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A New Day, A New Crisis By Frank Atkins

Minimum Wage Hikes, Fair For Whom? By Amber Ruddy

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Social Licence Can’t Be Bought By Colin Craig

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Leading Business The Calgary Report

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The Fight for Trans Mountain is Not Over

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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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Calgary Smarts The Smart Growth Initiative By John Hardy

Road to Recovery Calgary’s commercial leasing market clawing back after years of suffering By Jamie Zachary

Collaborating for Climate Change Is it really working for the benefit of Canada’s oilsands? By John Hardy

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A NEW DAY, A NEW CRISIS // FRANK ATKINS

A New Day, A New Crisis BY FRANK ATKINS

I

t seems each new day brings a fresh new crisis. These take the form of problems that the progressives believe must be dealt with, or the consequences will be extremely dire. Recently it was plastic straws. Apparently, plastic harms wildlife and ecosystems. It is interesting to me that nobody asks the questions of how plastic straws get into wildlife habitats and ecosystems. Perhaps instead of banning plastic straws, we should educate people on how to reuse and/or properly dispose of plastic straws. The left wing is at the top of their marketing game when they can tie a new crisis to an existing crisis. The latest hotbutton issue to do this is food waste. The Suzuki Foundation jumped all over this one, tying food waste to global warming. On their web page, they declared, “Besides being a waste of money, time and energy, unused food that ends up in landfills is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases.” My goodness, for a long period of time the Suzuki Foundation has been telling us that the Alberta oilsands were the main culprit. Further, most communities in Canada now have separate garbage pickups for left-over food, so I do not see how a lot of this food ends up in landfills. Clearly, thinking a problem through to the end is not a strong point of the Suzuki Foundation. In a similar sort of crisis marketing game, in a recent Policy Options article – Solving Canada’s Food Waste Problem – Tammara Soma ties food waste to food insecurity. You have to read this article carefully, as Ms. Soma simply states, “Another shocking statistic is that an estimated four million Canadians live in food insecure households,” without actually offering any causality. However, adding this clearly implies that somehow food waste is tied to food insecurity.

NOW, LET ME STATE THAT I AM ALL FOR REDUCING POLLUTION OF ALL SORTS, AND AS AN ECONOMIST, I WOULD SAY THAT WASTE OF ANY SORT MAY BE INEFFICIENT. Now, let me state that I am all for reducing pollution of all sorts, and as an economist, I would say that waste of any sort may be inefficient. However, the solutions to these problems are complex, and there is a tendency to seek simple quick solutions, as these problems are always deemed to be a crisis. The problem is that left-wing approaches to potential solutions inevitably degenerate into gobbledygook that always involves more government intervention in the economy. Ms. Soma, to her credit, actually states that there are no simple solutions to the problem of food waste. However, she then goes on to state, “We need to convert our paradigm of wastefulness into a paradigm that is based on the principles of the circular economy.” Now to an economist this is an odd statement. For those of you who have suffered through a first-year macroeconomics course, you may remember the dreaded circular economy diagram, which describes how a free market economy is supposed to work. Perhaps Ms. Soma is suggesting that there are free market solutions to this food-waste problem. I am all for that. I eagerly await the next crisis de jour.

Frank Atkins is a senior fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

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MINIMUM WAGE HIKES, FAIR FOR WHOM? // AMBER RUDDY

Minimum Wage Hikes, Fair For Whom? BY AMBER RUDDY

T

he Alberta government constantly uses fairness as a justification for its sweeping labour reforms. But the fairness principle needs to apply to small business owners as well. One policy in particular that needs to be examined through the small business lens is the drastic 50 per cent increase in entry-level wages. The rate has increased too far too fast over three short years and business owners providing entry-level jobs are struggling to cope. Using Statistics Canada and Bank of Canada data, analysis from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) shows a stark reality: inflation rose 30 per cent from 2005 to 2018, while the minimum wage skyrocketed by 114 per cent. Increasing entry-level wages at this rate is simply unsustainable for employers, with the rate increasing almost four times faster than inflation over the past decade and a half. It has been three years since the policy was announced on June 29, 2015, and the government still hasn’t released a stitch of economic impact analysis to validate that this policy is having its intended impact. Where’s the fairness in that? To top it off, there hasn’t been any mitigating measure linked to offsetting the negative effects. A CFIB survey of 1,040 Alberta business owners asked: Which of the following changes has your business already made as Alberta moves to a $15 an hour minimum wage? Fifty-five per cent have reduced or eliminated plans to hire new workers, 52 per cent have reduced or eliminated plans to hire young workers, 46 per cent raised prices, 43 per cent reduced overall staffing hours and 42 per cent have reduced the number of employees, to name just a few of the implications.

Small business owners are in the business of fairness. They have to be fair in setting their prices or their customers will find an alternative. They have to be fair in compensating their workers to attract talented people at the right level throughout the wage scale. Is it fair that all the risk of a small business is on the owner? Yes. It’s also fair for them to earn a living and reward for the opportunities they took on. Is it fair that many small business owners work 50-plus hour weeks and get no overtime? Yes. They are investing in a better future for themselves and their family. Is it fair that the owner is the last one paid in a business? Yes. It’s also fair for them to have the flexibility to decide what wages to offer. Is it fair that one-in-three small business owners effectively earn less than $15 an hour themselves? Yes. As they hone their craft, gain experience and build a reputation they will have the opportunity to earn more. But fairness is a two-way street. When the Alberta government imposes new taxes, regulations and labour laws on small businesses under the guise of fairness, they should remember that the fairest outcomes are determined by free and voluntary exchange in the marketplace. The Alberta government’s message on labour reforms and minimum wage has cast small business owners as being “unfair.” With many small business owners donating money, time, and goods and services to local charitable and community causes, nothing could be further from the truth.

Amber Ruddy is the director of provincial affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. She can be reached at amber.ruddy@cfib.ca. Follow her on Twitter @aruddy.

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SOCIAL LICENCE CAN’T BE BOUGHT // COLIN CRAIG

Social Licence Can’t Be Bought BY COLIN CRAIG

S

ince coming to office, Premier Notley has expressed the idea that if she imposed just enough new regulatory barriers and costs on Albertans she could gain so-called “social licence” for energy projects such as the Trans Mountain pipeline. “We’re not going to get the social licence we need to get pipelines built unless we take action on responsible climate change,” explained Premier Notley back in November 2015. Yet here we are more than two years later and the protestors at the Burnaby Trans Mountain pipeline site couldn’t seem to care less about Premier Notley’s new carbon tax or other new regulatory decisions. Hopefully it’s now clear to the premier – you can’t buy social licence if it’s not for sale. Even if the premier sat down with the protestors and properly briefed them on all her policy changes, it’s difficult to imagine them packing up their tents, bowing courteously and then fading off into the night to resume discussing Karl Marx’s work in underground cafés. But Premier Notley has not just struck out with protestors, she has also failed to gain social licence from her NDP colleagues at the federal level and in other provinces. For example, her federal NDP cousins are still very much a collection of anti-oil obstructionists. Federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has indicated he’s 100 per cent opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline project while B.C. NDP MP Nathan Cullen seemed to tweet with glee about a miniscule spill by the Trans Mountain pipeline of about 100 litres (a bit more than what a Ford F150’s gas tank holds).

Premier Notley’s provincial NDP cousins in B.C. are obviously opposed to the project, but so is the Alberta government’s hand-picked radical environmentalist she appointed to Alberta’s Oil Sands Advisory Group – Tzeporah Berman. After hearing about Prime Minister Trudeau’s decision to nationalize the pipeline, Berman joyfully predicted, “All hell is about to break loose in British Columbia.” So what should happen going forward? Here are two thoughts. First, if the government hasn’t realized it yet, it needs to abandon the idea of obtaining so-called social licence. By design, it’s an abstract concept that can’t be achieved. Radical activists leverage the idea to get incremental concessions without agreeing to support approved projects. Second, the government should scrap its carbon tax. Alberta taxpayers have now paid well over $1 billion in carbon taxes and yet it hasn’t bought us anything. If social licence can’t be bought for a billion dollars, it can’t be bought for any price. Instead of making Albertans poorer, the government should pursue policies that help our economy while reducing carbon dioxide emissions at the same time. For example, if Canada could develop its natural gas resources even further, and increase exports to China, China could use the gas to replace its coal-powered electricity. This move would help create jobs and opportunities in Canada while helping China reduce its smog problem and CO2 emissions at the same time. One thing should be clear: the premier needs to stop vying for social licence and focus more on taxpayer-friendly policies.

Colin Craig is the Alberta Director for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation

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THE FIGHT FOR TRANS MOUNTAIN IS NOT OVER // CODY BATTERSHILL

The Fight for Trans Mountain is Not Over BY CODY BATTERSHILL

L

et’s be absolutely clear about one energy fact: as of this writing, the battle over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project (TMX) is far from over.

The federal government decision, in late May, to buy the project from Kinder Morgan should help get things back on track, but it’s sad it came to this and many obstacles still remain.

CONSIDER THAT GLOBAL OIL DEMAND IS GROWING AT ITS FASTEST PACE SINCE THE EARLY 1970S. AS A CONSEQUENCE, SOCIETY IS FACED WITH A DOUBLE WHAMMY: THE WORLD HAS TO BRING

Until at least early June, B.C. Premier John Horgan continued to signal he’d stick with his campaign to defeat TMX, and thus ignore the nation’s interests while catering to green activists and their foreign donors.

ON STREAM MORE THAN THREE

Let’s hope all that has changed by the time this column runs. Horgan’s B.C., nor any other province in the country, can support indefinitely a giant U.S. discount on Canadian oil, forced on us by the U.S. because of our lack of competitive global market access.

REPLACE DEPLETION. IT ALSO HAS TO

In other words, how is it reasonable that any nation should continue to forgo $40 million per day (according to Scotiabank estimates) in unrealized revenues? The answer is: it’s not. Consider that global oil demand is growing at its fastest pace since the early 1970s. As a consequence, society is faced with a double whammy: the world has to bring on stream more than three million barrels per day of new production – and that’s just to replace depletion. It also has to account for new demand. So, while Canada remains a global sustainability leader, environmental activists continue to ignore that leadership, and instead focus on attacking various misconceptions about the sector.

MILLION BARRELS PER DAY OF NEW PRODUCTION – AND THAT’S JUST TO ACCOUNT FOR NEW DEMAND. It’s no surprise some two dozen executives and investors wrote Premier Horgan recently to express concern that the province’s vow to block the pipeline could result in huge setbacks to Canada’s climate plans. As TMX gains public support and maintains solid indigenous backing, I wanted to thank the hundreds of thousands of supporters who have spoken in favour of this crucial infrastructure. I know there are many who may question the level of public investment in the new arrangement. Fair enough. But one way or another, we need this project to be built if we’re going to access international markets. I know it. You know it. Environmental activists know it. That’s why it’s clear to me this fight is far from over.

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

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Hull in One It’s scary, disturbing and an unfortunately real fact of Calgary life: one-in-five children struggle with a mental health challenge. They live in neighbourhoods across Calgary. They live next door. They go to the school down the street. Many have experienced trauma due to physical and sexual abuse, neglect, loss, grief and more. There is documented proof the trauma can lead to serious mental health issues like depression, anxiety, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide. It is a vital Calgary cause and Bob Harris, the tremendouslyrespected and tireless Calgary booster and Centron CEO, has stepped up to the plate – or tee box. And he is inviting Calgarians to join him at September’s Hull in One Golf Classic to make a difference for children in need. “Calgary is one of Canada’s most diverse cities. We are known for being welcoming, strong and home to over a million Calgarians,” Harris says. “We all have a common goal of making it a home that is fuelled with the support of the community and securing the future for our coming generations.” Calgary’s Hull Services is a registered charitable organization that provides leading-edge and effective behavioural and mental health services for children and families. “Choosing Hull was an easy choice for Centron,” he says with passion and positivity. “We have long-standing relationships with Hull and really believe in their overall vision.” According to Hull, “Mental health problems have a huge impact on a child’s development and it greatly impacts their ability to build positive relationships with friends and family, and to thrive in the community. Nearly 75 per cent of all mental health problems in adults begin in childhood.” The Calgary group emphasizes that childhood mental health issues don’t just end. “Kids don’t just grow out of them.

Without intervention and support, unhappy, angry children become unhappy, angry adults.” Fore! The September 13th Hull in One Golf Classic at Heritage Pointe Golf Club is just one recent high-profile Centron example of the focus and commitment to giving back. Harris points out that giving results in an amazing feeling and creates positivity among Centron employees and colleagues within his industry. “Centron provides outstanding quality buildings that will stand in our city for current and future generations. Hull is helping our future generations thrive,” Harris adds. “We hope to continue to support their phenomenal organization in the future. Like other respected Calgary business leaders, Harris acknowledges that the past couple of downturn years have been challenging but feels that it has not made a dent in the Calgary spirit of giving. “With recovery within reach, we hope the spirit for giving increases to match Calgary’s spirit for caring. “We’re proud to live in a city that has a unique legacy of caring. Seeing the compassion that Calgarians have for others, and the care and time they contribute to their communities, makes this a great place to live.” For more information, or to register or sponsor the Hull in One Classic at Heritage Pointe on September 13th, contact Alana Barron at 403-831-6457 or abarron@hullservices.ca.

ABOVE: BOB HARRIS, TIRELESS CALGARY BOOSTER AND CENTRON CEO.

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The Efficient Workplace Despite the impact of contemporary workplace factors like technology, communication, time management, mobility, flextime and work/life balance, some things never change. A reality Calgary developer and builder Centron used as a basis for their new-generation office concept at Fountain Court. Various management studies have confirmed that most people still spend one-third of their day “at work.” A specific focus on managers or professionals who had been in their current jobs for a significant amount of time showed an average workweek of 47.2 hours. According to Engagement and the Global Workplace – a recent 270-page research document done by Steelcase – employees who are the most enthusiastic about their office environment are the most productive and engaged, and work for the most successful companies. Centron’s newest demonstration office and on-site fitness centre located at Fountain Court is a contemporary example which proves how a new and unique concept can work for many types of organizations. The dynamic and industry-leading workplace concept developed by Centron, in partnership with Shearer, RGO, Steelcase and Colliers International, captures new thinking in workplace productivity and organizational effectiveness. “The next generation of business leaders value a different set of qualities in their office,” says Cole Harris, president of Centron. “Traditional corner offices and designated executive spaces are not priorities for every company. There is a shift to flexibility and spaces that promote collaboration and socialization.” For decades, workplace factors like square footage and location were synonymous with corporate status, rank, seniority and success. Things continue to change. The influential Engagement and the Global Workplace research showed that the most engaged workers were those who had more control over their work experience and the ability to choose where to work in the office based on the task at hand. High workplace satisfaction is positively correlated with high employee focus and productivity, underscoring that physical

workplace can be used as a strategic asset to improve engagement. Despite the endless state-of-the-art advances and efficiencies, the most common workplace designs feature a combination of open spaces and private offices. More than three-quarters of surveyed employees say they work in either individual or shared private offices. Allison Clark, Vice President, Development, and Director of Centron Cares, explains, “Contemporary workplace aspects like office configuration, space and even office furniture are key for efficiency and flexibility and it has been proven that productivity is often undermined because an office performs poorly. “It’s why Centron’s new-generation office concept at Fountain Court features both open and closed workspaces, shared workspaces and areas where employees can gather to communicate with one another, share ideas and have fun. Additionally, the availability of an on-site fitness facility provides a place where employees can go to stay active at no cost.” Innovation and forward-thinking are key components of the Centron focus and vision, which is how they have earned the distinction of being an iconic Western Canada builder and developer of prime commercial and residential properties of offices, industrial warehouses, retail centres, hotels and multi-residential projects. Some remarkable Centron achievements include over $3 billion in project value, developing more than 10 million square feet of office, retail and industrial projects, leasing more than two million square feet of office space in the past 10 years and the planning of more than 10,000 residential units, lots and hotel rooms. More information and tours of Calgary’s Fountain Court concept are available by contacting Centron’s Sr. Vice President, Development and Leasing, Michael Anderson at manderson@centrongroup.com. ABOVE: CONCEPT PHOTO. OFFICE SNAPSHOTS – SWISS CONSULATE/SWISSNEX, SAN FRANCISCO.

