Page 1

PM41126516

JULY 2019 | $3.50 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Join MNP in Honouring Calgary’s Visionary Business Leaders

CALGARY CHAMBER

PAGE

83


53 years and still growing...

(Left: Stephanie McPhee - Sales Manager, Furniture Division; John Schoblocher - Senior Manager, Operations & Service; Dave Orr - VP Office Environments)

Our Furniture Division has depth, breadth of knowledge and expertise that transcends our organization from space planning and furniture selection to the installation and set-up. From the classroom, to healthcare and every unique office space in between, we can create the personalized space that speaks to your brand, your business and those who work there.


STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 29 | Number 7

REGULAR COLUMNS JULY 2019 | $3.50 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

9

Sports and Recreation as a Competitive Advantage By Brad Field

10 12

It is About Time By Frank Atkins

Activist False Narratives Hurt Our Environment and Our People

PM41126516

By Cody Battershill

Join MNP in Honouring Calgary’s Visionary Business Leaders

CALGARY CHAMBER

PAGE

83

CONTENTS COVER FEATURE

31

2019 Leaders Award Celebrating Calgary’s business icons

ON OUR COVER: THE 2019 LEADERS AWARDS RECIPIENTS PHOTO SOURCE: RIVERWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

FIND US ONLINE! B US I N E SS I NCALGARY.COM BUSINESS IN CALGARY

@BUSINCALGARY

BUSINESSINCALGARY

4

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

83 106

Calgary Chamber of Commercer The Calgary Report

110

Current developments for Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Tourism Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, and Innovate Calgary

Marketing Matters By David Parker


Providing the tools to

ENGAGE with your Customers. Cloud, Hybrid, and Premise Solutions

Your phone system, your way. Maintain it all on-site, all in the cloud, or somewhere in the middle. We will work with you to find the best fit for your organization.

Reporting and Business Intelligence

Have the data you need to make important business decisions at your fingertips. Reports such as Call Volume, Phoneline Capacity , Long Distance Summary, Time On Hold and much more.

Mobility Applications

With a simple App you can have your business phone line working on your mobile device. Receive voicemails, instant message and make calls from your work extension from anywhere.

Web Chat and SMS Texting

Be available to your clients and prospects through online chat. Share information via text to individuals or groups.

Security

Do the words “data breach” scare you? Whether it’s credit card compliance or cloud storage, cyber security needs your top attention.

At Altitude Communications we strive to ensure that we are taking care of our clients so that you can take care of yours. We provide Business Communication Solutions and Customer Engagement Tools that will increase productivity and improve your customer experience. PHONE 403 538 5555 EMAIL info@altitudecommunications.ca altitudecommunications.ca


STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 29 | Number 7

93

THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

CONTENTS

16 20

COMPANY PROFILES

93 101

 ifferent Roads to the D Same Castle Favourable conditions creating non-traditional opportunities within downtown Calgary office market By Jamie Zachary

Bow Mark Paving & Concrete

Celebrates 40 Years

Jertyne Interiors Services

Celebrates 25 Years

25 28 92

101 6

Sponsoring the Chucks Valuable exposure and western heritage By John Hardy

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Geology-Rich Canada A problem with investment and awareness By John Hardy

On the Fringe A look at the suburban real estate market By Nikki Gouthro

Topping the Ball? More at play than just standing up By Scott Orban


Creating beautiful, healthy smiles is what we do! Five full-time hygienists Open lunch hours and early mornings Call today for your consultation and your start to a more beautiful smile. An amazingly convenient location you can walk to from your urban home or office, saving you valuable time and money. If you choose to drive, dedicated parking is available!

General Dentistry

DOWNTOWN DENTIST • Cosmetically related dental services • Emphasis on Prevention • General Dentistry • Tooth Whitening • New Patients & Emergencies Welcome • Direct Billing of Insurance Plans Conveniently located under the Calgary Tower, 430 Tower Centre, 131-9 Avenue SW

403-265-3146 | www.drgalan.com


PUBLISHERS

Pat Ottmann & Tim Ottmann

EDITOR

Melanie Darbyshire

COPY EDITORS

Lisa Johnston, Nikki Gouthro

ART DIRECTOR

Jessi Evetts jessi@businessincalgary.com

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER

McCrum’s has been a proud supporter and trusted partner to Calgary businesses since 1971.

Ashley Grose

ADMINISTRATION

Nancy Bielecki nancy@businessincalgary.com

REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Brad Field Frank Atkins Cody Battershill David Parker

On behalf of the McCrum’s team—congratulations to this year’s recipients of the Business in Calgary Leaders Award.

THIS ISSUE’S CONTRIBUTORS Melanie Darbyshire Rennay Craats Jamie Zachary John Hardy Nikki Gouthro

PHOTOGRAPHY

McCrum’s Office Furnishings

403 259 4939 | mccrums.com

Cover photo courtesy of Riverwood Photography

ADVERTISING SALES

Evelyn Dehner evelyn@businessincalgary.com Chris Miller chris@businessincalgary.com Bobbi Joan O’Neil bobbi@businessincalgary.com Jasmine Croteau jasmine@businessincalgary.com

DIRECTORS OF CUSTOM PUBLISHING Leslee Rycroft leslee@businessincalgary.com Kylie Caetano kylie@businessincalgary.com

EDITORIAL, ADVERTISING & ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 1025, 101 6th Ave. SW Calgary, AB T2P 3P4 Tel: 403.264.3270 | Fax: 403.264.3276 Email: info@businessincalgary.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS Online at www.businessincalgary.com Annual rates: $31.50 CDN | $45 USA $85 International | Single Copy $3.50 Business in Calgary is delivered to over 33,500 business people every month including all registered business owners in Calgary, Banff, Canmore, Airdrie, Okotoks, Cochrane and the Calgary Chamber members. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement, and all representations of warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not of the publisher. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, in all or in part, without the written permission of the publisher. Canadian publications mail sales product agreement No. 41126516.

Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to circulation dept. 1025 101 6th Ave. SW Calgary, AB T2P 3P4 info@businessincalgary.com

WWW.BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

8

client Hy’s item Business in Calgary Ad 988 1407IN CALGARY JULY 2019 //604 BUSINESS // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

weareif.com

docket

HYS-18-032

size

4.5" x 4.75"

insertion date artwork due

Jul 2019 31 May 2019

Business in Calgary magazine’s circulation is audited twice a year by BPA International.


SPORTS AND RECREATION AS A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE // BRAD FIELD

Sports and Recreation as a Competitive Advantage BY BRAD FIELD

S

ummer is finally here. It may be short in Calgary, but it’s glorious. Calgarians are out to play. The soccer pitches, baseball diamonds and golf courses are filled. There are traffic jams on bike lanes and running paths. Paddlers and rafters are on the rivers. What does this have to do with business in Calgary? Bear with me. Calgary is blessed with some of the world’s greatest natural resources. No, not oil and gas reserves. I’m talking about the beauty of the outdoors in and around our city. Every business leader knows competitive advantage comes from controlling something valuable, rare and difficult for competitors to replicate. Calgary’s natural environment – our place – is our ultimate competitive advantage. From the Prairies to the mountains and from the Bow to the Elbow rivers, spanning winter and summer, Calgary offers a remarkable variety of outdoor pursuits. This is an active city. Why does it matter? Think about what attracts people to Calgary. As we focus on economic diversification, we need to attract the best and brightest from all walks of life to our city. Calgary’s unique value proposition includes world-class hiking, climbing, cycling, mountain biking, skiing, fishing, paddling, skating and more. The surfing may not be worldclass, but it does exist, on a standing wave in the Bow River. The idea that a strong arts and culture scene is essential to a city’s economy is well established. But what about a strong sports, recreation and active living scene? Calgary could do more to leverage its natural assets in this regard. There is some visioning work to be done. Calgarians value athletics, but last year’s Olympic debate showed we lack

alignment about what kind of active city we want to be. Are we a home for high-performance athletes and facilities? Or should parks and recreation facilities promote a healthy, active lifestyle for people in all walks and stages of life? This split has been a pain point, especially to the promoters of Calgary’s professional sports teams. Surely the two aren’t mutually exclusive. The city has many organizations that work on the business of activity (Sport Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, Tourism Calgary, City of Calgary Sports & Recreation, and many others). All organizations contributing to an active living city should be collectively working toward that bigger vision: a city that attracts the top talent because it’s such an incredible place to live, work and play. We need a coordinated and integrated strategy to build an active city of the future: one that leverages the natural assets that other cities only dream of, attracts active and diverse talent from around the world and supports an aging population to remain active. Today, we know that creativity and innovation are critical outputs of a healthy economy. We also need to recognize that an active economy drives immense tangible and intangible value. An active living city is good for both our physical wellbeing and our entrepreneurial spirit. The Economist defined Calgary as the world’s fourth most livable city in 2018. We have an opportunity to leverage the rich natural environment many of us take for granted. Calgarians in all sectors are embracing an active living mentality, both at home and in business. Let’s make it a citywide priority.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

9


IT IS ABOUT TIME // FRANK ATKINS

It is About Time BY FRANK ATKINS

I

think it is fair to say Alberta lost the public relations battle over oil a long time ago. The oil industry, as well as successive provincial governments in Alberta, did not take the opposition to oil seriously enough. As it turns out, the opponents have a great deal of money, and money buys the best public relations people. Now the environmental groups are clearly in charge of the agenda. Past provincial administrations in Alberta seemed to either ignore the mounting protests (think Ralph Klein) or actually be on the side of the protesters (think Rachel Notley). Now, at last, Jason Kenney has decided to take on the opposition. In early June, Mr. Kenney created what he called an energy “war room” to battle the opponents of the oil industry. In order to show how serious he is, Mr. Kenney has given this office a $30 million budget. The idea here is that waiting for an official government response to some of the nonsense remarks that come out of the mouths of environmental groups takes too long. Predictably, the environmental groups were quick to respond. The immediate criticism of this new initiative was that it will simply serve to galvanize the opposition to Alberta’s oil industry. In response to this Mr. Kenney correctly stated that the defensive posture used in the past was not working. Greenpeace was the first to respond. In a perfect example of slick public relations jargon, Greenpeace managed to use all the key “scare” words in one statement: wildfires, heat waves, floods, rising seas, inconvenient truths. You should read the whole statement made by Keith Stewart of Greenpeace Canada; it is a truly amazing piece that uses a lot of words but really says almost nothing. Presumably, this is the type of thing the war room is designed to combat.

IT IS ABOUT TIME WE STOOD UP TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL LOBBY. I OFTEN ASK MYSELF HOW DID THE WORLD COME TO BE LIKE THIS. IT APPEARS TO BE IMPOSSIBLE TO HAVE ANY SERIOUS DISCUSSION ABOUT OIL AND CLIMATE CHANGE WITHOUT HAVING YOUR SANITY QUESTIONED. YET AT THE SAME TIME, WE CANNOT QUESTION THE DRIVEL THAT COMES OUT OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL LOBBIES. It is about time we stood up to the environmental lobby. I often ask myself how did the world come to be like this. It appears to be impossible to have any serious discussion about oil and climate change without having your sanity questioned. Yet at the same time, we cannot question the drivel that comes out of the environmental lobbies. For instance, Greenpeace can make the statement that this initiative “does nothing to prepare Alberta for the coming transition off fossil fuels” without someone questioning the facts. The answer is that there is no factual basis for this type of statement, it is simply conjecture. If no one questions statements like this, the public begins to believe these types of predictions. We need fast, factual responses to these types of statements, so that we can win back the public relations war. I would like to think the creation of the war room will somehow turn the public relations tide the other way.

Frank Atkins is a Senior Fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

10

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


2019 ALBERTA BLUE CROSS WELLNESS SUMMIT OCT 10, 2019 | THE RENAISSANCE EDMONTON AIRPORT HOTEL Join us for a day where we explore fresh perspectives and practices around the core elements of healthy workplace cultures.

Connection happens here. | TheWellnessSummit.ca ®*The Blue Cross symbol and name are registered marks of the Canadian Association of Blue Cross Plans, an association of independent Blue Cross plans. Licensed to ABC Benefits Corporation for use in operating the Alberta Blue Cross Plan.

® Blue Shield is a registered trade-mark of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. WL19-001 2019/04 †

π SHIPPING SUPPLY SPECIALISTS

CLEANING ESSENTIALS OVER 2,600 JANITORIAL PRODUCTS IN STOCK

ORDER BY 6 PM FOR SAME DAY SHIPPING

COMPLETE CATALOG

1-800-295-5510 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

11


ACTIVIST FALSE NARRATIVES HURT OUR ENVIRONMENT AND OUR PEOPLE // CODY BATTERSHILL

Activist False Narratives Hurt Our Environment and Our People BY CODY BATTERSHILL

T

here’s an old saying: “A lie travels halfway around the world before truth can get its pants on.” It helps describe both the anti-Canadian energy campaign and the need for rapid response.

Can activist protesters reconcile the fact that, if the entire planet adapted world-leading Canadian standards for oil and gas production, emissions per barrel of global production would drop by 23 per cent?

The problem is that false or misleading narratives attacking the Canadian oilsands do more than hurt the economy; often they damage the environment.

Is it fair that, while activists claim Canadian oil is “the dirtiest in the world,” credible peer-reviewed studies on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border point to several international suppliers selling oil with significantly higher CO2 emissions per barrel than ours?

For almost a decade, my volunteer-led organization has been advocating for credible information to be always at the ready, if only so that truth is suited up and good to go any moment it’s called upon. We speak out proactively or, if necessary, we react immediately. Applying accessible, verifiable, objective data, we’ve consistently called out activists from David Suzuki, Tzeporah Berman and Bill Nye to Leo DiCaprio, Neil Young and Jane Fonda – and many more. The thousands in our network of energy employees, contractors, suppliers and their indigenous and non-indigenous families across Canada are worth that effort. While many activists claim to care about indigenous communities, reduction of CO2 emissions or landscape reclamation, industry supporters involved in the research, development and implementation of technology and innovation seem to care a lot more. Ask yourself these questions: Do these activists care that Canada is the only top-10 oil exporter on the planet with carbon-pricing initiatives that have been in place since 2007?

The answer to these questions is “no.” From collaborating among industry over the launch of a satellite for tracking CO2 emissions from space to leading the world in carbon capture and storage technology, the Canadian oil and gas sector deserves the support of those who claim to be fighting for the climate. Yet environmental groups push for a prohibition on oilsands activities and fight against a pipeline that would allow our country to compete in the world, and instead force Canadians to use 700,000 barrels per day of imported product from countries with often a miserable record of environmental and human rights. It’s time for environmental activists to join the growing chorus of indigenous and non-indigenous leaders and communities across Canada who say they support Canadian oil and gas, produced to the highest environmental standards on earth and providing the largest single contribution to Canada’s economy.

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

12

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


Misunderstanding Entrepreneurs The good and bad of entrepreneurship

E

ntrepreneurs and entrepreneurship are dynamic components of business life. However, as buzzwords, they are often overused – and many times misunderstood.

your family, learning new things daily, overcoming your fears, finding financial freedom, conquering the world, and ultimately doing what you want and love to do every day.”

With the tsunami of startup success stories, and the undisputable trendy popularity of the entrepreneurial wannabe parade on Dragons’ Den and Shark Tank, it seems becoming an entrepreneur is an exciting modern version of running away with the circus – and everybody wants to be one.

For Kachur, “The opportunity to build something that has a positive impact on society and the way we live. Our Virtuo team, for example, thrives on delivering amazing customer experiences and it’s what keeps us pushing hard. It’s not about the money. We know that if we keep delivering what we deliver, we will continue to grow at a fast rate and our business will have a positive impact on more and more people every year. That always feels good.”

