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JUNE 2018 | $3.50 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

GUY TURCOTTE PM41126516

RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 DISTINGUISHED BUSINESS LEADER AWARD



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The Perfect Getaway … Is Closer Than You Think …

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 27 | Number 6

REGULAR COLUMNS

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David Suzuki and the University of Alberta By Frank Atkins

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Small Businesses Brace for More Changes to Employment Rules By Amber Ruddy

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CONTENTS COVER FEATURE

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U of A: Whether on Suzuki or Energy Jobs, Albertans are speaking out! By Cody Battershill

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Property Tax Hike? Cities have alternatives By Colin Craig

16 41 79 105

The Power of Print

Guy Turcotte Recipient of the 2018 Distinguished Business Leader Award By Melanie Darbyshire

ON OUR COVER: ABOVE: GUY TURCOTTE, RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 DISTINGUISHED BUSINESS LEADER AWARD PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

William Joseph Communications

BOMA Calgary News Summer 2018 Leading Business The Calgary Report

FIND US ONLINE! B US I N E SS I NCALGARY.COM BUSINESS IN CALGARY

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Current developments for Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Tourism Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, and Innovate Calgary

Marketing Matters By David Parker


DIRECTORS EDUCATION PROGRAM

CANADA’S LEADING PROGRAM FOR DIRECTORS APPLY BEFORE AUGUST 16, 2018 FOR THE NEXT CALGARY OFFERING OF CANADA’S LEADING PROGRAM FOR DIRECTORS. “Taking the ICD-Rotman DEP has provided me with a more complete skill set as a director. The program filled in areas where I didn’t have in-depth knowledge, and the opportunity to learn the perspectives of others on governance matters was truly invaluable. I made new contacts and reinforced existing relationships, and I also became part of the ICD.D community; a group of over 4,000 directors who have also made the commitment to excellence in the boardroom. I would encourage all directors to take the program and join the ICD’s community of directors if they haven’t already.” RAY CROSSLEY, CPA, CA, ICD.D AUDIT COMMITTEE CHAIR, OBSIDIAN ENERGY, CANADA WEST FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBER, ALBERTA SECURITIES COMMISSION CFO, CALGARY HEALTH TRUST

The Directors Education Program (DEP), jointly developed by the Institute of Corporate Directors and the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, is offered nationally at Canada’s top business schools. Since the launch of the DEP, over 5,000 directors have completed the program, taking the first step towards acquiring their ICD.D designation. ATTAIN YOUR ICD.D AND BE MORE EFFECTIVE AS A DIRECTOR.

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Jointly developed by:


STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 27 | Number 6

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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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Climate Change and New Codes Revising the way homes are built

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CONTENTS 36 COMPANY PROFILES

69 85 91

E NMAX Corporation

Taking Energy Efficiency to the Next Level

Lundgren & Young Insurance

Celebrates 35 Years

Riddell Kurczaba Architecture Engineering Interior Design Ltd.

65 73

Five Years Later The 2013 flood and its impact on Calgary By Melanie Darbyshire

Cannabis in the Workplace Ready or not? By Erlynn Gococo

Turning a Blind Eye Convincing workers to wear safety eyewear an uphill battle By Cat Nantel

The Alberta Disadvantage Experts cite pipeline obstruction, regulatory uncertainty, taxation behind unfriendly environment for investors in province’s oilpatch By Jamie Zachary

Celebrates 30 Years

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Delnor Construction Celebrates 35 Years

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JUNE 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


DYING TO SMASH YOUR SERVER? With a speed of light FibreNet connection, you can. Free yourself from legacy bundles, and finally take advantage of the cloud.

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Melanie Darbyshire John Hardy Erlynn Gococo Cat Nantel Jamie Zachary Rennay Craats

PHOTOGRAPHY

Cover photo courtesy of Ewan Photo Video

Professional Development IT PAYS TO KNOW

Mark your calendar for payroll education! Teresa S., PCP - Member Prairie Region

With more than 200 federal and provincial regulations and changes each year, staying payroll compliant is one of the biggest challenges employers face. Improve compliance and reduce the risk of audits and penalties with help from Professional Development seminars from Canadian Payroll Association (CPA). The CPA offers seminars for all levels, from beginner to advanced. On a variety of topics covering Learning Payroll, Taxable Benefits & Allowances, Employment Standards, Pensions and more.

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Business in Calgary magazine’s circulation is audited twice a year by BPA International.


DAVID SUZUKI AND THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA // FRANK ATKINS

David Suzuki and the University of Alberta BY FRANK ATKINS

P

olitical correctness has slowly but surely taken over us all. A family friend recently sent a text that contained the phrase “my silly First World problems,” and on a recent visit this same person went on in detail about her white privilege. The problem here is not that she holds these opinions; in my mind, people can believe anything they want, as long as they are willing to defend their opinions when questioned. The problem is that I am not supposed to question these opinions, so defence is not needed. Rather, I am just supposed to accept them as some kind of a universal truth. The holy grail of this sort of political correctness is the topic of man-made global warming. Amongst the greenies in particular, and most of the population in general, questioning of this so-called scientific consensus opinion is strictly forbidden. This dogma is now taught in our schools as an undeniable truth that should be corrected, so we are raising a generation of eco-warriors. Apparently, teaching methodology has degenerated from trying to teach children how to think to teaching them what they should think. The whole question of man-made global warming has long been dominated by the celebrity doom-and-gloom crowd, led by, amongst many others, Al Gore and David Suzuki. What has been lost in all of this Armageddon talk is the concept of trade-offs. It would be impossible to produce goods and services without causing some environmental changes of some sort. So, I agree with the reasonable greenies that we should try to minimize these environmental effects of production. The problem here is that people like David Suzuki seem to want to shut down oil production completely, as they see fossil fuels as the main culprit of man-made global warming.

THE PROBLEM HERE IS THAT PEOPLE LIKE DAVID SUZUKI SEEM TO WANT TO SHUT DOWN OIL PRODUCTION COMPLETELY, AS THEY SEE FOSSIL FUELS AS THE MAIN CULPRIT OF MANMADE GLOBAL WARMING. What Dr. Suzuki seems to fail to understand, or refuses to believe, is that shutting down the fossil fuel industry would destroy the Alberta economy, and bring down the Canadian economy with it. The loss of jobs would be staggering. Now the University of Alberta is considering awarding Dr. Suzuki with an honorary degree. It does seem a bit odd that an institution that depends on oil and gas revenue for its funding would bestow this honour on an individual who would effectively shut down their funding. This question notwithstanding, universities should be free to make these sorts of controversial decisions. Where the real problem lies is in their defence of this decision. The university claims that it is “standing up bravely for freedom of inquiry, academic integrity and independence” by awarding this degree. Apparently, and quite alarmingly for such an institution of higher learning, the University of Alberta has not done proper research before issuing this defence. Has everyone already conveniently forgotten that David Suzuki is the man who suggested that those who question the consensus of man-made global warming (the deniers) should be put in jail? I sometimes think that we are living in George Orwell’s novel 1984, and the deniers should be imprisoned in the Ministry of Truth until they learn to think in the politically-correct manner. Frank Atkins is a senior fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

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SMALL BUSINESSES BRACE FOR MORE CHANGES TO EMPLOYMENT RULES // AMBER RUDDY

Small Businesses Brace for More Changes to Employment Rules BY AMBER RUDDY

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hought the Alberta government’s drastic overhaul of employment standards and the Labour Relations Code was burdensome? Changes to statutory holiday pay, overtime provisions and removing the secret ballot vote to unionize left business owners reeling. Well brace yourself; the Alberta government is far from done stacking the deck against small business owners. New Occupational Health and Safety rules are now in effect, as of June 1. The enabling legislation focuses on processes rather than outcomes and creates a series of mandatory workplace safety initiatives for businesses. The new act may require a significant investment of resources to simply be compliant. In the past, workplace safety was treated as the joint responsibility of employers and employees. Employees used to have a duty to refuse work that posed an imminent danger to their health and safety. That duty now becomes a discretionary right. The removal of this shared obligation is a step backwards and promotes the abdication of individual responsibility necessary at every worksite in Alberta. What other onerous new policies are now in effect? Businesses with five to 19 employees must appoint a health and safety representative. That representative is required to take additional employee training on workplace safety for a minimum of 16 hours (or two shifts worth, whichever is greater) per year. If your business employs 20 or more people, you now must establish a joint worksite health and safety committee. This committee must have at least four members, half of which must represent workers and must meet at least quarterly.

The joint worksite health and safety committee either has to meet during regular work hours or will have to be paid for additional time spent on their duties in this role. Thought you got into business to sell your unique products and services? Well, don’t neglect your job as an expert in employment legislation. Ensuring workers are not subject to nor participate in workplace harassment or violence is a given. But did you know your obligations now include advising workers of treatment options if harmed by violence or harassment and providing workers with wage and benefit entitlements while attending treatment programs? Small business owners care about the health and wellness of their employees; in fact in many cases friends and family members are employed in the business. What the Alberta government fails to understand is that more rules don’t necessarily mean safer workplaces. No matter how hard they try, governments can’t legislate common sense. In a recent survey of 800 business owners in Alberta conducted by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), 94 per cent said employment laws should be more flexible for small employers to better support small businesses. Small business owners are well placed to understand the unique needs in their workplace and act accordingly. Keeping track of all requirements can be completely overwhelming. It’s time for the Alberta government to put themselves in the shoes of small business owners and attempt to understand the realities of running a small firm.

Amber Ruddy is the director of provincial affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. She can be reached at amber.ruddy@cfib.ca. Follow her on Twitter @aruddy.

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U OF A: WHETHER ON SUZUKI OR ENERGY JOBS, ALBERTANS ARE SPEAKING OUT! // CODY BATTERSHILL

U of A: Whether on Suzuki or Energy Jobs, Albertans are speaking out! BY CODY BATTERSHILL

B

y the time you read this, the University of Alberta may have already added a new name to its list of recipients of honorary doctorates. Or, they may have heeded the views of thousands of angry citizens, reconsidered and rescinded the honour. Either way, many now agree, David Suzuki makes for a very poor award recipient.

MY VIEW IS THOSE POSITIONS

Tens of thousands of Albertans and others across the country reacted in outrage last month over the University of Alberta’s misguided decision to bestow one of the school’s highest honours on Suzuki, the divisive, fact-challenged and unrelenting celebrity oilsands opponent.

IN ENERGY, AND WHERE WORLD-

The U of A made the decision, let’s remember, after years of economic downturn, in the midst of an inter-provincial trade war, and while U.S.-based activists continue to block construction of a key energy link from Alberta to global markets. But it wasn’t just the school’s timing that was off. The promise to celebrate this anti-oilsands warrior struck many as inconsistent considering his many firmly-held positions in which he publicly promotes anti-fossil fuel opinions as facts, says environmentally-responsible and sustainable fossil fuel development is impossible, and compares fossil fuel development to “the perpetuation of slavery.” Further, Suzuki claims “all fossil fuels are unethical,” says prosperity and sustainable resource development can never coexist and still campaigns against vital energy infrastructure. My view is those positions disqualify him from receiving an honour from a school with a proud heritage of leadership in energy, and where world-class research is carried out in petroleum engineering, geology, geophysics, fossil fuels, economics, business and more.

DISQUALIFY HIM FROM RECEIVING AN HONOUR FROM A SCHOOL WITH A PROUD HERITAGE OF LEADERSHIP CLASS RESEARCH IS CARRIED OUT IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING, GEOLOGY, GEOPHYSICS, FOSSIL FUELS, ECONOMICS, BUSINESS AND MORE. So we’re grateful that tens of thousands of Canadians signed our petition urging U of A Chancellor Douglas Stollery to rescind the honorary degree, or saw our ad in the newspaper and became involved by contacting U of A and their own MLAs. As I write this column, however, I don’t know whether our work was successful in turning around U of A’s ill-conceived plan. But I know this: U.S.-backed activists and other singleminded energy opponents should never underestimate the passion of honest, hard-working women, men and their families who rely on our energy sector and take pride in its sustainability successes. They know fair-trade Canadian oil and gas is produced to the best environmental standards on earth and is the largest single contributor to Canada’s economy. And it looks like they’re not afraid to show it.

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

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PROPERTY TAX HIKE? CITIES HAVE ALTERNATIVES // COLIN CRAIG

Property Tax Hike? Cities have alternatives BY COLIN CRAIG

T

oo often municipal politicians ponder the amount to raise property taxes each year.

Large cities are typically inefficient organizations with plenty of room for improvement. There are multiple ways to trim spending and avoid a tax increase without reducing service delivery. All we have to do is convince our city council members to roll up their sleeves and make some hard decisions to reduce spending instead of taking the easy way out by raising taxes. We’re not suggesting cities like Edmonton and Calgary never trim spending. They do … here and there. But total spending increases every year – it’s as predictable as the sun rising in the east or the Maple Leafs fizzling out and not bringing home the Stanley Cup. One way to reduce costs would be to scale back city salaries and benefits. It’s common knowledge government compensation packages tend to be more generous than similar positions in the private sector. Thus, there’s plenty of justification for restraint. While politicians are generally loathe to actually reduce pay for current employees, it would be less politically challenging for them to grandfather in more reasonable compensation packages for new employees. For example, instead of putting new hires in golden city pension plans, they could receive a more modest benefit, such as a matched contribution to their RRSPs. Alternatively, instead of paying a new admin assistant, say, $55,000 per year, new hires could start at $45,000 or whatever level is offered in the private sector. Considering salaries and benefits tend to make up over half of the city’s budget, the opportunity for savings in this area is enormous and should not be overlooked.

While reducing compensation levels is one way to cut spending, it doesn’t address situations where employees are unproductive. Unlike in the private sector, where businesses have to stay competitive in order to survive, if a government is wasteful, it simply passes unnecessary expenses on to taxpayers. Unfortunately, it’s not so easy for taxpayers to shop around for a different government. (Doing so requires a more onerous task – packing up and leaving.) One way to address inefficient service delivery is to contract out more government services to the private sector – pothole repair, park maintenance or other services. When looking at tendering out such services, existing city employees should be encouraged to put in bids as they often know where the savings can be found. This approach helps inject competitive forces, keep costs under control and drive up productivity. Another option worth considering is an asset and services review. Back in the mid-2000s, reformists in Winnipeg began examining city land and assets and discovered the city owned river-front property outside of city limits. They also began urging the city to sell off some land – in the middle of a booming retail area in the city – that was being used as a snow dump. Cities could also re-examine some of the services they’re providing. Should they really be running money-losing golf courses and fitness centres? There are many ways city governments could operate more efficiently. It’s time for taxpayers to demand politicians spend more time investigating such options. Colin Craig is the Alberta Director for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation

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MOVING. PICTURES.

GETS THE BIG PICTURE. It’s simple: your clients need to know your story. So trust Ewan. He’s a storyteller with elevated ideas and a down to earth approach. Ewan has the experience, creativity and insight to ensure your clients see the big picture. Think big. Get more. Hire Ewan.

PHOTOVIDEO

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WILLIAM JOSEPH // THE POWER OF PRINT

William Joseph: The Power of Print I n the age of digital everything, it’s easy to assume that print is a dying medium. As a research-based strategic marketing and communications agency, we know nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, to create lasting and favourable impressions with your target market, the decision to include printed materials in your marketing strategy is probably more important than ever. The name of the game in good marketing is differentiation, and print provides opportunities to stand out in a big way. A word every marketer should know is haptic. Haptics relate to physiological phenomena – actual physical and neurological changes that occur in a person when they hold something tangible in their hands. Printed material has a way of making people take mental ownership of whatever it is they’re looking at in a way they don’t when they see things online. We’re not just talking about print ads (although those can be highly effective). Postcards, banners, sidewalk signs, brochures, sales folders – these are all print materials, and each of them, in the hands of a great designer, can be a highlyengaging and interactive experience for your customer. We at WJ have our own magazine that’s printed biannually and distributed to customers – both current and potential. WJ Magazine is an invaluable tool that gets us into customers’ minds and places of business without actually being there. (If you’d like to receive a copy, shoot us an email via our website at www.williamjoseph.com.) Statistically speaking, print is very powerful. Research shows that brand recall is an astonishing 70 per cent higher with print than with digital executions, and that more than half of people believe printed materials are more trustworthy than information sourced online. Above and beyond all this, print communication is a far more personal way to speak to your audience. There’s an intimacy to print that you simply don’t get through digital marketing,

and fewer restrictions in terms of content. You can design a printed piece any way you like and customize the amount of space you dedicate to copy. Websites and digital ads are extremely tight in this regard – you’re forced to keep the message short, giving print a distinct edge when it comes to brand development. If you want to design a print campaign that resonates, call the team at William Joseph. We’d love to get creative with you.

Likelihood to  No=ce  or  Read  Print  Adver=sements  

Likelihood to Notice or Likelihood to  No=ce  or  Read Read Print Advertisements

Always

8% Always/Oien   35%  

Always Oien  

27%

Oien

Some=mes

82 Rarely

8%

%

47%

16%

Some=mes

Rarely/Never 19%  

OF READERS NOTICE OR READ Never 3%   PRINT ADVERTISMENTS Rarely  

16%

Base: Respondents  who  read  Business  in  Calgary  (n=195)   R3.  How  oUen  would  you  say  you  read  or  take  noGce  to  the  adverGsements  in  Business  in  Calgary?  

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Never

3%


Nominations are now closed. Thank you to all who have nominated, and to the nominees who are part of this year’s program. We look forward to assembling another group of influential people from our business community who will be honoured for their contributions towards making Calgary a great place to live and work! Business in Calgary will celebrate the 2018 winners at our 11th Annual Awards Gala. Our July issue will feature the Leaders and their companies.

Save the Date Wednesday, June 27th | 6pm To stay informed on details for our event, visit www.businessincalgary.com/leaders or email leaders@businessincalgary.com

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OFF

THE

Diversifying Calgary Business There’s an exciting story waiting to be told

I

t’s dynamic, transformational and exciting. Although there is consensus that the direct and indirect business of the energy sector will be a vital driver of the Calgary economy for generations, Calgary’s business prism is diversifying from the conventional stereotype of being “the oil capital of Canada” to the “new Calgary” as a global innovation hub. It makes being in the right place at the right time an exhilarating and limitless challenge and opportunity for Dr. Terry Rock. Last month, Rock – who is a passionate booster of “the new Calgary” with extensive entrepreneurial and strategic business leadership experience – became president and CEO of Calgary Technologies Inc. (CTI), the respected, Calgarybased organization whose mandate is to accelerate the impact of innovation-driven ventures by providing access to space, programs, mentorship and funding. His enthusiasm and drive is a perfect fit for what many suggest is the Calgary recovery, transformation and new business focus: diversification. “I think there is an exciting story waiting to be told about a city that is a global player in one industry leveraging its strength into other areas as that industry matured,” he says. “We are fortunate to have been diversifying our economy all along. “It’s also true that our reputation lags the reality many people experience on the ground. We have to do more to tell the story of innovation that’s already happening in Calgary, while at the same time doing the hard work necessary to take it to the next level.”

people from around the world to our city to work in that industry, and many of them are here to solve the tough challenges that industry faces. We can leverage those networks. “From here, it will take the right civic mindset and belief in our potential, alignment of efforts, talent, investment and physical spaces/urban design to promote cross-pollination. “We have all the raw materials to move on the innovation agenda, much faster than people expect,” he points out. “We are already a global hub in one industry. We are well known for our entrepreneurial attitude, and we’ve already seen several initiatives come quickly together to build up essential elements of the innovation ecosystem, in spaces and investment.

