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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 27 | Number 10

REGULAR COLUMNS

11 12

The Right to Housing By Frank Atkins

Axe the Carbon Tax to Restore Alberta Business Confidence By Amber Ruddy

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Kenney Should Tackle Labour Costs By Colin Craig

CONTENTS

Berman’s Latest AntiAlberta Campaign Way Offside By Cody Battershill

COVER FEATURE

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Safeguarding the View Supreme Windows celebrates its half-century history By Melanie Darbyshire

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Calgary Chamber of Commerce The Calgary Report

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 27 | Number 10

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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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RenoMark: The Reliable Industry Standard Reputation is everything By John Hardy

CONTENTS COMPANY PROFILES

62 96 99 103 107 111

Stonewater

Celebrates 10 Years

Priority Leasing

Celebrates 25 Years

ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT

Celebrates 30 Years

8

Borger Group of Companies

Celebrates Safety Excellence

Westcor

26 32 44 52 74 82

Celebrates 15 Years

the VAULTS

Celebrating the Final Phase

OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

The Slow but Stable Recovery The housing market tells the story By John Hardy

The Big Ag Business From farmer cash flow to mergers and acquisitions By Dan Cooper

The IT revolution AI and IoT are disrupting today’s workplaces, and Calgary businesses are leading the charge By Jamie Zachary

The Population Rebound The year so far and what lies ahead in 2019 By John Hardy

Celebrating Small Business Much more than recognition By John Hardy

Buyers Invest in Memories with Recreational Properties By Rennay Craats

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Digital Versus Face-to-Face The importance of events By Erlynn Gococo


Volume 26 | Number 12

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REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Amber Ruddy Frank Atkins David Parker Colin Craig Cody Battershill

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THE RIGHT TO HOUSING // FRANK ATKINS

The Right to Housing BY FRANK ATKINS

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n August, a coalition of individuals and groups advocating for the poor people of Canada called on the federal government to enshrine housing as a human right. The group claims that roughly 235,000 people experience homelessness in Canada every year while over 1.7 million Canadian households are living in unsafe, unsuitable or unaffordable buildings, although it is not clear where these figures come from. A spokesperson for this group said, “We’ve come together to show the prime minister that there is broad-based support for legislated recognition of the right to housing and to offer a way forward.” It is interesting that any group that wants the government to do anything can always claim broad-based support for their cause. They never offer any evidence of this support. However, what I really do not understand here is the further statement by this individual calling Canada’s housing and homelessness crisis the result of a failure to protect human rights. I have no issue with trying to address the existence of homelessness, but as an economist it seems to me that trying to solve a problem without understanding the root cause is a methodology that will simply create further problems in the future. Simply declaring that homelessness is caused by the failure to protect human rights is a non-supportable assertion. Ask yourself the following question: if we had declared housing to be a human right, say, 30 years ago, do you really think there would be no homeless people today? Not likely. So, if the current problem is not caused by the lack of human rights, why do these individuals want this legislation? The answer must be that if the right to housing is enshrined in law, then the government will have to provide housing for all individuals who are declared as homeless. There must be a large variety of reasons why individuals become homeless.

WE SHOULD HEED THE LESSON OF WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU JUST GIVE PEOPLE HOUSING WHEN THEY CLAIM THEY ARE HOMELESS. IN THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS “TENT CITIES” HAVE BECOME A POPULAR METHOD OF DRAWING ATTENTION TO THE HOMELESS. I am sure that mental health issues and drug addiction must be high on this list. It is at this point that I see the danger in this legislation, which arises from a failure to understand that human beings are motivated by incentives. This kind of legislation has the potential to increase the number of people who declare themselves to be homeless. We should heed the lesson of what happens when you just give people housing when they claim they are homeless. In the last several years “tent cities” have become a popular method of drawing attention to the homeless. On the left coast, a tent city in Victoria grew quickly in numbers after it was first established and became a drug-addled, violence-ridden place. The Victoria government gave in and found housing for those in the tent city. The apartment where the homeless were housed quickly became an overcrowded drug-addled, violence-ridden place. It seems to me the answer here is not just to make housing a human right and give it to the homeless. I do not understand why we are afraid to try to understand the root causes of homelessness and deal with the issue properly.

Frank Atkins is a senior fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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AXE THE CARBON TAX TO RESTORE ALBERTA BUSINESS CONFIDENCE // AMBER RUDDY

Volume 26 | Number 12

Axe the Carbon Tax to Restore Alberta Business Confidence BY AMBER RUDDY

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ll along, small business owners in Alberta have had concerns about introducing a provincial carbon tax. The recent court decision revoking approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline project only further cements those concerns. Earlier this year, uncertainty on the Trans Mountain pipeline project’s livelihood began to seriously erode confidence in the Canadian business climate. In light of this, a group called Confidence in Canada formed to press for a resolution to the impasse on the project. Confidence in Canada represents more than 110 business, industry and community groups, and hundreds of thousands of Canadians. Now, we are at a stalemate. This is no longer an issue about whether a pipeline should be built. It’s an issue of whether or not businesses – large or small, across our country – can invest with confidence knowing the rules won’t retroactively change. Following the court announcement rescinding the pipeline’s approval, Alberta’s Premier Rachel Notley began backing away from the federal climate plan, which includes yearly carbon tax increases. While there is still much uncertainty for the pipeline, this is a step in the right direction for Alberta. But let’s not stop there – provincial carbon taxes should be repealed, too. According to new analysis by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), 87 per cent of business owners surveyed in Alberta want to axe the carbon tax.

profitability, 66 per cent say it increases pressure to freeze and cut salaries, while 59 per cent warn it causes a delay in investments in employee training and business equipment. The concept of social licence is to take steps to protect the environment and in return gain support for developing our natural resources in a sustainable way. Under the current circumstances, the carbon tax doesn’t do much to gain socalled “social licence.” This year, business owners faced a carbon tax increase of $10 per tonne, hitting $30/tonne in 2018. If Alberta is to maintain its carbon tax, at minimum it should be revenue neutral. CFIB survey data shows that 83 per cent of entrepreneurs believe the provincial small business corporate income tax rate should be lowered to zero to mitigate the impact. There is merit for the provincial government to decrease small business taxes – as was done January 1, 2016 from three down to two per cent. So why haven’t small business taxes continued to go down? The Alberta government’s so-called “Climate Leadership Plan” belongs in the recycle bin. Small businesses support further development of the province’s resources with appropriate environmental safeguards but levying more taxes doesn’t get us there. Real leadership would show action on getting our valued natural resources to new markets for the benefit of the Canadian economy.

Furthermore, 86 per cent say carbon taxes increase their operating costs, 85 per cent state it reduces their Amber Ruddy is the director of provincial affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. She can be reached at amber.ruddy@cfib.ca. Follow her on Twitter @aruddy.

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KENNEY SHOULD TACKLE LABOUR COSTS // COLIN CRAIG

Kenney Should Tackle Labour Costs BY COLIN CRAIG

I

t’s the worst-kept secret – people who are employed by the government tend to make more money, and enjoy better benefits, than those who have similar jobs outside of government. It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about salaries, pension benefits, sick leave or job security, study after study shows government employees – on average – are doing much, much better.

Canadian politics, he holds another important distinction. He is the only premier in the last 30 years of Canadian politics to actually require government employees to take a significant pay reduction. Back in the 1990s, while Klein was trying to get the province’s debt under control, he negotiated a five per cent pay reduction for government employees – one they agreed to without a strike.

So, the big question is: will someone ever tackle the problem and justifiably save taxpayers billions of dollars or will politicians just keep raising taxes?

That’s the type of leadership Alberta needs right now – someone who isn’t afraid to make tough choices to get our province’s growing debt problem under control.

Here in Alberta, Premier Rachel Notley has refused to tackle ballooning labour costs. Her party has always had a cosy relationship with powerful government employee unions so the situation isn’t too surprising.

And to be clear, making tough choices doesn’t mean health care and education will fall apart – as the government likes to claim. Next door in British Columbia, they’re providing health care, education and other government services for a fraction of the cost. If the Alberta government merely reduced its per capita spending levels down to what the B.C. government spends per person, we wouldn’t have a deficit right now.

While she claims to have frozen pay for teachers, nurses and other government employees, data obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation shows thousands of those employees are still receiving pay increases because of the way the government negotiated the so-called “freezes.” Yes, our government is barrelling towards $96 billion in debt and Premier Notley is still agreeing to pay increases for employees. Given our province’s economic woes, a poorer managerial approach is hard to imagine. There is hope, however, that Notley’s chief competitor, Opposition leader Jason Kenney, might tackle this problem if he is elected premier next year. For starters, unlike some conservatives, Kenney proudly trumpets the accomplishments of former Alberta premier Ralph Klein. While Klein’s debt repayment accomplishment in 2004 was perhaps his most epic and unique accomplishment in

At $27 billion, salaries and benefits make up roughly half of the provincial budget. Pruning this area of spending could be done through a number of different means including reducing salaries across the board – just like Klein did. Alternatively, the government could reduce salaries for current employees by a set amount, but require an even larger reduction for future employees. Thus, over time, the pay gap could be reduced immensely. The government could also scale back the number of sick days it offers to government employees and put new government employees in a less costly type of pension plan. Would Kenney pursue such ideas? Try asking him. Perhaps remind him that this is the type of leadership we saw from Ralph. Colin Craig is the Alberta Director for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation

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BERMAN’S LATEST ANTI-ALBERTA CAMPAIGN WAY OFFSIDE // CODY BATTERSHILL

Berman’s Latest Anti-Alberta Campaign Way Offside BY CODY BATTERSHILL

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ometimes it feels like Tzeporah Berman wants to see the Alberta oil and gas sector strangled with a neverending stream of anti-oilsands misinformation. Her apparent mission to hurt our sector – and by implication, to aid virtually every other global competitor – seems relentless. Now she’s urging California to cease all imports of Alberta oil; it’s just another plank in her one-sided anti-oilsands platform. Thankfully, some First Nations and Métis communities are still keen to buy an equity stake in the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, despite the recent courtmandated setback to its construction. Among others, McMurray Métis CEO Bill Loutitt is reported to be continuing his pursuit of a stake in the expansion. And reports say he sees an opportunity for B.C. coastal First Nations to be a big part of the project as well. The McMurray Métis and other like-minded indigenous organizations aren’t accepting the drivel from Berman and her latest group, Stand.earth. According to Berman, in her recent misleading brochure, “Everyone agrees – tar sands [her words] is by far the dirtiest type of oil. It has an outsized climate impact, is terrible for air quality, and when it spills it’s significantly harder to clean up than conventional crude oil.” It takes nerve to cram four misstatements into one short paragraph. But experts for California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard have found there are 13 oilfields in California, plus crude oil blends originating in at least six other countries, that

BUT EXPERTS FOR CALIFORNIA’S LOW CARBON FUEL STANDARD HAVE FOUND THERE ARE 13 OILFIELDS IN CALIFORNIA, PLUS CRUDE OIL BLENDS ORIGINATING IN AT LEAST SIX OTHER COUNTRIES, THAT GENERATE MORE UPSTREAM GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS THAN THOSE OF OUR CANADIAN OILSANDS BLENDS. generate more upstream greenhouse gas emissions than those of our Canadian oilsands blends. That same California study found the “dirtiest oil in North America” is not produced in Canada, but just outside Los Angeles, where the Placerita oilfield generates about twice the level of upstream emissions as Canada’s oilsands. What about Berman’s claim that our product carries an outsized climate impact, or that is causes terrible air quality, or that it’s harder to clean up in the unlikely event of a spill? Each of these claims has been proven wrong time and time again. I’m heartened that progressive indigenous organizations, deciding for themselves, continue to value the Trans Mountain project. They know Canadians are leaders in producing oil and gas that strives to balance the protection of people and the planet.

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

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OFF

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Healthy Aging

Everybody talks about the speed bumps of aging but few do anything about it. Recent surveys and statistics show that about 30 per cent of the North American over-50 population suffer from some form of chronic health problem. Many of these are lifestyle illnesses that are mostly preventable – although not always the case – and include cardiorespiratory disease, hypertension, Type 2 diabetes, anxiety and depression, autoimmune disease, substance abuse, dementia and cancer. Enter the positive and refreshing concept of “healthy aging.” It’s a basic life skill (and aging skill) for Dr. Garth Mann, director of Calgary’s Academy of Aging, the non-profit group associated with the Manor Village Life Centers. The academy is committed to developing important educational programs, exercise programs, de-stressing programs, and diet and nutrition programs for all ages. “It’s been documented that chronic health diseases can be dramatically reduced and even prevented with lifestyle changes,” he points out. “Our focus is coaching Canadians about avoiding chronic health conditions that often result in memory loss with aging.

minutes, and resistance training for stamina and strength enhancement. • Nutrition and diet education: learning about the aging process of the human body as it extracts necessary nutrition from food (for example, red meat becomes more difficult to metabolize). • Sleep enhancement therapy: relates to the mind and body achieving resilience from restful and restorative sleep. • De-stressing coaching: mindful-meditation techniques to help calm breathing and negative thoughts Dr. Mann sheds refreshing and thought-provoking new light on a telltale fact of everyday life.

“Because our brain is impacted by the same abuses to which we subject our bodies, it is not possible to differentiate between body and brain.”

According to research and medical care stats, fewer than five per cent of people understand test results after their doctor has referred them to a lab for blood work and other tests. “That means more than 95 per cent of the population is unaware of their A1C levels, their HDL/LDL (cholesterol) ratios, understand their electrolytes or even the significance of their blood pressure or resting heart rate.”

The good news, according to Dr. Mann: “It is never too late to start lifestyle changes. How we choose to live today has a huge impact on our health, our future wellness and the prevention of memory loss with aging.”

A key part of the Academy of Aging’s curriculum is teaching people how to effectively read lab results and vitals, so they better understand what their body is telling them about their health.

According to Dr. Mann, the four pillars of prevention include:

“Ideally, the human body is perfectly capable of aging gracefully,” Dr. Mann smiles. “And that’s what enables a person to enjoy a lifestyle without chronic health diseases. With good genetics, we are capable of aging to 100 and being healthy most of the way.

• Energy rejuvenation: improving flexibility, aerobic coaching to maintain an individualized target heart rate for 12 to 15

ABOVE: DR. GARTH MANN, DIRECTOR OF CALGARY’S ACADEMY OF AGING, THE NON-PROFIT GROUP ASSOCIATED WITH THE MANOR VILLAGE LIFE CENTERS.

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OFF

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Willow Park Wines & Spirits Hosts 25th Charity Wine Auction

On Saturday, November 3, 2018 Willow Park Wines & Spirits will host its 25th annual Charity Wine Auction, an event that is sure to delight even the strictest teetotaller. This year’s Diamond Ball will again be in support of the Vintage Fund (established in 2001), which focuses on education, health care and seniors’ needs in the community. To date, the fund has donated over $5 million to local charities. “Each year, our goal is to give our guests a surreal experience that leaves them wondering how on earth we will up the ante for the next year,” says Suzanne Henuset, co-chair of the auction. “It is our hope that this momentous 25th year will leave you in awe and amazement.” The event will feature libations from 25 world-class wineries, distilleries and breweries. Premium wines will be represented by a winery principal – either the winemaker, owner or ambassador of the estate – several of whom will travel from France, Italy and California to attend. Guests will also enjoy handcrafted cocktails from renowned mixologists, unique and delectable dishes from 25 of Calgary’s best chefs and catering companies, and spirited entertainment to keep the party rocking. “The silent and live auction offerings will be as diverse as ever,” continues Henuset, “with some of the most sought-after bottles, beautiful trips and once-in-a-lifetime experiences all awaiting the winning bid.” Live auction items include trips to Italy, France, Spain, New York for the U.S. Open and Napa for BottleRock as well as a diamond tennis bracelet. “Each year, the success of our event continues to grow and we attribute that to the generosity of our fabulous guests and donors both local and from around the world,” Henuset says. “This year, we hope to once again raise $300,000.” As in past years, the auction will support Alberta Children’s

Hospital Foundation and the proposed Centre for Child & Youth Mental Health. “Across Canada, the demand for child and adolescent mental health services has exploded,” says Henuset. “In southern Alberta, the current system is stretched beyond capacity, and an estimated 60,000 children and teenagers in Calgary require mental health intervention in any given year. Families are forced to seek assistance through the emergency department as there is no service located in the community that can respond immediately. This is a substantial service gap.” The vision for the new centre is to provide excellence in care and one-stop access to a walk-in clinic, intensive outpatient therapy and a community-based day hospital. “With our Diamond Ball theme, glitz and glam will shine bright,” Henuset predicts. “As always, copious amounts of Taittinger champagne will be served and our favourite restaurants will be offering tasty morsels of unforgettable food. Men bring out your tux and tails and ladies it’s time to shimmer and sparkle for a night like no other!” For more information or to purchase tickets, go to willowparkwines.com.

ABOVE: SUZANNE AND SCOTT HENUSET, CO-CHAIRS OF THE 25TH CHARITY WINE AUCTION.

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RENOMARK: THE RELIABLE INDUSTRY STANDARD // URBANOMICS

RENOMARK: THE RELIABLE INDUSTRY STANDARD REPUTATION IS EVERYTHING BY JOHN HARDY

W

hen it comes to Calgary reno contractors, like many other aspects of business, reputation is everything. That wasn’t always the case.

For years, choosing and hiring a reno contractor had become an iffy kind of consumer crapshoot. The customer was bombarded by grandiose claims, occasional word of mouth and invariably read the menu from right to left while often making decisions based on price. According to BILD Calgary Region (BILD CR), Calgarians know the value of a home renovation but some homeowners don’t know where to turn to find a reliable, reputable, professional renovator. To combat the underground economy, as well as the negative public perception perpetuated by illegitimate operators, BILD CR introduced RenoMark™ – a trusted source of renovation information and a listing of certified and reliable Calgary-area contractors. “Just because someone says they are a contractor doesn’t necessarily mean that they have specialized knowledge and skills,” cautions Gary Sharp, director of renovator services with the Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA). “Although in different parts of the country they may require licensing, the consumer needs to adequately interview contractors prior to making a decision. We encourage consumers to interview at least three contractors before making a decision.” He explains that RenoMark was created by BILD to provide an effective way to differentiate reliable

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and qualified member renovators from non-member renovators. As BILD CR emphasizes, RenoMark raises the bar and identifies renovation contractors who have agreed to the CHBA code of ethics. “RenoMark renovators understand the value of customer service, provide warranties and continually educate themselves on trends, materials and new regulations,” BILD CR adds. The requirements and standards to qualify as a RenoMark renovator are diverse and stringent. Sharp underscores that RenoMark renovators must be members of the Home Builders’ Association and agree to abide by a renovationspecific code of conduct. Consumer reliability is the key Calgary RenoMark driver. And it is so much more than a brand; it is consumer assurance. RenoMark renovators must provide a detailed written contract for all jobs, offer a two-year warranty, carry $2 million of liability insurance protection in case of an accident on site as well as workplace safety insurance, and make an unconditional commitment to only work with subcontractors who also have insurance to protect their workers. “In addition,” he points out, “the RenoMark member renovator agrees to have all the proper licences to do the work, get all the necessary permits and maintain a safe and organized reno worksite.”