“Entrepreneurs are misunderstood and even more so now, as they seem to have turned into a quasi-form of celebrity. People want to be one and are keen to call themselves an entrepreneur with minimal effort,” says Kyle McLaughlin Friedman, CEO of Calgary’s Zoom Painting and an EO Calgary member. “I think the biggest misunderstanding is that it is not that difficult or that we are lucky,” adds EO Calgary member Casey Kachur, co-founder and CEO of Virtuo, Canada’s only home-buying and moving concierge service. “Most people see the small percentage of entrepreneurs running a successful business and think it’s easy. “Once you build a business, you can decide when and how you want to work. This freedom is misunderstood. Most entrepreneurs I know work 60-plus hours a week. It just doesn’t happen during normal work hours. People often tend to forget that every business was just an idea at one point. Running a successful business is far from easy.”

Despite the bright side, being your own boss comes with negatives. “There are negatives in anything, but entrepreneurs have the power to control most negatives over time,” explains Friedman. “Some of the ones that I could not control in the beginning were working evenings and weekends, missing events and parties, seeing your wrong decisions and their outcome come to life, and possibly sacrificing some close relationships. Randi Zuckerberg, the respected American businesswoman, said, ‘Work, Sleep, Family, Fitness, and Friends. Pick 3.’ That’s the real negative of being an entrepreneur – realizing you still can’t have it all.”

In addition to the right or misleading perceptions of be-yourown-boss freedoms, entrepreneurships have unique positives and negatives.

Trendy or being synonymous with risk and success, Kachur is convinced entrepreneurship all comes down to people. “Entrepreneurs are often misunderstood as people. We can come across as selfish because we get so passionate about our businesses. It can consume our lives. The reality is the exact opposite. We aren’t building the business for us. We’re building it for the customers we serve, the people we employ and our families.

“Some of the many positives,” Friedman points out, “is the opportunity to provide employment to impressive people you look up to, giving back to the community that supports you and

“It’s not about the pat on the back. It’s about building something that helps people, creates jobs and ultimately makes the world a better place.”

Contributing Members:

Kyle McLaughlin Friedman

Casey Kachur

CEO of Calgary’s Zoom Painting

co-founder and CEO of Virtuo

The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

|

For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


OFF

THE

OMRU Hosts Historic Convocation Celebration

It’s tradition. It’s inspirational and aspirational. It’s positive emotion. It’s pomp and ceremony. A historic first and an exciting celebration, with a bit of Latin thrown in for effect. Early last month, Mount Royal University (MRU) hosted a three-part convocation ceremony for 1,700 MRU students while also installing its new president and vice-chancellor. According to Andrea Ranson, MRU director of communications, the number of graduates increased from last year, marking the largest spring graduating class in MRU’s history. In addition to the student success and high achievement celebrated during MRU’s convocation events, it was a bonafide historic occasion. This was the first year, in compliance with Alberta’s Post-Secondary Learning Act, that MRU was certified to participate in the university tradition of conferring honoris causa – “for the sake of honour” – awarding five distinguished Canadians honorary doctor of laws degrees. Ranson explains, “The key criteria for a recipient qualifying for an honorary degree includes the recognition of national or international accomplishments, someone who has distinguished themselves from others and has achieved an exceptional standard of excellence in their chosen field.” In addition, according to Ranson, they are business and community leaders who use their position for the betterment of society. Someone who brings honour to Mount Royal University while serving as a role model of leadership and inspiration to MRU graduates.

The MRU honoris causa selection process began with nominations, followed by the review of the MRU appointments committee allowing the general faculties council to make the final recommendations to the board of governors. The board then officially approved the honorary degree recipients – and bestowed honorary doctor of laws to the following distinguished Canadians.

ABOVE: DAWN FARRELL, PRESIDENT AND CEO TRANSALTA AND MRU HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS AND DR. TIMOTHY RAHILLY, NEW PRESIDENT AND VICE CHANCELLOR OF MOUNT ROYAL UNIVERSITY. PHOTO SOURCE: MRU

14

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


OFF

THE

Dawn Farrell, the Calgary-based president and CEO of TransAlta Corporation, a fervent advocate for Canadian business and a tireless Calgary community leader. Don Braid, the widely-respected Canadian political journalist – from Montreal, Toronto, Edmonton and Calgary – who has been a trusted voice interpreting Canadian politics and government for nearly 47 years. Ann McCaig, the high-energy advocate of advanced education, medical research, health care and youth development; an impassioned supporter of arts and culture; and a distinguished member of the Order of Canada and the Alberta Order of Excellence. Margaret E. Southern, the iconic supporter of sport and recreation and, together with her late husband Ron, the co-

founder of the esteemed Spruce Meadows, one of the finest competitive showjumping complexes in the world. Southern has twice been named to the Order of Canada and is in both the Alberta and Canadian Sports Hall of Fame. David Johnston, the revered academic, media personality and author, who was the distinguished 28th Governor General of Canada from 2010 to 2017. Johnston has served on many Canadian task forces, commissions, boards and committees invaluably contributing to the betterment of life in Canada. Also, as part of MRU’s convocation celebrations, the Honourable Lois E. Mitchell administered the oath of office and “robing” of Mount Royal University’s 10th president and first vice-chancellor, Dr. Timothy Rahilly.

A GREAT MEAL IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS

403-269-1600 www.centini.com LUNCH | DINNER Breakfast & Office Catering by Appointment | Special Events | Offsite Retreats | Private Dining | Private Rooms & Discreet Meetings For professional attention to the details of your event please email events@centini.com or telephone 403-269-1605

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

15


SPONSORING THE CHUCKS // CALGARY STAMPEDE - CHUCKWAGONS

SPONSORING THE CHUCKS VALUABLE EXPOSURE AND WESTERN HERITAGE BY JOHN HARDY

I

f there’s truth to the uniquely Calgary theory that the annual Stampede Chuckwagon Canvas Auction is a barometer of the city’s business community and the economy, there is encouraging news for 2019. The always exciting March event gavelled down on more than $3.285 million in going-once, going-twice, sold-to-the-highestbidder for the opportunity to advertise on the 36 chuckwagon tarps set to compete this month at the Calgary Stampede. The good news? The auction total is up from last year (which was the worst showing since 2010) but still off the 2012 record year when the chuckwagon canvas auction brought in over $4 million in sponsorship bids.

“Looking back through historical numbers, there have always been ebbs and flows when it comes to the canvas auction,” says Dana Peers, president and board chair of the Calgary Stampede. “It’s the nature of the auction and it’s always hard to predict the final results. What we do know with certainty is that our community continues to show strong support for chuckwagon racing and its cultural, historic and sporting significance. “The advertiser experience is much valued, even in challenging economic times.” The enthusiasm, excitement and sponsor bids underscore that despite the western uniqueness and recent controversies

ABOVE: CALGARY STAMPEDE CHUCKWAGON CHAMPION TROY DORCHESTER.

16

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


surrounding chuckwagon racing, it continues as not only a popular spectator sport but as a viable ROI opportunity for area businesses and community groups. “The Stampede has such an iconic history and a way of bringing people together,” says Grant Beck*, president and CEO of Calgary-based Graham Group, one of North America’s premier integrated construction solutions partners. “And the Rangeland Derby sponsorship is a fabulous opportunity for Graham.” No disputing – chuckwagon racing is a legit equestrian rodeo sport. And due to the dynamic work of the World Professional Chuckwagon Association (WPCA) and the Canadian Professional Chuckwagon Association (CPCA), it is most popular in Western Canada while stats show the Calgary Stampede – with a total purse in excess of $2 million – are the most famous chuckwagon races in the world. For Calgarians, and out-oftown visitors, it’s a raucous and exciting event but not many know the unusual sport’s backstory. Although the drivers get most of the attention, chuckwagon racing is very much a team sport. The driver leads a team of horses pulling the chuckwagon, supported by two outriders, who figuratively “break camp” by tossing a barrel (representing a camp stove) into the back of their wagon before mounting their horses and following the wagons as they

We Know People DID YOU KNOW ...

Since opening our doors in 2009, Pekarsky & Co. has successfully led over 650 searches in 15 different industires across 10 functions for over 250 clients across Canada?! Connect with us

Call us 403.263.4474

Learn about us pekarskyco.com

*Just prior to the printing of this issue, Grant Beck passed away suddenly. BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

17


SPONSORING THE CHUCKS // CALGARY STAMPEDE - CHUCKWAGONS

Top 10 Chuckwagon Canvas Auction sponsorships 1. Troy Dorchester $150,000 Graham Group Ltd. 2. Kurt Bensmiller $120,000 Versatile Energy Services 3. Jason Glass $120,000 Friends of Jason Glass 4. Mark Sutherland $105,000 Friends of Sutherland Racing

complete a figure eight around two barrels before circling a racetrack. The first wagon to cross the finish line typically wins, although various time penalties can be handed out for infractions such as a barrel being knocked over, the stove not loaded or wagon interference. In recent years, the sport has triggered some controversy about the risk of injury to the horses, and the drivers, prompting some animal welfare groups to protest. But this month in Calgary, the tradition continues. Most chuckwagon drivers devote more than 10 months of earlymorning/late-night long days of hard work and preparation leading up to the opportunity for the 36 highest bidders to have their name on a canvas during the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth. “To preserve and promote western heritage and values is our core purpose and has always been at the heart of our Stampede celebration,” Peers says with pride. “Agriculture and western events are one of the primary reasons more than 1.2 million people from our community and around the world visit Stampede every year. Nearly 70 per cent of our guests visit our agriculture area and, in 2018, tickets for the rodeo and evening show performances were, on average, 90-95 per cent sold out.”

5. Gary Gorst $105,000 Painted Pony Energy Ltd. 6. Evan Salmond $105,000 Excel Projects 7. Codey McCurrach $105,000 iON United 8. Vern Nolin $100,000 Dentons Canada LLP 9. BJ Carey $100,000 Carey’s Cartel 10. Logan Gorst $100,000 Century Downs Racetrack and Casino

While $3.2 million worth of sponsorships is a positive sign of Calgary’s recovery mood, Kynan Vine, the manager of western events for the Stampede, explains the business of the annual auction event. “It allows local companies and groups the opportunity to take part in an exclusive behind-the-scenes ABOVE: DANA PEERS, PRESIDENT AND BOARD CHAIR OF THE CALGARY STAMPEDE.

18

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


SPONSORING THE CHUCKS // CALGARY STAMPEDE - CHUCKWAGONS

“EACH YEAR, WE SUPPORT A CHARITY RAISING FUNDS THROUGH EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT. THIS YEAR WE ARE PARTNERING WITH SUPPORT OUR TROOPS.” ~ GRANT BECK experience while also promoting their brand. We begin speaking with potential tarp advertisers well over a year in advance.” This year, when the final gavel came down, “the big man” – colourful Rangeland Derby superstar and 27-year veteran of Stampede chuckwagon racing – Troy Dorchester commanded the record-setting top bid of $150,000 to drive with the Graham tarp on his wagon. “Troy was definitely a driver we were looking at coming into the auction,” Beck admits. “He exemplifies the same values as Graham, which is commitment, integrity and reliability. He has an outstanding safety record on the track and a very long history, which is also something Graham has. So it just seemed like a really good match, and we’re delighted to have him driving for Graham.” Although it is impossible to calculate ROI on chuckwagon canvas sponsorships, genuine passion for Calgary only goes so far. What’s in it for a Calgary businesses or groups to spend $90,000-$150,000 on 10 days of advertising exposure during a popular but unusual sport? “They get the exclusive opportunity to host guests in the barns, meet the drivers and their horses, learn about the sport from the inside,” Vine points out. “They also host guests in with private functions that include food and beverage service. They also receive tickets for themselves and their guests to watch the wagons. And the advertising on the actual tarp itself is in front of 20,000 guests per night as well as the invaluable TV exposure across North America.” Graham’s Grant Beck agrees. “Along with great brand exposure, we take full advantage of the 10 days to show appreciation to our valued clients, partners and employee-

owners. Another aspect is giving back to the community both locally and farther reaching. Each year, we support a charity raising funds through employee engagement. This year we are partnering with Support Our Troops.” The personable 46-year-old married father of three Troy Dorchester is (by his own roaring laugh admission) “a bigboned guy” and, with a passion for horses and chuckwagon racing, is a gregarious poster boy for the unique and physical sport. “I work hard. I’m a horse guy. It’s my life. I try to focus and I absolutely love what I do. Clean and steady,” he says with an infectiously warm smile. “Make some money and win some championships. But looking after 25-30 horses, year-round, and months of racing is a hard game. And it’s expensive. I have never been a nervous type but, during race season, my adrenalin is definitely going. It’s a rush. There’s nothing like it.” Dorchester admits to being surprised with Graham’s $150,000 auction bid. Of course it’s flattering but, especially for a consummate people person, the ROI on Graham’s investment will flow naturally. “I’m an easy-going guy and a good host,” he chuckles. “I enjoy entertaining people and telling them about my life and our sport. But what’s most important is flying the colours and doing as well as I can.”

ABOVE: GRANT BECK, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE GRAHAM GROUP.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

19


DIFFERENT ROADS TO THE SAME CASTLE // COMMERCIAL LEASING

Different Roads TO THE SAME CASTLE FAVOURABLE CONDITIONS CREATING NON-TRADITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES WITHIN DOWNTOWN CALGARY OFFICE MARKET

BY JAMIE ZACHARY

L

ow rents, building-rich amenities and a “flight to quality” are luring many businesses back to Calgary’s core following an exodus that saw nearly a third of all towers sitting empty just three years ago. Yet real estate experts say the diversity of these downtownbound companies is the real story behind a resurgence that will still take years to fully realize. After five years of downtrodden conditions, the downtown office market marked its third-consecutive quarter of positive absorption in the first quarter of 2019 – the first time it’s done so since 2012, according to Avison Young. Alexi Olcheski, Calgary-based executive vice-president and principal with the commercial real estate firm, credits the gradual turnaround to favourable leasing conditions, as well as creative landlords adding building amenities such as tenant lounges, concierge services and conference facilities. “With the nature of the type of clients we’re trying to attract to Calgary, we need to show ourselves as a progressive and

20

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

dynamic workforce. Along with that, you have to offer those types of services,” he says. Olcheski also points to incentive programs on spaces under 5,000 square feet that are luring tech startups, smaller engineering firms and even non-profits with flexible turnkey solutions. “The clients of mine who have taken advantage of these programs have come from a number of different industries – or what I would call non-traditional downtown industries,” he says. “They represent a young, dynamic workforce who want the benefits of being downtown, such as dining, nightlife and entertainment.” Adam Hayes, Calgary-based managing principal and broker with commercial real estate firm Cresa, is seeing a similar pattern of non-traditional clients moving south of the Centre Street Bridge. “We’re seeing a new wave of tenants emerge downtown, being technology, cannabis and coworking spaces,” he says.


3195—9 Street SE, Calgary High Tech Production Building •

22,966 s.f. •

1.61 acre site

2—dock, 2—drive in

7243—110 Avenue SE, Calgary

4930—74 Avenue SE, Calgary

Fabrication Bays

Large Vehicle Service Building

16,312 to 51,350 • Large drive-in doors

28,276 s.f.

