its team members first, all while helping to innovate new practices and remove barriers to banking. “I’m inspired by hard work. I’m inspired by bold, courageous leaders who take a stand and think differently – people who live with a purpose of abundance to help others and inspire others to be the best they can be. “The most rewarding aspect of my career is the people: the 5,000 team members, 100,000 businesses and the 650,000+

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AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

customers that push us to be better and that let us know when we need to improve. “This position is very exciting. It’s very humbling. We, as a team, can have such a great impact on the province. We believe we have a responsibility as an organization to be a catalyst that can drive innovation, be it tech, social, or corporate responsibility.” Social responsibility is vitally important to Stange and the ATB Team. Along with ATB’s support of numerous non-profit organizations, Stange is very excited about a


MORE THAN A BANK // COVER

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS VITALLY IMPORTANT TO STANGE AND THE ATB TEAM. ALONG WITH ATB’S SUPPORT OF NUMEROUS NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, STANGE IS VERY EXCITED ABOUT A NEW PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN ATB FINANCIAL AND THE CANADIAN MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION (CMHA). new partnership between ATB Financial and the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA). “About 100 team members on any given day miss work because they, or a friend, or relative is, impacted with mental illness,” says Stange. “What I’m really advocating for is to reduce the stigma and create a psychologically safe and healthy workplace. Then, how do we take that and translate it into a healthier province? There are far too many people taking their lives. Too many of our young kids, especially from grades 6 – 12, are struggling with mental health and don’t feel comfortable talking about it. We believe at ATB that we can help the province and all Albertans understand mental health, and we are keenly interested in defining a way to help the province reduce the stigma so we can have a healthier, happier province.” To this end, ATB and CMHA have partnered to provide tools and resources to help the ATB team recognize, deal with, and recover from mental health issues. As his time as the president and CEO of ATB begins, Stange looks back to those who helped him achieve the honour. “It’s hard to mention them all,” he reflects. “When I was going through the process of becoming the CEO, I leaned on a bunch of mentors and leaders that I interacted with over the years. My family is beyond supportive, especially my wife, Shannon, who, over the last 30 years, has moved the family with me across the country. I’m very grateful for the entire team and for different leaders across my 30-year career who have, at times, told me things I didn’t want to hear about things I did wrong but who also supported what I did right. I’m thankful for the groups that helped me think differently, and to Singularity University, which taught me to think outside the box about the abundance of access to technology for all.” Stange is very proud to have received the Order of Athabasca. “I graduated with an MBA from Athabasca

University in 2000, and that was just a really cool time in my career and my life. To receive the Order of Athabasca award was very rewarding for me.” He and ATB Financial have also been highly recognized for innovative banking, such as being among the first financial institutions to lean into blockchain, Apple Pay, and Facebook Messenger banking. From wanting to stay connected to his prairie roots to heading up the bank in Alberta that focuses on agriculture and beyond, what’s left to do for the energetic Stange? He’s just getting started. “The plan is to listen!” he says with excitement about his next ATB adventure. “I’m going on a tour from the top to the bottom of Alberta to hear what’s on the minds of each team member, and to learn and really know where ATB is at and how we are doing in our purpose of transforming banking and making it accessible. I won’t take anything for granted. I will open my mind, listen, and understand before I act. “To be given this opportunity is very humbling – to work alongside our team members, rich with a culture that has been created over the past decades, and to service our customers – I really believe we have a chance to transform banking and become more than a bank for Albertans. “We demonstrate every day that we are here for customers in good times and in troubled times. We stand next to Alberta and Albertans. ATB demonstrated this in both the 2008 and the 2014 recessions. We understand Alberta. We know Alberta. We are right here with you making your time richer and your aspirations closer, and we are focused on your happiness. We really focus on the dedication we have to Alberta and to ATB being more than a bank. “When I think of our team and our tech, I cannot wait to see what the future holds for ATB.”

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // AUGUST 2018

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EDMONTON: CANADA’S PRIME HEADQUARTER LOCATION // HEAD OFFICES

EDMONTON:

CANADA’S PRIME HEADQUARTER LOCATION Why Edmonton continues to grow as a prime spot for head offices in Canada

E

dmonton is the home office location for some of Canada’s most well-known corporations, including Stantec and PCL, and many startups, like Booster Juice and Famoso, that grew into province-spanning franchises. What’s driving the attraction of such a diverse industry base to Edmonton? The reasons, says Robert Borrelli, office managing partner, KPMG in Canada, are varied. “Corporations are attracted to Edmonton due to the availability of skilled labour while individuals are incentivized to work in Edmonton because of the competitive wages driven by the Alberta economy combined with low tax rates, giving rise to high levels of disposable income. This is in addition to the affordable housing available and an overall high standard of living for many,” explains Borrelli. “When larger markets are seen as saturated or too costly for a corporation to operate within, Edmonton is an appealing alternative. Additionally, companies that are attempting to either serve the northern regions of Canada or source supplies from these areas tend to headquarter in Edmonton due to the city’s proximity as Canada’s northernmost capital city.” Edmonton’s key industries are petrochemical, metal and fabrication manufacturing, transportation and logistics, and environmental engineering services. However, there has been an uptick in recent years in the rise of technologybased companies launching in Edmonton, like Innovative Trauma Care, and Trajectory IQ. With the concurrent rise in socially-focused and investing initiatives like the AI/

ML Fund and Three Knights Investments Inc., Edmonton has become prime real estate for the long-term success of its established corporations, and a hotbed of activity for startups across all industries. As Borrelli points out, this diversity in established and new, corporate and startup companies is what makes Edmonton thrive. “With the diversity of industries that prosper here, there is a large pool of skilled labour for a variety of positions, from trades to management, and Edmonton continues to develop the infrastructure needed to support additional corporate development. Numerous initiatives have made this development a priority, and therefore, recent expansion has been quite rapid, especially in comparison to other cities. This can be seen in the revitalization of downtown, and also in more bespoke areas like 124 Street. “Locally, Edmonton has really embraced the entrepreneurial spirit, which makes the city attractive to startups and unconventional, forward-thinking companies. The owners of these companies tend to be young people with a focus on local content, socially conscious initiatives, and technological advancement. This is indicative of the demographic of companies that are choosing to headquarter in Edmonton.” KPMG recently released its annual Canadian CEO Outlook, which provides insight into the growth outlooks, strategic priorities, business concerns and investment objectives of CEOs in more than 50 countries, including Canada. “CEOs

KPMG surveyed CEOs from around the world for their growth outlooks, strategic priorities, concerns and objectives. What did they have to say? Read the full report at kpmg.ca/CEOoutlook

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AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM


EDMONTON: CANADA’S PRIME HEADQUARTER LOCATION // HEAD OFFICES

from around the globe, across the country and right here in Edmonton tell us that in order to be successful they need to seize upon today’s opportunities and prepare to meet tomorrow’s challenges,” observes Borrelli. “To remain competitive in today’s market, companies need to focus on transforming for the future and that means putting a greater focus on innovation, business disruption and enhancing the customer experience. But what’s reassuring to see is that in our report, 94 per cent of Canadian CEOs expect the Canadian economy to grow over the next three years.”

“In a similar vein, foreign investment in certain markets, such as Vancouver, is starting to reach saturation, and Edmonton is becoming a potential alternative investee. This will not only help build momentum for the city on a global scale, but it will also create additional opportunities for corporations to do business in Edmonton.” No further proof is needed of Edmonton being Canada’s HQ location of choice when one considers the installation of Google’s DeepMind partnership with the University of Alberta in 2017, and with the behemoth of all successful corporate endeavors – Amazon – entertaining a bid from the Capital City for it’s next headquarter location.

That’s great news for attracting companies to start up and headquarter in Edmonton, since the city continues to revitalize with ICE District, The Quarters Downtown, and the Brewery District, and whose own Startup Edmonton and TEC Edmonton have helped companies like FotoJournal, MADSOFT Games, Extraordinary Absorbents Inc., and MERCK share their vision with the world.

When one thinks of corporate headquarters, the perception used to be the office tower in downtown, with its ancillary locations across Canada and the world. But Edmonton is showing the global business community that not only can we robustly support that type of headquarter, we can also pioneer and support the new age of the startup, disruptive, tech-forward industry. Edmonton has everything a business owner or corporation needs for it’s headquarters: funding and capital, infrastructure, skilled labour, and an eager audience ready to make that business venture a success.

“The endeavors undertaken locally over the past several years will continue to make Edmonton an attractive location for corporate development. The continued recovery from the recession within the energy industry will alleviate some of the pessimism surrounding Alberta, and Edmonton, which should help gain momentum in attracting new corporations to the city,” confirms Borrelli.

THE EDMONTON HEAD OFFICE FEATURE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY KPMG

PCL Construction Holdings Ltd.

P

Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

66

Stantec Inc.

T

CL is a group of independent construction companies owned by more than 4,000 employee shareholders across Canada, the United States, Australia and the Caribbean. These diverse operations in the civil infrastructure, heavy industrial, and buildings markets are supported by a strategic presence in 31 major centres. PCL Construction is the largest contracting organization in Canada and one of the largest in North America. Dave Filipchuk

Robert J. Gomes

REVENUE

8,035,673,000

$

Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

96

he Stantec community unites more than 15,000 employees working in over 250 locations. They collaborate across disciplines and industries to bring buildings, energy and resource, and infrastructure projects to life. Their work‹professional consulting in planning, engineering, architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, surveying, environmental sciences, project management, and project economics‹begins at the intersection of community, creativity, and client relationships.

REVENUE

www.pcl.com

5,140,100,000

$

www.stantec.com

When asked, 98% of Canadian CEOs are piloting or have already implemented AI. What else are they doing? Read KPMG’s latest report: kpmg.ca/CEOoutlook

BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // AUGUST 2018

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EDMONTON: CANADA’S PRIME HEADQUARTER LOCATION // HEAD OFFICES

Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission

A

Rank: Store Cdn (out of 800)

112

AutoCanada Inc.

A

Government of Alberta agency responsible for administering the Gaming and Liquor Act, Regulation and related policy. Ensures the gaming and liquor activities in Alberta are conducted honestly, openly and with integrity, and maximizing the economic benefits of gaming and liquor activities in the province to benefit all Albertans.

Alain Maisonneuve

utoCanada is one of Canada’s largest multi-location automobile dealership groups, currently operating 48 franchised dealerships in eight provinces and has over 3,400 employees. In 2014, their dealerships sold approximately 57,000 vehicles and processed approximately 786,000 service and collision repair orders in our 822 service bays during that time.

REVENUE

4,292,124,000

$

www.aglc.ca

EPCOR Utilities Inc.

Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

E

204

3,101,560,000

$

Alberta Treasury Branches

A

PCOR’s story began over 120 years ago, as Edmonton’s power and water utility and Canada’s first municipally owned electric utility. EPCOR Utilities Inc. has been a stand-alone company since 1996. The City of Edmonton is thier sole Shareholder, and they operate as a commercial entity, governed by an independent Board of Directors.

