Business in Calgary - September 2022

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SEPTEMBER 2022 | BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM$3.50 BOMA CALGARY NEWS - FALL 2022 PAGE 61 | CALGARY CHAMBER SECTION PAGE 75 PM41126516 STILL VALUES HARD WORK COMMITMENTAND THE KAISER

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LIFTBOSS MATERIALS HANDLING LIFTBOSS MATERIALS HANDLING

LiftbossJCB.com EDMONTON BRANCH 18420 118A (780)474-9900Edmonton,avenueAB CALGARY BRANCH 8010 40 Street SE Calgary, (403)301-0041AB The

last few years have brought some curve balls to most Alberta businesses. For Liftboss Materials Handling, an Alberta born and raised material handling and JCB equipment dealer, it also brought a long overdue move from their original Edmonton location of 16 years, into a completely renovated dealership in the heart of Edmonton’s northwest industrial area. Having outgrown the previous building and yard, they were looking for a space that would allow future growth. They were able to find a large 5-acre yard with a building that will allow expansion, as well enough land to incorporate a full acre on-site “proving grounds”. This demo space will allow customers to operate a number of different machines as they would in the field, ensuring they end up with the correct unit for their application. The owner group worked very closely with JCB corporate through the whole process and were very proud to find shortly after moving in, that the facility was selected as a Canadian dealer standard for new JCB facilities, meaning that all new JCB dealerships built will be based on the concept of what Liftboss has helped create. As a result, a JCB Canadian Dealer advisory council meeting was held at the facility the last week of July, and the staff were proud to show off their new home to a number of other JCB dealers from across the country. With that project complete and behind them, expansion of a third facility in Grande Prairie and a similar renovation of the existing Calgary facility are next on the list, both expected to be completed into 2023. If you are in need of new or used equipment, parts, rentals or service on all makes and models reach out to the Liftboss team and they will be happy to help you.

WILLOW LAKE MÉTIS NATION’S JOURNEY FROM OPPORTUNITY TO SOHKASTWÂWIN

First, TC Energy Corporation sold its 85 per cent stake in the Northern Courier Pipeline to Alberta Investment Management Corporation. It chose to sell the remaining 15 per cent to a partnership called Astisiy, that includes Suncor Energy Inc. and eight Indigenous communities – Willow Lake Métis Nation among them.

Operating with a business mindset, Bourque’s team set goals and started taking steps to achieve them. They restructured their not-for-profit. Deposits were placed on land near Anzac. They pursued Credible Assertion – a lengthy process that would officially recognize Willow Lake’s Métis Aboriginal rights, so they would be consulted about future Crown land decisions that affect them.

A t his lakeside cabin near Anzac, south of Fort McMurray, Justin Bourque is busy upgrading his solar panels from 24V to 48V. He lives at the cabin year-round, working his family’s trap line and living on the land as sustainably as possible.

“Our purpose is to be an integrated, self-governing Indigenous community. Within 10 years, we believe we can be a nationally recognized model Indigenous community. Those are our key drivers that we set two and a half years ago.”

And then, four remarkable things happened in succession.

Astisiy engaged ATB to facilitate their participation in the deal. With guarantees from the Alberta Indigenous Opportunities Corporation, a provincial entity with the resources to back $1B in loans, ATB was able to finance Willow Lake’s buy-in below market rates.

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

The values and passions he pursues in his personal life are perfectly parallel to those of his public life, as the CEO of Willow Lake Métis Nation. Sharing photos of last year’s trap line haul, he grins ear to ear.

“I had a very successful career in oil and gas,” he said, “And I always kind of saw myself as wanting to be a CEO one day. But then we started talking about our chance to do something different. We have the ability and knowledge from my skill set in the industry to talk to them at the same level.”

ABOVE: JUSTIN BOURQUE, CEO OF WILLOW LAKE MÉTIS NATION.

Thanks to Bourque’s leadership – and the acquisition of 205 acres – everyone in Willow Lake Métis Nation will soon be able to do the same.

Pipeline ownership meant that Willow Lake would have a guaranteed source of revenue for the next 50 years. Seeing a path forward, Bourque then asked ATB how they could leverage those cash flows to purchase land. ATB structured a mortgage that would be debt-serviced as dividends from the pipeline are received.

Until recently, the Willow Lake Métis were people without land, but had an independent spirit and ambition to spare. When Bourque’s uncle, who was Vice President of the board, passed away, they asked Bourque to take over his position. At first, he was reluctant.

“Best of both worlds, my friend. If it’s not business, I’m working on maintaining my cultural connection and my lifestyle as a Métis.”

“Partnerships and relationships are how we as a nation get to move forward. Our business savvy and our ability to provide for our community relies on our ability to engage in relationships.”

ABOVE: WLMN BOARD WITH DEAN SETOGUCHI, KEYERA PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER.

Both hint that more deals may already be in the works.

Sohkastwâwin’s eco-bison ranch is a meaningful step towards food sovereignty for the nation. The planned Community Culture Centre will be a net-zero facility with meat processing capabilities and a greenhouse. Housing and power generation are in the works.

“Often what we do is very transactional,” adds Carmen Maslowski, ATB’s Director of Energy Services, who facilitated the land purchase. “It’s exciting when we can do something that’s business-oriented, but also feels really good at the same time.”

Bourque lists health and dental care, support for elders and youth, post-secondary tuition, entrepreneurial bursaries and other social supports as just some of the benefits that his community members can look forward to in their modern and recognized settlement.

ATB is pleased to present a 2022 profile series on the businesses and people who are facing challenges head-on to build a strong Alberta.

And finally, Willow Lake Métis Nation purchased 205 acres on the shores of Willow Lake and named it Sohkastwâwin. The name means resilience, and it’s well-suited to a people who have struggled to reach a place where they can reshape their daily lives and restore what they once had, generations earlier. It begins with bison. “This land was shaped by bison. So, every single insect, plant, animal, vegetable – every organism once had some sort of connection and was reliant on an animal that touched every acre of this land. As we reintroduce those to the land, the effects on biodiversity will ripple outward.”

If Willow Lake Métis Nation’s recent successes can serve as a model for other Indigenous communities to follow, Bourque points to collaboration as a key element of what his community has been able to accomplish.

“They have such a good perspective about how they can help their community, and they’re insightful about creating strong partnerships with industry. That’s going to lead to more opportunities,” says William Vu, the Senior Relationship Manager of Indigenous Banking.

Bourque’s advisors at ATB Financial echo his sentiment and expressed admiration for what Willow Lake Métis Nation has been able to achieve.

“We’re moving and leading in so many areas right now,” Bourque teases. “The best is yet to come.”

6 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM STORY TITLE // SECTION Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. FIND US ONLINE! BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM @BUSINCALGARYBUSINESS IN BUSINESSINCALGARYCALGARY 76 REGULAR COLUMNS 11 You Want to Stop Inflation? Quit the War on Fossil Fuels By Shane Wenzel 12 In Good Times and Bad, Canadian Energy a Vital Global Product By Cody Battershill 14 The Solution to the Labour ProblemShortageMightbe Right Under our Noses By Adam Legge 75 Calgary Chamber of Commerce 102 Parker’s Pen By David ParkerCONTENTSONOURCOVER : ABOVE: BILL KUJAT PHOTO SOURCE: RIVERWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY COVER FEATURE 38 The Kaiser Still values hard work and commitment By Trevor Bacque Volume 32 | Number 9

8 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM STORY TITLE // SECTION Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. CONTENTS 87 COMPANY PROFILES 79 The Dorian Celebrates a Grand Opening 87 Jadler Industries Celebrates 40 Years 91 I DENT Oil & Gas Signage Celebrates 40 Years 95 Webber Academy Celebrates 25 Years 95 THIS MONTH’S FEATURES 18 It’s a Small World Small businesses in Calgary still thriving despite headwinds, say experts By Jamie Zachary 24 Federal Climate Policies Frustrate Alberta Farmers As carbon taxes increase, growers brace for possible fertilizer reductions By James Snell 30 Commercial Real Est ate on the Mend Encouraging momentum By John Hardy 34 Builders Still Bullish on Calgary New housing market continues upward swing despite mounting challenges By Jamie Zachary 61 B OMA Calgary News Fall 2022 67 Health and Wellness at Work It’s about absenteeism, productivity and morale By John Hardy 71 The Hot Market Cools (a little) Rising rates and the Calgary market By John Hardy Volume 32 | Number 9

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10 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM WWW.BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to circulation dept. 1025 101 6th Ave. SW Calgary, AB T2P info@businessincalgary.com3P4 Business in Calgary magazine’s circulation is audited twice a year by BPA International. PUBLISHERS Pat Ottmann & Tim Ottmann EDITOR Melanie melanie@businessincalgary.comDarbyshire COPY EDITOR Nikki Mullett ART DIRECTOR Jessi jessi@businessincalgary.comEvetts ADMINISTRATION/ACCOUNTING Natalia natalia@businessincalgary.comLopes REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Shane Wenzel Cody Battershill David Parker THIS ISSUE’S CONTRIBUTORS Trevor JamesJohnJamieRennayBacqueCraatsZacharyHardySnell PHOTOGRAPHY Cover photo courtesy of Riverwood Photography ADVERTISING SALES Evelyn evelyn@businessincalgary.com587-774-7615Dehner DIRECTOR OF CUSTOM PUBLISHING Brittany melissa@businessincalgary.com587-774-7601Melissacourtney@businessincalgary.com587-774-7613Courtneybrittany@businessincalgary.com587-774-7624FouquetteLovgrenMitchell EDITORIAL, ADVERTISING & ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 1025, 101 6th Ave. SW Calgary, AB T2P 3P4 Tel: 403.264.3270 | Fax: 403.264.3276 Email: info@businessincalgary.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Online at www.businessincalgary.com Annual rates: $31.50 CDN | $45 USA $85 International | Single Copy $3.50 Business in Calgary is delivered to over 33,500 business people every month including all registered business owners in Calgary, Banff, Canmore, Airdrie, Okotoks, Cochrane and the Calgary Chamber members. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement, and all representations of warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not of the publisher. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, in all or in part, without the written permission of the publisher. Canadian publications mail sales product agreement No. 41126516.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // SEPTEMBER 2022 11

Idiscussed.cannotget past the idea that if the interest rate increases were intended to slow down high home pricing in Vancouver and Toronto, would it be possible to have varying interest rates across Canada where pricing is more affordable? to Stop Inflation? the War on Fossil Fuels

BY SHANE WENZEL

As children we are told not to stick our finger in the candle flame because it will hurt. However, we all do. If we are not completely stupid, we never do it again. Fast forward to how government is addressing the flame of inflation by spending more and committing unnecessary suicide with their ‘War on Fossil Fuels’ by growing carbon taxes and ESG regulations. Now they are picking on the farmers and their fertilizer, not to mention our future food chain.

How we deal with this government-created financial crisis will be the challenge. There is no historical reference to turn to. It appears that all western governments are carrying a debt that could be catastrophic. Regardless, the USA President claims there is no ‘depression’ on its way, and our Prime Minister is ignoring the whole conversation and blaming increased costs on everything as our fault, but a depression is a growing possibility.

We are told there is a shortage of homes, and a need for millions of more affordable homes, as they add more climate regulations to housing which will cause prices to move even higher. To save us they raised the interest rate along with a higher mortgage qualifier which promptly put many homebuyers’ plans on hold. Someone in Ontario is testbuilding a home out of concrete using a 3D printer. Given the ‘seldom talked about’ emissions from concrete that exist I wonder if that home will past the test.

ife on earth has never been perfect, but you would have a tough time convincing some people of that. It is not that they are ignorant, but governments appear to have selective memories. The past few years has left people wondering what the next day will bring. The word of the year so far is ‘inflation,’ and for good reason. We hear and see it everywhere – at the grocery store, on everything we buy and through every news forum. The elephant in the room however is really at the gas pump.

Shane Wenzel is president of the Shane Homes Group of Companies. Follow him @shanewenzel on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and YouTube.His column is written for the Alberta Enterprise Group, @AEG on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

L

Dramatic increases in housing prices across Canada over the past two years in Toronto and Vancouver has received much attention. Once the ‘hot’ housing market in these select centres kept spiraling upwards, the Bank of Canada determined a need to raise the interest rate three times along with new measures to tighten mortgage qualifiers.

Inflation is typically about general increases in the price of goods and services in the country when the demand for these goods and services exceeds the capacity of the economy to deliver. There are some economists who believe that a relatively low and stable rate of inflation should be a goal of policy makers. But government spending continues.

As interest rates rise, the national debt will continue to explode and the question around the possibility of a recession looms, but on all counts such a risk is not being

Quit

YOU WANT TO STOP INFLATION? QUIT THE WAR ON FOSSIL FUELS // SHANE WENZEL You Want

ver several years, I’ve mentioned the fact the world needs more Canadian oil and gas. Through bull and bear markets, it continues to be a crucial point. Oil and gas touches virtually every aspect of modern life, and in the face of rising demand it’s clear those products ought to come from Canada – for everyone’s benefit.

Both in good times and bad, Canadian energy suppliers have a vital role to play, here and elsewhere. Perhaps we should play a stronger role in providing crucial energy to countries impacted by geopolitics that block access to the energy they need to keep their people fed, housed, clothed and secure. After all, we have the human and natural resources to get the job done.

In Good Times and Bad, Canadian Energy a Vital Global Product

There are more than a few reasons I continue to make the point.

Canadian oil and natural gas contributes $105 billion to Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP) and in 2020 supported almost 400,000 Indigenous and non-Indigenous jobs across the country. Between 2000 and 2019, oil and gas contributed more than half a trillion dollars to government revenues. More recently,

BY CODY BATTERSHILL

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder / spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer-initiated group that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

12 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Regular readers know when you line up the largest 10 oil exporters in the world alongside environmental, social and governance (ESG) investor criteria, Canada wins on every key Thosemetric.metrics show Canada’s energy leadership in our stringent environmental regulations, high standards for transparency, equality and worker safety and our huge investments in R&D where we develop technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions per barrel. We’re home to about 40 per cent of the world’s oil production that’s subject to carbon pricing. And the Canadian oil and gas sector has been among the largest investors in renewable energy projects including wind and solar installations across the country. Those are strong stories. But there’s an equally strong story to be told on the economic side of the equation.

unanticipated higher revenue from energy royalties and taxes are flowing into government treasuries at a rapid pace.

O

IN GOOD TIMES AND BAD, CANADIAN ENERGY A VITAL GLOBAL PRODUCT // CODY BATTERSHILL

The RBC Capital Markets report further projects some $64 billion in royalties and taxes can be expected by governments in 2023, based on assumptions that North American benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude could average US$114 per barrel next year. That’s roughly a doubling of government revenues year-overIt’syear.vital we focus as a country on maintaining and enhancing our competitiveness, while at the same time we continue to reduce our energy emissions. That’s how we ensure a strong energy future and a healthy tax base to support various Canadian public programming including roads and bridges, health and education.

One recent RBC Capital Markets analyst report suggests the recent rising energy prices have fuelled taxes and royalties paid by public Canadian energy companies to around $48 billion this year.

ab.bluecross.ca CORPORATE ANNOUNCEMENT

Mark Komlenic, President and Chief Executive Officer of Alberta Blue Cross, is pleased to announce the appointment of Marcia Nelson as chair of the Board of Directors of ABC Benefits Corporation.

Katherine is a seasoned executive with over 19 years at Shaw Communications navigating through a variety of diverse leadership roles. She is currently the president of Shaw Business and also sits on the board of Calgary Economic Development.

®* The Blue Cross symbol and name are registered marks of the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans, an association of independent Blue Cross plans. Licensed to ABC Benefits Corporation for use in operating the Alberta Blue Cross Plan. ®† Blue Shield is a registered trade-mark of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. ABC 81514 2022/07

Marcia has served on the board since 2020 and has over 20 years of public sector executive leadership experience including as Alberta’s Deputy Minister of Health. She is a senior strategic advisor with PricewaterhouseCoopers, serves on the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans Board of Directors, is a member of the City of Calgary’s Greenline LRT Board and is an executive fellow with the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary.

Alice is an accomplished senior executive with demonstrated year-after-year success in achieving revenue and business objectives within start-up, turnaround and rapidly changing environments. She is the CEO of Fillip Fleet and is a director of the Opportunity Calgary Investment Fund and Syantra Inc.

At the same time, we are also pleased to announce the appointment of Alice Reimer and Katherine Emberly to the Alberta Blue Cross Board of Directors.

Marcia is passionate about health care. She received her ICD.D in 2013 and has served on several national, provincial and community-based non-profit boards, including the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, the Institute for Health Economics, the Public Policy Forum Advisory Committee on Innovation during COVID- 19, Alberta’s Expert Panel on Affordable Housing and the Institute for Public Administration of Canada.

14 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

THE SOLUTION TO THE LABOUR SHORTAGE PROBLEM // ADAM LEGGE

Alberta’s economic recovery story continues as we head into the latter half of 2022. In fact, economists project that the province will regain 2014 levels of economic activity as commodity prices hit a near-decade high and unemployment rates hit a five-year low recently.