10 ton cranes

Overhead cranes • 2.3 acre site

Heavy Power

403-228-6015

ROMAN R e a l

E s t a t e

Roman Real Estate (2009) Ltd.

romanre.com

7 drive-in doors


DIFFERENT ROADS TO THE SAME CASTLE // COMMERCIAL LEASING

Downtown Calgary Office Historical and Projected Vacancy 27.0%

26.9%

26.8% 24.0%

20.9%

Q4

22.0%

Q3

21.4%

23.0%

Q2

27.1%

27.2%

23.4%

Q1

24.7% 24.4% 24.2%

22.5%

24.0%

Q4

23.7%

Q3

27.2%

27.2%

27.0%

26.8%

26.5% 24.7%

Q2

25.1% 24.9%

17.6%

16.3%

20%

24.3%

25.3%

26.2% 25.0%

24.7%

26.0%

25.2%

26.0%

25.6%

25.7%

23.9%

25.3% 25.3% 25.3% 25.3% 25.3%

21.1%

22.9%

25%

23.9%

26.4%

30%

2014 actual

Q4

Q1

Q2

Q3

2015

Q4

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q1

Q2

2016

Vacancy Rate - Optimistic Assumptions

Altus Group vice-president of data operations Ray Wong says tenants’ conditions are giving companies from all

Q3

2017

Q4

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q1

2018

2019

Vacancy Rate - Reasonable Assumptions

“While these companies do not absorb the amount of space required to offset what energy companies have shed, it’s the start of modest diversification for the core.” Altus Group, a leading Canadian commercial real estate services and software company, estimates 33.6 million of the 44.3 million square feet in downtown Calgary is now currently occupied. The remaining 10.7 million square feet still available represents a 23.1 vacancy rate that is beginning to stabilize despite being a far cry from the low of 3.4 per cent in 2012.

TELUS Sky (460,000 sf)

Q3

0%

Brookfield Place - East (1,400,000 sf)

6.2%

Q2

5%

707 Fifth (564,000 sf)

6.2%

Q1

7.2%

6.1%

10%

Eau Claire Tower (613,000 sf)

Calgary City Centre (853,000 sf)

12.2%

9.1%

10.7%

15%

2020

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

2021

Vacancy Rate - Pessimistic Assumptions

industries across Canada a reason to take a second look at downtown Calgary. “If you were a non-energy company looking to come into Calgary, it was difficult to come in during the boom periods because you had to compete with oil and gas for local talent,” he says. “Now, because of the shift in the energy sector, these companies are starting to see opportunities in Calgary where they can take advantage of higher office vacancy rates and more competitive rental rates. And they’re less worried that they’re going to lose their workforce to the energy sector. It’s going to feel more balanced moving forward.” ABOVE: DOWNTOWN CALGARY OFFICE HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED VACANCY. PHOTO SOURCE: AVISON YOUNG

RIGHT: RAY WONG, VICE-PRESIDENT OF DATA OPERATIONS AT ALTUS GROUP, A LEADING CANADIAN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE SERVICES AND SOFTWARE COMPANY.

22

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


DIFFERENT ROADS TO THE SAME CASTLE // COMMERCIAL LEASING

WONG ALSO EXPECTS MANY SUBURBANBASED COMPANIES TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF PRICES AND MOVE DOWNTOWN. Wong also expects many suburban-based companies to take advantage of prices and move downtown. He highlights Parkland Fuel’s decision in the third quarter of 2018 to expand and relocate to 111,000 square feet in BP Centre from the suburban northeast. “When the vacancy rate was at 3.4 per cent, it forced a number of tenants to relocate to the suburbs because there wasn’t anything available and the price downtown was getting out of hand,” he says.

EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS. Alberta-built modular solutions for housing and hospitality projects. horizonnorth.ca

1-866-305-6565 / BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

23


DIFFERENT ROADS TO THE SAME CASTLE // COMMERCIAL LEASING

“Seven years later, a lot of these companies are moving from the suburbs to downtown – paying similar rents or slightly lower, but closer to amenities.” Look no further than the sublease market, says Hayes. Many companies with natural lease expiries have been chasing lowcost sublease options to try and keep their balance sheets in check. As a result, these companies have been able to increase their standard of living while decreasing their costs. “This ‘flight to quality’ is leaving these companies’ older premises vacant in the market while driving vacancy down in the top product,” says Hayes, who estimates class AA vacancy at 16.92 per cent, down from its peak of almost 21 per cent at the end of 2017. Meanwhile, class B vacancy, which are largely west-end buildings, sits at 38.14 per cent. Some tenants who entered into new transactions in 2012-14 were forced into buildings they would have not chosen in a normalized market – from either a cost or lack of inventory perspective. With those contracts now expiring, many of these tenants are coming to the core, says Hayes. Looking forward, Olcheski optimistically forecasts 150,000 square feet of positive quarterly absorption for the rest of this year and to the end of 2020, corresponding with a 0.5 per cent quarterly reduction in vacancy rates. “It’s a slow climb into higher absorption,” he says, noting, comparatively, that downtown experienced nearly 5.5 million square feet of negative absorption from 2014-16. “We believe the major hurting is done. We feel both are at a stabilization point.” A key to keeping vacancy rates steady will be mitigating new inventory to the market, says Wong. Telus Sky will be the last to come online, adding 435,000 square feet of space – 285,000 of which will be immediately available. Wong estimates Sky will only marginally increase downtown office vacancy by 0.2 per cent. He notes, however, 5.5 million square feet of new inventory has come online over the past five years, including Calgary City Centre (853,000 square feet), Eau Claire Tower

24

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

(613,000), 707 Fifth (564,000) and Brookfield Place (1.4 million). Take these new builds out, and he expects the vacancy rate would be about 13.4 per cent – which considers downsizing and M&A activity, as well. While it appears vacancy rates are holding steady in the mid 20 per cent range, there is more than meets the eye, notes Hayes. What is not often considered is “ghost space” – space that’s being leased by companies, but unoccupied and not on the market for sublease. Also referred to as “shadow vacancy,” Hayes estimates this unused space could account for up to another 10 to 15 per cent, which would drive the availability rate closer to 35 to 40 per cent. “Why this is very important to consider is ghost vacancy is generally carried by larger energy companies, which would be the first to grow when the commodity markets turn,” he says. “They have to first occupy all their ghost vacancy before they would ever need a square foot of the posted vacancy, which will inevitably prolong a recovery of the real estate market.” In addition, to get back to equilibrium – pegged at 10 per cent vacancy – Calgary needs to see upward of 20,000 jobs created, adds Hayes. “A herd of mice cannot create that amount of jobs,” he says. “We need the elephants such as infrastructure companies and integrated energy companies to invest capital, kick off new projects and hire people accordingly. That likely only happens with a sustained recovery in the oil and gas commodity markets and a return of capital and confidence to the sector.” An added challenge is the average square foot for an employee has been steadily dropping for about 10 years now, says Wong. Companies are looking more to collaboration and coworking spaces, as well as offering telecommuting options. “And if Calgary sees more companies move from the suburbs to downtown, it’s going to create a situation of simply trading spaces wherein citywide vacancy rates on a whole stay about the same,” says Wong.


GEOLOGY-RICH CANADA // NATURAL RESOURCES

GEOLOGY-RICH CANADA A PROBLEM WITH INVESTMENT AND AWARENESS

BY JOHN HARDY

B

lame it on clichĂŠs and popular myths but (throughout Canada and here in Alberta), the mining of minerals and stones is under-appreciated and misunderstood.

Generations of stereotypes and word associations have unfairly overlooked the importance of minerals and stones. They have also minimized the importance of the mining sector and aggravated the simplistic and false mining=coal assumption, often overlooking potash, uranium, niobium, nickel, aluminum, sulphur, diamonds and other minerals, metals and stones. Due mostly to a fluke of the planet, rich geology makes Canada one of the largest sources for minerals and stones in the world, producing more than 60 minerals and metals, and one of the top five countries in the global production of 13 major minerals and metals.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

25


GEOLOGY-RICH CANADA // NATURAL RESOURCES

Industry stats show that the mining of minerals and stones is the prime industry in over 150 Canadian communities and a significant employer of Canadians. The minerals industry (excluding oil and gas) is estimated to directly employ about 10,000 people right here in Alberta. Non-energy minerals excavated and mined in Alberta today include sand and gravel (production value of $289 million), sandstone and other building stone ($6 million), iron and magnetite, and gold. Salt and limestone continue to be the leading non-fuel minerals while other Alberta products include industrial and metallic minerals, diamonds, ammonite and other precious stones. “By the numbers, Canada is first in potash, second in uranium and niobium, third in nickel, gemstones, cobalt, aluminum and platinum group metals,” explains Pierre Gratton, president and CEO of the Mining Association of Canada (MAC). “We are fourth in indium and sulphur and, as a surprise for some, fifth in diamonds, titanium and gold.” According to MAC’s most recent report, the industry directly employs 426,000 workers across the country in mineral extraction, smelting, fabrication and manufacturing, and indirectly employs an additional 208,000 working with more than 3,700 companies supplying engineering, geotechnical, environmental, financial and other services to mining operations. Proportionally, the mining industry is also the largest private sector employer of indigenous peoples, providing over 16,500 jobs.

“To be brutally honest about it, we have been in an up cycle for more than a year but it’s not a great time. We’re not booming but we’re healthy.” Two random examples also happen to be interesting reflections about the significance of Canadian minerals and stones: the vital importance of obscurely-known potash and the surprising importance of Canadian diamonds. It’s a little-known fact in routine Canadian business life that about 95 per cent of potash is used for fertilizer in agriculture and the remaining five per cent is used for commercial and industrial products such as soap. Canada is the number one potash-producing country (contributing more than 35 per cent of global production) and Nutrien is the world’s largest producer of potash.

However, for various key reasons (mostly internal), the importance of minerals and stones often continues to fly under the Canadian radar.

“We have an integrated network of six potash mines throughout Saskatchewan which produced almost 13 million tonnes last year,” says Nutrien spokesperson Will Tigley. “Our potash industry continues to grow and innovate every year. We’ve entered a recovery phase in our commodity cycle with strengthening potash prices and reached record global demand of potash at an estimated 66 million tonnes last year. Our largest markets for potash are in the U.S. followed by Brazil and then China.

“It’s one of the few sectors of the Canadian economy where Canada can claim global leadership,” Gratton adds. “Even though minerals and stones were not as impacted by the Alberta downturn as some other industries, we do face our own unique challenges.

“A lot of this growth is responding to the need to replenish nutrients removed by record global harvests and increased recognition of balanced soil fertility in developing countries. Safety is driving some of the innovation and technology we use in our mining operation,” he says.

Internationally, Canada is acknowledged as one of the largest producers of minerals and metals, accounting for $97 billion (or 19 per cent of the value) of Canadian goods exports in 2017 and selling a diversified array of minerals and metals abroad.

ABOVE: PIERRE GRATTON, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE MINING ASSOCIATION OF CANADA (MAC).

26

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


GEOLOGY-RICH CANADA // NATURAL RESOURCES

“TO BE BRUTALLY HONEST ABOUT IT, WE HAVE BEEN IN AN UP CYCLE FOR MORE THAN A YEAR BUT IT’S NOT A GREAT TIME. WE’RE NOT BOOMING BUT WE’RE HEALTHY.” ~ PIERRE GRATTON “Late last year, we started programs that are improving safety, productivity, costs and flexibility across our potash operations. This includes digital operations which keep our employees safe by allowing them to work from a distance from the actual worksite.

percentage of clarity and are high quality. A diamond mine also needs to be economically feasible,” he explains. “Technology has dramatically impacted diamond mining by tremendously impacting safety and allowing production to be more economically efficient.

“Technology is also improving our precision in mining by using sensors and cameras to assess the geology and predict ground disturbances and other hazards which again improves our safety,” Tigley notes. “All in all, working alongside our other nutrients and our retail business, potash represents about one-third of our company’s EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization).”

“De Beers came to Calgary in 2016 when our focus shifted west, closer to our Canadian assets. We fly direct from YYC to our mine in N.W.T., and when it came time to decide on a Canadian location, Calgary checked more boxes. With all the available resource operations, Calgary is a great place to recruit qualified people.”

Still a surprise to many people is Canada being a key player in the global business of diamonds. Diamond-rich areas weren’t discovered in Canada until the early 1990s. Before then, diamond mining in Canada had been virtually non-existent. But by 2017, Canada was solidly the world’s third-largest producer of diamonds by value (14.6 per cent) and the second-largest producer by volume (15.4 per cent). The most recent stats show that Canadian mines have produced 23 million carats of diamonds valued at $2.7 billion. Even in business and industry, some clichés and stereotypes are difficult to change. So, Canada-as-a-world-source for diamonds is still a reputation in progress, says Tom Ormsby, head of external and corporate affairs for Calgary-based De Beers Canada. “We have five diamond mines in Canada – in the Northwest Territories and Ontario. “Canada is a legit world leader in the diamond business but, maybe because most Canadians are not in the backyard of diamond-mining activity, there is still a lack of awareness. “Diamonds are down very deep in rock and with Canada’s geology, Canadian diamonds tend to have a higher

MAC’s Pierre Gratton points out that Canada’s minerals, metals and stones sector is dealing with some Canadian and global speed bumps. “A real and important issue is that, for various Canadian and global economy trends and reasons, Canada’s relative share of global exploration and mining investment has been falling. Canada as an investment destination has a business investment world that getting infrastructure built is a problem. “While Canada remained the world’s top destination for nonferrous exploration spending in 2017, it continued to cede market share to other jurisdictions, including Australia.” The mining industry does have some concerns as Canada’s share of international exploration investment has fallen for a sixth-consecutive year, and Gratton underscores Canada’s long-term decline in the share of global exploration spending, from 20.5 per cent in 2008 to 13.8 per cent in 2017. “It reflects the fierce competition for global mineral investment and the financing challenges especially junior companies are facing,” he notes, but highlights some encouragement on the horizon. “The federal government’s recognition of this challenge, and subsequent decision to renew the Mineral Exploration Tax Credit for a five-year term, should help address this trend and boost awareness about Canada as a strong minerals and stones player.”

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

27


ON THE FRINGE // REAL ESTATE

ON THE FRINGE A LOOK AT THE SUBURBAN REAL ESTATE MARKET

BY NIKKI GOUTHRO

A

s is the case in most urban centres, homeowners pay a sizable premium for what some would call the “convenience” of inner-city living. But for those Calgarians pursuing the “Canadian dream,” amenities such as a garage, a backyard and breathing room are worth far more than convenience. Life in the suburbs aligns well with what families really want, and maybe most importantly, is easier on the wallet.

28

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


ON THE FRINGE // REAL ESTATE

ACCORDING TO THE NUMBERS RELEASED BY THE CALGARY REAL ESTATE BOARD (CREB), THE CITY’S SURROUNDING AREAS ACCOUNTED FOR 22 PER CENT OF TOTAL REGIONAL SALES IN MAY AND MOST OF THAT IS FROM AIRDRIE, FOOTHILLS REGION AND ROCKY VIEW REGION.

According to the numbers released by the Calgary Real Estate Board (CREB), the city’s surrounding areas accounted for 22 per cent of total regional sales in May and most of that is from Airdrie, Foothills Region and Rocky View Region. Calgary’s average home sale price in January was $472,741, while in a suburb like Airdrie, for example, the average came in at $386,891. The real estate market in Calgary’s three major outlying suburban centres is attractive for not only first-time buyers but for those who want more space, civic and social amenities, and to settle into community-centric and slower-paced living.

Cochrane At just under 28,000 residents, the town of Cochrane is quaint, affordable and a convenient location for those seeking easy access to the neighbouring Rocky Mountains. • The typical house in the town is 1,500 square feet, sits on a 5,500-square-foot lot, has three bedrooms and is 20 years old. • The average price for a home was $405,194. • There were 369 listings and 69 sales.

Airdrie

Okotoks

In the last decade, the city of Airdrie has essentially doubled. Of the 68,000 dwellers, more than 78 per cent are in the under-50 age bracket. According to the CREB® Calgary Regional Housing Market Statistics May 2019 report:

A typical detached home in the town of Okotoks was built in 2002 and includes 1,491 square feet and three bedrooms on a 4,973-square-foot lot. In May:

• The typical single-family detached home includes three bedrooms with 1,400 square feet of above-ground living space on a lot size of 4,600 square feet built circa 2003.