Rank: Bank Cdn (out of 800)

210

Curtis Stange REVENUE

2,035,000,000

$

www.epcor.ca

Workers’ Compensation Board - Alberta

T

Rank: Service Cdn (out of 800)

227

2,003,668,000

$

Canadian Western Bank

C

he Workers’ Compensation Board is a statutory corporation created by government under the Workers’ Compensation Act to administer a system of workplace insurance for the workers and employers of the province of Alberta. The organization is employer funded to provide cost-effective disability and liability insurance.

Guy R. Kerr

www.atb.com Rank: Bank Cdn (out of 800)

314

anadian Western Bank offers speciality business banking services for small- and medium-sized companies with a focus on general commercial banking, equipment financing and leasing, commercial real estate financing, real estate construction financing, and energy lending. Full-service personal banking options, including chequing and savings accounts, loans, mortgages and investment products, are also available. Christopher H. Fowler

REVENUE

1,745,287,000

$

Capital Power Corp.

REVENUE

www.wcb.ab.ca Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

C

321

1,111,529,000

$

Liquor Stores N.A. Ltd.

1,046,000,000

$

Servus Credit Union Ltd.

S

Rank: Store Cdn (out of 800)

Stephen Bebis

422

iquor Stores N.A. Ltd. (and its predecessor companies) has been a leader in the Alberta retail liquor industry since liquor privatization in 1993. The Company operates over 180 stores in Alberta, over 30 stores in British Columbia, over 20 stores in Alaska and over 10 stores in Kentucky. The Company’s Liquor Stores primarily operate under the brand names Liquor Depot, Liquor Barn, and Wine and Beyond in Alberta; Liquor Depot, Liquor Barn and Wine Cellar in British Columbia; Brown Jug in Alaska, and Liquor Barn, The Ultimate Party Source and Liquor Barn Express in Kentucky.

REVENUE

www.capitalpower.com Rank: Credit Cdn (out of 800)

434

621,361,000

$

Alberta Investment Management Corp.

A

ervus Credit Union is a member-owned, community-based financial institution with roots dating back to 1938. Based in Edmonton with regional offices in Lloydminster and Red Deer, Servus Credit Union provides a complete line of financial services and solutions.

Garth Warner

Kevin Uebelein

REVENUE

583,963,000

www.cwb.com

L

apital Power (TSX: CPX) is a growth-oriented North American power producer headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta. The company develops, acquires, operates and optimizes power generation from a variety of energy sources. Capital Power owns approximately 4,500 megawatts of power generation capacity at 24 facilities and is pursuing contracted generation capacity throughout North America. Capital Power (TSX: CPX) is a growth-oriented North American power producer headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta. The company develops, acquires, operates and optimizes power generation from a variety of energy sources. Capital Power owns approximately 4,500 megawatts of power generation capacity at 24 facilities and is pursuing contracted generation capacity throughout North America.

REVENUE

www.liquorstoresna.ca Rank: Finance Cdn (out of 800)

484

lberta Investment Management Corporation, AIMCo, is one of Canada’s largest and most diversified institutional investment managers with more than $100 billion of assets under management. Established on January 1, 2008, AIMCo’s mandate is to provide superior long-term investment results for its clients. AIMCo operates at arms-length from the Government of Alberta and invests globally on behalf of 32 pension, endowment and government funds in the Province of Alberta.

REVENUE

www.servus.ca

455,563,000

$

94% of Canadian CEOs expect growth in the Canadian economy over the next three years. Discover other insights from Canadian CEOs at kpmg.ca/CEOoutlook

28

www.autocan.ca

lberta Treasury Branches, doing business as ATB Financial, is a financial institution and crown corporation owned by the Province of Alberta. ATB operates in Alberta only, providing financial services to nearly 700,000 Albertans and Alberta-based businesses. ATB has 172 branches and 135 agencies, serving a total of 243 communities in Alberta.

Stuart Lee REVENUE

$

144

Thomas L. Orysiuk

REVENUE

Brian T. Vaasjo

Rank: Store Cdn (out of 800)

AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

www.aimco.alberta.ca


Discover unchartered value in your business Is your tax adviser providing you with just the standard compliance requirements? A KPMG tax adviser can look beyond your financial statements and tax returns to help unlock value in your business and steer you in the right direction. To find out more, speak with an adviser today. David Magdalinski KPMG Enterprise Tax Partner T: 780-429-6035 E: dmagdalinski@kpmg.ca

kpmg.ca/enterprise

© 2018 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 16022


EDMONTON: CANADA’S PRIME HEADQUARTER LOCATION // HEAD OFFICES

North American Construction Group Ltd.

N

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

600

Melcor Developments Ltd.

M

orth American Construction Group (NACG) is the premier provider of heavy construction and mining services in Canada. With over 60 years of experience, NACG can provide a comprehensive and integrated approach to meet our customer’s requirements from consultation to completion - a distinct advantage that few contractors can rival. Darin Rayburn REVENUE

292,557,000

$

www.nacg.ca

Alberta Capital Finance Authority

T

Rank: Finance Cdn (out of 800)

637

259,079,000

$

238,212,000

www.acfa.gov.ab.ca

TerraVest Industries Inc.

T Tom Ruth

Rank: Manuf Cdn (out of 800)

T

680

Dr. Dustin Haw

206,099,000

www.corporate.flyeia.com

ZCL Composites Inc.

E

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

684

stablished in 1987, ZCL COMPOSITES INC. has grown to become North America’s leading designer, manufacturer and supplier of costeffective fibreglass tank systems to the petroleum industry. An unrelenting drive to manufacture superior fibreglass tanks that simply will not corrode has made ZCL the preferred choice in many industrial and retail sectors. Ronald M. Bachmeier

REVENUE

REVENUE

192,535,000

$

www.terravestcapital.com

K-Bro Linen Inc.

Rank: Service Cdn (out of 800)

K

707

188,169,000

$

170,559,000

www.k-brolinen.com

Peace Hills General Insurance Co.

H

731

eadquartered in Alberta’s Capital Region in Acheson, Alberta (AB) _ just outside of Edmonton, Alberta - ENTREC has been providing specialized crane and integrated service solutions throughout Western Canada for over 18 years.

John M. Stevens

Rank: Prop Ins Cdn (out of 800)

743

148,686,000

$

REVENUE

www.entrec.com

Foremost Income Fund

F

eace Hills Insurance is a licensed, general insurance company, which has been insuring Western Canadians since 1982. They are committed to serving the community and feel this is best met by distributing their product though an independent brokerage system. Peace Hills Insurance has over 200 employees who are committed to serving over 478 independent broker offices across British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory.

134,413,000

Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

$

P

www.zcl.com

ENTREC Corp.

-Bro was founded in 1954 as Stork Diaper Service and later grew to meet the needs of the healthcare and hospitality industries. To better reflect the company’s evolving role and in honor of its founders the Kinasewich brothers, the name was changed to K-Bro Linen Systems Inc. in 1984. Today, K-Bro is the largest provider of laundry and linen services in Canada meeting the needs of healthcare, hospitality and other commercial sectors.

REVENUE

Kevin Johnson

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

744

oremost has been a central player in the Western Canadian energy story going back to 1948. Foremost had its humble beginnings starting with a line of tracked vehicles for heavy terrain applications. Through acquisitions and strategic growth, Foremost is now one of the largest, most diverse industrial manufacturers in Western Canada specializing in oil & gas, heavy oil, mining, water well and construction equipment. With more than 640,000 square feet of manufacturing space, 9 locations, and over 600 employees across Alberta, Foremost is well positioned to meet and exceed clients’ expectations.

REVENUE

www.peacehillsinsurance.com

132,530,000

$

Cyber attacks are a case of ‘when’ not ‘if’ according to 50% of Canadian CEOs. Learn their other perspectives by visiting kpmg.ca/CEOoutlook

30

669

he Regional Airports Authorities Act of 1989 governs airport authorities in Alberta. The Edmonton Regional Airports Authority (known as Edmonton Airports) was established under the act in 1990. Transport Canada officially handed the management of the Edmonton International Airport to Edmonton Airports on Aug. 1, 1992. EIA leases its land from Transport Canada. The Authority is legally and financially independent. No government or other body has a call on the assets of the Authority, nor are they liable for the debts of the Authority. By law the Authority does not have equity shareholders or to provide any external body with an equity interest in our organization. We operate as a not-for-profit corporation. All income and surpluses must be applied to the promotion of our purposes.

$

erraVest Capital is an Industrial Manufacturer focused on acquiring businesses with strong cash flow generation, long track records of operating success, strong balance sheets and committed management teams. We are focused on creating value for shareholders through our existing lines of business as well as acquiring additional businesses with stable cash flows and potential for growth through our support.

$

Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

$

Kathy Boychuck

www.melcor.ca

Edmonton Regional Airports Authority

he Alberta Capital Finance Authority (“ACFA”) is a provincial authority and acts only as an agent of the Alberta crown. Its business is to provide local entities with financing for capital projects. ACFA is able to borrow in capital markets at interest rates which would not be available to local authorities acting independently. ACFA makes loans to Alberta municipalities, school boards and other local entities at interest rates based on the cost of its borrowings.

REVENUE

Linda J. McCurdy

624

elcor Developments manages the full life cycle of real estate development: from acquiring raw land, to community planning, to construction and development, to managing leasable office, retail and residential sites. They develop and manage mixed-use residential communities, business and industrial parks, office buildings, retail commercial centres and golf courses.