It is well known that CTI has been consistently committed to establishing Calgary as a global innovation hub. And as exciting as the limitless possibilities are, Rock explains it’s not instant; it is a process.

“We have advantages in youth, wealth, education levels and affordability. We have an abundance of social capital due to our high level of volunteerism, driven by our culture scene, including the Calgary Stampede. Most of all, we have a level of civic pride that I can see forming up behind this agenda.

“We already have one key: we are an established player in an industry with global significance and reach. We attract

“When Calgarians get behind something, they’re all in. That moment is coming for our innovation ecosystem.” ABOVE: DR. TERRY ROCK, THE NEW PRESIDENT AND CEO OF CALGARY TECHNOLOGIES INC. (CTI).

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OFF

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Homes For Heroes

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here is much, well-deserved buzz about Calgary having a pulse of innovative creative thought and bright ideas.

Every once in a while, particularly when Calgary innovation blends with the city’s tremendous spirit of caring, there’s a creative, bright idea that is also a lifechanger and genuinely touches people. The most recent example is about to become a reality in Calgary’s Bridgeland community: Homes For Heroes – a community of peers, a support structure designed to meet individual needs, and a sense of place and belonging for Canadian military veterans experiencing homelessness. It is the focal project of the Homes For Heroes Foundation (HFHF) – the new registered charity of the McCann Family Foundation and Canadian Legacy Project – with the goal to end homelessness among Canadian military veterans. “Sadly, it is a silent but huge problem,” explains David Howard, co-founder and president of Calgary’s Homes For Heroes. “It’s inexcusable that, according to Veterans Affairs Canada (VA), there are 2,600 or more veterans, approximately 180 just in Calgary, who are homeless. They have been through a lot and they have seen a lot. They have various difficulties integrating into life back home and they often disengage from their families. “Tragically, they often turn to isolation and self-medication and homelessness, although according to VA, many homeless vets don’t identify themselves as vets. Not only are they a proud group, they also don’t want to risk being disqualified for benefits if they identify themselves as vets. “The Homes For Heroes village (a Canadian and a Calgary first of its kind) will feature 20 tiny homes, a resource centre, community gardens and memorials to Canadian soldiers who lost their lives in Afghanistan. “In contrast to other traditional homeless services, Homes

For Heroes will provide veterans with privacy, security, peerto-peer support and the ability to integrate back into society at a comfortable pace,” Howard explains. He is infectiously gung-ho and caringly empathetic about the unique project being a much-needed and special community. Home For Heroes will be an intimate village of 300-squarefoot homes – built by major partner ATCO – with full kitchens, bathrooms, showers, a bed and a desk. “The tiny size is intentional,” he notes. “A conventional 800-900-square-foot apartment would be overwhelming.” Each of the 20 homes is designed open-concept style in a barracks layout to provide each “vet tenant” with a home facing a central common area to provide the feeling of community. The village will include a resource centre with a full-time counsellor and a room the vets can book for visiting family or friends as part of the healing process. HFHF is leasing the land and the buildings with no funding from either the provincial or federal government. Howard points out, “This is by no means a free ride. The vets will pay rent to live at Homes For Heroes and the rents will cover the project’s operating fund. And when a ‘vet tenant’ is ready to leave the village, they will mentor a new tenant. “We are very proud of Homes For Heroes,” he adds with enthusiasm and emotion. “And we plan to have some vets all moved in and ‘at home’ by Remembrance Day.”

ABOVE: THE INTIMATE HOMES FOR HEROES VILLAGE OF TWENTY 300SF HOMES FOR CALGARY VERERANS WILL BE READY FOR MOVE-INS ON REMEMBRANCE DAY.

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CLIMATE CHANGE AND NEW CODES // URBANOMICS

CLIMATE CHANGE AND NEW CODES REVISING THE WAY HOMES ARE BUILT BY JOHN HARDY

D

espite puns to the contrary, climate change is a “hot” topic.

In many subtle and not-so-subtle ways, climate change impacts most aspects of contemporary life and business. While many effects and side-effects are indirect and long term, the impact of climate change on the homebuilding industry is immediate. The key issue is how climate change can and will affect the many detailed sections, specifications and regulations of the National Building Code (NBC). The code – scheduled for a 2020 revision and update – is a crucially important, complex and detailed work-in-constant progress. And BILD Calgary Region members and committees have been focused and involved with consultations and input on vital municipal, provincial and national levels. “Code changes are managed through five-year cycles,” explains Rick Gratton, senior development manager at Brookfield Residential, chair of both BILD Calgary Region’s technical builder committee and BILD Alberta’s provincial residential technical committee while also active provincially and nationally on building councils and code review task forces. “Previously, Alberta followed the Alberta Building Code (ABC), adapting national code changes specifically for Alberta. Now the province is moving away from ABC to the National Building Code (NBC), Alberta Edition. “So before we even get to 2020, the next code changes to hit our industry will be the 2015 ones which are just about

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JUNE 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

to go through legislature this fall for implementation in early 2019. As for the 2020 NBC, we don’t yet know what’s coming at industry because it is still under review. Generally there are hundreds of submitted code change requests that have to be reviewed,” he points out. “What percentage of those actually make it into the final approved changes is unknown. Just to give a scope of the magnitude of the code review cycle – there are nine national code standing committees, each with a variety of task groups focused on very specific portions of the code. Our estimation is that the standing committee for housing and small buildings alone has over a dozen specific task groups.” Gratton adds that there are still two more public reviews for the 2020 codes that must happen and whatever ends up actually being part of the 2020 changes likely won’t be released until late 2020 and adopted by Alberta in the spring of 2021. “The building code, as with any new code that dramatically changes the structure, the systems or how a house can sit on a lot, has the most impact,” says Joan Maisonneuve, director of buildings, policies and practices with BILD Alberta. “Large amounts of change or complex changes require time to learn and adapt to. This could be caused by sourcing new materials, new suppliers, changing designs to accommodate construction changes or adapting to new permitting processes. “An example of this was the 2014 adoption of a new section for energy efficiency in the Alberta Building Code that affected houses and small buildings.”


CLIMATE CHANGE AND NEW CODES // URBANOMICS

Industry experts agree that a key aspect of the climate change impact on building codes will be the recent trend of extreme weather. “Awareness about extreme weather events has been growing since before the 2010 code cycle. When wind values increased, for example, it translated into increased bracing and changes to wall construction for buildings in high-wind areas in southern Alberta. “However, the code has never required construction to meet worst-case scenarios that occur only occasionally,” she adds. “Besides, Alberta builders often adapt their practices ahead of code change based on local knowledge.” Closer to home, the City of Calgary has been developing its Climate Resilience Plan since last spring. The recommended actions will comply with federal and provincial regulations, reduce the impact of extreme weather events and climatic changes on infrastructure and services, and identify ways to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. BILD Calgary Region has been a dynamic participant in the consultations and detailing the final proposal that will be presented to Calgary council next month. It will include some positive things that can be used to impact the homebuilding industry such as electric vehicles and charging stations, more walking and cycling paths, promotion of transit, green spaces in community designs, and others. “BILD CR has been working proactively with the city on this,” notes Grace Lui, BILD Calgary Region’s director of strategic initiatives and government relations. “It is a comprehensive strategy that will impact the city and our industry broadly and extensively: from building code and retrofits to community design and transportation changes, electric vehicle use, waste/consumption, water, infrastructure and new technologies. “One of the key areas of collaboration amongst Calgary, Edmonton and Alberta on city charter policies is empowering environmental stewardship,” she says. “There are specific charter authorities allocated to the city for

GRATTON ADDS THAT THERE ARE STILL TWO MORE PUBLIC REVIEWS FOR THE 2020 CODES THAT MUST HAPPEN AND WHATEVER ENDS UP ACTUALLY BEING PART OF THE 2020 CHANGES LIKELY WON’T BE RELEASED UNTIL LATE 2020 AND ADOPTED BY ALBERTA IN THE SPRING OF 2021. clean-energy loans, for climate change and (compulsory) adaptation plans allowing the city to consider the environment in its land-use planning decisions, and to establish requirements in excess of existing building codes to meet environmental and energy conservation objectives.” Lui emphasizes the various aspects could have significant impact on Calgary’s building industry and can be positive or negative, depending on application. “Our collaboration is important,” she notes with enthusiasm. “The city is a good regulator. BILD CR are good implementers. Both sides are needed.”

ABOVE: RICK GRATTON, SENIOR DEVELOPMENT MANAGER AT BROOKFIELD RESIDENTIAL AND MEMBER OF BILD CR.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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GROWING TOGETHER As our population increases, so does the demand for services and infrastructure. And, as we get closer as neighbours, the Calgary Metropolitan Area needs a plan.

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EFFICIENT TAX SPENDING Wiser use of tax dollars by coordinating infrastructure needs and construction for several municipalities at once.

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ALIGNED VISION The board’s mandate includes promoting the economic well being of the area. Collaboration means a clear vision for a thriving region that benefits all of us.

Savings from the new plan can benefit homeowners. More certainty in the long-term plan means more efficiency for developers, and better new home prices.

LEARN MORE ABOUT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE CALGARY REGION Sponsored by the Building Land Development Association (BILD Calgary Region), Smarter Growth Initiative fosters informed conversation on development issues that affect all of us.

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FIVE YEARS LATER // FLOODS

FIVE YEARS LATER I

n June of 2013, Calgary experienced disaster. A year’s worth of rain – approximately 300 millilitres – fell in the span of two days on a relatively small area west of the city (from Bragg Creek to Canmore). This, combined with a melting snowpack from the nearby mountains, caused a one in 100-year flood of the Bow and Elbow rivers in the city and surrounding areas. It would be the second largest natural disaster in Canadian history after the Fort McMurray fires. The numbers are telling: $6 billion in financial losses and property damage across southern Alberta, including $445 million in damage to public infrastructure in Calgary; five lives lost; 80,000 Calgarians evacuated; 32 communities affected including the downtown core which was inaccessible for days; 5.1 million lost work hours; and, a $2-billion reduction in the Canadian GDP.

THE 2013 FLOOD AND ITS IMPACT ON CALGARY

BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

have passed through Calgary, in 1879 and 1897.” Regular flooding occurred until about 1932; then, through sheer probabilistic luck, Calgary experienced a 70-year period of relatively no flooding. “But this is absolutely a flood-prone place,” Frigo stresses. “What’s surprising is not that 2013 occurred, but that events of similar magnitude or lesser magnitude haven’t occurred more regularly in that 70-year period preceding 2005. “In fact, river flooding is identified by the Calgary Emergency Management Agency (CEMA) as the predominant risk Calgary faces.”

Five years later, could a flood of the same magnitude devastate the city again? Yes, absolutely.

For clarity, a one in 100-year flood means a one per cent chance every year that a flood of that magnitude will occur. “It doesn’t mean we start the clock again and wait another 100 years,” explains Greg Clark, MLA for Calgary-Elbow. It’s also based on a rolling average over time, such that the 2013 flood is now considered a one in 70- or 75-year flood.

“People think that 2013 was an outlier or unusual event,” laments Frank Frigo, leader of watershed analysis at the City of Calgary. “But even in the short time that we’ve been measuring flow rates in the Bow, two larger events

And even though the 2013 flood was devastating, it could have been much worse. “About six more hours of rainfall and the entire downtown core would have been flooded,” reveals Paul Battistella of Flood Free Calgary, an

ABOVE: AT THE HEIGHT OF THE FLOOD, THE FLOW RATE ON THE BOW RIVER REACHED FIVE TIMES ITS NORMAL RATE FOR THE TIME OF THE YEAR. BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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FIVE YEARS LATER // FLOODS

organization advocating mitigation on both rivers. “In that scenario, where you have parkades and elevator systems destroyed, you’re potentially losing months of access to the downtown.” The downtown vacancy rate, he notes, is currently around 30 per cent. “If we think that’s a problem, imagine the vacancy rate with that type of flood. What’ll be the impact on the city’s economy and to all the businesses in and around the downtown?” Mitigation, everyone agrees, is required. Five years in though, after much study, analysis and evaluation, significant mitigation – which would protect against an event similar to the 2013 flood – has yet to occur.

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At the municipal level, the River Flood Mitigation Program (RFMP) was formed shortly after June 2013 to carry out an investigation of flood-mitigation issues and responses. The expert management panel (EMP) released its report one year later with recommendations focused on six broad themes: managing flood risk; watershed management; event forecasting; storage, diversion and protection; infrastructure and property resiliency; and, changing climate. Since 2013, the city has committed over $150 million for various flood-mitigation projects. To date, 11 of the EMP’s recommendations have been completed, and 16 are in progress. “We have been working predominantly on smaller, communityscale projects to improve resilience,” says Frigo. “Things like flood protection at the zoo, barriers and flood work at the Stampede, lots of work on bank stability to protect key infrastructure like water mains, bridges, electrical substations. All of that work has reduced our estimate of the current exposure by about 30 per cent on aggregate, which is about a $52-million differential from 2013.” What of the remaining 70 per cent exposure? “An important investment the city supports and the province has committed to is the Springbank reservoir,” he says. The Springbank Off-Stream Reservoir is a dry reservoir that will divert water from the Elbow River and store it in a temporary reservoir during a flood. It will work in tandem with the Glenmore Reservoir, where new floodgates currently under construction will double the capacity of the reservoir. Once completed in time for next spring, the new gates will provide protection for approximately 20 per cent of the volume of a 2013-type flood. Together, the new gates and the Springbank reservoir would accommodate water volumes equal to the 2013 flood, with nominal damage to riverbanks in Calgary. Originally committed to by the provincial government of Jim Prentice, the Springbank reservoir was re-approved by the NDP government in October 2015. Since that time, it has been slogging through the regulatory process of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA), and not without opposition. “The Springbank reservoir is the right solution for the Elbow River,” says Battistella. “It’s in the regulatory process which is subject to intervention. The

JUNE 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


FIVE YEARS LATER // FLOODS

“WE HAVE BEEN WORKING PREDOMINANTLY ON SMALLER, COMMUNITY-SCALE PROJECTS TO IMPROVE RESILIENCE, THINGS LIKE FLOOD PROTECTION AT THE ZOO, BARRIERS AND FLOOD WORK AT THE STAMPEDE, LOTS OF WORK ON BANK STABILITY TO PROTECT KEY INFRASTRUCTURE LIKE WATER MAINS, BRIDGES, ELECTRICAL SUBSTATIONS.” ~ FRANK FRIGO

opposition is against the project for their own reasons and I see the regulatory process being used to do what is being done in Trans Mountain – to delay and defer and hopefully stop the project.” Battistella is referring to the approximately 22 landowners whose land must be acquired by the provincial government to build the reservoir. These landowners oppose the project. “But I haven’t seen anything coming from them that identifies environmental impacts as a concern,” he adds. “Springbank is the least-expensive, most-effective and most-timely flood-mitigation project for the Elbow River,” says Clark. “It’s not without impact unfortunately. But when you have the economic engine of Western Canada – downtown Calgary – under threat, ABOVE: FRANK FRIGO, LEADER OF WATERSHED ANALYSIS AT THE CITY OF CALGARY.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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FIVE YEARS LATER // FLOODS

the public interest demands that private landowners have their land acquired.” Clark, Frigo and Battistella agree the alternatives to Springbank, including the McLean Creek project and a tunnel under the Glenmore Reservoir, are inadequate. The general consensus is the project will happen, though perhaps not by the spring of 2021 as originally planned. “The latest projection shows it will be half done by the spring of 2021,” offers Clark. Mitigation on the Bow River is more complex, Frigo says. Construction of a new reservoir upstream of Calgary has been identified as needed, though alone wouldn’t be enough. Another key component is a 2016 agreement between the province and TransAlta to operate Ghost reservoir and the Kananaskis river system reservoirs so as to offer more flood protection. “Unfortunately, even with a new dam and the TransAlta agreement it’s still not enough,” says Frigo, “so there has been a significant investment of about $150 million – which is about 30 per cent complete now – of resilience features such as improved draining systems, flood walls and barriers put in place in specific communities in Calgary: Bowness,

ANOTHER KEY COMPONENT IS A 2016 AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE PROVINCE AND TRANSALTA TO OPERATE GHOST RESERVOIR AND THE KANANASKIS RIVER SYSTEM RESERVOIRS SO AS TO OFFER MORE FLOOD PROTECTION. Sunnyside, parts of downtown, parts of the Bonnybrook industrial area, as well the east part of Inglewood.” “If you want to protect the downtown core and the business community, you need mitigation on both the Bow and Elbow,” says Battistella who is confident in the Springbank project. He’s less satisfied with the status of the Bow. “It’s going to take us approximately 10 years to get the Elbow taken care of and it’s already underway. How much longer is it going to take for the Bow? Are we looking at another decade before there’s the required flood mitigation there?” For now, and the foreseeable future, let’s hope luck is on the city’s side. ABOVE LEFT: 10TH STREET BRIDGE FLOODING. ABOVE CENTRE: DURING THE 2013 FLOOD, THE CENTRE STREET BRIDGE PROVED TO BE A BREACH POINT FOR WATER INTO THE DOWNTOWN CORE. RIGHT CENTRE: FLOODED UNDERPASS IN THE CITY’S DOWNTOWN.

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FIVE YEARS LATER // FLOODS

PREPARING TOMORROW’S WORKFORCE WITH LESSONS ON MONEY MANAGEMENT AND FREE ENTERPRISE

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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GUY TURCOTTE // COVER

ABOVE: GUY TURCOTTE, RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 DISTINGUISHED BUSINESS LEADER AWARD PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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GUY TURCOTTE // COVER

GUY TURCOTTE

RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 DISTINGUISHED BUSINESS LEADER AWARD BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

T

o Guy Turcotte, ethical leadership is straightforward. “It means being an honest person,” the well-known Calgary businessman says, as if it’s the most obvious thing in the world. “Living with a strong sense of honesty and integrity and a value system that means you do the right thing. You don’t cut corners, you don’t lie and you don’t cheat.” This innate ethical sensibility has been instrumental throughout Turcotte’s 42-year career. It guided him in founding no less than six companies: oil and gas darling Chauvco Resources Ltd., a company he formed for $2 million in 1981 that sold for $1.3 billion 16 years later; Veresen Inc. (formerly Fort Chicago Energy Partners LP), which was instrumental in building the Alliance natural gas pipeline; Western Oil Sands Inc., a 20 per cent partner in the Athabasca Oil Sands Project (AOSP); Stone Creek Resorts (SCR), the owner and operator of Silvertip Resort in Canmore and Eagle Ranch Resort in Invermere; Field Upgrading, which has developed a breakthrough sour heavy sulphur removal and upgrading process; and, Western Hydrogen, developer of a new hydrogen manufacturing technology called molten salt gasification. Throughout each of these business endeavours, Turcotte has maintained his reputation – in Calgary, across Canada and internationally – as a great leader. A truly worthy candidate, Turcotte has been named this year’s recipient of the Distinguished Business Leader Award (DBLA). In its 26th year, the award, co-presented annually by the Haskayne School of Business and the Calgary

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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GUY TURCOTTE // COVER

Chamber, recognizes outstanding leaders with superior business ethics. Past recipients include Clive Beddoe, Patrick Daniel and Leslie O’Donoghue. At the awards gala on June 21 – proceeds from which fund an annual scholarship for a Haskayne student as well as the Chamber’s Emerging Entrepreneur Scholarship – Turcotte will join their ranks. “I’m very humbled and honoured,” the down-to-earth Turcotte says from his beltline office, headquarters for SCR. “I’ve spent my entire business career in Calgary, so it’s a really nice recognition.” It’s a business community, he offers, with ethics. “We’re a relatively small community and it’s a self-policing exercise, because if you want to be unethical, you’ll probably only get one or two chances to do so.” “Calgary is entrepreneurial spirit. It drives us, defines us, and is fuelled by the exceptional contributions and communitybuilding initiatives of business leaders like Guy Turcotte,” says Sandip Lalli, president and CEO of the Chamber. “From oil and gas to real estate to fuel cells, Guy has shown leadership and innovation in a variety of industries, all with a commitment to paying it forward.” Known best for these achievements, the unassuming Turcotte began from humble beginnings. The third of nine children, he grew up on a small mixed farm just outside Chauvin. “I had a wonderful childhood,” he reminisces. “A lot of time spent outdoors in wide-open spaces.” The oldest son, Turcotte was given responsibility at a young age. “I was milking cows by hand at eight years old,” he recalls. “I didn’t see it as a hardship – I saw it as an important contribution to my family.” He also gained an appreciation for business. “My father was a very happy guy because he was his own boss. Being a farmer is serious business – you put up with bad weather, bad years, unforeseen circumstances. I learned a lot about business from him.” It was on the farm where Turcotte first glimpsed Alberta’s oil and gas industry. “There were oil wells all around,” he says. “I was interested in what was coming out of them; how much money they were making.” After high school, Turcotte attended NAIT. He graduated in 1972 and decided to complete an engineering degree.