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The Gung-Ho CEO Most management consultants, business schools and MBA programs differ slightly but they all agree on the makings of a contemporary CEO: vision, leadership, strategic thinking and risk management. Equally important are the other business intangibles, like enthusiasm, passion, market feel, people skills and a sixth sense. Some CEOs are “naturals.” That was the Calgary business reaction consensus last month, when the Homes by Avi Group of Companies – Homes by Avi (Canada), Avi Homes (Texas) and Avi Urban – announced that Calgary-based Charron Ungar, previously president of Avi Urban, the multifamily division, had been appointed the company’s CEO. Since joining Homes by Avi 21 years ago, Ungar showed industry and market savvy. According to company founder and chairman Avi Amir, “Charron has grown up with the company for all of its 40 years of existence. He has sharpened his management and leadership skills during the last 15 years and has shown himself to be an obvious choice for the position of our top executive.” Ungar is a high-energy CEO, who chuckles about “enjoying outdoorsy things, motorcycles and working on my bourbonbased education,” and is professionally and privately positive about the uniqueness of the Calgary market. “For the past 15 years, our housing product has been getting smaller as we grapple with ways to keep new homes affordable,” he says. “This is across the board, from singlefamily to town houses to apartments. The trend now has shifted to larger, higher-value homes at great prices. “It’s competitive out there and it’s important to bring an innovative product to the market, not just a lowest-price/ highest-square-footage mentality. There is also significantly greater collaboration between the city administration and the housing industry. From the very top of the administration, there is recognition that a collaborative

approach to building our city is the way to move forward and see our way through to a friendlier part of the cycle. I’m very happy about that.” Ungar concedes – and enjoys – the constantly changing dynamics of building new homes. In the Calgary market, business aspects like consumer trends, the millennial factor and the rebounding economy impact business strategy. “Our focus will be the continued process of greater efficiency and effectiveness in bringing the wide variety of our housing product to market. “We are a highly-innovative design leader. Over the past few years, there has been a major shift in the type of housing product coming online. A considerable transition from compact designs that are able to keep the price affordable in a heated market to larger higher-value homes reminiscent of the kinds of home sizes we were building a decade ago. “And the ways that technology, especially Wi-Fi, affects how we use the spaces we call home,” he notes. “Contemporary designs should be about creating great gathering spaces and not so much about a predetermined use for a room.” Like other Calgary executives, Ungar has been dealing with various downturn-related speed bumps for more than two years. He admits it has been a challenge but also considers it an opportunity to improve product lines and all aspects of the business. “Housing has to innovate to stay competitive and our teams across all our divisions are dedicated to achieving more as efficiently as possible.”

ABOVE: CHARRON UNGAR. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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The Small Business Owner’s Dream There’s an exciting and unique addition to Calgary’s vibrant and entrepreneurial retail landscape. “Smaller businesses have long wanted access to the same kind of shopping mall environment and the corresponding customer base enjoyed by larger businesses,” explains respected retail industry and developer expert Eli Swirsky, president of Torgan Group. “The New Horizon Mall breaks down the barriers for businesses looking for that retail advantage in a unique mall environment not found anywhere else in southern Alberta.” The $200-million, 320,000-square-foot mall in Balzac, 20 minutes from downtown Calgary and directly across from CrossIron Mills, opened for business in early May and will soon feature more than 500 stores ranging in size from 285 to 855 square feet. New Horizon Mall is a southern Alberta retail first. Each store is purchased outright; some stores have been purchased by the retailers themselves and some are purchased by investors and leased out. A majority of the store spaces are privately owned by different investors who lease out the store space to individual retail tenants or directly to store owners. Torgan retains ownership of about 30 per cent of the space and the units are governed by a set of common bylaws, similar to a condo corporation, with yearly maintenance fees. The mall, which some are already calling “a small-business owner’s dream” is a sprawling, bright, modern “international bazaar,” featuring a food court with 26 restaurants and seating for 300 – serving up a variety of international cuisines and local specialties from dozens of national and independent owner-operated eateries. The mall also has an underground parkade and outside surface parking.

In terms of the total number of actual stores, New Horizon is the largest mall in Calgary and second largest in Alberta, behind West Edmonton Mall. “A key aspect of the New Horizon Mall uniqueness is, unlike other malls which are occupied primarily by large corporations and chains, New Horizon Mall is a collection of small businesses, family enterprises and local entrepreneurs bringing their products and services to the Calgary region,” Swirsky says. “The physical design of New Horizon is different. It has intentional details which give smaller stores maximum retail exposure. It’s also different from other malls where the types of stores are usually limited and controlled – like only two clothing stores, only two shoe stores, one houseware store. We allow the marketplace to dictate. There is total control and a free market.” He adds that New Horizon Mall may be the most culturallydiverse shopping destination in southern Alberta. Each retail space provides shoppers with international specialty products or services, including contemporary fashion, hightech goods and exotic everyday items. He acknowledges that consumer trends and other factors impact retail and mall operations and emphasizes that the New Horizon Mall location, across from the booming CrossIron Mills, is a positive. “We don’t see it as competition at all. On the contrary,” Swirsky points out, “it’s not competition but complementary. We are next to a mainstream mall with mostly big stores. The smaller and culturally-diverse stores at New Horizon Mall enhance the consumer experience and the area.”

ABOVE: NAYER AZAM (STORE OWNER AND OPERATOR – JUICE BAR), MOHAMMED KHARFAN (STORE OWNER AND INVESTOR), ELI SWIRSKY (TORGAN GROUP PRESIDENT), ALBERT FIALKOW (STORE OWNER AND INVESTOR), SARABJIT SINGH MATTU (STORE OWNER AND OPERATOR – PERFUM BOUTIQUE) AND RAMESH PRAJULI (STORE OWNER AND OPERATOR – HIMALAYAN ARTS AND CRAFT) PHOTO SOURCE: BUD MOORE PHOTOGRAPHY

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2018

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CALGARY SMARTS // URBANOMICS

CALGARY SMARTS THE SMART GROWTH INITIATIVE BY JOHN HARDY

T

he urban planning of any community has always been a tremendously complex but basic and vital science. While traditionally layered with officialdom like zoning, codes, permits, bylaws and regulations, the essence and the primary focus of urban planning has always been livable, desirable and enjoyable neighbourhoods. The tsunami of technology and the impact of environmental consciousness in most aspects of contemporary life and business continue to add new dimensions to the science (and art) of urban planning. The standard planning priorities now include factors like density and sustainability. Two crucial aspects of the Calgary planning process to create livable, desirable and enjoyable neighbourhoods – communication and rapport – are not traditionally in the jargoned vocabulary of urban planning. For a long time, Calgary-area builders and developers functioned in a sometimes confrontational, us versus them, relationship with municipal planners. Once communication and cooperation was achieved, the two sides began talking – and listening – to each other. “We were concerned that the message that was being received about and from the industry was being looked at through a lens that was not helpful to collaboration with the municipalities,” admits Guy Huntingford, CEO of BILD Calgary Region, the advocacy group that represents the homebuilding and development industry in Calgary and surrounding areas.

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JULY 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

“There was a sort of conventional wisdom that if industry said something, it was totally biased. We wanted to create a way for us to get information out to the public, politicians, stakeholders, the whole gamut of people, and say, ‘there’s information you need to know before you make a decision as to whether industry is being self-serving or whether you agree with what’s being said. You just need to know the facts.’ “We needed a better way to get our message out, rather than through the BILD CR. So, almost five years ago, we created a separate and distinct entity – the Smarter Growth Initiative: a purely educational tool with all sorts of information and data about our industry. The SGI doesn’t editorialize; it doesn’t lobby or advocate. It just simply states facts about things that are going on in the industry.” Huntingford acknowledges that there is such a glut of information, particularly relevant for Calgary’s homebuilding and development industry, that a reliable source for data and information like SGI was vital for municipal planners and the housing sector. As a random example, he cites the 2017 Canadian Home Buyer Preference Survey, completed for the Canadian Home Builders’ Association, highlighting the responses of 2,775 recent homebuyers from six provinces. “Sixty-five per cent of survey respondents reported a preference for single-family dwellings, up from 55.7 per cent in 2015. The building industry accounts for seven per cent of Calgary’s GDP – 46,935 jobs and $3.2 billion in wages. “And by 2021, there will be 31,300 more single-family homes built in Calgary, averaging 6,260 units per year. Among these


CALGARY SMARTS // URBANOMICS

“LET’S FACE IT. THERE IS STILL A UNIQUENESS TO CALGARY’S DEVELOPMENT, UNLIKE OTHER MAJOR AREAS LIKE TORONTO AND VANCOUVER. CALGARY IS STILL A DOWNTOWN-CENTRIC CITY. ROADS AND TRANSIT LEAD TO THE CORE. ~ GUY HUNTINGFORD

31,300 units, 21,284 will be built in new communities or communities currently in the development process, while 10,016 will be built in developed areas. “That is important information for Calgary and the industry to consider.” As SGI emphasizes, it’s all about growing smarter. Calgary’s population bursts have sometimes felt like a mad scramble as housing struggled to keep up. As BILD CR points out, Calgary has always had spaces to grow while maintaining river pathways, abundant parks and growing industry. Until recently, the planned expansion outward was believed to be the best thing for both housing affordability and infrastructure efficiency. Now, governments and the building industry agree that sustainable growth must include redevelopment of existing communities. “Let’s face it,” Huntingford points out. “There is still a uniqueness to Calgary’s development, unlike other major areas like Toronto and Vancouver. Calgary is still a downtown-centric city. Roads and transit lead to the core. “While there is a push by the municipality to create other commerce hubs and complete communities that don’t require people who live there to commute downtown, it will be many years before the makeup of Calgary fundamentally changes.”

He underscores that, in addition to many aspects about sustainability, densification planning is a hot Calgary topic. “The MDP (Municipal Development Plan) was finalized in 2009. It is the bible by which the city sets its planning directives. The move from a maximum density in new communities to a minimum density in new communities changed everything. And now, new communities are some of the densest in North America. “The MDP calls for 33 per cent of all new population growth to be housed in developed communities by 2039, and 50 per cent by 2069. This is a forced way of creating increased densification in low-density Calgary areas through redevelopment.” According to Calgary’s SGI, studies continue to show that increased density in urban areas often positively impacts the economic, social and cultural health of the community, in part because residents value the local shopping experience. A study of Canadian downtowns by the Canadian Urban Institute found that promising trends for downtown retail are emerging. In the same way that retailers followed residents out to suburban areas in the postwar era, so too are retailers following people back into the core. New developments often incorporate main streets and boast increased density, creating more Calgary communities where residents enjoy socializing, walking and working in a relaxed atmosphere. Visit Smartergrowth.ca to learn more.

ABOVE: GUY HUNTINGFORD, CEO, BILD CALGARY REGION.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2018

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GROWING TOGETHER As our population increases, so does the demand for services and infrastructure. And, as we get closer as neighbours, the Calgary Metropolitan Area needs a plan.

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

The Calgary Metropolitan Area

To ease growing pains, the Alberta Government has mandated Growth Management Boards in Edmonton and Calgary.

CALGARY METROPOLITAN REGION BOARD Made up of 10 elected mayors or reeves, the board collaborates and coordinates decision-making while planning for the future. By January 2021, they’ll have growth and servicing plans in place that benefit all of us.

RESPONSIBLE LAND USE Save costs and help environment through mutually-agreed upon growth areas, including corridors for recreation, transport, energy and utilities.

EFFICIENT TAX SPENDING Wiser use of tax dollars by coordinating infrastructure needs and construction for several municipalities at once.

1

Airdrie

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Strathmore

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ALIGNED VISION The board’s mandate includes promoting the economic well being of the area. Collaboration means a clear vision for a thriving region that benefits all of us.

Savings from the new plan can benefit homeowners. More certainty in the long-term plan means more efficiency for developers, and better new home prices.

LEARN MORE ABOUT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE CALGARY REGION Sponsored by the Building Land Development Association (BILD Calgary Region), Smarter Growth Initiative fosters informed conversation on development issues that affect all of us.

smartergrowth.ca


ROAD TO RECOVERY // COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

ROAD TO RECOVERY CALGARY’S COMMERCIAL LEASING MARKET CLAWING BACK AFTER YEARS OF SUFFERING

BY JAMIE ZACHARY

P

ositive momentum in Calgary’s commercial leasing sector has industry experts expressing muted optimism following years of downturn conditions.

president – principal with Avison Young, which reported 212,000 square feet of office space in Calgary being absorbed in the first quarter of 2018.

Yet some also warn it will take time before the sector returns to “normal” conditions, and the road to recovery will be fraught with challenges that will force landlords to adapt.

Calgary’s overall vacancy still sits at 23.2 per cent, up from 22.5 per cent 12 months ago. Vacancy was the highest downtown at 25.6 per cent.

“We still haven’t seen significant increases in rates, but leasing activity is up and we’ve seen positive absorption for the first time in years,” says Alexi Olcheski, executive vice-

Similarly, CBRE reported a downtown vacancy rate in the first quarter of 27.5 per cent. Yet it saw a silver lining as well, with 68,390 square feet of positive absorption in the core,

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2018

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ROAD TO RECOVERY // COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

NEW LEASE ON LIFE NON-PROFITS BENEFIT FROM CALGARY’S SOFT COMMERCIAL MARKET

T

iming, as they say, is everything. That’s proved especially true for local non-profit organizations, which have emerged as winners within a commercial leasing market that’s struggled with high vacancy rates in recent years. In early 2015, the Alex was approaching a crossroads. The non-profit, which has provided accessible health-care and social programs to Calgarians for more than 40 years, had its five locations across the city coming up on expiring leases by year’s end. CEO Shelley Heartwell knew she wanted to consolidate some of the Alex’s locations, but never expected to find or afford a single building to house all of the organization’s administrative and client service functions. Six months into the downturn, however, Heartwell found not one, but several potential locations before settling on the former Honeywell Building on 2nd Avenue SE near 28th Street operated by Artis REIT. Located steps from the Franklin C-Train station, the 60,000-square-foot building allowed Heartwell to not only collect all administrative staff under one roof, but also centralize all of the Alex’s client services in a dedicated 40,000-square-foot space. “I always thought I would need to get at least two separate locations. I didn’t think I’d be able to find a facility large enough to house us all together,” says Heartwell, who moved into the new location in June 2017. “I never thought this would happen in my lifetime.” Freshly minted as the Alex Building, Heartwell says the benefits to having a central location extend far beyond convenience – although accessibility to staff and clients has been huge. The larger space has also allowed the organization to expand its services, including adding a larger youth centre,

16 examining rooms in the family clinic, a pharmacy and a teaching kitchen and workshop. Artis REIT even agreed to renovate the building to accommodate more customized programming. “It came at a time when everyone was very uncertain about the economy,” says Heartwell, noting they’ve signed a 15year lease on the property with the option to purchase. “And it’s such a large space. Not everyone needs this much space in the inner core.” The Calgary Women’s Emergency Shelter has similarly benefited from a soft commercial office market. Nearly two years ago, the non-profit organization relocated its administrative staff and many of its client services to the Centre 15 tower just off 17th Avenue SW. The 13,000-square-foot space – which would “have never been available five years ago” – not only doubled CWES’ previous footprint, but also better connected the organization with the community, says executive director Kim Ruse. “It’s been a game-changer for us. We were just sort of invisible before. Now, we’re more accessible,” she says. “It has also allowed us to mobile the team more locally. We were able to co-locate our administrative staff with our service teams, which freed up space in the shelter. It has really changed the energy of the organization.” In addition to redesigning the space to fit CWES’ needs, Ruse says the building’s owners, Artis REIT, were also flexible with rates over the term of the 11-year lease. “They were quite excited to have a non-profit come back into that building. We’re good tenants in that our funding is fairly constant. We don’t have large ups and downs. And other non-profits have since followed us.” ABOVE: THE ALEX FAMILY HEALTH CENTRE PHOTO SOURCE: THE ALEX

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JULY 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


We are pleased to welcome Brian Rogers, Q.C., Jeff Larson, Daniel MacAulay and Jake Plotsky to our Real Estate and Corporate | Commercial Groups They bring significant experience in real estate and corporate/commercial projects and transactions, including development of commercial, residential and multi-use properties, financings, corporate acquisitions and dispositions. As well, Brian and Jeff have extensive experience representing clients as negotiators for major land developments and infrastructure projects throughout the province of Alberta.