Addressing these barriers is undoubtedly important from an equity and inclusion perspective. But furthermore, removing barriers to labour force participation could assuage the critical labour shortages facing Alberta’s economy. If we can improve the engagement of these groups, well over 100,000 people could be added to Alberta’s labour force. Closing the participation gap for women alone can add over 140,000 people. Ultimately, helping Albertans have equal opportunity to pursue the work they want would go a long way to filling the 100,000 vacant jobs in the province.

However, this robust economic environment has led to a variety of challenges, including inflation and its painful remedy, rising interest rates. But for businesses, the primary challenge keeping CEOs up at night is labour shortages. Labour markets in Canada are tighter than they’ve been in decades. There are over one million unfilled jobs across Canada, and over 100,000 of them are in Alberta. Alberta’s job vacancy rate is currently 5.2 per cent, meaning one in 19 jobs is vacant. This is up from one in 42 jobs pre-pandemic. At the same time, while many jobs are looking for people, relatively few people are looking for jobs as Alberta’s unemployment rate has fallen to record lows – 4.9 per cent in June. This all adds up to businesses having an exceptionally difficult time filling vacant positions. More than threequarters of Alberta businesses report that labour-related constraints are limiting their ability to meet demand.

BY ADAM LEGGE, PRESIDENT, BUSINESS COUNCIL OF ALBERTA

Structural changes such as an ageing population and shifting work preferences, and pandemic-related factors such as slowed immigration and worker absences, have added to the labour shortage we see today. With several different contributors, there are certainly many possible solutions (e.g., investing in automation or increasing immigration levels).

But one important opportunity that is often overlooked is enabling the participation of Albertans who are not currently in the labour force and belong to groups underrepresented in the labour force.

There is a huge opportunity to add more workers to Alberta’s economy by removing critical barriers to participation faced by various demographic groups, including women, persons with disabilities and older workers. These groups consistently have lower participation rates than their counterparts. And while immigrants, visible minorities and Indigenous peoples have similar participation rates to their counterparts, people from these groups are more likely to be underemployed with respect to their training, exacerbating the skills shortage reported by employers.

While any individual person may face challenges or barriers to employment and career success, research consistently demonstrates that many face systemic barriers based on the group or groups they belong to. Barriers can include discrimination in the hiring process, harassment and micro-aggressions from colleagues, self-selection into “safe” or “appropriate” jobs, or a lack of transportation, accommodations, supports or training. Ultimately, this leads to the chronic underrepresentation and underemployment of these groups in the labour market.

The Solution to the Labour Shortage Problem Might be Right Under our Noses

16 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM OFF THE Chalk up another first for the Wood Automotive Group with the opening of Okotoks Volkswagen. The store is a satellite operation of the Wood Group’s South Centre Volkswagen in Calgary and is unique in Canada.

Buchanan says that sales have been strong since opening day in mid-July, and the service department has a steady stream of Okotoksappointments.Volkswagen is part of the on-going growth of the Wood Automotive Group. The company will be moving its Big 4 (Chrysler, Dodge Jeep, Ram) store on Macleod Trail, to a new dealership now under construction in Taza Park, near the Grey Eagle Casino on the Tsuut’ina Nation. The store is scheduled to open in 2023.

“Okotoks Volkswagen builds on the success of our South Centre location,” says Gerry Wood, executive chair of the Wood Automotive Group. “It has a smaller footprint than most traditional dealerships but offers the same exceptional service. This may be the first, but it’s the model Volkswagen Canada is following closely.”

Okotoks Volkswagen is in the former Okotoks Ford store on Westland Road. The building has undergone a near total transformation with renovations build to Volkswagen’s exacting standards. It now includes a modern, customer-friendly showroom, and a state-of-the art service department with twelve service and detailing bays including a specialty bay for electric vehicles. The bank of EV charging stations has two available for public use.

Joshua Buchanan, the general manager at South Centre Volkswagen has responsibility for the Okotoks store as well.

“This is such an exciting opportunity,” says Buchanan, “We love Calgary customers, but we will be the first to reach out to welcome new customers from throughout Southern Alberta. There are a lot of VW fans in the sunny south.”

ABOVE: GERRY WOOD; EXECUTIVE CHAIR (WOOD AUTOMOTIVE GROUP), JASON LEGERE; SENIOR DIRECTOR, SALES, (VOLKSWAGEN CANADA), JOSHUA BUCHANAN; GENERAL MANAGER (OKOTOKS VOLKSWAGEN), RORY WOOD (WOOD AUTOMOTIVE GROUP), ELAINE WOOD (WOOD AUTOMOTIVE GROUP), CAILEAN WOOD (WOOD AUTOMOTIVE GROUP), PIERRE BOUTIN; PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (VOLKSWAGEN GROUP CANADA) AND MAYOR TANYA THORN (TOWN OF OKOTOKS).

“Reaching out to customers. Bringing more convenience to customers and bringing them the level of service that is expected from owning a Volkswagen, so for us its so important to be well located,” says Pierre Boutin, president and chief executive officer, Volkswagen Group Canada, who traveled to Okotoks for the store opening. “We’ll be working with and following Okotoks Volkswagen closely to bring success here and across the country.”

Wood Automotive Group Opens New Dealership

Okotoks Volkswagen First of Its Kind in Canada

ucpg.ca

SMALL

“We have seen some businesses close, but we’ve also seen many grow. For example, we’re witnessing a very vibrant hospitality sector. And our tech and start-up community is on the global map. There’s just a lot of really exciting things going on right now.” From October 17 to 21, many of these stories will be celebrated as part of 2022 Small Business Week. Ahead of the annual celebration, Business in Calgary sat down with three inspiring local business owners to learn more about their companies’ respective growth stories.

IN

“Small business isn’t for the faint of heart. It’s for the brave, the patient and the persistent. It’s for the overcomer.” - Unknown Through labour shortages and high energy costs, supply chain delays and inflation, small businesses have been fraught with a relentless wave of challenges over the past several years. In many cases, these obstacles have intensified postpandemic. For example, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business reported this past summer that many small businesses are still in “bad shape,” with their collective confidence continuing to decline. The three-month index fell nearly eight points to 46.7, while the 12-month index fell nearly seven points to 52.7 in July. Despite these odds, Ruhee Ismail-Teja believes the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in Calgary – a testament to the fortitude she feels is synonymous with our city.

BY JAMIE ZACHARY

IT’S A SMALL WORLD // SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

PHOTO SOURCE: PROLIFIC SPORTS HOUSE

“Calgary’s business community continues to be incredibly resilient. This has always been one of our key hallmarks –and one that’s been put to the test over the past couple of years,” says Ismail-Teja, who is the director of policy and communications at the Calgary Chamber of Commerce.

18 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

It’s not often you hear about a youth sports training facility launching amid a global pandemic. Yet that’s exactly what David Singleton did when he first opened the doors to Prolific Sports House in early 2021.

Prolific Sports House

IT’S A SMALL WORLD BUSINESSES CALGARY STILL THRIVING DESPITE HEADWINDS, SAY EXPERTS

ABOVE: DAVID SINGLETON, CEO AND HEAD SKILLS TRAINER AT PROLIFIC.

Nearly two years later, he calls it one of the best decisions he’s ever made as the facility in the city’s southeast is thriving as a premier training destination for up-and-coming athletes.

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The facility itself features two full-size basketball courts, two full-size half courts and 15 hoops surrounding the facility, as well as dedicated cardio/ fitness space and entertainment and lounge areas.

Best known by Calgarians for its involvement in projects such as the Wonderland sculpture at The Bow and the Emergent exhibit at the Edison building, the business has been actively reshaping the urban landscape both in our city and beyond for nearly 20 years.

Housed within 17,000-square-foota building at 120, 8489 40th Street S.E., Prolific is primarily focused on basketball development with elite-level programs ranging from training sessions and coaching clinics to skill development and league play.

“We’re focused on helping young athletes take their game to the next level,” says Singleton, a native of Coatesville, Penn., who previously played for several powerhouse Division 1 programs such as High Point University, Marquette University and Albright College.

20 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Heavy Born out of a local garage in 2003, Heavy’s rocket-like journey to becoming a globally recognized name in the creative placemaking community has been wild. Yet to hear it from company president Ryan Bessant, and to borrow a line from a famed rock band, “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.”

ABOVE: CALGARY’S INNOVATIVE INNOVATION CENTRE AND PARKADE ALONG NINTH AVENUE S.E.

More recently, Heavy’s expertise has been called upon for a trio of high-profile local projects that include Platform

In addition to its elite-level programs, Singleton notes Prolific is open to anyone who is interested in sports. He notes they offer numerous different recreational opportunities that include drop-in availabilities, a mini-hoopers program for preschoolers and even pickleball rentals.

The company’s portfolio today is made up of more than 1,000 installations that includes several highly acclaimed projects around the world such as the famed Inverted Lake along Toronto’s Bayfront area and North Harbour Sculptures in East Chicago.

IT’S A SMALL WORLD // SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

“We want to be known as a company that can work with clients to tell unique stories. We want to be known as a company that can do something special,” says Bessant.

“Our motto is we want to help our athletes get one per cent better each day.” Singleton notes several young athletes who train at Prolific are already seeing success first-hand. One of its current athletes currently represents Canada on the U17 women’s national team, while others have graduated and are now en route to elite schools across the U.S. and Canada.

“It’s been amazing. It’s done better than I could have ever envisioned,” says Singleton, CEO and head skills trainer at Prolific.

“Players of any skill level are welcome to come through and achieve their goals. It’s a real community vibe,” says Singleton.

“To offer an inclusive space that brings all parts of the community together,” says Brett Ireland, co-founder of Last Best and CEO of parent company Bearhill Brewing, which also operates Campio Brewing Co. in Edmonton, as well as Jasper Brewing Co. and Banff Ave Brewing Co.

“Already, we’ve been able to successfully enhance original concepts, as well as turn what would otherwise be huge obstacles into opportunities by just adding our special blend of creativity,” says Bessant. “Just seeing this part of our journey come to fruition gives us added confidence to move forward.”

22 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Calgary’s innovative innovation centre and parkade along Ninth Avenue S.E., as well as renovations at Glenbow Museum and the massive BMO Centre expansion.

Last Best Drawing its name from Western Canada’s storied history, Last Best Brewing & Distilling has become a flagbearer for the Calgary craft brew scene, and arguably a beacon of hope for a hospitality industry that has faced its fare share of challenges in recent years.

“At our core is real, true, honest community building. That’s been our focus.”

Bessant notes Heavy’s involvement in these latest projects aligns with the launch of Heavy’s new brand, which took place earlier this year. Based around a Plan-Design model, the company is looking to collaborate with clients earlier in the process to provide what Bessant says is better value from the overall placemaking process. That includes everything from better defining the “why” at the outset to streamlining collaboration between artists, architects, developers and Heavy’s team of fabricators and project managers.

The Last Best brand – which pays homage to the “Last Best West” campaign launched by the federal government at the end of the 1800s to populate the western prairies and grow agriculture in Canada – also continues to push further into the community. Today, products such as its popular IPA and Show Pony pale ale can be round in restaurants and grocery stores across the city.

“The creativity of the brewing team at Last Best has always been exceptional – very ‘hop’ forward,” says Ireland, noting its spirits program also continues to make headlines. Distillery operations manager Bryce Parsons is in the process of getting certified by the Guinness Book of World Records for his feat of creating 52 unique gins in one year.

“We enjoy being able to help people expand the spectrum of flavours they can enjoy.”

IT’S A SMALL WORLD // SMALL BUSINESS WEEK ABOVE: LAST BEST

To that end, Ireland is encouraged to have seen so many events return to Last Best over the past several months, on top of what he calls a “very successful Stampede.”

First opened in May 2015, the popular brew pub on 11th Avenue S.W. has emerged from the start-stop motion of the pandemic strong and with a renewed sense of purpose.

“We continue to be amazed to see the community support that we’ve seen,” says Ireland

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Hear

FEDERAL CLIMATE POLICIES FRUSTRATE ALBERTA FARMERS AS CARBON TAXES INCREASE,BRACEGROWERSFOR POSSIBLEREDUCTIONSFERTILIZER

FEDERAL CLIMATE POLICIES FRUSTRATE ALBERTA FARMERS // AGRICULTURE

There’s also concern over soaring input costs and pandemicinduced supply chain issues that are making it more difficult to obtain farm equipment and parts, says one grain producer.

24 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

BY JAMES SNELL

ABOVE: SEED DRILL WITH ANHYDROUS AMMONIA TANKS. THE NITROGEN IS INJECTED INTO THE SOIL AND PLACED NEAR THE SEED TO HELP IT GROW THROUGHOUT THE GROWING SEASON. SOURCE: HOLLY NICOLL

Alberta farmers and agriculture stakeholders are burdened and anxious over federal government climate change policies like escalating carbon taxes and a goal to dramatically reduce nitrogen fertilizer use by 2030, which could hit farmers hard and threaten Canada’s status as a food exporter.

PHOTO

On April 1, the federal government, despite record high fuel prices, increased its carbon tax by 25 per cent, raising the cost of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to fossil fuel consumption to $50 per ton. For consumers, that translates into an additional 2.21 cents per litre for gasoline and 2.68 cents for diesel. For Alberta farmers, who don’t pay carbon tax on dyed farm fuel, it means paying even more for fuels like propane and natural gas that are used extensively for grain drying and heat. Also, most agriculture service industries are subject to carbon tax and pass on the added expense to farmers, who are at the mercy of grain markets.

“The challenges, in terms of what it is for farmers right off the bat, are of course the expenses,” says Tara Sawyer, chairperson of Alberta Barley. “That’s an expense we cannot pass on to the rest of the chain of our users. I mean, we are getting hit with that carbon tax in more than one area. There’s the cost on our inputs, and there’s transportation and we can’t recover that cost.”

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Farmers want to reduce GHG emissions, explains Sawyer, but she fears politicians are not recognizing the work already completed by grain producers. She argues many farmers have already achieved net zero GHG emissions – adding to the frustration over Canada’s goal to reduce nitrogen fertilizer emissions by 30 per cent by 2030. According to a Government of Canada press release, nitrogen

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // SEPTEMBER 2022 25

INPUT COSTS ON SAWYER’S FARM NEAR ACME, ALTA., HAVE DOUBLED IN THE LAST YEAR.

// AGRICULTURE

Input costs on Sawyer’s farm near Acme, Alta., have doubled in the last year. Fertilizer prices have skyrocketed. Compounding matters, many prairie farmers are coming off a drought year, so there’s less grain in storage and less money to cover expenses.

JAMES

“What more do they want us to do?” says Sawyer. “First of all, we’ve already implemented a lot of technology that has allowed us to reduce those emissions. And there’s pressure because we are not being given credit for what we’ve been doing for the last number of years. We have a world we need to feed. We are an exporting nation.”

FERTILIZER PRICES HAVE SKYROCKETED.

“To have a government statement issued saying you’ve got seven years … I mean don’t take away money from research and innovation then because those are some of the tools we need,” she says. “Don’t take away the tools of the fertilizer we use. How we farm has improved exponentially. We’ve moved into no till, offering carbon sequestration. We have GPS, so we are not overlapping in fields.”

COMPOUNDING MATTERS, MANY PRAIRIE FARMERS ARE COMING OFF A DROUGHT YEAR, SO THERE’S LESS GRAIN IN STORAGE AND LESS MONEY TO COVER EXPENSES.

26 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM fertilizer causes the release of nitrous oxide, a potent GHG. The agriculture sector, they explain, produced around 10 per cent of Canada’s total GHG emissions since 1990.

ABOVE: TARA SAWYER, CHAIRPERSON OF ALBERTA BARLEY, SPOKE WITH BUSINESS IN CALGARY DURING A CALGARY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AGRICULTURE CONFERENCE ON APRIL 5, 2022.

PHOTO SOURCE: SNELL

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David Yager, a Canadian energy analyst, says people who write climate policy in Canada are oblivious to economic principles. He says the real issue isn’t what climate activists are doing, but why they are doing it.

“On the flip side, we can’t achieve those goals if we’re continuing to be held back by bad government policy like continued increases in the carbon tax, fertilizer prices, failing supply chain, labour crisis and fertilizer reduction,” he says. “All of these things have happened because of bad policy with no consultation or input from producers.”

In addition to climate change policies affecting farmers’ bottom line, Sawyer is also worried about global supply chain problems and inflation. Also, she’s expecting another drought “Gettingyear.equipment, getting parts. We just bought a new drill (seeder) and it’s just getting here now,” she says. “We’re supposed to start seeding in the next couple weeks. That’s cutting it a little close. The cost of equipment has also gone up.”

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Government of Canada department responsible for agriculture regulation, said in a recent statement it met with producer groups and provincial and territorial partners in 2021 to discuss GHG targets.

“The sleeping giant is food,” he says. “Now, one of the reasons they are doing this, and this is another twist, is the demographics of Canadian politics is just astounding. Sixtyfive per cent of voters live in urban centres. Urban voters that support the NDP and Liberals have absolutely no idea where anything comes from. They don’t know where their food and gasoline come from. When it comes to Western Canada and farmers and oil producers, they go: ‘What’s that noise? What’s your problem?”

“This is what happens when decisions are based on activism and not on sound science and data,” he says.

The prime minister’s office, asserts Yager, has told the world that Canada plans to exceed its 2030 GHG targets. He wonders how that’s going to happen, adding it’s been “open season” on the oil and gas sector. The federal government, he explains, has followed through when it comes to pushing back against the energy sector.