• The average price for a home in Okotoks was $420,511. • There were 242 listings and 71 sales.

• Of the 532 listings inventory, there were 145 sales and 216 new listings.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

29


ON THE FRINGE // REAL ESTATE

“I THINK WE MIGHT SEE A SLIGHT UPTICK IN ACTIVITY AS WE HEAD CLOSER TO THE SPRING. THERE IS A LOT OF PENT-UP DEMAND FROM BUYERS WHO ARE WAITING FOR THE MARKET TO ‘BOTTOM OUT.” ~ SUMAN BRAR

While the market is expected to move towards more balanced conditions, the transition will likely take most of the year. Experts are quick to confirm it is still a buyer’s market, so sellers need to try harder.

New supply is expected to ease, as price adjustments will cause some consumers to delay moving into another home. This should help slow inventory gains in the latter portion of 2019 and reduce the amount of oversupply in the resale market.

“If sellers are serious about moving, they need to have their home show at a ‘10 out of 10’ and be aggressive in their pricing,” says Suman Brar, REALTOR® with Luxe Homes, Century 21 Bamber Realty Ltd. “The first three weeks are critical as that is when you get the most activity on a listing.

“In the last few years, builders have been busy adding to their spec inventory,” says Greg Kennedy, real estate agent and owner of CalgaryHouseFinder.ca. “They seem to be pulling back now, which bodes well for the market as it decreases the number of listings coming on.

“I think we might see a slight uptick in activity as we head closer to the spring. There is a lot of pent-up demand from buyers who are waiting for the market to ‘bottom out,’” she says. “Eventually they will have to make a move, because let’s face it – marriages, children, divorces and life changes are going to continue to happen.”

“We all know that the new stress test brought in by Ottawa made things even more difficult for first-time homebuyers to get into the market,” says Kennedy. “But the good news is, there’s quite a bit of rumbling in the industry about the likelihood of that relaxing in the foreseeable future. If that happens, we’ll see a significant shift in suburban home sales.”

ABOVE: SUMAN BRAR, REALTOR® WITH LUXE HOMES, CENTURY 21 BAMBER REALTY LTD.

30

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

31


Fifty percent of businesses may never re-open after a disaster. That’s why knowing the easiest way to contact SERVPRO® is so important. Because the sooner you get in touch with us, the quicker we can start to minimize the damage, as well as the cost. Just go to servpro.com or call 1-800-SERVPRO to activate the cleanup team that’s faster to any-sized disaster. We’re a leader in giving control back to homeowners, property managers and even entire communities after the ravaging effects of water and fire. So whether you’re responsible for 1,000 square feet or 100,000 – it’s your decision to call on the very best. Your trusted, local SERVPRO® professional. SERVICES IN CANADA PROVIDED BY INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED FRANCHISES OF SERVPRO INTERNATIONAL, LLC.


2019 Leaders Awards

A celebration of Calgary’s finest BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

C

algary’s economy encompasses many industries. From energy to health care, construction to hospitality, real estate to technology – an ever-expanding number of sectors propel the city forward, providing goods, services and employment to all Calgarians, through good times and bad. Populating these industries are thousands of small, medium and large businesses. And at the head of these businesses are leaders. By whatever name called – president, CEO, founder, boss – these leaders are tasked with a job that includes many things: having a vision, articulating and inspiring a vision, making (sometimes difficult) decisions, assembling a team, listening, collaborating, taking the fall, leading by example, among many other responsibilities. The role is daunting and certainly not for everyone.

The Judges

TREVOR WINKLER

“There is no mould or template that makes someone a leader,” offers returning judge Trevor Winkler, regional managing Partner at MNP. Winkler united with returning judge David Allwright, dean, Chiu School of Business, and new judge Faizel Poonja, managing director, ATB Business & Agriculture, to complete the task of sorting through numerous applications to decide on the final 20 award recipients. Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Poonja agrees, “The way leaders lead is different. That said, a great leader is ethical, truthful and shows vulnerability. [They are also] great at listening. Great leaders listen to learn. In addition, strong leaders are able to inspire and bring out the best in people. They find a way to execute regardless of circumstance.” The circumstances – in particular, Calgary’s economy – have been difficult for the past few years and, though a challenge to all businesses, have been overcome by this year’s recipients. “The downturn is a challenge for leadership; however, great leadership looks at challenges as opportunity,” Poonja says. “The cream rises to the top in the face of a difficult economy and this creates enormous opportunity for the right leader.”

That is why great leaders – those who go beyond the basic job description and inspire others – are worthy of recognition and praise. Which is precisely the goal of the 2019 Leaders Awards. In its 12th year, the Leaders Awards recognize exceptional Calgary businessmen and women who have led with purpose, integrity and strength, through the most recent economic turmoil (and in some cases, previous downturns as well), to create today’s thriving businesses. While each leader is unique in his or her own story, they all demonstrate the same commitment to and passion for their businesses.

“To be a good leader you truly have to know and understand your team and be able to communicate effectively to your team. A leader also needs to empower and trust their team – support them through the journey – and carry oneself with absolute integrity.”

DAVID ALLWRIGHT

FAIZEL POONJA

“Scalability (both upsizing and downsizing) seems to be key for a lot of businesses these days,” adds Allwright. “Surviving in an economy that can contract significantly overnight means that flexibility is a competitive advantage.” Financial sustainability, whether the applicant has driven change in their industry, and involvement in the industry and larger community were all components driving the judging criteria. “If there is one thing that stood out it would truly be the diversity of businesses in Calgary that you don’t hear too much about given the fact that we are an energy city,” Winkler says. All 20 recipients were honoured at an awards gala held June 26.

Official Airline Partner


Calgary’s employers hire our grads. Want first dibs? Find out why top employers get a competitive advantage partnering with Bow Valley College to provide co-op and work experience placements. Hire our best and brightest Chiu School of Business students before your competitors do. Email business@bowvalleycollege.ca to get started.


Dr. Hasmukh Patel AgeCare

D

r. Hasmukh Patel co-founded AgeCare in 1998 to improve the quality of senior care in Alberta. His vision was a modern, home-like “aging-in-place” care facility that would set new industry standards. To date, AgeCare has designed, built and operates 2,637 senior care and housing beds in three provinces. Since 2008, Hestia Construction, a subsidiary of AgeCare, has designed and developed the projects. “As a family physician, I was struggling with the institutionalized feel of the nursing homes available for my patients. The quality of life experience left me unsettled; it was not what I would want for my own family. I knew there had to be a way to provide quality seniors care in places that did not feel like a hospital. This was what inspired me to build my first seniors care community in Medicine Hat.” ~ Dr. Hasmukh Patel, Co-Founder, President & CEO

Company snapshot

21

Years in Business

2,400 employees

Health Care Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Sean McArthur Bow Mark

A

s president of Bow Mark, Sean McArthur carries on the work ethic passed down by his father Robert, founder of Bow Mark. Family owned and operated in Okotoks, Bow Mark offers complete general contracting services for large commercial and industrial projects. Driving its success is a commitment to quality, strong corporate culture and support for the community. “Doing the right thing is always the right thing to do.� ~ Sean McArthur, President & Owner

Company snapshot

40

Years in Business

110 employees

Roadway Construction & Project Management Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


“We are proud to sponsor the Business in Calgary Leaders Award, it was an honour to be a 2018 recipient; congratulations to the 2019 cohort, and all the nominees on their accomplishments” Desiree Bombenon – CEO

SureCall is a purpose driven company specializing in award winning Business Process Optimization and contact centre solutions for every business.

SureCallcc.com SureCall Contact Centers Ltd. Suite 240 3030 – 3rd Avenue NE Calgary Alberta T2A 6T7


Con Giannoulis Caesar’s Steak House & SPQR Lounge

S

ince opening Caesar’s 47 years ago, Con Giannoulis has seen his family-owned restaurant become a Calgary institution. Featuring exceptionally-prepared Alberta beef and professional service – including table-side presentation and the “Home of the Caesar cocktail” – Caesar’s has thrived through decades by remaining true to its classic foundation. Long before the trends of “eat local” and “open-concept kitchens,” there was Caesar’s. “My defining moment of success was when word quickly spread after we opened in 1972, and Caesar’s was soon jam-packed with businessmen, closing deals over rib-eye steak sandwiches, emperor-size three-ounce martini lunches and dinners fuelled with bottles of red wine. Caesar’s was called “the second Petroleum Club” as a lot of deals were being made here. The saying still goes around in Calgary that if you want a barometer on how the oilpatch is doing, stop by Caesar’s at lunch.” ~ Con Giannoulis, Owner

Company snapshot

47

Years in Business

70

employees

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Hospitality, Restaurant Industry Sector


Delivering On

Great Taste.

Gus, Congratulations to you, my friend. On behalf of Centennial Foodservice I would like to congratulate you on your Business in Calgary Leaders award for 2019. You epitomize the definition of a leader & a partner, and have created an institution in our city that has passed the test of time. As the third generation of my family to work with you, I am honoured that Centennial has been your partner for 47 years and look forward to working with you and your family in the years to come. BRAD FIELDING CENTENNIAL FOODSERVICE

www.centennialfoodservice.com


Ken King Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation

A

s vice chairman and CEO of Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corporation, Ken King oversees the NHL Calgary Flames, the AHL Stockton Heat, the WHL Calgary Hitmen, the CFL Calgary Stampeders and the NLL Calgary Roughnecks. With the business objective of winning championships, King also works to ensure CSEC positively impacts the community and provides a sense of pride and investment of emotional equity for the city. “Leadership is really serving those you are alleged to be leading.� ~ Ken King, Vice Chairman & CEO

Company snapshot

40

Years in Business

271

1,500 part time employees Media & Entertainment Industry Sector

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


HEALTH + WELLNESS

AMATEUR + GRASSROOTS SPORTS

EDUCATION

Over $36 million has been invested into southern Alberta communities since 2000

L E A R N

M O R E :

C A L G A R Y F L A M E S F O U N D AT I O N . C O M @ F L A M E S F O U N D AT I O N

@FLAMESFDN


Monica Kretschmer Canadian Business Chicks, Women of Inspiration Awards

S

ince launching Canadian Business Chicks in May 2014, Monica Kretschmer has broken traditional barriers and silos by embracing collaboration and diversity. In five years, she has built a recognized brand across Canada and spearheaded partnerships with government agencies, non-profits, venture capitalists and women’s organizations. In 2015, she launched the Women of Inspiration Awards to recognize women across Canada who lead by example. “I believe that you are not defined by your story; you are empowered by it. Success happens when you’re working hard doing what you love. Leaders are the crazy ones with a vision fuelled by a bigger purpose, who embrace vulnerability, raise those around them, and have the courage to take the road less travelled. Serving others and making a difference is the tonic that inspires me to keep dreaming big!” ~ Monica Kretschmer, Founder & CEO

Company snapshot

5

Years in Business

3

employees

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Entrepreneurial Industry Sector


   

A modern day hiring tool for progressive companies. The Emergenetics® Selection Program (ESP) is an assessment that helps effectively capture your company’s selection needs by properly defining roles, expectations, motivations, and the desired skill level of candidates. The ESP Assesment provides customized feedback on all of your applicants and accurately measures each candidate’s job fit and performance.

- Hire Based on Scientific Research - Increase Retention - Build Cohesive Teams - Build on Peoples Strengths

Find out more at emergeneticscanada.com or email diana@emergeneticscanada.com or phone 403-226-0878 x2


Darcy Hulston Canoe Financial

A

founder of Canoe Financial, Darcy Hulston’s leadership has seen the Calgary-based asset management company become one of Canada’s fastest-growing independent mutual fund companies. Guided by three foundational pillars – outstanding asset management talent, outstanding wholesale talent and a demonstration of stability through brand – he has overcome industry headwinds and continued to create wealth and employment for Canadians. “My father had a successful mixed farm and took a visit from our local bank, who were attempting to convince him to take on debt to expand his farm. They said my father qualified to finance and purchase new farm equipment at 15.75 per cent. My father turned down the offer and indicated ‘his used equipment did the job just fine.’ I can’t even begin to describe the number of lessons I took from this one moment.” ~ Darcy Hulston, President & CEO

Company snapshot

8

Years in Business

74

employees Asset Management Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Canoe Financial is an award winning, 100% Canadian and employee owned firm that manages the hard earned savings of Canadian investors to help them reach their financial goals. With over $5.6 billion* in assets, Canoe has become one of Canada’s fastest growing mutual fund companies by staying true to our key tenets: being active investment managers, remaining fiercely independent, and focusing on our investors. *as of April 30, 2019

ACTIVE. INDEPENDENT. FOCUSED. Learn more at canoefinancial.com


Ryan Engel Crestview Group

A

fter assuming leadership of Crestview Electric in 2017 following the passing of his father, Tim, Ryan Engel diversified the company’s services, redefining the electrical industry. He launched the CVE Solar division and the Crestview Building Technologies (CBT) division, creating the Crestview Group. CVE Solar is a leader in PV installation and has collaborated on a new solar wind turbine, while CBT focuses on intelligent building solutions. “When I reflect back to what has inspired me over the last 23 years, I only have to look as far as my team. When I see everyone working hard and going the extra mile to accomplish a task, it’s what truly makes me wake up every morning and say, ‘let’s do this!’” ~ Ryan Engel, President

Company snapshot

31

Years in Business

200 employees

Technology, Telecommunications, Electrical, Solar Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


“When you have the right team in place everybody wins! Thank you for the continued support as we grow.� - Ryan Engel


Vince Fung Debian Information Technology Inc.

W

hen Debian Information Technology Inc. faced a difficult market in 2015, founder and CEO Vince Fung had a choice to make: cut costs or double down and invest. His choice to invest has propelled the IT services and cybersecurity solutions provider into a growth phase of over 40 per cent year-over-year, nearly tripling in size the past three years. “Very early on, I realized that entrepreneurship can be a lonely journey. I was fortunate enough to have met amazing people who helped me along the way, guided me in making good decisions, kept me pushing forward and picked me up when I fell down. Today, I am surrounded by an incredible team, family, clients, partners, mentors, and coaches who have all helped our organization grow and thrive in these challenging economic times.� ~ Vince Fung, Managing Director & CEO

Company snapshot

23

Years in Business

35

employees Professional, Scientific, Technical Services Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


(587) 871-0388

www.debianIT.com

CALGARY | TORONTO | VANCOUVER | CAPE BRETON

AWARD WINNING IT SERVICES & CYBER SECURITY SOLUTIONS Cyber Security

I.T. Support

Cloud Integration

I.T. Strategy

Infrastructure

VoIP Phones

Managed Services

Business Intelligence

Business Continuity

Certified Partner

Fibre Internet

SmartVoice

Data Connectivity

Data Centre

Congratulations to Vince Fung and the Debian IT Team from all of us at Shaw Business! We’re proud to be your partner for Internet, data connectivity, datacenter, and VoIP solutions. Find out how Debian IT and Shaw can help your business www.debianIT.com/shaw


James Boettcher Fiasco Gelato

S

ince acquiring Fiasco Gelato in 2009, James Boettcher has bootstrapped his company through two fires, each of which almost put him out of business, to see it bounce back stronger each time. The mission of ‘Enriching People’s Lives’ has led Fiasco to become the first and only Canadian ice-cream company certified as a B Corp (using business as a force of good). It is available in 2,000plus grocery stores across Canada. “The defining moment for me was realizing that business isn’t about business. Business is about people. The people you employ, their families, their communities and all the people who touch your brand. I feel honoured and privileged to get to come to work every day to serve those people.” ~ James Boettcher, Chief Idea Officer, Custodian of Culture & CEO

Company snapshot

10

Years in Business

60

employees Manufacturing Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Dr. Alan Ulsifer FYidoctors

D

r. Alan Ulsifer sees adversity as opportunity. It is something that has led the chairman and CEO of FYidoctors to great success: acquiring independent clinics and integrating them both culturally and operationally, scaling infrastructure, building Canada’s most modern lens manufacturing facility and merging a Quebec business. Today, FYidoctors owns and operates over 240 clinics across Canada. “Creating something of value will always be a personal test. You will have successes that make you feel like you can succeed anywhere, and failures that make you question your own worthiness. These failures can cause people to stop taking risks, or make them more resolute to pick themselves up and continue forward with their dream despite the potential agony in defeat. These are the stories of entrepreneurs that have truly inspired me.” ~ Dr. Alan Ulsifer, Chairman & CEO

Company snapshot

11

Years in Business

2,500 employees

Health Care, Retail Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Excelling at your passions requires attention to detail. Ours is your vision. Ensure you’re seeing your best with a personalized eye exam. OUR LENSES ARE

MADE IN CANADA TAILORED FOR YOU AND YOUR EYES

Personalized eye care to see life’s finest details.