RENOMARK: THE RELIABLE INDUSTRY STANDARD // URBANOMICS

“WE HAVE SUGGESTIONS FOR HOW TO CHECK OUT A CONTRACTOR, HOW TO FOLLOW UP WITH REFERENCES AND THE KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK, WHAT SHOULD BE IN A PRICE QUOTE AND SOME SUGGESTIONS ON DECIDING WHO TO HIRE.” ~ GARY SHARP

Despite construction industry cautions and unfortunate after-the-fact consumer horror stories, vital (and often pricey) reno decisions are often based on lowball quotes and poorly informed gut feel. “I am amazed how many reno clients don’t check important factors like licensing, bonding and don’t even ask for verification,” says Paul Klassen, general manager and founder of the respected Pinnacle Group, a Calgary-based RenoMark renovator and a BILD Calgary Region member. “A few months ago, I finally had a client that asked. It was the first one in a long time. “The RenoMark code of ethics is crucially important. So is bonding, contractual compliance and a prepaid contractor licence. RenoMark is consumer assurance that the reno contractor is a qualified and trustworthy professional that has been vetted by a nationwide organization and is worthy of hire.” Klassen is a much-in-demand Calgary reno professional. Although Pinnacle Group deals with the gamut of reno assignments, the company has its own custom cabinet division resulting in a high volume of calls for kitchen, ensuite, powder room and great room projects. Sharp adds that hiring a reno contractor is often more than qualifications, skills and price. “Selecting a renovation contractor is very much like picking a business partner to do work. Depending on the size of the renovation, it could

be a multi-week project and there is a crucial need for the renovator and the homeowner to communicate effectively so the homeowner gets the renovation they are planning for. “Remember,” he says, “the contractor will likely be at your house before you leave for work and will likely be there when your children get home from school. You need to pick a contractor who you trust and who you believe is competent to do the work.” He also urges an individual “consumer checklist” to compare and eventually choose a qualified and reliable professional. “The BILD CR RenoMark website (http://www.renomark.ca/ CalgaryRegion/Home) is a great reference for homeowners to use to help identify the things a contractor should have to protect them, including liability insurance, workers’ compensation and the important features to look for in a proper contract. “We have suggestions for how to check out a contractor, how to follow up with references and the key questions to ask, what should be in a price quote and some suggestions on deciding who to hire.” RenoMark is the consumer’s due diligence when it comes to making a reno decision. “By the end of the consumer’s search, review and interview process, hopefully one of the member contractors will feel like a good fit for the homeowner and their family,” Sharp says with enthusiasm.

ABOVE: GARY SHARP, DIRECTOR OF RENOVATOR SERVICES WITH THE CANADIAN HOME BUILDERS’ ASSOCIATION.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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OFF

THE

Small Business vs Tax Hikes

A

s the Canadian mood and the many ripple effects of the economy gain momentum on the trajectory to October 21, 2019 – Canada’s 43rd federal election – the wants and needs of small business continue to be a political hot potato and a somewhat contentious election issue. In terms of stereotypes and public perception, “big business” usually gets much of the attention but it’s an undisputable fact that small businesses – with fewer than 100 employees and making up 95 per cent of all businesses accounting for the majority of jobs in Alberta – are the solid cornerstone of the Canadian economy. In business and political lingo, small businesses have potent clout. Last year, when the federal government announced a cobweb of upcoming business tax changes, small business flexed. According to PC MP Pierre Marcel Poilievre, the proposed taxes “put a 73 per cent tax on small business savings income, penalized family businesses for sharing earnings and work with family members, and doubled the tax on the sale of a farm from parents to children, forcing them to instead sell the farm to multinational corporations.” Startups, farmers, entrepreneurs, plumbers and pizza-shop owners (among others) launched a massive uprising. A chorus of small business advocates and political pundits joined in, suggesting that with the 2019 election on the horizon, a small business backlash and a tax revolt would be a risky mistake. And it worked. The government backed down from the planned tax increases. In late 2017, the government announced it was “lowering the small business tax rate in the new year, better enabling businesses to grow and create good, well-paying jobs and

NOW THAT THE FEDERAL ELECTION IS ABOUT 12 MONTHS AWAY, SMALL BUSINESS CONCERNS AND THE PREDICTABLE GOVERNMENT VERSUS OPPOSITION WRANGLING IS STARTING. AND SMALL BUSINESS IS, AGAIN, ON THE FRONT LINES. that, effective January 1, 2018, the small business tax rate is proposed to be reduced to 10 per cent, as a first step toward lowering it to nine per cent in 2019.” The government announcement also said, “The combined federal-provincial-territorial average tax rate for small business will be by far the lowest in the G7 and fourth lowest among Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries.” Poilievre begs to differ and warns, “They decided to go ahead with increases and complicated compliance rules that will still hurt many small businesses. For example, any small business owner with more than $50,000 in investment income – from rental properties, stocks or bonds – will lose access to the small business tax deduction. That means much higher tax rates on earnings.” Now that the federal election is about 12 months away, small business concerns and the predictable government versus opposition wrangling is starting. And small business is, again, on the front lines. Last month, PC MP Michelle Rempel tabled a petition with the signatures of 45,000 small business owners, urging the government not to reintroduce small business damaging tax increases after the election.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

25


THE SLOW BUT STABLE RECOVERY // REAL ESTATE

THE SLOW BUT STABLE RECOVERY THE HOUSING MARKET TELLS THE STORY BY JOHN HARDY

M

ost Calgary business sectors agree: the downturn is history. The recovery, although more sluggish than Calgary business hoped and expected, has begun.

And although things are not quite back to a wishfulthinking normal, Calgary business is adjusting to the many dimensions of ‘a new normal.’ All things considered, the Calgary business mood is positive but it is also a matter of definitions. When it comes to the 2018 outlook for Calgary real estate, it varies with the definitions of “stable” or “flat.”

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

This year’s Calgary housing market is panning out much like it did last year, according to Calgary Real Estate Board (CREB) forecasts. According to Ann-Marie Lurie, CREB’s chief economist, “while the trending and actual stats indicate that Calgary is out of the economic downturn, we started to see some transition, prices weren’t falling at the same pace as last year and we started to see some stabilization in the Calgary housing market.” She cautions that regardless what real estate numbers are referenced, there is a nagging Calgary market problem: there


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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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THE SLOW BUT STABLE RECOVERY // REAL ESTATE

“EVEN THOUGH OVERALL SALES ACTIVITY INCREASED LAST YEAR, THERE WAS STILL JUST TOO MUCH SUPPLY. IF NET MIGRATION TO ALBERTA CONTINUES TO INCREASE, THE OVER-SUPPLY WILL START TO GET ABSORBED.” ~ ANN-MARIE LURIE is far too much supply, including too much rental and new home starts and a particular glut in Calgary’s condo market. And even though the overall Calgary real estate market stabilized last year, and migration is slowly happening, it isn’t translating into the employment growth that is necessary for what can be called a robust recovery. The CREB report also underscores that the local housing market, like many other is Calgary business sectors, is adjusting to the new normal. Perhaps a bit more than some other businesses, it continues to face challenges. It’s unavoidable. One key speedbump is the stricter lending criteria introduced by Ottawa and slightly higher interest rates, likely putting downward pressure on Calgary prices and offsetting any upward momentum from the positive of Alberta’s continuing recovery from the downturn. Real estate professionals reference last year’s controversial new rule, when the federal Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions extended the stress test applied to only high-ratio loans to all loans. The test now requires all buyers to qualify at the greater of the Bank of Canada’s fiveyear benchmark rate or the contracted rate plus 200 basis points (two per cent).

Particularly Calgary area realtors are cautious that this change could be forcing some prospective buyers to reconsider their housing price ranges, putting the higher range properties out of reach for more people. A specialized, limited but interesting indicator of the Calgary housing market are the prices and the listing/sales activity for higher-end single, attached and condo homes in Calgary. According to the crunched numbers and stats, sales of Calgary homes listed for more than $1 million have dropped sharply in the first half of this year and the $1-million-plus single family home market saw a 13 per cent dip in activity in the first six months of this year. Many realtors and analysts say the outlook for Calgary’s toptier real estate market reflects the tenuous state of the city’s economic recovery, which has not been strong enough to withstand the impact of recent changes in the new lending rules and upward-creeping interest rates. “Even though overall sales activity increased last year,” Lurie adds, “there was still just too much supply. If net migration to Alberta continues to increase, the over-supply will start to get absorbed. No matter how gradual, Calgary economic conditions are improving which helps support the

ABOVE: ANN-MARIE LURIE, CREB’S CHIEF ECONOMIST.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


A GREAT MEAL IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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// REAL ESTATE

A InvItAtIon

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You and the wonderful people you want to share with us.

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Why

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SMWL.CoM 30

Calgary housing market. The challenge is that we do have an almost new lending environment.” Jim Sparrow, the respected and Calgary-savvy realtor shares the cautious positivity. “The Calgary real estate market showed signs of recovery in 2017, with home sales rising 6.1 percent, which was the first increase in sales in three years. City-wide, detached home prices have stabilized and have even increased in certain areas. Condo and apartment prices continue to feel downward pressure as the sector has a much higher listing inventory than the detached sector.” He cites Calgary spring stats that showed 848 detached Calgary home sales and he notes that it works out to 27.6 percent lower than 2017. Local new listings were 1,871, about four percent higher than last year. Sparrow also echoes that the new federal mortgage rules are having a definite Calgary impact. “The mortgage stress test guidelines have forced many Calgary buyers to rethink or cancel their purchase plans. Mortgage rule changes affects the provision of credit across the board. “Calgary year-to-date sales are down 20 percent. It is a trend that has persisted for three months. So far, prices haven’t been affected but if the trend continues we’ll see lower prices as the year progresses.”

ABOVE: CALGARY REALTOR, JIM SPARROW.

OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


THE SLOW BUT STABLE RECOVERY // REAL ESTATE

“THE MORTGAGE STRESS TEST GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED MANY CALGARY BUYERS TO RETHINK OR CANCEL THEIR PURCHASE PLANS. MORTGAGE RULE CHANGES AFFECTS THE PROVISION OF CREDIT ACROSS THE BOARD.” ~ JIM SPARROW

“Traditionally, although Q2 is usually the most active for Calgary real estate and we are now well into the second half of the year,” Lurie says, “we still have more inventory, which could create some price fluctuations, although the improving economy is expected to prevent overall prices from slipping by significant amounts.

“While prices trended down on a quarterly basis, they remained relatively unchanged over last year’s levels due to modest gains in the detached sector offsetting declines in the apartment sector.”

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THE BIG AG BUSINESS // AGRICULTURE

Big

The

Ag Business

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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Let’s keep food and yard waste out of the landfill. BY JOHN HARDY

N

ow more than ever, farming is dynamic. It is exciting, demanding, challenging and rewarding. The contemporary farmer and producer and the entire Ag industry deals with technology, a gamut of sciences, new ways of doing things and the essential business savvy to effectively manage the vital facts of ag life like the economy, spiking land costs, cash flow and the industry trend of subtle and giant Ag business mergers and acquisitions.

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THE BIG AG BUSINESS // AGRICULTURE

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“With changing technology, farmers are generating vast amounts of data and they’re exploring ways to use it to become more efficient,” says Janine Sekulic, managing director of agriculture financing at ATB Financial. “Also, as operations get larger and employ more people, there’s a need for HR strategies that help attract and retain qualified employees.” Despite the momentum of sophistication of the Ag business and while the contemporary farmer’s basics continue to change, three crucial areas for the business of modern farming continue – marketing, land and production. “Today’s farmer must be knowledgeable about markets and pricing,” explains Lynn Jacobson, the industry-respected president of the Alberta Federation of Agriculture. “They must know how to use the gamut of marketing tools to maximize their returns. In many cases, producers are hiring marketing managers to help them. “And when it comes to production, they must be expert with most of the new production agrology technologies to maximize their yields per acre, under varying circumstances. “It is important for the farmer to be innovative and look for opportunities with new crops. In the near future, farmers are going to have to look at multiple enterprises for their farms to be profitable,” he adds. “For example, instead of just grain farming, look into supply managed agriculture or local food production. With the high costs (especially for land and equipment) of entering agriculture for new producers or expanding an operation to allow the next generation to farm, the traditional methods may just not be enough. “Many producers today do not own the majority of their land,” Jacobson notes. “They are renting, custom farming or partnering with landowners or they have a company that has investors. I know a few very large producers that are using the investor model.” In addition to the traditional purpose and function of farming – production – the contemporary farmer must understand and effectively manage various

ABOVE: JANINE SEKULIC, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF AGRICULTURE FINANCING AT ATB FINANCIAL.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


THE BIG AG BUSINESS // AGRICULTURE

“WITH CHANGING TECHNOLOGY, FARMERS ARE GENERATING VAST AMOUNTS OF DATA AND THEY’RE EXPLORING WAYS TO USE IT TO BECOME MORE EFFICIENT.” ~ JANINE SEKULIC

business dimensions of farming: from cash flow, operations, investments and the economy to dealing with the direct and indirect effects of a growing trend of Ag industry mergers and acquisitions. “As capital requirements have increased, we’ve seen farmers focus on protecting their investments. Farmers are constantly evaluating their risk exposure. They invest a lot of time in planning, forecasting and enterprise analysis,” ATB’s Sekulic points out. “They know their costs down to the penny, and they’ll use combinations of production insurance, pricing strategies, unique marketing arrangements or business structures to be sure that in a worst-case scenario, they can cover those costs.” With much experience in the Alberta Ag industry, she outlines that, for the Alberta farmer, agriculture is a long game. It is cyclical and the cycles are influenced by many things that are usually beyond an individual producer’s control. “That’s why we recommend looking at trends over time, never at one particular year, good or bad. Changing conditions in the overall economy absolutely impact the business of modern farming. The important thing is to determine whether that shift is short or long term in nature,” she says.

When it comes to the big business of agriculture, some insiders are still reacting to January’s mammoth Ag industry merger. Saskatchewan-based PotashCorp, the world’s largest potash producer, and Calgary-based Agrium, the giant agricultural and chemical company, combined as Nutrien. “Through this merge we’ve formed the world’s largest provider of crop inputs and services and have become the third-largest

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THE BIG AG BUSINESS // AGRICULTURE

“CALGARY AND ALBERTA WILL STILL REMAIN AN IMPORTANT CENTRE FOR AGRICULTURE. AND WE WILL CONTINUE TO HAVE A SIGNIFICANT PRESENCE IN THE CITY.” ~ RICHARD DOWNEY

natural resource company in Canada,” explains Richard Downey, vice president of Nutrien investor and corporate relations. “We now have the largest crop nutrient production portfolio with an unparalleled global retail distribution network that includes more than 1,500 farm retail centres. A key driver was the opportunity to capture half a billion in synergies, through more efficient use of resources and assets, including transportation and warehousing costs.” The new company is headquartered in Saskatoon and Downey emphasizes that “Calgary and Alberta will still remain an important centre for agriculture. And we will continue to have a significant presence in the city. Our

Calgary office has over 350 employees and remains an important link to our global operations around the world.” He accentuates that throughout the massive Nutrien integration, the company’s goal was to ensure the merger was completed in as seamless a manner as possible. “Everyone in our company has been working hard to ensure that we continuously improve our services and products to our customers and stakeholders with limited noticeable changes, other than the name change.

ABOVE: RICHARD DOWNEY, VICE PRESIDENT OF INVESTOR AND CORPORATE RELATIONS, NUTRIEN.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


THE BIG AG BUSINESS // AGRICULTURE

“We are focused on innovation and we intend to add more resources in the area of our retail business research and development of new products and solutions to benefit our grower customers.” Perhaps the size of the merge, combined with the possibility that the conventional Ag industry is sometimes cautious about embracing change, some analysts have voiced concerns that the Nutrien merger is likely to affect hundreds of thousands of Canadian farmers, particularly as they shop around for products like fertilizer and seeds. Ag industry concerns are mostly rooted in the business reality that giant companies can’t simply compete on one continent or in one region. They inevitably think globally. Regardless, Sekulic is positive and upbeat, and underscores the essential business savvy of contemporary farmers. “Planning is key. Ask yourself what investments you are going to need to make in the next 12-36 months. Then prioritize – what are your ultimate goals? Knowing that, prepare for those investments. Understand what the cash flow requirement is going to be. Consider what adjustments you can make to accommodate another principal payment. Engage experts to evaluate financing options – do you need to own it, or does it make better sense to lease it?” According to Downey, there is another key to a farmer’s business smarts. “Today’s farmers have a lot more technology, products and services to evaluate and utilize

than they ever have before. This trend will only continue in the future, whether it’s precision agriculture, new seeds or new crop protection products. “As we accelerate development of our own products and services for farmers, we have some upcoming interactive platforms that will focus on making it easier for growers to work with our agronomists to optimize their crop yields and their financial bottom line.” With much invaluable experience in Alberta’s farming sector, Jacobson suggests the Alberta farmer is bound to be affected. “Most rural communities only have one Ag supplier and when they are merged with another Ag supplier, the competition for service and price between them is gone or they close one of the facilities, so producers usually have to travel further to access their inputs. “When a merger of a major Ag company is going on, we do get contacted by the Competition Bureau for comments or concerns,” he notes. “The buyer may have to divest themselves of some of the assets of the merged companies to increase competition but, in most cases, I have not seen any lasting benefit.” Sekulic highlights positive realities. “Consolidation is happening at all levels of the industry and has been for the last 20 years. Losing competition can understandably cause some discomfort. But on the flip side, Nutrien will be a huge global player. The efficiency gains resulting from this could have real benefits to the Ag industry.

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SAFEGUARDING THE VIEW // COVER

SAFEGUARDING

THE VIEW

SUPREME WINDOWS CELEBRATES ITS HALF-CENTURY HISTORY

BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

I

f you’ve lived in Calgary for more than a minute, chances are you’ve looked through a window or walked through a door manufactured by Supreme Windows. In operation since 1967, the company has furnished countless homes in the city and province with a variety of windows and doors, all fit for four unrelenting seasons. As Calgary has grown over the last half-century, flourishing in the booms and weathering the busts, so too has Supreme. Today, it sits at the top of its industry. “We have seen record sales the last couple of years,” reveals Ann MacKenna, principal/owner at Supreme. “In fact, this year we are trending to demolish our sales record. Despite the economy, we’re hiring new people and growing. You don’t hear a lot of stories like that right now.” The cherry on top of the sales success is the recognition Supreme has received within its industry. “Last year was a real banner year for the company,” MacKenna continues. “Not only was it our 50th anniversary, but we also won some major accolades.” These include the Star Metro Calgary Community Choice Best Windows and Doors Store and the Home Stars Best of 2018. “Home Stars was a really big

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

one since reviews are based on customers only,” she adds. “Customers in Calgary rated us the best last year.” The reason for all this good news? “We manufacture everything here in town,” MacKenna offers, “including the Sealed Unit [two or three pieces of glass hermetically sealed together]. We’re pretty much the only one in town manufacturing the entire window structure. Everything is fully integrated into one location.” That location is in the city’s southeast, and includes Supreme’s manufacturing plant, head office, sales, administration and showroom. The 100,000-square-foot building was purpose-built in 2007 when Supreme needed more space. “Because we manufacture everything here, we can solve issues quickly,” she explains. “We’re not calling down to the U.S. or across the country because we need XYZ unit. Our vice president of production, Craig Grant, can deal with it immediately.” The plant is fully automated, with specialized computercontrolled machines from Italy, Canada and Germany for everything from cutting glass to cleaning welded corners.


SAFEGUARDING THE VIEW // COVER

ABOVE: ANN MACKENNA AND GORDON SOKOLON. PHOTO SOURCE: BOOKSTRUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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SAFEGUARDING THE VIEW // COVER

MacKenna recalls making the decision to automate the new plant: “There was a lot of set up and we needed many technicians; I didn’t realize that would be the situation, and found it very frustrating for the first 60 days. But then everything started rolling.” The facility and equipment were built for overcapacity, and Supreme hasn’t had to expand the plant.