Martin Ferron REVENUE

Troy Holinski

Rank: Real Est Cdn (out of 800)

AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

www.foremost.ca/about-us/income-fund/


Are calm waters ahead? As a business owner you want peace of mind that when it comes time to sell your business, the process will go smoothly. KPMG Enterprise can help you prepare well in advance so that when it is time to exit, the value of your hard work is accounted for and you can aim to set sail for the future. Speak with an adviser today. Deborah MacPherson KPMG Enterprise Lead Tax Partner T: 780-429-7374 E: dmacpherson@kpmg.ca kpmg.ca/enterprise

© 2018 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 17168


HOW ONE AREA IS REVITALIZING AND KEEPING ITS HEART // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

HOW ONE AREA IS REVITALIZING AND KEEPING ITS HEART WITH ALL EYES ON ICE DISTRICT, EDMONTON HAS BEEN SLOWLY BUILDING UP ANOTHER AREA: THE QUARTERS DOWNTOWN. BY ZACHARY EDWARDS

N

estled east of downtown, from 97 Street to 92 Street and from 103A Avenue to the top of the North Saskatchewan River Valley, is a neighbourhood known as The Quarters Downtown. The area has always played a vital role in the city as a cultural hub, and it has seen its fair share of hardships. Today, it has become an important site of renewal and revitalization for the city, and one that aims for a balance of the influx of new buildings and people with a commitment to those who already call it home. The Quarters was an important first for Edmonton as a city in the form of the first commercial district. Back when

32

AUGUST 2018 // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM

horse-drawn carriages were still the primary traffic, the area was a hub for businesses. “The Quarters was where the first commercial district started in Edmonton,” says Mary Anne Debrinski, City of Edmonton’s director of Urban Renewal. “As the city started to grow, the businesses moved westward. The Quarters became a place where immigrants first moved and then left as they prospered, making it a great place to start in the country.” Kenneth Cantor, president of the PRIMAVERA Development Group, who is currently overseeing the Brighton Block development in The Quarters, says geography has been


Construction

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HOW ONE AREA IS REVITALIZING AND KEEPING ITS HEART // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

a major part of the area’s story since its beginnings. “The Quarters has had many unique challenges,” he says. “Although it was a vibrant community at the beginning of the 20th century and home to many active commercial and residential users, as well as a vibrant Chinese community, many of the things that contributed to Edmonton’s success over the next 100 years didn’t treat Jasper East Village/ Chinatown as kindly.” Now, that same geography has made it a prime location for a major revitalization effort that has been underway in its current inception since 2005. Back then, the provincial government amended the Municipal Government Act to include access to a Community Revitalization Levy that funds specific revitalization efforts. The first grant was for Calgary’s East Village, but money was soon set aside for The Quarters as well. In the years since the levy was acquired, the area has slowly been improving. The Quarters currently houses an estimated 2,400 people, but Debrinski hopes that number will increase tenfold over the next 20 years. To accommodate such a change, the City has two strategies: investing in infrastructure and buying and rezoning land parcels for developers and public projects. For the former, Edmontonians can already see the improvements to 96th Street and, below that same street, new drainage infrastructure is in place to help woo developers. As for property, the City has been buying individual plots over the course of years and turning them into larger plots for private and public use. “One of the obstacles to redevelopment in the area is fractionalized property ownership,” says Debrinski. “The city bought around 10 lots from five property owners over seven years that we could then consolidate into one large lot that could be redeveloped. For a developer, that’s a long time for them to invest in acquisition of one site. One of the ways we found that we can help speed things along is to slowly acquire the lands and consolidate them.” Parceling land and investing in infrastructure has attracted developers and public projects, many of which are still in the planning stage. However, the influx of activity has brought

“THE CITY BOUGHT AROUND 10 LOTS FROM FIVE PROPERTY OWNERS OVER SEVEN YEARS THAT WE COULD THEN CONSOLIDATE INTO ONE LARGE LOT THAT COULD BE REDEVELOPED. FOR A DEVELOPER, THAT’S A LONG TIME FOR THEM TO INVEST IN ACQUISITION OF ONE SITE. ~ MARY ANN DEBRINSKI people like Cantor to the area, who says the closing of the municipal airport was a significant moment for the area. “There has been a steady stream of other things since [the airport closed] that are starting to create critical mass – Boyle Renaissance, Louise McKinney Park, the Quarters’ street and servicing upgrades, the Hyatt Place, the Five

ABOVE: MARY ANN DEBRINSKI, CITY OF EDMONTON, DIRECTOR OF URBAN RENEWAL.

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HOW ONE AREA IS REVITALIZING AND KEEPING ITS HEART // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

Corners tower, National Cappuccino’s restoration, the Law Offices building, and the resurgence of Chinatown.” The Brighton Block is poised to join these other projects as a watershed moment for the neighbourhood. The iconic heritage building, constructed in 1912, must be completely renovated inside, but Cantor hopes it will be a central aspect of the revitalized area. “The Brighton Block was always a prominent building in that stretch of Jasper Avenue,” he says. “It’s our intention to restore it to its previous heralded status. One of the things that will contribute to that is it being in its own way ‘centre ice’ even if it’s not in ICE District.” Cantor says the Brighton Block, while smaller than previous projects like the EPCOR Tower, is a unique opportunity, especially as ICE District continues to dominate headlines around urban renewal in downtown Edmonton. The Quarters offers something different compared to the skyscrapers down the road. “There are large segments of our market who aren’t well served in buildings that large,” says Cantor of ICE District’s massive towers. “Brighton Block’s spaces will speak to those tenants who are looking

for something different, something a little bit out of the ordinary. As much as ICE District is corporate personified, the Brighton Block is bespoke.” As with all revitalization projects, local residents and community groups are concerned with gentrification. In an area like The Quarters, which is historically important for newcomers and artists alike, the fear of getting pushed out comes with real precedent. Debrinski is concerned about the process as well, and points to numerous projects, both complete and underway, that will provide affordable housing in the area. “The one thing we learned when we did our public engagement is that [residents] didn’t want the area to become gentrified,” Debrinski states. “They definitely want to have 20,000 people living there, but they want a diverse mix of people in incomes and backgrounds. They want it to be an area that will still welcome vulnerable people.” To that end, the City has worked with numerous local groups and agencies, building and planning projects like the Boyle ABOVE: CONSTRUCTION IS ALREADY UNDERWAY ON THE BRIGHTON BLOCK, A HISTORICAL BUILDING IN THE HEART OF THE QUARTERS.

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HOW ONE AREA IS REVITALIZING AND KEEPING ITS HEART // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECTS PLANNED FOR THE AREA IS ARTISTS QUARTERS, A PROPOSED BUILDING THAT WILL PROVIDE SUSTAINABLE HOUSING, STUDIOS AND WORK SPACES FOR THE CITY’S ARTISTS. RAPID FIRE THEATRE, ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL, AND ARTS HABITAT WILL ALL WORK OUT OF THE SPACE, AND IT WILL BE PART OF THE REVITALIZATION CYCLE THAT’S BEEN SEEN IN THE CITY BEFORE. “The arts are a catalyst for development. We’ve seen this in lots of cities and specifically in Edmonton,” says Julian Mayne, executive director for the Art Quarters. “We can see the Edmonton International Fringe Festival and events that happen in the Whyte Avenue area and how that revitalized that area years ago. When you bring people in, businesses come in and the whole circle thrives. Street Community Centre and affordable housing in and around the area. These buildings, developed under the City’s Cornerstone affordable housing program, ensure affordable housing will remain in the area for everyone from young families to senior citizens. One of the most exciting affordable housing projects planned for the area is Artists Quarters, a proposed building that will provide sustainable housing, studios and work spaces for the city’s artists. Rapid Fire Theatre, Alberta Craft Council, and Arts Habitat will all work out of the space, and it will be part of the revitalization cycle that’s been seen in the city before.

“The overarching idea with the Arts Quarters is to literally embed artists in The Quarters to ensure that their presence not only initiates the catalyst but stays and becomes part of the revitalization of the area on a long-term, sustainable basis.” The Quarters revitalization represents an important moment in Edmonton. An area that has long served an important purpose is perfectly situated to become part of the city’s rise. It also has a deep commitment to its history and its people. As new business comes in, projects like Brighton Block and Artists Quarters will not only define its skyline, but the lives of the people living in the area.

ABOVE: THE PROPOSED FINAL LOOK OF THE BRIGHTON BLOCK WHEN FULLY RESTORED WITH ADDITIONAL OFFICE SPACE. PHOTO SOURCE: PRIMAVERA

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USUAL BUSINESS IN UNUSUAL SPACES // COMMERCIAL LEASING

USUAL BUSINESS IN UNUSUAL SPACES THERE ARE A LOT OF UNIQUE OPTIONS IN THE CITY’S COMMERCIAL LEASING SCENE.

BY NERISSA MCNAUGHTON

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dmonton is an exciting place for business owners these days. With the ongoing development of ICE District, and distinct neighbourhoods with identifiable personalities (Whyte Ave, 124 Street, Brewery District, the French Quarter) all evolving as the city expands, there is no shortage of leasing options. In fact, as David Kent, president and founder of Nearctic Property Group, explains, right now there is more supply than demand. “The commercial market capacity (space) has increased on all fronts: industrial, retail, and office. In both industrial and office, the increased supply has outstripped the demand, resulting in higher vacancy,” says Kent. “There is still positive absorption, but it has not kept up with supply owing to the recession and over-building. Some of the absorption,

especially in office, can be attributed to the refurbishing of old, functionally obsolete buildings.” Nearctic has been busy with several high-profile projects over the past three years, including a 50-acre commercial subdivision in Nisku and the reimagining of Nexus Business Park’s warehouse, which is being converted to small commercial and distribution space. “We are also building the second phase of Commerce West, which will be 63,000 square feet and was once an old trailer park on 111 Avenue. Additionally, we have built the Vantage Business Park, where we converted old obsolete cross dock space. Happily, it is 100 per cent occupied with small showroom industrial commercial tenants.

ABOVE: VANTAGE BUSINESS PARK. PHOTO SOURCE: NEARCTIC

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USUAL BUSINESS IN UNUSUAL SPACES // COMMERCIAL LEASING

building once owned by Molson. Molson owned the brewery from 1958 to 2007, when it shut operations down. Today, the site is being transformed into a bustling neighbourhood. Peter Schwann, principal at Avison Young, and the leasing agent at the Edmonton Brewery District (office premises) says, “The Brewery District is the epitome of convenience and on-site amenities for both patrons of the District and staff of the businesses that are located here. This, combined with a high end architectural design that lends tribute to the history of the former Molson Edmonton landmark, places visitor and staff experience at the forefront. “In terms of convenience, the Brewery District is located in the thriving Oliver Neighborhood, just minutes from Edmonton’s downtown district and on the primary arterial of 104th Avenue (Stony Plain Road), which enters and exits the downtown core. Despite being central, the Brewery District provides an abundance of parking (3.4 stalls per 1,000 square feet), the majority of which is located in a massive underground heated parkade. This quantity more than provides the parking required by staff and visitors of the site and, as a heated environment, it provides a welcome perk for everyone during Edmonton’s long winter months. In addition to ample heated parking, the future LRT will pass and stop directly in front of the site.” The District has an ideal mix of amenities, including Loblaw’s City Market, Shoppers Drug Mart, GoodLife Fitness, Starbucks, finanical institutions, and medical services. “These core on-site services also provide the staff of businesses located at the Brewery District with everything they would want; this has been a major factor in attracting office users that are focused on staff enjoyment, which assists with recruitment and retention of talent,” explains Schwann. Nearctic’s revival of what would otherwise be old or unused space is part of an ongoing trend in the city. Rather than languishing as boarded up buildings and empty spaces as businesses converge on the trendy ICE District downtown, older neighbourhoods are being brought back to life in style. One such revival is seen in Edmonton Brewery District. The iconic look of the district is built around the red brick

Some opportunities for leasing in the Brewery District are still open, including space in the iconic building that gave the neighbourhood it’s identity. “There is a truly unique opportunity for users within the former Molson Building (Building 11), which is being redeveloped to high end, loft, exposed brick and beam office space,” says Schwann. “This building, which is nearing completion, will fill a satiable demand for this style of space,

ABOVE: BREWERY DISTRICT RENDERING - OFFICE. MIDDLE: BREWERY DISTRICT RENDERING - OFFICE. BOTTOM: PREMIUM OUTLET COLLECTION EIA. PHOTO SOURCE FOR BOTTOM PHOTO: IVANHOÉ CAMBRIDGE