In a 2021 report commissioned by Fertilizer Canada, a fertilizer industry advocacy and research group, MNP said Canada’s aspiration to massively reduce nitrogen fertilizer use, if realized, would be devastating and cost growers approximately $48 billion over the next seven years.

The Government of Canada says on its website that fertilizers play a major role in farmers’ success and have enabled record harvests over the last decade. Fertilizers drive increased yields, sales and exports, they explain.

“However, nitrous oxide emissions, particularly those associated with synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use have also grown significantly,” they say. “That is why the Government of Canada has set the national fertilizer emissions reduction target, which is part of the commitment to reduce total GHG emissions in Canada by 40 to 45 per cent by 2030.”

When the federal government announced its fertilizer emissions target it did so without consulting provincial, agricultural or other critical stakeholders, says Karen Proud, president and CEO of Fertilizer Canada in a press release.

“Of all the things that the entire climate change file has completely ignored, or chosen to ignore, or doesn’t know enough to ignore, is the role of fossil fuels in the food chain,” he says. “Something like half the population of the world is fed by nitrogen-based fertilizer. I’ve watched the entire climate debate unfold with absolutely nobody talking about food or the impact of food or the cost of food. The whole climate debate has been that the cost of doing nothing is so huge that the short-term costs are irrelevant.”

Canada’s recently announced GHG targets are unrealistic, asserts Barlow. He says there is no agriculture stakeholder on Ottawa’s Net-Zero Advisory Body. It’s time, he says, to unleash the potential of Canadian agriculture to help rebuild the post-COVID economy and ensure Canada has a prominent position on the world stage. He wonders why the federal government is “doing everything it possibly can” to discourage Canadian agriculture.

28 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Foothills MP John Barlow, shadow minister for agriculture, agri-food and food security says producers are anxious about climate change policies that are making farming more difficult, adding an imminent global food shortage means Canada must maintain agriculture output.

FEDERAL CLIMATE POLICIES FRUSTRATE ALBERTA FARMERS // AGRICULTURE

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30 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Avison Young’s gradual but encouraging absorption and vacancy curve numbers show that “premium space is becoming scarce with only 7.8 per cent headlease vacancy in prime, downtown, Class AA space and, thanks to this higher BY JOHN HARDY

“Longer term, continuing to put a concerted effort into diversifying our industrial base to make advances in agricultural, financial, renewables and software technology industries will help balance our demand profile and lead to less severe market cycles.”

“Indicators like city and province-level GDP growth, net migration, energy prices, inflation and federal interest rate decisions,” explains the plugged-in and Calgary-savvy John Fisher, executive vice president, CBRE Advisory &

he momentum is encouraging. The COVID curse has faded. The new normals of business have settled in. And, in particular, there is a much-awaited pivot of good news for Calgary’s ravaged commercial real estate, with more than a third of the downton core space sitting vacant.

The post-pandemic mindset and business recovery is also happening. Not as quickly as some would like, but happening. There’s a positive factor when it comes to the rebounding of Calgary’s commercial real estate. “It’s most definitely good news and we are certainly seeing a case for optimism,” notes Todd Throndson, principal and managing director with Calgary’s Avison Young Commercial Real Estate Services. “We saw positive absorption in Q4 2021, as well as declines in office vacancy in Calgary commercial space. Specifically, overall office vacancy decreased to 26 per cent, down from 26.1 per cent the previous quarter, and downtown vacancy also ticked down from 29.9 per cent to 27.7 per cent.” He adds that he expects the next 12 to 24 months to be relatively stable although global events could play a major part in the economy.

A strong economy growing at a pace unseen in more than a decade has spurred investment in Calgary’s commercial real estate sector, including multi-family residential. RE/MAX Commercial Real Estate recently released its Real Estate Report for 2022, and tracks that investment in Calgary commercial real estate reached almost $1 billion in the first three months of the year.

ENCOURAGING MOMENTUM

T

Whether it was legit or just a high-profile distraction, the two years of pandemic commotion have gotten the brunt of the blame for Calgary’s commmercial real estate doldrums. But the detailed numbers show that lockdowns and other disruptions were, by no means, the only culprits. For several pre-pandemic years, Calgary’s commercial real estate market has been a fluid dynamic of highs and lows, impacted by various key factors.

There is no doubt that the continued recovery in the energy industry is key to Calgary’s short-medium term recovery.

Transaction Services. “Positive results in the first three should increase the demand profile for commercial real estate in Calgary, lowering vacancy and raising rental rates.

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE ON THE MEND // COMMERCIAL LEASING

Demand for industrial and flex-space buildings have been among the hottest market segments, after having been in a severe slump since 2019 and before.

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“Given the prolonged downturn affecting Calgary’s office market – which started in 2015 – landlords have lowered rental rates to attract and retain tenants.” For stereotypical reasons, references to Calgary’s commercial real estate usually focus on “downtown.” According a recent CBRE report about Calagary commercial real estate, The report also tracks the glaring differences between prepandemic years and the impact of lockdowns and people working by remote. Between 2012 and 2021, the price gap between the net rental rates in Calgary’s newer and higher quality buildings (which CBRE calls class A) and older or less lavishly equipped buildings (class B) dropped significantly. In the fourth quarter of 2012, the rental rate for class A was about $40 per square foot, and class B was about $30. In the same period in 2021, with lockdowns and other COVID disruptions in place, the rate for class A space was $13.07

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demand and shrinking supply, we’ve started to record some upward pressure on rental rates for top quality space both downtown and in the suburbs,” he says.

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UPWARD SWING DESPITE MOUNTING CHALLENGES

Allison Grafton has seen many of Calgary’s most popular communities transform right in front of her eyes. In fact, she’s had a hand in many of those changes.

“In general, we’re seeing a lot more construction and activity in general so far this year, and it’s supportive of continued demand that extends back to 2021,” says Michael Mak, senior economics analyst with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC).

34 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

And Calgary seems well-positioned to meet growing demand moving forward – especially when compared with other jurisdictions across Canada. BY JAMIE ZACHARY

It’s a comment echoed by Jordan Chambers, who works in business development for Rockwood, and subsequently, has had a front-row seat to much of the action.

“We’re so busy because there’s just so much opportunity. In the last eight months ... as the city has started finding its legs again, we’re seeing more inquiries, especially within the inner city – more than we’ve ever had in 13 years.”

The founder and president of luxury custom home builder Rockwood Custom Homes has been “disrupting” Calgary’s housing market since the company formed in 2009 –apropos given the changing landscape over that time.

“There doesn’t seem to be any sign of it slowing down, either. We’re continuing to see strong demand across all types of the housing spectrum.”

“The luxury market has not slowed down for Rockwood. In fact, within Calgary, we’ve grown around 20 per cent over the past two years alone,” says Grafton, whose company is a regular within inner-city communities such as Bel Aire, Britannia, Elboya, Mount Royal, as well as its own exclusive developments such as Lazy H and Abby Farm in Springbank.

NEW HOUSING

“The amount of inquires we are getting on any given day has been significant,” she says. “And it’s coming in different ways. We have clients who are reaching out to us directly, as well as lot owners, developers. So a lot of inquires from a lot of different spaces in the market.”

Rockwood’s story is symbolic of a renaissance that’s continuing to reshape Calgary’s new housing market. After a downturn in early 2020 due to lockdowns associated with the pandemic, residential construction in the city has been firing on all cylinders ever since.

PHOTO SOURCE: ROCKWOOD CUSTOM HOMES MARKET CONTINUES BUILDERS STILL BULLISH ON CALGARY

BUILDERS STILL BULLISH ON CALGARY // CONSTRUCTION

RENAISSANCE

SYMBOLIC

CMHC reports the average price of a new single-family home in Calgary heading into this summer was around $560,000, up from a base of $510,000 over the past couple of years yet still off all-time highs of around $590,000 set in 2015.

LOOKING ULTIMATE BACKDROP? got a to for@calgaryzoo.comsalesinfomoreinformation. IS OF A THAT’S CONTINUING TO RESHAPE NEW HOUSING MARKET. A IN EARLY 2020 DUE TO LOCKDOWNS WITH THE PANDEMIC, RESIDENTIAL IN THE CITY HAS BEEN FIRING ON ALL CYLINDERS EVER SINCE.

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// CONSTRUCTION ROCKWOOD’S STORY

CONSTRUCTION

In a report issued this past June, CMHC notes current practices need to change to better restore affordability to the country’s housing sector. Specifically, it’s calling for 3.5 million additional housing units beyond current projections by 2030 – two-thirds of which are needed in Ontario and British Columbia.

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Specific to Calgary, Mak points to strong completion numbers as a strong indicator of how the local industry has best tackled rising demand. Since early spring, he notes more than 1,000 units are being completed monthly in the city, which is comparable to highs reported in 2013-14.

“We haven’t seen those types of numbers in years,” says Mak, reiterating that healthy supply remains important as demand continues to be driven by strong economic activity in the province, illustrated by unemployment numbers that are now below 2019 levels and positive migration numbers over consecutive quarters.

Of note, Mak points to single-detached starts and new apartment construction levels that continue to rebound to levels last seen in 2014 and 2015, respectively.

Yet CMHC singles out Alberta as an example of how to best go about increasing that housing supply. The national housing agency says that while productivity growth in the industry has been notoriously weak nationwide, Alberta has been better able to meet growing demands by allocating more resources to new home starts – 8.4 workers per construction site in 2021, compared with a historical low of 3.3 in B.C.

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In turn, a deeper stock of inventory in our province has better balanced out housing prices relative to income. Only 31 per cent of household income was needed to afford the average price of home in Alberta last year, which CMHC reported at $426,000. In comparison, that ratio peaks at 44 per cent in B.C., where the average price was a staggering $929,000.

FOR THE

36 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

In terms of where in Calgary new residential construction activity is taking place currently, CMHC points primarily to the north around Livingstone and Carrington, as well as communities such as Mahogany and Seton in the south.

Interestingly, a separate CMHC housing supply report released this past spring notes approximately 40 per cent of new apartment construction in Calgary is being targeted toward rental use. By comparison, only an average of 15 per cent were intended for use in the primary rental market between 2011 and 2020.

That said, residential construction activity is strong citywide, notes Matthew Sheldrake, manager of growth and strategic services at the City of Calgary. For example, he points to 23 new communities across all four quadrants that recorded more than 100 new builds in 2021 – a trend that has continued in 2022.

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Sheldrake acknowledges the local housing market is continuing to see “enviable” growth in 2022. Yet he also points out it has been anything but a linear path to get here. “The shape of the curve has been quite high … from an eight-year low in 2020 to an eight-year high in 2021. And we actually started 2022 faster than 2021, if you

Perhaps not surprisingly then, the single-family segment is representing a growing share of total new starts in the city. As Sheldrake notes, “there is no question that the single-family market on the edge of town is the strongest (segment).”

While single-family represented 35 per cent of all new starts in 2019, that number jumped to 44 per cent in 2021. And Sheldrake says the split between single- and multi-family in new communities – where a lion’s share of residential construction activity is taking place – is closer to 80/20.

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Interest rates are not the only challenges Calgary’s housing sector will face moving forward, either. Sheldrake and Mak also point to delivery times of new homes creeping up due to material shortages and difficulties attracting skilled Despitelabour.this,Grafton says her team at Rockwood remain optimistic for 2022 and beyond. “Challenges are going to continue to present for the next year to 18 months. However, I feel people are very clear on their wishes and wants for how they want to live. A home has become more important than it’s ever been,” she says. “I’m very bullish. Yes, it’s been a tremendous learning curve over the past two years, but the last six months have been very, very strong. For Calgary, it feels like the energy is here.”

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // SEPTEMBER 2022 37 can believe it,” he says, noting yearover-year starts were up more than 35 per cent at the start of 2022. However, that started to taper off by June. According to the City, year-to-date starts near the midyear mark were around 2,100 from around 1,900 in 2021. “It’s a pretty easy answer as to why: interest rates have gone from two per cent to more than five per cent in just six months, which can be $800 more a month for a new homebuyer,” says Sheldrake.

THE KAISER // COVER

As an 18-year-old, Kujat arrived in Canada in 1957 with -$192; while he had $37 to his name, he owed the Canadian government a $229 sponsorship fee to immigrate as part of a youth movement to stimulate the national economy.

BY TREVOR BACQUE KUJAT

Sometimes the real race is getting to the starting line. For Bill Kujat, truer words cannot be spoken. The Germanborn Canadian is living proof that through hard work, grit and determination, one can blaze his own trail.

ABOVE: BILL

PHOTO SOURCE: RIVERWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY STILL VALUES HARD WORK COMMITMENTAND THE KAISER

38 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

For a few years he worked odd jobs including hauling sacks of potatoes at a Chinese restaurant, counting 2x4s as a labourer at a lumber mill, operating a powerhouse at Lake Louise and working weekends at CP Rail. It did not matter, though. He was in Calgary and that was all that mattered.

He was enamored with the romantic notion of the wide open Prairies, which was not too different from growing up in Gronau, Germany, 130 kilometres north of Dusseldorf. He set foot in Calgary with a grin, cocksure as any cowboy could be.

The Business Machine is Born The trajectory of his life rose dramatically upward when, in 1961, he accepted a job as operations manager for Modern Building Cleaning Services, a full package janitorial business. For 17 years, day in and day out, Kujat worked to oversee many sites and guarantee quality above all else for customers. It’s his penchant for going above and beyond that ultimately led him to become the vice-president, western region of the national company.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // SEPTEMBER 2022 39

One of the buildings he managed was Elveden House, on the corner of 7 Avenue & 7 Street S.W. He cared meticulously for the tower, which carried an appropriate level of prestige considering it was the only high rise – 20 floors – west of Toronto, at the time. Little did he know the major role that building would later play in his life.

“That was our first industrial building,” he says with a quiet pride. “I was still working for them and continued to work for them all along the way.”

THE KAISER // COVER

“I read about the Calgary Stampede,” he says. “Every German boy’s dream was to go west and experience the spirit, excitement and promise of the wild west as fueled by the many books we had read as young men.”

“I knew the building, I knew every square foot,” he says with confidence. For years, every Sunday he would drive a group of German-Polish ladies from Forest Lawn to Elveden House to clean it. This was a cleaning service above and beyond the daily cleanings, a detailing of sorts for the tenants of Elveden House. He would bring the ladies sandwiches and later drive them home. “My early history to this building goes way back.”

As he began to save money, Kujat branched out into real estate, something he had learned was important in his European upbringing. He bought two modest houses and rented them out, to a pair of English friends he played soccer with on the local team, the Calgary Kickers. After renovating and selling the properties, he built a duplex and later used the equity from those properties to invest in an 18-unit apartment building, which kickstarted a lifelong foray into real estate. He expressed to his passion for real estate to the president of Modern. As a result of his faith in Kujat the president of Modern made a deal, offering to be the first company to sign a lease on a new industrial building if Kujat could build it.

He hasn’t lost his love of the West either. His office is festooned with artwork and sculptures depicting the spirit of Alberta and cowboy culture. Aside from that, pictures of his wife, three daughters and four grandchildren make his corner office feel as close to a living room as possible while being in downtown Calgary.

ABOVE: ON THE STREETS OF CALGARY 1959 WORKING FOR MODERN.

Kujat was awarded the Pinnacle Award in 1990 for his commitment to Alberta business. You couldn’t talk about cleaning services without talking about Bill Kujat.

It wasn’t as though it was easy, however. “I had always wanted to be on my own, but then again, it’s a tough business,” he explains. “I would work six to seven days a week, minimum of eight hours.” He took absolutely nothing for granted and built a business empire modelled on austerity rules to rival Greece in 2010.

His primary goal of being the best landlord possible has given him a bevy of long-term clientele who remain loyal through thick and thin. Kujat’s financial philosophy of never just living in the moment also helps weather such storms.

“I always worry about tomorrow, next week, next month, next year,” he offers. “You’re happy when you get a tenant

“We are not buyers and sellers,” he says flatly. “Very seldom we do sell, but generally we believe in hanging on to what we’ve built. We always say, ‘If things really get bad, I want to make sure I don’t lose what we built up over the years.’ So, being conservatively funded is always very important. That is a belief I had as an early child. Always make sure that you don’t buy something if you cannot pay for it.”

He lived as though he was always playing one goal behind, which he believes gave him the humility to never stop trying his best. His ethic of hard work and smart decisions proved to be the golden ticket for Kujat, and he continued to acquire buildings and structures around Calgary.

40 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

By 1999, Focus was established as one of Canada’s premier janitorial services providers and it attracted the attention of an American company. This was not the first offer to purchase Kujat had received, but the timing seemed auspicious on this occasion.

THE KAISER // COVER

“It just made sense to try when the opportunity came up to acquire it,” he explains. “It was a dream, a dream come true.”

After the sale, Kujat focused his time and efforts primarily on real estate. “If you build it, it’s never going to cost less,” he says. “It only goes up, so I always had a special love for real estate and built quite an empire.”

All Kujat’s real estate holdings are run through a limited company, Estancia Investment.

With Focus firmly established by 1995, a unique opportunity presented itself. A previous owner of Elveden House had gotten himself into financial trouble. Through connections in the business world, Kujat learned of the situation and was fortunate to be able to make a move.

ABOVE: THE KUJAT FAMILY, KARLA, RUTH, BILL, KRISTA AND HEIDI.