Gordon Sokolon, director of sales and marketing at Supreme. “We deliver our products in our own trucks so that when you order from Supreme you get the personal touch the whole way: contact with your salesperson, the product manufactured in a plant in Calgary by Calgarians, and then we don’t third-party ship it out; we ship it in our own trucks right to the community that ordered it from us.”

And despite the fact that the new facility opened in April of 2008, just as the market was moving into a downturn, it has been a boon. “It’s paid for itself many times over,” MacKenna reveals happily. “The payback has been incredible because we get quality products and consistency in our production. Automation is definitely the way to go.”

Sokolon, who joined Supreme three-and-a-half years ago, is part of the management team headed by president and CEO Martin Polychuk which MacKenna and co-owner/partners, brothers Dennis and Gerard Huber, rely upon to run the day-to-day operations of Supreme. “Martin and Gordon are a very central part of our business,” she confirms.

Another benefit of being local and fully integrated is that Supreme’s products don’t have far to travel. “They don’t get banged around in a truck for 2,000 kilometres,” says

For her part, MacKenna has been with the company since 1994 and an owner since 1998. The Huber brothers both worked at Supreme with their father since childhood. Dennis ABOVE: SUPREME WINDOWS MANAGEMENT TEAM. DB SHIM, IT MANAGER; DAVE MCDONALD, DIRECTOR OF INSTALLATION; GORDON SOKOLON, DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING; ZANE YANIW, PROCUREMENT MANAGER; MARTIN POLYCHUK, PRESIDENT AND CEO AND CRAIG GRANT, VICE PRESIDENT.

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SAFEGUARDING THE VIEW // COVER

became an owner in the 1980s while Gerard became an owner in 1998. Founded in Edmonton as Economy Windows some 51 years ago, the company was renamed Supreme in 1971 when it moved to Calgary. It grew steadily from then on, expanding into ever-larger facilities and increasing production every year. Supreme’s windows come in a variety of styles, with numerous options for dual- or triple-pane Sealed Units, size, shape, frame materials, glazing, grill, jambs, casings and brick moulds. All window frames and sashes are manufactured with vinyl extrusions. Supreme’s door business includes entry and garden doors, door slabs, doorlites and sliding patio doors, which also come in a variety of options. The company’s market is primarily residential homes and multi-family (town homes and smaller apartment buildings) developments. While it manufactures more windows than doors (for obvious reasons), its door business has grown with the advent of newer homes boasting more than two doors to the outside. “We have three pillars of business,” explains Sokolon. “First is our renovation division. This consists of the sales team which attends customers’ homes and measures out the product. We then custom-build the product at our plant.” The service, adds MacKenna, includes removal of old doors and windows and delivery and installation of new ones. This division comprises about 50 per cent of Supreme’s business, and it’s growing. “We’ve seen the biggest jump in renovations,” she continues. “We’ve been established for such a long time and have a great reputation that new and repeat customers keep coming to us. They’re choosing to stay in their homes and chosen neighbourhoods and renovate, rather than move.” “The renovation division is really hot,” Sokolon agrees. “We’ve offered some new innovative products that they have to pick from, we have a great reputation with the public, and the leads that we track are record breaking over the last number of years. Put all that together and we’re going to get more than our fair share of the pie.” Supreme’s renovation business also partners with the Better Business Bureau – which rates Supreme as an A+ – as

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

a speaker for its series on how to hire a good contractor. “We’re involved with that to help Calgarians identify quality contractors,” says Sokolon. The second business division, comprising about 30 per cent of Supreme’s business, is the new home construction division. These customers include new home builders and contractors in Calgary and the surrounding areas. The third division is Supreme’s dealer network, which provides about 20 per cent of the business. “These are dealers in rural Alberta,” explains Sokolon. “For example, Home Hardware. Customers in rural Alberta can order a locally-made product and we will ship the product to the dealer.” “We pretty well cover most of the province of Alberta,” MacKenna apprises. She highlights Supreme’s customer-care policies, including its warranties: “We have an industryleading warranty. Our 50-year history of providing quality products gives people the confidence to know that if something does happen, we’ll be here to take care of it.” Supreme’s warranty is a complete two-year warranty and up to 20 years product replacement warranty. “But we’re not cut and dry on warranty issues,” she qualifies. “Let’s say a customer calls us 15 years later about a broken latch. We’ve always told the service coordinator that we have to give back, do a little bit extra. So go drop off the handle – it goes a long way. There’s warranties on paper and there’s what we actually do.” MacKenna has the same attitude when it comes to Supreme’s 75 employees, 43 of whom work in the plant. “You have to treat people fairly and be good to them,” she opines. “If you look after them and treat them well, people stay.” She credits Grant for the longevity of many plant employees. Indeed, Supreme has many long-term employees in both the plant and office. MacKenna views them as a major asset. “For the manufacturing and production lines, the consistency of having the same people in place – we’ve got people 35, 30, 25 years – makes a big difference because they know the product inside and out. They can look at it and realize that something isn’t going together properly and pick out quality issues.” She makes a point to know her employees’ names, to chat with them and help them out when needed. “We look after them,” she says, “and it goes a long way.”


SAFEGUARDING THE VIEW // COVER

In return, Supreme’s employees work hard. They also spread the word. “There are many examples of people who have brought their spouse over, and then maybe their child, and their brothers and sisters,” says Sokolon. “We have two salesmen who are father and son, and many people in the plant who are related.” “We’re in the business of manufacturing windows and doors but at the end of the day, I view it as a family business, even though we’re not all related,” says MacKenna. “We have to make the right decisions for 75 families – so we can continue to employ people, hire new people and innovate with new products.”

typically raise about $140,000 that day and all the money goes to the program,” MacKenna says. For Supreme, the future is full of possibility and growth. “Our strategic vision for the future is to grow and expand our network in rural Alberta and then into B.C., Saskatchewan and potentially the U.S.,” Sokolon reveals. “We also see growing the renovation division by hiring more staff. And then it’s just a matter of adjustments to the number of shifts in the plant to accommodate more new home builders. All three pillars of business can be expanded on.”

Local, quality-focused, service-oriented and communityShe views her responsibilities as extending beyond Supreme minded, Supreme provides far more to Calgary than first-rate too, to the local community. A cause near to MacKenna’s heart windows and doors. No wonder it’s doing so well. is the Rotary Club of Calgary South Stay-in-School scholarship fund, of which Supreme has been the lead sponsor since inception 18 years ago. The fund provides financial support to four Grade 6 students (two boys and two girls from Sherwood and Falconridge schools) chosen each year, who have limited McMillan LLP is pleased to welcome Cameron Schepp and family financial resources, to attend Paul Barbeau to the Calgary office. Joining our nationally post-secondary institutions. “They’re mentored all the way through the program by Rotarians,” smiles MacKenna. “And when I see kids who have gone through the program and graduated, there are so many hugs and accolades and they’re tickled pink because they never thought they’d have an opportunity to go to university. It’s such a great feeling to be able to give back to the community in that way.”

established securities and capital markets group, Cameron and Paul bring extensive experience in corporate finance, mergers & acquisitions, corporate governance and securities regulation. With excellent knowledge of the Alberta market, they look forward to providing legal services to current and future clients.

As the lead sponsor, Supreme takes part in a golf tournament every year in support of the fund. “We Vancouver | Calgary | Toronto | Ottawa | Montréal | Hong Kong | mcmillan.ca

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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THE IT REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHONOLOGY

THE IT REVOLUTION AI AND IOT ARE DISRUPTING TODAY’S WORKPLACES, AND CALGARY BUSINESSES ARE LEADING THE CHARGE BY JAMIE ZACHARY

I

t’s being dubbed as the third Industrial Revolution. The combined concepts of artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things (IoT) – machines and big data simplifying some tasks while taking over others – are changing the world around us.

“It’s the most important thing we are doing right now. Everything hinges around this,” says Winsor. “Machines are showing they’re capable of doing just about anything. Our challenge is not whether we do this. It’s coming, regardless. It’s how we handle it.”

Activities that used to take hours now take seconds. Operations that used to cost billions now cost millions or even thousands. Professions with high-mortality rates are now safer than ever.

Narrow AI, as Winsor refers to it, is the programming of machines to do individual tasks better than humans. IoT, meanwhile, is about reaching back to grab data that becomes information that becomes knowledge that becomes wisdom – good decisions based on facts rather than just on political ideologies or wild guesses.

The proliferation of AI and IoT in today’s society, while intimidating to some, was inevitable, especially as we looked to do things, better, faster and more efficiently, says Robin Winsor, CEO and president of Cybera, a Calgary-based not-for profit technology accelerator that oversees the development and operations of Alberta’s cyberinfrastructure.

“When you put it into that context, you can see the further you can go with the IoT, the better you can instrument everything from fridges to bicycles,” says Winsor. “If you’re constantly driving by looking in the rear-view mirror, you have a bit of a problem when it comes to trying to drive well. ABOVE: CIRCLE CARDIOVASCULAR HAS DEVELOPED CVI42, WHICH IS A CARDIOVASCULAR POST-PROCESSING SOFTWARE USED TO VIEW AND ANALYZE CMR AND CCT IMAGES IN A MATTER OF SECONDS. PHOTO SOURCE: CIRCLE CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING INC.

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THE IT REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHONOLOGY

What you want is to be able to look out of the windshield instead. That’s what IoT does for you.” Many Calgary businesses are already leading the charge when it comes to AI and IoT. Circle Cardiovascular Imaging Inc. is making waves in the health-care industry by using deep learning and big data to provide physicians with the tools to more quickly and accurately diagnose complex cardiovascular disease. The company has developed cvi42, which is a cardiovascular post-processing software used to view and analyze CMR and CCT images in a matter of seconds. “We cut the time radiologists needed to read the scan, localize the heart and calculate the volume of blood flow from 20 minutes to less than one minute,” says Alireza Sojoudi, engineering manager of advanced technologies at Circle Cardiovascular, noting cvi42 is already being used in more than 800 hospitals in 40 different countries. “Cardiologists used to have to go through images one by one to localize the blood flow. It was a manual time-consuming process. So we trained the system using artificial intelligence. We collected millions of images and then trained the AI.”

Meanwhile, Calgary-based White Whale Analytics has dived into the deep end of the data pool and come out in three short years with partnerships in health and wellness, defence, oil and gas, aviation and even a collaboration with the National Hockey League. Co-founded in July 2015 by Peter Guo and Robert Mereau, the nine-person company specializes in machine learningbased optimization solutions. It currently offers industrialscale cloud-based dashboarding and optimization software, and is looking to deploy a first-of-its-kind AI management consultant capable of natural-language interaction and autonomous problem solving. When it comes to IoT, Guo says businesses get value if they do three things right: collect their data, analyze and extract value from it and then share with others what they’ve learned. That’s where White Whale comes in. CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

Sojoudi believes AI is a gamechanger for the health-care industry. Medical imaging is growing; the number of scans is increasing by the hour. Yet the number of technicians trained to read those images has plateaued. AI is giving health-care professionals access to timely information, which, in turn, is improving patient care, he says. “We are seeing improvements that are making a difference between life and death,” says Sojoudi.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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where conductive wires are layered in rows and columns on two parallel sheets of glass and voltage is then applied sequentially to the rows and columns. Wherever the screen is touched by a finger (or touch pen), the controller identifies the change in capacitance in the grid of wires. While this technology allows for multiple touchpoints, ‘noise’ and unintended touch inputs can still “The use of be a problem. touchscreen

Interactivity has become the norm for life today; think about it… touchscreens are everywhere - one may even be in your hand right now! Phones, tablets, ticketing machines, even your local ATM are all running some sort of interactivity! But, applying touchscreen technology to large screens is more difficult; which is why we look at trusted professionals to recommend, provide and install the proper solution for every need.

monitors enhances presentations in boardrooms, increasing attention and engagement, and bringing a new level of control.”

Let’s take a look at how ordinary captive touchscreens work. The easiest way to make a capacitive touch screen is to coat one side of the screen with a transparent conductive layer, such as indium tin oxide. A small voltage is applied to the four corners of the screen and this creates a uniform electric field. When a human finger (or touch pen) touches the other side of the glass the device’s controller can determine the location of the touch from the change in the capacitance as measured from the change in voltage in the four corners of the panel.

This technology is fine for small screens and simple applications, which only need one touch at a time. When it comes to the traditional large format touchscreens, the typical technology used is based on infrared (IR), but this technology introduces latency issues that can be distracting to the user.

Sharp is combating these problems with their new professional-class interactive whiteboards which enhance the Projected Capacitive Touch technology with an advanced controller and faster sampling techniques. This achieves high sensitivity and precision by reducing the noise level to one-eighth of conventional models.

Touch accuracy is improved, unintended and false inputs are almost completely eliminated, and latency (time lag) is virtually eliminated. With up to ten simultaneous touch points, this technology delivers a natural and fluid experience for effortless collaboration and communication and sharing. These models include face-up installation! The screens are available in both 70” and 80” and are rated for 24/7 usage. To see a demonstration of this latest technology, contact Matrix Video Communications in Calgary at 403-640-4490 or visit www.mvcc.ca

Recently, we have been introduced to a new technology called Projected Capacitive Touch (PCT or PCAP). This is *Awards belong to model PNL705H


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Are Calgary’s Businesses Prepared for New Mandatory Privacy Breach Notifications?

C

anadian businesses are facing a perfect storm of new notification regulations, rampant data breaches, escalating cyberattacks and inadequate cybersecurity defences. Customers, investors, employees and regulators will judge how you respond.

In an update to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), new regulations come into force on November 1, 2018. These regulations mandate notifications “as soon as feasible” of security breaches which have a “real risk” of identity theft, humiliation, financial loss, or harm to reputations and relationships. Cybercriminals have stolen billions of personal and corporate passwords, now for sale on the Dark Web. From LinkedIn to MyFitnessPal, from Equifax to Facebook, mass breaches are snowballing. It isn’t just the big players who are hit. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are soft targets for ransomware, social engineering, data theft and espionage. The CIRA reported that last year 19 per cent of businesses suffered ransomware and 32 per cent had divulged personal information through a phishing attack. Organizations must step up their ability to detect, assess and respond to cybersecurity incidents. That is a big ask. Detection involves complex tools and systems to sift through a mountain of events and logs. Advanced skills are needed to triage and investigate alerts. It takes time and effort to develop and test response plans. A thorough incident investigation demands forensics experience. Most IT departments and IT service providers do not have the time, budget or human resources to develop the expertise and systems to address today’s cybersecurity challenges. In the “always on, always connected” world we live in, if detection and response is not 24-7, it’s not very useful. Fortunately, there are options. Managed security services offer a shortcut to maturity. Cybersecurity competency was once the exclusive domain of large enterprises. Now, managed security service providers have stepped up to fill the void. For example, F12.net recently announced Dark Web Monitoring and F12 Secure solutions designed for businesses with between 25 and 250 people. Where should a concerned business leader start? A third-party security assessment will arm you with analysis of your security posture, will alert you to “weak links” and will advise you of steps to take.

See Our Video Online at www.f12.net


What’s your weakest link? Your business depends upon keeping your intellectual property and sensitive client data secure. But is it? Problem is, you only need one weak link in your security for the bad guys to get in. What’s the weak link in your Cybersecurity?

Call 1-833-F12-SAFE to book your security assessment and find your weakest link.


THE IT REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHONOLOGY

“THAT’S WHAT WE DO. WE DESIGN WORKFLOWS THAT CLEAN THE DATA, BUILD ALGORITHMS AND THEN CONVERT THAT DATA INTO SHARABLE FORMS.” ~ PETER GUO “If companies can do those three things, they can get tremendous value out of their data and make their business a lot more efficient and profitable,” says Guo, who is cofounder, algorithms, for White Whale. “That’s what we do. We design workflows that clean the data, build algorithms and then convert that data into sharable forms.” Mereau, co-founder, business, adds in the age of information overload, a level of automation can be a good thing – it helps with cognitive processing. In White Whale’s case, they help companies visualize the massive amount of data that’s part of the day-to-day work, which, in turn, helps with mundane tasks. Businesses today cannot be successful moving forward without IoT strategies, says Mereau. He points to knowledge retention as a significant problem as baby boomers continue to leave the workforce – and, in doing so, taking a lot of that institutional knowledge with them. “This where IoT and AI comes in – it’s a way to formalize some of the experiences and learnings from the past so people in the future can quickly learn without having to go through the same linear time scale,” says Mereau, who says the growth potential for White Whale is unlimited – so much so he expects it be a billion-dollar company within 10 years. Steve Liang agrees IoT is unprecedented in its applications. Liang is associate professor at the Schulich School of Engineering at the University of Calgary and founder and CEO of SensorUp, a Calgary-based startup whose mission is to make IoT open and interconnected. He believes IoT can give businesses unprecedented visibility into their data, and, with the proper algorithms in place, the ability to eliminate inefficiencies – whether that’s reducing downtime or improving safety.

“You don’t service equipment before or after they need to. You service them at the right time,” says Liang. “When you have real-time visibility into your data, you can make decisions at the right time. Our platform gives companies that visibility.” SensorUp is using SensorThings API’s open standards for a non-proprietary system that aggregates sensor information into one cloud platform. It was a part of Creative Destruction Lab Rockies at the Haskayne School of Business, a seed-stage program for massively scalable, science-based companies. Liang recently returned from meetings with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Department of Homeland Security about the applications of SensorUp’s platform. JPL is already using IoT to collect data on temperatures, gases and other danger signals to predict flashes during fires and to safely guide firefighters. Sensors worn by firefighters wirelessly talk to one another, including a firefighter’s GPS location, heat, presence of dangerous chemicals and gases, drone images and more. ABOVE: FROM LEFT, PETER GUO, CO-FOUNDER, ALGORITHMS, AND ROBERT MEREAU, CO-FOUNDER, BUSINESS, WITH WHITE WHALE ANALYTICS. PHOTO SOURCE: WHITE WHALE ANALYTICS

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THE IT REVOLUTION // BUSINESS TECHONOLOGY

“YOU DON’T SERVICE EQUIPMENT BEFORE OR AFTER THEY NEED TO. YOU SERVICE THEM AT THE RIGHT TIME. WHEN YOU HAVE REALTIME VISIBILITY INTO YOUR DATA, YOU CAN MAKE DECISIONS AT THE RIGHT TIME. OUR PLATFORM GIVES COMPANIES THAT VISIBILITY.” ~ STEVE LIANG

“Our role is to aggregate all that data to help predict what is going to happen. And by doing so, we are starting to truly unleash the power of that data,” says Liang. Winsor says AI and IoT is not a distant concept – it’s here today. The Alberta Machine Intelligence Institute at the University of Edmonton is already training its AIs to pass both the Canadian and Japanese bar exams. And jurisdictions around the world are allowing AIs to become directors of corporations. Four years ago, Japanese venture capital firm Deep Knowledge became the first to name an AI to its board of directors.

“Does that mean we could have an oil and gas company with at least some of the board made up of AIs that have the ability to make unemotional decisions about how to buy a piece of land?” asks Winsor. “You could have, with today’s technology, a fully artificial oil company that replaces traditional roles. And what would that mean for a city like Calgary? That’s not way down the road. We could put one of those together now. “This one isn’t optional. The future is coming. You either get on board or you will get run over by it.”