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USUAL BUSINESS IN UNUSUAL SPACES // COMMERCIAL LEASING

long under-supplied in Edmonton. We are anticipating high demand from professional services, IT companies, and a host of other office user categories for this rare opportunity.” Sometimes what makes a commercial district special is not only it’s history, but the type of retailers that gather there. In a city where big box retail and branded services can be found in every quarter, one area is eschewing the norm and actively pursing a different direction. “What makes 124 Street a unique place to do business is that the majority of our businesses (approximately 95 per cent) are independent and locally owned with very few franchises or chain stores,” says Jeff McLaren, executive director of the 124 Street Business Association. “Subsequently, our business owners bring a creativity and passion to their businesses that translates to not only unique and one-ofa-kind products and services, but also to the authentic and personal experience you have every time you visit 124 Street. There is a really strong community and connection, not only among the business members, but also between our business owners and patrons. Unfortunately, this sense of business community, like a traditional Main Street, is becoming increasingly unique in Edmonton, which is being inundated more and more by franchises, big-box stores, and shopping power centres.” Businesses large and small abound on 124 Street, including the Canada-wide famous Duchess Bake Shop, several art galleries, and no shortage of boutique jewellery, clothing, and specialty stores. Yet, there is no lack of professional services; architects, insurance firms, lawyers, real estate agents, event planners, web designers, engineers, and more also hang out their shingle on 124 Street. “We are trying to attract creative, independent, and locally owned businesses that add to the existing niches that 124 Street is now known for, such as finer food/restaurants, art galleries, boutiques, and premium services,” notes McLaren. Edmonton has old districts that are being revitalized, trendy districts that are growing steadily – and one feature not common to many cities in Canada: an international airport.

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Leasing opportunities around the airport come with a builtin clientele, making Edmonton International Airport (EIA) a hot spot for retailers that support the distribution and logistics industry. However, thanks to Edmonton’s newest mall, Premium Outlet Collection EIA, leasing opportunities abound for fashion and outlet brands as well. “Premium Outlet Collection EIA is a fully enclosed shopping centre, offering a mix of fashion and outlet brands, and it is ideally situated in a highly visible location. About 89,000 vehicles access the Queen Elizabeth II Highway by the property daily, the EIA saw 7.8 million passengers in 2017, and our trade area includes 1.3 million people,” says Jason Bos, general manger, Ivanhoé Cambridge. “The architectural design aesthetic provides a warm and modern shopping atmosphere, within a manageable footprint. The centre opened on May 2 and so far, we are very pleased with the traffic and sales numbers.” What makes Premium Outlet Collection EIA a unique leasing location? Bos explains, “It is positioned to be a destination for both tourists and locals, given its location adjacent to the Edmonton International Airport and proximity to south Edmonton, Leduc County, and surrounding areas. Touristfocused services include DeliverEase, a parcel shipping and delivery service, a refresh room, Asian payment methods, flight status screens, luggage storage, and boarding pass printing. EIA’s complimentary on-airport shuttle service runs every 30 minutes between the two locations. “The centre also offers a unique space called SHARE. SHARE is a welcoming place where you can enjoy a craftbrewed coffee, sample locally produced nourishing foods, and browse a maker’s market showcasing the work of Alberta’s considerable makers community. SHARE is all about sharing experiences.” Thanks to the plethora of unique leasing opportunities across the city, companies in every sector – warehousing, fashion retail, hospitality, logistics, or those in need of office space – have a chance to put roots down in extraordinary places; it’s one more way Edmonton’s diverse business landscape benefits the entire city.


#ITSAMESS // TRAINING & EDUCATION

#ITSAMESS

IS SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE WORKPLACE A CORPORATE OR PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY? THE LINES ARE, UNFORTUNATELY, BLURRED

BY LAURA BOHNERT

#

MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter, #NoBanNoWall: social activism has taken more than a turn; lately, it’s gone viral, but what does this new dynamic mean for the workplace? Now that social issues can be brought to light with a viral following in as little as a few minutes, do workplaces need to adapt to mitigate the increasing tensions that could result among employees, shareholders, and clients? According to Dena Gillies, partner, Omni Management Consulting Alliance, the social media impact has been notable. “Social media has extended the definition of the ‘workplace’,” she explains. “Much of the training that I do is less about sensitivity and more about educating employees on the consequences of off-duty conduct, including the use of social media. While the #MeToo movement has influenced the workplace, I believe the more significant influence has been the recent changes to Alberta’s OH&S Act, effective June 1, 2018. We’ve had several client requests for training on what this change means specific to workplace harassment.”

“Bill 30’s changes to the Alberta OH&S Act has introduced requirements for employers to develop violence and harassment prevention plans,” Gillies continues. “Educating employees will be a part of that plan. While not a legal requirement, it may be in the best interest of an employer to provide staff education in some or all of the above areas mentioned as a means of proactively addressing potential workplace issues. Pro-active education in these types of emerging issues is reasonably new and growing in the workplace. While employees may be receiving training in school, my sense is that employees entering the workforce are receiving most of their education by the world around them, often through social media. Social norms and laws are changing in terms of what is considered acceptable and unacceptable behaviour.” Does that mean this is becoming the new normal? “Yes, very much so,” Gillies affirms. “Currently, millennials are now the largest generation in the Canadian workforce. Social consciousness is a trait associated with millennials

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#ITSAMESS // TRAINING & EDUCATION

“THESE MOVEMENTS SHINE A LIGHT ON WHAT’S BEEN AN ISSUE IN SOCIETY AND IN THE WORKPLACE TO A SHOCKINGLY LARGE EXTENT IN TERMS OF HARASSMENT, AND THAT’S OPENED UP A LOT OF EYES AND SCARED CORPORATIONS INTO ACTIVELY DEALING WITH THEM.” ~ O’RYAN HUGHES

that generally hasn’t been connected with the previous generations. In my experience, companies that choose to offer training on healthy workplace practices are doing so in the best interest of the company and its employees. Failing to address poor workplace behavior could come at significant cost to a company’s finances, turnover, productivity, and reputation. As the labour shortage in Canada continues, having a poor reputation in the market is a significant risk to any company.” O’Ryan Hughes, MBA., managing partner, Stoppler Hughes Ltd., agrees that social movements like #MeToo have had an important impact on businesses. “These movements shine a light on what’s been an issue in society and in the workplace to a shockingly large extent in terms of harassment, and that’s opened up a lot of eyes and scared corporations into actively dealing with them. There is always a risk identified, but the social pressure of these movements has made a meaningful impact in terms of training policy awareness and unacceptability.”

In terms of implementing the changes necessary in preventing social movements from becoming issues in the workplace, “It’s up to individual leaders in organizations,” Hughes observes, adding that, “with leadership that cares about its people, we will have already seen them become more proactive in the past. It’s the ones who are not so conscious that are having to make changes now.” “It’s a positive thing, not negative,” he stresses. “We’ve actually seen a lot more focus on diversity hiring as a result.” He’s also noticed an increased value being placed on higher quality human resources, which at times haven’t been given as much priority. “If done right, HR is more proactive. When stuff goes sideways in the media, PR and marketing step in.” He points to the recent example of two African-American men being arrested for “trespassing” at a Philadelphia Starbucks. “Shutting down to train your employees is a PR move. The type of training that needs to go along

ABOVE: O’RYAN HUGHES, M.B.A. MANAGING PARTNER, STOPPLER HUGHES LTD. PHOTO SOURCE: BROCKKRYTONPHOTOGRAPHY

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What is the one thing that can make a difference in average success & extraordinary success?

Leaders of Edmonton Symposium October 12, 2018

Dr. John C. Maxwell

New York Times bestselling author, named the #1 leadership expert by the AMA and Inc. Magazine.

Carly Fiorina

Former CEO of Hewlett- Packard and 2016 U.S. Presidential Candidate.

Daniel Pink

New York Times bestselling author and time management expert.

Guaranteed to provide key insights so you can achieve optimal performance! Sutton Place Hotel, Edmonton 10235 101 Street RSVP at: www.LeadersOfEdmonton.com For more information: Rozanna Wyatt, info@wyattleadershipiq.com or 587-337-5220


#ITSAMESS // TRAINING & EDUCATION

“BASED ON EXTENSIVE MARKET RESEARCH, FIRE & FLOWER’S STORES ARE INTENDED TO ENSURE CUSTOMERS ACROSS DIVERSE DEMOGRAPHICS FEEL WELCOME, COMFORTABLE, AND THAT THEY ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN A LEVEL OF PRIVACY, SHOULD THEY SO CHOOSE.” ~ JESSE CHEETHAM with harassment has to be long-term, purposeful, and embraced by the top of the organization. The problem doesn’t end because of one sensitivity training session. It has to be a top-line strategy that the company focuses on. Unless it is embraced throughout the whole company, it is not going to succeed.” However, it doesn’t just come down to corporations. He points out, “It can’t just be certain groups championing when society as a whole is responsible. Social media has spread the word to the masses to shine a light on what’s going on. These social movements are legitimately important to people—employees stakeholders, and customers—society is demanding changes be made to account for what isn’t acceptable anymore. And the whole movement is about bringing the issues into the light, so companies are not going to be able to hide. “The companies that really care about making those changes are doing it as a wholistic approach in everything they do. It becomes the mission and vision, which allows the company to be conscious of their impact and to purposefully make all of their decisions based on that vision. That’s really when the shift will happen, when that vision becomes part of what the company does, part of its brand—and we are starting to see more and more of a legitimately genuine desire to make that happen.” One company that has thoroughly embraced that wholistic strategy is Fire & Flower, a cannabis shop taking root in several locations across Canada. Jesse Cheetham, vice president, Human Resources, Fire & Flower, explains that, “Based on extensive market research, Fire & Flower’s stores are intended to ensure customers across diverse demographics feel welcome, comfortable, and that they are able to maintain a level of privacy, should they so choose. Fire & Flower is focused on delivering a responsible, education-based approach to retail and extensive community engagement.”

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“Like any retailer,” Cheetham observes, “people decide where they shop, and we need to offer an experience that sets us apart. Educating the cannabis curious, setting the bar high, and being actively involved in the communities where we operate is fundamental to the Fire & Flower ethos, and that will set us apart from the rest. How we hire, train, and elevate our team is based on mindset over skillset. We look for emotionally intelligent, compassionate, and uniquely talented individuals through a unique hiring process. Anyone vying to be hired by Fire & Flower is made aware early in the process that there are inherent challenges in the cannabis industry, but we will face them together. Impairment, mental health, dependency, and minors attempting to access cannabis are issues our training and education will address.” Cheetham notes, “Because social media is instantaneously accessible, it is incredibly influential; issues can quickly gain momentum. Anonymity empowers people to feel safe in sharing their vulnerabilities. The speed and momentum of social media in this context is amazing, but the awareness of that fact has only provided Fire & Flower with a new angle toward success. Intentionally building principles, such as inclusion, compassion, empathy, and mindfulness into how you operate, creates instant humanity in your business. This humanity is what people expect and connect with. “The expectations society places on businesses is vastly different than it was even five years ago. With mass social movements, such as #metoo, longstanding businesses and entire industries have had to make radical changes. Making large scale changes is challenging for large businesses both in time and costs. The benefit we have in the cannabis industry is that we have an opportunity to build from the ground up and are not tied to long standing practices.” “From Fire & Flower’s perspective,” he concludes, “the ‘glue’ that motivates our current team, and a key element we look for in hiring, is viewing this industry as an opportunity to do things right.”