“Don’t get into deep debt, be very cautious, very conservative,” he advises. “I watched a lot of friends overextend themselves and said, ‘That’s not what I want to be.’”

Today, given the situation in downtown Calgary, Kujat is glad he chose a strategy of being a long-term holder, rather than a flipper.

By 1976, he had learned all he could and stepped away from Modern to form his own janitorial operation, Focus Building Services. Everything he had learned at Modern – how to be a good businessman and what made for new and repeat customers – he applied to Focus. For the next 21 years, Kujat poured every fibre of his being into the company. Focus would become responsible for more than 50 clients, including housekeeping services at the Rockyview General Hospital in Calgary. It had offices stretching from Vancouver to Winnipeg and at one point and ran 2,600 employees.

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Still, with rock bottom rates, Kujat has seen new people moving into the city’s core and Beltline and knows that there will always be innovators and excited company presidents looking to make a splash. It’s a movie reel he’s seen time and again after being in business in the city’s core for more than 50 years.

CENTRON

CHARLIE

To Kujat, it comes back to a work ethic that is perhaps somewhat taught, but mostly something a person is born with. The drive is simply there or it’s not. It takes a rare breed to not only leave things better than when they found it but also to treat people the same if not better than themselves.

OPENING

BOB

RGO OFFICE

SAFEWAY

42 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM that at least covers your operating expenses, so you can survive in the long run. That has been a real, real challenge and it’s going to be a challenge for the next 10 years or so.”

AND BILL

(FROM

THE KAISER // COVER

Throughout the years, Kujat has worked just as hard away from the desk as he has behind it. He and his wife Ruth have been married for 53 years and make a point to take annual holidays and spend time at their self-built cabin at Panorama, B.C. Kujat is quick to recognize and compliment Ruth as he knows the importance of a strong relationship and partner at home. Their daughters Heidi, Krista and Karla live across North America and have made lives for themselves that are as unique as their father’s, who also spares no time talking about the accomplishments of each one and their wonderful grandchildren. Karla, in a tribute letter to her father written as a 20-something, wrote: “You have been a part of my life and have been quietly instrumental in me learning many different lessons.” ABOVE: IN 2015 KUJAT JOINED A GROUP OF LIKE-MINDED BUSINESS ASSOCIATES TO GIFT $5.6 MILLION TO RESOLVE, 45 DOORS DESIGNATED TO ACCESSIBLE HOUSING. LEFT TO RIGHT) ROSS GLEN OF PRODUCTS, GUILLE OF COUGAR CONTRACTORS LTD., HARRIS OF GROUP OF COMPANIES, KUJAT OF HOLDINGS.

Out of Office

Taku Gas Ltd: Once a partner, Kujat has now been the sole owner of this company, which specializes in heavy oil production, since 2015.

“I look at Canada, I look at Alberta. The country has been good to me and it’s given me a chance and an opportunity to do something. If I work hard, then I’m in a position so that I can share with people that truly need help. And that’s always a very big thing,” he says.

It would be a dull world to simply focus on just a single business. That’s why Bill Kujat has made sure to lend his experience and expertise to many different companies across multiple industries. Here is a snapshot of some of his other dealings.

Kujat supports Inn from the Cold, Woods Homes, Meals on Wheels, Resolve, both the YMCA and YWCA, the Alberta Children’s Hospital and specific schools in the city. “We are under the radar,” he admits. “We do a lot of things that people don’t know about, but those are my beliefs.”

THE KAISER // COVER

Alberta Security and Investigation: Kujat owned a security company with more than 300 employees and sold it off about the same time as Focus in 1999.

Services: Founder and president (1978 - 1999). The company was successfully sold to an American buyer. At the height of its operation, the company boasted more than 2,600 employees across Western Canada.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // SEPTEMBER 2022 43

Safeway Well Services: Former president and CEO of the oilfield services company between 1997 and 2005 with operations in B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan.

“I’ve done so many different things,” he reflects. “I’ve enjoyed life so much and appreciate things and you just should never forget about all of that. I mean, it’s a gift.”

The Kaiser Charitable Foundation: Since 2013, the Foundation has donated millions of dollars to countless charities and groups around Calgary.

Estancia Investments: Current president of the inner city- and downtown-focused real estate company with more than 700,000 square feet of space.

Chairman and founder: Safeway Holdings, a private real estate firm with two million-plus square feet of residential, commercial and industrial structures in its Focusportfolio.Building

And no matter what Kujat’s next chapter is, rest assured it will challenge and stretch him in new ways. It’s simply his nature. “What would I do if I don’t go to work? I love to get up early in the morning, work out, then go into the office.

Canstone Energy: Since buying the company in 2014, Kujat has been Canstone’s president. The company’s assets are primarily in natural gas.

One of those lessons is to simply push away from the desk every now and again. “You need diversification, you don’t put all your eggs in one basket,” he says. “I needed to get away from the office, I needed something different.”

Kaiser Investment Inc.: Current president and director of the Arizona-based real estate holdings company in both Arizona and California.

“I have not achieved this alone, I have had the opportunity to work with some incredibly talented, bright, colleagues, partners and friends throughout my business career. I owe them a big thank you for not only contributing to what has been built, but also for making the experience so amazing.”

He hopes that his daughters will be involved with the Kaiser Foundation for years to come and will continue Kujat’s legacy of charity and helping others.

His key activities away from work include hockey, tennis, golf and soccer, all of which he has happily played for more than 50 years, and still plays today. One of his soccer teammates has been playing alongside Kujat for 62 years. Aside from being active with his friends, most of whom he has had for 50-plus years, Kujat is very active through the Kaiser Charitable Foundation, the philanthropic wing of his business established roughly 20+ years ago to give back to the community that has given him so much over the years.

Keepin’ up with Kujat

Yes, I have to have the balance, but why wouldn’t I do it? I am so fortunate to have the great mix that I do.”

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SEPTEMBER 2022 PREPARING FOR AUTUMN the next 45 days are crucial A GALLERY OF FINE HOMES take a peek inside MOST WANTED on the hunt for these properties FALL EDITION The MARKETING YOUR HOME FOR ALL IT’S WORTH®

THE NEXT 45 DAYS ARE CRUCIAL TO THE

THE MARKET IS CHANGING. DON’T MISS YOUR OPPORTUNITY. OUR EXPERIENCE IS YOUR ADVANTAGE. CALL US TODAY.

REAL ESTATE MARKET

CHECK YOUR EXTERIOR

Make the most of the warm weather while it lasts and get any exterior painting and repairs completed now. Take a look at your front entry and touch up chipped paint, replace light fixtures and mailboxes to insure a good first impression. Remove any garbage and get rid of dead paint material in pots before they are frozen solid.

You are required to supply an up-to-date Real Property Report (RPR) when you sell your home. It is much easier for the survey company to complete this before snow is on the ground. Get in touch with me to find out how you can save money on this essential document.

ASK SAM

Not intended to solicit properties already listed for sale nor intended to cause a breach of any existing agency relationship.

Get your home listed quickly! The real estate market picks up in the fall because buyers want to be settled in before the winter. They tend to spend less time shopping around and make their decisions quickly. Typically, sales activity slows down in late autumn and there are fewer transactions until the spring arrives. To take advantage of this serge of activity in the next 45 days it is really important to get your house listed now. Here are a few tips if you are considering selling this fall.

What advice would you give to someone thinking of selling this fall?

ORDER EXTERIOR PHOTOS

PRICE IT RIGHT

Your landscaping looks best before the first frost and potential buyers will want to know what it looks like in the summer. Make sure you get professional photos of your yard, garden and any outdoor features while the weather is warm. If you need a recommendation on a photographer, please reach out. I’d be happy to share my contacts.

UPDATE YOUR RPR

Q

Because most of the activity in the fall real estate market happens during a short time frame, you have to price your property correctly. If you set a price that is too high, your house will linger on the market into the winter months when there are fewer buyers. Don’t test out the market with an inflated price if you are serious about selling before the end of the year

c 403 870 8811 | t 403 686 7800 | www.SAMCOREA.COM | SAM@SAMCOREA.COM FEATURED PROPERTIES A GALLERY OF FINE HOMES FOR SALE Escarpment Drive Block 13 Plan 2850JK Title: 121 021 078 Area 8.864 ha (21.90 Ac.) Lot 4 Plan 801 1118 Title: 121 021 077 Area 6.54 ha (16.16 Ac.) 24.38mTransmissionLine RWPlan780DH 0513031PlanRWPipeline6.00m Lot 5 Plan 901 0021 Lot 6 Lot 5 Plan 001 0683 Lot 4 Lot 3 6.00AccessRWPlan9913150 Escarpment Park LowerSpringbankRoad RoadViewHorizon Road Plan 771 0012 TH CROK GEOMATICS IRD Title boundary shown thus Image Date May 24, 2020 Scale 1:2000 Areas noted according to the titles and have not been independently verified. Fantastic opportunity to buy two adjacent Springbank parcels of land totalling 38 acres. Located at the intersection of Lower Springbank Road and Horizon View Road and bordered to the North by Escarpment Drive, these spectacular properties offer rolling hills and stunning mountain views. The north parcel consists of 22 +/- acres zoned R-1 (2 acre minimum) and R-2 (4 acre minimum). Currently, both parcels are being utilized for agricultural purposes. This beautiful piece of paradise is in a prime location, surrounded on three sides by paved roads with scenic countryside views and offers privacy, and proximity to Stoney Trail. This is a great opportunity to buy both parcels together making it the ideal picturesque spot for future development. INTERSECTION OF LOWER SPRINGBANK ROAD & HORIZON ROAD $4,000,000 DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY

Country living within the city limits! This large home nestled into the hillside offers spectacular mountain views. The living room features a wood burning fireplace and plenty of space for large parties. The craftsman style kitchen has granite counters, double wall ovens, a 5 burner cooktop, breakfast bar and overlooks the cozy sitting room. A conveniently located mud/laundry room offers lots of pantry storage for busy families. The quiet home office with built-ins is located off the foyer. Up the curved staircase is an open library, ideal for homework. There are 3 spacious bedrooms and an owner’s suite upstairs with a fireplace, an ensuite and walk-in closet. The lower floor has an additional 1947 SF of living space that includes 2 bedrooms, a games area, family room, snack bar and media room. This home is in immaculate condition, has a new roof, furnaces and water tanks. Some of the city’s best private schools are steps away. This home has space for everyone to spread out and enjoy the peaceful setting.

CONTACT US TO BOOK A PERSONAL TOUR

42 ANATAPI LANE SW SPRINGBANK$1,800,000HILL MAIN LEVEL FORMAL DINING 19'0" X 14'0" DEN/OFFICE 16'0" X 11'2" MUD ROOM 21'5" X 6'4" FOYER 11'5" X 9'0" KITCHEN 18'0" X 12'4" LAUNDRY 11'2" X 6'6" SITTING ROOM 19'0" X 14'5" LIVING ROOM 28'2" X 20'3" DECK 20'0" X 16'0" WRAP-AROUND PORCH 100'0" X 6'0" GARAGE 34'0" X 23'0" BREAKFASTBATH NOOK 11'8" X 9'6" UPPER LEVEL PRIMARY BEDROOM 28'0" X 19'7" LIBRARY 13'2" X 11'10" STEAM WALK IN CLOSET ENSUITE BATH BEDROOM TWO 17'2" X 11'0" BEDROOM THREE 20'0" X 15'2" BEDROOM FOUR 22'2" X 11'0" BATH BASEMENT FAMILY ROOM 20'6" X 19'2" BATH UTILITY ROOM 20'5" X 20'4" WET BAR 8'8" X 6'0" VAC MEDIA ROOM 23'3" X 16'6" GAMES AREA 18'3" X 12'0" BEDROOM SIX 13'3" X 10'3" BEDROOM FIVE 14'9" X 12'2" ENSUITE STORAGE ROOM 11'0" X 11'0"

c 403 870 8811 | t 403 686 7800 | www.SAMCOREA.COM | SAM@SAMCOREA.COM FEATURED PROPERTIES

67 67 DISCOVERYVALLEYDISCOVERYCOVESWRIDGE$1,695,000

GALLERY

Located on a quiet cul-de-sac, backing Griffith Woods, this sprawling home is an escape from city life. Enter into the foyer to take in the warm and inviting living area with vast windows and fireplace flanked by custom millwork. The spacious kitchen has stainless appliances, granite counters, a pot filler & large island. A casual dining nook overlooks a backdrop of trees. The formal dining area and quiet home office provide extra living space. Head upstairs to the serene primary bedroom with ensuite & generous walk-in closet. Three more bedrooms (one with its own ensuite) and a laundry room complete this floor. The walk-out level provides plenty of space for the kids to sprawl out in the large recreation room, family room, bar, den, and media room. The lush yard has multiple areas to enjoy the outdoors and space for the the kids to play. Access the park thru the back gate. Dine al-fresco on the raised deck or sit around the fire-pit and gaze up at the stars. You will feel miles away from hectic city life.

A OF FINE HOMES FOR SALE

ASK US HOW MUCH YOUR HOME IS WORTH MAIN LEVEL W.I.C PRIMARY BEDROOM 19' 10" X 14' 7" 5 PCS ENSUITE BATH LIVING ROOM 18' 0" X 14' 2" DINING AREA 15' 2" X 12' 0" BEDROOM TWO 13' 6" X 11' 3" 4 PCS BATH LAUNDRY PANTRY KITCHEN 20' 6" X 11' 9" FOYER 12' 0" X 7' 2" BALCONY 46' 9" X 9' 0" BALCONY 19' 6" X 6' 6" ENTRY DOUBLE SIDED FIREPLACE #501 201 QUARRY WAY DOUGLASDALESE$1,495,000

A sophisticated penthouse overlooking the scenic banks of the Bow. This spacious, luxurious unit contains details you would expect to find in an estate home. A double sided French chateau inspired fireplace separates the generous living room from the dining area. There is plenty of space to host elegant dinner parties or special occasions. The open concept kitchen allows conversation to flow while you prep meals. Highlights include custom cabinetry with carved corbels, Wolf and Subzero appliances, and high end finishes. The grand primary bedroom has access out to one of the two outdoor living areas both with river views, a luxe 5-piece ensuite, and a large closet any fashionista would envy. Guests will appreciate the tucked away 2nd bedroom and bathroom. A laundry room, additional storage unit and 2 titled parking stalls are included. The concrete construction dampens noise between floors making it extra quiet. Communal gardens, access to the river paths and uncompromising quality make this the lap of luxury!

c 403 870 8811 | t 403 686 7800 | www.SAMCOREA.COM | SAM@SAMCOREA.COM FEATURED PROPERTIES A GALLERY OF FINE HOMES FOR SALE LIVING ROOM 24'0" X 19'0" DINING AREA 14'8" X 11'6" KITCHEN 14'8" X 12'6" OPEN TO BELOW DECK 35'0" X 7'6" PRIMARY BEDROOM 18'0" X 14'8" 5 PIECE ENSUITE BEDROOM 2 15'0" X 13'6" BEDROOM 3 13'10" X 11'10" 5 PC. BATH MUD/ LAUNDRY 13'8" X 8'0" GARAGE 29'6" X 23'0" PORCH 29'6" X 6'8" FOYER W.I.C.W.I.C. 33

A rare, walk-out bungalow with 3 main floor bedrooms backing the Heritage Pointe Golf Course. The open concept living, dining room and kitchen is ideal for entertaining and features a soaring ceiling, stone accent wall, fireplace, modern wood cabinets, a central island, granite, and a gas range. Down the hall is the private principal suite including an ensuite with modern rustic finishes, his/hers closets and access out to the deck overlooking the west facing yard. Two more bedrooms, a bathroom with separate water closet and dual vanity, and a laundry/mudroom complete the main floor. Downstairs is an inviting family room with fireplace, a games room, wet bar, two additional bedrooms, and bathroom. The oversized double garage is the perfect showpiece for car collectors and has ample space for a workshop. Enjoy the views of the manicured lawns of the 9th hole or warm yourself by the fire pit surrounded by mature trees. Over the years this home has been immaculately maintained and updated. The setting, proximity to the golf course and floor plan are spectacular!

HERITAGEPOINTEMEADOWDRIVEPOINTE$1,398,000

COACH

COACHROADGROVESWHILL$1,250,000

A tastefully updated brick bungalow in Coach Manor Estates with a fantastic floor plan and 3 bedrooms on the main level. A standout feature is the bookshelf lined office with soaring ceiling, bay window and hidden wet bar. The living room is separated from the dining room by a row of columns and is ideal for entertaining friends and family. A large kitchen with lots of storage, high-end appliances, granite counters and glass cabinets is open to the sunny dining nook and cozy family room. The primary bedroom contains a fireplace, sitting area, walk-in closet and large 5- piece ensuite. Two more bedrooms, a bathroom and powder room are on the main floor. Downstairs, a fully developed basement contains a bar, rec room and large games area with space for a pool table and access to the yard. The triple garage makes coming and going a breeze. The extensively landscaped yard with mature trees offers multiple outdoor living areas. Quality finishes and the convenience of main floor living make this property a knockout.