Grant Beck Graham Group

E

mbodying the “prairie culture” of hard work, perseverance and deep-rooted values, Grant Beck ascended to the top in every position he held – from labourer to president and CEO of Graham Group, a multibillion-dollarper-year construction company. A professional engineer by trade, Beck led Graham’s four business divisions – buildings, industrial, infrastructure, and development and real estate – in 15 locations across Canada and the United States. “After almost 30 years working at Graham, and 45 years in the fast-paced and exciting construction industry, I’d have to admit I don’t have a single defining moment, but rather a collection of many challenges and opportunities that concluded with the incredible privilege of leading Graham and our extraordinary employees.” ~ Grant Beck, President & CEO

Company snapshot

93

Years in Business

1,600+ employees

Real Estate Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

JUST PRIOR TO THE PRINTING OF THIS PUBLICATION, GRANT BECK PASSED AWAY SUDDENLY.


Ryan Bessant Heavy Industries

A

natural leader, Ryan Bessant never stops asking why. It is through his tireless pursuit of finding a better way to do things that he has driven Heavy Industries to success over the past 16 years. Today, his company plans, builds and installs iconic art and unique architecture, and is firmly planted at the forefront of an industry at the intersection of art, architecture and construction. “I’m a creative builder at heart – from LEGO® at age four, dad’s workshop at age eight, to designing and drafting in my teens. These experiences put the building blocks in place for me to co-found Heavy Industries and help build it into the company that it is today. I am inspired by the amazingly talented and unique people that I’ve been fortunate enough to rub shoulders with – from world-class artists, architects and developers to young emerging creatives and of course my team at Heavy Industries. It’s an unbelievable opportunity to wake up every day and plan-build world-class art and architecture.” ~ Ryan Bessant, President

Company snapshot

16

Years in Business

66

employees

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Public Art, Architecture Industry Sector


Glenn Burgess & Shelly Burgess Matrix Video Communications Corp.

G

lenn and Shelly Burgess founded Matrix Video Communications in 1994 with an equipment sales focus but, in the face of market changes, quickly transitioned it to a highlytechnical services group with advanced technical personnel. Today, Matrix is a leading audiovisual (AV) systems integrator that operates across Canada, providing a wide range of tools and expertise in consultation, design, supply, integration and installation of custom AV systems. “The success of Matrix Video Communications is derived by the complementary skills that my wife and I bring as co-managers. I’m more the big-picture person – a strategic thinker; while Shelly is more analytical – a numbers person. Our complementary personalities have guided us into our 25th year as a company.” ~ Glenn Burgess, President

Company snapshot

25

Years in Business

80

employees Technology Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


James David McManes McManes Automotive Group

J

ames David McManes started McManes Automotive Group with the purchase of Eastside Dodge Chrysler in 1987. Today, the organization owns and operates 18 automobile dealerships in Western Canada, eight of which are in Calgary, selling approximately 25,000 cars per year with revenue of over $1 billion. An organizational culture based on winning, caring and learning has ensured the best and brightest join – and stay – with the team. “My business philosophy of ‘Share the Wealth’ is the most important factor that has led to my success. My business model of equity partners has allowed me to attract and retain top-performing people. Our internal culture of winning, caring and learning serves both our employees and customers well.” ~ James David McManes, President

Company snapshot

32

Years in Business

1,300+ employees

Automotive Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


OUR DEALERS “ WHEN YOU HAND GOOD PEOPLE POSSIBILITY, THEY DO GREAT THINGS.” 18 dealerships from Winnipeg to Vancouver, over 1300 team members and over 25,000 vehicles sold per year. Without our team’s hard work and determination this recognition would not have been possible. Thank you and I am honored to have all of you as part of our team.

2018 Innovator Laureate Award Winner | Proud member of the MDA


Kevin Read Nomodic Modular Structures Inc.

A

s CEO and founder of Nomodic Modular Structures Inc., Kevin Read believes in building without boundaries and always leaving things better than he found them. His company is the industry leader in design-build projects, and one of the most complete and trusted providers of custom hybrid and off-site building solutions, specifically for First Nations infrastructure, hotels and affordable housing. “My mom and dad are two of my greatest inspirations. I was quite motivated even as a young kid and they made sure to balance this enthusiasm by providing a foundation of honesty, respect and hard work. They taught me the importance of being a good person. Ensuring they are proud of me for the impact I have on people’s lives is paramount.” ~ Kevin Read, CEO

Company snapshot

7

Years in Business

82

employees Construction Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


THINK BIGGER

Our wide range of products help clients stand out in a crowded marketplace. With our expertise and wide format printing equipment, Run Digital successfully manages projects from one-off creations to mass production with nationwide distribution. We offer creative solutions in the large format print market including: • Banners and Banner Stands • Wall Murals • Media Walls • Point of Purchase • Decal Printing • Vehicle Wraps • Wayfinding • Reception Signage • Nameplates • Glazing Film • Outdoor Signage • Construction Signage • Hoarding • Lawn Signs RUNDIGITAL.CA | SIGNWORLD.CA • 403.291.9786 • INFO@RUNDIGITAL.CA


Chris Burylo Pinnacle Accounting & Finance

E

ntrepreneurial by nature, Chris Burylo has a long history of rigorous business experimentation. His latest venture – Pinnacle Equities – started in his apartment and today operates as a full-service corporate advisory boutique, specializing in tax and accounting, corporate finance and business consulting for small and medium-sized business. Under Burylo’s leadership, the company has enjoyed a staff retention rate of 100 per cent. “Success cannot be distilled to one single defining moment. Rather, it is achieved through the compound power of continuous learning, relationship building and operational systems design. Like compounding an investment in your savings account, the culmination of your life’s work can have a profound impact on the community.” ~ Chris Burylo, Managing Partner

Company snapshot

10

Years in Business

15

employees Accounting and Financing Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Pinnacle understands entrepreneurs because we are entrepreneurs. Pinnacle started with nothing in my apartment. Now, we are a thriving firm with the top professionals in our field.

CHRIS BURYLO - MANAGING PARTNER

TAXATION, CORPORATE FINANCE, ADVISORY Whether your business is small or large, regardless of the industry, our hands-on professionals will protect your interests, pay attention to detail, and keep your fees affordable. Pinnacle will value you…

Our client first, our #1 principle.

Pinnacle Accounting & Finance 204-2333 18th Ave NE Calgary, AB, T2E-8T6

403.453.0532 www.pinnacleaf.ca


Lara Murphy & Karen Ryan Ryan Murphy Construction Inc.

L

ara Murphy and Karen Ryan met on a construction job site. Shared frustrations with the construction industry led to the birth of their company, Ryan Murphy Construction Inc., in 2008. Their hands-on presence and team-based approach at the multi-skilled general contracting firm – which provides a wide range of consulting, renovation, management and maintenance services – has allowed the company to thrive. “I am inspired by those around me to forge my own path; it doesn’t matter how slow you go as long as you don’t stop.” ~ Karen Ryan, Founder “Each experience (especially the hard knocks) has built resilience and encouraged me to infuse my life with action.” ~ Lara Murphy, Founder

Company snapshot

10

Years in Business

9

employees Real Estate, Construction Industry Sector

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Danny Ritchie Ultimate Homes & Renovations

A

self-proclaimed workaholic, Danny Ritchie has immense knowledge in every aspect of his luxury renovations and custom homes business, Ultimate Homes & Renovations. His 40 years of experience in both running the company and working in the field equip him with the knowhow to come up with creative solutions for any job, while his goal is always to ensure the customer receives the best solution. “In September of 1991 there was a devastating hailstorm in Calgary that brought us here for extensive exterior work. This led to our first addition above a garage which is still standing. From there we went from additions to renovations, and from renovations to custom homes. And we’re still growing!” ~ Danny Ritchie, President & Co-Owner

Company snapshot

40

Years in Business

30

employees Building, Renovation Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


Bill McKenzie Wild Rose Brewery

B

ill McKenzie has led Wild Rose Brewery – purchased by Sleeman in May – since 2012, through an explosion of the craft beer competitive landscape and a recession, only to see increased revenue, profits and market share. Leading a team made up of the best in the industry, McKenzie employs a hybrid business model of big beer business acumen with small beer entrepreneurial spirit. The result is world-class beer. “Over the years, I have been very fortunate to have many supporters and mentors. The Molson team in Sudbury, Ontario where I got my start, the teams I was able to lead at Molson, Diageo, Big Rock and Wild Rose always inspired me to do the best I can. As much as I am grateful to all of those who have helped me along the way, if I didn’t have such a supportive wife I would not have been able to chase my career as I did. Maggie made many career sacrifices so I could chase mine and I can’t think of anyone who has more influence towards my career.” ~ Bill McKenzie, President & CEO

Company snapshot

23

Years in Business

63

employees

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Consumer Products Industry Sector


Branded with

character

4580 Quesnay Wood Dr SW Calgary, AB


Kyle McLaughlin Friedman Zoom Painting

K

yle McLaughlin Friedman started Zoom Painting as a typical painting company but by thinking bigger, soon saw an opportunity to focus on one specific market: new residential highrise towers. That focus has paid off, and his company is now Canada’s fastest-growing painting company, operating in Alberta, B.C. and Ontario. His title – chief executive officer – suits him perfectly. “My mother always told me, do what you love, and the money will follow, but success did not come overnight just by doing what I loved. My greatest success came from convincing a handful of people that we could do what we love, and they too could find purpose in doing so. In hindsight, I am not sure if money was the right word; I now feel that purpose is the most powerful currency.” ~ Kyle McLaughlin Friedman, Chief Executive Officer

Company snapshot

7

Years in Business

27

employees Painting, Manufacturing Industry Sector Photo by Riverwood Photography.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner


We Know Calgary! Great Rates, Local Decision Making, and That’s Just The Start. Meet with us to get a free, no obligation review of all your business accounts and services. We'll use our local experience and knowledge to see if we can save you money, and serve you better. Get Started Today!

403.736.4170 FirstCalgary.com/Commercial


Legacy

LEADERSHIP AWARD

G

erry Wood, CM, is a man in motion. The founder and president of Wood Automotive Group is always looking for the next new opportunity, especially when it comes to automobiles. “My father James, who owned a Ford dealership in our native Scotland, told me, ‘dare to be different and don’t be afraid to take a chance,’” says Wood, “so when we opened Woodridge Ford in 1983 we were different. We offered longer hours, Saturday service and no appointment oil changes. We were also one of the first dealerships in Canada to make leasing a real option for families and that really took off.” Today, Wood Automotive Group employs almost 600 people and includes Woodridge Ford Lincoln, Advantage Ford, Okotoks Ford Lincoln, Village Honda, Big 4 Motors (Chrysler/Jeep/Ram), pre-owned specialty stores Driverz Auto and Cavalcade Auto Acceptance, and All Makes Collison, one of the city’s busiest auto-body repair shops. Wood doesn’t take success for granted and sees big changes ahead. “Technology is revolutionizing our industry,” says Wood. “Now more than ever it’s critical to stay ahead of the curve and that’s what we’re striving to do. Today, you can buy a car online, pay for it through electronic transfer and have it delivered right to your door. That wasn’t even a consideration just a few years ago.” The Wood family, wife Elaine and children Rory, Megan and Cailean, all work in the family business and all share Gerry’s commitment to the community. “My dad told me you have to give to get and to make the world a better place and that’s what we’ve tried to do,” says Wood. The family supports the Woodridge PREP Centre and the PREP Program, a school for individuals with Down syndrome. “Our daughter Megan attended PREP and we’ve learned so much from her. Ultimately, she’s our teacher,” says Wood. They also support dozens of local charities including a $1-million donation to the Salvation Army for an urgently-needed family resource centre in Forest Lawn, STARS, KidSport and numerous other organizations. “We’re really proud to be part of the Shaw Charity Classic for the past five years. You’d think with all that, I’d be a much better golfer,” he jokes.


“IF YOUR ACTIONS INSPIRE OTHERS TO DREAM MORE, LEARN MORE, DO MORE, YOU ARE A LEADER” – John Quincy Adams

LEADERSHIP HAS A LASTING LEGACY. Building community is something we love to do. As a support partner for Business in Calgary Leaders Awards, West Campus Development Trust would like to congratulate Gerry Wood as the first-ever recipient of the Legacy Leadership Award. As someone who has demonstrated a sustained impact on the fabric of our city through outstanding leadership and stewardship in community building we are proud to recognize and honour his ongoing contributions.

GERRY WOOD Dealer Principal and Founder of Wood Automotive Group

wcdt.ca


LEADERS ALUMNI “THEN AND NOW”

E

leven years after celebrating the first Leaders Awards, our Leaders Alumni continue to play a vital role in making Calgary’s business community an outstanding place to work and have fun. Their business ethics and contributions to the community are as strong today as they were in the year they won the award. Successful Leaders always look for opportunity to challenge the process and go beyond normal thinking; they look for ways to improve their organization through innovation and forward thinking. In the process, they find opportunities to serve their industry, moving it forward to create a stronger community for all Calgarians. Business in Calgary magazine is proud of our Alumni Leaders – encompassing 220 members in this exclusive club to date. They are the Leaders in our community and their philanthropic efforts are part of their makeup – giving back to the community is part of who they are. They are growing and in the process are continuously improving contributions to support the many charities and not-forprofit organizations located in every corner of our city. They are – and remain – our Leaders.


2018

A Landlord’s Most Valuable Resource

Landlord Leasing Forms and Notices

ATING 60 YE BR A LE

1959-2019

CRRA

• RS

CE

Help with Tenancy Problems Annual Trade Show, Awards Gala and Golf Tournament Educational Seminars, Luncheons & Courses Exclusive Member Discounts

Helping Our Members Succeed In Their Business Conveniently located north of Chinook Centre at 4653 Macleod Trail SW 403-265-6055

info@crra.ca

www.crra.ca


2016

ALUMNI LEADER

NANCY KLENSCH A

lumni Leader Nancy Klensch spent a decade striving to change the face of childcare in Calgary by ensuring children and their parents have fulfilling, engaging options. She founded Summit Kids in 2009 and today, with 18 locations across the city as well as in Chestermere and Cochrane, she has certainly succeeded.

By creating an alternative learning environment, Klensch and her team of childcare professionals are helping children make meaningful connections to others and the world around them. While other parents feel guilty about leaving their children in daycare, Summit families are proud they can provide such an amazing experience for their children and know their kids are in great hands. “We’re focused on heart-centric teaching, giving these children confidence, teaching them about love and compassion and having them learn to navigate the world. We’re building a guilt-free environment and a sense of pride that their children get to have these early experiences and build these foundations,” Klensch says. In an effort to strengthen these foundations, Klensch has implemented a pilot daycare location in the Bethany Riverview long-term seniors care facility. Summit and Bethany Care Society both want better for their populations and they realized they could work together to achieve it. The seniors, some of whom suffer from dementia, benefit from the energy and interaction with the children while the kids learn history through the elders’ stories and experiences. It also establishes a sense of community and connection that is valuable for both age groups.