SUIT UP! // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

Suit Up!

ARE YOU WELL-SUITED FOR YOUR JOB? BY LAURA BOHNERT

T

he business world is changing, but as we are shifting to a more mobile professional dynamic, does that mean our workwear needs to change too? Or do we still need to suit up to meet the expectations of our corporate peers and clients? Before we get into the expectations of the suit, we first need to take a look at what it is that makes a good, modern, timeless suit in the first place. According to Sam Abouhassan, master tailor, Sam Abouhassan Custom Clothiers, there are a few key features to look for in a suit that will keep you looking professional and up-to-date. “Classic and modern could go together if you update from your basic navy, grey, or black suit with subtle tone-on-tone patterns in the fabric, and those colours never go out of style,” Abouhassan explains; however, “the timeless staples that you should keep in your arsenal are the black, grey, and navy suit—and, for some men, brown.” “As good as your suit is,” Abouhassan warns, “you must not forget the importance of the shoes and the tie.” You can

have the most classic of suits and still look unprofessional or uncoordinated with the wrong colour or style of shoe or tie. Then, of course, there’s the fit. “The fit of the suit is more important than the colour and make,” Abouhassan emphasizes. “A good-fitting suit and shirt should make you feel great and confident.” Janel Dickin, owner, Hye Fashion Inc., agrees. “The most important consideration for a classic suit is fit. When a suit fits your body well, there is a much better chance that it can be made to look like it’s new, on-trend, or in style.” Katie Cruickshank, store and marketing manager, Hye Fashion Inc., explains that, “For the jacket, you want the shoulder seam to fit snug without being tight. It should pull in at the waist and flare out slightly for women, and it should be cut straight from the waist for men to create the inverted triangle. For men with bellies, it’s best to leave the jacket unbuttoned for the most ‘square’ look. Too much horizontal pulling makes the jacket look too small. For the pants: a

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SUIT UP! // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

But how necessary is the suit in the workplace today? Is casual becoming the new professional in more office spaces? “For a casual meeting, sure,” says Abouhassan. “For the serious transaction, though, a suit, or a jacket and pants, and tie should be worn.” “Clients still expect the pros to look like pros,” he explains. “You don’t want to over-dress, but you also don’t want to underdress. You should have a feel of what those expectations are. It is true about the first impression. If you are dealing with hi-caliber clients or co-workers, you are not going to get away with a lower-quality suit that does not fit.” “Dressing appropriately ensures you’re taken seriously for the position you’re in or aiming to be in,” Dickin agrees. “Have you ever heard the phrase, ‘dress for the position you want, not the position you have’? A well-fitting suit immediately gives a first impression of overall competency; You are viewed as the authority and the expert because you look the part.”

flat front, fitted style with a slim but not too skinny leg are classics for both genders.” “Suiting in both genders is trending toward a narrower leg,” Dickin adds. “This elongates the silhouette and, for women, allows the pants to be tucked into a boot. But when I say a ‘narrow silhouette,’ I don’t mean skin-tight. Bottoms don’t need to be snug across the backside—and shouldn’t be, in a professional environment, unless they are paired with a jacket or blazer that covers the backside.” “Over the past several seasons, there has been a trend in womenswear to wear a blazer open. For this reason, designers have come up with styles that have no closures. This is a timeless look—provided the blazer is not a sloppy fit,” says Dickin. Cruickshank adds that, for a classic blazer, you want a “medium-width lapel—not too skinny, not too wide—with a notch feature. A two-button style is the most classic for both men and women. One-button is also good. Black is always good, but navy and grey are the new classics.”

‘Looking the part,’ however, also means taking into consideration the appropriateness of the attire, and that is something that is seen as a greater challenge for women. “I think women get more flak in their dress because, traditionally (since the 1960s), there have been more options for womenswear than there have been for menswear. It’s impossible to make a dress code that covers every possible parameter,” Dickin explains. “Therefore, with men, the dress code is often, ‘shirt, tie, jacket, dress slacks, and dress shoes’. Conversely, for women, the dress code needs to attempt to address the many varying styles women can wear while still looking professional.” Like, for instance, leggings. “I cannot stress enough that leggings are not pants!” Dickin expounds. “Leggings need to be worn with extreme caution, particularly in the workplace. Think of leggings as pantyhose or tights; leggings must be paired with a tunic, dress, or skirt that covers the back and the front of the body.” The “fingertip test” is the best bet for ensuring the appropriateness of your leggings, she adds: “stand with your arms comfortably at your sides. Your tunic/dress/skirt should be at least the ABOVE: JANEL DICKIN, OWNER, HYE FASHION INC.

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A successful man in a well-tailored custom-made suit will always shine brighter than a guy in an off-the- rack suit

John The Tailor has been the prime destination for distinguished Edmonton professionals for decades. At John The Tailor, every custom-made suit is individually hand-cut on individual paper patterns, based on your exact measurement and posture specification to ensure a one-of-a-kind fit. This is our tradition and our attitude that has been repeated over the years, enlivened by a passion for timeless elegance craft. As today’s fashion is increasingly dominated by mass-produced suiting that does little to reflect a man’s personal style and fit, our custom-made suits are created in the old Italian fashion manner – rich with specialized techniques and a flair that has been refined by legend master tailors, exhibiting a unique style and allure.

No 204 East City Centre Mall Edmonton, AB T5J 2Y9 Phone: 780-421-0347 | johnthetailorshop.com

We welcome the opportunity to offer you the best in fine custom-made clothing in the industry. The beauty and elegance of any fine piece of clothing rests heavily on the quality of the fabric used to create it. At John The Tailor, we carry an array of elegant and luxurious fabrics. This almost unlimited collection of exclusive fabrics consists of offerings from the world’s best fabric makers including Loro Piana, Holland & Sherry, Dormeuil, and Cerruti to name just a few. Our extensive collection presents the elegant and luxurious four-seasons pure wool (selected from the finest Super 100s through 160s), Merino wool, all wool, superfine worsted wool, silk, cashmere, Scottish tweed and cashmere, flannel, Italian pure silk and silk mohair, all English and Italian fabrics – and much more.


SUIT UP! // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

the impression that you’re in tune with the latest trends in your industry.” You still need to be dressed appropriately for the workplace, though, Dickin warns. “Regardless of how you dress, be sure to familiarize yourself with and adhere to your company’s dress code. Dress codes are in place not only to uphold the appropriate image of an organization, but also to ensure the organization’s employees are dressed to complete their jobs safely.” “If a firm is moving away from professional attire, they should be doing so strategically,” agrees Adel Hanafi, director of RE/ MAX Excellence Commercial Division. “From a branding perspective, a company’s standards for attire and style of clothing provide an implicit means of immediately conveying the corporate culture, target audience, and level of competence.”

length of your fingertips, or longer. If in doubt, put on pants or an appropriate-length skirt instead.” That doesn’t mean Dickin opposes the idea of professional workplaces moving away from the reign of the suit. On the contrary, she loves the juxtaposition of wearing one dressy piece with a more casual item.

“In commercial real estate,” he continues, “performance is often considered the determining factor when our clients retain us as their service provider or business partner. Performance and competence can be immediately conveyed through a well-designed suit. That being said, not all professional service providers hang their hats on these traits, and if a firm’s unique selling proposition is collaboration or creativity (for instance), then their professional attire can reflect this.

“A good rule of thumb,” she says, “is that, if you’re wearing a more casual piece (i.e.: cardigan, jeans, or t-shirt), ensure the remainder of your outfit compensates for the casualness of the least formal item.”

“Professional attire definitely influences a client’s perception. If a company intends to move away from formal wear and suits, it is important that they understand who they are working with and the type of clients they would like to attract. In this sense, the company could be tapping into a niche market by differentiating themselves from other professional firms.”

“In certain workplaces, clients or colleagues may find you more ‘relatable’ when you’re dressed closer to the way they are dressed,” suggests Dickin. “However, to ensure they aren’t offended and that they take you seriously, I still believe it’s important to look professional and dress a level above the individual(s) you’re meeting with and selling to. When you are dressed on-trend, you appear to be up-and-up with the latest fashion trends, thereby giving

“Dressing appropriately means assessing existing perceptions, but more importantly, it shows an understanding of purpose,” Hanafi concludes. “Like most things in business, I think it boils down to what your objectives are. Understanding the goals of an interaction, the attributes you’d like to convey to support these goals, and how this can be achieved through your attire will help guide your professional style.”

ABOVE: ADEL HANAFI, DIRECTOR OF RE/MAX EXCELLENCE COMMERCIAL DIVISION.

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GROWING MORE FOR PARKLAND COUNTY: THE IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE // PARKLAND COUNTY

GROWING MORE FOR PARKLAND COUNTY:

THE IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE BY LAURA BOHNERT

T

he agriculture industry is important to any economy, and Parkland County is proud to recognize—and champion—its impact.

“Parkland County’s commitment to ensuring the longterm viability of the agricultural industry, along with its economic, environmental, and community contributions, is important to sustaining the area’s strong rural economy and vibrant lifestyle,” explains Trevor Anderson, rural business development officer, Parkland County. Currently, Parkland County is home to 679 farms on 375,449 acres, which represents approximately 65 per cent of all County land. Anderson says, “The agriculture sector generates over $50 million annually and contributes equipment and materials to the local economy, including combines, trucks, fertilizers, and seed. The County is a major producer of wheat, barley, oats, and canola, in addition to major livestock operations, greenhouses, and nurseries. The 2016 Census reports 20 farms in Parkland County with commercial vegetable production, 24 with nursery and sod production, and 16 with fruits and berries. There has been some expansion within the County of these very high value crops.”

“Parkland County is well located to attract and support new business growth in the agriculture industry,” Anderson adds. “The proximity of Parkland County to a metropolitan area of more than 1 million consumers and the availability of local inputs presents a significant opportunity for this intensive form of agriculture to continue to expand. New business development in Parkland County will supply interest in local food, as well as align with the Government of Alberta’s goal to grow the food processing sector. “In 2016, Alberta’s value-added sector, including food and processing manufacturing sales, was worth $14.6 billion and was the largest manufacturing employer in the province, representing more than 22,400 jobs. “Parkland County strives to enhance and provide opportunities for agricultural diversification and enhancement into the future. Part of broadening opportunities in agriculture is ensuring the ability to use agricultural property for more than traditional agricultural activities. Value-added pursuits help ensure the viability and profitability of agricultural operations, fostering rural entrepreneur development that could include agriculture commodity processing: crushing, milling, malting, drying, packing, processing etc.; other food innovation such as food products, health products,

ABOVE: PARKLANDS BROOKBANK

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GROWING MORE FOR PARKLAND COUNTY: THE IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE // PARKLAND COUNTY

supplements, etc.; on-site sales, stores, restaurants, agritourism, or other supportive activities.”