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Jeff Larson Counsel

Daniel MacAulay Associate

Jake Plotsky Associate

Our focus is on you - the client. We work with you to clearly understand your goals and challenges, and deliver practical and efficient legal solutions. Our clients are business owners and entrepreneurs. From new ventures to established companies, they operate in a range of industry sectors from health care, technology, hospitality, commercial and residential land development, manufacturing, and beyond.

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ROAD TO RECOVERY // COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

“TENANTS ARE MOVING OR GROWING, WHEREAS A YEAR AGO IT WAS COMPLETELY STAGNANT. IN THE DOWNTOWN OFFICE MARKET, SPECIFICALLY, WE’RE SEEING AN INCREASE IN LEASING ACTIVITY EVEN THOUGH THERE’S NOT A LOT OF NEW NET GROWTH. WE’RE STILL NOT OUT OF THE WOODS, BUT IT LOOKS, FEELS AND SMELLS LIKE WE’RE AT THE BOTTOM RIGHT NOW.” ~ GREG KWONG

marking only the second positive quarter since late 2014. “We’re still hovering at high vacancy rates, but based on a year ago, there is a greater sense of optimism,” says Greg Kwong, executive vicepresident and regional managing director (Alberta) for CBRE.

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JULY 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

“Tenants are moving or growing, whereas a year ago it was completely stagnant. In the downtown office market, specifically, we’re seeing an increase in leasing activity even though there’s not a lot of new net growth. “We’re still not out of the woods, but it looks, feels and smells like we’re at the bottom right now.” Forging a path out of the woods will take time and “pulling all the levers,” he adds. Calgary has approximately


// COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

45 million square feet of total office space, and is used to seeing vacancy around eight per cent. At 28 per cent currently, that means another nine million square feet would need to be leased before the city returns to optimum conditions.

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Calgary’s suburban sector, meanwhile, has held its value over the past two years. Avison Young pegged vacancy in the first quarter at 22.3 per cent, yet Olcheski adds it has traditionally hovered around 15 per cent. “There are suburban buildings that are still garnering strong rental rates – especially in niche areas with limited supply for class-A product such as Marda Loop and Kensington,” he says.

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Niche tenants are also emerging in these supply-rich times – notably with tech in the core and new entrepreneurs in the suburbs. “We’ve been seeing an increase in diversity in our overall tenant base,” says Olcheski.

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2018

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// COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

He credits the increase in non-traditional leasing activity to landlords willing to get aggressive with rates and creative with their spaces. “Within the past 12 months, we’ve seen a lot more collaborative workspaces being developed – non-traditional office environments,” he says, pointing specifically to Aspen Properties’ work with tech incubators downtown, the Strategic Group’s development of collaborative workspaces and Artis REIT’s focus on tech-friendly buildings.

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Allied Properties REIT, which owns nearly one million feet in downtown and the beltline, is another one of those creative landlords. The company has focused on developing properties that tend to be more affordable, centrally located and situated in re-adapted spaces within historic buildings. President and CEO Michael Emory says Allied’s properties have held up well over the past couple years – especially for Calgary’s growing number of tech, advertising, media and IT tenants. “There’s no question that the format we focus on tends to hold up a little better in a downturn – in larger part because we’re a low-cost provider in the innercity,” says Emory, noting about 90 per cent of its portfolio in the city is currently leased. “People can’t really move out of our buildings and save money.” He adds Allied, like most landlords, has been flexible with its terms and rates, but has focused more so on building turnkey spaces specific to tenants’ needs. “I think the future of Calgary is bright. I really do. I’m glad we’re there. We would increase our exposure to Calgary if good opportunities came up,” says Emory. Kwong, however, believes the solution to Calgary commercial leasing woes will not come down to just creative landlords or lower vacancy rates. Instead, it will largely come from reducing high-unemployment levels in the city – which, at eight per cent in April, outpaced the national average of 5.5 per cent. “The rule of thumb is you need about 250 square feet of space for every person in the core. So if you take the 40,000 people who have been laid off in the last three years and hire them back, at 250 square feet per person, guess what? We don’t have a vacancy problem anymore,” says Kwong. “The bigger question is when will oil and gas companies begin to start hiring again?”

JULY 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


2018 Platinum Partner

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2018 Leaders Awards

Celebrating Calgary’s business icons BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

T

o be a great leader when times are good is a challenge enough; to be a great leader when times are bad, ensuring that one’s business lives to see the return of better days, is a challenge worthy of praise. These are exactly the types of individuals the 2018 Leaders Awards aims to celebrate. In its 11th year, the Leaders Awards recognize Calgary’s business icons who have led their teams through the most recent economic malaise, only to emerge stronger than ever. “What struck me this year was the durability of the businesses and industries that made it to the other side of this recession,” says David Allwright, dean of the Chiu School of Business at Bow Valley College and one of this year’s returning judges. “You’re looking at some industries that two or three years ago you might have wondered whether they would make it, and here they are. As the economy continues to grow, these are businesses that are going to thrive.” Allwright is joined by fellow returning judges Trevor Winkler, regional managing partner at MNP LLP, and Myron Feser, vice president of business and agriculture at ATB Financial. The trio was tasked with sorting through the numerous Leaders Awards applications and narrowing the field down to 20 winners. Applicants came from a range of industries including technology, personal services, construction, real estate, oil and gas, and many others. “Judging was difficult and at the same time a lot of fun,” says Feser. “It was difficult because of the large number of impressive nominations that display strong commitment and leadership. At the same time, it is a lot of fun to get together with Pat [Ottmann, publisher of Business in Calgary Magazine], Trevor and David to discuss

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leadership and Calgary as a whole.”

The Judges

Judging criteria included financial sustainability, whether the applicant has driven change in their industry and involvement in the larger community. “What really stood out for me was the leaders’ passion,” says Feser. “First their passion and genuine caring for people; second, their passion for their business – the past and the future; and third, their passion for the community. All of the nominees do so much for their people, business and the community.”

TREVOR WINKLER

Winkler agrees, adding that there are many characteristics that make a good leader, but a great leader must not be self-serving. “It’s not about themselves, but about the people and community that surrounds the leader.”

DAVID ALLWRIGHT

All the recipients, Winkler says, showed day-today involvement in operations, driving culture and adapting to change. “No two stories are ever the same,” he says, “but they are all truly engaged in their business and influencing others within their organization to share similar characteristics that drive effective leadership.”

MYRON FESER

Allwright believes there has been a change in the applicants’ attitudes, likely fuelled by their experiences during the recession. “The businesses that we looked at are taking a much more sober view of things and are a lot more level-headed,” he explains. “In the past, there were far too many businesses that relied on a booming economy to grow their business, rather than on a solid business plan. Nowadays we have businesses that don’t look at what the economy is doing; they run a good solid business first and foremost.” All 20 recipients were honoured at an awards gala held June 27. Official Airline Partner

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2018

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Here’s to the hustle of Alberta entrepreneurs You know who you are. The movers and shakers, the doers and makers. For all that you’ve done to get where you are, thank you for your hustle.

atb.com/amplifybusiness


Sharlene Massie

Company: About Staffing

I

n the case of Sharlene Massie’s company – About Staffing – the name really does say it all. They help clients find the perfect employee to fit the company and they assist candidates by searching far and wide to find dream jobs. Established in 1996, About Staffing credits its successes to an amazing group of employees. “I founded About Staffing with a $500 overdraft; I have survived the 2013 flood that nearly knocked us out, and a few nasty recessions. The reality behind a successful business is to hang on for dear life, stick to your strengths, count on relationships and rely on your core values to guide you through tough times. Hang the heck on is my motto.” ~ Sharlene Massie, Founder

Company snapshot

22 9 Years in Business

Total Employees

Staffing & Employment Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


HOUSEHOLD NAME SINCE 1996 OUR LOYAL TEAM

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WE ARE PEOPLE THAT STICK!

www.aboutstaffing.com | 403-508-1000 | info@aboutstaffing.com


Arup Datta

Company: ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT LTD.

A

s the founding principal of ARUP DATTA ARCHITECT LTD., Arup Datta has designed major architectural and master-planning projects that are well known nationally and internationally. Combining international-calibre design capability and a strong management background, he delivers the best end product to all of his clients ranging from small businesses to multimillion-dollar companies. “Great architecture is the result of a great collaboration. Architecture is not about just creating a design for the client; it is an integrated collaborative problem-solving process. It is not about one person’s ideas; it is about resolving multiple issues. It is about how you integrate the users’ needs collaborating with all the players to find the best solution for an exceptional user-friendly project. This is how you create the best design for the client.” ~ Arup Datta, President & Principal

Company snapshot

30 7 Years in Business

Total Employees

Architecture Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Creating beautiful, healthy smiles is what we do! Five full-time hygienists Open lunch hours and early mornings Call today for your consultation and your start to a more beautiful smile. An amazingly convenient location you can walk to from your urban home or office, saving you valuable time and money. If you choose to drive, dedicated parking is available!

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Geoff Best

Company: Best of Seven Barbers Ltd.

G

eoff Best is an amazingly talented, multifaceted entrepreneur who is the owner and founder of both a law firm as well as a barber shop. Best of Seven Barbers was designed from the ground up to deliver a consistent, authentic barber-shop experience. From travelling the world, Best believes a hot-towel shave is as relaxing and beneficial as a full spa day, yet compressed into just under an hour. “My defining moment was at 1 p.m. on Sept. 11, 2009; the date I was kicked to the curb by a multinational corporation. A wonderful development in hindsight, I was compelled by circumstance to do what I should have years before – partner with some amazing people to build something awesome.” ~ Geoff Best, President

Company snapshot

7 21

Years in Business

Total Employees

Personal Services Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Jesse Messom & Kerri McGrath

Company: Bigfoot Industrial Services

J

esse Messom and Kerri McGrath are an excellent brother-sister duo working hard to provide their clients with top-quality industrial service and maintenance. Bigfoot Industrial Services takes pride in dealing with their customers, employees, suppliers and community with absolute honesty – they take responsibility for all their work because their work is always something to be proud of. Over the years, Bigfoot Industrial Services has become known across North America for premium service and quality products. “My defining moment has really been an accumulation of different experiences; all of which helped bring me to the point in my career where I came to the strong realization and conclusion that sometimes you just have to take that leap of faith and let go of your inhibitions and attachment to security – even if the thought of that makes you extremely uncomfortable – and pursue your own dreams. Autonomy, for me at least, is a fundamental part of my being and has been instrumental in my own personal growth. As a great business leader and mentor once taught me, ‘Glass ceilings are meant to be broken. Don’t ever place limitations on yourself because of your age, your gender or what society thinks you should be doing. Don’t accept mediocrity.’” ~ Kerri McGrath, COO “A defining moment in my journey to success happened earlier this year. I was taking my family out of the country for a vacation and for the first time since starting my business, I felt completely comfortable leaving my business in the hands of my employees; I was completely stress-free. I knew that I had an organization that could run itself and that I wasn’t the company anymore; the company had evolved to an autonomous organization. My vision had come to fruition.” ~ Jesse Messom, CEO

Company snapshot

8 60

Years in Business

Total Employees

Construction Industry Sector Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Simplifying Industrial Services • Millwrights • Welders (CWB Certified) • Custom Fabrication • Manufacturing • Engineering Services (Apega registered)

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10528 46 Street SE, Calgary, Alberta T2C 1G1 | P. 403.277.6270 www.bigfoot-industrial.com | www.bigfootwelding.com


Gerry Baxter

Company: Calgary Residential Rental Association

C

algary Residential Rental Association is a non-profit organization that aims to provide various property owners with the resources they need to help grow their business. Since 1959, the CRRA has been helping residential business owners network with both each other and with various clients. Gerry Baxter founded this association because he saw an opening that needed to be filled – helping in the process to put a place up for rent, renting it out and learning all of the rules and regulations that go with it. “No one person can do it all. It’s important to surround yourself with good people, seek their input, listen to them and then create the environment for them to succeed. My greatest inspiration has come from the enthusiasm of the many people I have had the privilege of working with in my career and in the community.” ~ Gerry Baxter, Executive Director

Company snapshot

59 4 Years in Business

Total Employees

Professional Business Association Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


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Edward Alfke & Alastair Handley Company: Carbon Credit Solutions Inc.

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s climate change is one of the biggest challenges facing global development today, Carbon Credit Solutions (CCSI) was founded in 2008 to measure, report and verify the carbon footprints of various green projects. Edward Alfke and Alastair Handley are the perfect team to tackle this important initiative as they are both committed to making a positive environmental difference. “My greatest inspiration is the dedication of all our people reducing GHG emissions, slowing climate change for future generations. We are proud to have already removed the equivalent of 700,000 cars’ carbon from our atmosphere and will reduce millions more before we are done.” ~ Edward Alfke, CEO “The defining moment in my journey to success occurred on the day I chose to mortgage my house to make payroll and keep CCSI alive. That’s the day that I became a leader committed to success. Inspiration has come from mentors, friends and family who believe in CCSI and me.” ~ Alastair Handley, President

Company snapshot

10 40 Years in Business

Total Employees

Technology Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


CHANGING THE WORLD

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hile a dwindling few politicians and deniers still debate and argue about climate change and global warming, it’s a refreshing source of pride that Alberta is being recognized as a pioneering world leader in highlighting the urgent reality – and doing something about it. “It’s gratifying and exciting that Alberta has such a leadership role in the Americas,” says Alastair Handley, the positive and dynamic president and founder of Carbon Credit Solutions Inc. (CCSI), an innovative and globally-respected carbon offset market leader and North America’s largest aggregator of small environmental projects. “Alberta was the first jurisdiction in the Americas to focus on reducing emissions, put a price on carbon and the first to create a carbon market in 2007. And just 11 years later, Alberta is recognized for being a world leader for reducing emissions, having one of the best carbon markets, primarily because we have an efficient carbon market that really works.” He concedes that, with the business and social focus of climate change and global warming and the urgent priority of doing whatever it takes to reduce emissions, the options and the progress can get technical, confusing and sometimes contentious. “Then carbon market is not about carbon tax,” Handley emphasizes. “In its most simplistic and non-technical definition, the carbon market is a positive that rewards good behaviour.” Carbon Credit Solutions uses ingenuity, expertise and its proprietary software to consult, develop and measure carbon credit project performance against environmental standards. Knowledgeable consultants identify risks and implement preventative and corrective controls to mitigate project risks, and they also monitor and verify the progress and success of not only agricultural emissions but a broad range of green projects.

Handley explains that carbon credits are not only part of the emission-reducing solution but are financially and environmentally rewarding. “It’s understandable that people usually think of industries that produce greenhouse gas. The electric and energy sector are key sources of emissions. It is documented that in Canada and globally, agriculture is a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. The goal is to slow global warming by removing greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere and isolate carbon in farmland used for no-till farming. “CCSI is working with eight million acres of land,” he enthusiastically points out. “That’s the equivalent of removing emissions from 700,000 cars.” The emission-conscious world is catching on to the innovation and ingenuity of CCSI. The Airdrie-based company, with 42 employees, has grown by more than 400 per cent in less than four years and has expanded its carbon market consulting operations into the U.S. and South America. China is next. Although the expertise and specialty is highly technical, Ed Alfke, the Carbon Credit Solutions CEO and chairman of the board, exudes the company’s passion and purpose. “We’re working hard and we are the largest on the globe at what we do. I am determined to make the world better for my children and grandchildren and to create a company that’s both profitable and sustainable in order to achieve that,” he says with emotion and pride. “Climate change is one of the single-biggest challenges facing global development today,” Handley adds with personal and professional drive. “And we are committed to making a difference.”