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Unable to transfer his NAIT credits to a university in Alberta, he enrolled at the University of Tulsa. “Sometimes fortuitous things happen,” he reflects. “The experience of going to another country was life changing. I gained a lot of confidence and it opened up the world for me.” He completed a chemical engineering degree in 1975, followed by an MBA in 1976. Turcotte’s first job out of university was at the Federal Business Development Bank (BDC today), where he was in charge of recommending loans to various businesses. He again witnessed the benefits of being one’s own boss, solidifying his desire to be a business owner. Opportunity soon came knocking, when a loan-seeking woodworking company asked Turcotte to become its CFO. The 26-year-old, lacking any knowledge of woodworking, accepted. He also paid $25,000 to purchase one-sixth of the business. “I’d paid off my student loans, saved $3,000 and got up the courage to ask my father to loan me the other $22,000,” he explains. “I didn’t even know if he had $22,000, but he loaned me the money.” Turcotte learned valuable business ethics early on at his new job: two weeks in, he discovered the president had been stealing from the company. “It was eye opening,” he says. “I had to approach the board and tell them what I’d discovered. So they let him go and put me in that position, if you can believe it!” Two years later, Turcotte and his partners sold the business. “And that’s where I made my first $50,000. It was the start of my business career.” He spent the next year working in venture capital for Dick Bonnycastle in Calgary, learning how to valuate a company, an invaluable skill throughout his career. But deep down, Turcotte knew he couldn’t remain someone’s employee. “I started to plan my own oil and gas company.” At the ripe age of 29, Turcotte started Chauvco (named after his hometown). “I needed $2 million to list on the Alberta Stock Exchange,” he recalls, “but it was a difficult time to raise money.” Prime was at 23 per cent and Government of Canada bonds were paying 19 per cent. Nonetheless, he was able to sign up enough shareholders (including some from Chauvin) and secured the $2 million – with one day to spare.


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GUY TURCOTTE // COVER

Chauvco’s initial strategy was to drill with partner companies, but once cash flow developed and Turcotte gained experience, it starting making acquisitions. “With the high interest rates a lot of companies were going broke,” he explains, “so there were a lot of good deals to be had.” The oil price crash of 1986 – when the price dropped to $10 per barrel – was rough for Chauvco, and Turcotte was soon looking for opportunities outside Canada. A Chauvco director suggested Argentina. After travelling to Buenos Aires to evaluate the opportunity, Chauvco spent US$48 million on oil and gas assets purchased from the state oil company. “It’s probably the best purchase we ever made,” he reflects. “Over the next five years, we spent about a quarter of a billion dollars in Argentina and developed about a hundred million per year of cash flow. It changed our company.” When Chauvco was sold in 1997 to Texasgiant Pioneer Natural Resources Co., the Argentine business accounted for just over 40 per cent of the company’s business. The sale of Chauvco excluded a 20 per cent stake in the Alliance pipeline, something Turcotte had acquired a year prior. “We had been selling our gas for so cheap for so long because we didn’t have pipeline space,” he says. “I saw the pipeline as a good opportunity.” Turcotte formed Fort Chicago to maintain the pipeline interest, which eventually grew to 50 per cent. The company’s name was later changed to Veresen. It was purchased last year by Pembina Pipeline Corporation for CAD$9.7 million.

every fossil fuel product – runs through a pipeline, or many pipelines, before it gets to the consumer. Pipelines are very safe. And it’s not like the rest of the world is going to stop consuming oil; it just won’t come from Canada because we can’t get pipes built. That’s going to affect our country and our economy.”

“It’s very tragic,” Turcotte laments of the current pipeline crises. “Every product consumed – all gasoline, all diesel,

Turcotte’s involvement in the oilsands – as CEO and the largest individual shareholder of Western Oil Sands – came

ABOVE: SILVERTIP RESORT BELOW: THE TURCOTTE FAMILY, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: JOE, GUY, THOMAS, DAWN, PAULA & ALEXANDER.

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GUY TURCOTTE // COVER

IT WAS TURCOTTE’S LOVE OF THE NATURAL WORLD – AND A DESIRE TO DIVERSIFY HIS PORTFOLIO – THAT LED HIM TO START SCR. ORIGINALLY INVOLVED AS A ONE-THIRD INVESTOR IN THE SILVERTIP LAND IN 1993, HE BOUGHT HIS PARTNERS OUT IN 2005. about in 1999 when he was approached to partner with 20 ex-BHP Billiton Ltd. employees left jobless after BHP pulled out of its partnership in the AOSP. The ex-employees wanted to continue BHP’s 20 per cent stake in the project, but needed cash. “My job was to raise capital,” Turcotte explains. And raise it he did: within a few months of becoming involved, he secured just under $1 billion to keep the newly-born Western Oil Sands alive. “I invested quite a lot of my own money,” he adds. The 155,000-barrel-per-day project included a mine in Fort McMurray and an upgrader in Fort Saskatchewan. Turcotte remained CEO until 2004. In 2007, Western Oil Sands was sold to Marathon Oil Corp. for $6.5 billion. “It was a great project that created a lot of jobs,” he says. “Fifty-three million hours of work were generated from that project. The income tax generated from the construction of the project put our governments way ahead of the game, before we even turned it on. And that’s what people don’t realize: energy makes an economy go around. “Our oilsands industry is probably the most environmentally-conscious industry on the planet,” he continues. “When I was running Western Oil Sands, we’d have an all-day meeting every month: the first thing on our agenda was human safety; the second thing was the environment. We wouldn’t move until we were top drawer on both of those.” It was Turcotte’s love of the natural world – and a desire to diversify his portfolio – that led him to start SCR. Originally involved as a one-third investor in the Silvertip land in 1993, he bought his partners out in 2005. “The Canadian Rockies are an incredible place,” he praises. “I saw an opportunity to build a business here where we could invite visitors from all over the world.” Today, Silvertip includes a 600-acre, par-72 golf course and approximately 350 home sites, with zoning for another 400 home sites, 1,300 hotel rooms and 800 staff housing units.

There are plans for a conference centre and gondola too. “I believe strongly in the business plan, the opportunity and the project,” Turcotte says. “I’ll probably be working on that for a few more years.” SCR also acquired Eagle Ranch in 2000. Currently a golf course and restaurant, Turcotte has plans to develop lodging and residential units. In 2006, Turcotte founded both Western Hydrogen and Field Upgrading. “We have a real global opportunity for upgrading and desulpherization of hydrocarbons,” he explains of Field. “It works for oilsands but also many different parts of the oil industry.” Field owns the global rights to the technology and operates a pilot plant in Fort Saskatchewan. A commercial plant is in the works. “The DBLA recognizes ethical leaders who realize transformational results,” says Jim Dewald, dean at Haskayne. “Guy Turcotte is a living legend in the conventional energy industry, having founded three highly successful energy companies. As a true visionary and disruptor, he has more recently become a leader of Calgary’s emerging cleantech energy ecosystem. In all his ventures, Guy has a unique gift to see opportunities and create lasting value by mobilizing strategic resources.” “I’ve been very blessed,” Turcotte concludes. “Every day I come to work and it’s fun for me. I feel very fortunate.” He and his wife, Dawn, share much of that good fortune with local charities. He prefers not to single out any one charity, and in fact does most of his charitable giving anonymously. With four adult children, most of his free time is spent with his family. “Family is for sure the most important thing in my life,” he says. “We have a wonderful life. My wife has made our life very nice and comfortable; she is the heart and soul of our family.” A distinguished business leader in every sense, Turcotte is the perfect DBLA recipient. His life’s work is a testament of his business acumen and ethical fortitude, and provides a legacy for many to be proud of. He is an example for all to follow.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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CANNABIS IN THE WORKPLACE // CANNABIS

CANNABIS IN THE WORKPLACE

Ready or not?

BY ERLYNN GOCOCO

W

ith the imminent legalization of marijuana in Canada, what are the issues and concerns that employers will be faced with and what can they do to prepare themselves? As companies begin to review their HR policies and hiring/firing practices, they must also take into consideration the legalities surrounding drug testing and medical marijuana usage. How does this compare to alcohol and prescription medication in the workplace? According to Alison McMahon, founder and CEO of Cannabis at Work, the main focus of employers is on safety and productivity. Her organization is the leading source in Canada for cannabis jobs, recruitment services, online industry training and workplace impairment training. On the safety side, McMahon says there are concerns that cannabis legalization will lead to more occurrences of individuals being impaired in the workplace. “When it’s legal, people may assume there will be more flexibility around

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use in the workplace,” which McMahon says is not the case. “And in non-safety sensitivity workplaces, it comes down to concerns around productivity and performance and simply being impaired in the workplace.” Field Law labour and employment lawyer Christin Elawny agrees with McMahon that the number one concern is safety. “Employers are required to provide a safe workplace and any employee who is impaired by drugs or alcohol is a potential threat to safety. Employers need to review and update their drug and alcohol policies to promote a fit-for-work culture and that will look different in different workplaces. In most cases, this will include educating employees on safety practices and the company’s drug and alcohol policies, and training managers and supervisors to recognize impairment.” One of the challenges of legalizing cannabis is that it can be used medically and recreationally. As a result, says McMahon, two slightly different sets of rules will need to be applied.


Clearing the Smoke on

Weed at Work As a responsible Alberta-based employer, are you ready for the legalization of cannabis and its effect on the workplace? Have you: Reviewed and updated your drug and alcohol policies? Clearly defined “impairment” in those policies? Properly considered and accounted for your occupational health and safety obligations in the context of legal cannabis?

Included in your policies a plan to manage medicinal cannabis, employees with addictions and recreational users? Revisited your drug testing policies to ensure they reflect the current law? Specified when an employee may expect to be drug tested and what the process will be if an employee tests positive? If not, Field Law can provide advice, customized workshops and policy reviews to ensure you are ready when the legal landscape changes. Contact: Christin Elawny, Lawyer 403-260-8583 celawny@fieldlaw.com Geoff Hope, Partner 780-423-9585 ghope@fieldlaw.com fieldlaw.com

“Field Law” is a trademark and trade name of Field LLP.


CANNABIS IN THE WORKPLACE // CANNABIS

For example, if an employee has medical authorization to use cannabis, “it can trigger an employer’s duty to accommodate that individual – and duty to accommodate is to the point of undue hardship. So, for that reason, employers cannot really have a zero-tolerance policy towards medical cannabis, because that would offend human rights.”

WHEN IT COMES TO RECREATIONAL

When it comes to recreational cannabis, McMahon says employers can be more restrictive, much like the workplace drug and alcohol policies already in place at most organizations.

WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL

On the topic of drug testing, Elawny says it raises a number of issues for employers. “Unlike testing for alcohol, the current technology for cannabis testing cannot definitively prove impairment. Currently, if an employee tests positive for cannabis, they’re testing positive for an illegal drug

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CANNABIS, MCMAHON SAYS EMPLOYERS CAN BE MORE RESTRICTIVE, MUCH LIKE THE POLICIES ALREADY IN PLACE AT MOST ORGANIZATIONS. and disciplinary action is warranted. But once cannabis is legalized, the employee will no longer be testing positive for an illegal substance. This makes disciplinary action more difficult, especially if the employee may have ingested the


CANNABIS IN THE WORKPLACE // CANNABIS

cannabis full days before testing, and may not actually be impaired at work.” HR professional Eleanor Culver says, “For positions that are categorized safety sensitive with a bona fide occupational requirement (BFOR), drug testing for cannabis will not be an issue. It is already included in even the most basic of pre-employment and post-incident drug-testing panels.” What will become more interesting, she says, is the ability to conduct pre-employment drug testing for non-safety sensitive positions, something Culver does not personally recommend as a practice. Legal advice, says Jan Chappel, senior technical specialist for the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, is highly recommended for any employer who is considering implementing substance testing. “Canadian Human Rights Commission (2017) states: ‘In deciding whether and how

to conduct drug or alcohol testing in the workplace, an employer must consider a variety of factors including human rights law, safety, privacy, labour standards, the provisions of any applicable collective agreements, regulatory requirements, the level of supervision available in the workplace, among other considerations.” In order to mitigate concerns, says Elawny, “Employers will want to ensure their policies require reporting of medical authorization or addiction issues before there’s an incident that leads to testing. This will give employers a better foundation for disciplining employees.” She adds that there are also issues surrounding when an employer can test an employee. “In most cases, employers can implement pre-employment or pre-access to site testing, testing after an incident occurs, return-to-work testing after an employee has been off to seek rehabilitation for

C E N E R A I S P L E A S E D TO A N N O U N C E … Joan Dunlop B.A., LL.B., CIAPP-P is now Manager, Client Services Joan joined Cenera’s Privacy and Information Management team in 2011, bringing her extensive experience as an analyst and resource for the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Since joining our team, Joan has made the complex world of Privacy and Information Management accessible and understandable to all kinds of organizations with her enthusiasm, confidence and experience. Joan’s consulting work includes multijurisdictional access and privacy training, privacy gaps assessments, privacy impact assessments, workplace investigation casework and training.

Jennifer Doiron B.A. is now Director, Client Services Jennifer joined Cenera in 2006 and has over 10 years’ experience building sustainable relationships with both organizations and individuals. With a bachelor’s degree in psychology, she specializes in providing career management, development and transition services. Working collaboratively with Human Resource professionals and business leaders, Jennifer offers guidance and coaching for implementing effective best practices and developing processes that reflect organizational culture and goals. Jennifer also has extensive experience working one-on-one with clients and focuses on empowering each individual as they find new success along their career path. Empathy, humor and optimism are brought to every relationship, helping to create an environment that is safe, trusting and productive.

C A R E E R T R A N S I T I O N . H U M A N R E S O U R C E S A N D B U S I N E S S C O N S U LT I N G . E X E C U T I V E S E A R C H . W O R K P L A C E I N V E S T I G AT I O N S . P R I VA C Y A N D I N F O R M AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T. E X E C U T I V E C O A C H I N G .

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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CANNABIS IN THE WORKPLACE // CANNABIS

an addiction, and reasonable cause testing. However, most employers will not be able to implement random drug and alcohol testing in the workplace.

“THE POLICY SETS OUT

“Although case law suggests that random testing may be an option,” says Elawny, “it will only be available in dangerous workplaces when there’s evidence of an issue with a drug and/or alcohol problem in the workplace. It’s also currently unclear what will constitute sufficient evidence of an issue in the workplace to allow random testing.”

CONTRACTORS AND VOLUNTEERS,

Many employers, like the City of Calgary, already have a substance use policy in place. Miriam Van Essen, leader of health management, human resources, says, “The city’s standard of review (fitness for work) already encompasses the use of legal or illegal substances which includes alcohol, prescription medication and over-the-counter medication that can impact an employee’s fitness for work. “The policy sets out expectations for employees, contractors and volunteers, and substance use in the workplace. It is an important part of our commitment to promote and maintain a safe, healthy, respectful and productive work environment.” The legalization of recreational cannabis will not change the city’s testing protocols. “As part of employer obligations under the Alberta Human Rights Act, the City of Calgary helps employees obtain treatment when a dependency has been diagnosed by a substance abuse expert. Where there isn’t a dependency, employees who violate the substance use policy may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment. “Cannabis,” says Van Essen, “simply moves from being in the ‘illegal substance use’ category, to ‘legal substance.’ Medical cannabis (where an authorization has been issued) is handled the same as any other medication. As a result, the city is taking an approach of ‘business as usual.’ That said, we will be communicating with employees, alongside code of conduct training, to remind them of the fitness-for-work standards, and their obligations under the substance use policy.”

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JUNE 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

EXPECTATIONS FOR EMPLOYEES, AND SUBSTANCE USE IN THE WORKPLACE. IT IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR COMMITMENT TO PROMOTE AND MAINTAIN A SAFE, HEALTHY, RESPECTFUL AND PRODUCTIVE WORK ENVIRONMENT.” ~ MIRIAM VAN ESSEN Interestingly, Chappel says, “Surveys conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in 2014, and by the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction in 2017, indicate that marijuana is used by about 10 per cent of the population on an annual basis, with about 40 per cent using in their lifetime. In comparison, alcohol is used by approximately 80 per cent of adults.” Employers, cautions Chappel, should not wait until legalization to implement an “impairment in the workplace” policy. “The key steps to reducing the impact of impairment on the workplace are to have appropriate mechanisms in place, to provide clear guidance to all workplace parties, and to apply workplace policies and programs using a fair and consistent approach.” The legalization of cannabis will have its challenges, but Van Essen says, “The key message is that nothing is really changing – employees continue to be required to report in a condition fit for work and to remain fit for work during their shifts. They need to be able to safely and effectively perform their work, irrespective of whether cannabis is legal or not.”


NEWS SUMMER 2018

BOMA Calgary Recognizes Industry Leaders at the 2018 TransCanada BOMA Excellence Awards

O

n May 3, 2018 at the Westin, the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) of Calgary was excited to recognize the industry leaders who work in commercial real estate at the 2018 TransCanada BOMA Excellence Awards. The evening was filled with plenty of laughter and hosted by Warren Dean and Aisling Tomei.

The Malcolm Bryce Award pays homage to the spirit of volunteerism and acknowledges the contributions of BOMA Calgary’s volunteers. This year’s recipient was Michel Luhnau, 1-800-GOT-JUNK?.

The TransCanada BOMA Excellence Awards recognize individual achievements as well as the teams who are responsible for high-performing buildings in and around the Calgary area, no matter the size, age or occupancy type. The best of the best in the industry were all there to celebrate the accomplishments and the night proved to be a huge success.

The Property Management Team of the Year award recognizes the people who make a difference every day, going above and beyond to ensure their tenants and the public have access to well-maintained spaces. The winner was Suncor Energy Centre, Brookfield Property Partners.

