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MADAME CHANCELLOR

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CALGARIAN GRIT MCCREATH ON HER NEW ROLE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN



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Practical nursing and virtual reality: Bow Valley College opens new, high-tech lab The college piloted the tool in its Adult Health Assessment course, and the reviews were positive. “Students were able to learn about and feel comfortable with the technology in about 10 to 15 minutes. It is very user-friendly,” says Kimberly Hogarth, Associate Dean in the School of Health and Wellness, Bow Valley College. One of the students who took part in the pilot project found it useful, despite initial anxieties. “I have never been into video games or much of a techy person, so I was nervous about learning to operate the VR. The instructor that I had was very helpful, and I caught on quickly,” says Kristen Cameron.

Bow Valley College is embracing the application of virtual reality in the healthcare field by helping to create new technology for practical nursing students. Students in the Practical Nurse Diploma program are now using a virtual reality platform in a newly opened lab which provides valuable insight into what they will find when they see patients after graduation. The School of Health and Wellness at Bow Valley College teamed up with Calgary-based technology company ICOM Productions Ltd. to develop the assessment tool. Students previously did assessments on one another. As a result, they had limited exposure to abnormal findings before performing patient care in a real-world setting. The virtual reality application randomly matches students with nine different avatars which range in age and ethnicity. The digital patients are programmed with various conditions impacting the respiratory system. A virtual stethoscope provides audio clues similar to what a nurse would hear in a real patient. Instructors use the VR tool to monitor the assessment process and keep track of how students chart their findings.

Cameron’s avatar was a male patient with asthma. Upon auscultation, she was able to pick up the wheezing and rales (crackles). Cameron adds, “(The) majority of our nursing classmates that we practice on have healthy lungs. However, that is not the reality for some of our patients, and we need to be able to pick up on that.” Cameron found guidance from her instructor on limiting head movement made a difference in limiting feelings of motion sickness. “ICOM was able to use innovative ideas to reduce some of the common issues with VR such as dizziness,” says Hogarth, who worked with the company to bring the tool to life. Bow Valley College’s role in developing and implementing an application like this is part of an ongoing commitment to advance curriculum using emerging artificial intelligence, as well as virtual and augmented reality technologies. This tool will help practical nursing students to develop the skills they will need to be work-ready in a competitive field, benefiting their employers, and most importantly, their patients. Cameron hopes to work in a rural hospital with interest in obstetrics and emergency room nursing. She will graduate with knowledge gained through this unique laboratory. “When I heard about the opportunity we had to use the virtual reality tool at main campus, I was excited. I presumed it would be a cool experience.”

bowvalleycollege.ca/VRlab


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Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 30 | Number 1

REGULAR COLUMNS

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Comparing Apples to Oranges By Brad Field

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Let’s Keep a Little Optimism Here By Frank Atkins

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TMX Tanker Traffic Dwarfed by Other Salish Sea Sailings By Cody Battershill

CONTENTS COVER FEATURE

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Madame Chancellor

Calgarian Grit McCreath on her new role at the University of Saskatchewan By Melanie Darbyshire

ON OUR COVER: ABOVE: GRIT MCCREATH, CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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Calgary Chamber of Commerce The Calgary Report Current developments for Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Tourism Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, and Innovate Calgary

Marketing Matters By David Parker


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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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CONTENTS 34 COMPANY PROFILES

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Custom Electric Ltd.

Celebrates 50 Years

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L  ooking Forward to 2020 Calgary’s residential real estate outlook By Tamara Isbister

T  he Big Decision Build or buy? By John Hardy

W  orking Beyond Nine to Five How to avoid burnout By Erlynn Gococo

S  urviving Job Loss It’s personal, but it’s business By John Hardy

Alberta  Independent Schools: Serving Students, Parents and Communities With Directory

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COMPARING APPLES TO ORANGES // BRAD FIELD