LIVING ROOM 19'0" X 15'10" DINING AREA FAMILY ROOM 18'0" X 15'8" KITCHEN DECK 20'0" X 12'6" DEN 17'0" X 9'10" FOYER 12'0" X 7'10" 4 PC. BATH 5 PIECE ENSUITE PRIMARY BEDROOM 20'0" X 13'0" W.I.C. BEDROOM 2 13'2" X 9'4" BEDROOM 3 15'8" X 10'0" 2 PC. PWDR. PATIO 22'0" X 11'0" RECREATION ROOM 31'4" X 12'4" UTILITY 12'0" X 7'8" WET BAR/ GAMES AREA 16'6" X 12'6" 3 PC BATH/ LAUNDRY

GET OUR MARKETING DOLLARS WORKING FOR YOU

TRIPLE GARAGE 27'6" X 22'8" BEDROOM 4 16'2" X 9'0" FAMILY ROOM 18'0" X 15'4"

640

FEATURED PROPERTIES

218 MYSTIC SPRINGBANKPARKRIDGESWHILL$1,100,000 BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME HERE

c 403 870 8811 | | | @SAMCOREA.COM

A spectacular spot to build your dream home! This half acre lot backs on to a natural ravine lined by a grove of mature spruce trees. The unobstructed views of the Rocky Mountains are absolutely breathtaking. It is an ideal lot for a home with a walk-out basement. The backyard would have sunny southern exposure and the reserved land behind offers a beautiful backdrop and privacy from neighbours. There is no building timeline or commitment so you are able to select the builder of your choice and take your time in the design phase. This affluent cul-de-sac is just moments from the Aspen Landing and Westhills shopping districts. Some of the best schools in Calgary are nearby. This is a rare piece of land where you can build a spectacular home to your own specifications. It’s country living within the city limits!

A GALLERY OF FINE HOMES FOR SALE

FIND OUT ABOUT OUR CONCIERGE SERVICE 2105 19TH STREET RICHMONDSW$1,100,000

Welcome home to the heart of Hillhurst. This stylish, family home is within walking distance to schools, shops, restaurants, and the outdoor pool. The main floor is elegantly appointed with a formal dining room, hardwood floors, and a great room that opens up to the sunny west-facing backyard. The large kitchen features white and walnut cabinets, marble, soapstone, and a Brigade gas stove perfect for the chef at heart. Upstairs the vaulted ceilings soar to 14’ and provide ample natural light. The built-in desks provide a spot to work from home or do art projects. The primary suite features a large walk-in closet and a luscious bathroom with free-standing tub and shower enclosure. Two more bedrooms with custom closets and a full bathroom complete this level. The basement has big windows allowing light in and a large flex room for your gym, media room or extra bedroom. The attached garage opens into to a large mudroom. Truly an ideal location!

CALL TODAY TO GET YOUR HOME IN OUR NEXT ISSUE LIVING ROOM 18'0" X 12'2" FOYER 11'2" X 6'6" BEDROOM 11'10" X 9'8" PRIMARY BEDROOM 10'8" X 10'8" BATHROOM 7'4" X 6'0" DINING 11'2" X 11'0"KITCHEN12'6" X 10'4" OFFICE NOOK 7'0" X 6'0" SAM COREA REMAX HOUSE OF REAL ESTATE ADMIN@SAMCOREA.CA 403.686.7800 JULY 22, 2022 240 7th Ave NE MAIN - 1072.91 Sq.ft. / 99.67 m2 RMS TOTAL - 1072.91 Sq.ft. / 99.673 m2 DETACHED SINGLE FAMILY *RECA RMS MEASUREMENTS TAKEN TO EXTERIOR FOUNDATION MAIN FLOOR PLAN 240 7TH AVENUE NE CRESCENT HEIGHTS$725,000 Unbeatable location on one of the nicest streets in Crescent Heights! This R-C2 zoned 50’ x 120’ corner lot is surrounded by mature trees and sits on a quiet street. Currently, a charming 1072 sq ft bungalow with some tastefully done renovations including granite counters, hardwood floors and an updated bathroom sits on the property. There are also two detached garages with parking for up to 3 vehicles, perfect for car lovers or a work shop. This beautiful, mature, inner city neighbourhood has schools, shopping, restaurants, transit and the downtown core at your fingertips. Being a corner lot, the possibilities are phenomenal for those planning to build their inner city dream home. This is a fantastic opportunity for buyers who want some old world charm, as well as developers and builders. The opportunities for this property are numerous! SOLD AT TIME OF PRINT

30TH STREET SW KILLARNEY $575,000 SOLD AT TIME OF PRINT

|

#103 2214

7840 8A AVENUE SW WEST

| $695,000

GALLERY

This top-notch brownstone with quality finishes is unlike others on the market and is located on a tree-lined street steps from a park, the Killarney pool, and the LRT station. The classy brick facade hints at the high-quality design details you can expect inside. Hardwood flows from the open concept dining room right through to the living room. The sleek two-toned walnut and white kitchen features a large waterfall edge island and stainless appliances including a gas range and French door fridge. A fireplace in the living room is flanked by built-ins. Highlights of the primary bedroom include a panelled accent wall and a coffered ceiling. The bathroom has a vaulted ceiling, double vanities, a soaker tub, separate shower and walls clad in large scale book-matched tiles that create an elegant statement. The second bedroom contains a large walk-in closet and a huge arched window, making this the perfect spot for guests or to be used as an office. This unique, upscale brownstone is in a prime location and must be seen!

c 403 870 8811 | t 403 686 7800 | www.SAMCOREA.COM | SAM@SAMCOREA.COM FEATURED PROPERTIES

This corner townhouse built in 2020 has a modern design, over 1700 SF of living space, and 440 SF of sunny outdoor living areas making this a unique option for the Westside. A wrap-around deck is the first of 3 private outdoor spaces welcoming you from the courtyard. The cozy living room contains a contemporary fireplace and the large dining area offers plenty of room for dinner parties. A sleek two-toned kitchen has ample cabinetry, a central island, quartz counters, gas range and even a beverage bar. The principal bedroom features its own south facing balcony and well-appointed ensuite with heated floors. There are 2 more bedrooms perfectly sized for guests or a home office, a laundry room and bathroom upstairs. The developed basement has storage and a flex room that could easily be used as a gym or media room. Access the double attached garage via the convenient mud room. Additional features include 9’ ceilings, A/C, and easy access to shopping and walking paths. This modern one-of-a-kind corner unit is outstanding! SPRINGS

A OF FINE HOMES FOR SALE

CALL TO LEARN ABOUT OUR EXCLUSIVE LISTINGS MOST WANTED ON THE HUNT FOR THESE HOUSES DO YOU OWN A PROPERTY LIKE ONE OF THESE AND WANT TO SELL? WE HAVE THE BUYER FOR YOU! REACH OUT TO US TODAY FOR A QUICK AND EASY SALE! MARDA LOOP AREA ELBOW PARK, RIVERDALE, RIDEAU, ROXBORO ASPEN WOODS WEST HILLS AREA BUYER #1 $2 MILLION - $2.5 MILLION BUYER #7 UP TO $4 MILLION BUYER #10 UP TO $1.75 MILLION BUYER #9 $800,000 - $1 MILLION PROFESSIONAL COUPLE SEEKING A MODERN 2-STOREY EMPTY NESTERS SEEK MODERN DESIGN BACKING THE ELBOW RIVER FAMILY WITH TEENS ON A QUEST FOR HOME WALKING DISTANCE TO RUNDLE COLLEGE EMPTY NESTERS DOWNSIZING TO BUNGALOW IN A QUIET LOCATION ASPEN WOODS WEST HILLS BUYER #13 $600,000 - $900,000 BUYER #16 $800K - $1MILLION SMALL FAMILY NEEDS A TWO-STOREY NEAR WEBBER ACADEMY QUIET BUNGALOW WITH OFFICE AND FORMAL DINING ROOM DISCOVERY RIDGE BEL-AIRE,ELBOWBRITANNIA,PARK BUYER #19 UP TO $1.5 MILLION BUYER #21 $3M PLUS DETACHED HOME FOR YOUNG FAMILY LOOKING FOR DREAM HOME IDEAL FOR ENTERTAINING GARRISON WOODS BUYER #22 UP TO $800,000 YOUNG SEEKINGPROFESSIONALBROWNSTONE WESTHILLS INNER CITY SPRINGBANK HILL OR ASPEN WOODS BUYER #25 UP TO $1.8MILLION BUYER #28 $900K - $1.5MILLION BUYER #36 $1.6 MILLION TO $2 MILLION TORONTO TRANSPLANTS YEARN FOR YARD ON GREEN BELT COUPLE SEEKS LOT TO BUILD LUXURY BUNGALOW TWO STOREY WITH ROOM FOR THE KIDS TO GROW

The rapidly changing real estate market continues to bring new challenges at every turn. We are dedicated to getting our clients the results they seek quickly and easily. We know that the hardest part of selling your home is the time and effort it takes to prepare it for the market. To take away the pain of selling we’ve developed a Concierge Program that assists home owners with everything from minor repairs, painting, home organization, staging, legal documents and more. Buyers are concerned about finding the property of their dreams while inventory remains low and edging out the competition during bidding wars. Our experience and sharp negotiation skills have proven to be invaluable. As well, a huge resource for exclusive listings is our network of thousands of past clients. We’ve been able to match many buyers and sellers before the house hits the market. It’s always a privilege and a pleasure to represent our clients and we are deeply grateful for their friendship and trust. Whenever you need us, we’re here to help.

With Sincere Gratitude, Sam Corea, Chris Fullerton, Alison Kallstrom and Jacqueline Corea Team Re/Max House of Real Estate

c 403 870 8811 | t 403 686 7800 | www.SAMCOREA.COM | SAM@SAMCOREA.COM

Sales Partner, Agent

Partner,

SAM

Corea Marketing Director Sam Corea Team Leader, Agent

Jacqueline Alison KallstromChris Fullerton Sales Agent

MOVINGMARKETINGFORWARDYOURHOME FOR ALL IT’S WORTH®

SAM and his Real Estate Concierge Team get really excited about making great deals. Selling or buying propertyhe helps homeowners get thrilling results. For a seriously successful and enjoyable home sale or purchase, SAM is your man. SAMCOREA.COM FINECALGARY’SSHOWCASINGHOMES

Page 1 - Reinvigorated with a Contagious Vibrancy Page 4 - BOMA InsiderTOC

While the industry remains laser focused on providing the spaces and services to enable businesses to grow and attract the workforce of the future, here at BOMA we remain committed to ensuring all levels of government provide a stable and competitive environment.

61

1 NEWS FALL 2022

While the industry remains laser focused on providing the spaces and services to enable businesses to grow and attract the workforce of the future, here at BOMA we remain committed to ensuring all levels of government provide a stable and competitive environment. The number one issue I hear from our members and from Calgarians is that we must take additional

A s we look back on the summer of 2022, one can’t help but recognize the excitement and optimism apparent across our community. What would have once been considered somewhat ordinary felt extraor dinary as we saw our city – and particularly downtown, Beltline and Victoria Park – reinvigorated with a con tagious vibrancy thanks to the long-awaited return of summer staples like Folk Fest, Stampede, and high streets full of people. The excitement that all these once ordinary things elicit isn’t so much a celebration of a “return to normalcy” as a recognition of what is possible for our city and our industry as we set the ground for what comes next.

Reinvigorated with a Contagious Vibrancy

By Lloyd BOMAExecutiveSuchet,Director,Calgary

BOMA Calgary Suite 225, 550 11th Avenue SW, Calgary AB, T2R 1M7 Email: info@boma.ca • Web: www.boma.ca Tel: 403.237.0559 • Fax: 403.266.5876

© 2015 by BOMA Calgary. Printed in Canada. steps to ensure that workers feel safe returning to offices downtown. This challenge has a number of root causes, including an opioid crisis, and while BOMA has been at the table supporting immediate improvements like an increased Calgary Police Services and Bylaw officer presence along tran sit lines, as well as Safety Hubs on Stephen Avenue and East Village, we know that law enforcement alone cannot solve the problem. An enduring and compassionate solution to the safety challenge must involve govern ment, the private sector and Calgarians working together to ensure the vulnerable population has access to mental health- and recovery-oriented services. BOMA is committed to being a part of this solution and has senior level working groups dedicated to real action.

BOMA2 Calgary News BOMA Calgary News is a co-publication of BOMA Calgary and Business in Calgary. Business in Calgary 1025, 101 - 6 Ave. SW, Calgary, AB T2P 3P4 Tel: 403.264.3270 • Fax: www.businessincalgary.cominfo@businessincalgary.com403.264.3276

All of this work has a tangible impact to the sector, providing value to both people and assets. By leveraging our strong relationships with key decision makers, we are able to represent the industry and its interests, allowing you to focus on your core business of providing exceptional spaces and experiences.

While these two topics are at the top of our advocacy agenda, we remain active on a number of other issues impacting the industry, including a +15 maintenance and structural repair initiative from the City, monitoring operation and ensuring the appropriate removal of the 3rd Avenue cycling detour. We are also working with the Province to develop a standard method of collecting energy utility data for industrial and multi-residential sites, as well as work with the Safety Codes Council on escalator mainte nance and safety.

The other key area BOMA is engaged with government is tax competitive ness and ensuring that the property tax burden in Calgary is equitably shared between households and businesses. The past seven years have exposed a fundamental inequity where businesses pay 3.81 times more property tax than a household on the same assessed value. This is making it harder to attract and retain business, increases the likelihood of business failure, and has required an unsustainable use of municipal reserve funds to mitigate the burden. That is why BOMA and our partners are proposing a phased in reduc tion to the non-residential tax burden from 3.81 to 2.80 times higher than the residential rate.

The Building Owners and Managers Association of Calgary publishes BOMA Calgary News quarterly. For advertising rates and information contact Business in Calgary. Publication of advertising should not be deemed as endorsement by BOMA Calgary. The publisher reserves the right in its sole and absolute discretion to reject any advertising at any time submitted by any party. Material contained herein does not necessarily reflect the opinion of BOMA Calgary, its members or its staff.

Executive Officers CHAIR Rob Blackwell, Aspen Properties CHAIR- ELECT Candace Clark, Triovest Realty Advisors TREASURER Tanya Befus, Cadillac Fairview PAST CHAIR Richard Morden, QuadReal Property Group Directors Aaron Pratt, Allied Properties REIT Art ColinSkowNorris, Insignia Asset Management Blair Carbert, Carbert Waite LLP Carla Fedele, Choice Properties Dan Lindsay, Surety Technologies Dominik Hubaczek, Oxford Properties Graham Halsall, ONE Properties Kevin Morgans, Avison Young Laurel Edwards, Avison Young

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4 BOMA Insider A few highlights from the BOMA Membership Appreciation Party with 200+ members. Thank you for your support!

6 CLEANINGHEALTHFOR KEEPING YOUR FACILITIES CLEAN AND SAFE 1.888.985.7141 | WWW.SERVANTAGE.CA BOMAAwardsExcellenceisBack! The 2023 BOMA Excellence Awards Gala will take place in May 2023. 2023 guidebooks will be available in November. Visit www.boma.ca /awards for more info. BOMA Mentorship Program, celebrating its 10th year, focuses on individual development through mentorship and professional development; however, it also helps the industry to grow and succeed by retaining employees and enriching their skills. We are now accepting applications for the 2022/23 program. Visit development/mentorship-program/www.boma.ca/professional-formoreinfo.

employer of more than 14,000 Calgarians (excluding the Calgary Police Service) and has a vital health and wellness program for employees.

In many aspects of business and the workplace, the past two pandemic years have experienced a lot of complications and unprecedented disruptions. Work routines. Work schedules. And digital communications altering work communications and other personal factors of most workplaces. The broadsides have also impacted the popular trend of workplace health and wellness programs.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS AT WORK // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS AT WORK IT’S ABOUT ABSENTEEISM, PRODUCTIVITY AND MORALE

In addition to some of Calgary’s biggest employers like CP Rail, Suncor, Enbridge and others, the City is a dynamic

“When the wellness program works together with the health and safety program, it creates a more comprehensive approach to the overall wellness of the organization and those in it,” says Moira Game, human resource manager, Total Rewards & Healthy Workplace for the City of Calgary. “This means having initiatives that promote personal health and wellness as well as workplace practices that create a physically and psychologically healthy environment.

BY JOHN HARDY

A report by the Public Health Agency of Canada points out that chronic disease rates are increasing by 14 per cent every year, and three out of every five Canadians over the age of 20 are living with a chronic disease.

“Health promotion addresses strategies at the individual level to prevent/diffuse stress and foster resiliency, and hazard prevention addresses the sources of injury or distress in the work environment. When health and wellness programs are part of a continual improvement process to better physical and psychosocial aspects of the work environment, they can help improve creativity, cooperation, engagement, morale, productivity and retention,” she adds.

“WHEN HEALTH AND WELLNESS PROGRAMS ARE PART OF A CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT PROCESS TO BETTER PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF THE WORK ENVIRONMENT, THEY CAN HELP IMPROVE CREATIVITY, COOPERATION, ENGAGEMENT, MORALE, PRODUCTIVITY AND RETENTION,” ADDS GAME.

“At the same time, they can also contribute to reduction in absenteeism, presenteeism, employee turnover, and medical Commonleave.”health

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issues are increasing absenteeism rates in the Canadian workforce and costing employers huge amounts of money in lost productivity.