1


BOMA Calgary News is a co-publication of BOMA Calgary and Business in Calgary.

Business in Calgary

1025, 101 - 6 Ave. SW, Calgary, AB T2P 3P4 Tel: 403.264.3270 • Fax: 403.264.3276 info@businessincalgary.com www.businessincalgary.com

BOMA Calgary

Suite 225, 550 11th Avenue SW, Calgary AB, T2R 1M7 Email: info@boma.ca • Web: www.boma.ca Tel: 403.237.0559 • Fax: 403.266.5876

Communications Committee Kelsey Johannson, Chair, TransCanada Corporation Christine White, Vice Chair, Oxford Properties Group Rita Borrow, Brookfield Aydan Aslan, BOMA Calgary Lance Merrifield, Epic Roofing Enam Islam, Hines

Board of Directors

CHAIR Lee Thiessen, MNP LLP CHAIR-ELECT Richard Morden, QuadReal Property Group SECRETARY TREASURER Rob Blackwell, Aspen Properties PAST CHAIR Chris Nasim, GWL Realty Advisors EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Lloyd Suchet, BOMA Calgary

Directors

Jay de Nance, RioCan Management Inc. Steve Walton, Oxford Properties Group Todd Throndson, Avison Young Art Skow, Bentall Kennedy Canada LP Laura Newcombe, GWL Realty Advisors Irene Au, Manulife Candace Walker, Brookfield Blair Carbert, Carbert Waite LLP

The Building Owners and Managers Association of Calgary publishes BOMA Calgary News quarterly. For advertising rates and information contact Business in Calgary. Publication of advertising should not be deemed as endorsement by BOMA Calgary. The publisher reserves the right in its sole and absolute discretion to reject any advertising at any time submitted by any party. Material contained herein does not necessarily reflect the opinion of BOMA Calgary, its members or its staff.

The Building Operator of the Year Award award celebrates the success of individual building operators and recognizes how their contributions support their company’s accomplishments. The recipient was Tom Kostek, Brookfield Property Partners.

The Pinnacle Award for Innovation allows BOMA Calgary to recognize the innovative offerings of the service and supply side of the industry. This year’s recipient was Camfil Canada for their HiFLo ES Filter.

The Building Operations Team of the Year award acknowledges that it takes a team of dedicated operators to effectively run a building, and looks at all aspects of operations including tenant services, emergency preparedness, workplace safety, energy and waste management. The recipient was Suncor Energy Centre, Brookfield Property Partners.

Client: SERV

© 2015 by BOMA Calgary. Printed in Canada.

The Chief Engineer of the Year award recognizes operations leaders who through their work raise the standards of the industry and demonstrate excellence to their peers. This year’s recipient was Mohammed Uddin, Cadillac Fairview.

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BOMA Calgary News

The Pinnacle Award for Customer Service recognizes and promotes service excellence in the commercial real estate industry. This year’s recipient was GDI Integrated Facility Services for their industry-leading approach to customer service.

2


FOR EVERYTHING THAT CAN GO WRONG UNDER YOUR ROOF, THERE’S THE NUMBER THAT LIVES UNDER OURS. Fifty percent of businesses may never re-open after a disaster. That’s why knowing the easiest way to contact SERVPRO® is so important. Because the sooner you get in touch with us, the quicker we can start to minimize the damage, as well as the cost. Just contact SERVPRO of Calgary South or SERVPRO of Edmonton Southside to activate the cleanup team that’s faster to any-sized disaster. We’re a leader in giving control back to homeowners, property managers and even entire communities after the ravaging effects of water and fire. So whether you’re responsible for 1,000 square feet or 100,000 – it’s your decision to call on the very best. Your trusted, local SERVPRO professional. Services in Canada provided by independently owned & operated franchises of SERVPRO International, LLC.

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The Pinnacle Award for Above and Beyond recognizes those who provided a service to a customer that was unexpected, extraordinary, surprising, caring and perhaps even entertaining and outrageous at times. This year’s award went to ServiceMaster of Calgary for their flood restoration work on Sainte Marguerite Bourgeoys School.

The Earth Award is perhaps the most rigorous of the award standards, and recognizes buildings that excel in environmentally-sound management and resource preservation, and includes occupational health and safety criteria. The category winners were:

Earth Award in the Universal Category – Calgary Courts Centre, Alberta Infrastructure, managed by SNC-Lavalin.

4

Earth Award in the Office Category – Eighth Avenue Place, Hines Canada.

Earth Award in the Retail Category – Seton Gateway, FCR Management Services LP.


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The Outstanding Building of the Year (TOBY) Awards looks at all facets of a building’s operation, and recognizes quality in commercial real estate buildings while rewarding excellence in building management. The category winners were:

TOBY Medical Building – Cochrane Community Health Centre, Bentall Kennedy.

TOBY Retail Building – Park Place Shopping Centre (Lethbridge), Primaris Management.

TOBY 100,000 – 249,999 sq/ft – 999 8th Street, Triovest Realty Advisors.

TOBY 250,000 – 499,999 sq/ft – Palliser South, Aspen Properties.

TOBY 500,000 – 1M. sq/ft – Livingstone Place, QuadReal Property Group.

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Don Bell Selected as EO’s Patron of the Year O

utstanding utstanding Calgary Calgary entrepreneur entrepreneur Don Don Bell Bell has has been been selected selected EO’s EO’s (Entrepreneurs’ (Entrepreneurs’ Organization) Organization) 30th 30th Anniversary Anniversary Patron Patron of of the the Year, Year, presented presented at at the the EO EO 2018 2018 Global Global Leadership Leadership Conference Conference held held in in Toronto. Toronto. Bell Bell was was selected selected across across 173 173 chapters chapters in in 54 54 countries countries around around the world, over such people as the co-founder of Rock the world, over such people as the co-founder of Rock Records, Records, Johnny Johnny Duann, Duann, and and Eric Eric Garcetti, Garcetti, the the mayor mayor of of Los Los Angeles. Angeles. The The Calgary Calgary chapter chapter put put forward forward Bell’s Bell’s name name because because he he isis an an outstanding outstanding entrepreneur entrepreneur with with much much influence influence around around the the world, world, who who fully fully represents represents EO’s EO’s core core values: values: boldly boldly go; go; thirst thirst for for learning; learning; make make aa mark; mark; trust trust and and respect; respect; cool; cool; and and engaged. engaged. He He isis aa “superhero” “superhero” member member of of our our community. community. Bell Bell certainly certainly “boldly “boldly went” went” with with his his four four friends friends when when they they cocofounded founded WestJet WestJet and and took took the the company’s company’s first first Boeing Boeing 737 737 flight flight in in 1996. 1996. AA Boeing Boeing pilot, pilot, as as co-COO co-COO and and EVP EVP customer customer service, service, Bell Bell isis proud proud to to have have built built the the airline’s airline’s celebrated celebrated success success in in customer customer satisfaction satisfaction that that quickly quickly became became so so respected. respected. He He isis still still an an entrepreneur entrepreneur busy busy with with aa number number of of exciting exciting ventures ventures including including being being lead lead director director of of Cervus Cervus Equipment, Equipment, one one of of the the largest largest John John Deere Deere agricultural agricultural equipment equipment dealers dealers in in Canada; Canada; chair chair of of the the board board of of Jostle, Jostle, aa Vancouver-based Vancouver-based software software company; company; and and partner partner in in Highstreet, Highstreet, aa developer developer of of high-end high-end affordable affordable rental rental apartments apartments across across Western Western Canada. Canada. AA big big fan fan of of EO EO and and the the benefits benefits the the organization organization offers offers to to young young entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs, Bell Bell says says he he just just wishes wishes EO EO was was around around when when he he launched launched his his business business career. career. But But itit was was just just being being formed formed 30 30 years years ago ago although although the the Calgary chapter is proud to be the first established in Calgary chapter is proud to be the first established in Canada Canada –– and and globally. globally. Today, Today, Bell Bell continues continues to to support support EO, EO, primarily primarily as as aa willing willing and and welcomed welcomed speaker speaker to to events, events, including including the the EO EO Global Global Conference Conference in in Banff. Banff. Some Some visitors visitors were were so so impressed, impressed, he he was was made made an an honorary honorary member member of of aa Mexican Mexican chapter chapter on on the the spot. spot. Calgary Calgary chapter chapter president president Wendy Wendy Coombs, Coombs, CEO CEO of of Momentum Momentum Health, Health, says, says, “When “When you you sit sit down down to to dinner dinner with with Don, Don, by by the the end end of of the the meal meal you you are are scrambling scrambling to to find find aa pen pen and and paper paper to to write write down down some some of of the the inspiring inspiring thoughts thoughts and and ideas ideas he he has has wound wound into into his his many many stories stories and and experiences. experiences. Don is really generous with his time, giving our Don is really generous with his time, giving our EO EO Calgary Calgary

Don Don Bell Bell and and Wendy Wendy Coombs Coombs

members members many many opportunities opportunities to to get get to to know know him. him. In In EO, EO, we talk about having that spontaneous ‘one conversation’ we talk about having that spontaneous ‘one conversation’ that that could could change change your your life. life. Spending Spending time time with with Don Don Bell, Bell, your your chances chances of of having having that that ‘one ‘one conversation’ conversation’ increase increase exponentially.” exponentially.” Coombs Coombs adds, adds, “Don “Don attends attends quite quite aa few few of of events events and and members members enjoy enjoy meeting meeting the the founder founder of of WestJet WestJet and and getting getting to to know know him him and his wife Roxanne.’ and his wife Roxanne.’ Street Street Characters Characters president president Glenn Glenn Street, Street, aa past past president president of of the the local local chapter, chapter, says says he he has has known known Bell Bell for for many many years years and and echoes echoes the the fact fact that that so so many many members members have have been been inspired inspired by by listening listening to to him. him.

Upcoming Events: June June 77

•• Ryan Ryan Avery Avery ““ From From AA to to The” The”

June June 12 12

•• Accelerator Accelerator Learning Learning Day Day

June June 15 15

•• Year Year End End Social Social

The The international international Entrepreneurs’ Entrepreneurs’ Organization Organization (EO) (EO) isis the the respected, respected, world-wide world-wide business business networking networking group group — — with with more more than than 10,000 10,000 members members in in 35 35 countries countries — — where where business business leaders leaders meet meet informally informally to to brainstorm, brainstorm, compare compare notes, notes, learn learn and and share share relevant relevant discussions discussions about about business. business. EO EO has has 122 122 chapters chapters around around the the world, world, including including the the Calgary Calgary chapter chapter which which isis the the fifth fifth largest largest and and one one of of the the most most active active EO EO chapters chapters in in the the world. world.

www.eocalgary.com www.eocalgary.com

||

For For membership membership inquiries: inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com membership@eocalgary.com


BOMEX2018.ca

BOMA

EMBRACING CHANGE OCTOBER 1-3, 2018

For available sponsorship opportunities, please contact Marketing & Events Manager Aydan Aslan at aydan.aslan@boma.ca


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BEARSPAW ELBOW PARK | $4,900,000 | $3,100,000

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One of a kind opportunity in Elbow Park! The initial builder of this 1920s craftsman home wisely combined 4 oversized lots to create a large private space for a growing family. Since then, this historic home has been lovingly maintained, thoughtfully updated and completely renovated for today’s modern family. Beyond the sanctuary of 13,000+ sf of lush landscaping and secluded outdoor living areas you’ll find an ideal home for lovers of vintage details like eyebrow dormers, wide painted trim, French doors, and elegant fireplaces. The classic white kitchen with 48” Wolf double range, Subzero fridge and marble counters is perfectly designed as are the newly refurbished, subway tiled bathrooms. There’s lots of room in the spacious main floor living room, family room, office and sunroom. As well, the lower level includes a media room, playroom, wine room, two extra bedrooms, workshop and storage area. For those looking for a beautifully designed traditional home with pedigree, this is it.

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BEARSPAW UPPER MOUNT | $4,900,000 ROYAL | $2,150,000

2106

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Renovated character home in Calgary’s highly coveted neighbourhood of Mount Royal! Professionally decorated & beautifully updated this elegant home is move-in ready, sits on a 160’ lot & boasts a walkout basement, city views, in-floor heat & new Bosch boiler system, updated electrical, professional-style Wolf, Miele & Sub-Zero appliances, built-in speakers, spectacular vaulted & beamed ceilings, panelled walls, original millwork, designer wallpapers, draperies & chic lighting, granite counters, a huge mudroom, 3+1 bedrooms, 4 updated bathrooms, classic white kitchen and a truly gorgeous backyard! Relax on the front veranda or on the 2-tiered deck in the backyard, wake up to city views, a spa-like ensuite & large walk-in (w/ organizers) in your master suite, entertain in the formal living & dining Rms, spend family time in the walkout level media Rm & enjoy being able to walk to some of the city’s best schools, shops & restaurants.

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BEARSPAW | $1,950,000 BRITANNIA $4,900,000

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Beautifully balancing modern design and classic architecture this timeless home renovated in 2012 is the perfect place for a growing family. The impressive main floor offers comfort and simplicity needed for everyday living while the formal dining room and living room are upscale spaces for hosting lavish soirees. A stunning white farmhouse kitchen with marble backsplash and counter features top of the line appliances. Glass doors lead seamlessly out to the large stone patio when warmer weather prevails. Tucked away lies a home office, luxurious powder room, and an oversized mudroom to keep everyone organized. The elegant master suite features a Juliet balcony, a stunning arched window and herringbone marble mosaic tile. Two bedrooms, each with walk in closets and charming window seats are connected by a Jack & Jill bath. Utilize the spacious third floor flex space as a playroom or nanny suite. The lower level offers additional living space, a games area or gym, a fourth bedroom, and a 4 piece bathroom.

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BEARSPAW | $4,900,000 SPRINGBANK HILL | $1,750,000

2857

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Enjoy stunning panoramic views of majestic Rocky Mountains from this custom built 5 bedroom executive family home. This home offers over 5300 sq ft of developed living space, top of the line finishing throughout, open concept featuring a formal dining area, great room with 14’ coffered ceiling, fireplace & bar adjacent to the gorgeous gourmet kitchen with granite counters, 2 large islands, built-in hutch, & top of the line appliances & breakfast nook, which also provides access to the large west facing deck with stunning unobstructed views. There is also a den/office, 3 large bedrooms & 4 piece bath on the main level. The master bedroom is exquisite with rope light ceiling, spectacular mountain views, double sided fireplace & lovely 6 piece ensuite with cast iron claw foot tub. The fully developed walk-out basement includes a recreation room, media room, bar, wine room, exercise/ hobby room, 2 bedrooms & a 4 piece bath. Don’t miss out on this excellent opportunity! Conveniently close to all amenities.

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BEARSPAW| $1,695,000 BEL-AIRE | $4,900,000

1025

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Mid Century Modern Marvel! This wonderful splitlevel home in the hidden gem community of BelAire is a design lovers dream. Located on a large lot with a wonderful South facing backyard, this home underwent an extensive high-end renovation in 2013, while tastefully maintaining its mid-century allure throughout. These elements are apparent in the fireplace stone, architectural open riser staircase, glass brick window elements, grass cloth and other statement wallpaper accents.The high end updates are apparent from floor to ceiling, with modern light fixtures, plush wool carpeting, granite countertops in the kitchen and bathrooms, and porcelain tiles in the kitchen and master ensuite. This home is the perfect space for a family , with multi levels and open spaces to spread out across and enjoy. The expansive backyard is an ideal place for a garden party or lawn games. A sublime home, on a large lot, in an idyllic community‌ the perfect combination!

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BEARSPAW | $1,495,000 HILLHURST $4,900,000 - $1,595,000

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Three units to choose from, offering luxury in the heart of Kensington! this incredible, architecturally designed new executive tri-plex features outstanding, highend fixtures & fittings, spectacular interior design (by Monica Stevens Interior Design) and a location second to none, perfect for those who appreciate walkability/ pedestrian friendly living it is set on a quiet, tree-lined street just steps away from trendy shops & restaurants, Riley Park, c-train & Bow River. Walk/bike to nearby SAIT, Jubilee auditorium for a concert, ballet or opera or to downtown from this inner city retreat with bedrooms (2 master suites) & 4 bathrooms, rooftop deck, city views & developed basement. Showcasing exceptional finishes thru-out if offers: Wolf & SubZero appliances, Empire kitchen & bath millwork, Ann Sacks designer backsplash, Caesarstone counters, site-finished white oak hardwood, European plumbing fixtures, 10” baseboards, 9 & 10’ ceilings, Legrand electrical outlets, ICF party-walls & foundation, heated garage & basement floor.

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A stunning renovation, worthy of a spread in Style at Home magazine! This ultra-chic 2-storey is perched on the ridge with city views & a gorgeous, lowmaintenance, walled “secret garden” with waterfall, extensive perennial plantings & a big deck. Inside you’ll find extensive updates feature: kitchen (site finished with high-end appliances), bathrooms (including steam shower adjacent to gym), dark hardwood & porcelain tile, designer paint & lighting, plumbing & heating systems, custom window coverings, fireplace feature wall & extensive site-finished built-ins! Plan offers chef ’s kitchen with Thermador & Miele appliance package, quartz counters & glass backsplash, living room w/modern fireplace, formal dining has a dramatic light fixture & city views, 2 bedrooms upstairs including the tree-house inspired master suite with fireplace, sitting room, amazing closet & spa bathroom. Basement has gym, 3rd bedroom & spa bathroom with steam shower.

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SIGNAL HILL | $895,000

212

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Charming home on a quiet cul-de-sac! The large pie lot backs onto a green belt which gives this home a park-like feel while still being minutes from the amenities of Signal Hill; like the C-train line, Westside Recreation Centre, and many schools and parks. Light streams into the main floor from the sprawling 2 storey living room windows. While the bright kitchen makes hosting a breeze, welcoming guests to gather at the island bar. From here a door leads out to the private deck and spacious backyard The airiness of the home continues upstairs to the master suite with raised sitting area and bay windows. The ensuite offers dual sinks, a shower, and a soaker tub. The upper level is completed with 2 additional bedrooms and a 5 piece bathroom. Finally, the basement comes equipped with a fourth bedroom, 3 piece bathroom, large living space with a corner fireplace, media room, and flex room.

WEST SPRINGS | $739,000

131

W E N T WO RT H C R E S C E N T S W

Fantastic family home in wonderful West Springs. The functional floor plan of this home begins with a bright office and a powder room just off the front foyer accented with vaulted ceiling open to the upper level. Continuing into the main floor living space brings you to the spacious kitchen with a dynamic two tiered island, ample counter space, wine rack, and stainless steel appliances. A dining area surrounded by windows with access out to the deck and fenced yard, a living room with corner gas fireplace, and a laundry/mud room complete the main level. Upstairs a family room provides additional living space for a media or play room. Across from here is the master bedroom with dual sink vanity and soaker tub, 2 more bedrooms, and a 4 piece bathroom. You will feel instantly at home here. With schools, parks, playgrounds, shopping, and dining this neighbourhood comes fully equipped for your family.