1-724 East Lake Road NE Airdrie, AB T4A 2J5 information@carboncreditsolutions.ca 403 912-9132 or 1-877-912-9132

www.carboncreditsolutions.ca


Alina Martin

Company: Danatec Educational Services Ltd., a Yardstick Group of Companies

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anatec is a leading educational safety provider as well as a family legacy. With 30 years of experience building, publishing and customizing training solutions, they have taken the challenge out of complex regulation compliance that comes along with safety training. Danatec’s training programs are easy to use, easy to implement and cost-effective. “The best piece of business advice I ever received, I got from my father. He said, ‘Alina, business is nothing but problems. How well you solve the problem dictates how well you do. So, solve problems well.’ I’ve lived by that rule every day since.” ~ Alina Martin, President & COO

Company snapshot

33 18 Years in Business

Total Employees

Safety Education Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Safety Training. Your Expert Provider Danatec is an award-winning publisher of occupational health & safety training materials. We offer an expansive range of educational and compliance training tools such as self-teach training programs, online training, handbooks, apps, reference materials, regulations and a variety of technical custom training solutions. We are experts in workplace safety and compliance-based training.

Regulatory Consulting Safety Education Paper, Online & In-Class Reference Materials & Compliance Resources RapidLMSTM & LearnerVerified

Did you know? As of June 1st, all Alberta employers must comply with Bill 30.

New Course

If you own or run a business, you may need to establish a Joint Work Site Health & Safety Committee.

Joint Health & Safety Committee and Representative Online Training

This course was developed to aid employers and employees with their transition to comply with Alberta’s updated Occupational Health & Safety Act. Learn More: www.danatec.com/bill-thirty

www.Danatec.com Danatec Educational Services Ltd. | 1.800.465.3366 | sales@danatec.com


Brock Schroeder Company: Entuitive

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s an integral member of the leadership team at Entuitive, Brock Schroeder believes it’s important to maintain the balance between his leadership role and having a hands-on role in his projects. Schroeder works hard to foster a collaborative relationship with both his clients and his design team from the very beginning to the very end of all his projects – both corporate and residential engineering. “At 32, I was hired to start a new office for a consulting engineering firm – a somewhat daunting challenge at that early point in my career. The biggest lesson that first year taught me was to trust my instincts when it came to making decisions and taking risks, and that any limits I might have thought I had were only selfimposed. To this day, I work actively to push my own boundaries.” ~ Brock Schroeder, Managing Director

Company snapshot

7 190

Years in Business

Total Employees

Building Engineering Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Photographik

For Every Special Occassion Located in the heart of downtown, The Westin Calgary offers over 26,000 square feet of flexible function space for your next event or conference. To book your next event, call 403.508.5208 or visit www.westincalgary.com

Š2017 Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. For full terms andconditions, visit westincalgary.com


Megan Szanik

Company: Espy Experience

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pened by Megan Szanik as a discount designer boutique in 2009, Espy Experience quickly morphed into something much more. There are three crucial parts to the Espy Experience – professional styling, affordable fashion and community involvement. With Szanik’s natural affinity for people and her great staff, the customer’s shopping experience turned into something both body and wallet positive. “Espy is in the service business and Espy is in the people business; we just happen to sell clothes.” ~ Megan Szanik, Proprietor

Company snapshot

9 19

Years in Business

Total Employees

Consumer Products Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Bill Hunt & Dan Evans Company: Evans Hunt

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ill Hunt and Dan Evans co-founded a marketing agency that aids with strategy, digital analytics and design, advertising campaigns, branding, e-commerce, content creation and social media campaigns as well as many other media-related endeavours. In the process, they help brands and audiences connect by bringing together the best mix of ideas and technologies. “Some people can point to a clear defining moment in the success of their company. Our defining moment was actually how we defined our path from the very beginning – placing culture and people above all else. Our simple goal was to create a company that we would want to work for, working with people we’d want to spend our day with.” ~ Bill Hunt & Dan Evans, Managing Partners

Company snapshot

10 98 Years in Business

Total Employees

Marketing & Technology Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Leadership advice from Evans Hunt

Great executives lead from the front, and I mean that both literally and typographically. Move first, get out front and stay there! – Dan Evans

Leadership advice from Evans Hunt

I guess my biggest piece of advice is, don’t leave the room for a phone call when your partner is registering your business name. – Bill Hunt

We’re proud to be among the talented group of leaders recognized by Business in Calgary. Congrats to all.


Scott Kerr

Company: IronCreek Oilfield Rentals Inc.

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cott Kerr and the entire team at IronCreek Oilfield Rentals Inc. pride themselves on being safe, experienced and efficient in everything they do. IronCreek has four divisions – trucking, rentals, fire suppression and environmental cutting management – that offer a wide variety of services ranging from 400bbl storage tanks and frac storage tanks to excavator invert packages. “I don’t think there was ever ‘one’ defining moment in this journey so far, but rather a collaboration of moments that keep driving the ‘push’ per se to chase the dream. My inspiration comes from life experiences – and these are not always positive, but nevertheless, you learn life lessons – having lost my father at the age of nine and my mother shortly thereafter. Time is a precious commodity. My biggest inspiration comes from my son who always reminds me that the things that are important in personal life are the same in business: trust is earned, honesty is proven, hard work is not easy and integrity is everything.” ~ Scott Kerr, President & CEO

Company snapshot

7 66

Years in Business

Total Employees

Oil & Gas Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Safe

Experienced

Efficient

“I am honoured to be a Leaders award recipient for 2018. This award is possible through the superior teamwork, commitment and dedication of IronCreek Oilfield Rentals employees. Thank you to my team for your continued hard work, belief and support”. ~ Scott Kerr – President & CEO

Cochrane AB Office: 403.932.2823 | Fax: 403.932.3131 2B – 70 Railway Street East, Cochrane AB

www.ironcreekrentals.com


Jay McKeen

Company: Jack Carter Chevrolet Cadillac Buick GMC

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ince 1962, Jack Carter Chevrolet has been delivering topquality service to the greater Calgary area. Jack Carter Chevrolet is conveniently located and has an excellent selection of new and pre-owned vehicles. Under Jay McKeen’s leadership since 2013, a highlycapable team remains committed to customer service and satisfaction. “Business is simple – it’s all about the people. No matter the fast pace of changes in technology or the latest in methodology, our success has always come back to individuals who make up our team. Sometimes the most ordinary things are made extraordinary by doing them with the right people.” ~ Jay McKeen, Managing Partner

Company snapshot

56 112 Years in Business

Total Employees

Automotive Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Thank you to the team at Jack Carter’s for making this recognition possible. “Sometimes the most ordinary things can be made extraordinary by doing them with the right people.”

CHEVROLET • CADILLAC BUICK • GMC

www.jackcarterchev.com


Sheri MacMillan

Company: MacMillan Estate Planning

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acMillan Estate Planning has always been committed to the protection of the future. For two decades, MacMillan Estate Planning has been designing comprehensive estate plans that incorporate unique solutions tailored to each specific family. To Sheri MacMillan and her team, estate planning extends far beyond basic preservation of wealth; it’s really about maintaining the quality of life for generations to come. “I believe leadership is to live up to your own potential, so you liberate everyone you touch to do the same. I believe in the flow of abundance.” ~ Sheri MacMillan, Founder & CEO

Company snapshot

21 30 Years in Business

Total Employees

Estate Planning Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Safeguarding Significance For Over 20 Years

Will Planning Business Succession Investments & Assets Probate & Estates Charitable Giving Tax Planning Trust Planning Generational Planning

www.macmillanestate.com

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1-833-266-6464

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David Wallach - Triumph Real Estate Investment Fund Trust | 2015 Leaders Alumni

David Wallach Triumphs With Real Estate Funds by Rennay Craats David Wallach. Photo by Ewan Photo Video.

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hen it comes to commercial real estate, there are few professionals more respected than David Wallach. His brokerage firm Barclay Street Real Estate is one of the most prominent in the province and in April 2014 he applied his vast expertise to establish the Triumph Real Estate Investment Fund (“Triumph” or the “Fund”). The Fund buys commercial properties in defined markets including Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, Washington, Oregon and Texas. Triumph’s first Fund (Fund I) currently has eight properties – four in Arizona, one in Denver and three in Alberta – with six being neighbourhood shopping plazas with multiple tenants to better mitigate risks associated with market fluctuations.

“Until all the boxes are checked – financial, building inspection, real property report, roof report, and my walk through and meeting with tenants—we won’t close on a building,” he says. Shortcuts and compromise aren’t part of Triumph’s mandate. The five-member board of Triumph’s second Fund (Fund II) consisting of three independent directors – Neil Bane, Richard Boyer and Lesley Conway – along with Triumph founders, Wallach and Craig Bentham, are dedicated to protecting investors’ money. In fact, profit-sharing with Triumph management does not trigger until 100 per cent of investors’ contributed capital and a seven per cent preferred return is recovered by investors. “This Fund is very investor-centric,” Wallach says.

“We are focusing on finding properties that do not have tenants with services or products that can be acquired through the Internet. The big box is changing because of such things as Amazon. We are shying away from those properties. Instead we are going after properties that have tenants that provide personal-based services – hair salons, restaurants, dentists, nail salons.” But not just any property can be a Triumph property. Properties have to fit specific criteria in order to be considered and only after rigorous due diligence will Triumph acquire a space.

Fund I closed its subscription books in March after raising $22 million and Fund II launched in June. With six registered exempt market dealers acting as selling agents of Fund II, Wallach believes Fund II will be just as successful as Fund I. Fund II has a minimum subscription of $10,000. Fund II expects to invest in properties ranging from $3 to $15 million and will finance its acquisitions with a maximum of 70 per cent of the value of the properties. This article is for information purposes only and does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation to securities in Fund II.

info@treif.ca | 403.290.0178 www.triumphref.com


Milena Radakovic

Company: Nexus Exhibits Ltd.

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exus’ core values have always been customer service, customer service and most importantly – customer service. At Nexus Exhibits, the customer’s needs have always come first and this – combined with their creativity and passion for results – has helped form an amazing reputation and created some truly breathtaking displays. Milena Radakovic is at the head of this company and with her passion for business, trade shows and visual marketing, Nexus Exhibits has grown and flourished. “My parents not only inspired me but drove me to find my own success in life. In 1979, my parents left Russia, because they wanted to offer me a better life. So they left their family, the life that they knew and everything they had to come to Canada. With literally the clothes on their back, they took a risk and persevered, and this is where I learned the importance of taking risks to follow your dreams.” ~ Milena Radakovic, President

Company snapshot

39 15 Years in Business

Total Employees

Marketing & Advertising Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Linda Robinson

Company: Pacific Wine & Spirits Inc.

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acific Wine & Spirits has been an industry-leading distributor since its conception in 1973. Linda Robinson has found a dedicated and knowledgeable sales and administrative team to operate various locations in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Yukon and Northwest Territories. Pacific dedicates all of their success to their top-tier suppliers and their continuous traditions that bring Pacific some old-school charm. “After taking over as president in May 2005, I decided Pacific Wine & Spirits would remain independent. It has allowed us to represent an unequalled portfolio of global and enduring family-owned and operated brands. In the current world of mergers and acquisitions, I am inspired by our like-minded houses with their history, determination and tenacity. It makes you want to get up in the morning to tell their stories again and again.� ~ Linda Robinson, President

Company snapshot

45 26 Years in Business

Total Employees

Consumer Products Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


Dr. Greg Uchacz

Company: ProActive Health Group

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r. Greg Uchacz founded ProActive Health Group in 2006 based on his strong values of professionalism, excellence and unimpeachable integrity. Through 25 years of experience, Dr. Uchacz has become a passionate and confident leader in health care and high-performance sport. Over the course of 12 years, he has created a destination location for active Calgarians and a culture that sports specialists strive to emulate. “Throughout my life, I’ve always had a passion to learn new things and enjoyed the challenge that this brings. Most of this challenge is gaining the knowledge and clarity needed to make the path crystal clear. A statement that has always resonated with me is that ‘there is incredible knowledge and advice everywhere – you just need to hear it!’ I try to live my life respecting that statement.” ~ Dr. Greg Uchacz, Owner & Director

Company snapshot

12 16 Years in Business

Total Employees

Health Care Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


JARISLOWSKY FRASER CONGRATULATES THE RECIPIENTS OF THE 2018 LEADERS AWARDS!

EXPERIENCE YOU CAN RELY ON. PROFESSIONALS YOU CAN TRUST. As a business leader, your time and expertise are focused on growing your company. At Jarislowsky Fraser, we understand that and offer portfolio management tailored to your needs, designed to grow your capital in a low risk manner, providing you peace of mind. Jarislowsky Fraser’s history and values are rooted in investment stewardship that is expressed through our commitment to high-quality investing and the advancement of good governance and sustainable investing. A trusted leader for over 60 years, Jarislowsky Fraser provides premier wealth management services to affluent individuals and families. For any investment needs or a review of your portfolio, contact: Blaine Lennox, CFA Regional Director & Portfolio Manager blennox@jflglobal.com | 403.233.9117

INSTITUTIONAL

PRIVATE WEALTH

MONTREAL | TORONTO | CALGARY | VANCOUVER | NEW YORK

MUTUAL FUNDS

www.jflglobal.com


Sam Corea

Company: Sam Corea, Re/Max House of Real Estate

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am Corea has always been a strong leader in Calgary’s residential real estate market since he began his career in 1990. Corea has surrounded himself with a highly-capable team who has helped maintain his No. 1 spot as Re/Max’s top realtor for over eight years. With over 20 years of experience working with Re/Max, he has created an amazing reputation of professional excellence and quality expertise. “The art of the deal and the power of marketing thrill me. I am motivated to get my clients the positive results they seek because I know it makes a difference in their lives. Their confidence and trust in me is utterly inspiring.” ~ Sam Corea, Team Leader & Realtor

Company snapshot

18 7 Years in Business

Total Employees

Real Estate Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


YES! It is an honour to accept the Business in Calgary Leaders Award. The Sam Corea Real Estate Team is thrilled to be included among Calgary’s business elite.

Our success is due to the trust, confidence, loyalty and friendship of our clients. We are overwhelmed with gratitude.

Thank You!

403 870 8811


Desirée Bombenon

Company: SureCall Contact Centers

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s one of the “Top 40 Under 40,” Desirée Bombenon has shown she is more than capable of running an extremely successful business. Over the past 25 years, she has steadily built her business experience including ventures into import, distribution and consulting before becoming president and CEO of SureCall Contact Centers. SureCall helps to connect companies with their customers through top-quality call services using expert staff and technologies. “I found that every challenge during my years in business helped define who I was as a leader. These crucibles are really hidden learnings, and each time we persevere, we inch closer to becoming our best selves. I try to mentor my team to embrace the uncomfortable; as a leader, my job is to develop more good leaders, and that’s meaningful to me.” ~ Desirée Bombenon, CEO

Company snapshot

5 104

Years in Business

Total Employees

BPO Call Center Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


SureCall’s North Star ‘Doing Good with Every Call’

SureCall’s GoodCall program donates a percentage of revenues to charities and organizations helping children and educating females around the world.

“Our success is tied directly to the passion and commitment our team has. I am honoured to be a recipient of the Business in Calgary 2018 Leaders Award, it’s my tribe’s support here at SureCall, that makes the magic happen.” ~ Desiree Bombenon, CEO

Phone: 403-291-5400 www.surecallcc.com


Graham Sherman

Company: Tool Shed Brewing Company

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ool Shed Brewing was founded by Jeff Orr and Graham Sherman in 2012, after the duo met while working on IT and satellite communication projects. Both had a passion for home brewing and a strong entrepreneurial spirit. Craft beer is Sherman’s passion and he has managed to create an amazing company out of his backyard tool shed – hence, Tool Shed Brewing. “It’s incredible how quickly our business became much bigger and way more important than us. Building something that now supports 40 amazing employees, promotes our province’s world-class barley farmers and has helped to create economic development for our province through agriculture is something that puts an enormous and perpetual smile on my face.” ~ Graham Sherman, Co-Founder

Company snapshot

6 40

Years in Business

Total Employees

Consumer Products Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


THINK BIGGER

Our wide range of products help clients stand out in a crowded marketplace. With our expertise and wide format printing equipment, Run Digital successfully manages projects from one-off creations to mass production with nationwide distribution. We offer creative solutions in the large format print market including: • Banners and Banner Stands • Wall Murals • Media Walls • Point of Purchase • Decal Printing • Vehicle Wraps • Wayfinding • Reception Signage • Nameplates • Glazing Film • Outdoor Signage • Construction Signage • Hoarding • Lawn Signs RUNDIGITAL.CA | SIGNWORLD.CA • 403.291.9786 • INFO@RUNDIGITAL.CA


Tom Chisholm Company: Trico Homes

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ver the past 26 years that Trico Homes has been in business, it has built up a reputation as one of Calgary’s top residential builders. With a strong history of integrity and community support, Trico Homes has managed to take part in over 8,000 single- and multi-family home projects. Tom Chisholm started as president at Trico Homes almost five years ago and since then the company has continued to grow and flourish under his leadership. “I have always been inspired by my father’s lessons of honesty, faith and family values. Coming from a large family contributed to my thoughts on the similarities between the dynamics of both a business and the family. The importance of communication, trust and respect in the office is the same for me as it was around the dinner table. This philosophy has certainly been a large factor in my success and in that of Trico Homes.” ~ Tom Chisholm, President

Company snapshot

26 129 Years in Business

Total Employees

Construction Industry Sector

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

Photo by Ewan Photo Video


We Continue To Evolve. And That Will Never Change. The Heart of Homebuilding® We know there’s more to success than revenue growth. We invest in our people and have developed an ownership-thinking culture that continually embraces change. We’ll never stop planning for continued success. Because when we win, our customers win.