There is a consensus among business leaders and HR specialists. An undisputable fact of contemporary business life – disrupted or not – is that people are an organization’s most important and valuable asset. Retaining, attracting and supporting talent involves a comprehensive bundle of employee experience, culture, health and wellbeing. Reports and surveys underscore that there is very much a payoff: happier, healthier, more engaged employees and a company that’s thriving from the inside and out.

Statistics Canada recently reported that the average rate of absenteeism among Canadian organizations was 10 days per full-time employee and Canadian companies lost an estimated total of $16.6 billion due to absenteeism alone.

When it comes to health, the Canadian workforce continues to age and chronic diseases become even more prevalent.

Experts agree that organizations will need to find suitable employee health and wellness programs as an effective way to manage the health of employees.

ABOVE: MOIRA GAME, HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER, TOTAL REWARDS & HEALTHY WORKPLACE FOR THE CITY OF CALGARY.

Some popular features include biometric screenings, workplace flu and other vax clinics, group workshop seminars, fitness activities, flexible health spending accounts, mental health and stress management and social and team-building activities.

According to the HR industry recent metrics, a well-rounded, high-quality and effective corporate wellness program includes much more than just gym membership coverage or an office kitchen.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS AT WORK // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

Stas show, and health and wellness experts agree, that mental illness is a leading cause of disability in Canada. Every week at least 500,000 Canadians miss work due to mental illness, and the resulting personal, workplace and economic impacts can be devastating.

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Although today’s health and wellness programs are diverse, from traditional basic, like company supported fitness and nutrition programs to massage therapy, communication, counselling and relationships, companies have significantly changed their attitude and now embrace the modern fact of life that workplace health and wellness programs must include mental health.

Most company health and wellness programs also provide help and skill building in areas that are useful in and out of the workplace – like time-management, personal financial planning, stress management and interpersonal relationships.”

Typically, health and wellness programs include initiatives such as health spending accounts fitness incentives, flu vaccination clinics, wellness workshops, and employee assistance programs.

// CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

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“Health and wellness programs provide a proactive approach to healthy living by providing employees with tools, resources, and strategies they can use to adopt and maintain healthy behaviours,” notes Lin Yu, occupational health and safety specialist with the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS).

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Wellness companies in Canada support people in improving their overall health and wellbeing. In addition to making healthier lifestyle choices, wellness companies also offer services to businesses, ensuring their employees achieve higher productivity levels, boost their self-confidence, and overcome stress.

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She points out that employee health and wellness programs are not one-sizefits all. They need to be customized to the organization. “Wellness programs are typically most effective when they address a wide range of issues and interests that are unique to the organization. Before launching a program, the company should assess the needs and interests of the workforce, to help determine what types of health and wellness initiatives should be included.

MORE AND MORE, EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND WELLNESS PROGRAMS RECOGNIZE THAT MENTAL ILLNESSES ARE REAL ILLNESSES. LIKE OTHER ILLNESSES, SUCH AS DIABETES OR ASTHMA, MOST MENTAL ILLNESSES ARE EPISODIC. THAT MEANS PEOPLE HAVE PERIODS WHEN THEY ARE WELL AND PRODUCTIVE, AS WELL AS PERIODS WHEN THEY ARE UNWELL AND OVERALL FUNCTIONING IS LOW.

“The last two years have been a time of immense change and transition for everyone,” she notes.

“At the City, we pivoted quickly to provide relevant, just-in-time health and wellness programs, services and information for employees. To support public health requirements, health and wellness programs shifted to a virtual delivery enabling employees to continue using health and wellness resources and receive timely information. We provide flexible options for wellness to suit employees’ diverse working schedules and levels of comfort and fitness.”

Wellness initiatives are changing to address well-being from a different perspective. Some wellness apps are taking the forefront of virtually bringing physical and mental health to employees.

HR professionals and employee health and wellness program providers are adjusting. The programs are changing. Shifts from traditional work-from-office models to hybrid work models or even some divisions and companies switching entirely to a work-from-home model. The corporate wellness culture is following suit.

“When health and wellness programs are part of a continual improvement process to better physical and psychosocial aspects of the work environment, they can help improve creativity, cooperation, engagement, morale, productivity, and retention,” Lin Yu adds.

Just like most other aspects of Calgary businesses, the past two pandemic years of lockdowns and workplace disruptions have also broadsided many employee health and wellness programs. At least, triggered glitches.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS AT WORK // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

“At the same time, they can also contribute to reduction in absenteeism, presenteeism, employee turnover, and medical leave.”

More and more, employee health and wellness programs recognize that mental illnesses are real illnesses.

The encouraging aspect is a big change in the perception and understanding about mental health in the workplace. The stigmas are fading. As some professionals explain, “It’s ok not to be ok.”

Like other illnesses, such as diabetes or asthma, most mental illnesses are episodic. That means people have periods when they are well and productive, as well as periods when they are unwell and overall functioning is low.

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“The City has increased its focus on psychological safety in the past five years,” Moira Game says. “We are committed to advancing psychologically safe workspaces by implementing key factors from the Canadian National Standard on this topic. We organize and champion events and learning during Health, Safety and Wellness month each year. The past few years have had a heavy emphasis on psychological health and safety.

The economic burden of mental illness in Canada is estimated to be approximately $51 billion each year, as well as lost productivity. Figures and guesstimates forecast that, by 2041, the cumulative cost of poor mental health to the Canadian economy will exceed $2.5 trillion. There are also indirect costs related to poor mental health in the workplace such as absenteeism, presenteeism and challenges with recruitment and retention.

The stats and trending reveal that Calgary as well as Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa and Edmonton experienced declines in home sales as Bank of Canada interest rate hikes have cut into affordability and dampened demand.

While the RBC forecast says that if that projection materializes it would rank as the steepest correction of the past five national downturns. The bank also cautions that the correction will play out differently depending on the specific market. Calgary appears to be an exception.

THE HOT MARKET COOLS (A LITTLE)

While the Canadian real estate market closely tracks salesto-new-listings ratios for major markets and shows balanced BY JOHN HARDY

THE HOT MARKET COOLS (A LITTLE) // REAL ESTATE

A late-July report from RBC details a ‘historic’ housing correction happening in Canada. The report points out that the Bank of Canada’s aggressive interest rate hiking campaign has weighed on the real estate market and caused four consecutive months of price declines. The RBC report also noted that it now expects the average home prices across Canada to decline by approximately 12 per cent from the hot market February peak, by early 2023.

Although the year-over-year drop in sales was the biggest in Toronto (41 per cent) and Vancouver (down 43 per cent) and Vancouver (35 per cent), the Calgary market had much more modest declines of about two per cent.

RISING RATES AND THE CALGARY MARKET

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A

fter more than a year of spiked home prices and real estate frenzy – in Calgary and throughout most of the country – the hot real estate market has begun to cool.

Calgary’s real estate market is affected by many of the factors which impact the economy. Consumer confidence. Inflation.

Respected Calgary realtor and former CREB chair Corinne Lyall, owner/broker of Royal LePage Benchmark points out that “spiking mortgage rates will inevitably balance the market. It will lead to an adjustment period as buyers will have to save more down payment to qualify for mortgage amounts. Sellers will have to start thinking about being realistic about their list prices as more inventory comes on the market. There shouldn’t be a concern about prices coming down but more a cooling off period as less buyers enter the market.”

“While we are starting to see some transition, it is important to note that in Calgary year-to-date sales are still at record levels and prices are still far above expectations for the year.”

“Rising rates will cause economic growth to slow. This leads to higher unemployment and less wage growth, which coupled with higher mortgage rates will make access to home ownership more challenging,” cautions Bob Dugan, chief economist at Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

ABOVE: CORINNE LYALL, OWNER/BROKER OF ROYAL LEPAGE BENCHMARK REALTY AND FORMER CREB CHAIR.

“Equally, rising rates will increase construction costs, mainly due to increased financing costs. Compounded with surging material costs and labour shortages, this constrains housing supply. Taken together, the Canadian housing markets are expected to experience a downturn by mid-2023,” he says. “Estimating what is needed to solve Canada’s housing affordability crisis by 2030, this would then lead to more pressure on the rental segment. Potential homeowners will stay renting longer and rental vacancy rates will be even lower.”

72 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM conditions between buyers and sellers in most of the country, Calgary is an exception and continues a mostly seller’s market. By mid-summer, Calgary stats reflected the peak of the hot market and the cooling. The average home price reached $517,059, about a five per cent from last summer’s $494,163. The number of new listings was 4,061, a slight two per cent drop from 4,134 one year ago. The economy in-general and spiking mortgage rates get the credit – or blame. According to analysts and real estate experts, increases in borrowing costs and more expected interest rate hikes will impact sales and prices even more for the remainder of the year.

LYALL POINTS OUT THAT “SPIKING MORTGAGE RATES WILL INEVITABLY BALANCE THE MARKET. IT WILL LEAD TO AN ADJUSTMENT PERIOD AS BUYERS WILL HAVE TO SAVE MORE DOWN PAYMENT TO QUALIFY FOR MORTGAGE AMOUNTS.”

THE HOT MARKET COOLS (A LITTLE) // REAL ESTATE

Migration. Unemployment. And, of course, interest rates. “Higher interest rates mean borrowing costs go up, which will likely see the economics of both private and public sector projects re-evaluated,” notes Deborah Yedlin, president and CEO, Calgary Chamber of Commerce. “It’s not out of the question there will be projects that will be delayed because the costs are higher. This is on top of cost inflation associated with supply chain issues, which has already caused some projects to be put on hold or delayed.”

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Hike mortgage rates are already impacting the Calgary market. According to CREB chief economist Ann-Marie Lurie, “It was inevitable. Higher interest rates have an affect on Calgary home sales, helping to shift the market toward more balanced conditions and taking some pressure off prices.”

ABOVE: BOB DUGAN, CHIEF ECONOMIST AT CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION (CMHC).

Migration is also a key factor for a real estate market. And for Calgary, that is encouraging good news. Migration from other provinces to Western Canada continues to prop up housing demand and prices, as prospective home buyers from Ontario and B.C., priced out of their respective local markets, flock to Alberta. As a result, Calgary has become a relative hotspot for many first-time homebuyers and young couples. From a hot market to a balanced market? It is getting there, but slowly. “As expected, higher interest rates are starting to have an affect on home sales. This is helping shift the market toward more balanced conditions and taking some of the pressure off prices,” explains Lurie. “While we are starting to see some transition, it is important to note that in Calgary year-todate sales are still at record levels and prices are still far above expectations for the year.”

CMHC’s Dugan is part of the professional consensus that “the hot market” couldn’t and wouldn’t last. Something had to give. “The skyrocketed prices and low interest rates were unsustainable. The cost of housing reached levels that are unaffordable for a large share of new home buyers, translating into a slowdown in 2022.

“The expected increases in borrowing costs will contribute to a further slowdown in house price growth in 2022 and 2023. Mortgage rates eventually start to stabilize in 2024,” he adds. “Supported by rising household income and higher immigration, house prices are expected to return to positive but moderate growth.” Although the Calgary markets cooldown is not as sharp as other markets (like Vancouver and Toronto,) Calgary realtors and business leaders are positive about the Calgary momentum going in the right direction.

“We talk a lot about an inclusive recovery, because it has real economic benefits,” Yedlin says. “That means ensuring equity-deserving groups have a seat at the table and a stake in decisions. Affordability is part of this. If people don’t see opportunities, or can’t afford to access them, we’ll miss out. Higher interest rates will cause housing prices to moderate, which will cool housing markets and potentially improve affordability.”

“Relative to other cities, Calgary still stands out as a more affordable place to live, work and play,” Yedlin points out with positivity. “According to the most recent survey issued by the Economist Intelligence Unit, Calgary ranked as the world’s third most liveable city. That said, we need to continue to make strategic investments, such as affordable housing stock, to continue to be a city that attracts talent, capital, and opportunity. Right now, we are seeing rising rental costs, which is going to squeeze people and families in the lower income brackets.”

“The current economic conditions in Calgary should help continue to favour migration to the city,” Lyall says. “Even with real estate prices increasing the last few years, Calgary is still one of the most affordable cities to live in Canada. As well, it helps that there is pent up demand for people moving to Canada since the pandemic and we will continue to receive our fair share of migrants.”

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THE HOT MARKET COOLS (A LITTLE) // REAL ESTATE

“THE SKYROCKETED PRICES AND LOW INTEREST RATES WERE UNSUSTAINABLE. THE COST OF HOUSING REACHED LEVELS THAT ARE UNAFFORDABLE FOR A LARGE SHARE OF NEW HOME BUYERS, TRANSLATING INTO A SLOWDOWN IN 2022,” SAYS DUGAN.

People travel from around the world to see our backyard. From the dazzling peaks and lush meadows of the Rocky Mountains to the multi-hued canyons and wind-sculpted hoodoos of the Alberta badlands, Alberta offers an abundance of opportunities for adventure. And for domestic and international travellers, Calgary is a desirable jumping-off point from which to experience the wealth of adventure tourism opportunities on offer both within the city and as a gateway to nature.

A NATURAL CONNECTION Research shows stress and anxiety are linked to physical and mental health1. Studies also suggest exposure to na ture can increase life satisfaction and reduce the likelihood of depression, anxiety and other stress-induced health issues2. As the benefits of being in nature have become more widely understood, outdoor activities and tourism – including adventure tourism – have become exponen tially more popular3. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, people have worked to mitigate the adverse mental and physical consequences of lockdowns, with a key go-to remedy: spending time in nature. And while the widespread closures and public health restrictions of 2020 meant a 32 per cent drop in visits to national parks, Banff National Park still topped the list as Canada’s most visited4 Seventy per cent of Canadians said their appreciation for parks and green spaces increased during COVID-19 with over half of Canadian cities reporting an increased use of parks through the pandemic5

Realizing the Adventure Tourism Dream

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Adventure tourism is any tourist activity that includes physical activity, a cultural exchange, or activities in nature6. It’s rapidly growing worldwide, and Alberta, particularly Calgary, as a city sometimes called the gateway to the Rockies, is well positioned to build and amplify a thriving sector focused on experiences in nature and active lifestyles. 1 https://www.psu.edu/news/health-and-human-development/story/how-has-covid-19-pandemic-affected-outdoor-recreation-america/ 32https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8983608/https://tctrail.ca/news/national-leger-survey-finds-trail-use-has-increased-40-in-2021/4https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/2021/03/visitor-stats-reveal-how-canadas-parks-and-historic-sites-fared-20205https://parkpeople.ca/blog/covid-19-and-parks-highlights-from-our-national-surveys6WhatIsAdventureTourism?|HeadRushTechnologies

The Calgary Chamber exists to help businesses thrive. As the convenor and catalyst for a vibrant, inclusive and prosperous business community, the Chamber works to build strength and resilience among its members and position Calgary as a magnet for talent, diversification, and opportunity. As an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization, we build on our 131year history to serve and advocate for businesses of all sizes, in all sectors and across the city.

OPPORTUNITY TAKES ROOT

ROOM TO GROW Globally, the adventure tourism market is expected to reach $1.16 trillion by 2028, an increase of more than 20 per cent from 20209. The economic potential of the adventure tourism market is significant, with travellers spending more money on adventure tourism experiences than any other type of travel10. However, global competition for the market is growing, and Canada – including provinces with a wealth of adventure tourism opportunities – is at risk of being left behind. According to the Adventure Tourism Development Index, Canada ranks seventh globally among developed countries with strong potential for adventure tourism competitiveness, but since 2016, has fallen from the top five in North America and Europe as a top potential choice destination for adventure travel11. In Canada broadly, and Alberta specifically, more can be done to realize the full potential of our collective adventure tourism experiences. Travel Alberta identifies “Curious Adventurers” as a high-value target market – this market segment is most interested in the mountains and rural areas and looks to engage more deeply with destinations and activities, including outdoor excursions and camping. And what are the benefits of attracting these ‘high-value’ visitors? According to Travel Alberta, this type of traveller is likely to spend more per visit, yield a higher return on investment and make a higher contribution to Alberta’s economic growth12. A study of British Columbia’s adven ture tourism market noted the adventure tourist economy supports 2,200 businesses and generates more than $2 billion in annual income across the province13. During and post-COVID, over 40 per cent of Canadians in creased their use of outdoor trail networks and 52 per cent indicated they would include trail usage in future vacation plans14. Recognizing the critically important role adventure tourism can play in regional national economies, investing in and promoting Canada – and Alberta – as an adven ture tourism destination will accelerate sector growth.

151413121110987https://learn.adventuretravel.biz/research/the-new-adventure-traveler/https://learn.adventuretravel.biz/research/the-new-adventure-traveler/https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/press-release/adventure-tourism-market.htmlhttps://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/press-release/adventure-tourism-market.htmlhttps://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/press-release/adventure-tourism-market.htmlhttps://industry.travelalberta.com/resources/brand-and-marketing/alberta-ultimate-travellershttps://wilderness-tourism.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Adventure-Tourism-Strategy-for-British-Columbia-Nov28-2016.pdfhttps://tctrail.ca/news/national-leger-survey-finds-trail-use-has-increased-40-in-2021/https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/press-release/adventure-tourism-market.html

A country’s ability to realize economic benefits from this immense market potential is predicated on its capacity to offer tourists a variety of attractive locations and range of activities in different cities15. In both cases, Canada is unparalleled in its ability to offer adventure experiences year-round. With regional and provincial tourism economies inextricably linked – there is an opportunity to attract both domestic and international travellers to explore the many backyards on offer from coast-to-coast-to-coast.