Renewable Energy in Entwistle have quickly recognized the flexibility this new land use provides.”

Anderson continues, “In 2017, Parkland County created a new land use district (AGI – Agricultural Industry Development District) that accommodates development in rural Parkland County, specializing in value-added agricultural and alternative energy production. Parkland County’s rural and rural fringe areas are uniquely capable of providing such amenities for the various value-added agriculture and alternative energy industries.

Of course, the success of Parkland County’s agriculture industry hasn’t come without its challenges.

“The purpose of this district is to accommodate new agricultural-based and alternative energy-based development that manufactures or processes value-added agricultural products, produces or imports materials or grows biomass crop for use in alternative energy feed stocks or products, or generates alternative energy. Companies such as Pinnacle

Anderson explains. “The industry has experienced several trend shifts, including an increased global demand for food, an increased demand for growing local food, the growth of average farm sizes, an increase in vegetable farming (indoor and outdoor), an increase in nurseries and greenhouses, and an increase in specialty livestock. Despite the increase in demand, there has been a 13.2 per cent reduction in the number of farms since 2011, and a total 43.3 per cent reduction in the number of farms over the past 20 years mainly due to the rise of large-scale farms. “The continuing growth of large-scale commercial farms in

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GROWING MORE FOR PARKLAND COUNTY: THE IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE // PARKLAND COUNTY

sector in the County is actually growing. Gross farm receipts have increased by 49.0 per cent during the 1996 – 2016 period. An assessment of the inflation rate over the same 20-year period indicates a compounded rate of 43.1 per cent. Thus, the actual growth over this period is + 5.9 per cent. Incredibly, this growth has occurred despite a 22.2 per cent reduction in the farmland base in the County. Despite the reduction in the land base, the County’s net farm income, after equalizing for inflation, has actually increased by 55.6 per cent since 1996. The size of the agriculture industry as an economic entity in the County is at least sustaining itself, and probably growing, not to mention the fact that gross farm sales are at the highest in the region (+75 per cent).” What do some of the voices from within the industry have to say about its success?

response to global forces that demand cost competitiveness and the ability to compete with world prices means smallto medium-sized family farms are reducing. Over the past 20 years, the average farm size in Parkland County has increased by 36.9 per cent versus an Alberta average of 40.4 per cent. During the last five years, the increases have been in the order of 7.6 per cent for Parkland and 5.9 per cent provincially. Parkland County is part of the overall provincial trend to fewer but larger farms.” However, while trend shifts have forced the agriculture industry to adapt and innovate to meet and support its developing sectors in a way that has the potential to introduce new opportunities for the industry, there is one challenge that poses a bit more difficulty: the decline of farmland. “It is important to have a balance between development lands and protecting valuable agricultural land. Parkland County’s recently updated Municipal Development Plan defines the areas where different development types can occur, and which are protected as prime agricultural lands,” says Anderson. “In spite of the decline in the farmland base,” Anderson is quick to point out, “the economic size of the agriculture

Seba Beach Farmer’s Market is quick to praise to the County. “The agricultural industry is successful because there is a strong support system in place from both Government Agencies and Parkland County in promoting local foods and products. The agriculture industry in Parkland Country is rapidly growing, and the new trends in our society of bringing locally grown and farm fresh products to the table has made Farmers Markets a huge player.” “The agriculture industry is important to Parkland County as an economic driver,” agree Rhonda and Sheldon Bignell, owners/managers of Hawkstone Stable, “but it also helps us retain the rural lifestyle that is important to our Alberta culture.” Alicia Howery, co founder of Strawberry Fields, points out that “The Edmonton Region is lucky to have great quality soils and a favourable climate to grow a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. I am so glad to be a farmer in today’s world because of the resurgence in the desire to buy local. I also feel a great deal of support from the local farming community. Fellow producers in Parkland County and across the province want to see each other succeed. The willingness for other producers in our area to lend a hand and share knowledge is invaluable. We are a community that truly supports our neighbours and I feel that lends itself to the success of the agricultural industry in Parkland County.”

ABOVE: PARKLANDS HAPPY ACRES

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Alberta Leads the Way on Legal Cannabis

2018 Board of Directors Board Executive

Chair: Len Rhodes President & CEO, Edmonton Eskimo Football Club Vice Chair: Dawn Harsch President & CEO, ExquisiCare Senior Living and Care at Home Treasurer: Bryan DeNeve Senior Vice President Finance & CFO, Capital Power Past Chair: James Merkosky Partner, Tax Services Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP

Board Directors

Dr. Glenn Feltham President & CEO, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology Crystal Graham Partner & Licensed Interior Designer, Kasian Architecture Interior Design & Planning Ltd. Elan MacDonald President, Impact Consulting Scott McEachern Vice President, Engineering & Projects, Enbridge Pipelines Inc. Dennis Schmidt Legal Counsel and Associate Development Manager Alldritt Land Corporation LP Craig Thorkelsson Head of Tax PCL Constructors Inc. Dr. Jenelle Trenchuk-Saik President & CEO, Parker Ford and MacKay

O

By Janet Riopel, President and CEO, Edmonton Chamber of Commerce

n October 17, Canada will become only the second country in the world (the first of the G7) to have legalized recreational cannabis. Alberta and Edmonton are well-positioned to lead the unprecedented opportunity of developing this brand-new, multi-billion dollar industry. Edmonton is in line to become an important hub for legal cannabis production, with Aurora Cannabis and more than a dozen other companies establishing their operations in our metropolitan region. Aurora Cannabis has its global headquarters in Edmonton and is building the world’s largest cannabis facility – 800,000 square feet adjacent to the Edmonton Airport. Other major players include GrenEx Pharms, Edmonton’s first medical cannabis grow-op, and Canopy Growth Corp., one of the world’s largest cannabis firms.

The Edmonton Chamber championed a private retail system for the sale of recreational cannabis, similar to Alberta’s liquor system, so we were very pleased when the Province announced in November 2017 that it was adopting that model.

Chamber Executive

Janet Riopel President & CEO Edmonton Chamber of Commerce Tim Ferris Director, Member Services Edmonton Chamber of Commerce Brent Francis Director, Advocacy and Outreach Edmonton Chamber of Commerce Ian Morris Director, Organizational Excellence Edmonton Chamber of Commerce

Contact

Edmonton Chamber of Commerce #600 – 9990 Jasper Avenue Edmonton, AB T5J 1P7 T: 780.426.4620 • F: 780.424.7946

According to City of Edmonton estimates, the local industry could be worth up to $100 million and employ up to 2,000 people within two years. The Edmonton Chamber championed a private retail system for the sale of recreational cannabis, similar to Alberta’s liquor system, so we were very pleased when the Province announced in November 2017 that it was adopting that model. The private model lets business do what it does best and ensures reliable access for consumers. The results are staggering. There are over 600 applications for retail stores province-wide. Edmonton alone has received over 200 applications from entrepreneurs who are ready, willing and able to take on the risks and rewards associated with developing this new industry. Compare that to Quebec, which expects to have just 20 publicly operated retail stores open by October. It remains to be seen exactly how big the new legal market will be. According to some estimates there is a base retail market of about $6 billion. And there are opportunities in areas well beyond retail including agriculture, research, testing, security and tourism. BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // AUGUST 2018

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There are still unknowns and challenges to address. The Edmonton Chamber of Commerce has consistently advocated that lawmakers take a balanced approach between the significant economic opportunities of the legal cannabis industry and the risks, including workplace safety issues, which legalization will bring. One concern is that there still isn’t a test that reliably shows if someone is impaired. That creates challenges for employers who have an obligation to provide safe work environments. So, while we approach this brand-new industry with some caution, we are also confident that Alberta has set the conditions for business to succeed. Our business climate, our entrepreneurial nature, and the private retail model mean that Alberta can lead the way for legalized recreational cannabis. We can serve as a model on the world stage of how to responsibly develop a flourishing cannabis industry that minimizes risk and maximizes rewards. The Edmonton Chamber would like to hear from you. Is your business prepared for the legalization of recreational cannabis? Please share your thoughts and ideas with us. Contact us by email: policy@edmontonchamber.com or call us at 780-409-2618.

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Is Your Business Ready for Legal Cannabis? While the legalization of recreational cannabis will create issues for employers, cannabis in the workplace is nothing new. Employers have long tested for cannabis in safety-sensitive positions, and many businesses across Canada are already dealing with legal medical cannabis in the workplace. What does legalization mean for my business? Employers have a duty to provide a safe workplace, which includes ensuring workers aren’t impaired on the job. Employers also have a duty to accommodate workers who use cannabis for legitimate medical purposes. These two obligations can easily come into conflict, creating complicated HR issues for your workplace. The best way to navigate these issues is to develop a workplace drug and alcohol policy that: • Clearly outlines the rules around workplace drug and alcohol use for employees; • Outlines the rights and responsibilities of the employer in dealing with drugs and alcohol in the workplace; and • Sets out the proper protocols to accommodate legitimate medical needs, including medical cannabis use. What do I need to do? If you don’t have a workplace drug and alcohol policy, talk to your HR professional and get one in place before October 17.


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Craig Wilson and Raj Dhillon (centre left and right) are the Co-Owners of Pivotal Physiotherapy and ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy, pictured here with fellow ARC by Physiotherapy owners Chris Montgomery and Jack Haworth.