Nancy and co-owner/chief operating officer Tyler Alton have created programs that accommodate children from 12 months to kindergarten age and then up to 12 years old in the out-of-school care program. More than 900 children participate in these programs and are benefiting from the different approach Summit takes to childcare. “Our philosophy is that with childcare, we can do better as a population,” Alton says. “Summit has always provided that experiential learning beyond what is being provided by the school system and what parents have time, money or even knowledge to provide.”

“A lot of our families are from other parts of the world and are here without extended family, and many seniors don’t have family close by either,” says Klensch. “We’re reintroducing community into what has been typically an institutional environment, both in childcare and eldercare. We’re really excited.” The Riverview location opens July 22 and along with the multigenerational programming, it is also accommodating shift workers and helping Calgarians get back to work by operating seven days a week from 6 a.m. until 11 p.m. Nancy Klensch continues to grow Summit Kids into a one-of-a-kind experience for children, their families and the community.

summitkids.ca hello@summitkids.ca


2018

CARBON CREDIT SOLUTIONS INC. While Carbon Credit Solutions Inc (CCSI) expands globally, the work it is doing here at home is what Ed Alfke, CEO and Alastair Handley, President, are particularly proud of. Today the company is providing planet positive equipment, finance and software solutions to companies that are working to reduce their environmental impact. A great example of this is the work that CCSI is doing with oil and gas companies in Alberta. Government regulations mean that companies need to reduce vented methane emissions by 2023. In order to comply, companies must invest in new equipment that reduces emissions. Ed and Alastair with their team have come up a whole new system to accelerate the deployment of this equipment. “We deliver the equipment and financing that is needed to replace equipment that is venting methane to the atmosphere. We track the associated emission reductions and convert them to carbon credits that we monetize to pay for the program,” says Ed Alfke. “Here’s an opportunity for O&G companies to acquire and install the equipment needed to comply with new regulations for free.” Both Ed and Alastair are passionate about working toward a low-carbon economy and have created a business environmental solution where economics matter. This approach has garnered much attention. Among other accolades, CCSI won the 2018 Alberta Best of Business award at the Alberta Business Awards of Distinction, ranked 140th in North America on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500 list and 28th in Canada in Deloitte’s Technology Fast 50 for its meteoric growth, entrepreneurial spirit and innovation over the past five years. Ed won the 2017 EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award in the Prairies Cleantech and Environmental category and both Ed and Alastair were 2018 Leaders Award winners.

“It’s wonderful to be recognized as a business leader in Calgary and we’re here to stand with the energy sector through this transition,” Ed says.

Carbon Credit Solutions Inc 21st floor, 440 2nd Ave SW Calgary, AB, T2P 5E9

Ed Alfke and Alastair Handley

In an energy industry battered by the recession, CCSI is working with the oil and gas sector in Alberta to help them adopt new equipment needed to meet methane reduction requirements. CCSI offers a business opportunity to leverage carbon markets at no operating cost for the oil and gas companies. It’s a win-win, and the results are amazing. Parent company CCSI now has strong companies in its operating group, like TriCore Carbon Solutions and CSG Canada. CSG Canada introduced new cogeneration equipment that reduces energy costs 25 to 40 percent. Tricore has deployed 2,800 solar powered chemical injection pumps making a significant difference both environmentally and economically for its clients. The social trend toward low-carbon economies is here to stay, and Ed Alfke and Alastair Handley with their team at CCSI are excited to present a better paradigm for the oil and gas industry to get on board.

403 912-9132 information@carboncreditsolutions.ca www.carboncreditsolutions.ca


2017

ALLISON GRAFTON DELIVERS DREAMS I n the five years since Allison Grafton was honoured with a Leaders Award, she has shown why she and her team at Rockwood Custom Homes deserved the accolades. The award-winning boutique custom-home construction and renovation company creates bespoke custom homes in the most coveted areas of the city, and is currently constructing the sold-out Residences of King Edward development and embarking on sales for the estate lots in the Lazy H development in Springbank.

“Continuing on the success of our Villas at Aspen Heights project, we are also selling and building more detached villas in Aspen Heights, which are now 95 per cent sold out, as well as several custom homes on estate lots in the same area,” says Allison Grafton, president of Rockwood. “In June, we launched our next large villa project on a distinct historic property in Calgary’s Springbank Hill neighbourhood, the Villas at Abby

Farm. The development is close to several major shopping areas like Aspen Landing and features both southwest exposures and scenic mountain views.”

Rockwood boasts a full complement of integrated construction, architectural and interior design services that come together to create beautiful high-end multihome and single-family residences in Calgary and Kelowna. Through transparency, integrity, value-creation and amazingly creative people, Rockwood builds clients the forever homes of their dreams. “We build homes to stand the test of time, in both quality and design.” And it has not gone unnoticed, with Rockwood receiving several national honours, including Canada’s Most Admired Corporate Culture Award (2017) and a finalist nod for Best Managed Companies (2018). Grafton herself has received several awards, most recently winning the AWE Upsurge Entrepreneur Award (2019) and has no plans on slowing down anytime soon.

LAUNCHING SUMMER 2019

Custom Luxury Walk-out Bungalow Living An exclusive development in one of Calgary’s most desirable areas, with panoramic southwest mountain views and a mature and lush green belt, the villas combine architectural elegance with contemporary custom interiors.

REGISTER TODAY 403.452.5955 | abbyfarmliving.com


They stepped up and helped us expand internationally. Arnon Levy, GuestTek CEO First company in the world to put internet connections into hotel rooms. Now in 107 countries across the globe.

Get connected at

atb.com/corporate


Even the Best Are Driven to Be Better Leadership is about staying ahead. It’s defined by the ability to anticipate and adapt to change – to improve, refine and keep moving forward, charting your own course. MNP proudly congratulates the Business in Calgary 2019 Leaders. As an entrepreneurial firm built by entrepreneurs, we commend your achievements and commitment to community. Contact Trevor Winkler, Regional Managing Partner, at 403.263.3385 or trevor.winkler@mnp.ca


The Calgary Chamber is the voice of the business community. We double down on commerce and work with businesses to create catalysts for growth.

83


In June, eight of the country’s largest Chambers of Commerce and Boards of Trade launched a new campaign called “Canadians for Natural Resources.” This campaign is all about coming together and having essential conversations about the future of energy in our country. Together, we all want to be a country that we are proud to live in. One that looks after all people, creating opportunities and jobs. However, we currently find ourselves in a country that is divided. Canada has an incredible endowment of energy resources produced at the world’s highest ethical and environmental standards. Not just oil and natural gas products, but also nuclear, hydro, solar and other renewable sources. In recent years, we have found ourselves missing out on investment and losing money every day because we cannot get our products to market. By ensuring that all of Canada’s natural resources can get to market through essential infrastructure, we can displace fuel sources and energy production with much higher emissions. We can ensure that the world’s energy consumers can access Canada’s responsibly-produced products and are not forced to purchase from less ethical suppliers. Through continued technological innovation and growth of renewable energy technology, we will also be able to further reduce global emissions here at home. Canada can be a global leader in all types of energy. Energy extraction and climate change are not mutually exclusive, no matter what some people would want us to believe. Find out more about this initiative at www.ournaturalresources.ca. This month is the time of cowboy hats, pancakes, country music and harvest time. Agriculture has always been a mainstay of the Calgary economy and it comes to its celebration apex during the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth, the Calgary Stampede. The Stampede isn’t just about midway snacks and socializing, it is also a great indicator of the economic status of our city. During the 10 days of Stampede, the economic impact of the event is immense, bringing in over $400 million to the city. And the benefits are not limited to the city. The surrounding areas all feel the excitement and optimism for the future through the upcoming weeks. This is a great time to learn more about the role of agriculture in Alberta’s economy, and take the time to get out and about and support some of our wonderful local agriculture and agri-food businesses. Sandip Lalli President & CEO Calgary Chamber


Dawn of a New Chapter for CEO Peer Mentoring

I

n an innovative and rapidly-growing city such as our own, small businesses are contributing to our economy in every corner of the city. In search of success, many entrepreneurs are seeking a supportive network they can rely on to ask questions and gather insights from. The Calgary Chamber has taken steps to assist business leaders and entrepreneurs through our CEO Peer Mentoring program. CEO Peer Mentoring is a Calgary Chamber program that has been running for almost four years, rooted in the Edward Lowe Foundation’s internationally-recognized methodology of peer-learning programs. Continuing from a solid base of Dawn O’Connor strong facilitators, the Calgary Chamber is excited to welcome Dawn O’Connor as the newest facilitator for two cohorts. Dawn is coming in to lead two strong long-term groups of entrepreneurs as they continue to grow their businesses. In addition, Dawn is working to set up additional CEO Peer Mentoring groups within the Calgary Chamber program. Dawn has been a trainer and facilitator of peer-mentoring groups for six years and is also an entrepreneur herself. We caught up with Dawn to talk about the program, the cohorts, and what she is most looking forward to in the below interview. Calgary Chamber (CC): Tell us a bit about yourself. Dawn O’Connor (DO): My title is master productivity ninja, and I have been a group facilitator for the past six years. I have owned and sold two businesses, so I can relate to the challenges and joys of business ownership that are brought up in the Peer Mentoring meetings. CC: How does CEO Peer Mentoring work? DO: Peer Mentoring follows a format that starts with a question period, followed by experience sharing. The surprising thing about this program format is that no advice giving is allowed. Peer Mentoring works because it is about asking insightful, mind-expanding questions that encourage people

to think more broadly and creatively about solutions. The whole session happens under a strict code of confidentiality; it’s this trust base that ensures the success of the group. I should mention that Peer Mentoring is not a networking group or “lead club,” with no focus on securing new clients. The focus is on problem solving, idea generation and supporting each other. CC: Who can benefit from CEO Peer Mentoring? DO: Any business leader who is thirsty for knowledge, generous with their ideas and interested in growth will benefit from a peer group. CC: Why should a business leader join? DO: Many people join because it can be lonely as a business owner, particularly for women in male-dominated industries. Entrepreneurs face very different challenges than their friends and family who may be employees of a company. A peer group gives them an excellent outlet for exploring the unique challenges they face in the running and building of a business. CC: How does CEO Peer Mentoring impact growth on businesses? DO: These peer groups are not about growth for growth’s sake, it’s about figuring out what is meaningful and manageable. As a “productivity ninja” I teach mindfulness and balance, so I try to bring these principles to the tables of my peer groups. Dawn started facilitating the groups in May, and is currently looking to add a few more business leaders into each group. “I absolutely love facilitating these groups. I get excited for all their successes, and I feel deeply for all their challenges,” she concludes. To learn more about CEO Peer Mentoring visit www.calgarychamber.com/programs/ceo-peer-mentoring/.


Stampede Barometer

T

he Calgary Stampede has been a driver of the city’s economy for over 100 years. While it provides the city with economic benefits, it also serves as a pulse check on our economy.

In 1912, Stampede’s first rodeo show brought in $120,000 for the city, which equates to about $3 million today. Fast forward to 2019 and the Calgary Stampede’s estimated contribution to the local economy has now grown significantly to more than $400 million – contributing to the city’s well-being through events, hotel stays, shopping and many businesses that depend on it for their success. The Calgary Stampede showcases a bedrock industry for Alberta: agriculture and agri-food. The industry contributes over $5 billion a year to the province’s economy and is expected to grow in the upcoming year. The Protein Industries Supercluster, based in the Prairies, has been working towards adding value to key Canadian crops and increase exports to high-growth foreign markets. The goal of the supercluster is to bring a cross section of industries together for collaboration and innovation while moving Canada towards becoming a world leader in plant-based proteins. The Stampede brings attention to this sector and offers an opportunity to bring different industries together in a venue where business relationships can develop or grow. The annual Stampede Chuckwagon Canvas Auction also provides insight into the confidence level of businesses operating in our city. Each March, potential sponsors compete for advertising space on chuckwagon canvases (or tarps) featured during the 10 days of the GMC Rangeland Derby. The amount spent on sponsorship dollars provides us with a snapshot of business confidence in Calgary.

Historically, we have found that yearly changes in canvas auction results, GDP, employment and the price of oil generally experience similar patterns of growth or contraction. This year, the total amount spent on sponsorships for the derby was just shy of $3.29 million, bringing in $47,000 or 1.5 per cent more in bids from last year’s total of $3.23 million. The small jump is significantly less than last year’s growth of 34 per cent or a total of $817,000 from 2017 sponsorship spending. However, this growth came at a time when Calgary was recovering from a recession. This year’s auction results paint a fairly accurate picture of our city’s economy: improving, but at a slow pace. Calgary’s recovery from the 2015-16 recession is evident but has recently slowed to a crawl. The Conference Board of Canada expects real GDP growth in Alberta to shrink to 1.3 per cent by the end of 2019, trailing behind every other province. The board also expects business investment in the province to fall once again this year, marking the fifth consecutive year that investment has decreased. These sentiments are also shared by major financial institutions across Canada. Alberta has already faced significant challenges in 2019 that include: a sluggish start for the national economy, a trade war between two of the largest economies in the world that has tempered investment attitudes, ongoing tensions around the ratification of the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) and high levels of personal debt in the province. Additional uncertainty is stemming from ongoing disputes around the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion limiting market access for Canadian energy products, sweeping changes to the regulatory environment proposed in Bill C-69 and the looming threat of Bill


C-48. The combination of all these factors have hurt investor confidence to start the year and caused a cooling effect on our economy. Employment throughout the city has also been affected by the factors above. Average unemployment for the first three months of the year has improved from 9.5 per cent two years ago but has barely changed from 7.9 per cent last year, sitting at 7.5 per cent to start 2019. During the auction, Calgary’s unemployment rate was higher than any other major city in Canada and was nearly two per cent higher than the national rate. The Atlantic provinces were the only region that saw higher unemployment than our city. Between 2018 and 2019, the average price of oil in the first quarter also fell. At the time of the auction, the average price of West Texas Intermediate was just under $55 US/ barrel, 13 per cent lower than the 2018 average. Historically, high oil prices led to high business confidence in Cal-

gary. This was most notable in 2012 when the tarp auction hit record sponsorships at over $4 million while the average price of oil was around $100 US/barrel. It’s unlikely we’ll be seeing oil prices return to those levels any time soon, but there is a silver lining. The auction reached three-quarters of record sponsorship dollars with the price of oil nearly cut in half, a correlation that suggests Calgary’s economy has been diversifying and that energy companies have found ways to maintain sustainability at lower commodity prices. The Calgary Stampede has a rich history and has steadily contributed to our local economy for over a century. The annual event gives us insights into the current economic climate of the city and sets the stage for future growth of our local businesses and businesses across Alberta. Although the canvas auction this year did not come close to record numbers, it does show that our city is moving towards growth and business confidence is improving.


Surecall Contact Centers Chamber member since 2008

Get a department of We Got Your Back Chamber members have exclusive access to Canada’s #1 plan for health and dental benefits for companies with1-50 employees.