Comparing Apples to Oranges BY BRAD FIELD

L

ike any other leader of a large, capital-intensive business, I spend a lot of time thinking about strategic planning, budgeting and financial stewardship in tough times. Watching Calgary city council’s budget deliberations recently has been an exercise in frustration. At the risk of comparing apples to oranges, here are two examples of knee-jerk thinking that have played out recently in our council chambers, and a suggestion of a more strategic approach to making service delivery more efficient. The apples: in March 2019, just shy of the provincial election, the City of Calgary announced Calgary had secured exclusive rights to host the X Games in Canada for a minimum threeyear run from 2020 through 2022. The former provincial government had promised $13.5 million to be combined with corporate sponsorship to fund the popular extreme winter sports competition and festival. But shortly after the provincial budget announcement in October, the city cancelled the X Games because the provincial funding was no longer on the table – without investigating other possible investment sources or ways to make this event a reality. This is a short-sighted decision involving a relatively small amount of money. The X Games would put dollars into our businesses and our people while creating something to give Calgarians hope. Not saying the X Games would magically transport us to a time flush with cash, only that there was an opportunity in front of us for some excitement. Hope isn’t a plan, to use the cliché, but you can leverage hope to build community. A budget hole of $13.5 million over three years is insignificant in a $4-billion budget. Tourism Calgary suggested the games were set to bring over $75 million

annually in an economic boost to a struggling city. Those are strong economics where tax dollars are concerned: $13.5 million invested for a $225 million return on investment for Calgarians and an estimated 540 jobs. The oranges: in the spring of 2018, facing an office vacancy crisis, city council approved a $100-million Opportunity Investment Fund to be handed out by Calgary Economic Development to attract new or expanding companies to Calgary in emerging sectors. Surely, at a time of mass job losses and bankruptcies in Calgary’s hospitality sector and existing businesses, our focus should be on supporting the businesses that have invested in Calgary over decades, and on bird-in-the-hand opportunities like the X Games. Restructuring property tax systems is hard work, while announcing big investment funds is exciting. Today, we need more of the former and less of the latter at city hall. Here’s where operating efficiency comes in. The city pays far more than it needs to for essential services like garbage collection. City council has finally commissioned enough studies (the latest one cost $200,000) to undertake a pilot project on privatized waste collection. According to Waste Management (which has some skin in the game), the savings to taxpayers could be 15 to 40 per cent. The flashing neon points to operating efficiency as the solution, yet our city council insists on more studies, dragging its collective feet on politically difficult decisions. Our citizens deserve greater due diligence and oversight on the city’s operating budget. This isn’t the first time I’ve said it; it certainly won’t be the last. The new year is as good a time as any to get strategic about balancing our books to give Calgarians better bang for their tax bucks.

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LET’S KEEP A LITTLE OPTIMISM HERE // FRANK ATKINS

Let’s Keep a Little Optimism Here BY FRANK ATKINS

W

henever I think about what might happen to the economy in the coming year, I remember that I spent the early part of my academic career doing economic forecasting. It took me a while to learn that this is a dishonest game. You can forecast pretty much whatever you would like by fiddling with the underlying parameters of the model you are using. This is why I have always been skeptical about climate doom-and-gloom predictions. No model will consistently accurately predict what is going to happen even two years from now. With this warning in mind, what can we expect to happen to the economy in 2020? The best way to sum this up is that it does not give me a warm fuzzy feeling. As always, the major problems with the Alberta economy come from the poor performance of the oil and gas sector. The world price of oil is only part of the problem. The major problem is the federal government and some provincial governments. The Trudeau government seems content to stumble from one economic bad decision to another, and I do not see any end in sight for this behaviour. There are major ramifications from the fumbling of the TMX file, combined with the blind adherence to some sort of climate crisis thinking. This is causing investment dollars to go elsewhere, mainly to the United States where, in spite of what you may think about Mr. Trump, there is a much more pro-business and pro-oil atmosphere. This does not bode well for the oilpatch in 2020. Further, it may quite possibly be true that Bill C-69 will actually become the “kill the pipeline bill” as some have feared. If this turns out to be true, this is bad news for Alberta. In terms of other provincial governments, Quebec and British Columbia will continue to oppose pipelines in general and the TMX in particular.