Pivotal Physiotherapy and ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy Member profile Raj Dhillon and Craig Wilson, Co-Owners of Pivotal Physiotherapy and ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy

www.pivotalphysio.com What’s your story? Craig and Raj first met and became friends in university while both pursuing their degree in physiotherapy. They graduated from university in 2003 and soon began working together at Northtown Physiotherapy and Fort Saskatchewan Physiotherapy. In 2006, they became business partners with then owner, Anna Hughton, and in 2008, Craig and Raj took full ownership of the clinics. Wanting to make the practice a reflection of who they are personally and professionally, they rebranded to Pivotal Physiotherapy in 2011. The new brand conveys a message of change to patients and emphasizes that patients have important choices to make in their health. In 2016, Craig and Raj opened the High Performance Centre. This was their first endeavour to build a business from the ground up. They overcame challenges of

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entrepreneurial growth with the launch of their third clinic but looked upon the challenges as professional development opportunities and enjoyed the full process. This also marked a chance to redefine how physiotherapy and rehabilitation is delivered in Edmonton. Most recently, in May 2018, Craig and Raj acquired two new partners and opened ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy located inside the Evolve Strength downtown gym. Their vision of ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy is to provide a physiotherapy model that transcends traditional physical rehabilitation. They are on a path of strategically changing the landscape of physiotherapy in Edmonton at a time in the rehab world where people are interested in moving better, more effectively and more often. Therefore, with the Athletic Development & Recovery Centre (ARC), they shift their focus to the other end of the rehab spectrum and help improve individuals’ performance or facilitate recovery depending on their personal needs and phase of training. What are people often surprised to learn about your business? That physical rehabilitation is more than pain management. We offer rehabilitation services and provide treatment that covers a wide spectrum of physical therapy. On one end,


our Northgate and Fort Saskatchewan clinics generally serve traditional demographics such as injury rehab and pain management patients. On the other end, our High Performance Centre and ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy serve performance-based physiotherapy. What has been your biggest challenge in the last 12 months? Opening up ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy and acquiring two new partners. Only 20 months after opening the High Performance Centre, Craig and Raj launched their fourth location. This naturally brought on additional pressures of multitasking as well as prioritizing their attention in the appropriate direction. In addition, after 10 years of being sole business partners, they added two new partners for ARC by Pivotal Physiotherapy. This brought new entrepreneurial challenges and opportunities for partnership and leadership. Further, Raj and Craig aim to balance their commitments to Pivotal with the joy of raising young children, progressing their own fitness goals and engaging with the local community. What do you think is the biggest issue impacting Edmonton’s small businesses at this time? In the face of ongoing government changes and an unpredictable economic landscape, small business owners need to remain committed to their mission, vision and core values. This sets the foundational table upon which a vital serving of customer engagement and optimal experience delivery can be served. In a nutshell, stay the course with a relentless focus while enjoying the process. What’s your secret to keeping your employees engaged? Communication and authentic relationships. We believe in having crystal clear communication with our team even before they are formally employees. Sharing our culture and introducing prospective teammates to current Pivotal staff is a key strategy. This allows real relationships to be forged and sets the stage for successful work to be done in a positive setting. Another key strategy is keeping two-way feedback loops very tight. Gaining an understanding of each staff member’s strengths and goals, as well as potential challenges and difficulties, is a crucial focal point.

Do you have a personal mantra? • Choose 2-3 key areas of focus and do them really, really well. • Balance is crucial to sustainable long-term success. • The only constant is change. It’s best to work to get ahead of change and create the change you want to see. • Ensure your actions match your values. • Exercise is medicine. As a new Chamber Member, what have your first impressions been? We have enjoyed meeting fellow small business owners and look forward to the chance to further our relationships. Our Chamber mandate is to create the best environment for business in Edmonton. If you could make one substantial improvement to Edmonton’s business environment, what would it be? Edmonton has done a great job of building its reputation as a destination city for culinary delights, love of sport, festivals and as the “start-up” capital of the nation. We believe it’s pivotal to continue this momentum with an everlasting focus on building the City of Edmonton with a sustainable, reputable marketing strategy. What is your favorite thing to do in Edmonton? Raj: Bike the trails in the River Valley, enjoy meals with family and friends and play basketball. Craig: Mountain biking in the River Valley. Apple or android? Both: Apple. Your most favorite place in the world? Raj: In no particular order, on the basketball court, cuddling with my family in bed and Rishikesh, India (spiritual destination). Craig: Again, mountain biking in the Edmonton River Valley. Coffee or tea? Raj: Espresso. Craig: Coffee.

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Connecting Business 2018 Grey Cup ‘Bring The Heat’ Breakfast On June 1, 2018, hundreds of Canadian Football League fans gathered at the Shaw Conference Centre to kick-off the first day of ticket sales for the 106th Grey Cup Championship Game, which will be held in Edmonton this November

CFL Commissioner Randy Ambrosie (centre right) enjoyed a morning spent with Len Rhodes, Edmonton Chamber Board Chair and President & CEO of the Edmonton Eskimo Football Club; Janet Riopel, Chamber President & CEO; head table guests and elected officials; the Grey Cup; and more than 250 football fans.

Randy Ambrosie inspired football fans to “think big” while sharing stories about his first year on the job as League Commissioner, his years spent playing in the CFL (including a 1993 Grey Cup win with our Edmonton Eskimos) and his vision for the CFL in coming years.

The Edmonton Eskimos Cheer Team got the crowd excited about the 2018–2019 CFL season with thrilling aerial stunts and original dance routines.

CFL fans cherished the opportunity to have their photo taken with the league’s top trophy: The Grey Cup. The experience was made complete by getting to pose alongside two Canadian Mounties clad in their iconic uniforms.

Members in this Issue City of Edmonton and PRIMAVERA Development Group in How One Area is Revitalizing and Keeping its Heart on page 32 RE/MAX in Suit Up! on page 45 Avison Young and Nearctic Property Group in Usual Business in Unusual Spaces on page 38

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Education Mixer & Trade Show Business mingled with education on June 7, 2018, at our first-ever Education Mixer & Trade Show at the City of Edmonton’s ACT Aquatic & Recreation Centre.

A group of more than 20 educators were on hand to share their organizations’ resources, tools and programs to help local businesses grow and achieve success.

Educators and attendees alike enjoyed connecting with one another to discuss the many ways for businesses to prosper from lifelong learning.

49th Annual Edmonton Chamber Golf Tournament Presented by Grand Villa Casino & Starlight Casino

More than 160 golfers took business out of the office for an action-packed day of connection building at The Quarry Golf Club on June 14, 2018, during our sold-out annual tournament.

Lowest scoring for the tournament was posted by Team Slate 6A, with the happy winners pictured here.

Golfers enjoyed fun sponsor activities and tasty eats and sips as they played their way through a round of 18 holes.

Chamber staff from our membership and events teams visited golfers throughout the day to give away some great prizes, including hotel stays, dining gift cards, Chamber advertising and so much more!

This year’s tournament proved to be the perfect opportunity to make hole-inone business connections while enjoying a beautiful day outside on the golf course. BUSINESSINEDMONTON.COM // BUSINESS IN EDMONTON // AUGUST 2018

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2018

My Chamber

keeps me informed on critical issues impacting my business.

Mayor’s State-of-the City Address

After Business

My Chamber

provides a platform to promote my business to a qualified business audience.

Mixer and Trade Show

49th Annual Edmonton

My Chamber

gives me opportunities to expand and enrich my business network.

Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament

My Chamber empowers me to stay informed on emerging issues, promote my business, and reinforce key partnerships. My Chamber gives me a platform for my business to prosper.

EdmontonChamber.com

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Advocate. Educate. Connect.


A. Clark Roofing and Siding:

65 Years and Counting

An old company with new ideas, A. Clark Roofing and Siding is pleased to celebrate a milestone in its journey. By Nerissa McNaughton with Photos by Rebecca Lippiatt

A.

Clark Roofing and Siding is more than a professional service provider for anyone in need of a leak-proof roof, new building exterior, full roof replacement, or repairs on existing claddings. It’s a company that uses innovation, problem solving, tenacity, and a relentless drive to improve the entire roofing and cladding industry in Canada. After all, when you have 65 years of experience, you’re in a position to be an industry disruptor – something A. Clark Roofing and Siding does with pride.

The word “disruptor” gets thrown around a lot lately, and it’s usually reserved for upstart finanical companies breaking into established industries in innovative ways. But it’s the only way to describe A. Clark Roofing and Siding, who has never been content to just put roofs on houses. “It’s a company that holds onto a lot of integrity. We take leadership and give the community what they need and deserve for exterior products,” says general manager Jay Dunlop. A. Clark Roofing & Siding • 65 Years • 1 61


Jay Dunlop, General Manager and Mario Glynn hold an air intake vent and the requisite flashing as a solution to the venting issue created when closing the soffits with the new fire codes.

“We don’t want to be the biggest, we just want to be the best!” agrees vice president of operations Robert Dunlop.

and working his way through various company positions over the years.

Jay is Robert’s son, and a fourth-generation roofer. Robert joined A. Clark Roofing and Siding in 1977; Jay followed in his father’s footsteps 10 years ago, starting as a service tech

“We take care of the customers,” continues Jay. “We take a lot of leadership. When the industry changes, we are on top of it, be it issues with condensation or new fire codes. We were

Congratulations A. Clark Roofing & Siding on 65 years of success! WE ARE PROUD TO BE A PART OF YOUR TEAM AND TAKE PRIDE IN BUILDING THE COMMUNITY TOGETHER…

10050 29A Ave NW Edmonton AB T6N 1A8 780-463-7413 • www.shoemakerdrywall.com A. Clark Roofing & Siding • 65 Years • 2


kenroc.com

Congratulations A. Clark Roofing & Siding on your 65th Anniversary!

Proud to support customers like you for over 50 years Helping customers succeed is the mission of each Kenroc location across Western Canada. Kenroc provides customers with the materials they need, delivered where they need them, when they need them, backed with full technical support. It was true in 1967, remains true today and will continue going forward.


solutions that worked in our economy and climate.” Not wanting to install costly customized soffit vents or other solutions that would lead to water coming into the house, A. Clark Roofing and Siding came up with a fix to the problem. Jay’s grandfather was at the forefront of this project, as was the current sales manager, Mario Glynn. “We came up with a venting solution that did not compromise fire safety or disturb attic insulation, and that took care of the venting/ condensation issue,” says Mario with pride. “We have always been innovators. A. Clark Roofing and Siding was the first to come up with an app for quality control. It’s on Jay Dunlop and Mario Glynn our site supervisors’ phones. They have to go on the roof, go through a check list, and do an e-signature to the company that helped Edmonton Home Builders deal with prove they have checked the roof to our standards. It gets the fact that closed soffits were causing condensation issues archived digitally right to the office. That checklist is done in attic spaces due to the reduced venting. We came up with before crews are paid and before we invoice our customers. “When manufacturers have problems with products, we have been known to talk directly with them about what is not working and how it can be fixed. We care. We want to get in there and say, ‘this is what is happening to your product in the winter’.” Jay notes, “We really hold ourselves accountable by taking pictures and using technology. We go on the roof and physically inspect it when it’s done. We know you can’t see the fine details by inspecting a roof from the ground. We always go onto the roof.

Achieving greAt things together We are proud to have been part of the journey with A. Clark Roofing & Siding for the last two decades and we wish Doug, Robert and the team continued success in years to come.