2004 - 2018

Trico is proud to have been named one of Canada’s 50 Best Managed Companies every single year since 2004, making us a coveted Platinum member.


Brad Field - BRC Group (Big Rig Collision) | 2008 Leaders Alumni

BIGGER IS BETTER WHEN IT COMES TO BRC GROUP

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verything about BRC Group (Big Rig Collision) is exactly that: big. From the size of the vehicles it services to its impressive facilities to its dedication to customer satisfaction, BRC has delivered consistently for more than 40 years. Brad Field has grown the company by 10 times over the past 25 years, earning it a reputation for excellence in the industry. Since Field was featured in 2008, he has established BRC as the international benchmark when it comes to collision repair and refurbishment of vehicles bigger than one tonne – public transportation vehicles, motorhomes, oilfield equipment, tour buses and highway tractors. Companies from all over Canada and the United States ship their units to BRC knowing the job will be done right. “It’s a fairly niche market,” says owner and president Brad Field. “We do mechanical, collision repair, fire restoration, electronics repair, frame repair – it’s endless. There isn’t anything we don’t do.” Everything BRC does comes with a lifetime warranty, which is unheard of in the industry. Field has the best people in the business working for him and he stands behind their craftsmanship and expertise. Customers know they are getting the best when they hire BRC and are confident the job will be done quickly to get the vehicle back on the road. “Most of the equipment we work on is revenue producing so downtime is a direct impact to the owner’s cash flow and supply chain management. The quicker we can turn the product around and get it back to our customers the better,” he says. To help get vehicles up and running faster, BRC opened a second location in Las Vegas, Nevada, in 2010. While large projects are still done out of the Calgary facility, the U.S. branch allows BRC to better serve American customers with their smaller jobs. The company also moved into a new 55,000-square-foot facility in Calgary last fall. It is both functional and stylish, promoting clean workspaces, warm meeting areas and a comfortable atmosphere for clients and staff. It’s another example of how Brad Field is doing things differently in the industry and why his company is a leader within it. Field is dedicated to both the industry and the community. He sits on various volunteer boards and is an active member of the Calgary Chamber of Commerce working to expand

Brad Field

the type and size of the businesses that are part of the membership. Further, he volunteers as a mentor to young CEOs in support of a program run by the Chamber. “There is value for all companies to be a part of the Chamber of Commerce. I want to ensure that the full range of Calgary businesses are part of the conversation. Small to mediumsize enterprises are the foundation of Calgary’s economy.” Brad Field of BRC Group is a leader in the shop, the boardroom and the community as an Alumni Leader.

6061 90th Ave SE Ph: (403) 243-7400 Toll Free: (888) 848-8686 www.bigrigcollision.com


Kim Caron - Executive Mat | 2017 Leaders Alumni

Executive Mat & Eco-Growth Environmental working together to deliver significant GHG emission reduction technology. by Rennay Craats

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ince 1996, Executive Mat has provided quality rental floor mat products and superior service to Canadian businesses. Owner Kim Caron is as much an environmentalist as he is an innovator, and he has created technologies to help him better serve his clients and the environment. Eco-Growth was a product of that dedication and led Caron to revolutionize how he does business. “There is a synergistic partnership between Executive Mat and Eco-Growth, and it created the Green Thumb Initiative,” Kim Caron says. The initiative started as a way to keep paper hand towels and cups out of the landfill. Caron engaged clients to buy his paper consumables and when Executive Mat arrived to replace the client’s mats, they would pick up the used paper products at the same time. These products were then processed into biofuel briquettes at the plant and fed into a gasification boiler. Those briquettes were used to heat the facility’s water. “This concept of taking back the waste is revolutionary. No one else has thought to do that,” he says. Caron’s quest for a zero-waste workplace made him look at additional ways to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. He developed a technology that greatly reduced the time it takes to wash and dry mats. The system uses 1/20th of the water other systems use and allows operators to simply feed the mat onto a conveyor belt, where it is automatically

washed, sanitized, dried and rolled ready for distribution, all in less than two minutes. “The new technology provides excellent cleaning action,” he says. “The patented technology is able to reduce time required to dry the industrial matting from 30 minutes to just six seconds.” The quick-dry technology is being applied to EcoGrowth food-waste recycling systems as well. Eco-Growth has developed its organic reactors to processes raw organic waste on site and at clients’ workplaces, and the end result is a solid biofuel that can be used to run the boiler. “Adopting the revolutionary drying technology developed by Executive Mat into our line of organic reactors will allow us to dramatically increase the throughput of our organic reactor technology,” says Scott Kerr, Eco-Growth president. The increased throughput will also allow EcoGrowth to convert food waste and sewage sludge waste to thermal energy for small- to medium-sized communities. With the government’s carbon tax, this is critical. Replacing natural gas with one tonne of biomass material produces up to 8.5 tonnes of CO2 offset, and this initiative will help Alberta and Canada achieve GHG reduction targets set by the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement. Kim Caron and Executive Mat/Eco-Growth will continue to find ways of turning waste into energy to better serve clients and the environment.

1 – tonne of repurposed waste reduces GHG emissions by 8.5 tonnes

Executive Mat 403-720-5905 • Eco-Growth 403-932-2823 www.executivemat.com/eco-growth • Eco-Growth.com


Robert Heaton - Cambrian Pharmacy | 2017 Leaders Alumni

Much More

Than Just Prescriptions by Rennay Craats

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ince opening its doors in 1959, Cambrian Pharmacy has provided Calgarians with a fresh, unique approach to health care. This independent pharmacy offers customized options for patients by looking at the entire individual not just at a prescription to fill. Complementing the pharmacists are herbalists, naturopathic doctors and nutritionists, all of whom are on hand to assist in determining the best course of action for patients. As well, staff specialists have expertise in a variety of areas including diabetes, skincare, support-stocking fitting, injections and personalized medications to better serve customers. “We want to keep ahead of the curve. We work to understand and listen to what the customers or marketplace want and try to fulfil those needs,” says Robert Heaton, pharmacist and owner of Cambrian Pharmacy. This business leader has been fulfilling patient needs since taking over the pharmacy in the 1990s. Since then, Cambrian Pharmacy has become an industry leader by merging traditional pharmacy services with the more holistic and personalized services of the other health-care practitioners on staff. Cambrian is one of the largest suppliers of homeopathic and supplement products in Calgary, giving customers attractive non-traditional options. The staff herbalists and naturopaths can consult with customers to advise on appropriate herbal products for a specific issue while a vast selection of supplements, both retail and professional brands, are also available. The pharmacy is one of the few in the city that has a compounding lab where staff specialists can further personalize medications by creating unique blends or dosage forms for customers. This allows them to cater to customers who aren’t served by commercial products due to allergies, sensitivities or availability. In addition, Cambrian has an impressive selection of unique skincare products, many of which are uncommonly found outside of spas such as Jane Iredale. It has a great selection of personal-grooming care for males as well.

Robert Heaton, pharmacist and owner of Cambrian Pharmacy. Photo by Ewan Photo Video.

“We have it all in one location with the experts to service it,” he says. “We have the people here who have the passion and understanding of what they’re selling.” Whether patients are looking for traditional products, organic skincare lines, medical foods that can help manage health conditions, aromatherapy options, or herbal, supplement and homeopathic remedies, Cambrian Pharmacy has everything patients require for their health needs. For decades, Alumni Business Leader Robert Heaton has proudly gone above and beyond for Calgary customers with his unique approach to health and wellness. “There are more people trying to emulate our model but we seem to be leading the way,” he says. He plans to continually be innovated, going forward. Most of all, Rob is always aware of the great team behind him, which makes his company so successful.

#9, 728 Northmount Dr. NW | Phone: 403.289.9181 www.cambrianpharmacy.com


40LEADERSHIP TH ANNIVERSARY OF HOMES BY AVI Charron Ungar - Homes by Avi Group of Companies | 2016 Leaders Alumni

T

PASSES TO CHARRON UNGAR

he Homes by Avi Group of Companies – parent company of Homes by Avi (Canada), Avi Homes (Texas) and Avi Urban – recently announced the appointment of a new CEO. Charron Ungar, who has served as president of Avi Urban, the multi-family division, succeeds Monte Kendall as residing CEO. Since 1978, Homes by Avi has been building award-winning houses through the pursuit to design, build, sell and hold real estate that creates dream communities while sustaining growth. “Homes by Avi has grown exponentially since Avi built his first home in 1978. We have expanded our reach into three distinct markets offering a broad range of housing product and adding value to all the communities we help to build,” notes Ungar. “As we look forward, there are significant opportunities for Homes by Avi that will capitalize on our expertise in design innovation built upon the solid foundation over 40 years of experience has taught us.” The selection of Ungar was a natural one. Formally joining the family company in 1997 as an estimator, he quickly established the company’s product development department and participated in the company’s expansion into Edmonton and Austin, Texas. In 2000, he launched Homes by Avi’s multi-family division, Avi Urban, which has since grown to become one of the most respected multi-family developers in Alberta. To date, Avi Urban has completed 21 successful developments and has eight current communities in production. Avi Urban’s broad range of projects includes live/work infill developments, street-oriented row housing and large-scale, multi-phase town-home and apartment developments. Planning has also begun for the company’s first concrete residential highrise situated in Calgary’s beltline neighbourhood with an expected launch in 2019.

40

Years in Business

Charron Ungar. Photo by Ewan Photo Video.

Personally, Ungar holds social responsibility close to his heart and volunteers much of his time to local organizations, including over 10 years of participation on the board of the Better Business Bureau – Southern Alberta and East Kootenay. He also leads the company initiative on production of a 26-unit homeless shelter for the RESOLVE Campaign to end homelessness in Calgary.

300 employees

Real Estate Industry Sector

245 FORGE RD SE, CALGARY, AB T2H 0S9 | (403) 536-7000 | WWW.HOMESBYAVI.COM


MOVING. PICTURES.

GETS THE BIG PICTURE. It’s simple: your clients need to know your story. So trust Ewan. He’s a storyteller with elevated ideas and a down to earth approach. Ewan has the experience, creativity and insight to ensure your clients see the big picture. Think big. Get more. Hire Ewan.

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Fifty percent of businesses may never re-open after a disaster. That’s why knowing the easiest way to contact SERVPRO® is so important. Because the sooner you get in touch with us, the quicker we can start to minimize the damage, as well as the cost. Just go to servpro.com or call 1-800-SERVPRO to activate the cleanup team that’s faster to any-sized disaster. We’re a leader in giving control back to homeowners, property managers and even entire communities after the ravaging effects of water and fire. So whether you’re responsible for 1,000 square feet or 100,000 – it’s your decision to call on the very best. Your trusted, local SERVPRO® professional. SERVICES IN CANADA PROVIDED BY INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED FRANCHISES OF SERVPRO INTERNATIONAL, LLC.


Even the Best Are Driven to Be Better Leadership is about staying ahead. It’s defined by the ability to anticipate and adapt to change – to improve, refine and keep moving forward, charting your own course. MNP proudly congratulates the Business in Calgary 2018 Leaders. As an entrepreneurial firm built by entrepreneurs, we commend your achievements and commitment to community. Contact Trevor Winkler, Regional Managing Partner, at 403.263.3385 or trevor.winkler@mnp.ca


COLLABORATING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE // OIL & GAS

COLLABORATING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE IS IT REALLY WORKING FOR THE BENEFIT OF CANADA’S OILSANDS?

BY JOHN HARDY

O

f course it’s no longer an emerging trend. The environmental impact of all businesses – from global giants to small local operations – is a crucial fact of contemporary life. About a decade ago, it was no surprise that Alberta’s oilsands became the poster industry for ravaging the environment. It led to a prime opportunity for technology advancements and oil production sciences to mesh together and take on some legit and notorious oilsands issues. After all, Canada generates about 1.8 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions and the oilsands contribute about 9.3 per cent of that total. The Alberta government has set a hard cap of 100 million tonnes per year, which could limit growth in the oilsands unless GHG emissions can be reduced. The year 2012 marked the perfect timing for Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA) and the collaboration of industry giants Suncor, BP, Cenovus, Syncrude, Nexen, Teck, Imperial, Devon, ConocoPhillips and Canadian Natural to cooperate and share innovation expertise to do something for the primary oilsands focus on the key environmental issues of greenhouse gases, land, water and tailings.

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COLLABORATING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE // OIL & GAS

“BETWEEN 2012 AND 2016, THERE HAS BEEN AN 11 PER CENT REDUCTION IN GHG EMISSIONS INTENSITY AT IN-SITU SITES AND A NINE PER CENT REDUCTION IN EMISSIONS INTENSITY AT MINING OPERATIONS.” ~ DAN WICKLUM

Six years, and hundreds of million dollars later, it’s a good opportunity to question how it’s going and how much the oilsands is impacting the environment. “There has been much progress on the oilsands use of water and greenhouse gas emissions,” says Dan Wicklum, former CFL football player and the tremendously knowledgeable and understandably biased COSIA chief executive. “An 18 per cent reduction in water-use intensity from the COSIA member companies engaged in mining operations and a 42 per cent reduction in fresh-water use at in-situ operations. “Between 2012 and 2016, there has been an 11 per cent reduction in GHG emissions intensity at in-situ sites and a nine per cent reduction in emissions intensity at mining operations.” He also cites other oilsands innovation, like finding new ways to reduce the need for steam, which causes almost 80 per cent of its greenhouse gas emissions. Wicklum explains that generating steam to separate heavy sticky bitumen from the northern Alberta sands is responsible for about 56 million tonnes per year of the total 71 million tonnes of GHGs emitted from the oilsands. He is blunt and admits that, although the innovations continue, the past few Alberta downturn years have not

been easy for the oilsands and the COSIA partners. “It has been challenging, no doubt about it. Particularly with lower-for-longer commodity prices and all the consequences that has for corporate balance sheets. But through it all, the commitment of COSIA members has not waned. “If anything, it has strengthened,” he says with enthusiasm. “The project count has gone up year over year, and by the end of 2017, COSIA companies had shared 981 distinct technologies and innovations that cost over $1.4 billion to develop. Last year, COSIA companies started 99 new projects worth $188 million. Today, in its active portfolio, COSIA has 308 active projects, costing $545 million.” Despite nearly three years of industry speed bumps, Wicklum is passionate and proud of COSIA’s effective and forward-looking vision, innovation and accomplishments. “To date, our members have made 431 implementation decisions on the technologies developed and shared through COSIA,” he says. “The research and innovation around in-situ subsurface steam and waterless extraction has potential to lower water and land use, and reduce production costs as well as GHGs. It is an area of focus that will lead to farreaching improvements. ABOVE: DAN WICKLUM, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF COSIA.