ABOVE: STEVE LIANG, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AT THE SCHULICH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY AND FOUNDER AND CEO OF SENSORUP. PHOTO SOURCE: SCHULICH SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY

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THE POPULATION REBOUND // REAL ESTATE

THE

POPULATION REBOUND

THE YEAR SO FAR AND WHAT LIES AHEAD IN 2019 BY JOHN HARDY

C

algary’s real estate market has always been a reliable indicator of the local economy. However, this year, according to the Calgary Real Estate Board’s 2018 Mid-Year Forecast, there is a bit of an anomaly between Alberta’s rebounding economy and the recovery of the local real estate market. The report shows that, by the numbers, Alberta had the fastest growing economy in 2017 – employment has started to improve and recent net migration numbers are encouraging. But, for various reasons, the real estate market recovery does not seem as brisk as some have hoped and expected. According to Ann-Marie Lurie, CREB’s knowledgeable chief economist, the Calgary economy has not yet reached the levels of pre-recession activity. In addition, job growth opportunities have shifted and employment gains have not occurred in traditional sectors.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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THE POPULATION REBOUND // REAL ESTATE

“DUE TO THE STRESS TEST, SALES ARE DOWN BY 13 PER CENT, YEAR-OVERYEAR, BUT QUARTER-TO-QUARTER SALES HAVE INCREASED.” ~ TRENT EDWARDS

The CREB numbers also show that higher lending rates and stricter qualifications are preventing some first-time buyers from transitioning to the ownership market, while also impacting the ability of existing homeowners to move up to a higher price point. The roller-coaster that is the Calgary real estate market is affected by various key factors like consumer confidence, the (not so new) Canadian mortgage rules, affordability, migration, and supply and demand. The CREB report, which tracks MLS listings and sales, has crunched numbers to explain that Calgary home sales have eased more than anticipated in the first half of 2018, as economic conditions did not improve enough to offset changes in the lending market. The report shows that while inventories did rise, the oversupply resulted in downward pressure on pricing across all product types. For this second half of the year, CREB expects the economic recovery to gain further traction, helping to limit the pull back in demand, but still cautions that it is unlikely to be enough to offset the declines from the first portion of the year. The guesstimates indicate that total Calgary MLS sales activity will likely decline by 9.7 per cent (to 17,047 units), a downward revision from CREB’s previous forecasted levels. Prices are expected to ease by 1.17 per cent across the city, with expected declines ranging from 2.5 per cent in the apartment sector to nearly one per cent in the detached sector. “It has been an interesting year for the Calgary home market,” says Trent Edwards, COO for Alberta with Brookfield Residential Properties. “Some segments are flourishing even with the new rate changes and there is continued economic uncertainty. Calgary’s multifamily new home market increased by 28 per cent in the second quarter of 2018 and the luxury home market has seen an uptick as well. “Due to the stress test, sales are down by 13 per cent, year-over-year, but quarter-toquarter sales have increased. We have also noticed a consumer confidence increase and more traction in the market over the past four months.”

ABOVE: TRENT EDWARDS, COO FOR ALBERTA WITH BROOKFIELD RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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THE POPULATION REBOUND // REAL ESTATE

“THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT: 2018 HAS BEEN A CHALLENGING YEAR. THE CALGARY AND ALBERTA ECONOMY MAY BE RECOVERING BUT IT’S STILL VERY SLOW.” ~ SHANE WENZEL

When it comes to the real estate market, as with most aspects of Calgary’s recovery, it likely is not happening as fast as many would like to see. “It will take a while for consumers to adjust to the rate of economic recovery and new mortgage rules,” he adds. “Once people have had an opportunity to re-evaluate what is feasible, we will start to see them enter the market.” Shane Wenzel, president of Shane Homes, is realistic. “There’s no doubt about it: 2018 has been a challenging year. The Calgary and Alberta economy may be recovering but it’s still very slow. Investment into the city and province have to improve before this cycle can accelerate. Until then consumers are cautious. “Homebuyers have had challenges over the last year with qualifying under new mortgage rules set out by Ottawa. I think regional solutions would have been better to counteract some out-of-control markets in Canada. Hopefully, after a short period of time, these conditions will be relaxed as confidence is still shaky in our marketplace.” Lurie notes, “Two years of recession left us with excess supply in all aspects of the housing market. And consumer confidence continues to be impacted by concerns about Alberta’s prospects and how much more this circumstance could influence housing prices, particularly now with elevated inventories.” Tracking the second half of the year, she points out Calgary’s rebounding migration and population growth stats are gradual but encouraging positives. “It’s actually turning out to be a positive surprise. Last year, the bleak migration forecast was for around 2,000 migrants. It turned out to be 11,000. That’s nowhere near the numbers Calgary used to have but it’s definitely an improvement. Let’s just say we’re cautiously optimistic about next year.” Many homebuilders and area real estate professionals agree that any detailed analysis and the forecasting of Calgary’s real estate market gets a bit murky when it comes to the impact on actual 2018 real estate numbers and the trending for 2019. While essentials like consumer confidence, migration and the economy continue as crucial real estate market variables, Calgary housing starts and resales are much influenced by the vital real estate factor of affordability.

ABOVE: SHANE WENZEL, PRESIDENT OF SHANE HOMES.

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THE POPULATION REBOUND // REAL ESTATE

Edwards emphasizes, “Affordability is always top of mind for our industry. There is no growth without affordability. Our goal is to work with the city to maintain affordability and choice for consumers, so people can live where they want and love where they live. “A focus on maintaining affordability for consumers is key, especially with a challenging economy. Calgary city council recently approved the development of 14 new communities, meaning more jobs in construction and retail, and better choice and affordability for consumers.” Wenzel underscores that the “affordability factor” goes beyond prices and market values. “Affordability is always important to the consumer, especially when qualifying is a challenge. Alberta incomes aren’t rising and if the consumer can’t qualify for what they want in a home then they tend to stay where they’re at. Like any market, consumer spending has to happen or we stagnate economically.” Lurie cautions against expecting an overly gung-ho Calgary real estate market recovery. “There is excess supply in the market. The pattern has been that sales have come down while inventories have risen. It causes prices to trend down. “Before prices can recover, the market must get rid of excess supply. Time will tell how long it takes Calgary to get closer to a balanced supply/demand market.” Despite all the professional strategizing and forecasting, ultimately it comes down to the consumer. “We expect the mood for 2019 will be similar to 2018,” Edwards guesstimates according to real estate numbers and trends. “It’s evident that consumer confidence is increasing as net migration increases, the economy begins to stabilize and more developments are approved. Next year will see more product choice for consumers at different price points which will also help spark activity. “Along with buyers getting more comfortable with the economic conditions and the continuation of stable economic growth, there will be two very important elections at the federal and provincial level, as well as positive news coming out of the oil and gas sector,” he points out. Wenzel shares the realistic optimism. “I see a little more light at the end of the tunnel in 2019. Municipally, we seem to have a very pro-business council which is great for economic recovery. We also have a provincial election on the horizon and think we’ll see some changes in the status quo. That may spark some more confidence no matter the outcome, and improve our economy at a more accelerated pace.” “Our economy and industry are resilient,” Edwards notes with enthusiasm, “and we are confident that with all of the positive events happening, next year will be positive for Calgary’s real estate market and consumers.”

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Celebrates 10 YEARS

Chris Corriveau, Anthony De Almeida and Kevin Graham. Photo by Riverwood Photography Inc.

STONEWATER GROUP

by Rennay Craats

T

he key to a quality home is a good foundation, and Stonewater Group’s foundation is as solid as they come. The flagship company, Stonewater Homes, has become synonymous with custom luxury homes in Calgary since its inception in 2008, and managing partners Kevin Graham and Chris Corriveau built on its reputation for

Congratulations Stonewater!

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high-quality products and unbeatable service with its foray into commercial construction and project management four years ago. “After many years of success, Stonewater Developments was created using the construction background and experience of Kevin and Chris and my experience in the development, real estate and finance side. We have a well-rounded management team,” says newest managing partner Anthony De Almeida. The two divisions work together seamlessly. They use the relationships with trusted trades and suppliers that the team has forged over the years on the homes side to facilitate growth in commercial construction, land development and multi-family projects on the developments side. The result is exponential growth on both sides, further solidifying Stonewater’s place as a leader in the industry. Stonewater Homes has branched out into building acreage properties around Calgary as well as new homes in Canmore, all the while helping clients build custom vacation homes in such areas as Kelowna and Vancouver. With the recession loosening


its grip, clients are starting to pull the trigger on their custom build or renovation projects. “We are getting a lot more interest outside of the city to build a Stonewater product. Our reputation has exceeded the city limits,” says Corriveau. The Stonewater brand is growing and reaching beyond Calgary on the developments side as well. In the past few years, the company has evolved into a provider of large multi-family projects and industrial and agricultural projects including warehouses and equestrian stables. Stonewater Developments is currently in the planning stages of a 94-unit assisted-living project in Calgary along with a 32-lot custom residential neighbourhood near Edmonton.

honesty to ensure clients are aware of what is going on, from schedules to material costs to coordinating the trusted trade partners and design teams. “Building a house is a huge undertaking and we want to make sure the client understands it all and that they are happy with the process,” says Graham. And Stonewater clients are truly happy. They have an incredible one-of-a-kind home that was built on time and on budget by a group of professionals who are as invested in the outcome as are their clients. For 10 years, Stonewater has been dedicated to providing Calgary customers with custom builds and renovations, and as its brand continues to grow, more commercial and residential clients will see why Stonewater Group is the only choice for custom luxury builds and developments.

“It’s a sought-after golf community that we’re co-developing, building and marketing,” says De Almeida of the Edmonton project. No matter if the project is a luxury custom home or a commercial property, Stonewater Group applies the same high standards to every build. As a boutique shop, Stonewater gets to know clients well to make certain that their needs are met. The management team is accountable and accessible throughout the process, guaranteeing transparency and

9504 Horton Rd SW Calgary, AB T2V 2X4 Ph 403.287.1100 • F 403.287.1166 www.swgroup.ca

Congratulations

Congratulations to Stonewater!

Stonewater!

We wish you many years of continued success.

10510 – 46th Street S.E. • 403-238-1100

pacificstone.ca @pacificstonefabrication

Serving Calgary and Western Canada for over 30 Years

Celebrating 30 years!

#8002 – 11500, 35th Street SE

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CONGRATULATIONS STONEWATER!

FLOORS WE CAN BOTH BE PROUD OF. 403.255.8207 | hrd-wood@shaw.ca | heritagehardwood.ca

Stonewater • 10 Years


THANK YOU

to the generous sponsors of JA Southern Alberta’s 2018 Alberta Business Hall of Fame - Southern Alberta Gala LEAD SPONSOR

Governors’ Announcement Luncheon Sponsor

General Reception Sponsor

Selection Partner Sponsor

Laureate Video Sponsor

Alumni of Influence Award Sponsors

Rural Regional Partner

Laureate Recognition Wall Sponsor

Sponsor

Executive Table Sponsors

Premier Table Sponsors Calgary Technologies Canadian Western Bank David and Barbara Johnson & Family Lawson Lundell LLP National Bank Financial Markets Pembina Pipelines RBC Capital Markets Torys LLP University of Alberta - Faculty of Engineering University of Calgary - Cumming School of Medicine Proceeds from the Alberta Business Hall of Fame will support JA programs & services that equip today’s youth with the skills to become tomorrow’s leaders. www.jasab.ca - www.south.abhf.ca

JA Southern Alberta A Member of JA Canada


Congratulations to the Nominees! KPMG People’s Choice Award Passion is what drives entrepreneurs, family businesses and fast-growing companies alike. It's also what inspires KPMG to help drive your success. Help us support Small Business Week Calgary and join the conversation #sbwyyc #kpmginyyc

kpmg.ca © 2018 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 21103 The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International.


We don’t stand still in Calgary. It’s simply not part of our DNA. We have a grit and determination that vibrates through our city, much like the first railroad did when we rallied for it almost 130 years ago. Our roots are deep which means our growth has no limits, and it is our job to nourish, power and inspire you and your businesses so you can nourish, power and inspire the world. This is no small feat, but we’re up for it, because together we are mighty and our mission to grow the business community means you are never alone. We are always by your side. You can count on us – to be your department of policy, connection, or advocacy. To be your biggest voice, to have your back, and to be your most trusted advisors. To double-down on commerce so you can grow. We’re not in it for ourselves, we are 100% member founded and funded, and we operate with your best interests at heart. We are relentless in our pursuit of relevance, of growth and of innovation. ‘It’s Grow Time’ is our new mantra. Our call to action. Our bottom line. And we want you to join us in this journey of looking to the future and committing to grow in whatever way makes a difference to you.

The Chamber is here for you. We are your Podium of Record – where you can come for trusted and valued business advice and advocacy. We are your innovation hub with our accelerator program Ignite. We support the next generation of business leaders with GenYYC in partnership with the Calgary Foundation. We give you a peer to talk to when you need one with CEO Peer Mentoring. We build a community of likeminded business owners and all are welcome. Join us on this journey. It’s grow time.

Sandip Lalli Calgary Chamber President and CEO.


Your business is vital to Calgary. Calgary is extraordinary. A city of entrepreneurs, scientists and dreamers with a spirit like nowhere else on earth. Business has helped make Calgary an incredible place to live and work, and the Chamber builds business. By advocating, educating, motivating and congregating, we power an environment where business can grow and the city can thrive. We’ve been building the businesses that build Calgary for 127 years. We can help you grow, too. Join us. | Find out more at calgarychamber.com


We are your department of... You are not alone. That sentiment has been at the very heart of the Calgary Chamber since before Calgary was even a city. In a community as dynamic, progressive and ever-changing as ours, we have always been stronger as one. Those words ring true every day on the sixth floor the Burns Building in Calgary—the home base of The Calgary Chamber—where our small but mighty team works to nourish, power and inspire your business. How do we do it? By listening to your needs and being your extended department of Making Things Work. Of Finding Answers. Of Connecting to a Mentor. Of Helping you Grow. Behind every call, every event, every point of view and every program at The Chamber is a team member who is dedicated to elevating your business through programs, connecting, and advocacy. And when we support your growth, we all win, because businesses help Calgary flourish.

They say success is 1% inspiration, and 99% perspiration. The Chamber helps with both. Because regardless of your size, growth does not come easy for any business. There are headwinds every business must manage – financing, finding the right people, regulations, taxes, new business – along with the considerable effort and expertise required just to operate the business. The Chamber is your Department of Whatever You Need. Join us. It’s Grow Time.

This team is ready to grow as the Chamber launches a new initiative to nourish, power and inspire Calgary business to new heights.


Sunterra powers Calgary as a Chamber member.

It’s like having your own Department of Getting an Edge. Chamber membership gives you access to a team of people who want you to grow and succeed as much as you do. Join us. | Find out more at calgarychamber.com


Nourish. Power. Inspire. The Chamber’s purpose is to build a business community that nourishes, powers and inspires the world. The programs we offer are world-class and will support you to grow your business. Ignite is a three-month program for business leaders who want to scale up their existing operations or kick start a new revenue stream. Participating companies walk away with a comprehensive and market tested strategic plan for their next steps.

GenYYC is a new leadership development program designed by the Calgary Chamber of Commerce and the Calgary Foundation. The goal of this program is simple: build great leaders, strong organizations and an engaged community. Participants will have the opportunity to better understand complex issues facing our city and be given a platform for envisioning how to address these challenges collectively.

CEO Peer Mentoring is designed for leaders of second-stage, growth-oriented companies who want to be part of a support network of likeminded business owners. Participants gain real-time feedback on sensitive business issues from their peers who are facing, or might have faced a similar issue.

Congratulations! Of the hundreds of applications received we are proud to announce the finalists for the 2018 Small Business Calgary Awards. ATB SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

COMPANY CULTURE

KPMG PEOPLE’S CHOICE

• Doodle Dogs Inc. • Fiasco Gelato • G.E.M. Inc. • Tool Shed Brewing Co. • William Joseph Communications

• Apex Massage Therapy Ltd. • BRITT Land & Engagement • Glacier • SPLICE Software • TWT Group

• Doodle Dogs Inc. • Fiasco Gelato • Neal’s Yard Remedies • RedBloom Salon • The Performance Studio

BDC EMERGING GROWTH

INNOVATION

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

• Burgundy Oak Group Ltd. • Cold Garden Beverage Company • Doodle Dogs Inc. • Virtual Gurus • Vog App Developers

• Complyworks Ltd. • FREDsense Technologies • Think Tank Innovations (ShareSmart) • VizworX Inc. • VEERUM

• CMNGD • InOrbis Corporation • Made Foods • MaxGreen Windows, Siding and Roofing • SwizzleSticks Salon Spa

Join us on Friday October 19 at our Small Business Calgary Awards Gala, hosted at Grey Eagle Resort, to celebrate the finalists and winners.


Imperial powers Calgary as a Chamber member.

It’s like having your own Department of Standing Up For Your Business. Whatever Calgary businesses need to grow – from attracting investment, finding new clients, dealing with government to staffing – we have people and programs to help. Join us. | Find out more at calgarychamber.com


CELEBRATING SMALL BUSINESS // SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

Celebrating SMALL BUSINESS

MUCH MORE THAN RECOGNITION BY JOHN HARDY

I

t’s harmless, unintentional and unfortunate but the public perception of “small business” is a misleading stereotype.

The misinformed cliché consciously or unconsciously doesn’t take “small business” as seriously as big business. The stereotype is fading and, some say, has been shattered. According to the Calgary Chamber, the majority of businesses in Alberta are small businesses. In fact, small businesses account for 95 per cent of all business activity in the province and are a driving force of the economy accounting for almost 30 per cent of Alberta’s GDP. From construction contractors and family-run restaurants to serial entrepreneurs and marketing firms, the province’s small businesses can be found in virtually every sector. And they are making a big impact. There are about 39 small businesses in Alberta for every 1,000 people, far exceeding the Canadian average of 31. “Small businesses are critical to Calgary’s economy,” says Phil Roberts, co-founder of Provision Analytics and chair

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of the Calgary Chamber. “In many instances in Calgary, small businesses have been an incubator of new ideas that bring innovation into our industries. I don’t think we can underestimate the importance of small businesses to a healthy Calgary economy.” Despite the gutsiness and the determined entrepreneurship that are often key aspects of small businesses, there is agreement, particularly in the Calgary business market, that the recent couple of years have been laced with small business speed bumps. “There are many challenges facing small businesses,” he points out. “Layered costs from all levels of government make it harder to do business, and the skills gap (the difference between the skills supplied by Calgary’s workforce and the skills required by businesses) is still very much present. “A survey by the Business Council of Canada showed that Alberta is the province where the skills gap is the most persistent. It presents a challenge for employers looking to fill critical positions as the economy improves.”


Small Business Week Calgary Evening with the Entrepreneurs #EEYYC Presented by McLeod Law LLP

McLeod Law is proud to sponsor Small Business Week Calgary for a sixth year. Celebrating the contributions of small and medium-sized businesses to the local economy is what Small Business Week is all about. A marquee event of Small Business Week Calgary, we are pleased to host this year’s Evening with the Entrepreneurs, featuring two local success stories: Pippa Blair and Neige Blair of Routine, and Wendy Coombs of Momentum Health, Evidence Sport and Spine, Innovative Sport Medicine. We invite you to join us for an evening of up-close and personal interviews with these three dynamic entrepreneurs who are leading the charge in redefining their industries from right here in Calgary. They will be putting it all on the table for you, sharing their unique stories, insights and lessons learned in business and how they have built successful companies.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 | 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm Studio Bell National Music Centre - Performance Hall

Wendy Coombs is an award winning serial entrepreneur in the healthcare sector. She is the owner of 12 clinics that offer 3 different healthcare models and 10 medical disciplines. Wendy has a passion for providing the best possible rehabilitation care services and mentoring other entrepreneurs.