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A. Clark Roofing & Siding • 65 Years • 4

“Customers should know that all their roofing issues usually show up in the first five years. This is why we build relationships with manufacturers and are careful in choosing the kinds of products we sell. It’s not just the work we put into the roof. It’s the products as well; we ensure we use the ones best suited for Alberta’s climate, and for the building’s normal wear and tear.” From the start, A. Clark Roofing and Siding ensured it would always be in a position to be a positive influence in the industry. A. Clark is one of the oldest roofing companies in Alberta. They are also very proud to be the oldest member of the Canadian Home Builders Association. With the Better Business Bureau (BBB), they are the oldest company in Northern Alberta and have earned a place in the trust club of the BBB (a company in good standing for 50+ years). They


are also the oldest member since 1964 in the Edmonton Construction Association. A. Clark Roofing and Siding’s way of doing business is why it is one of the oldest roofing companies in Alberta, why it has served more than 300,000 customers over the years, and why operations have grown to include both Edmonton and Calgary. “We established a good reputation for quality work and customer service from the get go,” says Jay. “We maintained that and never let that go. We improved on it over the years by incorporating technology and hiring the best staff.” “Our people are a huge part of our success,” Robert stresses. “When I hire my staff, I make sure they have the passion and belief that reflects our company’s mission and values.” Being the oldest roofing company in Alberta provides the team with a lot of history to work from, and nothing is more historical to the province than its energy-related downturns. “When the market is slow, there is a lot of downward pricing,” says Mario. “A lot of smaller companies come out of the woodwork. We’ve seen that people working from their truck or home don’t fully understand or offer the proper safety needed. This is important. Safety standards protect the homeowner and the worker. If the person working on a home is not covered with the proper paperwork and he or she is injured, it’s the homeowner that could lose everything. We have all the proper safety procedures and paperwork in place, and we are COR certified.” A. Clark Roofing and Siding developed a full comprehensive safety program that not only targeted their own staff and installers, but all their suppliers, too. For example, they have mandates in place on how to safely load a roof. The company

has zero tolerance for unsafe behaviour, and therefore, has an exemplary incident rate near zero. “They can beat us on price due to their lack of overhead, but it’s hard to sell a house with a roof that has been done wrong,” Jay says about the startup competitors. “A lot of people come from out of town or try to start up on their own, do the work, then leave. If something goes wrong, what can you do? We have a diversity of experience that allows us to manage our industry’s challenges in proven ways, and a longstanding reputation that backs up our work.” “In this economy, we understand that price is a driving factor,” Mario points out, “but we tell our clients they cannot take unnecessary risks. A roof or siding job is a big investment. It needs to be protected with the proper process and warranties.” Mario, ever the poet, waxes eloquently, “The sweetness of a good price can be completely overshadowed by the bitterness of poor quality!” “If we could tell our customers anything about what we do, it would be about quality and customer service,” says Robert, and although the humble company is not one to toot its own horn, customers also appreciate the way A. Clark Roofing and Siding gives back to the community. “We’ve been involved in donating roofs and labour for the STARS Dream Home lotteries for the last seven years,” says Robert. “We’ve also donated roofs and labour for Edmonton’s own Alberta Wellsprings building by 111 Street. They help families that are dealing with cancer by providing much needed help with therapy, exercise and diet. Their motto is, ‘no one should face cancer alone,’ notes Mario.

Your Exterior Product Specialists

Setting an example in the industry for 65 Years!!! A. Clark Roofing & Siding • 65 Years • 5


Jay says, “This is our 65th anniversary, so we are donating $65 from every roof this year to the Hope Mission, and we are also volunteering with the organization.” Every year, the company ensures it gives back to the community that supported its growth by donating materials, volunteer hours, and funds. Giving back is a large part of the A. Clark Roofing and Siding culture. What comes next for the company that grew up in Edmonton, expanded to Calgary, has been driving many changes in the industry, all the while continuing to grow and thrive with each passing year? “We are going for 75 years!” cheers Robert enthusiastically, and the team shares his vision. “There are lots of exciting things going on in our industry,” Jay exclaims. “Tech is changing fast, for example, with innovations in solar and more environmentally green products. There are some great new products out there. We will choose the right direction and plan for it, and we will continue to be a leader in the industry.”

customers is built by in-person interaction and by getting up on those roofs for inspections.” A. Clark Roofing and Siding’s management team and staff thank their customers in Edmonton and Calgary, their contractors, vendors, and suppliers. “We also thank Wayne Dunlop, who ensured the company survived during the recession in the ’80s when many companies had to shut down,” says Robert. Doug Clark and Wayne Dunlop made the company come through so we could continue with that success today. Fintech is not the only industry where disruption is taking place. Thanks to A. Clark Roofing and Siding, it’s happening right here in Alberta with thanks to an old company that will always embrace and introduce new ideas – because that’s what it takes to make sure each client gets the best roofing and siding service in the province.

www.pigi.ca

A. Clark Roofing & Siding 3120 – 93 St. Edmonton, AB T6N 1C7 Phone: (780) 465-7571

“But we will never forget,” interjects Mario, “that no matter how important that tech is, no matter how close we can look at a roof with satellite images, real trust with our

www.aclark.ca

www.pigi.ca

Congratulations to A. Clark Roofing & Siding on 65 years! www.pigi.ca

A. Clark Roofing & Siding! Suite 101 - 8704 51 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T6E 5E8

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780-465-0041

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www.pigi.ca A. Clark Roofing & Siding • 65 Years • 6

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THE HISTORY THAT IS HAPPENING NOW:

By Nerissa McNaughton

Commonwealth Stadium Turns 40

G

reece has the Parthenon, Rome has the Colosseum, and Edmonton has Commonwealth Stadium. Yes, it’s fair to put the Stadium right up there with the world’s most recognizable landmarks. This year, the Stadium turns 40, and it’s time to reveal the things you never knew about one of the most prolific venues in Canada. Owned and operated by the City of Edmonton, Commonwealth Stadium is the largest open air stadium in Canada. With a 56,400-seat capacity, the entire populations of Edmonton’s Spruce Grove and Stony Plain suburbs could simultaneously attend an event – with room to spare. It’s the home of the Edmonton Eskimos, and over the last 40 years, the stadium has played host to two Grey Cup games, a U2 concert that drew in 90,000+ attendees over two nights, a near sellout Pink Floyd

extravaganza, the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup opening ceremonies and first game, the Rolling Stones, AC/DC, and much more. It all started in the 1930s, when the City of Edmonton acquired 26 acres on a long-term lease. The plan was for a sports field that included baseball diamonds, rugby and soccer fields, a track, and a cricket pitch. However, Mayor Joseph A. Clarke had more ambitious plans for the land. Banking on the popularity of football, he and city council worked hard to create a one-of-a-kind stadium. In 1939, the Edmonton Eskimos played their first home game at the venue. The stadium was named Clarke in his honour. Today, a smaller, refurbished Clarke Stadium still stands in the shadow of Commonwealth Stadium as an homage to where it all began.

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In the early ’70s, Edmonton bid for the 1978 Commonwealth Games. It quickly became apparent that Clarke Stadium was too small for the event. Rebuilding Clarke Stadium was a consideration, but by 1974, it was agreed that a new, bigger stadium was a better option. Construction on Commonwealth Stadium commenced in 1975. It was a colossal undertaking with the removal of 500,000 cubic yards of dirt from the infield. The sight of 40 trucks, eight earth movers, numerous backhoes and other excavators was unforgettable. Interestingly, an $18.2+ million dollar roof was hotly debated. The public was not a fan of the price tag, and ultimately, the ‘no roof’ camp won, making the stadium the open air venue we know and love today. As the 1978 Commonwealth Games date drew near, the builders were required to install “a royal retirement room”, a private bathroom for the venue’s most prominent guest: Queen Elizabeth II, who would arrive to open the ceremonies. In the end, her Majesty didn’t request use her private restroom, but that doesn’t mean the illustrious toilet was never used. It was only used once, but very notably, by a 6-year old Justin Trudeau! Heather Seutter is the Director of Commonwealth Stadium, and she’s proud to help maintain the venue’s history while ensuring it has a place for today’s diverse audience. “Being an open air, outdoor venue is part of what makes Commonwealth Stadium so dynamic,” she says. “Being outdoors brings a different perspective to a live or sporting event.

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Another key to the experience is our outstanding relationships with the Edmonton Eskimo Football Club, concert promoters, contractors, and food and beverage operations.” The food and beverage options go beyond the traditional hot dog and soda. Two buffets on site allow patrons to dine on roast beef and to have a cocktail mixed at the bar while never missing a second of the action on the field, thanks to big screen televisions and large windows. For Seutter, the magic of Commonwealth Stadium never fades.

Heather Seutter, Director Commonwealth Community Recreation Centre Commonwealth Stadium, Arenas & Field Facilities.

“It’s always interesting to see how people react to being in a place like this,” she smiles, “Everyone has a story about the Stadium, and I love to hear people share their memories about an event that impacted them 5 or20 years ago. Some of the music bands and live shows are once-in-a-generation events, and it’s a unique experience being in an outdoor venue with such a large crowd and detailed production.”

OUR HOME FOR 40 YEARS

CONGRATULATIONS & THANK YOU

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“Since it’s such a large facility,” Seutter continues, “it’s important to ensure that it stays relevant in the community and has a place for all Edmontonions and visitors. We strive to cultivate positive relationships with the people around the stadium, and with Mother Nature – we never know if she is going to smile on us or give us some challenges. Weather is an important feature for us. Sometimes it’s a great aspect. Other times it makes things more interesting! “As a 40-year old facility, it’s important that we continue to give audiences an outstanding experience. To ensure that, recent upgrades from the City of Edmonton and the Edmonton Eskimos include new stadium seating, expanded WIFI and Internet, new mid bowl LED ribbon boards, an upgraded jumbotron, and in-game entertainment. We look at the trends, what is relevant, and what fans want.” Commonwealth Stadium also supports the community. Following events, on site food and beverage contractor Western Foods donates its surplus to the Hope Mission and the Bissel Centre. The venue itself is frequented by community groups for their fundraising events and is used for high-profile charity drives, like CapitalCare Foundation’s Feast on the Field. The stadium has received numerous awards, including the Urban Architecture Award of Excellence, a 2016 Prairie Design Award, the 2013 Mayor’s Award for Universal Design in Architecture, and the 2014 Stephen Barr Award of Excellence for Recreation Facility Design. Yet no award can compare to the feeling athletes, bands, entertainers, and guests feel when they step through those doors into the immensity of the stadium that feels grandiose, yet so welcoming at the same time.

Coming up for the historic facility is a lifecycle maintenance face lift; expanded access for all kinds of events; even more diversification to accommodate soccer, football, and rugby at the pro and amateur levels; and the continued drive to ensure the stadium is a safe, accessible, world-class venue for the citizens of Edmonton and visitors. It’s been a long road for Commonwealth Stadium, from it’s humble start as Clark Stadium to it’s international presence as the modern behemoth with the ability to catch the attention of royalty, music’s elite, and world champion sporting events (it’s in the running with stadiums in Montreal and Toronto as a potential FIFA 2026 World Cup venue). But for Edmonton, Commonwealth Stadium feels like home because it is part of our home. It’s the big deal we have going on right in our own backyard. So, Greece can have it’s Parthenon of the gods, Rome can boast its Colosseum, Italy can have it’s leaning landmark, and Paris it’s gigantic iron tower; Edmonton has a stadium that not only brings the world to our doorstep, but one that also has been working hard for 40 years and will continue to be in action for the foreseeable future.

11000 Stadium Rd, Edmonton, AB T5H 4E2

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780-495-0650


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Business in Edmonton August 2018  
Business in Edmonton August 2018  
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