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COLLABORATING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE // OIL & GAS

“There are very promising technologies in the area of steam reduction. One example is direct contact steam generation (DCSG). Using a specialized burner, configured much the way a rocket engine is, waste water is put in direct contact with a heating flame. The resulting product, called flue gas, is a mixture of steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) that can all be injected underground to recover bitumen.” He adds that DCSG is more energy efficient, and doesn’t require water treatment, so it uses less energy, cuts costs and decreases GHG emissions. While there is genuine industry respect and enthusiasm about the focus, commitment and momentum of COSIA to impact its four defined environmental targets of oilsands performance, some analysts and industry insiders are

cautious about the coombaya of 10 fiercely competitive oil giants to genuinely co-operate and share strategies, technologies and innovation. “By and large, the oilsands is doing a good job about reducing the environmental impact. Unfortunately, too many people in the industry – governments, Alberta’s energy regulator and even the activists – don’t know about it,” says the outspoken Dr. Bob Schulz, a professor at Calgary’s Haskayne School of Business. “The industry does not do a good job of collecting and matching to performance targets and COSIA doesn’t seem to have an effective communication plan. There has to be much better environmental reporting and collaborating. There are various really good things being done. But I really don’t feel the industry is willing to collaborate.

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COLLABORATING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE // OIL & GAS

“PERHAPS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE IS: HOW DO WE CONTINUE TO BE A PROFITABLE, GROWING BUSINESS IN A WORLD THAT DEMANDS A MUCH STRONGER FOCUS ON ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY?” ~ STEVE WILLIAMS

“The way COSIA goes about sharing is very flawed and companies are only motivated to put technologies into the collective pot. But the industry must do a much better job with communicating,” Schulz adds with frustration and passion. Canada is way ahead of other global producers. “The glass is definitely half full. Many activists say the glass is half empty. “There’s so much focus on the oilsands, which are making impressive environmental progress. Nobody is talking about shutting down all the coal plants in China and India. And there is little discussion about unethical offshore oil. Canada’s east coast refineries use offshore oil. If the government really wants to levy an environmental tax, put it on unethical oil.” The urgent topic of climate change and COSIA’s four defined areas where oilsands impact is being addressed is a critical global (and Alberta) topic. It’s also a thorny fact of business life. “Perhaps the biggest challenge is: how do we continue to be a profitable, growing business in a world that demands a much stronger focus on environmental performance and social responsibility?” asks Steve Williams, president and CEO of Suncor.

He references the global challenge of tackling climate change and points out, “We all have a shared interest in finding solutions. At Suncor, we’ve moved on several fronts – internally and externally – to reduce our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity while providing the energy the world needs. We came very close to meeting our 2015 energy efficiency improvement target (first set in 2009) and, in 2016, we announced an ambitious new sustainability goal: to reduce the total GHG emissions intensity of our oil and petroleum products by 30 per cent by 2030. It’s a target we believe that puts us on the path to ultimately bending the curve on our absolute GHG emissions as well. “Along with other oilsands producers, we’ve collaborated with our peers, with environmental leaders, with Aboriginal Peoples and with other governments to help advance climate change policy that has made Alberta a global leader in this area. “Ambitious action will be required by all of us to effectively tackle the climate change challenge,” he emphasizes, “and it is our conviction that technology will continue to transform our industry to a place of global cost and carbon competitiveness.”

ABOVE: STEVE WILLIAMS, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF SUNCOR.

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ROI ON CANVAS SPONSORSHIPS // CALGARY STAMPEDE - CHUCKWAGONS

ROI ON CANVAS SPONSORSHIPS MAKING IT ALL HAPPEN

I

BY JOHN HARDY

t’s unanimous! From Okotoks, Kelowna, Medicine Hat, Michigan, Munich, Tokyo and beyond, there is an undisputed consensus the Calgary Stampede is unique.

Countless Stampede-isms create what is world renowned as the “Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth,” including the dripping poutine; the mini donuts or deep-fried everythings on the midway; the livestock show-and-tells; the terrific concerts; the excitement and thrill of the rodeo.

be the most awe-inspiring. And the 2018 edition began this past March at the exciting and action-packed Chuckwagon Canvas Auction. Although some old habits are tough to change, chuckwagon insiders wince about referring to the chuckwagon covers as “tarps.” They proudly and adamantly point out they are “canvases” – not tarps!

And the action and thunder of the outriders, the horse teams and the drivers of the GMC Rangeland Derby chuckwagon races.

Canvas sponsorships are vital for the drivers and for the annual occurrence of the race. The sponsorships are also a quirky barometer of Calgary business climate in both good and bad economic times.

Newbies and seasoned Stampede goers say that, of all the unique and special attractions of Stampede, the chucks may

The historic record for canvas auction bidding happened in 2012, the Stampede’s momentous centennial year, when

ABOVE: KURT BENSMILLER, THREE-TIME GMC RANGELAND DERBY CHUCKWAGON CHAMPION.

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ROI ON CANVAS SPONSORSHIPS // CALGARY STAMPEDE - CHUCKWAGONS

bids totalled $4,015,000. This year, the canvas auction evening at Calgary’s Boyce Theatre generated $3,243,000 – an impressive spike from last year’s $2,420,500. “We were not only thrilled by the final amount of the bids,” says the beaming David Sibbald, president of the Calgary Stampede, “but also delighted by the diversity of the sponsors. It’s a winwin for everybody. The chuckwagon races are a special event that no one else in the world does like we do, and the canvas sponsorships make it possible for us to bring it to the Calgary community.” Most Stampede visitors (with or without plaid shirts and cowboy hats and boots) and the TV audience fail to realize that about 80 per cent of the canvas auction money goes directly to the driver. It is a substantial boost for the high overhead of seasonal chuckwagon racing. Since the Stampede is a not-for-profit organization, any revenue from the auction is put back into the sport and reinvested in Stampede operations for: the latest equipment, technology and handling methods; increased drug testing for animals in Stampede competitions; a new invitational process for chuckwagon drivers that considers driver safety record history as a key criteria; rebuilding the inside rail of the racetrack for better footing and greater safety during heavy rain; and the Nutrien Western Event Centre which uses leading-edge animal-care practices to ensure the safety of animals in exhibition and competition. There is a discreet but common question about canvas sponsorship that most don’t dare ask out loud. Aside from being loyal Stampede boosters, what ROI do local companies

and groups get for their generous five- and six-digit sponsorship bids? “Of course it is great exposure and it promotes their brand, as the racers compete around a sold-out grandstand with their sponsor’s logo on the canvas,” Sibbald explains. “Not only the on-site exposure with the people in the grandstand but the TV reach is tremendous, almost 200 million homes. ABOVE: DAVID SIBBALD, PRESIDENT OF THE CALGARY STAMPEDE. BELOW: KURT BENSMILLER, THREE-TIME GMC RANGELAND DERBY CHUCKWAGON CHAMPION.

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ROI ON CANVAS SPONSORSHIPS // CALGARY STAMPEDE - CHUCKWAGONS

“The sponsors also get the value-added aspects of a uniquely intimate Calgary Stampede experience. The sponsorships include the opportunity to host clients and staff to various events on the grounds, before, during and after the races; visiting behind the barns and becoming a part of our Stampede.” Sibbald, who has been actively involved for decades, is passionate and supercharged about the focus of the Calgary Stampede. “Our job is to create a dynamic guest experience for the 10 days in July. We are constantly moving forward with making the Stampede better and more exciting each year. While the Stampede will always include longstanding traditions, we believe in continued evolution and improvement, like developing a world-renowned animalcare strategy.” Stampede attendance is carefully tracked and, according to recent trends, about four per cent of visitors are from the U.S., another five per cent are international and about 90 per cent converge from across Canada, a majority coming from Calgary and the surrounding areas. The 2018 Top 10 Canvas Auction Bids • Kurt Bensmiller, Versatile Energy Services, $130,000 • John Walters, Shaw GMC Chevrolet Buick, $120,000 • Logan Gorst, SRDL Business Group, $120,000 • Dustin Gorst, BD&P Put the Boots to Hunger, $105,000 • Layne MacGillivray, Spray Lakes Sawmills, $105,000 • Troy Dorchester, CARSTAR/Friends of the Brakemen, $102,500 • Chad Harden, MNP/Paul Brandt Buckspring Foundation/ Kubota, $100,000 • Gary Gorst, Painted Pony Energy Ltd., $100,000 • Jason Glass, Friends of Glass Racing, $100,000 • Mark Sutherland, Air Canada, $100,000 • Obrey Motowylo, League Projects, $100,000

Chucks Champ Kurt Bensmiller “Of course it’s a sport; it’s also part of our western heritage and it’s my family’s way of life,” says Kurt Bensmiller, the personable, soft-spoken and top-ranked 34-year-old chuckwagon driver from Dewberry, Alberta. The winner of three of the past four GMC Rangeland Derby chuckwagon championships admits that being a world-champion driver and earning the highest bid at the 2018 canvas auction is not only the result of much hard work and achievement but, personally and professionally, it is an opportunity. “It’s a great feeling,” he says with a proud smile. “It’s a good indicator how the rest of the season will be for our team. There is a lot of work to be done.” Bensmiller explains that professional chuckwagon racing is a six-plus month commitment, although the season and the “circuit” make it seem shorter for many people. “The Stampede is biggest stop of the year – it’s our Stanley Cup finals – but there are eight other stops, including big races like Grande Prairie, Dawson Creek and Strathmore.” At Bensmiller’s level, it is quite a gruelling and challenging operation. Although he currently has 42 horses in training, he travels the circuit with two tractor trailers, 28 horses, his family and two paid staff. “We have been lucky to be successful with the races and the sponsorships in the last few years. We have a good group of horses and some new up-and-comers. We should be strong, but anything can happen,” he says with years of training and winning-and-losing experience. “We’re excited and also a bit worried. You never know until the end of the summer where it will all shake out. By the third week of August or so, we’ll know how well we did in 2018. But it’s a long time from now to then.” Bensmiller openly admits that canvas sponsorships are crucial. “Aside from being a terrific sport, we treat chuckwagon racing like a business. It’s how I budget my whole year and how many new horses we buy. “Horses are athletes. Just chiropractor and massage fees cost more than $10,000 a year. But if you don’t look after your athlete, they’re not going to look after you.”

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CALGARY’S MULTI-FAMILY MARKET // REAL ESTATE

CALGARY’S MULTI-FAMILY

Market

W H AT ’ S N E W A N D W H O ’ S B U Y I N G ? BY ERLYNN GOCOCO

W

herever you look, there seems to be a new condo project popping up – from the downtown core all the way to the burbs. Cranes and cement trucks seem to slow traffic down in almost every quadrant of the city. But are there actually buyers for all these units and who are they? What about resale? How are they being affected? And why would builders want to build in this economy? We must first understand that there are many different types of buyers. There are the first-time homebuyers, young downtown professionals, families and empty nesters, just to name a few. Some buyers want the convenience of maintenance-free living in the downtown core, where they can walk to work and also be in close proximity to trendy restaurants, and others want to get as far away from the downtown core as possible, seeking family-oriented multi-family communities

that offer lakeside living or a quick getaway to the mountains. There are numerous projects currently underway that fit many moulds – from Melcor Development’s Greenwich in northwest Calgary, to Jayman BUILT’s Westman Village in Mahogany, to the many new builds in Calgary’s beltline district, the choices are endless. The East Village, a neighbourhood once in a state of neglect, is now a hip locale where people can eat, drink and live. Clare LePan, marketing and communications director for Calgary Municipal Land Corporation (CMLC), says their organization was formed in 2007 with the City of Calgary as the single shareholder. The mandate: to revitalize the Rivers District – home to East Village. “In 2009,” says LePan, “CMLC released the master plan vision for East Village and fast forward to today, we are 10 years through the delivery of that master plan. To date,

ABOVE: CALGARIANS ENJOYING THE VIBRANT EAST VILLAGE. PHOTO SOURCE: CMLC

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CALGARY’S MULTI-FAMILY MARKET // REAL ESTATE

CMLC has invested over $357 million in infrastructure and placemaking programs in East Village to help realize the master plan. This investment has in turn attracted nearly $3 billion in private investment into the community. Our investment has taken the shape of public spaces like RiverWalk, St. Patrick’s Island and Bridge, streetscapes and pedestrian sidewalks along with the New Central Library.” LePan confirms that their developer partners are well underway with residential condominium projects. To date, four new condominium buildings have been completed and welcomed new residents with two more anticipated to be completed this fall. “Over the past four years, we’ve welcomed nearly 2,000 new residents into the community which has really added to the vibrancy and appeal of East Village. New retail businesses continue to open in the community and have created East Village as not only a residential community but a destination for all Calgarians to visit.”

And despite the economy, builders are confident in building for the future. Projects are not being built for immediate possession; they are being built with projected completion dates down the road. Developers today have better financing than in the past and have a more sophisticated way of analyzing current and future markets. Ryan Bosa, president of Bosa Development, says, “We recognized East Village’s potential when it was just a vision of a vibrant, walkable community designed for people to ‘live, work and play’ within proximity. We have a strong attachment to the community, and following the success of Evolution, our first two-phased project in the neighbourhood, we are proud to build Arris, a landmark project at the gateway to downtown. “We know there is a strong connection between amenities and the well-being of residents, and with Arris, we are thrilled to be able to offer numerous amenities within the building, as well as many daily retail options with no need to cross a street. When complete, the two impressive residential

ABOVE: ARTIST RENDERING OF ARRIS IN EAST VILLAGE, A BOSA PROJECT. PHOTO SOURCE: BOSA

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CALGARY’S MULTI-FAMILY MARKET // REAL ESTATE

“CALGARY’S MULTI-FAMILY MARKET IS PROVING TO BE DIFFICULT THIS YEAR. WITH ALL THE NEW DEVELOPMENT HITTING THE MARKET AND MORE TO FOLLOW, IT LEAVES ONE THINKING “WHAT’S IN STORE FOR CALGARY’S MULTI-FAMILY?” ~ TANYA EKLUND

towers at Arris will have more than 500 homes. They will be one of a kind.” When it comes to the resale market, local Realtor Tanya Eklund says, “Calgary’s multi-family market is proving to be difficult this year. With all the new development hitting the market and more to follow, it leaves one thinking “what’s in store for Calgary’s multi-family?” As new builds continue to go up in all quadrants of the city, Eklund says she has seen resale condo sales come to a screeching halt. “Pricing is key and, oftentimes, sellers are not prepared to list their condos at what it will take to sell.” MLS apartment-style condo sales are down 14.8 per cent year-to-date over last year and inventory levels up 6.46 per cent year-to-date over the same time frame. “We need to see a higher demand, which may be difficult considering the interest rate hikes, the mortgage stress test implemented this year and low migration into the city. We also see sellers who cannot sell for what they need to and turning to the rental market which, in turn, is increasing the amount of rental doors coming to the market.” Richard Cho with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation confirms, “After reaching a record high in December, new apartment inventories in Calgary have been declining. However, despite the decline, apartment inventories continue to remain well above historical averages. This has contributed to some imbalances in the housing market.”

ABOVE: TANYA EKLUND, CALGARY REALTOR. BELOW: ARTIST RENDERING OF THE RIVER PATHWAY IN EAST VILLAGE. PHOTO SOURCE: CMLC

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Leading Business JULY 2018

The annual Chuckwagon Canvas Auction, a litmus test of Calgary’s economy

CalgaryChamber.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JULY 2018

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2018 Board of

Directors Executive Chair: Phil Roberts, President, Vintri Technologies Inc Vice Chair: Brent Cooper, Partner, McLeod Law

What Does the Stampede Tell Us About Calgary’s Economy?

Past Chair: David Allen, Founder & President Situated Co. Treasurer: Wellington Holbrook, Chief Transformation Officer, ATB Financial

Directors Bill Brunton, Vice President, Habitat for Humanity, Southern Alberta Mike Williams, Executive Vice-President, Encana James Boettcher, Chief Idea Officer, Fiasco Gelato Desirée Bombenon, President & CEO, SureCall Contact Centres Ltd Mandeep Singh, Audit Partner, Deloitte Jason Hatcher, Managing Principal, Navigator Greg Garcia, President and CEO, Calgary Elite Roofing Brian Bietz, President, Beitz Resources Jenn Lofgren, Founder, Incito Mike Shaw, Vice President, Calgary Region Gas Distribution, ATCO Management Sandip Lalli – President and CEO

F

or over 100 years, through hell or high water, the Calgary Stampede has continued to contribute to our city’s economy.