Wendy Coombs

routine. N AT U R A L

D E O D O R A N T

Sisters-in-law Pippa Blair and Neige Blair are budding entrepreneurs and the co-founders of Routine Inc. What started in Neige’s kitchen 7 years ago has become Canada’s premier natural deodorant company, sold in 1000+ stores worldwide. They are creating products that defy conventions and enhance routines (pun intended)! Pippa Blair

To Register visit www.mcleod-law.com/events McLeod Law is the official law partner of:

Business Law | Litigation | Personal Client Services

Neige Blair


CELEBRATING SMALL BUSINESS // SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

Roberts highlights some extra repercussions of the Calgary downturn on area small businesses. “The last couple of years have been tough for all size of businesses. Some of which had been around for decades have closed their doors. The encouraging trend is that the economy is showing signs of improvement and the Calgary Chamber will continue to support the business community through all stages of the economic cycle. “We’re not out of the woods yet; there’s plenty of work ahead to improve access to markets, access to capital and access to skilled labour in an efficient rules-based economy that can attract the investment required for business growth.” A major boost and recognition for Calgary’s small businesses is all set for October 15-19, 2018. It is Calgary’s version of Small Business Week (SBW), a national recognition and networking opportunity for small businesses.

“Small Business Week gets bigger and better every year. This year, we’ll see innovation and business excellence from companies in every corner of the economy,” he says. “It will honour people who have put everything on the line to make their dream a reality, and companies that have grown to establish themselves as household names.” Although SBW includes many networking opportunities, two of the biggest events are the Expo and the Awards Gala, happening on the last two days of Calgary’s Small Business Week. The finalists have been announced and the winners will be congratulated on Friday, October 19, 2018 at the Awards Gala at the Grey Eagle Event Centre. Two award finalists are excellent examples of the entrepreneurial spirit of small business.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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CELEBRATING SMALL BUSINESS // SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

He underscores the importance, and the opportunities, of Calgary small business. “It is the lifeblood of Calgary’s economy. We have all seen and felt the effects of the oil and gas market slump. Too many eggs in one basket. “Small businesses offer diversification, employment and stability during challenging times, much like a large mutual fund comprised of many different companies spreading the risk while managing growth.” Kamphuis and his successful Calgary company are defining examples of small business determination and attitude. “Never give up! In the early days, I was told by industry professionals that what I was intending to manufacture using recycled crumb rubber could not be done. Had I listened to the naysayers, we would not be here today. I sought out positive people with like-minded vision to grow the business.”

Euroshield Calgary-based Global Environmental Manufacturing (G.E.M.) Inc. is the manufacturer of Euroshield® Recycled Rubber Roofing Products. The original Euroshield goal was an ingenious response to the overwhelming problem of what to do with the deluge of old tires clogging up landfills and dump sites. Nearly 20 years of research and much business savvy resulted in the creation of the company’s durable, greatlooking and environmentally-friendly green roofing systems. The innovative Calgary small business was founded by CEO Henry Kamphuis who is a testimonial about the unique dynamics of small business. “All businesses have to start somewhere and Euroshield started in my garage. Ultimately, success and growth boils down to how well the small business meets or exceeds the needs of consumers,” he says with enthusiasm and pride. “In that sense, I think Euroshield defines small business, with the opportunity to become a world leader in sloped rubber roofing.”

Kamphuis is gratified that Euroshield is a Calgary SBW Award finalist. “It’s a terrific feeling of pride that comes from recognition of our hard work and team effort producing Euroshield products and contributing to our local economy on many levels. It’s a vote of confidence that what we do matters and we are making a difference in the world, regardless of how small.”

Burgundy Oak Burgundy Oak is a truly unique Calgary-based small business. It is creative. It is rustic. It is craft. It has struck a popular consumer chord and it is successful. Burgundy Oak is an 8,300-square-foot manufacturing facility where artisan woodworkers handcraft and create oneof-a-kind decor and furniture – from reclaimed Okanagan and Napa Valley wine barrels. Burgundy Oak founder and CEO Joel Jelinski was a quick study and thrives on the opportunities (and challenges) of being a small business. “Day-to-day operational issues and scalability bottlenecks experienced by a small business are amplified in the early stages of growth,” he says with

ABOVE: EUROSHIELD CEO, HENRY KAMPHUIS.

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It’s all about the experience.


// SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

Digital Marketing:

Small budget, big results! Being able to do more with less has become essential in the world of digital marketing. Here are 3 tips on how to optimize your digital marketing strategies to ensure they provide great results:

1. Demographics & Optimization Digital marketing is an extremely valuable advertising channel due to the amount of data that can be pulled from a campaign. The gender, age, interests and engagement of your target audience can be observed and recorded in order to allow you to properly optimize your content.

2. Tracking your Performance Coupled with the enhanced demographic information, the performance tracking aspect of digital marketing allows you to view the performance of your ads in real time. It allows you to customize and change your ads on the fly if you feel they’re under-performing.

3. Ready-to-Buy Customers Digital marketing platforms such as Yellow Pages Listings can help SMB owners to expand their reach, but also increase their significant interactions with potential customers. In fact, 66% of the 8 million Canadians people who visit YP sites and apps engage in a meaningful contact. Digital marketing provides you with incredible value, no matter your budget.

Learn more on how to harness the power of digital marketing, visit business.yellowpages.ca today!

positivity and experience. “Running a small business is often perceived to be simple and less complex than large corporations. In fact, it’s quite the opposite.” Jelinski admits that while the recent Calgary downturn was a broadside for businesses of all sizes, Burgundy Oak was not as affected as some. “If a small business is based in Calgary and its revenue is generated within the Calgary city limits, the downturn in the economy likely had a profound effect. For businesses like Burgundy Oak, we manufacture and distribute within Calgary as well as sell to clients all across Canada, so we don’t feel the speed bumps as substantially. “Small businesses in Calgary help with diversifying the economy. In a city that has heavily relied on oil and gas, the growth of small business helps to support emerging industries and overall economic growth. Small businesses often experience the same issues as a large company, but they don’t always have the resources or capital to solve them,” Jelinski adds. “We focus on building our company culture and telling stories. We are all young entrepreneurs and extremely passionate about our company. This passion extends to everyone in our company and is reflected in our product. “I am convinced that purpose, passion and perseverance are the underlying keys to success.”

ABOVE: BURGUNDY OAK FOUNDER AND CEO JOEL JELINSKI.

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BUYERS INVEST IN MEMORIES // RECREATION & INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE

BUYERS INVEST IN MEMORIES WITH RECREATIONAL PROPERTIES BY RENNAY CRAATS

C

algarians work hard, and now more than ever they are seeking a lifestyle balance that helps them to play hard too. One way some are achieving this is by purchasing recreational properties that allow them to enjoy their leisure time in a beautiful location that offers the activities and amenities they want most. And for the majority of recreational property buyers, what they want most is water. “We do our survey and look at recreational properties nationally and each year waterfront is the most popular,” says Elton Ash, regional executive vice president, Re/Max of Western Canada. Proximity to the water is a must, but recreational property buyers are selective and patient. They are willing to wait for the perfect home in the perfect spot to become available before making such a significant investment with their discretionary dollars. In a province like Alberta that has fewer lake locations than Ontario or British Columbia, demand is high for those waterfront properties. So is the

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price. A Royal LePage report on recreational properties stated that vacation property values in Alberta are expected to grow by 8.9 per cent in 2018, placing the average at more than $770,000. Homes in areas like Sylvan Lake and Canmore are driving the provincial demand and spiking the average, but Calgarians looking for a weekend getaway are exploring other options as well. Communities along such water bodies as Gull, Gleniffer, Pine and Pigeon lakes are offering great solutions to people looking for opportunities to get into recreational properties without breaking the bank. “People are buying lots in places like Gull Lake and Pine Lake,” says Rick Easthope, realtor with the McKelvie Group. “You can take a $20,000 trailer and live at the lake for the summer.” But many vacation homebuyers are looking beyond the September long weekend, seeking a place that is as appealing in the winter as it is in the summer. They are looking for short, easy commutes and access to activities all year.


// RECREATION & INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE

• office coffee services & “There are a lot of young families buying recreational properties so they are looking for biking, golfing, water sports, skiing. It’s about year-round usage,” says Easthope. And by being in close proximity to these playgrounds, Calgarians are able to get a lot of use out of their recreational properties. Jeff and Leslie Pakish bought their vacation spot on the northwest side of Gull Lake in 2012 for that very reason. At only 175 kilometres away, it’s drivable for a weekend or day trip, allowing their busy family to escape the city at the drop of a hat. “With two boys in hockey and our daughter in competitive dance, we find it hard to get there throughout the school year. The nice thing about living relatively close to the cabin is that if we can find a spare day we are able to head to the lake for a night or two. We spend our summers there, along with Christmas and spring break,” says Leslie Pakish. They take advantage of everything the area has to offer: boating and kayaking, playing on the beach, biking and walking the par-3 golf course in the summer; sledding and ice-fishing in the winter. Family time dominates the motivation behind acquiring a vacation property, whether that’s young families like the Pakishes raising their children at the lake or baby boomers seeking a retirement home or legacy property for their grandchildren. While gen-Xers and baby boomers are the demographics most interested in acquiring recreational properties, millennials are also entering the market in search of a better life-work balance. “We’re actually seeing that millennials are continuing to rent in the city and buying a recreational property as opposed to buying a principal residence,” says Ash. “They can work remotely out of that property in many instances, and it’s an opportunity to enjoy a better lifestyle.”

kitchen management

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They know where they want to eventually end up and decide to invest in the property that will get them there. This is true of many people buying second homes in coveted areas. Trailing-edge baby boomers in their 50s and early 60s from across the country are leading the market, buying property in areas like Vancouver Island and the Okanagan with the intention of eventually selling their primary residences and retiring in B.C. While B.C. areas like Invermere remain attractive to Calgary buyers because of the amenities and the manageable drive, other hot spots are cooling slightly this year as the market awaits the B.C. government’s speculation tax legislation this fall. The proposed tax intends to make housing more affordable by curbing foreign and out-of-province speculation by taxing foreign entities two per cent of the property value per year and Canadian owners from outside B.C. one per cent

Tragically Vital The Fresh Coffee Co. 4, 2807 - 107th Ave S.E. Calgary, AB T2Z 4M2 Tel: 403 686 6296 F: 403 474 5134 tragicallyvital.com

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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BUYERS INVEST IN MEMORIES // RECREATION & INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE

of the value. This has made Alberta buyers nervous about investing in the affected areas which include Vancouver, Victoria, Kelowna, West Kelowna, Nanaimo, Lantzville, Abbotsford, Chilliwack and Mission. “We’ve had buyers tell our realtors that they’ll wait and see what occurs this fall when the proposal goes to legislature but we’re still seeing strong demand and strong prices,” says Ash. The proposal doesn’t sit well with Alberta owners already in the area. David and Jennifer Vass’ vacation property on the west side of Okanagan Lake between Kelowna and Vernon has been in the family for the past 13 years, but they bought it out three years ago. Since then, they have spent a lot of time and money in the area in construction and renovation as well as recreation. “We love it – the beauty of the lake, the wineries, the weather. It’s paradise on earth,” David Vass says.

The family spends three months a year in the area, enjoying summer and Christmas break at their piece of paradise. They pay $1,800 per year in property taxes but they do so without complaint because they love and support the area. But the speculation tax is something else entirely. “We are fellow Canadians, and all of our extra money is going into the B.C. economy – restaurants, stores, construction contractors – and we hardly use any of the public services,” says Vass. “And now this new tax will be $10,000 per year on top of my property taxes. It’s a slap in the face and it would be disastrous for B.C. if it goes through.” Should the tax get approved as proposed, Vass and many other Albertans would see no other option than to sell their vacation places and find somewhere else to invest that isn’t targeted by the extra taxation. But the legislation is far from a done deal. A lawsuit filed against the government argues that the speculation tax is unconstitutional, as the Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees mobility rights to live and work anywhere in Canada as well as protects Canadians from government discrimination. While the lawsuit may not succeed, it would put pressure on the government to defend the proposal in court and, as owners and realtors are hoping, to retool it. Whether the speculation tax is enacted or not, it is still a good time for Alberta buyers to look for recreational properties. “The economy is starting to turn around and there’s a bit more confidence so people are starting to invest again,” says Easthope. And there’s nothing better to invest in than family memories built around a dream recreational property.

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DIGITAL VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE // EVENT PLANNING & CATERING

DIGITAL VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE

THE IMPORTANCE OF EVENTS

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BY ERLYNN GOCOCO

n a world ruled by technology, there’s no denying that faceto-face interactions are becoming few and far between. More companies are taking advantage of apps like Skype and Google Duo to conduct interviews or host large group meetings. Even in our personal lives, most of us tend to text or FaceTime to communicate with others. Events used to be one of the only ways to make meaningful connections with clients, and those clients looked forward to attending them. How important is it for businesses to ensure and maintain face-to-face interactions and how relevant and valuable are events in today’s digital age? According to Derek MacDonald, president and event producer at Boom Goes The Drum, “Face-to-face interactions are becoming more important. So many businesses and industries rely on having face-to-face interactions, not as a traditional way of meeting but more as a way to formalize

connections. We all know the difference between talking to a machine and talking to a real person. Business events are the same – things like CRMs (customer relationship management) and LinkedIn could never replace the connection created by a face-to-face interaction.” United Way of Calgary and Area president and CEO, Karen Young, agrees and says, “Bringing people together to solve complex social issues to improve local lives is what we do. Relationships and partnerships, we believe, are key to getting things done. Our mission of mobilizing communities for lasting social change enables us to bring people together in person and build a sense of common purpose. This allows us to probe deeply into issues through interactive conversations and questions, and energizes us to further our work as milestones and successes are recognized together.”

ABOVE: LOOK2016, EVENT PLANNED BY BOOM GOES THE DRUM. PHOTO SOURCE: PHIL CROZIER

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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Red Plate Catering Creates Food Excellence Through Experience Written by Alison Masniuk

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n the current economic state of Calgary’s culinary industry, the precedent for service excellence is higher than ever.

Combating minimum wage hikes against production costs, restaurants and food services are competing for consumers’ attention. The role of service sector leadership will be concentrated on managing expectations to provide not only quality food but quality service and customer convenience. When Calgarians are seeking out unique dining experiences, Red Plate Catering offers up dynamic and economically-viable options that work for not only the individual consumer but the business community as well. Red Plate’s team of culinary experts provide a variety of catering options; everything from artfully crafting delicate hors d’oeuvres to planning one-of-a-kind dinner menus.

The Red Plate team is committed to a full-service experience beyond the plate. They help customers dream up a theme, plan a menu, organize entertainment, select decor and even assist with equipment. Red Plate also offers team-building opportunities to help organizations make meaningful moments and memories to support growth and innovation.

Some signature favourites the culinary team serves up include Bison and Quail Egg Sliders, Lobster Ravioli and Savoury Creme Fraiche Macarons. Red Plate curates and customizes each menu for every occasion.

With the continued rapid expansion of East Village, foot traffic is increasing around Calgary’s downtown, and searching for venues that uphold a level of excellence and elegance in proximity can be a challenge.

The catering company works against the competitive costs of local competitors to provide immediate value to its guests while upholding an impeccable standard of culinary excellence.

Red Plate provides convenience for patrons not only around affordability but through accommodation, operating out of the Scotiabank Saddledome in the heart of East Village.

In addition to not only maintaining a fantastic inhouse experience, Red Plate offers off-site catering with superb cuisine selections that can be tailored for an intimate event or a celebratory occasion.

The venue is conveniently situated within walking distance of the city’s most exciting retail shopping, arts, culture and entertainment venues with complimentary parking.

From weddings and holiday mixers to social events, Red Plate is prepared to serve up a one-of-a-kind culinary experience that tantalizes tastebuds and leaves no detail untouched.

No matter how big or how small the occasion, Red Plate is setting a precedent for events with catering architects crafting the ultimate culinary experience for the Calgary community.

For more information, visit redplateevents.com.


We can’t wait to be a part of your next memory

redplateevents.com r e d p l a t e @ c a l g a r y f l a m e s . c o m | 403.777.4532


DIGITAL VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE // EVENT PLANNING & CATERING

For many businesses, face-to-face interactions will continue to be an important way to connect, regardless of how digital the world becomes. “It allows people to establish deeper connections through body language signals, facial expressions and hand gestures, rather than relying on audio or digital solutions alone. It creates efficiency in decisionmaking and problem solving and allows for direct lines of communication between both parties,” says Meredith Trueman, event director and partner at Bijou Events. And for businesses where the client’s financial well-being is at stake, face-to-face interactions are even more key to building trusting relationships. “Relationships are the foundation of our business at Raymond James,” says Christina Chow, financial adviser and member of the Raymond James Canada Foundation Advisory Committee whose role is to help facilitate philanthropic efforts and events across the firm. Events create networking opportunities for advisers at Raymond James, something that would not be possible virtually. “Networking opportunities and personal, genuine interactions with our clients still matters. You can’t build

those types of relationships virtually or digitally. We have our clients’ financial well-being first and foremost in mind. Faceto-face interactions help to build trust and an understanding of their financial goals. It’s too easy to misinterpret an email and very impersonal over an app like FaceTime.” Event professionals, says MacDonald, are becoming very sophisticated at designing events for the specific purpose of creating interaction and sparking new connections. “The use of technology format and social media are all areas where planners are getting really good at designing environments ABOVE: HASHTAG AWARDS, EVENT BY BOOM GOES THE DRUM. PHOTO SOURCE: NEIL ZELLER PHOTOGRAPHY

BELOW: 2016 VERSATILE DEALER MEETING, EVENT BY BIJOU EVENTS. PHOTO SOURCE: BIJOU EVENTS

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DIGITAL VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE // EVENT PLANNING & CATERING

that spark new connections and facilitate meaningful interactions between attendees for this exact purpose.” Young says, “Bringing people together who have a common concern or purpose from across a continuum of services and walks of life ignites passion, compassion and new ideas. Events build affinity not just with our organization, but with our city, our communities and our residents.” Trueman echoes Chow’s comments and says events allow people to connect in person and therefore help to establish trust and transparency. She adds, “Events allow the client to control their brand and the message they want to send to their audience. It gives a company the ability to showcase their product or service with context and have staff on site to walk a potential client through their brand. Beyond increasing brand awareness, it leaves a potential client with a positive impression that your company is willing to give a personal touch in an increasingly digital world.” MacDonald believes the value of live events is growing more than ever. “Most large brands are moving towards including live or experiential communications tactics as a way to have people experience their message. Whether it is for sales and marketing, employee engagement, relationship building or just being in control of the tone and messaging of their brand, many organizations are now blending their digital communications efforts with live events. “We all know that feeling of ‘you just had to be there.’ But the exciting thing is that organizations are thinking about their investment in live events as a way to fulfil their digital goals and vice versa. Events can now go beyond the live moment and reach a digital audience,” says MacDonald. Young adds, “In today’s business environment, we connect more digitally than ever before – emails, video chats, digital platforms, texts, social and more. Digital is a core part of how United Way is building the future of philanthropy. However, I believe this makes true, human, face-to-face interactions more, not less, important. For this reason, events are a strategic part of our work; they are rare windows of opportunity for real human connections in an increasingly digital world, and every minute in an event is an important moment to maximize those connections.”