QUEBEC, BEING THE CHIEF BENEFICIARY OF THE STATUS QUO, WILL VEHEMENTLY OPPOSE ANY CHANGE. IT CONTINUALLY AMAZES ME THAT QUEBEC CAN PUBLICLY DEMONIZE OIL AND YET TAKE TRANSFER PAYMENTS THAT COME LARGELY FROM ALBERTA. On January 1, 2020, the federal government will still start applying its carbon tax on the purchase of fuels like gasoline, natural gas and propane in Alberta. Under the Rachel Notley dark years, Alberta had a consumer carbon tax on fuel. However, Jason Kenney cancelled it earlier this year. Now we are going to get it back again. I cannot understand how any government can think that introducing a new tax on an economy that is struggling is a good idea. Mr. Kenney is doing his best to put equalization on the federal agenda. He should be commended for this. However, I cannot help but think this will go nowhere politically. Quebec, being the chief beneficiary of the status quo, will vehemently oppose any change. It continually amazes me that Quebec can publicly demonize oil and yet take transfer payments that come largely from Alberta. In the face of all of this potential bad news, I suggest that we heed the words of Han Solo. When everything looked terrible in Return of the Jedi, Han said, “Come on, let’s keep a little optimism here.” Maybe the minority Trudeau government will fall. Frank Atkins is a Senior Fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

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TMX TANKER TRAFFIC DWARFED BY OTHER SALISH SEA SAILINGS // CODY BATTERSHILL

TMX Tanker Traffic Dwarfed by Other Salish Sea Sailings BY CODY BATTERSHILL

Y

ou’re already aware U.S.-supported anti-pipeline activists continually oppose Canadian tankers. But did you know that while these activists make Canadian tankers the fall guy in the energy debate, U.S. oil tankers constantly pass through Canadian waters unabated? Those U.S. tankers bring imported oil to Washington state and B.C. markets because those activists have blocked Canadian pipeline construction from the oilsands to our tidewater. Meanwhile, ferry, cruise ship and whale-watching traffic continues to grow and, as the National Energy Board (NEB) states, Vancouver and Victoria release “about 700 million litres of untreated and under-treated wastewater into the Salish Sea per day.” There’s a problem in our oceans – but the addition of a small number of TMX-related tankers has virtually nothing to do with it. A tiny increase in oil tankers poses almost no threat to ocean ecosystems. That’s not to say our oceans don’t need better stewardship. But activists are barking up the wrong tree. The combined population of Vancouver and Seattle – key urban centres on the Salish Sea – is expected to hit 10 million within 30 years. That dwarfs the 14 per cent more ship movements TMX would add to today’s traffic numbers for the Port of Vancouver. The key issues are population growth, overall marine transportation strategies and infrastructure management – not coastal tanker traffic. The NEB’s TMX report was clear about the challenges faced by the southern resident killer whales whose 73-member

population is struggling: “The most significant contributors to the noise pollution that negatively impacts the ability of the whales to hunt and feed,” the report stated, “are other commercial vehicles – mostly passenger ferries, tug boats, deep-sea fishing vehicles and in the summer, whalewatching boats.” In 2018, 53 ocean-going oil tankers docked at Burnaby’s Westridge Marine Terminal, representing 106 vessel trips in and out of the Salish Sea. After it’s expanded, 408 oceangoing tankers will generate 816 trips a year to and from Westridge for export crude oil. Compare these numbers with those from the B.C. Chamber of Shipping: large international cargo vessels arriving and departing BC south coast and Puget Sound ports perform about 11,000 Salish Sea trips each year, while 316,388 ferry trips supported B.C. and Washington travellers in the Salish Sea in 2017. That doesn’t even include whale watching and other commercial vessels. Marine transportation is vital to the region. But access to markets for Canadian oil and gas, a tiny fraction of the trips, is equally crucial to Canada’s prosperity in a growing global market. Canada ranks at the top of global energy suppliers in terms of environment, health, safety and human rights, with stateof-the-art pipeline, tanker and tug technologies. We’re the ideal global supplier. Let’s not miss our opportunity.