Cycling, rock climbing, hiking, backpacking, skiing and canoeing are all adventure tourism staples highly sought after by outdoor enthusiasts globally. Such activities attract both domestic and international travellers, and generate economic, environmental, cultural and health benefits. Research by the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA) shows tourists seek transformative cultural and environmental experiences while travelling7. ATTA indicates tourists also look for opportunities to learn, have meaningful experiences, enjoy activities in a natural environment, and experience a new culture8.

Calgary, as a top transportation hub in western Canada, has a somewhat unique opportunity to further build and fortify its position as the nucleus for adventure tourism experiences in western Canada. Tourists can visit in the summer to enjoy cycling, rafting, fishing or camping and return in the winter to try skiing, dog sledding, ice climbing or snowshoeing. Access to a west coast adventure or a tour of the badlands is a puddle jump from Calgary, making the city an appealing and convenient hub for adventure travellers. THE PATH AHEAD Investments in adventure tourism will not only attract inter national travellers but will also promote travel domestically. Additionally, strategic investments have the potential to ensure the economic benefits of adventure tourism can be fully realized locally, regionally and across the country.

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3. In line with the Federal Tourism Growth Strategy’s goal of supporting capital assets in Canada’s national parks, con servation areas and historic sites, provide federal funding in support of sustainable infrastructure projects – including rail projects – that connect tourists to adventure tourism destina tions in Canada, such as Banff National Park.

4. Expand and permanently implement pilot programs that enhance or promote participation in adventure tourism experiences – such as the Bow Valley Parkway Experience – and identify additional, adventure tourism-specific, programming for future consideration.

5. Work with federal partners to develop and implement a Canada-wide adventure tourism marketing campaign to incentivize adventure tourism by promoting its associated physical and mental health benefits. As Canadians resume travel, it is critical to position tourism experiences as world-class and in line with evolving consumer demand, encouraging our neighbours to travel closer to home and rediscover the wonders in our own backyards. Similarly, as we move forward to attract and welcome international visitors, we stand at a key juncture to capitalize on a newfound appreciation for natural wonders and experiences. Taken holistically, strategic investments into Canada’s adventure tourism market have the potential to ensure Canada can realize the full economic benefits of adventure tourism and expand the potential of regional adventure tourism offerings. With the right investments, collaboration among governments and tourism operators, and a focus on delivering sustainable, authentic and accessible experiences in the outdoors, we can put a pin in the map among visitors as the adventure tourism destination of choice.

2. Under the aforementioned adventure tourism product line within the Canadian Experiences Fund, allocate funding toward the development of multi-use infrastructure that supports the adventure tourism industry, such as the ʔapsčiik t̓ašii multi-use pathway in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve.

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The Federal Government has a number of initiatives in place focused on growing Canada’s tourism economy. To further attract and monetize adventure tourism, the Calgary Chamber has developed several recommendations to capitalize on the strengths and opportunities of Canada’s adventure tourism economy and create a clear path to economic recovery for the tourism sector, which was among the hardest hit by the pandemic:

1. Under Pillar 1 of the Federal Tourism Growth Strategy, create a sixth product line within the Canadian Experienc es Fund specific to adventure tourism to promote health, sustainability and associated economic benefits. This functions to spur development and investment in experiences that reap both economic and social benefits.

Oscar Wilde once said, “I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.” If that’s true, the new Dorian Hotel, inspired by Wilde’s title character in ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray,’ would suit him perfectly. In a landscape of generic accommodations, The Dorian injects style, sophistication and a dash of flamboyance to the downtown Calgary hotel scene. While the dual-brand Autograph Collection and Courtyard by Marriott boutique hotel is located on 5 Avenue SW, it transports guests to another time and space entirely. To celebrate Oscar Wilde, The Dorian invokes the heyday of Victorian England with décor that reflects the eccentric writer’s love for the finer things of 1800s life, blending British inspiration with Calgary’s western roots to create something that is both beautiful and uniquely Calgarian. Throughout the property, the décor embraces Calgary’s traditions while challenging the notion that they are something that defines the path forward. The Alberta rose is reimagined in the colours of the peacock made popular in Victorian times and is featured brightly on the wallpaper and along the edge of the English tweed carpet.

The Dorian • Grand

Whimsy and Charm Meets Sophistication and Style at The Dorian

PatriciaOpeningPhillips.

by Rennay Craats

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

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“We’re watching Calgary transform from previously being celebrated for its western heritage and energy-rich industries which allows us now to reflect on the new Calgary and all that it includes – a rich art and music scene, sought-after restaurants and expanding industries that ultimately attract younger people to the city,” says Patricia Phillips, CEO of PBA Group of Companies, developer of The Dorian Hotel.

From top to bottom, the 27-storey boutique hotel boasts a design-forward, vibrant space where guests are able to not just enjoy their stay but have a unique experience that lasts long after checkout. The Dorian is the city’s only dual-brand lifestyle hotel, with the 175 rooms on the Courtyard floors being more traditional Marriott hotel rooms while the Autograph Collection floors above them feature 133 premium Oscar Wilde-themed rooms that tell a story of British whimsy, sophistication and style.

Whether hotel guests are there for an event or just spending a night or two, The Dorian’s amenities are enough to make them want to extend their stay. For those looking to stay in shape while away from home, The Dorian features a 1,500-squarefoot fitness centre where guests can jump on a Peloton or join weekend yoga sessions.

The Dorian • Grand Opening • 2

The hotel also displays glass-blown cowboy hats inspired by Calgary’s western traditions but created in vibrant peacock blues, emerald greens and purples to evoke the similar hats popular in Britain in Oscar Wilde’s day. This reflects the move away from the stereotypical Calgary culture and into something else.

“What makes it unique is that dualflag development which really has two distinct brands that allow us to target really specific demand segments. And we offer two unique price points with shared amenities,” says Phillips. This has been popular with future brides and grooms who want to hold their wedding in the 3,345-square-foot ballroom. With two price points on offer and rooms ranging from king and double queen rooms to king suites, there is a selection of rooms that fit the budgets and needs of their guests. That means more family and friends can stay at the wedding venue to share in the couple’s dream wedding experience – a custom-designed menu and curated cocktails in a stunning venue.

CONGRATULATIONS to PBA Group of Companies on the Grand Opening of The Dorian. We are a proud partner on this beautiful Hotel. HEADQUARTERS 10805 - 50th Street SE Calgary, AB T2C 3E5 Canada Phone: 403.279.6661 | Fax: 403.279.6604 24/7 Service: 403.279.6661 crestviewgroup.com Continuity, Vision, Experience... A PROUD LEGACY

The second floor hosts the fresh and fun Bistro Novelle where diners can indulge in fantastic breakfast, lunch and dinner fare featuring fresh local ingredients.

Luxurious in-room amenities add to the experience of staying at The Dorian as well. Guests can ease into mornings with Premium Lavazza coffee, a selection of loose leaf and luxury teas from TEALEAVES, and a gentle wake up with AESOP bath amenities. Each room also includes a beverage cart that features the property’s own signature Earl Gray Gin as a nod to the British inspiration of the hotel. The most alluring amenities are the three distinctive but complementary dining options that help tell the story of The Dorian. Prologue Café and Cocktails on the first floor offers guests everything from specialty coffee and fresh pastries early in the day to light snacks, craft beer and curated cocktails at night.

“The Wilde is abundant with drama and eccentric elements. It will be a place where you come as you are but don’t leave as you came,” says Phillips. The eccentric elements aren’t confined to the fabulous rooftop patio; there are amazing art pieces sprinkled throughout the hotel that tell the story of the life and style of Oscar Wilde through a Calgary lens. One prized art piece in the thirdfloor conference room features a 3D art installation that creates an Alberta rose from the pages of the hotel’s namesake novel. It was important for Phillips and her organization to feature and support local artists alongside some incredible

The Dorian • Grand Opening • 4

The Wilde Rooftop Restaurant & Lounge will wow locals and visitors alike with its exquisite food comprised of locally sourced and sustainable ingredients and cutting-edge cocktail culture. Chef Kevin Birch and his culinary team have curated a spectacular menu that is eclipsed only by the Wilde’s views from the 27th floor. And whether it’s local musicians performing on stage or a backstreet DJ party or an ice carvings and vodka-inspired event in winter, it’s clear guests are ready to live, travel and experience new and exciting things again after the past few years of restrictions.

“We are extremely excited about The Dorian and the role we envision this hotel property playing in the revitalizing of Calgary’s downtown,” says Phillips. As it moves from its July soft opening to its grand opening this fall, The Dorian is sure to quickly become a key part of the cultural landscape of the city’s core and a favourite spot for locals and visitors to enjoy first-class food, whimsical design, unique night life and a splendid night’s sleep. Oscar Wilde would definitely be satisfied at The Dorian. possibility 5th Alberta

PBA Group of Companies has played an integral part in shaping the city’s downtown skyline over the past nearly 60 years and continues to facilitate the growth of Calgary as a cultural hub with the completion of The Dorian.

and community. Congratulations to PBA Group of Companies on the grand opening of The Dorian! Proud to partner with PBA Group of Companies in this new era of hospitality with The Dorian! 525

Ave SW Calgary,

403-300-6630 www.thedorianhotel.com The Dorian • Grand Opening • 5

Canadian and American artists much in the same way as they have supported local entrepreneurs and “We’resuppliers.goingthrough a cultural explosion in Calgary that will really put it on the map to a national if not world-class level on the cultural front,” Phillips says.

403.296.2400 | rogersinsurance.ca Rogers Insurance is proud to support the PBA Group of Companies as they continue to build

JA celebrates all that was made possible for young people in southern Alberta throughout the 2021-2022 school year thanks to the incredible support of the Economic Futures Council and other valued partners.

investments from the Economic Futures Council empower JA to deliver relevant financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and work readiness education to youth from grades 3-12 at no cost to parents or teachers.

Junior Achievement is the link between education and the business world, giving youth the confidence and knowledge they need to define personal success, enhance their workforce readiness and pursue their dreams. JA inspires youth to make informed, educated and knowledgeable financial decisions, start companies, develop career plans and express their innovative Transformationalspirit.

Here's a summary of what we accomplished this year: prepare and develop the next generation of business leaders!

By joining the Economics Futures Council, you can help leverage the impact that Junior Achievement Southern Alberta has on our youth and our Youreconomy.contribution and support will make a difference. Join the Economic Futures Council today. Contribution levels start at $5,000. For more information about JA Southern Alberta programming or interested in the Economic Futures Council, please visit jasab.ca.

if you are

Help

STudents CLASSROOMSCOMMUNITIESSchool Boards 40,000+ 24 124 1,534 Like our new look? Visit jasab.ca for more!

Developed and delivered financial literacy programs for indigenous youth on Partneredreserves with All in For Youth – A United Way led Initiative to offer financial literacy and work readiness training to vulnerable youth

Developed digital enhancements for popular programs

Increased program delivery and student reach by 30%

The JA Southern Alberta Economic Futures Council (EFC) is a group of individuals who firmly believe that JA enhances the lives of young people, strengthens our economy and produces solid ethical citizens. The EFC was launched in 2012 in an effort to raise much needed annual funding to support core programming and growth initiatives for JA Southern Alberta. Since its inception, EFC members have pledged over $2.8 Million to support programming and technology for Junior Achievement. Because of this support, we MacJRClaytonRonaldRichardClivehave:BeddoeF.HaskayneN.MannixRiddell*Shaw*VanWielingen

Partnered with the Calgary Board of Education to build customized semester long financial literacy programs for students in non-traditional career pathways such as Arts and Trades

Alvin Libin Eda Libin, Nora Lee, Louis Libin Ronald P. Mathison Jeff SusanMcCaigNelson and Gordon Case David O’Brien Todd Poland Brian Sidorsky The Stollery Family Mike and Renea Tims Guy *C.DavidTurcotteWerklundH.WoitasFamilyinmemoriam John* and Cheryl Aldred David A. Bissett Richard Bonnycastle Robert G. Brawn Wayne Chiu Jim JackDavidsonandJoan Donald N. Murray Edwards Dr. T. Chen Fong and Alice JohnChan and Lana Geddes Wayne Henuset Sam Kolias Hal Kvisle FOUNDERS JA Southern Alberta is proud to recognize the founding members and patrons of the Economic Futures Council: PATRONS

Expanded JA Southern Alberta's rural programming and reach

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Curtis Reynolds, Michelle deVries, Kolton Dixon and Vernon Victoor. Photo by Riverwood Photography Back row – Kolton Dixon, Karl Halvorsen, Curtis Reynolds, Dakota Boyer and Gary Copeland. Front row – Levi Braithwaite, Ronan Harrington, Sherry Bonn, Nathan Pozyluzny, Vernon Victoor, Michelle deVries and Brad Smith. Photo by Riverwood Photography

JADLER INDUSTRIES

For 15 years, the Fishers established a reputation for superior products and service, and they wanted to ensure that continued after they retired. Sherry Bonn and Levi Braithwaite, who had proven themselves as key experienced employees at Jadler, were interested in buying the owners out. They just needed another piece to complete the leadership triad and the Fishers’ son-in-law, Brad Smith, was the perfect addition. The result was a seamless ownership transition that created a collaborative team to carry Jadler into the future. Years

Jadler evolved from predominantly serving the food and beverage sector to providing quality process equipment whatever the liquid.

Jadler Industries • 40

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“They focused on equipment and instrumentation that could be used in any sort of liquid processing – any process that had liquid being pumped, measured or analyzed by sensors,” says Brad Smith, president of Jadler Industries.

Small Business Delivers Big ResultsbyRennayCraats

After 40 years in business, it’s clear Jadler Industries holds the secrets of maintaining a successful company. The current ownership team took the reins in 2018 and has built on Jadler’s foundation to finetune the business and make it more resilient, more collaborative and even more successful.

John and Carol Sadler started the liquid process equipment company in 1981 and grew the business until 2003 when they sold to Greg and Katie Fisher. The Fishers expanded Jadler’s product lines and began to serve industries outside the food and beverage market such as oil and gas, agriculture, construction and water treatment.

Jadler Industries • 40 Years • 2

The team implements the best solutions for a project, often designing an integrated system that clients didn’t even know was possible, and they see the project through to the end to make sure it operates as promised.

Ronan Harrington. Photo by Riverwood Photography. Ronan Harrington and Karl Halvorsen. Photo by Riverwood Photography. Gary Copeland. Photo by Riverwood Photography. Ronan Harrington. Photo by Riverwood Photography.

“It’s not a fab shop pumping out widgets. We go right from the design stage to building and installing it, so we’re there from start to finish,” says Karl Halvorsen, shop manager. And from start to finish, it’s relationships that fuel Jadler, whether that’s the long-time relationships with key suppliers like SPX Flow, Seametrics and Flowline, the collaborative relationship between staff, or the relationships with clients who know Jadler will exceed expectations on every project.

“We really try to understand what their application is because maybe they don’t really need what they think they do, or maybe it won’t work. We figure out exactly what’s going to work best so we’re selling them a solution moreso than just a product off the shelf,” says Levi Braithwaite, general manager at Jadler.

The entire team, from welders to sales professionals to administrative staff, works well together, is supportive and truly enjoys socializing during team building events. Jadler built responsibility overlap into processes so everyone knows what others have in the works and they can step in to help if necessary. It’s a positive environment and to protect it the management team continues to be selective about new hires. They want to ensure the candidate’s character aligns with the team focus and that they are up to the challenges of Jadler’s unique work. No two days are the same. Through diversification, the company has again tapped opportunities in the food and beverage sector as well as varied projects in construction, oil and gas, pharmaceuticals, water transfer and mining. On top of rebuilding systems, customizing solutions and installing products, Jadler is also exploring remote monitoring and wireless automation and control, helping clients capture data remotely without having to dispatch employees to far-off sites. It’s just part of the comprehensive service offerings that clients have come to expect from Jadler. They also expect to reap the benefits of Jadler’s specialized knowledge, from TIG welding proficiency to an all-encompassing understanding of how a client’s facility works. The team prides itself on knowing its own extensive product lines and how they can be applied to a client’s facility so they can provide solutions and not merely take orders.

Visit rsmcanada.com/aboutus for more information regarding RSM Canada and RSM International. It gives us tremendous pleasure to recognize the achievements of Jadler Industries. Congratulations on 40 years! rsmcanada.com Congratulations to Jadler Industries. Your achievement inspires us all. Water Solutions for Life The Best Value in Flow & Level Measurement Solutions seametrics.com Congratulations to Our Valued Partner Helping Business Flow for 40 Years Water Level/Depth/Pressure Sensors Measure up to 200 meters of water depth Integrated Datalogger Battery TemperaturePoweredMeasurement included Full Bore Magmeters Measure liquid flow without moving parts 2”-12” Line Battery/DC/ACSizesPowered CSA Approved Insertion Magmeters & Paddlewheel 1/2”-48” Line Sizes Easy Installation Magmeter: no moving parts Paddlewheel:mechanicalintuitive,cost-effective,serviceable,flowmeter Multi-Jet Water Meters Totalized liquid flow Cold, Hot, and Potable Water Meters Low Flow Meters 3/8”-1” Line Sizes Polypro & Teflon Material Builds Flow Rate/Total Indicators Readout any Seametrics’ flow meter Multi-Parameter Water Quality Sensors Measure pH, ORP, temperature, conductivity, salinity, TDS, pressure level, and dissolved oxygen or turbidity Jadler Industries • 40 Years • 3

jadler.ca Jadler Industries • 40 Years • 4 SPX Flow Waukesha PD Pump package with pressure relief valve for an Alberta Honey producer. 10” Flow meter package with pressure and temperature monitoring complete with battery powered cell and satellite capable telemetry. Used in oil and gas water transfer, mining, agriculture and general industrial applications. pH Discharge monitoring with remote monitoring for BC Environmental Service company.