In 1912, the Stampede’s first rodeo show brought in $120,000 – equivalent to close to $3 million today. As the Stampede has grown over the last century, so has its contributions. Estimates suggest the Stampede now provides more than $400 million in annual economic impact, with consumer spending supporting local hotels, restaurants, retail shopping and many other businesses. While providing a great source of economic benefit, the Stampede also provides a good indication of how our economy is doing. More specifically, the Chuckwagon Canvas Auction can be a good indicator of the business confidence in Calgary.

The Background Potential sponsors gather in March to compete for sponsorship and advertising space on each chuckwagon canvas (or tarp) featured during the 10 days of the GMC Rangeland Derby. What we have found is that more often than not, the more money invested during the tarp auction, the better off we find Calgary’s economy. Canvas auction results (shown in the graph as a percentage of change year to year) and economic activity tend to follow a similar trend. This is illustrated in the figure below.

Michael Andriescu – Director of Finance and Administration Aaron Kroontje – Director of Digital & Technology Scott Crockatt – Director of Marketing and Communications Rebecca Wood – Director of Member Services Zoe Addington – Director of Policy, Research and Government Relations Leading Business magazine is a co-publication of the Calgary Chamber and Business in Calgary Calgary Chamber 600, 237 8th Avenue S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 5C3 Phone: (403) 750-0400 Fax: (403) 266-3413 calgarychamber.com

Sources: Alberta real GDP Annual Growth: RBC Economics - Provincial Outlook March 2018 (years 2011-2018); years 2009, 2010 RBC Economics March 2017). Tarp Auction Results: 2018, 2017 Calgary Stampede Auction Results; Calgary Herald,

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“2016 Rangeland Derby canvas auction brings in hefty $2.29 million,”; Global News, “2016 Calgary Stampede chuckwagon canvas auction held Thursday.” Chamber Calculations.

oil and gas in 2017 was down 19 per cent from 2016, and 46 per cent from 2014. In comparison, capital spending on oil and natural gas in the United States last year increased by 38 per cent to $120 billion.

What Does This Tell Us About Calgary’s Economy?

Jobs: Unemployment Falling but Many Haven’t Felt Recovery

This year’s auction results paint a fairly consistent picture of the current state of Calgary’s economy – improving, but not firing on all cylinders.

Across Alberta, there are nearly 10,000 more job vacancies than a year ago – a sign that more firms are looking to hire. Albertans are also earning higher wages this year compared to last, with average weekly wages in Alberta remaining higher than any other province. Calgary’s unemployment rate has also dropped since its peak. The average first quarter monthly unemployment rate has dropped from 9.5 per cent last year to 7.9 per cent in 2018.

The 2018 auction, coming in at $3.2 million, represents a 34 per cent increase over last year’s total, and is the second year in a row where auction totals have increased – a sign business confidence is improving. That said, this year’s result remains below pre-recession levels, and nearly $800,000 below 2012’s high. The picture of the economy painted by this year’s canvas auction results – improving, but not fully recovered – is observed when looking at other economic data. Let’s take a closer look.

Economic Activity: On the Rise but Investment a Concern The data shows that Calgary’s economy is creeping up from the depths of the recession. Over the course of 2017, Alberta’s economy grew faster than any other Canadian province, over a percentage point greater than the second-fastest growing province (B.C.). When looking at Alberta as a whole, the data shows that employment, earnings, exports and retail sales have all seen improvements. While this progress is welcomed by Albertans with open arms, economic activity remains below its 2014 peak. A noteworthy concern for our economy as we move forward is business investment. The Alberta government’s 201718 Q3 economic update predicted business investment would decline by 1.9 per cent this year. Investment in the oil and gas industry, is also lagging. Around the world, capital investment in the oil and gas sector increased in 2017, while investments in Canada decreased. In fact, total capital spending on Canadian

But, thousands of Calgarians are still looking for work. Calgary’s unemployment rate is edging around eight per cent. In March – when the tarp auction occurred – Calgary’s unemployment rate was higher than any other major Canadian city, over two percentage points above the national rate.

What Does This Mean for Calgary Businesses? The data shows Calgary is emerging from a very difficult recession. But, some businesses have not yet felt the benefits of recovery. Businesses continue to be impacted by government policy and increased costs. All levels of government continue to make it harder to run a successful business in Calgary by layering costs through minimum wage increases, labour reform, greater corporate taxes, carbon pricing and greater property tax burdens, to name a few. In 2018, businesses have faced mounting uncertainty through NAFTA negotiations, tax reforms made in the U.S., pipeline disputes and new resource regulations. That said, just like this year’s canvas auction totals, Calgary’s economy is improving. While we may not be out of the woods yet, there does appear to be a sense of optimism among Calgary business leaders. And after a few years of difficult times, economic improvements are definitely worth celebrating.

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Be a Part of the Action at the Shaw Charity Classic

Esteban Toledo visits the Alberta Children’s Hospital, one of the 180 benefiting charities.

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ummer is here and your social calendar is likely filling up but it is never too late to secure a spot in one of the most memorable events to swing into Calgary each summer. The Shaw Charity Classic, an award-winning PGA TOUR Champions event, will once again be the place to be in Calgary, August 29 to September 2.

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The centrepiece to the sixth addition of the Shaw Charity Classic is once again 78 of the legendary names in the game including Mediate, defending champion Scott McCarron, Colin Montgomerie, Jesper Parnevik, Kenny Perry, Jose Maria Olazabal, among so many more who will battle it out over 54 holes. But this stop on the PGA TOUR Champions is so much more than great golf.

“I remember teeing off on Friday and thinking, ‘What in the heck are they giving away out here?’ because it seemed like there were a million people there, and it was so cool to see that,” says Rocco Mediate, who was first to get sized up for the champion’s Smithbilt cowboy hat in 2013. “All week, all of us players were in shock about how many people showed up. And the people have come out ever since. It is just an awesome tournament.”

“Since the first day the Patron Group committed to bringing this event to Calgary, our decision-making has stayed true to the tournament’s core mission: bring elite golf to Calgary for families to enjoy while making a difference in the lives of Alberta youth who need our support,” says Clay Riddell, tournament chairman, Shaw Charity Classic.

More than 40,000 Calgary-based golf fans will once again head down to Canyon Meadows Golf & Country Club to fill private suites and viewing areas, hang out alongside the fairways or get under the ropes to play with one of golf’s greats at the top event on the PGA TOUR Champions this summer.

From pro-am golfing opportunities to tournament product demos and luxury hosting venues; ramped-up fan experience areas for kids and adults alike; interactive junior and corporate clinics with TOUR Champions pros; and memorable community events; the Shaw Charity Classic offers local businesses of all sizes a menu of

JULY 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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Be a Part of the Action at the Shaw Charity Classic effective and cost-effective opportunities to achieve their branding, community investment and hosting needs, while also teeing up a perfect afternoon out with the family. Regardless of how Calgarians choose to get involved, all of the tournament’s efforts remain squarely focused on making a positive mark on its charitable partners. In its first five years, Riddell and his Patron Group, along with Calgary’s corporate community and fans lining the fairways, have raised an unprecedented $22.1 million that has changed the lives of more than 450,000 children connected to one of the tournament’s charities. Young Albertans are now gaining new opportunities in areas of education, arts and culture, sport or accessing summer camps, all while enjoying life’s precious moments. The success story reflects the generosity of Albertans in giving back to their community despite a stressed economy. “Since the beginning, the Shaw Charity Classic has exceeded its expectations on every level. None of this is possible without community engagement starting in the heart of Calgary’s downtown. The corporate community, led by our title partner at Shaw Communications, have been the difference maker through their support of this event. I hope Calgarians will help us continue to ensure the Shaw Charity Classic has a lasting impact on our own youth well into the future,” says Riddell, who adds the tournament has set a lofty goal of raising $10 million in 2018. Record-setting crowds and the tournament’s unique charitable fundraising program – Shaw Birdies for Kids presented by AltaLink – have captured the attention of those around the PGA TOUR Champions. “Calgary is a good golf town. There are a lot of knowledgeable fans. The sponsor, Shaw, and local businesses are really behind this event. And there a lot of great volunteers,” says Jeff Maggert, who won the 2015 instalment. “When you put all those together, it just leads to a very successful event. And obviously, the money they’ve been able to raise for charity (through Shaw Birdies for Kids presented by AltaLink) has just been unbelievable.”

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2017 Shaw Charity Classic Champion Scott McCarron.

Created four years ago, the unique charitable-giving program provides corporations, and individual donors alike, the opportunity to make a gift to one of the more than 180 youth-based charities the tournament has aligned itself with. Those donations are further leveraged through a matching program that provides participating charities with additional funds of up to 50 per cent of what they raise. “We have had a very strong charitable component to this event since the first tee ball was hit, but Birdies for Kids continues to set a new precedent for fundraising on the PGA TOUR Champions,” says Riddell. “I think all Calgarians should be very proud of what we have been able to do for youth while catching a glimpse of our heroes play golf.” So, whether it’s testing your mettle against the greats of the game of golf in one of the championship pro-ams, gaining inspiration at women’s day, interacting with a family-friendly crowd outside the ropes, or hosting VIPs in style, the Shaw Charity Classic provides world-class budget-friendly opportunities for all to enjoy. Don’t miss out on the action! For more information on the sponsorship and hosting opportunities at the 2018 Shaw Charity Classic, August 29 – September 2, please visit shawcharityclassic.com or contact Rhys Royer at rhys@shawcharityclassic.com.


Chamber Member Spotlights The Calgary Chamber is proud to represent many Calgary businesses large and small; this month we are highlighting some of our industry leading members.

AltaLink

AltaLink is one of Alberta’s largest electricity transmission providers, serving more than three million Albertans through its 13,000 kilometres of transmission lines and 300 substations. AltaLink partners with its customers to provide innovative solutions to meet the province’s demand for reliable and affordable energy. Headquartered in Calgary, with offices in Edmonton, Red Deer and Lethbridge, AltaLink is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway Energy and is part of a global group of companies delivering energy services to customers worldwide. For more information, visit altalink.ca.

BMO

Serving customers for 200 years and counting, BMO is a highly-diversified financial services provider and the eighth largest bank, by assets, in North America. With total assets of $728 billion as of January 31, 2018, and a team of diverse and highly-engaged employees, BMO provides a broad range of personal and commercial banking, wealth management and investment banking products and services to more than 12 million customers. It conducts business through three operating groups: Personal and Commercial Banking, BMO Wealth Management and BMO Capital Markets. For more information, visit bmo.com.

Bow Valley College

Bow Valley College is an innovative world-class college operating as a comprehensive community institution. As Alberta’s largest community college and a proud partner in Campus Alberta, Bow Valley College serves 15,000 learners each year in Calgary and throughout southern Alberta, offering year-round career certificate and diploma programs as well as high school upgrading and English language learning. Dedicated staff provide a range of career services and specialized services to support newcomers to Canada with securing viable careers and professional accreditation. Bow Valley College delivers programs and skills that make learners think in new and creative ways, removing barriers to fulfilling and lasting employment. For more information, visit bowvalleycollge.ca.

Thanks

The Chamber thanks the following long-standing member companies celebrating anniversaries this month for their years of support to the Calgary Chamber, and their commitment to the growth and development of Calgary.

Member name Mount Royal University YMCA Calgary An Affair to Remember 9th Avenue Animal Clinic BILD Calgary Region Petro Management Group Ltd. Distress Centre Eligeo CRM Lobstick Project Solutions Mission Management MKA Canada Original Restaurant Group Boardwalk Equities Commissionaires – Southern Alberta Drake International Inc. Everbrave Branding Group Gentherm Global Power Technologies New West Public Affairs Inc. Servus Credit Union SMART Technologies Swiss Chalet – Cara Operations Tekarra Project Services WinSport

Years as a member 40 30 20 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 10 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

industry. Coupled with their proprietary point-of-sale tools and software, HUB Financial is the MGA of choice for independent advisers and their clients. For more information, visit bowvalleycollge.ca.

Congratulations to YMCA Calgary for celebrating 30 years as a Calgary Chamber member.

YMCA Calgary

HUB International

HUB Financial is the largest managing general agency operating in Canada. HUB Financial Calgary provides independent advisers with extensive sales, product, concept and process training to offer the most efficient process in the

YMCA Calgary has evolved into a vibrant charity where thousands of Calgarians are involved each year through health and wellness programs, leadership, community outreach programs, childcare, and day and overnight camps. Guided by four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility, YMCA Calgary strives to offer quality programs and services that give children, youth and adults the opportunity to belong, grow, thrive and lead. For more information, visit ymcacalgary.org.

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BOMEX2018.ca

EMBRACING CHANGE OCTOBER 1-3, 2018

For available sponsorship opportunities, please contact Marketing & Events Manager Aydan Aslan at aydan.aslan@boma.ca


Prestige Railings and Stairs Ltd. Prestige Railings and Stairs continues its “rise and run” to the top of the stair and railing industry in Alberta as we once again have received the Consumer Choice Award for Business Excellence in both Calgary and Edmonton. For well over a decade, Prestige has been privileged to receive these awards – a constant reflection of our dedication to quality and a sincere effort to exceed customer expectations – every step of the way.

achieve the goals and visions of each individual customer. Whether it be a starter home with a feature railing or a commercial property with 10 stories of interior railing that needs retrofitting, Prestige is the only call you need to make. For well over 25 years, Prestige has been pleased to set the highest standards in the industry and will continue to raise the bar and focus on improving the product and the process. While the customer doesn’t realize it in most cases, Prestige is the only stair and railing company to be a member of the Architectural Woodwork Manufacturers Association of Canada.

Prestige continues to build the highest quality stairs in the industry and we pride ourselves on helping our customers realize their dreams in creating a focal point in their homes with unique designs and extraordinary craftsmanship.

This speaks to the Prestige commitment to constant evaluation and improvement in an industry where we already set the bar for quality. The Company’s vision of being the most respected, reliable and sought after provider of all things stairs and railings to the residential and commercial construction industry, is the focus of everything we do. While the awards are a nice pat on the back and a huge morale booster, we know the work to improve never stops.

Prestige offers an extensive variety of quality products, all the way from glass stair treads and stainless steel components to spindles featuring Swarovski crystals; from LED accent lighting to interior and exterior spiral stairs. Prestige continuously works with architects and designers, builders, contractors, and building and home owners to

Consistency, Quality, Craftsmanship Photo by Jean Perron Photography

Come in and talk to us about your project!

Our showroom is open from Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm | www.prestigerailings.com “We’re passionate about bringing spaces to life. Together with you.”

www.sunik.com

2777 Hopewell Place NE Calgary (403) 250-1020 • Toll Free: 1-800-382-8502

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River Spirit Golf Club:

The Secret is Out of the Golf Bag Rennay Craats

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iver Spirit Golf Club is the best-kept secret in town and this season, the secret is out. Located 15 minutes west of Westhills Towne Centre, this gem is close enough to the city to be convenient but far enough away to offer golfers a welcome escape from their busy lives.

“Our view of the mountains and Elbow River is amazing. You can get caught up and forget where you are,” says Paul Rudolf, general manager of River Spirit. The spectacular views and landscapes add to the appeal of the course. This 27-hole course with its numerous sets of tees has something for every golfer. Advanced golfers relish the challenge of the course, so it’s no wonder that the SVR Alberta Open Championship chose River Spirit Golf Club to host its tournament this past June. But novice golfers shouldn’t be intimidated. They can tee off from alternative boxes to make those challenges less daunting. “With our 27 holes we have three different rotations which offer plenty of variety and are sure to provide a unique experience for golfers of all ages and experience,” he says. River Spirit helps keep golfers at their best too. The club boasts a 325-yard grass driving range, numerous target greens, a practice bunker and putting greens to help golfers knock strokes off their score. For golfers looking to improve, they partner with one of Alberta’s finest golf academies – National Golf Academy – offering a variety of lessons and coaching opportunities for individuals or groups. River Spirit Golf Club is just as impressive off the links. It has incredible food and atmosphere including a great patio, and welcomes corporate and private functions like Christmas parties, weddings and tournaments to enjoy it. “We are well equipped both with our food quality and facilities to cater events of up to 200 people,” Rudolf says. As word spreads about River Spirit, more people are trying the course. Golfers can play for the day or choose a one-year or certificate membership. River Spirit is currently paying the 2018 dues on new certificate memberships to encourage golfers to join. With River Spirit Golf Club’s scenic course and top-notch food service, it is attracting a lot of attention and interest. “We are a relatively young and progressive course that really plays like a mature course,” Paul Rudolf says. “We are evolving and we want to continue to improve the golfing experience for our members and the general public.”