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STRATHCONA PARK | $675,000

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S T R AT H C O N A M E W S S W

Family approved and move in ready! This is an incredible value for an updated home on a private lot backing onto a green space with mature trees. Vaulted ceilings throughout the main floor and a skylight in the upgraded kitchen give the space a bright and airy feeling. Meanwhile, the family room is just a few steps down from the kitchen and keeps kids in sight while dinner is being made. A tiered deck is accessible from both the kitchen and family room and offers an outdoor space to enjoy with family and friends. It’s not uncommon here to come across a deer walking through the trees. Upstairs a master bedroom with ensuite, 2 more bedrooms, and a 4 piece bathroom keeps little ones nearby. While a bedroom and bathroom on the same floor as the family room gives a teenager a space of their own. A guest bedroom and recreation room in the basement provide even more living space. Your family will also appreciate the amenities of Strathcona Park, with schools, easy access downtown, and many parks and pathways.

SPRINGBANK HILL | $675,000

7232

T W E N T Y- S I X T H AV E N U E S W

Home sweet home in Springbank Hill! This wonderful home is well situated nearby to many desirable amenities such as Westside Recreation Centre, West LRT, and many desirable schools. A perfect family home with ample living space. The kitchen, with stainless steel appliances, opens to a dining area and living room. Access from the mudroom into the pantry makes bringing in groceries a breeze. In the summer months the living space extends out to the large deck, spanning the width of the home. Upstairs includes the master bedroom, with walk through closet and ensuite. Two additional bedrooms, a 4 piece bathroom, bonus room, and laundry room featuring a drying closet complete the upper level. Rivalling any movie theatre the fully soundproofed basement media room, with tiered seating, brings your favourite movie to life. A guest bedroom with Murphy bed and 4 piece bathroom with steam shower heat round out this fantastic home.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

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SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


STRATHCONA PARK | $625,000

5511

S T R AT H CO N A H I L L S W

Perched above the city skyline - Located in desirable Strathcona Hill this home overlooks a large park with expansive views of downtown. Just off the living room enjoy the fantastic city views from the front deck, or retreat to the private outdoor entertainment oasis in the landscaped west facing backyard. This renovated 3 bedroom infill is just 10 minutes west of downtown and was once featured in Dream Home magazine. Ideal for hosting guests, the sleek kitchen features stainless steel countertops, a bar/buffet area and an oversized island with seating for friends and family. Alternatively, guests can be seated out of the way at the bar style seating in the dining room looking into the kitchen, while still being part of the action. Upstairs the skyline views take centre stage in the master bedroom which also features his & her closets, vaulted ceiling, and spa inspired ensuite with rain shower and dual vanities. The rec room in the basement completes this home and is the ideal space for a home theatre.

WEST SPRINGS | $575,000

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Welcome to West Springs! Great value for a family looking to move into this neighbourhood. From the front porch you are greeted by an open foyer leading to a formal living room and dining room, with access through to the kitchen. Features of the kitchen include an island with room for seating on one end, and a bright breakfast nook framed by a large window overlooking the backyard. The functional main floor also includes a cozy family room with a fireplace, office, laundry/ mudroom, and a powder room. The upper level offers a master bedroom plus 3 additional bedrooms, ensuring everyone gets their own room. The master bedroom comes complete with a lovely 5 piece ensuite with dual vanity sinks and a soaker tub, as well as a walk-in closet. An additional 4 piece bathroom completes this level. The fully developed basement makes for an ideal escape for older children with a fifth bedroom and 3 piece ensuite.

EAU CLAIRE | $550,000

#202

6 6 0 E AU C L A I R E AV E N U E S W

Walk to work from your new home at the Princeton Cityscape and a rare opportunity to get into one of Calgary’s best buildings at a bargain. This intimate building, in the heart of the action suits both those looking for quiet solitude and active pursuits. Cook a gourmet meal in your spacious kitchen then take in your landscaped courtyard balcony view with a glass of wine. Host gatherings of friends in your open concept dining and living room. Escape the hectic pace of the office and sit by one of your two gas fireplaces with a good read. At the end of the day find refuge in your ensuite with double vanities and soaker tub. Utilize the second bedroom with separate ensuite as a private spot for guests to stay or a home office. On the weekends, explore the scenic river pathways, the vibrant restaurant and shops, or partake in the festivities at Prince’s Island Park. Take advantage of the on-site concierge and party room. Park worry free in your 2 titled parking stalls. This is priced to sell. Don’t miss it.

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403 686 7800 |

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TURNING A BLIND EYE // WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

TURNING

A BLIND EYE

CONVINCING WORKERS TO WEAR SAFETY EYEWEAR AN UPHILL BATTLE BY CAT NANTEL

D

erek Bosch was removing a kitchen backsplash when a small piece of ceramic flew into his eye. Thinking it was a minor injury, he went home and got some sleep. “The next morning, I couldn’t open my eye,” explains Bosch. “I tried to open it but everything was a blur. When I got to the optometrist, I found out that the cornea in my right eye had been sliced.” Bosch was clinically blind in his right eye for over a week. Off work for three weeks and without any income, the small business owner wondered if he would ever see again and whether or not his career was over.

Bosch had been wearing safety glasses at the time of the incident but they had slid down his nose as he worked, leaving his eyes unprotected. Stories like Bosch’s aren’t uncommon. According to CNIB (Canadian National Institute for the Blind), 700 Canadian workers sustain eye injuries on the job every day. Dr. Tom Wilk, optometrist and owner of Mountain View Optometry, knows this first hand. His office treated Bosch’s corneal abrasion back in 2016. “Most of the cases we see are related to corneal foreign bodies – specs of metal that get wedged in the cornea,”

ABOVE: SAFETY GLASSES ARE SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED TO FIT A RANGE OF FACE SIZES FROM PETITE WOMEN TO MEN. PHOTO SOURCE: ONGUARD

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TURNING A BLIND EYE // WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

explains Dr. Wilk. “Our office in Cochrane also sees some blunt-force trauma injuries caused by large farm animals. Overall though, most of these accidents are preventable,” says Dr. Wilk. Bosch believes his accident was preventable. “I wasn’t wearing the right type of safety eyewear,” he says. “I should have been wearing goggles or had a strap on my glasses to prevent them from sliding down on my nose.

Honestly though, I’m not surprised these accidents happen. Everyone on a site has safety glasses, but often they are on their hard hats – not on their face.” Some of the reasons why workers skip the safety glasses? They hate layering safety glasses over their regular glasses, they were given standard safety glasses that don’t fit right, they ordered their glasses online and they are uncomfortable, they feel like they look ridiculous wearing

ABOVE LEFT: INTEGRATED SIDE SHIELD, WITH CLOSE FIT AND OPTIONAL SEAL. ABOVE RIGHT: FULL SEAL, CLOSE FIT, WITH INTEGRATED SIDE SHIELDS. PHOTO SOURCE: WILEY X

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their safety glasses, or they want sun protection that their safety glasses don’t have. A 2009 study comprised of 51 participants published in Accident Analysis & Prevention states that “Lack of comfort/ fit, and fogging and scratching of the eyewear were suggested as the most important barriers to PPE usage.” Improving “comfort/fit” and “style/choice” were listed as some of the top suggestions made by participants to increase the wear of safety eyeglasses. That’s where programs like Eyesafe, a non-profit prescription safety eyewear program administered by the Alberta Association of Optometrists, come in handy. The program has been providing occupational safety eyewear for over 50 years and works with employers of all sizes across the province in managing their employee safety prescription eyewear requirements. “When a company contacts us to join Eyesafe, we meet with them to find out what their company safety eyewear policy requires,” says Al Amarshi, director of Eyesafe. “We’ll also ensure that their policy meets Alberta OH&S standards to ensure they meet the necessary safety requirements. All data is entered into a web portal, which managers or employees can access to generate a ticket that they can take to one of 500 optometrists across the province. The job ticket specifies a company’s policies on frames, lenses and approved coatings, which means employees will always get the right kind of safety eyewear.” There is no cost for companies to sign up for the program, and because Eyesafe orders thousands of pairs of safety eyeglasses per year, they’re able to offer deeply discounted prices to their clients. The program currently boasts a wide selection of safety frames from vendors like OnGuard, ArmouRx, Honeywell Uvex Rx and WileyX.

eyesafe CAN

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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TURNING A BLIND EYE // WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

WHILE SOME EMPLOYERS MAY CHOOSE TO PAY FOR THE ENTIRE COST OF THE GLASSES, OTHERS CO-SHARE WITH THEIR EMPLOYEES. EYESAFE IS WORKING TOWARDS INCLUDING EMPLOYER GROUP BENEFIT PLANS IN THE PROGRAM SO THAT EMPLOYEES CAN DIRECT BILL IF THEY ARE PAYING FOR A PORTION OF THE GLASSES.

Many group benefit providers offer an option to cover the cost of prescription safety eyewear.

frames, they are more likely to comply to workplace safety requirements and wear their safety glasses.”

While some employers may choose to pay for the entire cost of the glasses, others co-share with their employees. Eyesafe is working towards including employer group benefit plans in the program so that employees can direct bill if they are paying for a portion of the glasses.

Employees are responsible for taking care of their safety glasses. Should they break, damage or lose them due to a non-work related occurrence, they are responsible for replacing them.

Vince Anderson is a health, safety and emergency management specialist with the City of Medicine Hat. The city has worked with Eyesafe for over 10 years. “In addition to being a cost-effective solution, the Eyesafe program is quite practical for employees,” says Anderson. “It’s so easy for staff to choose the optometrist of their choice, choose their frames and build in their prescription. I’ve yet to meet an employee who wasn’t pleased with the program.” When an employee starts a new role at the City of Medicine Hat, a hazard assessment is performed. If the employee is found to need safety eyewear, they are given a ticket which allows them to visit one of 500 Eyesafe optometrists where they will receive an eye exam and obtain a pair of safety glasses. “Even if the employee doesn’t need a prescription, we allow them to participate in the Eyesafe program,” explains Anderson. “We want all of our employees to be able to choose the frame they want and the frame that fits best. By allowing them to infuse their own style into their

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JUNE 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

“It’s an added incentive for employees to take good care of their safety glasses,” says Anderson. Meanwhile, back at Dr. Wilk’s office, he’s busy fitting a landscaper with the right fitting safety glasses. “Some workers will swap their safety eyewear for sunglasses while working outside thinking it will offer them some protection,” explains Dr. Wilk. “In fact, non-safety certified sunglasses can be a liability. Photochromic safety glasses can also be a good option allowing employees to transition from inside to outside without having to remove or put on their safety glasses. “Whether an individual has a prescription or not, visiting an optometrist is a good idea. Safety glasses should be a perfect fit. Optometrists who partner in the Eyesafe program carry multiple safety frames and lenses. They can help you find the frame that fits the curvature, size and structure of your face and provide advice on the type of lens that’s right for you. You can’t try safety glasses online so it’s a bit of a gamble as to whether or not the frame dimensions will work for your eyes and whether or not they’ll be too tight or pinch your nose.”


ENMAX PROFILE

ENMAX DISTRICT ENERGY CENTRE

TAKING ENERGY EFFICIENCY TO THE NEXT LEVEL

F

rom the diverse and landmark construction of buildings such as the East Village’s National Music Centre to innovative developments like TELUS Sky, Calgarians have seen the face of downtown change dramatically over the past decade. But what’s equally interesting is what is happening below ground. Unbeknownst to the majority of commuters who pass by, there are kilometres of thermal water pipes branching out from ENMAX’s District Energy Centre on 9th Avenue and 4th Street SE to bring centralized heating to new and existing commercial, institutional and residential buildings across downtown. “ENMAX District Energy is the best-kept secret in downtown but we are working hard to change that,” says Jan de Wolde, director of district and community energy with ENMAX. The impressive facility was built in 2010 but many Calgarians don’t know just what happens within it. ENMAX has been spreading the word about district energy and the immense benefits it can provide to building owners and operators that connect to it. Now that the secret is out, interest is skyrocketing. The system currently services 19

properties, which represents about five million square feet of connected space. Other major Canadian cities such as Toronto and Vancouver have had district energy systems for more than 50 years, connecting over 200 and 150 buildings respectively. And, with Calgary’s vision for Victoria Park and the broader downtown core, ENMAX District Energy is ready to accommodate growth in the years to come. The concept of district energy seems simple enough: the facility heats water that is then pumped through a network of underground pipes to provide space heating and domestic hot water in clients’ buildings. While other entities like Alberta Health Services and the University of Calgary have similar district energy systems to distribute heat throughout their individual campuses, ENMAX is the only privately-owned and operated municipal district energy system in Alberta. ENMAX is striving to fine-tune and enhance the process to maximize efficiency and, in turn, maximize benefits for its clients. “It’s not rocket science. We’re making hot water from fire, but we’re doing it in a way that allows us to do it with higher efficiency compared to traditional heating

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ENMAX PROFILE

“I T ’S N OT R O C K E T S C I E N C E. WE’R E MAK I N G H OT WATE R F R O M F I R E , B UT WE ’ R E D O I N G I T I N A WAY THAT ALLOWS US TO D O IT W IT H H I G H E R E F F I C I E N CY C O M PAR E D TO TR AD ITI O N AL H EAT I N G SYST E M S OVE R A LO N G P E R I O D O F TI M E,” - JAN DE WOLDE, DIRECTOR OF DISTRICT AND COMMUNITY ENERGY WITH ENMAX. systems over a long period of time,” de Wolde says. “We are leveraging ENMAX’s experience in operating some of Alberta’s most efficient electricity plants to get a district energy facility with the reliability of a Toyota and performance of a Ferrari.”

District energy’s water is piped to a customer’s heat exchanger where it transfers the heat to the building’s water through plates separating the two water sources. Then the water returns to the centre where it is reheated by the boilers and distributed again.

In keeping with the organization’s commitment to developing projects that produce and distribute energy responsibly, the 20,000-square-foot District Energy Centre employs a combined heat and power (CHP) unit and high-efficiency natural gas combusting boilers that are dispatched to best match the heating demand of its customers at the time. The Energy Centre combusts natural gas to heat water to about 120 degrees C and then moves it through approximately 5,500 metres of underground pipe before the heat is transferred to customer properties via a heat exchanger.

These exchangers are where customers experience the most immediate, tangible value. Clients using district energy eliminate their need for on-site boilers and system maintenance requirements associated with traditional boilers, and replace them with a heat exchanger about the size of a Canada Post mailbox. This frees up valuable real estate and building operations resources in these downtown properties. “The exchangers are small and out of the way, and they can sit in a small room in the basement or a corner of the

TITLE PAGE: CALGARY DISTRICT ENERGY CENTRE ABOVE: JAN DE WOLDE, DIRECTOR OF DISTRICT AND COMMUNITY ENERGY WITH ENMAX. PHOTO SOURCE: BOOKSTRUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

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| ENMAX DISTRICT ENERGY CENTRE


ENMAX PROFILE

parkade,” de Wolde says. “No matter how many engineers or building operators we take to view one of our installations, they are always shocked at how small the footprint is.” For example, before converting to district energy, city hall used seven boilers to generate heat and hot water for its 750,000-square-foot space. Now it uses only three heat exchangers located in a small room which freed up the former boiler room to be repurposed. A property like TELUS Sky would have had to forfeit prime space to accommodate a boiler room, but with district energy, it was able to add a high-value penthouse space instead. “For new building construction, it allows developers to take that mechanical infrastructure out, which has given them the ability to harvest that real estate to make it more saleable and generate more revenue,” he says. Connecting to district energy has attractive economics for building owners as they look for opportunities to manage capital, operating and maintenance costs while gaining utility-grade infrastructure and reliability. ENMAX owns and maintains all equipment related to supplying thermal energy to buildings connected to the system and has operators on call 24/7/365 in case of any issues. They perform site visits and continually work with building operators to ensure energy is being delivered and consumed as efficiently as possible. “We provide a persistent eye that monitors ENMAX’s systems and the customer’s building to ensure that heat is being transferred safely and efficiently,” he says. For such an analogue idea as making heat from fire and water, there is a great deal of technology being implemented to make sure the District Energy Centre combusts natural gas in the most efficient way possible. ENMAX has installed stack economizers to capture exhaust heat, which would normally be considered waste heat, to preheat water before it enters the boilers. Warmer water going in means boilers need to burn less natural gas to heat the water to delivery temperature again. “We see a significant increase in efficiency by using those economizers. It’s another way we’re using thermal dynamics and technology to get the highest amount of usable energy out of the facility that we can,” de Wolde says.

ABOVE: GE JENBACHER J620 COMBINED HEAT AND POWER (CHP) UNIT. PHOTO SOURCE: BOOKSTRUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

3 | ENMAX DISTRICT ENERGY CENTRE


This increase is notable as the boilers are already highly efficient. While impressive enough, ENMAX is always looking for ways to make it better. In May, they commissioned a combined heat and power (CHP) unit that generates electricity and heat. The on-site CHP unit produces 3.3 MW of electrical energy and roughly the same amount of thermal energy. The reciprocating engine combusts natural gas to create electricity, which is put into the power grid to be consumed by Albertans, as well as heat, which is diverted to the district energy network to heat buildings connected to the system.

I N FACT, AB O U T 2 0 P E R C E N T O F

In fact, about 20 per cent of the thermal energy in the pipeline will be supplied by the CHP unit, so ENMAX is fully utilizing all energy coming off the unit. By doing this, the district energy system needs to burn less natural gas to operate, thus bringing the system’s efficiency up by 10 per cent.

TH I S, TH E D I STR I CT E N E R GY

“Also, we estimate this unit will offset about 14,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions a year,” he says. “It allows us to make electricity with a much lower carbon footprint than other forms of electrical generation.” The CHP unit will contribute to the city’s greenhouse gas reduction strategy and aligns with provincial and federal carbon reduction policies. That is no small thing, and lessening the city’s carbon footprint has been a focus since the District Energy Centre was conceived. Municipalities across the country are facing increased GHG reduction targets and the District Energy Centre with its CHP unit is a positive contributor to these efforts.

TH E TH E R MAL E N E R GY I N TH E P I P E LI N E W I LL B E S U P P LI E D BY TH E C H P U N IT, S O E N MAX I S F U LLY UTI LI Z I N G ALL E N E R GY C O M I N G O F F TH E U N IT. BY D O I N G

SYSTE M N E E D S TO B U R N LES S N ATU R AL G AS TO O P E R ATE, TH US B R I N G I N G TH E SYSTE M’S E F F I C I E N CY U P BY 1 0 P E R C E N T.

“We’re getting more market pull now as opposed to market push. People are saying this is a value-added, viable and really great service,” says Jan de Wolde. ENMAX’s District Energy Centre will continue to grow to meet the energy and efficiency demands of the community today and tomorrow as more property owners realize that district energy truly is the way of the future.

And as the pressure to hit these targets increases, district energy will become a more attractive option downtown. Many municipalities have bylaws incentivizing connecting to district energy when building or retrofitting a property in order to decrease the carbon footprint. Calgary doesn’t have any such bylaw yet, so those properties that are connecting are doing so because it makes fiscal and environmental sense. As the word spreads about the benefits of district energy, more property owners are coming to that same conclusion. ABOVE LEFT: JAN DE WOLDE, DIRECTOR OF DISTRICT AND COMMUNITY ENERGY WITH ENMAX. ABOVE RIGHT: GE JENBACHER J620 COMBINED HEAT AND POWER (CHP) UNIT. PHOTO SOURCE: BOOKSTRUCKER PHOTOGRAPHY

4 | ENMAX DISTRICT ENERGY CENTRE

Jason Grabinsky Manager, Business Relationships 141-50 Ave SE Calgary, AB T2G 4S7 Phone | 403-689-6779 Email | jgrabinsky@enmax.com


THE ALBERTA DISADVANTAGE // OIL & GAS

The Alberta Disadvantage EXPERTS CITE PIPELINE OBSTRUCTION, REGULATORY UNCERTAINTY, TAXATION BEHIND UNFRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT FOR INVESTORS IN PROVINCE’S OILPATCH BY JAMIE ZACHARY

T

he road to success is always under construction. For Alberta’s oil and gas sector, however, it’s turning into a highway to hell for investors, who experts say are ready to give up on in light of pipeline obstruction, increased taxation and regulatory uncertainty.