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

In response to the digital era, Young proudly announces that United Way and Salesforce.org, the non-profit subsidiary of Salesforce, have partnered to create Philanthropy Cloud, a game-changing technology platform to advance social purpose “unlike anything else in the marketplace.” She explains, “Philanthropy Cloud does not replace the work we do – it enhances it. As a tool, it provides another medium for people to engage in ways they are most comfortable with.” Trueman understands face-to-face events will always be necessary, but she also points out that “digital meetings are becoming more important as they allow companies to connect with distance audiences and speakers from all over the world and provide a cost-effective alternative to having someone or everyone come together in one place.” Knowing this, Bijou Events plans hybrid events that use both digital and traditional methods. Hybrid events, according to Trueman, are very effective in reaching an extensive audience and provide attendees with both digital and face-to-face aspects. For Raymond James, events are beneficial for both the team and their clients. “Our event strategies bring advisers and clients together on a social basis. This assists in breaking down barriers and helps to get to know your client better,” says Chow. “People develop ‘felt memory’ around an experience in a way that they never could through a digital experience. So at a time when our digital experiences are becoming cluttered and ubiquitous, a live moment is refreshing and attention grabbing. But more importantly, finding ways to balance the digital and live experience that people are having is really effective to building meaningful connections,” explains MacDonald. Young says, “The relationships and networking within a room full of people committed to a common purpose is irreplaceable. However, we recognize that as the world of technology evolves, many people prefer to engage and network online. To successfully realize lasting social change, we need to harness the support of the entire community, including online communities so they too can be involved and support causes they care about.”


experience We invite you to

the Badlands Community Facility

A meeting or conference held in the unique atmosphere of the Badlands Community Facility, nestled along the Drumheller River Valley, is sure to motivate your team! Conveniently located next to the downtown district, the Badlands Community Facility is a multi-use venue featuring professional meeting rooms, elegant banquet halls and a variety of amenities to make your event enjoyable and successful. “We have our multipurpose rooms on our main floor, a great option for smaller breakout sessions of 25-60 delegates, registration or even a temporary office. Upstairs, we have our banquet hall that can be sectioned off into thirds. The halls can accommodate up to 450 people in a banquet style when fully open, then 150 in each third in a matter of minutes.”

“We are so fortunate to have this facility in Drumheller” says Erica Crocker, Marketing and Sales Officer for the Badlands Community Facility. “Though, our success comes from our staff. They have such pride in offering five-star service by going above and beyond whenever possible.” The Badlands Community Facility will celebrate its seventh birthday March 2019. Since the doors opened in 2012, it has hosted over 13,000 bookings between small meetings, large multi-day conferences, sporting events, weddings and all else in between. Recreational Facility

Two Level Fitness Center

Banquet Hall & Meeting Rooms

Library

Fully Stocked Commercial Kitchen State of the art AV Equipment Easy Loading Access

Full Field House

Art Gallery

Free Wifi for up to 400 devices

Digital Signage for agendas

Lobby with floor-to-ceiling windows

Terrace with panoramic views of the Canadian Badlands

For a quote or tour of the facility, please contact our Bookings and Customer Service Specialist (403) 823-1370 | bookings@dinosaurvalley.com www.badlandscommunityfacility.com


KEEPING PACE WITH TECHNOLOGY THE STORY OF ZONE 3 BUSINESS SOLUTIONS By Nikki Gouthro

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here’s no denying that we live in an accelerated world. In the blink of an eye, everything around us seems to get smarter, faster, more advanced. But despite the shift toward digital trends, there’s still one certainty – print is not going anywhere. While digital media is effective, it’s not always the best medium for the job. There’s still a demand for tangible materials like for instance real estate flyers, business cards, brochures, marketing material and everyday office printing. Reading the local newspaper just wouldn’t have the same appeal if you couldn’t spread it out on the kitchen table and browse through while sipping your morning coffee. If there’s one man who understands the importance of keeping pace with an evolving world and accommodating the demand for both print and digital technologies, it’s Darryl Graham. He’s been at the forefront of the technology sector for more than three decades. At a very young age, Darryl learned that increasing productivity, reducing costs and boosting efficiency were at the crux of any successful operation. It was growing up on his family’s farm in a small town near Drumheller that gave rise to his interest in business. “I was 23 when our son was born and made the decision to go back to school,” he says. “I enrolled in business administration at Mount Royal University. My wife helped put me through.” Hardwired for entrepreneurship, he wasn’t content just hitting the books. Before long, Darryl partnered with another business student named Glen Wong and the pair started a landscaping company. “We called it Pro College Cutters,” says Darryl. “We had six crews going at the time and actually won the Student Entrepreneur of the Year Award from the Calgary Herald.” After graduating in 1986, he retired from the landscaping business and landed a job in the technology field with a company then known as Minolta. With a penchant for sales and business development, Darryl quickly earned himself not only the title of top salesperson in the country, but also in North America, eventually leading to his role as branch manager.


Calgary’s Go-To Provider of single and multifunctional printers, wide-format printers, 3D printers, toners and supplies.

Photo by Riverwood Photography

“I was there for 23 years and learned everything I needed to start my own business,” he recalls. “I wanted to do it right. No mistakes.” When he made the decision to pursue his own dreams in 2009, he started from scratch with nothing but a vision – to personalize service, to carry inventory, to have a real person answer the phone and to offer same-day service calls. Darryl knew that if he did all these things well, he’d have a business model that beat the manufacturers. With the help of his two sons Olivier and Mitchell, Darryl opened the doors to Zone 3 Business Solutions. By 2011, business was booming and with the boom came the need for more space. So, when he and his team walked into the condo bay in the East Lake Industrial area, they knew it was “the one.” A front-end office and back-end warehouse would enable Zone 3 to provide what the growing customer base demanded. Nine years later and Darryl still vividly recalls his original business goals. He wanted to position Zone 3 as the top business solutions provider in the city, find the perfect space to set up shop, and be able to offer his customers in-house leasing options for the equipment he distributed which resulted in the formation of OLM Leasing. He was successful in reaching all these goals. Zone 3 Business Solutions is Calgary’s go-to provider of single and multifunctional printers, wide-format printers, 3D printers, toners and supplies. The newly-formed Z3 Networks is the IT solutions divi-

sion that handles business technology, software, IT security, on-site management and backup. The company that started below ground level has grown to become an industry leader and continues to expand. In April 2015, the company purchased Independent Business Systems, a Red Deer operation that had been in business since 1978. Just a few years later, the branch was nominated for “2018 Business of the Year.” Darryl is proud of the operation he built from the ground up. Both of his sons still work at Zone 3, so it truly is a family business. The thing he is most proud of, though, is not his ever-expanding business or list of loyal customers. It’s the culture of his workplace. “There’s no division between departments here,” he says. “Everyone is treated with respect, just like we treat our customers. I wanted this to be a pleasant place to work. Our employees are rewarded for their hard work in many ways including mini team vacations, social club activities and cash incentives.” The Zone 3 team are constantly reminded that they’re valued. CALGARY: 403-454-0119 RED DEER: 403-342-2580 E-MAIL:

Sales@Zone-3.ca

WEBSITE:

Zone-3.ca

Find Us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & LinkedIn


PRIORITY LEASING 25 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

PRIORITY LEASING

MARKS A QUARTER-CENTURY MILESTONE by Melanie Darbyshire supports a dozen underwriters. “More people understand that getting the equipment you need today, rather than saving until you can pay cash, will increase profitability right now,” Sands explains.

Celebrating 25 years in the equipment leasing business, Priority Leasing began as a family enterprise and remains one today. Founded in 1993 by Debbie Sands, Priority entered an emerging field: acting as a broker to facilitate equipment financing for businesses.

Lease terms depend on the client’s credit and lifespan of the equipment. “We try to accommodate the client as best as possible,” Sands says. “We make a lease payment fit within their budget and make sure they understand the tax advantages. We work with their goals.”

Three years after opening, Sands’ husband, Bob Wall, joined Priority. Also from the equipment leasing world, Wall’s credit, administration and financial strengths combined well with Sands’ sales, marketing and relationship proficiencies. “We started out of our house,” Sands recalls. “We had a couple of underwriters and our first salesman worked off the dryer! After our daughter turned two we found office space. We’ve worked together ever since.”

Applications can be found on Priority’s website and are assessed upon submission. “Through our underwriters, we have online credit processes,” she explains. “We can have an approval for a good client in 30 seconds. It might take longer if there’s no commercial credit information available, in which case, we’ll call the client for more details.”

Twenty-five years later, Priority has helped over 7,000 clients lease the business equipment they need. Today, it 96

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Photo by BOOKSTRUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

An endless variety of equipment is leasable: technology, automotive, medical, construction, office furniture, software and commercial kitchen equipment are just some examples. “We’re very creative,” Sands confirms. “I’ve leased several ambulances, including the equipment and drugs on the ambulance. It just has to make business sense.”

“The concept was quite new,” explains Sands, who had previously worked for a large single-source underwriter. “We act like the hub of a wheel. The spokes are: the clients who need the equipment, the vendor who sells the equipment and the underwriter with the money. We marry all the parties together.”


PRIORITY LEASING 25 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

As a broker, Priority offers the advantage of more choice. “If at first we get a decline, we can move on and determine where we’ll get approved,” she says. “We can also divide larger purchases among different underwriters. Clients are generally very grateful.”

Working with my husband has helped us both grow, and it’s been a huge blessing to have the business do so well.”

With three full-time and four part-time employees today, Priority also gives back to the community. It supports Hands at Work in Africa, a program for orphan children, as well as the Calgary Food Bank and Canadian Blood Services.

3615 9 St SE, Calgary, AB T2G 3C7 P: 403-216-1930 www.priorityleasing.net

Its purchase of Dental Leasing Options Inc. in June was an important addition, and Sands plans to grow that business by working with dental equipment vendors and dental clients. “The underwriters appreciate that business,” she offers. “Credit is usually very strong.”

Congratulations Priority Leasing on 25 years!

She’ll also continue to grow Priority organically, through client referrals and the website, which contains a blog and the digitally-downloadable Equipment Leasing Guide Book, written by Sands. With much to be proud of, Sands is grateful: “I have two daughters in university now, but the business was my first child. Today, everyone is doing well, has grown, and is excelling.

VET

CONGRATULATIONS PRIORITY LEASING ON 25 YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS!

Providing finance solutions to help your business achieve more.

Toll Free: 1-800-220-1751 | www.bluechipleasing.com

cwbnationalleasing.com | 866-984-5381

BiC_ad_September2018_Outlines.pdf 1 2018-09-05 12:59:37 PM

Happy 25th Anniversary Priority Leasing! We wish you many more years of success.

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CUSTOMER COMMITTED. CAPITAL READY.

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Leasing Professionals for over 45 years

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TOP CHOICE FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE

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en years ago, Ashley Eide was a marketing and management student at SAIT and moonlighting as a rodeo princess for Airdrie and Cochrane. The two aspects of her life came together to shape her future over something as simple as shopping for a horse trailer. Her negative experience with dealers showed her there was a gap in the industry that she knew she could fill.

“I saw how I was treated as a female in the industry and that people weren’t knowledgeable about their products, so I set out to do better,” says Ashley Eide, owner of Light Speed Trailers. She started Light Speed Trailers in Langdon just east of Calgary with a line of horse trailers and quickly expanded her catalogue to include equipment trailers and toy haulers. She offers some of the best products on the market to ensure clients roll away happy. Light Speed carries a variety of unique, quality products ranging from Canadian-made Precision Equipment trailers to a polymer plastic-covered wood fencing called Woodguard, custom horse trailers to ATV haulers.

ASHLEY EIDE

OWNER OF LIGHTSPEED TRAILERS

Photo by Riverwood Photography

tilt-deck trailers use groundbreaking technology, and Light Speed prides itself on staying ahead of these types of trends to better serve customers. -deck trailers

“We strive to have the Best products in the industry and try to keep on the cutting edge... We also try to go above and beyond with our service to make sure we’ve met our customer’s needs.” The dealership is on her property so she takes after-hours appointments to ensure the process is convenient for customers. She also listens to what customers need their unit to do and helps them find the best fit, whether that is with a trailer from an established product line or a completely customizable factory order.

Light Speed has also started carrying Jumping Jack utility trailers. These three-in-one units are a combination of tent and trailer, offering a great solution for weekend warriors seeking a convenient travel solution. “It’s a neat trailer. It’s a pop-up tent trailer that you can load your quads on top of when the tent is folded up, and you can remove the tent completely and use it as a utility trailer,” she says.

Light Speed Trailers continues to grow its product lines, adding innovative and high-quality trailers at competitive prices. Ten years ago, Ashley Eide set out to do better, and with great service, knowledgeable people and quality trailers, it’s clear she has done just that.

Light Speed also carries Great Northern trailers, a full line of equipment trailers featuring a sliding axle gooseneck that makes loading safe and easy. The versatile

403-936-5430

info@lightspeedtrailers.com


BUILDING A LEGACY ARUP DATTA LEADS HIS FIRM TO LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS By David Parker

Top: Design Resource Platform, Bangalore, India. Inset: Kovai Centre, Coimbatore, India.

BACKGROUND & BUSINESS HISTORY

As the founding principal of ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT LTD. (ADAL), Arup Datta realized early in his career that great architecture is the result of a combination of talent, experience and collaboration. It is a creative problem-solving process that includes resolving multiple issues and integrating the user’s needs.

Returning from Nigeria, he joined the former MSA as the senior associate where he lent his talent and skills in designing West Edmonton Mall (Phase III & IV) and the Mall of America, two of the world’s largest billion-dollar mixed-use shopping mall projects. Today, he continues to create excellent planning and architecture drawing from the expertise of key core personnel while being personally involved in every project; a benefit to clients that cannot be assured in larger firms. His design of functional, efficient and economical buildings has been recognized through the many local, national and international awards his firm has earned, and projects designed have made a profound impact on the social, cultural and economic level wherever they are located.

In 1988, Arup founded his architectural, master planning, urban design and interior design company in Calgary. He has enjoyed tremendous success thanks to his fresh and appropriate design approach, creating effective solutions to meet all clients’ objectives. Through three decades, ADAL has reflected his unique ‘concept design expertise’ with outstanding projects nationally and internationally. Arup worked with two leading firms in India before immigrating to Canada in 1974 and becoming a registered member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC). He completed his education in project management at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, USA.

Since 1992, the firm has extended its practice to B.C., Saskatchewan and Ontario, and in 1993, began to market itself internationally, providing services to developers in Asia and the Middle East. Arup is a fellow of the Indian Institute of Architects. Backed by the firm’s strong reputation, which has been recognized by the Canadian High Commission, Arup has been invited to present on many international trade missions.

After being recruited at Cohos Evamy and Partners as a senior design and project architect, Arup was involved in designing Western Canadian Place (Husky Towers) and Bankers Hall. He went to Nigeria in 1983 on a three-year contract to design a $135-million twin-tower office and convention facility.

Having found its niche in providing architectural services, mixed-use commercial, senior’s housing, residential and the assessment of government projects both within Canada and abroad, today ADAL is well known for its

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Photos by Riverwood Photography Above: ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT LTD. Team

Above: Residences in Symons Valley

creation of unique design concepts with cost-effective solutions in Canada and internationally.

How ADAL sets itself apart begins with rigorously defining the constraints and parameters of the project; land features, esthetic demands, budgetary constraints and regulatory issues are all laid out on the table. Next, the team coordinates and collaborates to develop design solutions that meet the constraints. Then, ADAL works with the client to develop measurable, achievable benchmarks. Finally, the execution stage – after a laser-like focus on developing the right benchmarks, ADAL provides every project in a timely manner and within budget.

ADAL’S BUSINESS MODEL

The field of architecture is filled with creative talent. Arup chose to make process the firm’s unique selling point. Accordingly, no matter what type of project, or the environment within which it is being developed, the process attracts clients. It is analytical, systematic and practical. Arup subscribes to the maxim that high-quality process ensures high-quality results. With a core team of highly-experienced longtime members, the studio is currently busy on a number of exciting projects.

SPECIAL QUALITIES

Arup insists on delivering architectural design solutions that are innovative and provide value to clients. Innovation is about thriving through con-

Continued success and best wishes to all the Staff & Management Team at ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT.

Congratulations to ARUP DATTA Architect Ltd.’s on 30 years A PARTNERSHIP OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANTS Box 598 - 401 Main Street Three Hills, AB Phone: 403.443.7801 Toll Free: 877.333.7801 Email: white@whiteco.ca www.whiteco.ca

Municipal Engineering | Project Management | Infrastructure Design Storm Water Management | Erosion and Sediment Control p: 403.276.1001 |F: 403.276.1012 | jubileeengineering.com

Providing Mechanical and Electrical Engineering services to the Canadian Building Industry. Specializing in: Commerical • Industrial • Multi-Family • Institutional 204-110 12th Ave SW, Calgary AB T2R 0G7 T: 403-460-2277 • info@embeconsulting.ca www.embeconsulting.ca

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Every project starts with a sit-down meeting with the client to analyze their needs and then it’s back to the office to design a building with pen on paper, making hand-drawn sketches of ideas and notes as to how his creative mind can best address those needs.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Arup has had a hand in designing some of Canada’s most well-known buildings, including South Pointe Toyota and Lexus South Pointe, two of Canada’s largest car retail centres designed unlike any other car retailing location. Arup was invited to make presentations abroad under the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs Export Development Program. Since that time, Arup has made over 175 presentations in Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and throughout the Middle East to promote Canadian architectural and planning expertise. He was the keynote speaker at the Canadian Infrastructure Mission to Vizag and Hyderabad, India.

straints, which are abundant in architecture. Arup has always embraced the constraints of the profession. Client demands, budgets, regulations and topography are issues that deter the meek. Arup is never deterred. He greets these obstacles with perseverance. The result is always a project that is not

South Pointe Toyota, facing Deerfoot Trail with its distinctive showroom tower, was followed by another automobile dealership for the same owner in Edmonton. The stunning 50,000-square-foot Lexus South Pointe (Edmonton) luxury dealership won an Americas Property Award in 2014-15 in the retail architecture category – Canada, and went on to be judged America’s Best from the U.K.-based International Property Awards, while being listed in the top five – in the world – in Dubai.

only on-time and on-budget, but one of immense value. Arup has always maintained the highest ethical standards. He provides honest and fair assessments of cost upfront. His dealings with clients and contractors are transparent, as he maintains high-quality documentation during the life of a project.

Thanks, for making us look so good. Congratulations to ARUP DATTA on 30 years of outstanding design.

hestiagroup.ca hestiaproperties.ca

Congratulations to ARUP DATTA on your 30th Anniversary! Thank you for being a great business partner. We wish you many great years to come. COI ooers a wide range of flooring solutions to partner with and meet every need of our customers. 403-265-1133

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THIS YEAR ARUP HAS BEEN SELECTED AS THE TOP 20 BUSINESS LEADERS BY BUSINESS IN CALGARY.

Arup Datta still travels to Asia where he has completed major mixed-use projects in Chennai and Coimbatore, and the design of a retail, shopping and office resource centre of over 1.1 million square feet in Bangalore that was accepted as one of the Canadian exhibits at a World Architectural Festival in Barcelona competing with world-class international architects.

Above: Arup Datta, President and Principal

High-class multi-family residential projects have also been recognized by the same international institution: designs that are sympathetic towards social, cultural, economic and environmental aspects in each stage of conception, development and implementation.