Book a tee time now! (403) 247-4837 241155 Range Rd 34, Calgary, AB T3Z 2W4

www.riverspiritgolf.com


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Packages Starting At $135 / Person

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Belonging is closer than you think at

Contemporary Clubhouse • Only 15 minutes from downtown Calgary • Stunning 300 acres • Indoor training facility • Engaging Golf Pros • Affordable Equity Memberships now available • Now accepting bookings for your Corporate Events See you on the links!

The Valley Bistro

A Get-a-way, Not far away at the River Spirit Golf Club! Enjoy an amazing meal with stunning views of the Rockies on our fabulous patio! 241155 Range Rd 34, Calgary, AB T3Z 2W4 (403) 247-4837 www.riverspiritgolf.com

Ask about our one year trial membership. www.silverspringsgolfclub.com

403.286.1456

jon@silverspringsgolfclub.com

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Shining the Spotlight on Customer “Disservice” I

n most aspects of business, customer service is vital. Although not as clearly defined or openly discussed, many seasoned business professionals add caution about the impact and importance of customer disservice. When it comes evaluating disservice, numerous management studies suggest that some companies have chosen efficiency over positive customer service, through options like outsourced call centres and recorded messages, whereby efficiency notoriously trumps service. Some studies show that executives, particularly of larger businesses, are out of touch with the front lines. They believe everything is OK and that their posted values are being translated down to the customer touch point but, in reality, this is not happening consistently. “When customers ask more questions than usual and constantly follow up over deadlines and product details – that is an indicator that not enough time is spent by the CSR, responses are slow or service is lacking,” says Saqib Tariq, an EO Calgary member and co-owner of Minuteman Press Beltline, the award-winning Calgary print shop specializing in all types of printing and copying services. Printing 84 newsletters to more than 400,000 households in 140 communities in the Calgary area, EO Calgary member Mike Russell, president of Great News Publishing, is focused on some key aspects of customer service. “Number one is being very attentive and listening carefully to the customer. Hopefully we can offer a solution in line with their needs, and sometimes we can’t. We work hard at communicating as much as we can, and equally as important is the attitude of gratitude.” Many consultants warn about the effects of state-of-the-art technology on customer service. A hot topic is whether it has

replaced or undermined communication. Weighing in on the subject is Colette Hamon, an EO Calgary member and the dynamic president and CEO of BraTopia, a popular women’s clothing store specializing in perfectly-fitted foundation garments and swimwear. “On the contrary, if anything it’s opened up the channels in which we can help the customer,” she says. “At any given time, we can be respond to customers via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, our general email inbox, via a chat option on our website, texting or by picking up the phone. Technology has also opened up how we can help customers who cannot easily access products that we offer.” “Technology enhances communication,” Tariq says. “With templates, status updates, online ordering and customer portals we can ease and automate basic communication. This gives us the time to have meaningful conversations with our clients.” Russell adds that technology enhances customer service. “It allows us to email large volumes of customers, not to not replace but assist in communicating with our customers.” Are there “golden rules” about customer service? Since BraTopia is a somewhat specialized business, Hamon explains, “The keys to effective customer service for us are ensuring that we make what women consider a painful, dreaded experience (shopping for bras and swimwear) something they can enjoy. We know we’ve nailed it when they leave happy, upbeat and with a smile.” Russell suggests, “Genuinely listen and ask a lot of questions. Get rid of confusion and mystification, and clarify. Minimize assumptions.” “In our business, we have a few but important perspectives,” Tariq points out. “Customer service is everyone’s responsibility. Staff payroll comes from the customers. Always provide genuine care.”

Contributing Members:

Upcoming Events: July 5 • EO Stampede Party

Colette Hamon

Saqib Tariq

Mike Russell

president and CEO of BraTopia

co-owner of Minuteman Press Beltline

president of Great News Publishing

The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

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For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


WITH THE RIGHT PARTNER YOU CAN REACH THE HIGHEST POTENTIAL In business and in life, teamwork is crucial to success. You can have a vision of what you want to achieve, but without the right partners helping you to reach your goals, you can fall short. Partnership and collaboration are fundamental to accomplishing great things. The best things happen when we get a little help from our friends. At Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC), we understand that great events and meetings are accomplished and achieved when we engage others. That’s why our team, our staff and our partners — including the Calgary Marriott Downtown Hotel and FMAV — become your team and partners, dedicated to helping you deliver great events. Throughout all stages of the event from creative planning to flawless execution, our team becomes

your team. It’s our commitment to you to help you achieve your vision and collaborate to exceed all expectations. We have been an integral part of the Calgary community for over four decades, and we are incredibly proud of the customers we have worked with throughout this time. These meaningful connections in the city and beyond make us even stronger, and allow us to leverage our network of stakeholders to help you achieve even more success. Just think of what we can achieve if we partner together to reach new heights.

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Long-term Strategy Positions Calgary in the New Economy

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n the decade since its first long-term economic strategy was released in 2008, Calgary has experienced the heights of economic booms and the depths of a historic recession – a couple times. With Calgary now at a crossroads, a new economic strategy has been developed to guide the city in this period of unprecedented disruption across the global economy from the rapid adoption of technology in all industrial sectors. Times have undoubtedly changed and the latest version is simply titled Calgary in the New Economy. It reflects the risks and opportunities for the city from the innovation in digital, physical and virtual technologies impacting every sector of the economy. Almost 90 per cent of actions in the previous version of the strategy, titled Building on our Energy, were completed or there has been significant progress on its implementation. An economic strategy is a living document that continually evolves to remain relevant. It is a blueprint that helps to align governments, businesses, educators and other stakeholders on initiatives that support economic competitiveness, embrace shared prosperity and build a strong community. The vision behind Calgary in the New Economy is to be “the city of choice in Canada for the world’s best entrepreneurs, as we embrace innovation and create solutions to meet the world’s needs in food, health, energy and transportation.” The strategy focuses on four key elements that drive economic growth and it sets out the ambition for Calgary in each area: Talent: Canada’s destination for talent. Innovation: Canada’s leading business-to-business innovation ecosystem.

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Place: Canada’s most livable city. Business environment: Canada’s most business-friendly city. Calgary has a global reputation as an inclusive and entrepreneurial city connected through an incredible community spirit and those values guided the development of the strategy. Its fundamental principle is that an entrepreneurial and innovative city generates enduring prosperity, and human capital is critical to sustained growth. Like all elements of economic development, the strategy is ultimately about people. It is document that was developed by the people of Calgary in the last year through extensive community engagement and a CEO roundtable with leaders in business, government and education. The update focuses on industry clusters to enhance the competitive advantages of Calgary’s established sectors – energy, agribusiness, transportation and logistics – and embraces emerging areas for growth – creative industries, tourism, financial services and life sciences. The energy industry has been the backbone of Calgary’s economy for decades but it is evolving. Calgary will remain a global centre of excellence for all things energy – playing a key role in driving innovation to improve performance and reduce environmental impacts – but it is unlikely to be the job creator it was or occupy the office space it once did. Calgary’s future will be driven by the adoption of technology, the rounding out of our talent pool and the strengthening of our innovation ecosystem. Calgary in the New Economy will be officially unveiled this fall with implementation plans for the various tactics and initiatives. Calgary has been the economic driver for Canada for the last 25 years and successfully implementing the long-term strategy will ensure we continue to be a great place to make a living and great place to make a life.


Calgary’s Tourism and Hospitality Industry Creates Undeniable Value IN 2017, CALGARY WELCOMED MORE THAN 6.9 MILLION TRAVELLERS WHO CONTRIBUTED AN ESTIMATED $1.6 BILLION IN VISITOR SPENDING TO THE LOCAL ECONOMY BY BRIDGETTE SLATER

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ourism in Calgary stimulates the economy, builds the city, amplifies Calgary’s experiences, enhances quality of life, intensifies the city’s vibrancy and fosters community spirit. As champion of Calgary’s Destination Strategy: Ultimate Hosts. Ultimate Host City., Tourism Calgary is proud to share all the ways in which tourism creates undeniable value for the city and Calgarians. Tourism stimulates our economy. Calgary welcomes over 6.9 million visitors who contribute $1.6 billion to the local economy annually. Since 2005, the city has also seen over $500 million generated from Tourism Calgarysupported events. This influx of visitor spending stimulates the economy and supports jobs in multiple industries including those in the transportation, accommodation, culinary, attraction, event and retail sectors. Tourism builds our city. Cities that focus on destination development have diversified economies, a powerful network of connected and strategically-aligned partners, collaboration with government and engaged citizen advocates. Thanks to Calgary’s Destination Strategy: Ultimate Hosts. Ultimate Host City., a collective vision, strategy and action plan have been established to achieve Calgary’s short-, mid- and long-term goals. Through advancing Calgary’s Destination Strategy, the city will continue to build a robust visitor economy, pride of place for residents and become a sought-after destination for visitors. Tourism amplifies our city’s experiences. Tourism Calgary’s targeted and research-driven marketing increases the likelihood that travellers will visit Calgary within two years. These efforts amplify the positive stories surrounding Calgary’s compelling experiences and advance the city’s destination brand. With over two million website visits, one million social media engagements and 17 million earned media impressions annually, Tourism Calgary’s marketing is

nimble, bold and creative, and ensures visitors want to share the city’s experiences with others. Tourism enhances our quality of life. Calgary’s tourism industry works collectively to accomplish the city’s goals and actualize benefits for Calgarians and visitors. In representing over 660 industry partners, Tourism Calgary advocates for the industry and destination by supporting these partners and lending its voice to items that affect the industry and quality of life. Survey results from early 2018 indicate that 90 per cent of stakeholders believe Tourism Calgary is an effective champion for the industry. Tourism intensifies our city’s vibrancy. Events enrich Calgary by adding to the city’s vibrancy, attracting visitors, encouraging visitor spending, supporting hosting infrastructure development and inspiring Calgarians through legacies and participation. Calgary supports upward of 70 sport and cultural events annually, which create opportunities to build Calgary’s brand, offer shareable experiences and showcase Calgary’s hosting abilities. As an important subset of the visitor economy, sport tourism contributes over $6.5 billion to the Canadian economy annually. Tourism fosters our community spirit. As ultimate hosts, Tourism Calgary exemplifies Calgary’s unique community spirit by fostering a destination that is welcoming, innovative and offers shareable experiences for visitors and Calgarians. This is accomplished through online and in-person experience counselling and the facilitation of destination knowledge enhancement for Calgary’s frontline ambassadors. These efforts result in over one million referrals to industry partners annually. To learn more about how tourism creates value by building Calgary’s sense of community, sustainable development and shared prosperity, see visitcalgary.com.

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Connecting Business to Community BY ANDREA MENDIZABAL

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ocial enterprises are helping to transform Calgary’s community, and CTI’s RBC Social Enterprise Accelerator program ensures entrepreneurs are not only creating a social impact but are also building sustainable businesses with a financial return on investment and scalable market. The 2018 program wrapped up with a Demo Day on June 14 and featured six startups focused on areas ranging from health and education to persons with disabilities. Each startup was matched with a business adviser from within Calgary’s innovation ecosystem. Mentors bring decades of business, technical and entrepreneurial experience to the accelerator and help address specific business challenges, with the goal of increasing their social impact while growing revenue.

Meet the startups GenerousTickets GenerousTickets makes non-profits more effective by providing tools that help raise money, save time and build stronger relationships. The tools are only part of the story. Their business model includes a profit-sharing component to produce sustained long-term growth, for both GenerousTickets and the non-profit groups they partner with. For more information, visit www.GenerousTickets.com. Lumin Arts Inc. Lumin supports local talent by providing them with a digital platform that makes it easy for grassroots artists to connect with venues so that they can work together to create and promote live events. For more information, visit http://lumin.life. PlayCity Understanding that most of life’s best connections are made through a common interest, PlayCity’s goal is to connect

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as many people as possible through physical activity. PlayCity creates a more active and connected world by using technology to bring people together off-line. For more information, visit www.playcityapp.com. Re-able Up to 80 per cent of stroke survivors have some form of upper limb disability and Re-able is working to provide survivors with accessible and affordable technology to help maximize recovery. A wearable activity tracker and app offers features like exercise and medication scheduling, inactivity alarms, and can be leveraged to monitor recovery programs. For more information, visit www.re-able.ca. PwrSwitch PwrSwitch helps victims of digital harassment, whether being threatened, abused or persecuted via text, email, social media or voice call. Entirely mobile, the app instantly captures and securely stores all communication (the abuse record) for use by lawyers, the court system or the police service. PwrSwitch gives control back to those who feel like they’ve lost it, and power back to those who feel like they have none. For more information, visit www.pwrswitch.com. Universal Access (UA) Accessible spaces create immersive communities where all people, regardless of age or ability, feel comfortable going out without anxiety. UA increases accessibility for people with mobility, visual or age-related disabilities. They audit and certify spaces based on self-developed universal design standards. Once a business is certified, UA creates awareness of their space through social media, online platforms and via partnerships with care facilities, disability organizations and more. For more information, visit www.universalaccess.me. To learn more about Calgary Technologies Inc. (CTI) and how it’s accelerating the impact of innovation-driven ventures, visit calgarytechnologies.com.


With the right partner you can reach the highest potential. At Calgary TELUS Convention Centre, we’re proud to look for only the best partners to help make your event everything it can be.

calgary-convention.com


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

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aro has been a strong fixture in the Calgary market for almost 50 years so little wonder that when Torontobased communications agency Rain was looking to expand its operations nationally it sat down with Karo Group chair Chris Bedford to talk about the West. The result: Karo’s offices in Calgary and Vancouver have been acquired through the efforts of Rain president and CEO John Yorke and they are now under the Rain umbrella. Yorke says, “We have spent a lot of time in Calgary over the past year with Freedom Mobile clients, and we really saw an opportunity to bring our growth philosophy here.” Tracy Gonzalez, formerly with Venture Communications and Twist Marketing before it was integrated into Karo in 2016, has been named vice president, managing director responsible for the Calgary and Vancouver offices. Dennis Cant, with WAX partnership until last year, has been named vice president client development. Rain’s newest accounts in the Toronto office include Carlson Wagonlit Travel and Meridian Credit Union, a new digital bank launching this year with plans to expand into the Calgary market. Locally, Rain has been named agency of record for Peppino Gourmet Foods.

Sharie Hunter, principal and managing partner of Arthur/ Hunter, has relocated her office into new space on the third floor of the Petro West Plaza on the corner of 8th Street and 12th Avenue SW. Her “room to expand” news came at the same time she was proud to announce Arthur/Hunter had won six Hermes Creative Awards for clients Calgary Opera and ARC Resources.

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JULY 2018 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

It was also contracted to design Calgary Opera’s 2018-19 season; a campaign that includes the season brand, brochure, marketing materials, advertisements, digital media, event signage and media launch assets. And Hunter also boasts of new accounts PrairieSky Royalty, Kelt Exploration, Criterium Group and Crescent Point Energy.

Tyler Chisholm, CEO of ClearMotive Marketing Group, says he is excited and honoured to be awarded the brand refresh and creative identity work for Lammle’s Western Wear. The Calgary company, launched in 1983, has stores across B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan. Rated as the number one retailer in western wear, Lammle’s is the official western wear retailer of the Calgary Exhibition & Stampede.

Daughter Creative has been chosen to handle the promotion and marketing for Savanna Bazaar, the shopping centre to be built in Saddle Ridge inspired by open-air markets found throughout South Asia. The project by Royop Development and designed by Abugov Kaspar Architecture will include an ethnic market, professional services building and a banquet hall for cultural weddings and community activities.

Parker’s Pick The Calgary Zoo’s marketing campaign to welcome the pandas that helped bring in record attendance for the month of May.


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