Canada,” says Pickering, noting the project is being closely monitored by investors because it would represent the third major infrastructure project to be cancelled in the past 18 months – the other two being TransCanada Corp.’s Energy East and Enbridge Inc.’s Northern Gateway proposals.

“No matter how you describe it or which side you take, it creates a lack of confidence in our environment. It’s destabilizing,” says Tim Pickering, president and CIO with Auspice Capital Advisors Ltd. “There’s absolutely no doubt it is hurting interest in investment in the resource sector.”

Martin Pelletier, portfolio manager with TriVest Wealth Counsel Ltd., says Kean’s comments reflect a boiling point for industry leaders who are fed up over their inability to get shovels in the ground – whether that be due to politics, environmental regulations or costs such as increased corporate income taxes and the carbon tax.

Currently, all eyes are on Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion from Alberta to B.C. Earlier this spring, Kinder Morgan chief executive Steven Kean said the company would scrap a $7.4-billion project should it face additional roadblocks. The federal government has already approved the expansion, which would nearly triple capacity to 890,000 barrels a day. Yet since then, it has been caught up in legal challenges and politics between Alberta and British Columbia. “If Kinder Morgan actually walks away from the Trans Mountain expansion, it will be such a black mark on

“Industry should have been drawing lines years ago instead of kicking the can down the road. I don’t think we can kick that can any further,” says Pelletier. Ali Hounsell, spokesperson for the Trans Mountain expansion project, says due to ongoing uncertainty, Kinder Morgan will not commit further shareholder resources to the project. “We cannot resolve the differences between governments that have continued,” says Hounsell. “We remain clear and steadfast in our two objectives: the ability to construct in B.C. and to protect our shareholders.”

ABOVE: TRANSCANADA’S 4,250-KILOMETRE KEYSTONE PIPELINE SYSTEM TRANSPORTS APPROXIMATELY 20 PER CENT OF WESTERN CANADIAN CRUDE OIL EXPORTS TO REFINERIES IN THE U.S. MIDWEST AND GULF COAST. PHOTO SOURCE: TRANSCANADA CORP.

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THE ALBERTA DISADVANTAGE // OIL & GAS

According to the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), world capital investment in the oil and natural gas sector increased globally in 2017, but was down in Canada. Total capital spending on Canadian oil and natural gas was $45 billion in 2017, down 19 per cent from 2016 and 46 per cent from 2014. In comparison, capital spending on oil and natural gas in the United States last year increased by 38 per cent to $120 billion.

Earlier this year, Shell launched its multibillion-dollar Appomattox oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico, representing the company’s first major deep-water project since oil prices crashed in late 2014. And yet over the past 18 months, the company has sold most of its stake in Alberta’s oilsands, retaining just a 10 per cent stake in its original mines.

In a report titled A Global Vision for Canadian Oil and Natural Gas, CAPP attributed rising government costs, the burden of inefficient regulations and the lack of infrastructure to move Canadian energy to growing markets as factors in undermining investor confidence in Canada.

Despite a surge in domestic supply, Canada continues to import oil. By last count, Canada produced about 3.8 million barrels a day, exported about 2.7 million and kept about 1.1 million for domestic refining. But we also imported between 700,000 and 800,000 barrels daily.

“We’re being confronted with a competitiveness challenge that is threatening investors’ confidence with the sector as a whole in Canada,” says Ben Brunnen, vice-president of oilsands and fiscal policy with CAPP. “It begins with the market access issue, which has been an emerging and continuing challenge. That’s tempering investment expectations for both oil and natural gas.”

In 2017 alone, Canada managed to import crude oil from the U.S., Saudi Arabia, Azerbaijan, Norway, Nigeria, the United Kingdom, Angola, Russia, Colombia, Kazakhstan, Oman, Ghana, Ivory Coast and Trinidad and Tobago.

Brunnen adds the erosion of investor confidence in Canada overall is being augmented by a cumbersome regulatory process. He notes there are currently 40-50 policy and regulatory initiatives across Canada that have the potential to, or are already, making the country less competitive. “Take a look at approval timelines in Alberta and B.C., and compare them with other jurisdictions that are actively trying to court investment,” he says. “In Canada, the message is, ‘We may take your money if....’” Pickering notes investors are instead turning to jurisdictions such as Texas, Oklahoma and North Dakota – all of which recently ranked well ahead of Alberta as attractive places to invest in the Fraser Institute’s 2017 Global Petroleum Survey. “They are looking at the Permian (Basin) and different plays anywhere outside of Canada,” says Pickering. “We’ve seen companies leave oilsands. We’ve seen companies leave pipelines. They’ve had no problem saying it makes far more sense to look at other jurisdictions.

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“You only have to look as far as Shell, which has grown frustrated and slowly pulled away from Western Canada. We don’t have many opportunities left.”

JUNE 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Pickering is quick to point out that, without a national pipeline, it’s actually more economical for East Coast refineries to take in oil from tankers than from Alberta. “It costs a few dollars per barrel to ship by tanker, compared with $7 to $15 to the Texas Gulf,” he says. “We have no one to blame but ourselves. We lack the infrastructure and government support. Energy East is a perfect example where we had a chance to make a significant change nationally in that equation, but it was killed for political reasons.” The fallout from infrastructure bottlenecks is also being played out in commodity pricing. The gap between Western Canadian Select, a benchmark price for most Canadian producers, and West Texas Intermediate has doubled to $28/ bbl since November, according to the Alberta government. “Most people believe the price of Canadian oil – the heavy sour we produce – is discounted because of the grade. The reality is that is not the case,” says Pickering. “We have the cheapest heavy sour in the world, and it’s due to transportation costs out of Alberta – simple as that. “We do not produce a barrel of oil that the world doesn’t want. They want it. They need it. We’ve got it. We just don’t


THE ALBERTA DISADVANTAGE // OIL & GAS

have a transportation outlet to the coast and we don’t have enough capacity to send it to the U.S.” Hounsell adds Canadian producers are not getting a fair global price because they only have access to one buyer – the United States Midwest – and that enhanced access to growing Pacific Rim markets is essential in providing a critical alternative market. “For much of the last decade, Canada has been selling into the United States at a discount to the world price for similar oil products,” says Hounsell. “The simple truth is Canada’s oil will fetch a better price if we give ourselves the option of shipping more of it via

Trans Mountain’s Pacific tidewater terminal in Burrard Inlet. Canada will earn more on every barrel of oil that’s piped west compared to those sold to our existing customers in the United States Midwest market, a differential that exists regardless of the price of oil.” CAPP, meanwhile, is anticipating a year-over-year decline in oil and gas investment in Canada for the rest of 2018. In oilsands, that will represent the fourth consecutive annual decrease. “We haven’t seen that in the history of the oilsands,” says Brunnen. “Now compare that with the U.S., where we expect to see a 15-20 per cent increase in investment. Investors are definitely seeing the U.S. as the place to prioritize and generate returns – and that draws capital away from Canada.”

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Inglewood Golf and curling club (1980)

Centrally Located in Downtown Calgary’s Backyard... Nestled Along The Beautiful Bow River, one of Calgary’s Finest Semi-Private Golf Facilities Dating back to the 1930’s, this scenic par -71 layout boasts superb conditions and is very traditional in layout with many old trees, making accuracy a premium. Even though Inglewood is located in the heart of the city, its surroundings are very natural. Fully restored after the 2013 flood, now is the time to join one of Calgary’s favorite golf courses!With our central location, amazing views of the Bow River, a diverse and welcoming membership with a fun social atmosphere, what are you waiting for?

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jon@silverspringsgolfclub.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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Leading Business JUNE 2018

Alberta Fire and Flood, Celebrating 15 years in business

Gary Wellon, Wayne Gamester, and David Smith, Alberta Fire & Flood

CalgaryChamber.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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2018 Board of

Directors Executive Chair: Phil Roberts, President, Vintri Technologies Inc Vice Chair: Brent Cooper, Partner, McLeod Law

Changes to Alberta’s Occupational Health and Safety System Will Impact your Business

Past Chair: David Allen, Founder & President Situated Co. Treasurer: Wellington Holbrook, Chief Transformation Officer, ATB Financial

Directors Bill Brunton, Vice President, Habitat for Humanity, Southern Alberta Mike Williams, Executive Vice-President, Encana James Boettcher, Chief Idea Officer, Fiasco Gelato Desirée Bombenon, President & CEO, SureCall Contact Centres Ltd Mandeep Singh, Audit Partner, Deloitte Jason Hatcher, Managing Principal, Navigator Greg Garcia, President and CEO, Calgary Elite Roofing Brian Bietz, President, Beitz Resources Jenn Lofgren, Founder, Incito Mike Shaw, Vice President, Calgary Region Gas Distribution, ATCO Management Michael Andriescu – Director of Finance and Administration Kim Koss – Vice President, Business Development and Sponsorship Scott Crockatt – Director of Marketing and Communications Rebecca Wood – Director of Member Services Zoe Addington – Director of Policy, Research and Government Relations Leading Business magazine is a co-publication of the Calgary Chamber and Business in Calgary Calgary Chamber 600, 237 8th Avenue S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 5C3 Phone: (403) 750-0400 Fax: (403) 266-3413

T

he Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) outlines the minimum standards for workplace health and safety, as well as the roles and responsibilities of all parties in the workplace. A new OHSA is scheduled to come into force on June 1st, 2018. Here are some of the new workplace rules and how they may impact your business. New work site parties and expansion of the roles of existing parties The new OHSA defines four new work site parties and their responsibilities, as well as expands the obligations of existing work site parties. These new parties include supervisors, service providers, self-employed persons, and temporary staffing agencies. These groups now have the legal responsibility to protect workers under their supervision and in proximity to their worksite, ensure workers are suitable for assigned tasks, and must report unsafe or harmful worksite acts or conditions to Alberta Labour. The new OHSA also updates and expands the roles of existing groups including owners, employers, suppliers, prime contractors, and contractors. Some of these changes include responsibility for the “welfare” of workers and other people at or in the vicinity of the work site, in addition to health and safety. This includes new definitions of harassment, psychosocial hazards, and clarifies that all forms of violence, including sexual and domestic violence, are included. Employers will also be required to ensure that workers are supervised by an adequately trained person who is familiar with OHS, and is aware of the rights and responsibilities under the law. The role of workers was also updated and includes ensuring the health and safety of themselves and others, cooperating with their employer for purposes of health and safety, and using all devices and wearing all required personal protective equipment (PPE). They are also required to report unsafe or unhealthy conditions, and refrain from causing or participating in violence and harassment. Suppliers have the responsibility to ensure their products and equipment are safe, include the manufacturer’s instructions, and are in compliance with OHS. Prime contractors at construction and oil and gas sites are now defined as the person in control of the work site, instead of the owner of the site. Owners are still responsible for the land and ensuring that buildings or/and other infrastructure are safe.

calgarychamber.com

The legislation gives OHS officers greater inspection powers and increases the ability for workers to refuse unsafe work.

Changes to reportable serious injuries and incidents The new rules expand the scope of injuries and incidents that need to be reported and investigated to include any incident that results in a worker being admitted to a hospital

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(instead of a two-day stay), and any incident that occurred at a work site that has the potential of causing serious injury to a person (known as “near misses”).

Joint Work Site Health and Safety Committee If a work site has between five and 19 workers, a health and safety representative must now be appointed. Employers with 20 or more workers must have a written health and safety program and a health and safety committee (HSC). Health and safety programs must include a statement of the responsibilities from all workplace parties, health and safety training, an emergency response plan, and a schedule and procedures for inspections of the work site. The program must also identify existing and potential hazards to workers at the work site, including harassment, violence, physical, biological, and chemical/ radiological hazards. Previously, HSCs were only required under a ministerial order for specific work sites, but under the new rules, all workplaces with 20 or more employees (including offices) will be required to have a HSC. The committee must have two co-chairs (one worker and one management) and must consist of a minimum of four members with at least half not being associated with management. HSCs are responsible for addressing concerns and complaints, along with developing measures and

educational programs relating to health and safety. HSCs can recommend ways to improve workplace health and safety, inspect the worksite at regular intervals, and participate in investigations of serious injuries and incidents.

Impact to Business Everyone deserves a safe work environment, and we support the government’s effort to protect all workers. Yet, these new rules coming into force on June 1, 2018, come at a time when businesses in Calgary have seen increases in costs from all levels of government. Labour costs, in particular, have been increased by government policy through changes to the Employment Code, Labour Code, Workers Compensation Board, and for some, a 47 per cent increase in minimum wage (by Oct 2018). We believe the majority of businesses strive to provide the best working environment possible for their employees and take pride in being a good employer. At times of low unemployment in Alberta, businesses have even competed for labour by offering exceptional workplaces and benefits. As competition among businesses increases, businesses must offer better working environments or risk losing their employees to competitors. The Chamber supports the Alberta Government’s objective to provide a safe working environment for all employees. As we move forward, the Alberta Government can further encourage better working conditions by allowing a competitive and flourishing businesses environment.

Alberta Fire & Flood: Celebrating 15 years of Business in Alberta

Y

ou wake up to the sound of water running, and you think to yourself ‘did I leave a tap on?’ then it hits you, your water pipes have burst. Water is pouring into your basement saturating everything in its path. Water is absorbing into your furniture, colour from fabric is bleeding into the carpets and walls, your photographs and books start to swell and warp. You panic, feeling your heart beating in your throat and your hands starting to sweat. Then you wake up realizing it was all just a dream. Luckily it was just a dream, however, every year for many Calgarians this becomes a real-life crisis, garnishing swift action and a detailed clean-up.

Alberta Fire & Flood (AFF) has been in the restoration industry since 2003. Built on a philosophy of taking care of people, the environment, and the larger community, AFF has successfully woven this philosophy into every aspect of their company. Founded by Wayne Gamester 15 years ago, the company has successfully grown through the ebbs and flows of Calgary’s economy. Joined by partners David Smith in 2008 and Gary Wellon in 2009, AFF now operates out of a state-of-the art custom facility in Calgary’s Southeast. This facility was designed to support the wellbeing of staff and allows AFF to conduct ongoing development and training for employees. BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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“We are a community-based business. We live and raise our families in our market place,” describes AFF.

Alberta Fire and Flood fire line system. Items go through this line to have odour and water marks removed from them.

Water related services may be the highest in demand, however, AFF offers a wide range of remediation services including: fire, storm, sewer, disaster, crime scene, biohazard, and more. AFF knows that restoration is only part of the healing process around crisis situations, which is why they approach every situation with empathy and compassion. As disasters don’t just strike in the home, AFF works closely with business to reduce the downtime and business stoppage that can occur after a disaster. Having a business continuity plan can reduce the risk of having an emergency and will create an action plan and prepare staff for if and when a disaster may hit. With safety being a core value, AFF takes every precaution to ensure both employees and customers are safe during the remediation process. All jobs go through a detailed hazard and inspection process, with suspected harmful materials being tested and properly disposed. Safety doesn’t stop with the people; AFF has taken stringent steps to ensure all products are safe for the environment, and that hazardous waste is disposed of in an environmentally friendly manner. After 15 years of operations, AFF has built a strong foundation and a passionate team of employees ready to propel the business forward. “In recent years we have seen many challenges,” says AFF. “We must be able to mobilize as the threat of environmental catastrophe is on the rise.” Having taken away many learnings from the 2013 floods, which AFF played a key role in the clean up afterwards, AFF plans to continue streamlining efforts and finding efficiencies, allowing increased service in the community.

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Every year AFF gives back to the community through donations to causes such as Women in Insurance Cancer Crusade, Adopt a Vet, the Veterans Food Bank, and many local schools, to name a few. Along with monetary donations, AFF provides free accredited courses to industry partners. AFF works closely with their employees to determine what causes are important to them. “It’s important to us that our community is strong,” concludes AFF. To learn more about Alberta Fire & Flood visit: abff.ca About the Alberta Fire & Flood Team Wayne Gamester, originally from PEI, moved to Calgary, met his wife Pam and raised two daughters. With 37 years in emergency services, he is a wealth of knowledge and the founder of Alberta Fire & Flood. David Smith came to Calgary from Manitoba in 1979, where he has since raised a son and daughter and has two grandchildren. Initially a master carpenter with a talent for fixing things and devising repair strategies, David brings 40 years of experience to Alberta Fire & Flood. Gary Wellon hails from Newfoundland and is married to wife Alba. They have a young son and a daughter. Gary has been active on the restoration scene in Calgary for over 20 years.

Gary, Wayne, and David showcasing there custom facility in South East Calgary.


Let’s get you back out on the road faster! To view our inventory, visit drivingforce.ca

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It’s all about the experience. BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JUNE 2018

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Chamber Member Spotlights The Calgary Chamber is proud to represent many Calgary businesses large and small; this month we are highlighting some of our industry leading members.

Thanks Delta Airlines

Delta flies to more than 350 destinations on six continents, serving more than 160 million passengers each year. It’s an important job, which is why we have 70,000 dedicated employees who are up to the task every day, on every flight. To learn more, please visit delta.com.

Husky Energy

Husky Energy is an integrated energy company with operations in Western and Atlantic Canada, the United States and the Asia Pacific region. Husky has two core businesses. Its integrated corridor operates in Western Canada and the United States, where thermal production is integrated with the downstream business and supported by Western Canada operations. Offshore, Husky is focused in the Asia Pacific and Atlantic regions. Husky’s focus on safety helps to protect the public, its employees and contractors, the environment, and its assets while providing efficient and productive operations. For more information visit huskyenergy.ca

Mawer Investment Management

Mawer Investment Management Ltd. (pronounced “more”) is a privately owned, independent investment firm, managing over $48 billion in assets for individual and institutional investors across all major investment strategies. They have over 150 employees across three locations in Calgary, Toronto, and Singapore. For over 40 years, Mawer has provided investment management for clients using a “boring” investment approach. Their mission is to be the most trusted investment manager by delivering long-term investment excellence, building strong client partnerships, and making a commitment to do the right thing—always. For more information, visit mawer.com.

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT)

A SAIT education offers students practical experience and theoretical knowledge in a real-world context. Students benefit from hands-on learning in unique labs and classrooms, participation in applied research on campus with industry partners and, in many programs, workplace practicums that enable them to apply their learning to meet current industry needs. SAIT’s close partnerships with industry, government, and other post-secondaries help to give students the skills and connections they need to succeed in local, national and global economies. For more information, visit sait.ca.

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The Chamber thanks the following long-standing member companies celebrating anniversaries this month for their years of support to the Calgary Chamber, and their commitment to the growth and development of Calgary.