PROFESSIONAL AND COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS

Callaghan Ravines in Edmonton, Walden Heights in Calgary and a multigenerational housing project in Skyview Ranch (Calgary) are some of the most unique projects that have been designed by ADAL.

Arup’s contribution has been mentoring intern architects to become registered professionals for decades. His trainees become true professionals. Additionally, ADAL donates regularly to local organizations and supports several international organizations.

Currie has become one of the city’s most desirable communities and ADAL has been awarded the design by Statesman Group of Companies for the restoration and conversion of the heritage-designated former Officer’s Mess and three buildings for independent and assisted living which will be a lifestyle community for seniors to enjoy life with dignity.

As leader of his firm, Arup is responsible for many talent development initiatives. He also brings in external experts for training which allows his staff to stay abreast of the ever-changing architectural design environment. This year, he has been selected as one of the top 20 Business Leaders by Business in Calgary magazine.

ADAL has completed residential designs in Sage Hill, a 30,000-square-foot convention centre in Royal Oak and an industrial/commercial development in Jacksonport – all located in Calgary.

In May 2018, Arup was elected as a fellow to the College of Fellows of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) for his contribution to the built environment, one of the highest honours in the field, and was elected as a life member of the Alberta Association of Architects.

Master planning begins with a vision that will offer the best potential for a site and Arup is also currently working on the best use for a client on a 12-acre parcel of land in Edmonton.

ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT LTD.

ARUP AND TEAM CONGRATULATIONS ON 30 YEARS OF SUCCESS, AND THANK YOU FOR DESIGNING ‘A BEAUTIFUL WAY TO LIVE’ IN OUR ELEGANT STEEL AND CONCRETE CONDOS

PH: 403-809-6712 www.curriegreen.ca

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Group of Companies

IT’S SAFETY FIRST AT BORGER GROUP OF COMPANIES By Kelcey Blazina The Borger family has been in the construction business for the past 99 years and is now a fourth-generation business focusing on heavy civil construction. If asked, Bill Borger, the current CEO of Borger Group of Companies, will tell you they do “Deeps and Dirt.” Deeps are the installation of deep utilities such as sanitary, storm and water lines, and Dirt is earth moving. These two areas of heavy civil construction form the core of the operation. Clients of Borger include anyone who is in need of such services, from land developers that are building subdivisions for single-family homes to municipalities replacing aging infrastructure. Borger’s growing transport division takes pride in its collection of 76-wheel transport trucks and trailers specializing in heavy haul. Although just a medium-sized business, this Calgary-based company contends well above its weight class in the world of safety. In 2013, inspired by its world-class and innovative safety program, Borger was recognized as one of the top-two safest “Building and Construction” companies in all of Canada by Canadian Occupational Safety (COS)/Thompson Reuters. In 2014, Borger stepped it up another notch and was recognized by COS as the first place (Gold) winner as the safest Building and

Construction company in all of Canada. Again, after proudly receiving second in Canada in both 2015 and 2016, Borger not only found the top of the podium and Gold in 2017 as Canada’s Safest Employer in Building and Construction but also placed first for Canada’s Best Health & Safety Culture; a nationwide competition including all the different industries and the most prestigious safety award in Canada. “We are exceptionally humbled to win this award,” says Bill Borger. “It is recognition we are so proud to display on every one of our trucks.” The award itself is a very intensive process that begins with a detailed nomination application and continues with Canadian Occupational Safety administering an Employee Perception Survey from a significant portion of each applicant’s workforce. Based on these two pre-qualifications, potential winners are shortlisted. COS then sends an independent auditor to the short-listed organizations to verify their safety claims, best practices and culture. The results are tallied and examined by a panel of independent judges. The 2018 winners will be announced in October and Borger is hopeful to once again be included among the safest companies in Canada.

BORGER GROUP OF COMPANIES PROFILE | P.1

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Photo courtesy of Riverwood Photography

So, how do they do it? “Well,” says Borger, “we are keenly aware that the work we do is fraught with risks including team members on the ground in close proximity to massive equipment, steep ditches that tower up to 16 metres above those installing pipe, working around existing utilities such as gas and electric lines, accommodating vehicle traffic, and working in inclement weather; these are just a few of the risks encountered. Every day has potential for serious injury and for every team member to go home safe at the end of the day, strong policies, procedures and best practices are required, along with an outstanding safety culture that keeps safety at the forefront of everyone’s minds. We believe the best way to achieve this is to make safety fun, engaging and rewarding with a strong emphasis on the highest level of safety education.”

es for compensation, credits and certification. In fact, every type of equipment has its own course and exam that must be completed with a passing grade prior to the field proficiency test and the end goal of attaining an operator licence for that specific piece of equipment. A recent addition to the greater than 75 – unique to Borger – online education courses (complete with exams) is Cannabis Awareness in the Workplace. This training, as a response to new legislation and regulatory challenges for the industry, educates all Borger team members on the guidelines around cannabis in the workplace and re-familiarizes them with the company’s drug and alcohol policy. Videos and course content on identification signs of impairment reiterate that being under the influence of substances that impair judgment and the ability to work safely while at work, regardless of medical prescriptions, is not permitted. The course also reminds team members of their right to refuse work if they suspect another team member is under the influence, by presenting their Speak Out for Safety (S.O.S.) card to the supervisor to shut down the site, or team members can self-declare their impairment and leave the job site without professional consequences.

An S.O.S. Card

entitles an individual

to shut down any

job site at any time

in the name of safety,

with complete immunity,

by handing the card

to a site leader

A fundamental part of safety at Borger is its training programs both on the job and in learning settings, most significantly through online Borger U programs. The online portion of Borger U was created internally with course content on every aspect of Borger operations. Team members complete these cours-

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BORGER GROUP OF COMPANIES PROFILE | P.2


Since 2013, Borger has been recognized as one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies and is currently a Gold Standard Winner for this award. Borger U is available through the Borger App and downloadable from either the Apple or Google Play stores, making it available to all team members on their phones. This same app has the ability to simultaneously roll out education courses to team members with automatic prompts for uncompleted courses or exams and then delivers certificates, credits and compensation at course completion. Through the Borger App, team members can track their Borger Bucks and education credits, access maps to job sites, receive live updates on daily site conditions and listen to the weekly broadcast. The weekly Borger Broadcast, available companywide on the Borger App and recorded by Bill Borger, identifies the multiple weekly winning crews or divisions in safety and shares trends and concerns. “We are definitely goofy and silly in our broadcast, all part of making it fun to work at Borger, while still ensuring the safety messages are not lost,” expresses Terry Apuzza, Field Operations Manager and regular co-host on the Borger Broadcast. WikiBORGER, also available through the Borger App, is built on the Wikipedia platform and houses all things Borger. Every safety policy, procedure and best practice is at each team member’s fingertips in the easily searchable wiki format. No longer do team members refer to binders of policies and procedures but rather in real time on wikiBORGER. Borger has a creative safety program with many of its innovative team-generated safety practices finding their grand reveal at Borger’s internal annual Innovation Fair. At the most recent fair, a team member unveiled a new concrete pipe-lifting device

that does not require team members to get on top of the pipe for rigging and lifting thus mitigating considerable risk, especially in winter conditions. This new pipe rigger recently received an engineering stamp of approval and is now in use. Over the years, the annual Innovation Fair has been responsible for dozens of other outstanding team-generated safety ideas that now form a significant part of Borger’s safety best practices including Borger Nexus, A.W.A.R.E. and Live Safe to name a few. A significant safety innovation is the Speak Out for Safety (S.O.S.) card. The S.O.S. card is carried on each team member’s person from their first day of employment, along with their Borger ID and operator licence, if applicable, and entitles that individual to shut down any job site at any time with complete immunity by simply handing the card to a site leader. The site will not restart until the CEO and two safety officers are present and the identified safety concern is adequately addressed. With safety always at the forefront, it is not uncommon for Bill Borger to shut a site down with his S.O.S. card during regular site visits and hold an impromptu safety stand down; a reminder to all team members that safety is everyone’s responsibility. Borger innovators, those team members involved in the creation and/or implementation of a new innovation, receive a minted Innovation Coin and an invitation to participate in the elaborate Borger Innovation Coin game; game participants can win significant scholarships, cash prizes and future opportunities for Borger Bucks when they present their coin during coin challenges from Bill Borger. The Innovation Coin

YEAR ANNIVERSARY || BORGER GROUP OF COMPANIES10PROFILE | P.3

CALGARY ELITE ROOFING


Group of Companies

game has morphed into a type of travel gnome with team members taking pictures with their coin in more than 50 different countries on five continents thus far, all for a chance to win more Borger Bucks in the Innovation Coin photo contests. The coin has been filmed scuba-diving 30 metres deep off the coast of Honduras, was licked by a kangaroo in Australia, and was recently used in the official coin flip of the Calgary Stampeders versus Winnipeg Blue Bombers CFL football game. The team’s engagement and commitment to its safety culture appears to be working on all fronts. Borger is fortunate to have approximately 10 per cent of its workforce with the company

for 25 years or longer (members of the Quarter Century Club) and more than another third have tenure greater than 10 years; collectively this is an impressive amount of knowledge and experience that the Borger Group is very proud to share. Remarkably, greater than half of all team members are related to someone who is or has worked for the Borger Group from another generation. Family is synonymous with the Borger Group and as such the culture promotes dignity and respect for all through programs like Respect in the Workplace that strives for a harassment-free, discrimination-free environment. “To stay competitive, we need to have an engaged and productive team and safety is one of our advantages,” comments Bill Borger.

YEAR ANNIVERSARY || BORGER GROUP OF COMPANIES10PROFILE | P.4

CALGARY ELITE ROOFING


Photos from BOOKSTRUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

BUILDING A BETTER WORLD

THE WESTCOR WAY

In 2003, in the heart of northeast Calgary, an idea was born. Following the closure of the company they had previously worked for, four former co-workers came together to discuss the possibility of using their combined experience, unique skill sets and passion for construction to manage their own general contracting company. Fast-forward 15 years and you will find a company that, with sustained dedication, continues to thrive while being rewarded with a fine reputation within the industry. What was once a four-person operation struggling to land work in a saturated market is now a leader in the mid-market construction industry. In uncertain times, one thing at Westcor Construction is certain – they are here to stay. In the early days, president and CEO Bob Robinson and his founding partners, who are still shareholders,

suffered from the usual, “Come back and see us when you have built up your company project resumé” response to requests for business, which made it a quiet and challenging first six months or so. One of Westcor’s first jobs was partnering with St. James Church in Priddis to provide them with a new floor and a much-needed facelift. Westcor also landed a few public works interior projects at the Harry Hays Building, and from then on, work began to grow at a steady pace – and they haven’t looked back. Westcor has built up a compelling culture which leverages its passionate employees to consistently deliver successful projects, build strong relationships within the community, and appreciate the efforts and importance of its trade partners – treating them as

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equals and ensuring they feel valued. Its culture is one of engagement and continuous improvement. Westcor employs over 70 permanent employees and they are all encouraged to be a leader in their own right and to participate in the decision-making process and continuation of the philosophy that has driven Westcor’s success since its inception, a value system known as The Westcor Way.

work. In its first five years, up to 40 per cent of business was for the Calgary Health Region, and it continues to serve Alberta Health Services, currently active in many of its health facilities in Calgary and rural Alberta. Health care is a sector that requires the understanding of skilled crews working in active hospitals where there can be little tolerance for noise, dust and the general inconvenience to patients and staff.

The company focuses on delivering mid-market commercial, institutional and industrial projects, and staying within that range has been a key to its success. It has also been rewarded for its experience in health-care

Similar expertise is required in dealing with the challenges presented with working on seniors’ residences like Bow View Manor where Westcor crews have been carefully gutting and renovating four rooms at a time in

Congratulations to WESTCOR! We are proud to be a partner in your success!

Congratulations to WESTCOR on 15 years of successful business!

Specializing in Structural Engineering Across Alberta #300 160 Quarry Park Blvd SE Calgary, AB | (403) 984 2524 | heathengineering.ca

#4, 3655 - 18th Avenue N Lethbridge, AB | ph: (403) 381-4752

15th Anniversary | Page 2


the time to understand the nature of the project and proposed the best method of delivery. A good deal of work is completed outside of Calgary and Westcor has worked hard at establishing good relationships with trade partners around central and southern Alberta. Westcor also supports the communities it works in. This year, it participated in Cornfest in Taber, where it just completed a modernization of St Patrick’s School. Giving back has always been a big part of the company culture. Westcor understands that without the support of its community, friends and families, collaborators, and industry peers, it would not be where it is today. Throughout Westcor’s years working to Build a Better World, they have learned the importance of giving back to the community that has supported its growth. Robinson is active in the industry as co-chair of the SAIT School of Construction fundraising committee, and as a trustee of the educational fund of the Calgary Construction Association (CCA). Robinson has served as past president of the CCA and the Calgary General Contractors Association, is a past board member of the

the facility owned by the Brenda Strafford Foundation. And they have also completed projects at a number of occupied schools, ensuring that learning could seamlessly continue while construction took place. Westcor’s largest educational project to date is the 90,000-square-foot addition to Renert School in northwest Calgary. The biggest commercial project under construction is the 125,000-square-foot warehouse addition to the Samaritan’s Purse facility in the northeast. Executive director Fred Weiss chose Westcor because they, along with Gibbs Gage Architects, clearly took

Congratulations westcore on 15 years! We look forward to working with you well into the future

30 Years Experience New Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Flat Commercial Roofing Metal Roofing Repairs New Construction Maintenance & Inspections

Congratulations Westcor! To 15 years of being an integral part of the Calgary construction scene. It’s always a pleasure working with you. We wish you many more years of success!

100, 3668 - 60 Avenue SE Calgary, AB T2C 2C7 403-254-1289

Peddie Roofing & Waterproofing 3352 - 46 Ave SE Calgary, AB ph: (403) 273-7000 www.peddieroofing.com

15th Anniversary | Page 3


Canadian Construction Association, and sits on council at the Lean Construction Institute of Canada. Westcor promotes corporate social responsibility (CSR) and to celebrate their 15th anniversary, they launched Building a Better Community: A Westcor PeopleFirst Initiative. The purpose of this initiative is to give back to the community. For the first year, Westcor is committing to 15 acts of community kindness. On September 14, they held a fundraiser celebration to formally kick off the initiative, leveraging their relationships with valued trade partners, business partners, and design consultants to sponsor Dare to Care’s bullying prevention program in 15 schools across Calgary.

Westcor also invited the community to support their September Towel Drive. Westcor heard that the Mustard Seed was having a towel shortage and knew it would be the perfect place to start with one of their community initiatives.

Above: Bob Robinson, President and CEO

“WE ARE PROUD TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY THAT HAS HELPED SHAPE WHO WE ARE TODAY.”

Robinson says, “We are proud to give back to the community that has helped shape who we are today. The launch of this initiative reaffirms our commitment to being of service to our community and our city.” Westcor has shown through the years that it builds more than buildings, it builds relationships, and these relationships have defined the success of a construction company that for the last 15 years has maintained its inspiration to Build a Better World, The Westcor Way.

Congratulations WESTCOR

on 15 phenomenal years in business! And best wishes for many, many more outstanding years of success!

architecture | interior design | 3d visualization fire & building code | accessibility design

visit us online at riddell.ca

15th Anniversary | Page 4


The VAULTS Adds Style to Storage with Premium Storage Condominiums

T

by Rennay Craats with Photos by Riverwood Photography Inc.

he name says it all. When you think of a vault you think impenetrable security, and that is exactly what the VAULTS delivers. The luxury storage condominiums provide an inspired place for clients to store such items as cars and recreational vehicles with the peace of mind knowing that the location is safe and secured 24-7. While the concept of storage facilities isn’t new, the way the VAULTS is approaching it is. These developers did their homework, studying best practices and best design elements in storage from across North America and applying all they had learned to the design of their flagship location in North Calgary. The result is a marriage between luxury lifestyle and the practical need to store vehicles that won’t fit in the garage at home. And that is a marriage built to last.

“Our owners typically have a car collection, RVs or boats and need additional storage and they want to have a lifestyle around what they’re storing,” says James Murray, vice president of the VAULTS. “It’s not just a place to store stuff. We believe that you love what you’re storing.” It’s the VAULTS’ job to protect what owners love, and with a 27-foot concrete perimeter wall to ensure security and privacy, fob access and security cameras in common areas along with sprinkler systems, and an emissions sensor that automatically purges contaminated air and draws fresh air into the unit, the complex protects both owners and their prized possessions. No home garage could compare. And by purchasing a storage condominium, owners can customize their space to fit their vehicles as well as their personalities.

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Regardless of their use, these floor areas all have a 13.5-foot clearance under the mezzanine, ensuring any road-legal vehicle or lift will easily fit underneath it to accommodate the whole fleet. the VAULTS | 2


depending on the floor plan, and what owners do to the space varies as much as what they store in the space. “It’s designed to be that inspirational space. Owners can take it from a blank canvas and make it their own,” Murray says.

The 46-unit complex has something for everyone, with eight different size options ranging from 1,650 square feet to more than 4,000 square feet and design options limited only by the imagination. Owners who buy early can more easily and economically make enhancements at the construction stage, whether that may be to add additional plumbing, electrical upgrades, change the staircase design, or insert elements like skylights. The VAULTS designers are available to help owners tailor their space beyond simply storing cars or other treasures and strive to accommodate owners’ requests. While the storage condominiums are focused around vehicles, many owners and their families spend a lot of time designing the mezzanine space. The loft space ranges from 450 square feet to over 1,000 square feet

For some owners that means creating a mezzanine space that holds a boardroom table to host business meetings while for others it’s a cosy place in which to play poker with friends on Saturday night; while one owner may look to use the space to cook in a gourmet kitchen another may want to just relax and watch television after taking the car out for a spin. Units also feature a spacious three-piece bathroom. Regardless of their use, these floor areas all have a 13.5-foot clearance under the mezzanine, ensuring any road-legal vehicle or lift will easily fit underneath it to accommodate the whole fleet. “Everyone has a little something different that they want to do with the space,” he says. “Our designers work with owners to really understand what their needs are and what they want to create in the space.”

Congratulations to the VAULTS luxury storage condominiums Proudly serving real estate in the Calgary and surrounding areas.

Michelle Fournier Real Estate Advisor Licensee of Engel & Völkers Canada Inc. 140, 215 - 9th Avenue SW c: 403.618.5883 | o: 587.387. 2228 www.michellefournieryyc.com

Legal expertise you can count on. Advice you can trust. C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s t o t h e VA U LT S f r o m all of us at Carscallen LLP!

900, 332 6 Avenue SW Calgary, Alberta T2P 0B2 maclachlan@carscallen.com (403) 298-8465 • carscallen.com

the VAULTS | 3


These comfortable sophisticated spaces reflect the owners perfectly, whether they are relaxed or funky, conventional or a bit wild. Each space is uniquely designed, with units featuring everything from a fire pole to a suspended fireplace, graffiti art to brick accent walls. Owners can even choose to match the decor colours to the pantone of their prized vehicle or include high-end garage cabinetry for easy tinkering. And once the work is done, the units are a fantastic place to entertain friends. If the party outgrows the space, the VAULTS includes a 1,300-square-foot clubhouse on site that owners can book for their events. This twostorey space features multiple televisions, comfortable seating and a bar, encouraging a sense of community within the complex.