TOLL

Afterall, client satisfaction is critical, and Jadler maintains these relationships long-term through quality products and incredible service during and after a project. The sales team has a full instrumentation cart in the shop and if there’s an issue they can video conference with a client and troubleshoot a problem on screen in real time. If that doesn’t resolve it, someone from the team visits the site and services the equipment there.

“As we are looking for new product lines or diving into new markets, we always look for product lines that work with our existing ones so we can customize a package and integrate it to make us a one-stop shop,” says Sherry Bonn, office manager at ForJadler.40years, Jadler Industries has been that go-to one-stop shop for liquid processing for a wide range of clients across Western Canada, offering design, service, integration and installation. With a huge list of products and the ability to customize solutions, Jadler truly is a small company that delivers big.

Jadler welcomes small projects but has grown to the point where it can take on large projects too. The team maintains small-company service levels but boasts the capability and results of a much larger one. As a stocking distributor for about 15 exclusive product lines, Jadler operates as a big business by carrying about $1 million in inventory to ensure they can meet clients’ delivery demands to limit downtime. Jadler is always open to new products that complement its current lines to offer clients an incredible experience.

“We always go the extra mile. And it doesn’t matter the size of the project – we stand behind every product we sell and we treat each sale equally,” says Kolton Dixon, technical salesperson at Jadler.

Bay

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STANDOUT

B y the time Dany Babakhanian purchased and took ownership of IDENT Oil and Gas Signage in 2010, he had been playing the pivotal operations role of president for almost a decade. He set out to not only find a niche for the already well-established business, but to diversify the services offered and expected by clients for 18 Theyears.specialty signage company dedicated to consistent, compliant and quality product is now celebrating its 40th year of serving Calgary and Western Canada and has been recognized with 26 international print awards to date.

Proof that Dany’s vision and leadership has and continues to steer IDENT in the right direction.

By Nikki Mullett with photos by Debra Wilkes Gray

Standout Service, IDENT Oil and Gas Signage • Celebrating 40 years 91

“When I took over, we were doing whatever we had to do to survive – decals, banners, bumper stickers, etc.,” says Dany. “I knew we couldn’t be everything to everyone and I wanted to start focusing on becoming experts in signage for regulation and compliance.”

IDENT specializes in producing locally manufactured, high-end signage and works closely with customers (and their parent companies) to ensure their valuable corporate identity is protected, logo and colour matches are precise and regulatory compliance is maintained. SIGNS FOR 40 YEARS

Dany purchased it in 2001, is a division of IDENT bringing together three quality brands that have met Alberta’s signage needs for several decades. ASAP Signs specializes in designing, manufacturing and installing unique exterior and interior signage. A1 Signs offers signage, decals and tradeshow displays to help promote businesses with their marketing needs. And Sunset Awnings supports retailers in creating unique ways to stand out with superior awning designs. From design, surveying, permitting, manufacturing, installation and maintenance, ASAP Signs can handle it all. It provides both interior and exterior products such as

“We’re able to tell clients that we have the compliance part down. We just need a bit of information – legal site description and content for the sign – and we will make sure they’re fully compliant with the provincial oil and gas/energy regulators.”

Today, the company operates as part of the IDENT Group. ASAP Signs, which was already a 25-year-old business when

IDENT Oil and Gas Signage • Celebrating 40 years • 2

With extensive experience in this field, the quality and consistency are always on point. They don’t just sell signs, they make it easy for customers to get precisely what they need, when they need it.

With his team of more than 20 managing everything from printing to fabrication to installation, and sales, administration and customer service, the operation runs like a well-oiled machine. And it’s evident from the moment you step foot inside the front door of the 18,000-square-foot space in the southwest which duels as an office and a shop.

Congratulations on your 40th Anniversary!www.dbblaw.com Congratulations, IDENT Oil & Gas Signage, on 40 years of service! HUB International is proud to be a part of your team. Risk & Insurance | Employee Benefits | Retirement & Private Wealth With you for all your needs, in business and in life HUB 120-6712InternationalFisherSt SE Calgary, AB T2H 2A7 Ph: Contacthubinternational.com403-777-9240Us! supporting mutual success by providing quality solutions 7212 Flint Pl SE • Congratulationswww.primeboiler.com1-403-265-5055IDENTon40years! 7203 Flint Place SE Calgary, AB +1 (403) 543-3999 • www.peterhugheslandscape.cainfo@peterhugheslandscape.ca Congratulations IDENT Oil & Gas Signage on 40 Years of Business Excellence! 7212 Flint Place SE Calgary, AB T2H 1Y8 P 403.275.1919 / 1.800.661.1919 F 403.275.1888 | E speaktous@identsigns.com Identsigns.com | asapsigns.ca IDENT Oil and Gas Signage • Celebrating 40 years • 3

‘LOOK AFTER THE PEOPLE AND THE PEOPLE WILL LOOK AFTER THE BUSINESS.’

IDENT is one of those rare groups that doesn’t just talk about its companies’ core values or simply point them out on the website. They are actionable “Treat everyone as a customer” and “think beyond yourself.” And the IDENT team are measured against these values and hold themselves accountable. “I put the people first,” he says. “I bought the space here and completely renovated it, so the people are up front. We also have windows in the shop space to bring in light.”

illuminated channel letters, digital sign boards, pylons and monument signs, dimensional office signage and more.

Dany credits his team, as well as his wife and behindthe-scenes business partner Megan Carpenter with the success of IDENT and ASAP. “Without them, I’m not running the company I am today.”

Webber Academy A+ for Academics, Athletics and Arts by Rennay Craats 95

Photos by Riverwood Photography

Webber Academy • 2

The school started out with 82 students and nine dedicated teachers operating out of a rented Catholic school on Centre Street. In the four years it was there, interest in the programming skyrocketed and Dr. Webber incorporated portables to accommodate the growing student body. He knew it was only temporary as he started building his school on 47 acres in southwest Calgary in 1999. The school moved into the new space in 2001 and the first Webber Academy graduation class was celebrated in 2005.

When Dr. Neil Webber started his teaching career at Queen Elizabeth High School in 1959, his classes were bursting with 35 students. Given the large number of students with a vast range of aptitude in the subjects, he taught broadly and provided extra attention to students struggling with the material. He always wished there was a way to better serve and challenge the highly-capable and motivated students in his classrooms. He taught until 1974, was elected to the Alberta legislature in 1975, and all the while the idea to enrich the educational experience of top-end achievers quietly took shape in his mind. Once he left politics in 1989, Dr. Webber revisited his decades-old idea for a new way to teach students while also helping to create tomorrow’s leaders. With the help of investors who believed in Dr. Webber’s vision, he established Webber Academy in 1996 and the following year welcomed the first kindergarten to grade five students to the new school. “We started the school focusing on more of a traditional approach to teaching subjects,” says Dr. Webber, founder, president and Head of School at Webber Academy. “We added a grade on each year and increased the number of classes in each grade.”

Over the years the campus has expanded to better accommodate demand as well as to enrich the student experience. A few years in, Dr. Webber added a kinder centre to host the junior kindergarten and kindergarten students

Bradon provides an integrated construction package. We offer single source leadership and project development. Call for a quotation or consultation on your next: BRADON CONSTRUCTION IS PROUD TO BE A PARTNER OF WEBBER ACADEMY AND THE NEW ATHLETIC PARK. CONGRATULATIONS TO WEBBER ACADEMY ON 25 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE! • Industrial projects • Commercial projects • Residential or farm project • Concrete foundations and suspended slabs • Equestrian facilities and footings • Riding arena footing • Riding arena • Earthworks To learn more about our services, visit bradonconstruction.ca | www.brandonequestrian.ca

and in 2003 he added a second gymnasium. Two years later a high school wing was added to keep up with the grades being offered and in 2012, Webber developed an unparalleled high school science program by introducing its Science Centre with impressive laboratories and advanced programming, from robotics to coding, to support the growing interest in STEM.

“We introduced an applied science course whereby every student in the class has a mentor at the University of Calgary who gives them assistance in the preparation of their science fair projects, and we have 15 to 20 students in that class per year,” says Dr. Webber. “Since we’ve been participating in the Calgary science fair, our school has finished number one among all the Congratulations to Webber Academy for 25 years of excellence in education, and on the grand opening of your new Athletic Park!

www.crownfoodequipment.com Webber Academy • 4

One successful program that does just that at Webber is Debate, and the administration places a great deal of emphasis on public speaking and debate from early grades. Teachers seize any opportunity to get students up in front of the class, and this early exposure has created confident, persuasive debaters over the years. Webber students regularly win local, regional, national and even international debate tournaments and students across the city can learn debating at Webber’s summer camp. In the 25 years since Webber Academy was established, it has earned its reputation as a

high schools, with a number of our kids going on to the national science fair. The Center has become quite an attractive place for students to study high school science.” This program not only elevated Webber to one of the top-performing schools at the Calgary science fair year after year, but it has also ignited the interests and in some cases, future career paths of participants. In the program’s first year, one Webber student embarked on a project to study the impact of nanotechnology and heat on cancer cells and thanks to his mentor was able to test his theories on live cancer cells in a University lab. He won the national science fair and continued this area of study in medicine after graduation. This past year, after participating in the applied science program, a grade 11 Webber student won the Calgary Youth Science Fair and placed well in the national competition, which helped her gain acceptance to a prestigious NASA summer program at Houston Space Centre. This program is one of many that Webber Academy has created to keep students engaged, challenged and poised for future success. “Our focus is academics, although we certainly want to help develop the social and teamwork skills of students along the way,” he says. “One of the greatest assets a student can have when they finish high school is to be able to stand before a group of people and express themselves confidently and think at the same time.”

By the time they graduate, students have had the opportunity to learn Spanish, Mandarin and/ or French and can participate in immersion trips abroad to learn the culture and hone their second language skills. Webber also has a robust fine arts program where students can learn an instrument or participate in the award-winning choir, drama and dance programs. To facilitate these interests, Webber built a Performing Arts Centre in 2012 that includes music rooms, dance and drama studios, and a 500-seat theatre for performances and Thesepresentations.optionsareincredibly popular with students and there aren’t enough hours in the day to satisfy the demand. Instead of disappointing students, Webber offers for-credit after-school classes to ensure everyone who wants to can be part of these programs.

Wishing

“Students come to school at 8:15 and leave at 3:30 but because of the demand for technical theatre and acting, we now have classes until 6:00 in those areas in our theatre. It is busy all day long,” says Dr. Webber. For those students looking for a more physically active option, Webber Academy has incredible athletic facilities and programs that have earned the school championship banners. The main campus has two gymnasiums, a sports field, an outdoor sports court, cross-training trails and a running track. Athletics has also become a growth area for the school; it is developing the Webber Academy Athletic Park in Springbank that will benefit student athletes as well as community organizations. In time, the 530acre plot may include a Webber Academy High Congratulations Webber Academy on 25 successful years. you, your students and dedicated staff success for more years to come. Academy • 6

Webber

The majority of students explore AP levels in at least one of their courses to prepare for the demands of post-secondary programs, and 99 per cent of graduates continue their education at post-secondary institutions, many earning academic scholarships.

“Our objective is to prepare students for university and beyond, and that’s been our motto from the start,” he says.

renowned accredited university preparatory private school serving more than 1,000 students from junior kindergarten to grade 12. It consistently ranks among the top schools in Alberta for diploma exam results and finishes high in school rankings and achievement testing.

many

As impressive as the academic standards and achievements are, Webber Academy strives to develop well-rounded students who are prepared for not just school but life as well.

SOUTHLAND Transportation extends heartfelt congratulations to Webber Academy for 25 years of educational excellence and the Grand Opening of Webber Academy Athletic Park ! WWW.SOUTHLAND.CA Webber Academy’s exclusive TRANSPORTATION provider for over a decade www.executivemat.comWebberCongratulationsAcademyonyour25thAnniversary! Safer Cleaner Floors! www.longbowsales.com Congratulations Webber Academy on 25 years of Business Excellence. PhotographyRiverwoodbyPhoto General School Information 1515 – 93rd Street, S.W. Calgary, Alberta T3H 4A8 Telephone: (403) 277-4700 Facsimile: (403) 277-2770 www.webberacademy.ca

School, but in the meantime Dr. Webber decided to put it to good use by creating a Park that will include four turfed baseball fields, a soccer pitch and a field house for indoor training and recreation. One field is finished with another slated for completion in August and the rest will be completed by next year. This development gave rise to the introduction of Webber’s Wildcats Baseball Association last year, which provides a College Prep training program to help top baseball athletes in Calgary and surrounding areas get placed on post-secondary teams. The inaugural year of the organization saw three competitive teams training at the facility under the guidance of some impressive coaches. “One of our coaches, Chris Reitsma, was a professional major league pitcher drafted out of high school in Calgary when he was 17 and played for seven years. And Cole Armstrong spent the same number of years in minor league AAA ball. We have some well-qualified coaches to teach these kids,” says Dr. Webber. Whether it’s academics, arts or athletics, Webber Academy has created innovative and rewarding programming to challenge some of Calgary’s most remarkable students. As it grows and evolves, Webber Academy will continue to be the place students go to learn, play and become leaders of the future.

Talking of bureaucrats, didn’t the big bonus for Dr. Deena Hinshaw, on top of a fairly healthy salary, cause a few gasps. But let’s face it, they look after each other as it was reported that “cash benefits” were also handed out to more than 100 other management positions as extra pay for their efforts during the pandemic.

Parker’s Pen BY DAVID PARKER

We all like to celebrate anniversaries, but few can beat that of the scout troop that has called St. Barnabas Anglican Church its home for a remarkable 100 years.

Afriend motored up to Banff to enjoy what he said was a magnificent concert at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. Pondering a late drive home, he thought about staying the night and making the return trip refreshed in the morning. The cheapest inn on the strip was quoted at $350. He drove home – as would I have done. And checking the first page of booking.com website, I find that most of the Banff hotels listed was priced around $400 per night. We are being encouraged to vacation close to home, but those prices had me dreaming back to much cheaper accommodation in Italy and a fine fish dinner with an inrestaurant €5 nice Calabrian wine.

As columnist Don Braid wrote, ‘Their very job description –public servant – suggests a duty to plunge into a crisis and do whatever is necessary, without hope of a cash prize’.

102 SEPTEMBER 2022 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM PARKER’S PEN // DAVID PARKER

Trying to talk to someone at the bank I’ve been a customer of for decades became too big an irritant. I don’t want to talk to a virtual advisor, I want to go over my security problem with a living human being. Ninety minutes one day and try again the next, I listened to 11 teasers to get a U.S. account. Using the web to get an appointment meant waiting four days for a phone discussion and the next week for a face-to-face. When I finally got through, I explained that I had called another nearby bank, was invited for a meeting that afternoon, and by the end of the day had opened two new accounts and signed up for a new Visa card.

I was introduced at the Fairmont Palliser parade morning breakfast – always my best Stampede event – by a young public relations person who asked what was my biggest beef with people in her profession. “Believe it or not,” I replied, “It’s communications, starting with the fact that so few people want to talk on the phone these days.” But, of course, that’s a huge problem with most companies.

Inflation is the current scary word so it was nice to get a –surprise to me – cheque from the Government of Canada as my climate action incentive payment. The letter gave a figure for my entitlement, but the cheque at the bottom was only half that amount. Back to the letter to find that the rest was coming in two instalments – one in October and one in January. Why? Why not one lump sum? Simple, said an old friend, who told me that when he had a business, he paid staff monthly and they were happy. Then he switched to twice a month, and guess what, they were happy twice a month. One payment and we would thank Mr. Trudeau, now we get to think nice things about him three times. Or perhaps cutting three cheques instead of one just provides more work for government employees.

Final Words If ignorance is bliss, why aren’t more people happy?

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The Wood Automotive Group welcomes Okotoks Volkswagen Meet the newest member of our team Okotoks okotoksvolkswagen.comVolkswagen.Sales (587)364-5700Service (587)364-5701Parts(587)364-5702#200 4 WestlandRoad,Okotoks,Alberta,T1S1N1JoshuaBuchananGeneralManagerAs a satelliteoperationofSouthCentreVolkswagen,OkotoksVolkswagenisthefirstofits kind in Canada.• A complete line up of new Volkswagencars and SUVs• Quality pre-owned inventory• A fully-stocked partsdepartment• Stateoftheartservice and detailing bayswithfactory trained technicians• A specializedEVservicebay and public EVchargers“WeareexcitedandproudtoopenOkotoksVolkswagenandarecommittedtoprovidingexceptionalcustomerservice.Weinvitepeopletocomeinandseewhatweareallabout”,JoshuaBuchanan,GeneralManager.

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