Member name

Years as a member

Leighton Art Centre World Oil Tools Inc. Alberta Laundry Systems Ltd. Flip Factory HGC Construction Ideal Protein Weight Control Clinic MAGGNUM Ventures Inc. Spectacle Bureau for Architecture and Urbanism

20 15 15 15 10 10 5 5

Bennett Jones LLP

Bennett Jones LLP is an internationally recognized Canadian law firm. The firm and the affiliated and associated entities that comprise Bennett Jones have more than 380 lawyers and business advisors and 500 staff in nine Canadian and international offices—Calgary, Toronto, Edmonton, Ottawa, Vancouver, Doha, Washington, DC, Bermuda, and a representative office in Beijing. With exceptional experience in complex cross-border and international transactions, the firm is ideally suited to advise foreign businesses and investors with Canadian ventures, and to connect Canadian businesses and investors with opportunities in the United States, Asia, the Middle East, and around the world. For more information visit bennettjones.com

Congratulations to Leighton Art Centre for celebrating 20 years as a Calgary Chamber Member.

Leighton Art Centre

The Leighton Art Centre (LAC) is an art gallery, museum and arts education centre located on 80 acres just outside of Calgary, near Millarville in the Alberta MD of Foothills. Situated in A.C. Leighton and Barbara Leighton’s original home, the LAC houses a vibrant display of Alberta’s artists, both past and present. The LAC was established by Barbara Leighton in 1970 and was incorporated as a society in 1974. For more information, visit leightoncentre.org


LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE by Rennay Craats Photos by Riverwood Photography

a Family Legacy

S

ometimes being successful boils down to nothing more than dogged determination, a solid work ethic and a dedication to excellence. That formula worked for Jack Lundgren and Thom and Val Young and, after 35 years, the result of all that hard work is a thriving insurance business. Lundgren & Young Insurance has been offering the best insurance products and service since Jack Lundgren hung out his shingle in 1983. “Calling the company Jack Lundgren Insurance, we started with a desk, a phone, an empty file cabinet and no customers,” says founder Jack Lundgren.

He worked that phone, contacting previous customers to let them know he was in business and left handwritten notes throughout the neighbourhood introducing himself and offering his services. “The goal was one new customer every day and it seemed to work, slow and steady,” he says. Lundgren bought two brokerages in 1985 to expand his business and in 1988 he met Thom and Val Young through a mutual friend. The introduction was perfectly timed. The Youngs had just moved from Manitoba seeking new opportunities

LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE • 35 85


35

Years of success Congratulations to Lundgren & Young Insurance on celebrating their 35 year anniversary in the insurance industry. You should be proud of your accomplishment!

Their philosophy of hard work, integrity and service is deeply ingrained in the corporate culture at the firm. When Jack eventually retired in 2014 and the Youngs officially sold the business and handed the reins over to the next generation, the transition was seamless.

The BIP logo is a registered trademark of the Insurance Brokers Association of Canada (IBAC). All other trade-marks are property of Intact Financial Corporation used under license. © 2017 Intact Insurance Company.

ROBYN YOUNG, AJ YOUNG, MARK SENGER, VAL YOUNG & THOM YOUNG

and had decided that Calgary was an ideal place to make their dreams come true. “When we met Jack Lundgren there was synergy and opportunity to partner together to achieve great things,” says Thom Young, former owner of Lundgren & Young Insurance. The two families became equal owners and worked together to grow their insurance business. In 1993, they made the union official by changing the name to Lundgren & Young Insurance, but the new moniker didn’t change the way the owners did business. Throughout the years they have continued to offer top-notch service for their commercial and personal customers and grow the company from a team of three to a staff of approximately 130 working in branch offices across Alberta. LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE • 35 • 2


Their philosophy of hard work, integrity and service is deeply ingrained in the corporate culture at the firm. When Jack eventually retired in 2014 and the Youngs officially sold the business and handed the reins over to the next generation, the transition was seamless.

ships on which L&Y was built. In so doing, they have almost doubled in size in the past five years to become one of the largest independent brokerage firms in Alberta.

“The reward comes from watching what we made continue to be successful,” says Thom. “The real pride is seeing our children continue to be successful with the business model we set in motion so many years ago.”

And being independent is a source of pride at Lundgren & Young. Unlike many competitors that are owned or partially owned by an insurance company, L&Y is completely independent. Without an affiliation with any particular insurance company, L&Y brokers can focus solely on finding the best solutions for their customers.

Thom and Val’s son AJ and daughter Robyn bought the company and have continued to run it as Jack and their parents did for decades – attracting quality brokers and staff, offering the best coverage for customers and fostering the relation-

“A broker’s job isn’t to make sure you have the lowest rate. A broker’s job is to ensure you have the best coverage to meet your needs. That’s what we do. We provide choice,” says Robyn Young.

LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE • 35 • 3


For 35 years, Lundgren & Young has been driven by the concept of family. The owners are family but they are also invested in the success of those who work for them and think of them as family too. And they have families within their company, with husband-and-wife teams and parents and their kids working together as brokers, further reinforcing the value of family. LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE • 35 • 4


Choice extends beyond what products to offer from which insurance company. Lundgren & Young offers choice of broker as well by celebrating the uniqueness of the individuals involved. L&Y has brokers of all ages and backgrounds and it offers service in at least 10 languages to make customers feel at ease. Brokers also aim to accommodate the personal preferences of customers to ensure the best possible partnership. “It needs to be the right fit for the customer. Some people like to contact us through instant messenger or text or email, and others want to come into the office and sit down and have coffee and chat. We’re happy to be able to provide solutions to all those different types of people,” says Mark Senger, general manager of Lundgren & Young. Since the beginning, the company has provided those solutions in a unique way. One of the key concepts for Jack, Thom and Val, and now for AJ and Robyn, is that of opportunity. Through the company’s independent producer model, the Youngs encourage their brokers to be independent entrepreneurs rather than staff. This model attracts experienced, motivated professionals looking for the opportunity to build something better for themselves. Many of their brokers are independent producers earning ownership by building their portfolio from within the L&Y framework. The result is hard-working brokers with skin in the game who are dedicated to the long-term satisfaction of their customers.

“Generally the broker you talk to today will be the broker you talk to 20 years from now because he has a vested interest,” says AJ Young. “Customers stick to relationships and individuals for quite a lot longer, which generally makes a happier customer.” At the end of the day, happy customers is what the entire business is based upon. To better service their customers, the company recently renovated their Horton Road branch and head office and will be merging their largest two north Calgary branches into one larger space off of 16th Avenue NE this summer. Lundgren & Young is dedicated to making the insurance experience as pleasant as possible for customers by being accessible, knowledgeable and current. To stay current and knowledgeable, Robyn Young remains involved in the industry as past president of the Insurance Brokers Association of Alberta (IBAA), current vice president of the Insurance Brokers Association of Canada (IBAC) and as a director for the Centre for the Study of Insurance Operations (CSIO). She is also on the technology committee for IBAC and IBAA to ensure Lundgren & Young stays on top of developments and changes in the industry to better serve customers. “This industry has done a lot for my family and it’s my opportunity to give back,” she says.

Congratulations to Lundgren and Young Insurance on 35 successful years in the industry.

travelerscanada.ca The Dominion of Canada General Insurance Company, St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company and Travelers Insurance Company of Canada are the Canadian licensed insurers known as Travelers Canada. © 2018 The Dominion of Canada General Insurance Company, St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company and/or Travelers Insurance Company of Canada. All rights reserved. Travelers and the Travelers Umbrella logo are registered trademarks of The Travelers Indemnity Company in the U.S. and other countries. M-18381 New 5-18

LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE • 35 • 5


For 35 years, Lundgren & Young has been driven by the concept of family. The owners are family but they are also invested in the success of those who work for them and think of them as family too. And they have families within their company, with husband-and-wife teams and parents and their kids working together as brokers, further reinforcing the value of family. As the second generation continues to grow the company throughout the province, it will carry on those values and honour the hard work and vision of its founding families.

Pembridge is proud to be partnered with Lundgren & Young and congratulates them on their 35th anniversary.

“Our founders laid down a pretty cool foundation,” says AJ. “If it weren’t for them creating this independent model and having us be able to pick up and learn from that and make it better, we wouldn’t be where we are.” Where they are is a trusted, family-run, independent brokerage firm that puts customers first. And with AJ and Robyn Young at the helm, that’s where they intend to stay.

Trademark used under licence by Pembridge Insurance Company. © 2018 Pembridge Insurance Company. 182168 04/18

We’re coming out of our shell. At RSA, we’re ready to show you how we’ve transformed. Better wordings, more focused appetite, improved service—it’s now easier than ever to do business with us.

200C 9705 Horton Road SW Calgary, AB T2V 2X5 Phone: (403) 253-1980 Fax: (403) 253-1922 www.landy.ca

Congratulations to Lundgren & Young Insurance Ltd. on 35 years! Quality Insurance Adjusters Suite 110, 7710 5th Street SE, Calgary, Alberta, T2H 2L9 P 403-319-0434 | F 403-276-9594

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Thank you for your love Calgary! We’re still your #1 choice for fast friendly registry services

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We’re growing. How about you? Come grow with us at rsabroker.ca

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LUNDGREN & YOUNG INSURANCE • 35 • 6 2018-04-13 3:20 PM


photo by riverwood photography.

Riddell Kurczaba Architecture Engineering Interior Design Ltd. Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years

Turns 30

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John Riddell and Ron Kurczaba, Founders

C

algary became an internationally-known city in 1988, thanks to hosting the hugely successful Winter Olympic Games that also left this city with a legacy of buildings and sports associations. It also marked the birth year of Riddell Kurczaba Architecture Engineering Interior Design Ltd. (RK). Over the past 30 years, the firm has been able to boast of great success and continues to be a respected force in the community.

30

YEARS

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 2

Architect John Riddell left Winnipeg to move to Calgary and begin his career when, unfortunately, the city was

hit by the major 1983 recession. Undeterred, he strove on designing small- to medium-size projects and was fortunate to be introduced to engineer Ron Kurczaba through a casual conversation with a business colleague of Ron’s who just happened to be sitting next to John on a flight back from Toronto. They arranged to meet. Ron, who was working with Lavalin, was engaged in employing architects from time to time on a wide range of building projects, and was able to find a little architectural work for John on an electrical substation for the northwest leg of the LRT.

Extending our most sincere congratulations and well wishes to our friends at Riddell Kurczaba on their 30th Anniversary!

Structural Engineering Parking Planning Building Science Structural Restoration Structural Glass Engineering

rjc.ca


Leadership Team and Associates - Calgary Office This also marked the beginning of a growing friendship. The first major project they worked on together was converting the former Banff Mineral Springs Hospital to a student hostel; they enjoyed the relationship and explored the possibility of continuing to work together, eventually establishing the business partnership they salute with this year’s 30th anniversary.

It was not an easy time to launch as Calgary was in the doldrums and few major construction projects were on the drawing boards, but RK was able to win the renovation and expansion of the former Calgary Real Estate Board building along 5th Avenue SW. John says he was a little chagrined at having to change the original award-winning J. H. Cook design, but happy to see it is still working as a small commercial building in downtown Calgary.

CONGRATULATIONS TO RIDDELL KURCZABA ON CELEBRATING DESIGN FOR 30 YEARS!

CLARKBUILDERS.COM

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 3

WE LOOK FORWARD TO BUILDING MANY MORE EXCEPTIONAL EXPERIENCES TOGETHER.


building needs, and helping contribute to an ever-changing streetscape. It is satisfying to know that our work has helped shape communities.” The firm achieved early success with sophisticated facilities geared towards advanced electronics manufacturing. The Novatel CIMplex plant was followed by projects for Nortel, Hughes Aerospace, and Amptech among others. The crowning achievement was the Computing Devices Plant, a project that Calgary was in competition with other Canadian cities to attract.

Pembina Pipeline Corporation - Grande Prairie Service Centre From the outset of the newly-established firm, the partners created a culture whereby the relationship they were enjoying blossomed by surrounding themselves with good people, and the right people.

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 4

CEO Ron Kurczaba says, “It is extremely gratifying to have built a successful business that has endured for 30 years; providing meaningful employment, supporting many families, helping innumerable customers with their

Beyond technology, the firm took great pride in delivering several important cultural projects for its First Nations neighbours such as the Tsuu T’ina Administration Complex, the Siksika Protective Services Building and the Calgary Native Women’s Shelter.

In 1998, RK received a world-class perspective on the industry when it teamed up with major design firms to undertake the interior fit-out for TransCanada’s newly-merged business with Nova Gas. One of the earliest and most important business lessons Ron received was that “no one comes looking for you.” As a result, RK set up a dedicated marketing and communications’ team focused on promoting the unique attributes and capabilities of the company.


Remington Development Corporation - South Campus, Quarry Park This team, capably led by senior associate and vice president of marketing Niha Prasad-Kroliczek, has helped lift RK onto the national and international stage.

corporations in the world. Their functional design, creativity and innovation has played a large part in the growth of both our companies.”

Speaking on behalf of other staff, Niha says, “One of the strong assets we find about John and Ron is that they are very trustworthy. We have trust in them and they allow us to do the things that we believe would benefit the company.”

Ron recalls looking over the barren former gravel extraction site that has become Quarry Park, Remington’s outstanding live/work/play southeast community that evolved into one of North America’s foremost mixed-use developments.

They were able to establish the right relationships with their growing portfolio of clients. Remington Development Corporation is a major one that RK has been proud to work with since 1997.

RK won the process to design the Jacobs building. The park’s biggest building to that date, the 475,000 squarefoot, four-storey structure over a 22.5-acre site earned RK an International Best Office Architecture in Canada Award.

Chairman Randy Remington says, “For over 20 years, we have enjoyed working with RK to design millions of square feet of office and industrial buildings for some of the largest

Since then RK has designed the majority of office buildings in the park including the South Campus Calgary headquarters for Imperial Oil – five interconnected buildings totalling

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 6

Congratulation’s Riddell Kurczaba for 30 years of design excellence!

ground cubed landscape architects

www.ground3.com 403.475.0719


Remington Development Corporation - Jacobs, Quarry Park 880,000 square feet, the most significant suburban office building in the city. RK had already completed a similar major development for Fluor Canada. Ron and Niha had learned of the company’s holding of 50 acres of land on the east side of Macleod Trail and its plan to put it on the market. They were able to convince Fluor to undertake a feasibility study on the potential of keeping the land, acting as their own developer and constructing their new building there. The result was RK being able to design a magnificent

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225,000-square-foot office complex with a focal 10,000 square foot curtain wall atrium. RK also produced a master plan for the rest of the site that was developed as Sundance Place. The oil and gas industry has been a key part of RK’s business since a concerted effort was made in 1992 to reach out to that EPC/EPCM firms that Ron worked with during his time in the industry. One of the first to respond was Bantrel – part of the Bechtel Group – and the success in completing many of their projects resulted in earning more work in providing services to many more companies in the industry.

01 02 03 04

Joe Phillips Building 220, 101 6ST SW Calgary AB, T2P 5K7 403-777-2729

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 7

DESIGN PROCESS


Recently, RK completed projects for Pembina Pipeline in Grande Prairie (a two-storey, 40,000 square foot office building and design of a 30,000 square foot warehouse/shop) and in Drayton Valley (a two-storey, 30,000 square foot office building and design of a 30,000 square foot warehouse/shop), as well as seven buildings in Sturgeon County for North West Redwater Partnership (NWR). NWR chairman and CEO Ian MacGregor says, “We were very pleased – RK delivered offices, fire hall/warehouse, and a reactor assembly building of the highest environmental standards, and came in right on budget.” The success in continually winning oil and gas projects, many of them located in northern Alberta and across Western Canada, meant the firm was able to grow and diversify into other disciplines, giving architects and interior designers different challenges that they rose to with some tremendous results for a host of wonderful clients.

The Swarm - 2013 NAIOP Design Competition co-winner

Through persistence and tenacity – and the good balance between the different fortes of the two partners – the company has grown from strength to strength.

JLL Calgary Suburban & Beltline Team

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 8

MCW congratulates Riddell Kurczaba Architecture Engineering Interior Design Ltd. on their 30th Anniversary With offices in Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Halifax and Moncton, the MCW Group of Companies is everywhere you are.

MCW – creating the environments required to live, work, educate, play and heal www.mcw.com

403 456 2233 • jll.ca Rick C. Urbanczyk • David Lees • Adam Ramsay

Continued success and best wishes to all the Staff & Management Team at Riddell Kurczaba.

Municipal Engineering | Project Management | Infrastructure Design Storm Water Management | Erosion and Sediment Control p: 403.276.1001 |F: 403.276.1012 | jubileeengineering.com


Clients are great motivators and it was thanks to Remington Development’s expansion into the Edmonton market that RK opened an enterprising office in 2008 in the provincial capital to better serve their long-standing relationship. A notable project is the South Central Business Park consisting of nine industrial buildings, each one in excess of 100,000 square feet – a significant project in the Edmonton market.

Calgary Board of Education - West Ridge School Adding experienced and talented staff and earning interesting projects in a variety of sectors has resulted in what today is a multidisciplinary company able to tackle any kind of demand. Its portfolio of completed projects includes some outstanding examples of the diversity they have received accolades for over the years. In association with Gensler, RK delivered Enmax Place, which won three BOMA Awards. It is a comprehensive redevelopment of an existing building as well as a complete interior renovation to become the 320,000 square foot new corporate headquarters and operations centre for Enmax.

The firm’s interior design studio was formed in the late 1990s after contracting with other specialists that led to outcomes that John says were never entirely satisfactory. “We made a commitment to build our own interior design practice and the different dimension of communication has worked out very well,” he says. “The designers are able to meet with the architects at early stages and then talk to the people who will be working in the buildings, how it will work best for them, and how the design will enhance their productivity.” Earlier this year, Scott Pennock joined RK as its new managing director of interior design. Armed with 23 years of experience in Canada, the U.S., Australia, Singapore and the U.K., Scott has specialized in corporate, commercial, hospitality and residential interior projects. Currently directing a number of exciting projects, including Alberta Health Services in Strategic Group’s CN Tower in Edmonton, he joins a studio proud of a wide range of

Congratulations to Riddell Kurczaba! We wish you many years of continued success.

Solving Alberta’s pipeline problems by making low CO2, high value diesel.

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 9

www.nwrefining.com


interiors including restaurants, custom residential, a large number of offices, the Citizenship & Immigration Court, Hotel Alma at the University of Calgary, and huge projects like the Jacobs and Fluor interiors. Another dimension of the firm’s offerings to industry was the launch of a specialty fire and building code solutions department to deal with code compliance and life safety, offering consulting services to help other companies through the maze of code challenges. John Riddell has always had a passion for technology and was an early tester of 3D imaging. His interest in the advancement of interactive videos was primed when Fluor asked for a full-on animation so they could “walk” through their new building in the design stage. The result was primitive by today’s standards, but effective in that it produced a deep buy-in by everybody in the Fluor organization, and it set RK on a technology journey that has seen the company as a leader in offering – through RK Visualization – the highest-quality computer-generated stills, animated marketing videos, and virtual reality (VR) that transports you into spaces as if you are actually there. Good examples of the power of persuasion visualization can achieve are the west leg of Calgary’s LRT, the award-winning YYC LINK shuttle production; the first animated promotion for East Village using aerial drone footage; animated journeys around and through the New Central Library, capturing feeling of grandeur of the new public space; and depicting a quality and sense of place at University District. Currently the team is visualizing Arlington Street’s investment vision for the redevelopment of 17th Avenue.