Calgarians and corporations alike are eager to be part of this community. The VAULTS hosts two signature events each year, inviting partners including Porsche Centre Calgary and McLaren Vancouver to showcase their luxury vehicles while promoting the possibilities of the storage condominiums. Potential owners can get a feel for the development and the lifestyle it encompasses, and many are excited to sign on the dotted line to secure their own unit. Phase 1 is completed and fully occupied and Phase 2 units are largely passed over to owners. Phase 3 is available for occupancy this fall and the final phase, including the private wash bay, is under construction and will be completed by next spring. From there, the VAULTS will

Congratulations

Congratulations to the VAULTS for successfully bringing luxury to storage!

to the VAULTS on your final phase! 403.938.3938 www.albertastairworks.ca

430, 2020 4th Street SW Calgary, AB T2S 1W3 1.800.351.4606 | www.roosterbg.com

the VAULTS | 4


The VAULTS is 15 minutes from downtown and a stone’s throw from the airport and Deerfoot and Stoney Trails, making it convenient for people to pick up their car and get wherever they are going quickly and easily. develop a similar complex in Kelowna – preferred pricing pre-sales have already started for the single-phase 19unit development and construction is expected to get underway by the end of the year. With all the boats and toys in Kelowna, it’s a natural market and the VAULTS premium storage condominiums are already being well received. Developments in other markets including Vancouver, Toronto, Winnipeg and a South Calgary location are also planned for the future. “Our intention is to roll this throughout the country. That’s why we’re really taking our time in North Calgary to make sure we understand those pain points people have and how our solution meets them,” Murray says.

As a result, the storage condominiums are providing an ideal solution for people downsizing their estate homes who now have nowhere to keep their overflow property. The VAULTS is 15 minutes from downtown and a stone’s throw from the airport and Deerfoot and Stoney Trails, making it convenient for people to pick up their car and get wherever they are going quickly and easily. It also has brought style to storage, proving that even though it serves a practical function it can still be a beautiful place where people want to spend time. The development is in an architecturally-controlled community, which is important for future real estate values, and it backs onto a greenspace with a pond giving some units a lovely view out of their large windows. These high windows in all units ensure

Proudly Providing Structural Engineering Services for

The VAULTS

Proud to be the construction partner for the VAULTS!

DyCor Creative Thinking Practical Results Calgary 403-283-5073 Edmonton 780-452-2325

Lethbridge 403-320-0467 Kelowna 778-738-1700

info@rjc.ca Vancouver 604-738-0048 Victoria 250-386-7794

the VAULTS | 5

Construction Ltd.

Tilt up Specialists 250-558-8470 • dycor@shaw.ca


Congratulations to the VAULTS on your final phase!

owner privacy while letting natural light into each unit. The complex, with all of the incredible extra details, checks every box for discerning buyers. The VAULTS has become the premier secured storage condominiums in the country, offering high-end construction and a higher standard. With an ideal location, secure facility, a community atmosphere and a garage storage option that caters to a luxury lifestyle, the VAULTS North Calgary has everything luxury car owners could want.

For more info contact 403.919.8591 www.cpelectric.ca

BYRON’S PLUMBING COMMERCIAL * RESIDENTIAL * RENOVATIONS

LTD

Congratulations to the VAULTS

North Calgary Location: 1750 – 120 Ave NE P: 403.201.9999 | info@thevaults.ca thevaults.ca

on completing their final phase! 4 0 3 - 5 3 1 - 0 5 0 0 • W W W. B Y R O N S P L U M B I N G . C O M

Congratulations to The Vaults North Calgary as they power through their fourth & final phose

BLACK stone

~ Connecting people and their passions in a luxurious way ~

Proud to be the Land Survey service provider to the VAULTS!

WE ARE PROUD TO BE A PART OF YOUR TEAM AND TAKE PRIDE IN BUILDING THE COMMUNITY TOGETHER…

4663 Quentin St SW, Calgary, AB T2T 6E1 Phone: (403) 807-2496 • www.blackstonegeomatics.com

Congratulations

121B, 5555 – 69th Ave SE | 7012 - 8th Street NE 403-291-1013 • www.shoemakerdrywall.com

C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s t o t h e VA U LT S ! We are proud to be a par tner in your success!

to the VAULTS!

MAX Roofing

271170 Range Road 12 RR1 Airdrie, Alberta T4B 2A3

Ltd. 403.615.1004

10555 48 St SE Unit 105 Main: 403.454.8487 (dial 0) • Fax: 403.454.8478 w w w.sedulousengineer ing.com

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Calgary in the New Economy

The Economic Strategy for Calgary Over the past year, over 1,800 Calgarians were engaged to update the Economic Strategy for Calgary. Calgary is a young, vibrant city with limitless potential and this strategy establishes our shared priorities, sets ambitious goals, and puts in place a roadmap to achieve them. Calgary in the New Economy is the community’s plan to support economic competitiveness, embrace shared prosperity, and build a strong community. It is a guide for The City of Calgary, Calgary Economic Development and all stakeholders who contribute to our city’s prosperity. Calgary has a reputation for entrepreneurship, inclusion and community spirit and it is these values that advised the development of this Strategy. The vision is bold and achievable.

Calgary is the city of choice in Canada for the world’s best entrepreneurs as we embrace innovation and create solutions to meet the world’s most fundamental needs in food, health, energy and transportation.


Strategic framework The Economic Strategy embodies our values, makes our aspirations clear, and details specific plans for achieving these ambitious goals. The framework for Calgary in the New Economy starts with a bold vision that establishes Calgary as a leader in talent, innovation, place and business friendly environment. Qualities that make Calgary a great place to live, study, work and do business. To support the vision, the Economic Strategy identifies four strategic areas of focus that will enhance established and emerging industry clusters that have the highest growth and impact potential for Calgary.

Vision Calgary is the city of choice in Canada for the world’s best entrepreneurs. We embrace innovation and create solutions to meet the world’s needs in food, health, energy and transportation.

The Economic Strategy aligns The City of Calgary, its civic partners, the private sector, educators, and community stakeholders to achieve economic competitiveness while building long-term prosperity and a stronger community. This is a living document that will adapt and evolve with the changing times, but will remain resolute and focused on the four core areas of economic development.

Calgary is an inclusive and entrepreneurial city connected through our community spirit.

Values Calgary is an inclusive and entrepreneurial city connected through our community spirit.


Established Clusters Talent Canada’s destination for talent

Transportation & Logistics Agribusiness

Innovation

4

Focus Areas

Canada’s leading B2B innovation ecosystem

Place

Canada’s most livable city

Energy

Industry Focus: Emerging & Growth Clusters Tourism

Business Environment

Canada’s most business-friendly city

Creative Industries Life Sciences / Health Financial Services


Implementation and timelines A single vision cascades down into a series of focus areas, key initiatives and detailed actions. Timelines range from immediate to five years and beyond. Our success will be achieved through cross-sector collaboration and active engagement by all stakeholders and partners. A number of initiatives have been identified already but as the Economic Strategy is a living document, it will continue to expand and mature over time.

4

Focus Areas

Talent

Innovation

Place

Business Environment

13

Key Initiatives

Create Canada’s largest talent accelerator

Establish Calgary as a magnet for students

Emphasize creativity and innovation from Kindergarten to University

Address immediate needs through attraction efforts

Create the Calgary Innovation Corridor

Build funding to support generational growth

Develop relationships within the innovation ecosystem

Accelerate growth through attraction, advocacy and trade

Accelerate urbanization and connectivity in the core

Expand and enhance tourism, culture, and recreation assets

Intentionally support diversity and inclusion Deploy initiatives to facilitate business development and growth

Develop Calgary as a Living Lab

Stakeholders driving the Economic Strategy: Alberta Women Entrepreneurs ATB Financial BCG Benevity Brookfield Asset Management Brookfield Residential Calgary Academy The Calgary Airport Authority Calgary Arts Development Calgary Economic Development Advisory Committees Calgary Technologies Inc. Calgary TELUS Convention Centre Carbon Upcycling The City of Calgary

Creative Destruction Lab Enmax Fiasco Gelato FIELD Upgrading Futurpreneur Husky Energy KPMG Momentum Mount Royal University Parkland Fuel Corporation SAIT Tourism Calgary Trico Homes

Shell Canada Startup Calgary University of Calgary Vibrant Communities Calgary Vintri Technologies West Canadian Digital Imaging WestJet Zedi Zinc Ventures


MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY EVENT AN

EXPERIENCE TO REMEMBER. For many people October is a month to pause. It’s sandwiched between the busy time of back-to-school and the start of corporate planning. School’s in session, summer holidays are finished and everyone seems to be back into the full swing of things. It’s a time to focus and to catch your breath. Unless you’re the one responsible for this years company holiday event… While it may seem early to start thinking about the festive season, your holiday event is actually just around the corner. Companies should be getting ready to celebrate together and to wrap up a hard-worked year. Will your celebration be one worth sharing… filled with joy, happiness and a strong festive spirit? Or will it be more Scrooge-like, soon to be done and forgotten? You’ve made a list of all of the important things needed for your holiday event, and you’ve checked it twice. Now you’re looking for the right partner who’s less naughty and more nice.

In this case, it’s the one who will help you bring it all together to create a holiday event worth remembering. Located at the Centre of it all in Calgary’s vibrant downtown core, the Calgary TELUS Convetion Centre (CTCC) combines the passion of our people with the expertise of hundreds of holiday events to help you create an amazing and memorable experience. Whether you’ve got a small team or a large corporate workforce, this season let us leverage our knowledge and the amazing efforts of our food service and entertainment partners to bring your event to life. Consider it our our gift to you. Visit calgary-convention.com/holidayparty for holiday package options and to learn more about how we help deliver a great holiday event for your team.

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Calgary is a Living Lab Driving an Innovative Economy

C

algary has long been a leading centre for aviation and the aerospace sector, and is now emerging as one of the global hubs in the fast-growing field of autonomous systems. In fact, Calgary is one of the first major cities in North America to allow for mass testing of UAVs and the latest pilot project is an autonomous shuttle that is being tested on a stretch of road between TELUS Spark and the Calgary Zoo. The 12-passenger vehicle named ELA (for Electronic Autonomous) is operated by pilot partner Calgary-based Pacific Western Transportation. The pinpoint-positioning intelligence, which is significantly more precise than a GPS in a family car, is supplied by Calgary-based Hexagon PI. ELA is the first fully-autonomous vehicle to be operated in Calgary and one of the first in Canada. “Calgary is a city that has been built around cars; one of the findings that the city is extremely interested in [with this pilot] is what ELA brings in terms of innovation and how this reflects future city builds and transportation,” says Michael Thompson, general manager of transportation, City of Calgary. ELA is a 100 per cent electric-powered vehicle. Charging is powered by ATCO while the wireless connections are provided by TELUS. ELA navigates surroundings with 3D mapping and localization systems using data from four LiDAR sensors combined with a series of video cameras to evaluate environments in real time. The technology has proven to be safe and reliable in more than 170 deployments around the world.

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“The future that we dreamed about as kids is here,” says Calgary Centre MP Kent Hehr at the official ELA launch in early September. “Autonomous vehicles will have an everlasting impact on how we travel and get products to market. As we look forward, autonomous technology will support not only transportation but trade, economic growth and cleantech.” Hehr announced a $290,000 funding commitment from the Government of Canada to the city to establish a connected vehicle pilot along 16 Avenue North. It will allow familiarization with connected vehicle technologies, support shorter travel times and ensure safety for emergency vehicles. Under the Living Labs strategy, the City of Calgary is working with Calgary Economic Development to make public spaces, transportation corridors and land accessible to testing technology innovation. The Living Lab initiative is a tool the city can use to achieve the goals set out in the long-term economic strategy for Calgary city council approved in June. It includes being the most innovative and the most business-friendly city in Canada. ELA is an opportunity to test the long-term feasibility of autonomous technology as part of the city’s 30-year transportation plan. Calgarians are invited to experience the future of transportation with ELA, and TELUS Spark will soon unveil a temporary display to ignite conversations about the future of autonomous vehicles as a mode of transportation. Following the Calgary pilot, ELA will move to Edmonton for testing in our northern climate.


Introducing: Ultimate Host 2026 CALGARY’S TOURISM INDUSTRY COMES TOGETHER IN SUPPORT OF HOSTING THE 2026 OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC WINTER GAMES

BY BRIDGETTE SLATER

I

n late August, Tourism Calgary commissioned a survey to further understand the sentiments and expectations of its stakeholder organizations regarding a potential 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games bid. Results found that 79 per cent of tourism industry respondents support Calgary pursuing a bid and 95 per cent agree Tourism Calgary has a key role in providing accurate information about potential bid, hosting and legacy opportunities. Most notably, 83 per cent of stakeholders expect Tourism Calgary to proactively encourage a bid, giving the organization a clear mandate to foster support and collaboration toward a 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games bid. To carry out this mandate, Tourism Calgary spearheaded the formation of Ultimate Host 2026, a collective voice representing Calgary’s tourism industry in support of bidding for the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. With the November 13 plebiscite approaching, Ultimate Host 2026 recognized the need for a platform that articulates the numerous benefits associated with the bidding, hosting and legacy phases of the Games. As such, a multiplatform campaign including ultimatehost2026.com and a video series were created to share facts, up-to-date information and stories that support a legacy for the city while setting a precedent for the province and country. Calgary’s tourism industry knows the impact of hosting the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games extends far beyond the few weeks of the Games. It’s about hosting venues that become training facilities, updated infrastructure, job creation, affordable housing, a surge in the economy and the opportunity to host more events

and visitors beyond the Games. The entire process – from bidding, to winning and preparing for and then hosting the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games – offers an unparalleled opportunity to re-establish Calgary’s international brand, enhance infrastructure, encourage visitation and attract visitor spending. The potential impact is significant with the Conference Board of Canada estimating 32,200 net new visitors will contribute $25.6 million in incremental spending leading up to the Games, 98,000 visitors will contribute $270 million during the Games and an additional 529,000 visitors will contribute $320 million to Calgary’s economy post-Games. Calgary is made to host the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Until November 13, Ultimate Host 2026 will be engaging industry leaders, and organizations, and sharing information across all campaign platforms. In doing so, Ultimate Host 2026 is giving a voice to the tourism industry, and the thousands of Calgarians it employs, while supporting the opportunity to host a Winter Games reflective of the growing, evolving and cosmopolitan destination Calgary has become since 1988. Join the #Host2026 movement and show your support by visiting ultimatehost2026.com.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // OCTOBER 2018

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Dealing With Feedback O

f all the enormous, limitless and transformational ways technology continues to change how business is done, one of the most potent and fragile is the way feedback is given and managed. Feedback from happy and disgruntled customers, potential customers, the competition, the community and the public. While getting and reacting to feedback has always been important in the business world, technology is redefining feedback as a business art form. “We welcome and are always very thankful to customers who provide feedback whether it is positive or negative,” says Rhys Evans, owner of Calgary-based Advanpro Heating, Cooling, Furnace & Duct Cleaning and an EO Calgary member. “Positive feedback helps us see what we’re doing well and allows us to reward our staff and give them a pat on the back for a job well done. Negative feedback allows us to understand what we can do better and helps us continue to deliver the highest quality service and expertise available. “Having an open and unencumbered feedback loop is a great way to get close to a real-time score of how well we are doing and also ensures that we can be reactive to our customers’ needs.” According to Shelly MacGregor, president of Calgary’s Apex Massage Therapy and an EO Calgary member, feedback is a vital tool of doing business. “Feedback is a key way to engage with our clients and customers and it allows us opportunities to learn how our business is interacting with our customer.

focus on four aspects of dealing with feedback: let the customer know they’ve been heard and thank them for taking time to care about your business; offer understanding; explain how their situation will be addressed; and direct them to contact you personally for resolution.” Although popular tech feedback options like Yelp, TripAdvisor and many others are sources for potent personal feedback, the misleading cliché mistakenly suggests that feedback is invariably negative complaints. “We rarely receive complaints,” Evans adds. “But if there’s an issue, the feedback is mostly quite valuable. In the short term, it allows us to fix a job-specific issue and in the long term, it has helped us fine-tune our processes which enables us to offer an even higher level of service to the customer.” MacGregor underscores the opportunity to make feedback a proactive business tool. “We ask every client in person how their massage was at the end of their treatment. This allows us to address any concerns immediately. We then send every client a followup email asking for any additional feedback they may have. Feedback for our business is mostly face to face or via an email response by the client, sharing their experience or concern.” For Evans, dealing with feedback is an opportunity to build trust. “Communication can turn feedback into a positive experience. It serves the purpose of building trust with the customer and helping to demonstrate our integrity as a business.”

“When a customer communicates and offers feedback, we respond in the same format they contacted us. It’s important to

Contributing Members:

Rhys Evans

Shelly MacGregor

owner of Advanpro Heating, Cooling, Furnace and Duct Cleaning

president of Calgary’s Apex Massage Therapy

Upcoming Events: Oct 3

• Leadership Breakfast Series

Oct 11

• “What Big Brands Know” with Gerry O’Brion

Oct 28

• Family Halloween Costume Party

The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

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For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


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MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

R

elocating the Canadian Finals Rodeo from Edmonton to Red Deer was good news for that city, and it also provided a great opportunity for Ryan Townend and his team at William Joseph Communications (WJ). WJ, who will be marketing the event, has rebranded and now has an office in Red Deer. With additional offices in Calgary, Grande Prairie and Saskatoon, the firm is also excited about being awarded the upcoming Alberta Winter Games. At the Calgary location, Townend has expanded his space in the Joe Phillips Building on 6th Street SW to accommodate a growing number of local staff that now stands at 25.

C&B Advertising owners Leigh Blakely and Phil Copithorne have been working in different capacities with Travel Alberta for a half-dozen years, including contributing to memorable campaigns like “Remember to Breathe.” It has now been chosen as one of four marketing agencies to provide the province’s tourism industry with strategic, tactical, creative and analytical programs over the next three years. C&B has been tasked with providing creative strategy and content development. Other new business has been awarded by Revelstoke Tourism and it recently launched a Pacific Authentic campaign for Tourism Richmond. And we all enjoyed its tongue-in-cheek series for Big Rock featuring founder Ed McNally.

Ric Fedyna is enjoying his executive vice president role at agribusiness agency WS in a full-time creative capacity, and was recently joined by new art director Joel Heyland and copywriter Sean Mitchell.

V Strategies has launched a new site to ensure safety and impairment awareness are top of mind for employees. President and CEO Jeff Bradshaw says www.rufitforduty. com is being promoted to industrial associations across the country to focus on mental, physical and emotional concerns about workplace safety.

Mark Szabo has rejoined Critical Mass – after positions at Karo, Bow Valley College and the University of Calgary – in a new role as associate director market research. The Calgary-founded company now has a staff of 280 in its Inglewood office but is growing fast with close to 1,000 employees in 11 worldwide offices, primarily located in Calgary, New York, London and Toronto.

It’s been a busy year for LPi Group, buoyed by the winning of its pitch for the national on-premise business for Corby Spirit and Wine (Toronto), and bringing activations to market for Absolut, Polar Ice, J.P. Wiser’s and Lot No. 40. Recently, it also began work with Sherwood Park Mall in Edmonton, and added mall clients Sunridge and Northland Village in Calgary. During 2018, LPi Group also entered the homebuilder market with brand work for Jayman BUILT (Calgary), and in the retail segment nationally launched Gold Peak, Coca-Cola’s premium ready-to-drink tea. As a result, six new team members have been added across multiple teams.

Parker’s Pick ATB listens.

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OCTOBER 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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Business in Calgary - October 2018  
Business in Calgary - October 2018  
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