INGLEWOOD GOLF AND CURLING CLUB BETTER THAN EVER by Rennay Craats

S

pring in Calgary finds golfers eager to hit the links. Inglewood Golf and Curling Club is a favourite and welcomes golfers to the 2019 season with some impressive improvements to an already great facility. “Since the flood of 2013, we are fully restored,” says general manager Jason Stanier. “We replaced three of 18 greens, expanded some of the water hazards, re-sodded a few fairways, and added some new bunkers.” Golfers will be thrilled with the experience of playing this traditional tree-lined par-71 course situated on the banks of the Bow River. Upon arrival, they can warm up at the driving range and practice facilities before teeing up on the first hole. Once there, golfers can choose from four tee boxes according to their experience and skill level; yardages range from 6,575 from the back tees to 5,061 yards from the forward tees. “It’s a great course for all skill levels of golfers, from the experienced to the beginner,” he says. It’s a fun course to play, as it challenges golfers’ accuracy to stay between the tree-lined fairways, while rewarding them with some

of the best putting surfaces in the city. Inglewood Golf Club is a comfortable, welcoming course that offers great city views nestled within an inner-city natural oasis. “The greens and tees are close together making the course a great walk,” Stanier says. “And it’s centrally located 10 minutes from downtown so you can meet friends here after work and then go to your separate quadrants of the city after.” The convenient location is one draw for members but there are other perks that make Inglewood Golf Club an attractive place to call home. Members can book six days in advance and have priority for weekend morning tee times. Also, members can participate in ladies, men’s and senior leagues as well as numerous club tournaments and social events throughout the year. Now is a great time to join Inglewood Golf Club. The course is offering a limited number of memberships for $5,000, which includes the first year’s annual fees (prorated pricing available for the remainder of the year). Inglewood has everything a golfer could need – well-kept greens, great dining options, a diverse and welcoming membership with a fun social atmosphere and an incredible escape just minutes from the downtown grind.

WWW.INGLEWOODGOLFCLUB.CA 19 Gosling Way SE Calgary, Alberta T2B 3V7 | Pro Shop: 403-272-4363


GOLF

at a at h igh er leher vel GOLF a hig GOLF

at a h igher l e v el

le vel

www.silvertipresort.com

www.silvertipresort.com

O ffering scenery, breathtaking scenery, grand facilities, exceptional O ffering breathtaking grand facilities, exceptional cuisine, cuisine, and world-class golf, Silvertip or Eagle Ranch can tailor your next

and world-class golf, Silvertip can tailor your next tournament or group tournament or group event to suit your every need. Call 1-877-877-5444 event to suit your every need. Call 1-877-877-5444 to see how Silvertip to see how we can create a golf experience far above ordinary. can create a golf experience far above ordinary.

O ffering breathtaking scenery, grand facilities, exceptional cuisine, and

world-class golf, Silvertip or Eagle Ranch can tailor your next tournament or group event to suit your every need. Call 1-877-877-5444 to see how we can create a golf experience far above ordinary.

www.silvertipresort.com

www.eagleranchresort.com

find us on facebook

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

91


TOPPING THE BALL? // SCOTT ORBAN

McKenzie Meadows Golf Tip:

Topping the Ball? More at play than just standing up

BY SCOTT ORBAN, PGA EXECUTIVE PROFESSIONAL, MCKENZIE MEADOWS GOLF CLUB

F

ollowing a topped golf shot, I have often heard golfers comment: “I came up on that one.” This may be the case, but this is often the wrong diagnosis.

are you “flipping” it? See your PGA golf professional for a diagnosis and the fix.

The alternate cause may be an early release of the golf club prior to impact. I call this the “hit impulse” – overusing the hands and/or wrists prior to impact thus changing the club’s depth of the swing (Figure 1). This can result in a topped shot, fat shot or, if timing is perfect, a good shot.

Check out the video at http://mckenziemeadows.com/golf_tips/ to learn how to properly strike down on the ball using irons.

The hit impulse – also called “flipping” shows up when we are trying to hit a high shot: over water, to an elevated green, or trying to perform a high soft pitch or bunker shot. In lower handicap golfers the “hit impulse” often results in a closed clubface. Occurring when the golfer tries to create more speed by overusing their hands (especially in low lofted irons). You need to learn how to hit down (figure 2) on the golf ball and trust the loft of the club to give the shot the height it needs. The real lesson is that you need the correct diagnosis before you get working on a fix. Are you standing up or

FIGURE 1

FIGURE 2

Scott Orban is the PGA executive pro at McKenzie Meadows Golf Club.

Golf...with a smile :) McKenzie Meadows Golf Club in Calgary’s Fish Creek Provincial Park

www.mckenziemeadows.com 403.257.BALL (2255) Premium 18 Holes

92

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Academy & Range

Events

Bar & Grill


Celebrating 40 Years in Business Honouring our Past - Innovating our Future by Rennay Craats

Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary

93


Our staff, our family, our success!

N

o one could have imagined that the legacy of a City of Calgary firefighter and his wife would be found in the asphalt and concrete industry. In the 1970s, Robert McArthur traded in his fire hose for a hammer and set out to make his mark in home construction with wife Gail. They soon found that one thing was holding up their schedule: a lack of paving companies in Calgary. “There were only three or four paving companies serving our area and often property and business owners were unable to complete their projects as the existing supply companies were fully booked, so my

Sean McArthur, president of Bow Mark

dad recognized the need for more paving suppliers,” says Robert’s son Sean McArthur, president of Bow Mark. “I guess you could say the creation of Bow Mark Paving in 1979 was due to my father’s own needs as a developer.”

403-932-7784

hillstoneagg.ca

CONGRATULATIONS BOW MARK! Your honesty and integrity has taken you a long way.

2 • Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary

The company started with only six employees, all of whom were McArthur family members, and set out to do residential driveway paving and commercial projects in Okotoks. Bow Mark represented the McArthur family and their values so completing projects correctly was a high priority and remains one of the company’s core values today. By the time Sean McArthur and his older brother Steve bought the company in 1999, it had only grown to 10


Congratulations to Sean McArther and his team at Bowmark on their 40th Anniversary! Volker Stevin Contracting Ltd. 7175 – 12th Street S.E. Calgary, AB Phone: 403-571-5893 www.volkerstevin.ca

Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary • 3


Our main goals include ensuring the integrity and quality of the finished product for our customers

employees. As new owners, the brothers had big plans for the little operation. Over the years, Bow Mark Paving has become known for its reputation for quality workmanship – a go-to company for any and all paving needs in Calgary and surrounding area. That continued through the transition of ownership in 2012 when Sean bought out Steve’s interests to become the sole owner of Bow Mark. In 2013, with partners Ben Bjorge and Tim Becker, Sean expanded Bow Mark adding a concrete division that allowed the company to offer a more complete product to its growing clientele. Growth at the company has been organic and measured, and while the company embraces and adapts to change, it doesn’t seek it out frivolously. The slow, cautious growth pace has certainly paid off. Today, Bow Mark has become the benchmark for quality and service in the paving and concrete industries. “Our business only grows with the quality staff we employ. Even if we see a market we believe we could service, if we don’t have the people, we choose not 4 • Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary


to do it. We wait until we have the right staff and then we expand accordingly. We never force growth,” Sean McArthur says. Bow Mark’s approach to growth has clearly worked. Over the past five years, the company has expanded in scope and size, now boasting 110 employees (in the office and on job sites) working on projects in concrete, municipal and commercial paving, and project management. Bow Mark also offers general contracting services for large commercial and industrial projects, road construction and large residential projects. The company prides itself on completing jobs on time and on budget whether it’s for country residential asphalt, a patterned concrete driveway or a major thoroughfare. It is also a pre-qualified prime contractor with the City of Calgary and has been a general and prime contractor for a number of municipal projects in the area. Over the past four decades, Bow Mark has been involved with everything from road rebuilds to airports, utility installations to revitalizations.

THANK YOU for all your concrete cutting & coring business for the last 6 years! We wish you another 40 years of success!

From commercial and industrial to residential, Phoenix has you covered.

(403)-230-4040 www.phoenixccc.com

In fact, Bow Mark has gone from one town to the next tackling revitalization projects. With High River and Okotoks under its belt, it is currently doing the downtown revitalization in Coleman. “Revitalization entails pretty much everything – just taking the whole main street and tearing everything out and putting all new underground storm systems, electrical, street lighting, concrete, trees, the whole works,” McArthur says. “Exciting to bring new life back to a city’s core.”

Congratulations to Bow Mark On 40 Successful Years! We are proud to be a part of your journey!

Bow Mark crews are equipped to handle all the concrete and paving components of these revitalization projects while specialty project foremen manage all other trades and crews in the remaining aspects of the job. The municipal clients know Bow Mark will ensure their high standards apply to subcontracted crews on their job sites. The company fosters strong relationships with outside tradespeople and these valued partnerships only serve to make the product and the company itself better. This is important to McArthur and his team as their goal is to provide the best product possible and to continue to grow and improve. One way the company has done this is by not only attracting skilled, dedicated staff but also by keeping them. “Our genuine commitment and investment in our staff is unique in an industry that is seasonal and demanding, but our low turnover and long-term staff speaks for

INLAND CONCRETE // INLAND AGGREGATES #222, 885 – 42ND Ave. SE, Calgary Order Desk: 403-531-2800 Office: 403-531-3000 canconcreteorderscalgary@lehighhanson.com

Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary • 5


Humble beginnings early 80’s. Photo of founder Robert McArthur operating roller.

itself,” he says. “This is something that is important to our management team. The people we work with and our staff matter to us. They are our community.” This positive work culture is something that Robert McArthur introduced from the beginning and his core values hold true 40 years later. Just as it did in 1979, Bow

CONGRATULATIONS ON 40 YEARS! FROM ALL OF US AT

Robert McArthur, founder of Bow Mark EXCAVATING & TRUCKING LTD.

www.shawneexcavating.com

Phone: 403.603.3012

Thanks for Paving the Way Congrats on your 40th Anniversary!

opuscorp.ca

403.209.5555 6 • Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary

Mark follows through on its commitments and strives to do the right thing for clients every time. The team stands behind its product and prides itself on quality output. At Bow Mark there are no shortcuts and no compromises. Customers are the focus, and management does all it can to ensure the staff is positioned to do a quality job for clients. Using technology to track progress and communicate changes in real time, Bow Mark can limit delays and improve efficiency. “We focus on timely-productive communication and care and attention to details on each project, leaving the customer satisfied with the results,” McArthur says. The company also strives to stay abreast of new approaches and product applications in order to remain at the top of the industry. Staff complete annual safety and operations training, and in the offseason Bow Mark encourages employees to enrol in classes so they can add to their own resumés as well as learn how to better serve today’s marketplace.


FROM ONE FAMILY BUSINESS TO ANOTHER,

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR MILESTONE

Since 1912, BURNCO has been supplying aggregate construction materials as a successful, familyrun business based in Calgary.

Proud supporters of the Okotoks Oiler Midget AAA team. Photo Teams inaugural puck drop by Sean McArthur

Likewise, the management team is dedicated to professional development and training as well. “Learning is a lifelong skill and being open to new possibilities keeps Bow Mark working towards our future for the next generation of staff and management,” he says. The family-owned and operated company treats their employees like part of the family. Employees work hard and are invested in the success of the company, even more so given Bow Mark operates on profit-sharing with staff. When the company does well, everyone gets a piece of the profits. Even in the tough economic times of the past few years, Bow Mark avoided layoffs and kept the schedule booked for the season, with jobs like the Highway 762 Slide Rehabilitation as well as rebuilding the town of High River after the floods of 2013 – even donating equipment and manpower during the initial stages of the flood. The McArthurs are grateful for their success and are happy to pay it forward in the community. Bow Mark supports numerous organizations and groups including Foothills Country Hospice, the Centennial Centre and the Foothills Community Centre. It also supports a dozen hockey teams on top of being a major sponsor of the AAA Bow Mark Midget Oilers hockey team. Bow Mark is proud to have built the McArthur Outdoor Stage at Okotoks Old Towne Square Plaza in recognition of Sean’s parents Robert and Gail McArthur. “It’s really important for us to give back to the community. It’s how we were raised,” he says. Bow Mark has given back to the community and to its clients for the past 40 years and is eager to carry on Robert and Gail McArthur’s legacy for another 40.

For over 100 years we have embraced innovative technology and new marketplaces while always maintaining the vision and values that were first introduced by our founder, James F. Burns. Today we continue our unwavering commitment to safety, our renewed focus on family leadership and our steady, dependable growth into the future. Aggregate | Asphalt Ready Mix | Landscape Centres

www.BURNCO.com

Blue-Con Excavating Ltd. congratulates you on your 40th Anniversary! 40 years in business is achieved through core strengths, relationships and partnerships. We celebrate your enduring commitment to all and appreciate the opportunity to have done business with you! Best wishes for your continued success! Phone: 403-273-1144 www.blueconcalgary.ca

Congratulations, Bow Mark Construction!

A Family Business that has been a proud supplier of essential asphalt milling and recycled asphalt products for over 30 years

“You are a great bunch of people to work with, who exceeds industry standards. It is nice to see the same faces year after year!”

Bow Mark Paving & Concrete • 40th Anniversary • 7


Concrete • Paving • Commercial • Residential • Project Management Southern Alberta

Family owned since 1979 | Sponsoring community since 1979

Thank You!

To Our Staff, Partners and Clients 403-938-7920 | www.bowmark.ca


Photo by Riverwood Photography

25 Years OF EXCELLENCE at Jertyne Interior Services by Rennay Craats 101


A

fter 20 years as a tradesperson, Robert Legault was ready to try his hand at something new. Together with wife Lorie, he set out to establish a company of his own, combining her skills and experience on the office administration side with his vast field experience in construction to create Jertyne Interior Services. “One day we decided that we could provide a better quality and service to the industry and decided to start Jertyne in 1994,” says Robert Legault, owner and president of Jertyne Interior Services. Jertyne, which gets its name from a portmanteau of the Legault’s two eldest children Jeramie and Krystyna, quickly introduced a higher standard to the construction industry’s drywall and insulation practices. Although the company began small, it had large aspirations. Over the past 25 years, Jertyne Interior grew from three employees (including the two founders) to more than 54 staff in its heyday in the mid-2000s. It has evolved from a custom residential company to one with a broader clientele including the first-home buyer, multi-family and custom builds. Jertyne Interior has ridden the economic roller-coaster through several recessions since it started and has continued to excel despite today’s tough market conditions. “By continually adding performance targets, we’ve been able to complete the same volume of work with reduced overhead and more efficient processes to meet client expectations,” he says. Legault has risen to the challenge of running a business in a depressed economy and has established a lean, formidable team of 14 (including the original single employee) to guide the company into its next quarter-century. Most of the staff has been with Jertyne for more than 10 years, which gives clients a sense of stability, consistency and confidence in what they can expect. And what they expect is nothing short of the best. From the very beginning, the goal was simple: to provide a full range of residential services in insulation, spray foam and drywall to Calgary’s best homebuilders, and to achieve that on schedule and on budget. Jertyne has exceeded that goal. The company is known as much for delivering a high-quality product as it is for the unparalleled customer service the team provides both

Pegasus Disposal 403-680-2590 • pegasusdisposal@gmail.com

We are proud to have been in partnership with Jertyne for many years, and would like to congratulate them on 25 years of service.

CONGRATULATIONS JERTYNE INTERIOR SERVICES!