RK’s visualizations are able to encourage stakeholders and communicate to chosen audiences how developments will actually be completed. Being involved in the marketing of developments has also led RK into offering branding and other promotional tools; it recently completed a full advertising/promotional package for Sixty West, a new residential community in Sylvan Lake. The newest RK service offering stemming from its continual research and advocacy for higher accessibility standards, was the formation of RK – Access, a division led by architect Erin Shilliday in collaboration with Nabeel Ramji who experiences daily getting around in a powered wheelchair. It provides accessibility audits, design enhancement, and project implementation to address all aspects of accessibility design and construction methods. Blessed with good fortune, the firm has a culture of giving back. Whether it is 10 years as platinum sponsor for the Remington Charity Golf Tournament in support of prostate cancer research, working with elementary students with their tin-can creations, or contributing studio design reviews and professional mentorship to architectural students, RK is always there.

1110 1 St SW Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2R 0V1 (t) 1.403.266.2100 | (f) 1.403.266.2170 www.riddell.ca At CES we believe in providing the right solution the first time, on time. We offer services in planning and engineering for land development. Our service is based on design and construction with honesty, trust and commitment.

Providing Mechanical and Electrical Engineering services to the Canadian Building Industry.

We are licensed in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan and our work includes site grading, servicing, stormwater management, erosion and sediment control, traffic sound alternatives and road designs. We specialize in stormwater management and drainage studies.

Specializing in: Commerical • Industrial • Multi-Family • Institutional 204-110 12th Ave SW, Calgary AB T2R 0G7 T: 403-460-2277 • info@embeconsulting.ca www.embeconsulting.ca 204, 110-12 Avenue SW Calgary, AB T2R 0G7 T: (403) 460-2288 E: hbhaiji@civilengsolutions.ca

Riddell Kurczaba • 30 years • 10

Your Lifestyle, Your Community.

CONGRATULATIONS

Congratulations to Riddell Kurczaba! We wish you many years of continued success.

#710 – 5920, Macleod Trail SW Calgary, AB. T2H 0K2 Phone: 403.640.0708 • Fax: 403.640.0785 info@tristarcommunities.com • www.tristarcommunities.com

riddell kurczaba

NAVAGRAH landscape architecture + urban design

WWW.NAVAGRAH.CA INFO@NAVAGRAH.CA | 403.708.8778


Briggs Kitchen & Bar in Calgary, AB

Delnor Construction Ltd.:

THE LEGACY LIVES ON

Alberta based and serving the province for 35 years By Nerissa McNaughton

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his year marks the 35th year of Delnor providing expert commercial construction services across Alberta. What started as a company launched by two high school friends is now a company executing more than $200 million over 300+ projects annually, while consistently ranking in Canada’s Top 40 Contractors. “Ed Cyrankiewicz and I founded the company in 1983,” explains Ron Hinz, founder and member of the Board of Governors. The company where they were employed went into receivership and they faced a crossroad – take employment into their own hands or join the large group of the unemployed. It was an easy choice, considering that all other companies were offering nothing but low pay and excessive expectations! The first 10 years was about grit, building a reputation and brand. “After that time, we were

considered to have a solid reputation. Next came having our feet on the pavement, looking for work and taking on the tough and highly specialized jobs that no one else would touch” explains Ron. While they built the brand, they also built the company. Phil Miller, Delnor’s first superintendent, was hired when the company was about a year old. That same year, Delnor secured their first big project, valued at nearly $1 million, at the Edmonton International Airport. This set the stage for larger and more complex projects. “Some of the largest projects at this time came from clients that we still have relationships with today; for example, the University of Alberta Hospital’s rooftop heliport project,” Ron reflects. The TELUS Workplace Integration project in 1997 marked a huge turning point as Delnor’s workforce

Delnor | 35 101


35TH ANNIVERSARY ATB Place Calgary

tripled in a six-month period. In the proposal submission, Delnor was set apart and competitive due to Ed’s dedication to the project. He collocated his office to the TELUS project site for nearly two years, which demonstrates the commitment that Delnor strives for. In 1998, another milestone was achieved as the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) Food Services Redevelopment was the first $2 million+ project. At this time, Delnor was also one of the front-line founders of the Construction Management delivery methodology in the Edmonton marketplace and one of the earlier contractors with the opportunity on these types of projects (at both the NAIT Food Services project and Edmonton Public School Board with the McNally School modernization). They were easy to do business with and collaborative before those were buzz words.

Bridgeland Affordable Housing

“June 2005 – The Capital Health food services redevelopment project, valued at $5.5 million, was one of our largest healthcare projects at the time. This was a confirmation that our relationship with Alberta Health Services was allowing us to move toward becoming experts in healthcare projects,” notes Glenn Cyrankiewicz, Delnor’s CEO and Principal.

The Ardrossan Recreational Complex project valued at $17 million followed in 2010, and at 30 years, Delnor branched out of the city and entered the Calgary marketplace. After opening up the Calgary branch, they completed the first phase of the ATB consolidation projects in Calgary, valued

DVS Drywall Contractors Ltd. congratulates Delnor Construction Ltd. on their 35th year in business. We look forward to working with Delnor for many years to come.

D RY WA L L

C O N T R A C TO R S

D RY WA L L

C O N T R A C TO R S

Delnor | 35 | 2

2325 20 Avenue NE |(403) 276-8600

www.dvscontractors.com


at $10.5 million. This was important as the contract continued to also award the Edmonton consolidation project, valued at over $30 million. Following this award, Delnor further renegotiated the ATB Eighth Avenue Place floors 4-7 for $7.5 million. This made the ATB consolidation projects Delnor’s biggest collective project of all time at almost $50 million. “We are very fortunate to have solid employees that contribute to and are invested in the success of our company,” says Glenn. “They are willing to work hard and are the basis of the culture we are collectively trying to achieve. Having skilled, motivated, and empowered employees is key; however, it is our retention of successful employees, which has created stability, trust and confidence with our clients and servicing sectors for decades, that makes us stand out.” Glenn says, “Delnor has a goal of zero incidents, and we are committed to making this outcome a reality. We believe in consistently measuring and improving safety performance, and due to this philosophy, we have been successful in achieving a Certificate of Recognition (COR) for many years.”

Delnor Construction was the dream of two men, and the vision has grown into a reality that benefits all Albertans. The management team acknowledges that every person in the company plays a role in the company’s rapid growth and ongoing success. “Today, Delnor’s success extends beyond any one person,” says Glenn. “Leadership is not a title; it must be an attitude throughout our culture. We require total team engagement to be sustainably successful. It starts with our ownership group modelling the necessary behavior and being held accountable to the same standards.” Delnor helps many charitable organizations as part of their culture. They give back to clients that support them, which is especially true of healthcare organizations and not-for-profit initiatives. Health services affects all Albertan’s; it is fundamental to Delnor’s business to support many not-for-profit foundations that further research and provide healthcare to the community that they help to build. Delnor was also a major donor of products and services to the Cross Cancer Institute’s Healing Garden.

Delnor could do so much more with this space than we could. Here’s to 35 more years of creating inspiring spaces. We’re privileged to be your partner. atb.com/corporate

Delnor | 35 | 3


35TH ANNIVERSARY The company’s commitment to excellence has been robustly recognized in the industry, and Delnor counts a Canada’s Top 40 General Contractors award and an Alberta Ventures 2016 Contractor of the Year award among their many recognitions. Soon, Ed and Ron will be overseeing a transition in their positions as they join the Board of Governors. As such, Delnor Construction would like to formally introduce the new Principal Ownership Group:

is to have clients for life and make Delnor first, and we understand that we need to repeatedly earn that business partnership. This means being their construction partner; from looking after the smallest projects to the most complex projects, we are committed to overseeing our clients’ total construction needs. The successful execution of a new ownership transition plan for the company in this past year ensures that Delnor’s legacy lives forward.”

• Glenn Cyrankiewicz: Chief Executive Officer • Jeff Sterling: Chief Operating Officer • Dave Lamash: Senior Project Manager • John Vandenberg: Senior Project Manager • Kaylan Austring: Senior Project Manager Glenn concludes, “We want to say a very big thank you to our clients, staff, vendors, founders – everyone that has and continues to make Delnor the success that it is today. Our goal

T2, 7056 Farrell Rd SE Calgary, AB Telephone (403) 294-1650 Fax (403) 294-1651 www.delnor.ca

12727-St Albert Trail Edmonton, Alberta T5L 4H5 Tel: (780) 452-9151 • Fax: (780) 452-1785 • TF: 1-800-349-6806 www.nlc.ca

Congratulations to the team at Delnor Construction Ltd. on 35 years! Proud to be a part of your success.

Delnor | 35 | 4


OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND WHEN WE COME TOGETHER TO CREATE. Our community in Calgary is one of boundless possibility. It’s collaborative. It’s future focused. It’s diverse. Gone are the days of a city defined by a singular opportunity or industry. Today we are a unique place where anything and everything is possible when the right people come together and collaborate to reach their full potential.

Out team of more than 80 dedicated full-time staff and hundreds of event specific staff will leverage our wealth of experience and knowledge to help you achieve your vision and serve your attendees. It’s that focus on people that’s at the core of our business, and it’s what drives our customer-centric model.

At Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC), we believe that bringing people together to convene, to collaborate, and to share ideas moves everybody forward. It’s the reason why we provide both the services and the spaces that connect people in meaningful ways.

Our approach is one built upon our long-standing role in the downtown Calgary community. We’ve brought people together for the best events in Calgary and we’re looking forward to many more. At CTCC we strive to be more than just a convention centre. We reach for the stars and look to be the space where people convene and converge to increase collaboration and cooperation.

Having been an integral part of Calgary for over 40 years we know what needs to happen to effectively bring people together. We provide the right services and the most suitable spaces that foster collaboration and make for effortless face-to-face interactions.

And with increased collaboration and cooperation, the possibilities will be truly boundless.

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EvolveU to Train People to Pivot to Jobs in Tech BY STEPHEN EWART

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ivoting mid-career to make the most of changing circumstances and new opportunities is required at times and can be invigorating.

It’s also easier said than done; at least without some help. With unprecedented innovation and the application of advanced technology underpinning the future of all industries, many professionals find themselves needing to upskill or retrain to keep pace with a changing workplace in this digital economy. The evolution of Calgary’s economy – in particular, lower employment in a leaner and more cost-focused energy sector – prompted Hunter Family Foundation, RainForest Alberta and Calgary Economic Development to launch EvolveU for people looking to pivot their careers. EvolveU will offer opportunities to learn relevant and indemand skills across data, design, business and technology. The program combines a practical curriculum with onsite mentoring, peer-to-peer learning experiences and personalized career coaching. The courses are offered online and in classrooms and will have a limited number of spaces. The program is targeting adult learners who are unable to commit to or afford traditional programs but seek to upgrade their technology-oriented skills. Calgary is home to one of the highest educated and STEMoriented workforces in Canada but a lot of the skill set has been focused on the energy sector. Most cities Calgary competes with to attract investment in Canada have at least 50 per cent of their tech talent in software development and related fields but it is about half that in Calgary. Even with stubbornly high unemployment, a number of

leading companies are challenged because they can’t get the specific tech talent. It’s important to remember this issue applies to all companies; these days tech isn’t a sector but an element of all industries. To help address the situation, EvolveU will accept the first cohort of students for its inaugural Full-Stack Developer Program this September. The full-time, six-month program is focused on practical application and work readiness and will provide students with project-based experiences. Other courses are also in development. Building an agile and innovative workforce is critical to Calgary’s economic prosperity. By collaborating with employers such as Benevity, ATB Financial and TELUS, the program ensures learners are acquiring in-demand transferable skills. “As a Calgary-based software company, we’ve found it challenging to find enough people with the skill sets to fill our product development and technology operations roles,” says Vivian Farris, VP of people at Benevity, a company at the forefront of the digital disruption. “We look forward to working with EvolveU to foster much-needed skills in the Calgary tech community.” As it prepares for launch of the first cohort in September, EvolveU hosted an information session for Calgarians on May 22. Details can be found at www.evolveu.ca/. Today’s workforce is as diverse as the economy and Calgary’s post-secondary institutions are also offering curriculum tailored to the new labour market. The ability to evolve with the changing workplace is a critical skill and it’s equally as important that there are options available for people to acquire the skill sets they need while still earning a living.

Stephen Ewart is a manager in research and strategy at Calgary Economic Development.

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Tourism Calgary’s #AskMeYYC Roaming Team Takes to the Streets for the Third Year BY BRIDGETTE SLATER

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ince 2016, Tourism Calgary has challenged the traditional visitor information centre model by trading its fixed destination counselling locations for a hybrid roaming and semi-fixed location approach. The foundation of this initiative is the AMMY award-winning #AskMeYYC Roaming Team – a group of multilingual Calgary experience specialists who bring tailored information directly to visitors and residents. Each year, this initiative becomes more progressive as the #AskMeYYC Roaming Team continues to exceed the outcomes of the previous year. For 2018, the program has been extended into September and the team is piloting an online tour booking and purchasing system called OnceThere. While the team will continue to offer personalized destination counselling, recommendations, maps and industry partner brochures, they also have increased capacity to help visitors and Calgarians find, select and instantly book in-destination experiences. As ultimate hosts and ambassadors for our city, the #AskMeYYC Roaming Team plays a vital role in sharing the best our city has to offer by generating better awareness of events, festivals, performances and experiences. Throughout last year’s program, the #AskMeYYC Roaming Team counselled a record 13,000 people and provided over 48,000 referrals to industry partners, contributing to the $1.6 billion in visitor spending Calgary saw in 2017. This year, the Conference Board of Canada’s Travel Markets Outlook predicts 2018 will be another significant year for tourism in Calgary with forecasted travel numbers

anticipating upwards of seven million total visits and $1.7 in visitor spending. The #AskMeYYC Roaming Team is committed to maximizing engagement and supporting these visitors, and Calgarians, by exposing them to Calgary’s unique, shareable experiences. In doing so, the team contributes to Calgary’s active and vibrant community, which enhances quality of life, pride of place and well-being through economic stimulus, job creation and volunteer contributions. The Calgary experience specialists have already been out and about since May 18 enabling visitors and Calgarians to unlock the best version of Calgary. The team of five is available daily until September 30, and can be found at the base of the Calgary Tower, in high-traffic areas around the city and on Twitter using #AskMeYYC. The Wi-Fi enabled kiosks and #AskMeYYC Roaming Team members are easily identified by their red booths and “ask me about Calgary” T-shirts. To learn more about this year’s #AskMeYYC Roaming Team and to find location details, see visitcalgary.com.

ABOVE: TOURISM CALGARY’S 2017 #ASKMEYYC ROAMING TEAM AT THE CALGARY TOWER LOCATION. PHOTO SOURCE: TOURISM CALGARY 2017

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Third TELUS Technology Accelerator Announced BY MEGHAN OCKEY

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ow into its third year, the TELUS Technology Accelerator (TTA) is expanding across Western Canada, looking to support the development of growth-stage companies with technology that TELUS could potentially use, integrate or commercialize. TELUS announced its continued support of the technology accelerator in Alberta and British Columbia with plans to blueprint the accelerator in other provinces, starting this summer in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. “A thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem is vital to support Canadian innovation and TELUS is committed to strengthening that ecosystem through programs like the TELUS Technology Accelerator,” says Ibrahim Gedeon, CTO of TELUS. “We are encouraged by the healthy competition among the companies of the second cohort and look forward to expanding the program to welcome even more startups to TELUS Technology Accelerator 3.” This eight-month program is designed to accelerate each company’s business model, technology and operational backbone. The third cohort was announced during Demo Day for the second TTA, which showcased six high-potential companies from British Columbia and Alberta and announced SafetyTek, a Calgary-based software company that creates time-saving resources to increase safety culture, as the company who had shown the most progress through the program. Throughout the second TTA, each startup was matched with mentors from TELUS, CTI and Calgary’s innovation ecosystem. These mentors brought decades of business,

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technical and entrepreneurial experience to the accelerator. Companies within the accelerator were also invited to monthly peer mentoring sessions to share knowledge and provide support to one another. “The TELUS Technology Accelerator completely changed our company. When we started we thought we had everything figured out and then we went through the program, got completely flipped upside down and had to rethink everything,” says Ryan Quiring, president and CEO, SafetyTek. “Through working with our mentor, we realized we weren’t selling our software as mission critical to our client and once we started doing that our outcomes changed.” SafetyTek was awarded the grand prize for having demonstrated the most progress in customer growth, increasing deal flow and entering new markets. “The opportunity for SafetyTek to work with TELUS’ talented enterprise sales team was transformative in how co-founders Ryan and Craig now bring their product to market,” says Brian Reimer, founder of Evoco and SafetyTek’s TTA2 program mentor. “The team’s openness to feedback and support was what truly allowed them to accelerate their business.” The third TTA cohort will feature high-potential companies in the following priority areas: next generation telecommunications services; Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT); smart cities, secure by design; digital health and wellness; the last 100m technologies; and digital agtech. To learn more about TTA please visit, www.calgarytechnologies.com/tta.


We all have different goals and different ideas but as a community, we have a common desire: to collaborate, to bring people together, and to unite those different ideas to move forward. At Calgary TELUS Convention Centre we provide the services and spaces that connect people in meaningful ways.

Come together. At the Centre.

calgary-convention.com


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

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ig win for Karen Pearce, president of McCann West, with her successful bid for the strategy and creative portion of WCLC (Western Canadian Lottery Corporation), specifically the Scratch ‘N Win and the regional lotto business.

Vovia was founded by Cameron Prockiw 10 years ago as a search firm specializing in SEO and paid searches. In 2014, he persuaded Susan Murphy to join the firm as president and since then it has boasted a growth averaging 30 per cent over the past three years.

The Calgary office of McCann West, under the direction of vice president and media director, Tamara Dawson, has had the media portion of the business for 19 years so she is excited to add on strategy and creative to be able to build a more cohesive advertising model for WCLC.

Today it is one of Western Canada’s top-performing media and marketing intelligence agencies with an influential portfolio of clients including ATB Financial, SAIT, Cabela’s, SaskPower, Hopewell and Calgary Co-op.

The busy Calgary office enjoys working with major accounts like Bayer CropScience (agency of record), Alberta One-Call and Miracle-Ear, while the Vancouver office, overseen by Pearce, proudly won the global launch of Tourism Vancouver.

Susanne Fox, communications manager at Big Rock Brewery, was thrilled to announce the launch of “Ed Said,” an integrated brand campaign paying homage to its late founder Ed McNally and his trademark no-nonsense tenacity. McNally founded Big Rock in 1985 to buck what were the current beer trends, and is considered a godfather of the craft beer industry; he simply wanted to enjoy better-tasting, higher-quality beer at a time when it was hard to find one in Canada.

Dan King, president ZGM Modern Marketing Partners, and his team are bursting with confidence in this market and have re-signed the lease on its full floor of office space above Morgan’s Pub on 17th Avenue SW where staff make good use of the office workout room and the trainers brought in every week. ZGM Edmonton recently earned the contract with AGLC to handle the social responsibility and brand work for its cannabis file, and managing director Ric Williams is adding to his 14 staff there. CPR brand, culture and recruitment have been added to the Calgary roster of clients and among its portfolio keeps very busy with 15-year client Jayman BUILT.

That one message shines through in the campaign: “I wanted to drink a better beer. So I made one.” “Ed Said” is a result of work by Shelley Girard, vice president of marketing at the brewery and Calgary’s C&B Advertising.

Parker’s Pick University billboard on Crowchild Trail does it right with few words and big letters.

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We’re not done when the deal is. Curious?

atb.com/corporate


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