Bay 9, 9151 44th Street SE (403) 236-8080 • idealinsulation.com

Jertyne Interior Services | 35 | 2


during the job and after completion. Jertyne draws upon a large network of highly-qualified trusted trade partners that share the founders’ high expectations and standards along with their customer-first commitment. “The trade base that we have surrounding our customers have the same philosophies as Jertyne,” he says. “There is a real pride in workmanship there and it shows in the quality of the product.” Jertyne Interior stands behind its work and strives for perfection on every site. On the odd occasion when a problem arises, Jertyne makes it right to ensure complete customer satisfaction. Over the years, the company has also worked hard to make its processes more efficient while offering clients extra services that are included in the base price for the job. The extras are in the details, and Jertyne pays close attention to every detail on a job to ensure a superior end product. It offers clients a checklist that outlines what Jertyne provides compared to the competition, and with the high service and quality standards along with the value-added services, there really is no comparison. Seemingly simple inclusions like power vacuuming and thoroughly cleaning the floors after sanding make an enormous difference. The same attention to detail was implemented when Jertyne introduced a priming division almost 10 years ago to better control the product being applied and to enhance its end result. Rather than just rolling primer close to corners and calling it a day, Jertyne crews

Proud to be associated with Jertyne Interior Services. Congratulations on 25 years of continued success! 5515 48 Avenue SE • 403-255-8157 • www.fbmsales.com

Jertyne Interior Services | 35 | 3


cut into the corners and around every angle to achieve full coverage. This properly protects the compound and guarantees a great, uniform finished look after painting. The addition of priming made Jertyne a one-stop shop for wall preparation, and clients appreciate the convenience and peace of mind knowing the job will be done right and done well by proven crews. Jertyne’s product meets and exceeds industry and building standards in everything from vapour barrier to spray foam to caulking requirements, and this makes it an easy choice for clients. The QC checklist and value-add services is all the proof that homebuilders and renovators require to choose Jertyne for their residential interior needs. “We take things a step further to be the best,” he says. “For our checklist, we list competitor one, two and three for clients and every one of our boxes is checked. It’s all inclusive here. Challenge the competition and see how many boxes are checked there.” This superior service and product is a result of 25 years of hard work and commitment to making the industry better and establishing the company as a leader in all areas. Safety is a number one priority and not only is Jertyne COR certified, it also has a full-time in-house safety officer to ensure that procedures are in place and followed to keep crews safe on site. “We’re leaders in the industry with respect to safety. We want every crew going home to see their families. Last I saw, we were well into the 1,200s for days without an injury. We’re pretty proud of that.” Jertyne is proud of its reputation as honest, quality contractors and is constantly evolving in order to streamline its processes while creating the best possible product for clients. It uses the highest-quality gypsum boards and wet products, and it chooses green materials whenever possible. The company continues to improve by introducing new products, systems and techniques along with innovative ideas from the teams in the office as well as in the field. “There is always something new to learn – a different technique, a more efficient way. That’s what keeps it interesting,” says Legault. “Even after 25 years, it’s rewarding to me to deliver quality services and products to Calgary and the surrounding area, and that keeps us in the game.” As the local economy slowly gets back on its feet, Jertyne is poised to help the industry and community rebuild and grow. With a move to a smaller office in June, the company is incorporating more efficiencies and is excited to pass savings on to customers. This customer focus is what has sustained Jertyne Interior Services since it opened its doors in 1994 and it is what will help it continue to thrive into the future. “We are delivering a fantastic quality at a competitive price and that’s the goal to achieve for the customers who have remained loyal for so many years,” Robert Legault says. “We’re very proud of what we’ve done and accomplished, and we look forward to the next challenges as they unfold.”

60 Commercial Dr, Calgary, AB T3Z 2A7 (403) 219-1046 | jertyne.com Jertyne Interior Services | 35 | 4


Sunik Roofing: Serving Calgarians for 30 Years

C

algary is a city of extremes, and with hot summers paired with bitterly cold and snowy winters, those extremes can do a number on a roof. For almost 30 years, Sunik Roofing has been battling the city’s challenging environment to help extend the life of its customers’ roofs. “If I shingle your roof then we have a deal where we come back at no charge between year two and three to do a visual inspection – a roofing tune-up. We’d recommend this for all roofs,” says Nick Sims, Sunik Roofing president. Whether it’s an aging roof or a new one, homeowners should have a professional come out for annual or biennial visits to ensure there aren’t issues after a tough winter. Sunik’s trained professionals know what damage can occur from heavy snow loads, ice, wind and the effects of thawing and refreezing so they can identify and repair trouble spots to avoid costly repairs later. The team examines the roof thoroughly, looking for everything from exposed nails to curled or buckled shingles. As part of the maintenance package, Sunik re-tars plumbing collars and vents, checks the chimney, flashings and valleys, examines skylights to ensure they are sealed, and keeps an eye out for envelope

issues like condensation buildup in the attic from plugged or faulty vents. Sunik’s roofers evaluate the general condition of the roof during this inspection, offering advice on what needs repair and how homeowners can limit wear on the shingles to prolong the roof’s life. They recommend caution when going out on roofs to clean or hang Christmas lights. “I’ve seen homeowners get up on their roof and ruin a whole section from washing windows, so minimizing foot traffic is helpful,” he says. Older or damaged roofs may need to be replaced, and the eight-time Consumer Choice Award-winning roofer is available to offer the best solutions. Sims recommends products that are more forgiving in this punishing climate, including rubber shingles and class-4 shingles that hold up against the elements, including hail, better. A roof’s best defence against the ravages of weather is maintenance and prevention, and Sunik Roofing’s spring package offers homeowners peace of mind while saving them money down the road.

Consistency, Quality, Craftsmanship

Come in and talk to us about your project!

Our showroom is open from Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm | www.prestigerailings.com “We’re passionate about bringing spaces to life. Together with you.”

2777 Hopewell Place NE Calgary (403) 250-1020 • Toll Free: 1-800-382-8502

30 years in Business

www.sunik.com 403.280.2803

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

105


Spending on Digital Transformation in Alberta to Top $18B Through 2022

D

igital technology is poised to disrupt virtually every aspect of business as the growing connectivity between people, machines and organizations dramatically alters the business models for companies across all industrial sectors. As business embraces the new economy, the scope of the opportunity is becoming clear and companies are now forecast to spend $18.4 billion on digital transformation across all industries in Alberta through 2022 as expenditures steadily ramp up. Spending on digital transformation in the province, much of it driven from Calgary, is forecast to grow at a compound annual rate of 20 per cent over the next three years as disruptive technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) begin reshaping our economy. The forecast on digital transformation, or DX, as it is known in the tech sector, was compiled for Calgary Economic Development by the consultancy International Data Corp. (IDC) Canada. Calgary is the first city in Canada to forecast the digital spend across its key industries in areas such as AI, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), next generation security, 3D printing, augmented reality/virtual reality (AR/VR), and robotics. Innovation is one of the four pillars of the Economic Strategy, Calgary in the New Economy, for the city that was approved in 2018. The impetus for companies to increase spending on DX is a competitive edge as digitization is poised to disrupt all key industries. The energy industry is expected to account for about onequarter of the total investment in digitization in Alberta. However, most of the spending will occur in diverse sectors including creative industries, manufacturing, logistics, financial services, life sciences and agribusiness.

106

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

The data from IDC Canada forecasts that agribusiness will be the fastest adopter of digitization. The forecast was released by Calgary Economic Development in May during Collision, North America’s fastest-growing tech conference, and provided the 25,000 delegates attending more perspective on the growing tech scene in Calgary. The research underscored the employment opportunities in Calgary for top talent looking to resolve real-world challenges in areas such as cleaner energy, safer food, better health and safer transportation of people and goods. With more than 2,000 tech jobs currently open in Calgary, the opportunities for tech workers are here now. “We intend to be disruptors in industry in the new economy, not the disrupted,” Mary Moran, president and chief executive officer of Calgary Economic Development, told journalists attending the conference which attracts top talent and innovative companies globally. Calgary has a fast-growing tech ecosystem and the goal of the study was to quantify the spend for the engines of growth and innovation to ensure companies and top talent realize the scope of opportunity we have to take on global challenges. Of the $18.4 billion companies will spend on digital transition in Alberta over the next three years, $7.5 billion will be spent directly in Calgary. As the country’s energy capital, Alberta accounts for about one-third of all the spending on digitization of the vast network of energy systems across Canada. About $4.2 billion of the overall spend in the sector nationally is forecast to be by companies in Alberta in oil and gas, electric utilities and power companies, renewables and cleantech. The companies – and the people – that embrace change, adopt new technology and adapt to the new realities will have the best opportunities to succeed in the new economy.


Calgary SHiFTs into Gear to Develop New Tourism Experiences TOURISM CALGARY AND TRAVEL ALBERTA BRING TOURISM EXPERIENCE DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM TO CALGARY

BY BRIDGETTE SLATER

S

AS PART OF TOURISM WEEK,

HiFT, Travel Alberta’s sought-after experiential travel training program, is coming to Calgary March 9-12, 2020. Hosted in a different Alberta community each year, this three-and-a-half-day course brings destination marketing professionals and tourism businesses together to develop year-round, export-ready tourism experiences that support the visitor economy.

WHICH TOOK PLACE AT THE END

As part of Tourism Week, which took place at the end of May, Tourism Calgary and Travel Alberta made a joint announcement that Calgary will be the next city to benefit from the SHiFT program.

THE SHIFT PROGRAM.

“Guided by Calgary’s Destination Strategy, Tourism Calgary’s aspiration is to make ours the Ultimate Host City,” says Cindy Ady, CEO, Tourism Calgary. “Participating in the SHiFT program will bring Calgary one step closer to achieving this vision by supporting the development and marketing of tourism products that create year-round activity and vibrancy for the benefit of visitors and Calgarians.” As Ultimate Hosts, members of Calgary’s tourism industry are focused on providing visitors and Calgarians with shareable, memorable experiences. By combining classroom training and in-person experiences with new tourism products, SHiFT teaches tourism businesses and host communities about experience development best practices and ensures they are equipped with the tools, resources and investment required to succeed.

OF MAY, TOURISM CALGARY AND TRAVEL ALBERTA MADE A JOINT ANNOUNCEMENT THAT CALGARY WILL BE THE NEXT CITY TO BENEFIT FROM

vice president, industry development, Travel Alberta. “The ongoing development of new experiences makes Alberta an even more desirable destination and is vital to the continued growth of the industry and provincial economy.” Since launching in 2015, the SHiFT program has been hosted in Drumheller, Jasper, Edmonton, Banff and most recently in Sylvan Lake. Each time, over 20 tourism businesses and destination marketing and development organizations from around the province immersed themselves in the sold-out program. These efforts have resulted in over 50 new Albertabased tourism experiences being developed. To learn more about the initiatives Tourism Calgary is undertaking to make Calgary the Ultimate Host City, see visitcalgary.com.

“Travel Alberta is delighted that Calgary will host SHiFT 2020, which will expand on the unique experiences already available in this dynamic city,” says Shelley Grollmuss,

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

107


The difference between a good story and a great story is the leaders ability to tell one. At the Centre, we serve to expand your story everyday through the experience you receive. And for us... that’s our story.

calgary-convention.com


SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIP THROUGH STORYTELLING Innovator and storyteller. Two words we don’t often At the Centre, our leadership team also presents our see side by side when leadership is defined. Yet both story in all they do. From the stories where our guests words are the pillars at the centre of many great are welcomed enthusiastically into our space, to those achievements. Leaders who create a positive change where participants are provided exceptional service in the workplace are not just problem solvers and to enhance and build their own experiences. We credible individuals; they are the ones who tell the continually focus on leading our team through stories of their teams while effective storytelling. “Stories constitute the single building an environment based At the Calgary TELUS Convention on the experience of their most powerful weapon in a Centre, we are much more than organization. As leaders, they are leader’s arsenal.” just a space. We are the ones meant to innovate and influence who help create experiences the changes within their industry. – Dr. Howard Gardner, Prof. Harvard Univ. worth sharing. As a great leader, you already And for all of this years honorees of Business in know this. You’ve seen the economic changes. You’ve Calgary’s Leaders Awards, congratulations on made the tough decisions. You built your team while creating experiences worth sharing. You have effectively telling their stories and the story of the proven that your vision and leadership has helped company. It’s always been a challenge, but one you make our city one worth talking about. were meant to take on. calgary-convention.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2019

109


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

J

ohn Larsen has been busy handling the position of general manager at Edelman Calgary as well as national practice lead for crisis and reputation risk. He can now focus on his consulting passion as Megan Spoore has been named to run the Calgary office. She was working on corporate public affairs in Toronto before moving to this city in 2013 and has been acting general manager helping to build the Calgary office. Continuing growth has meant taking more space in its 8th Avenue and 8th Street SW offices to accommodate a current staff of 15 with a posting published for an account manager, media relations, as well as another two positions to be posted in the near future. Spoore says Edelman has been involved with the Calgary Zoo and Calgary Public Library (and its foundation), while keeping all other clients during the city’s economic troubles in addition to expanding the diversity of its business.

Alison Archambault has made a big jump from the financial world to the not-for-profit sector. After serving as director of corporate relations at First Calgary Financial and director, brand and stakeholder engagement, with Connect First Credit Union, she has joined the Calgary Zoo as its new director of marketing, sales and communication. Archambault took over the position previously held by Lindsey Galloway who moved to the Edmonton Valley Zoo, but contact will continue as he is current president of the board of Canada’s Accredited Zoos and Aquariums.

Agencies love to work with clients who have a good understanding of the business so Todd Fraser of Tandem Marketing Design is enjoying his firm’s relationship with Allison Webb, chief marketing officer of Mawer Investment Management, the Calgary-based independent investment firm that manages $55 billion in assets for independent and institutional investors. Webb’s experience includes working at Critical Mass and MacLaren McCann which fits well in partnering with Tandem in brand programming and internal and external communications. The Tandem team is also busy working with QuadReal Property Group, involved in tenant communications for its properties including the rejuvenated BP Centre and Western Canadian Place.

Gisele Danis and Susan Veres only launched Honeycomb Solutions at the beginning of this year but already the hardworking partners have built a strong portfolio of clients ranging from a $1-million not-for-profit to a company with an annual business of over $160 million. Amongst the portfolio is The51, a new investment collective founded in Calgary to increase fundraising for femalefounded startups. Others include Enrich Software and Bouchier Group, one of the largest Aboriginal-owned and operated companies in the Athabasca oilsands region.

Parker’s Pick Jump Studio’s new demo reel including C&B Advertising’s “The Never-ending Day” for UFA.

110

JULY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


Grow your Business with our Experience Cadillac Fairview offers a diverse real estate portfolio complemented with comprehensive property management services. Through the strength of ownership, strategic acquisitions, and development, Cadillac Fairview provides innovative, sustainable and functional facilities that are able to deliver exceptional solutions to tenants.

Encor Place Lobby

Leasing Information: Peter Stack 403.571.2532 peter.stack@cadillacfairview.com

ENCOR PLACE 635 8TH AVE CALGARY CITY CENTRE 215 2 Street SW

SHELL CENTRE 400 4th Avenue SW A LEED Gold building serving a global tenant. Shell Centre is connected to the core via +15 walkways and blocks from Eau Claire and Calgary's extended bike lanes. • LEED Gold Certified • Class A Office • 31 Floors • Retail Space Available • Close to Eau Claire • Global Tenant

This LEED Platinum building opened the doors in 2016. Calgary City Centre is anchored in Calgary's remarkable Eau Claire area. The building has a first-class fitness facility, professional conference centre and more. • LEED Platinum Certified • Class AAA Office • 36 Floors • 26,695 sf Floorplate • Fully Connected to the Core via +15 Walkways • Breathtaking Finishes

645 7th Avenue SW 635 8th Avenue SW This vibrant building has a premier location offering effortless access, in and out of Calgary’s core. 635 8th Avenue is situated on Calgary's intricate bike lanes. The building offers efficient floorplates and an energetic atmosphere. • Class B Office • 25 Floors • BOMA BESt Certified • Cogeneration System • Located on Calgary's bike lanes • One block from the LRT Line

Unbeatable location with easy access, in and out of Calgary’s core. Encor Place offers an efficient floorplate providing prominent layouts for all sized tenants. The building's lobby is finished with stunning marble and granite making it bright and welcoming. • Class A Office • 29 Floors • BOMA BESt Certified • Located on Calgary's LRT Line • Connected to the Core via +15 Walkways (April 2017)


Profile for Business in Calgary

Business in Calgary - July 2019  

Business in Calgary - July 2019  

Advertisement