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

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Tech West Collective: Putting Alberta Tech on the Map

On September 13, 2019, a team of tech enthusiasts met at the Showpass head office to explore ways to bring the tech community together, while simultaneously growing the talent pool in Alberta. Within two-and-a-half months, AltaML, Avanti Software, ATB Financial, Benevity, Kudos, Showpass and Replicon created the Tech West Collective (TWC), while funding, launching and producing their first event – the Fall 2019 Expo. “We’re proud to have been the catalyst in bringing the tech community together. The energy in that room, and the resiliency of the brilliant people who walked through the doors, is what our companies are built on,” comments Lucas McCarthy, CEO of Showpass. The event attracted over 1,000 people on November 30, where tech companies actively recruited, shared and demoed their company’s products. Of the attendees surveyed, 70 per cent felt the event accomplished what they were looking for: job opportunities, career advice and the ability to network in the industry. In turn, the companies received a surge in applications the days following. “The day of the event, we added a number of people into our hiring funnel while by the day after, we’d received the largest number of online applications in the history of our company,” sstates Lucas Scheer, managing director of AltaML. As the tech industry needs people with a variety of skills, the event staged an innovation alley alongside a number of breakout networking areas such as marketing, client success, and development and sales. The setup was informal, encouraging people (team members included) to build relationships and experience the passion in technology.

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“Beyond the opportunity to meet candidates face to face, we all enjoyed meeting the people from this collective of strong, innovative companies in the Calgary community,” says Jane Whitton, director of culture strategy at Kudos. Enrique Tognalli, VP of web applications engineering at Replicon, echoes those sentiments. “Getting together with some of the biggest software companies in Calgary to organize this event was a great way to collaborate and make sure the right talent attended and engaged with us. We had many conversations with very talented people in different areas.” From the survey feedback, it’s evident Albertans want bridge conversations between team members and jobseekers, while also building opportunities to hear from tech company speakers, participate in give-back opportunities and network.

“TWC’s Expo brought together high-potential candidates with exciting high-growth tech companies. I couldn’t be more excited to see and participate in grassroots initiatives like this one incubating the technology sector,” says Anusha Srijeyanathan, VP of client success at Benevity. With the goal of bringing awareness to Alberta’s thriving tech scene, TWC looks to expand the network of companies and launch more activities in 2020 to grow talent within Alberta’s borders and attract people to the province. “Intrinsically, people know tech is one key way to diversify. They’re keen to get involved and are proud of the success of our tech community, and it’s our intention to build TWC into the centre to share that message,” says Kelly Thompson, VP, marketing of Avanti Software. For more information, visit www.techwestcollective.ca.

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Positive Momentum Canadian Natural Resources boosts Alberta investment It’s encouraging and positive good news for Alberta’s recovery! A $250-million boost of the capital budget, adding some 60 drilling locations and putting three additional drilling rigs to work creating 1,000 more full-time equivalent jobs. It’s a welcomed way to start 2020 for Canadian Natural Resources, the respected oil and gas producer operating in Western Canada as well as in the U.K. North Sea and offshore Africa. “We continue delivering sustainable growth through our blend of large resource assets,” says Canadian Natural spokesperson Julie Woo. “The recent changes in market access will result in additional investment, jobs and longterm value for our shareholders.” The contentious battle to get Alberta oil to market has taken its toll. Although the stats are undisputable – Canada holds the world’s third-largest crude reserves, primarily in northern Alberta’s oilsands – the controversies and delays in building new export pipelines (mostly due to environmental opposition and regulatory hurdles) have slowed development of Canada’s – and particularly Alberta’s – energy sector. At the start of 2019, Alberta introduced mandatory production curbs to reduce a glut of oil in storage and lift prices, while it continued to hold broader curtailments in place to maintain production at levels not exceeding export pipeline capacity. This past November, the provincial government tackled the pipeline congestion that stranded crude in Alberta storage tanks and widened the discount on Canadian oil versus U.S. crude to record levels. Alberta’s recent announcement that the drilling of new conventional oil wells would not be subject to government production limits is also paying off, helping the recovery and boosting Alberta’s economy. It has also allowed companies to produce barrels at set levels, as long as that output moves by rail.

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“Canadian Natural will spend $4.05 billion this year, about $250 million more than last year,” Woo says. “Canadian Natural’s large, balanced and diverse asset base is complemented by an extensive network of owned and operated infrastructure. It is supported by a deep inventory of long-life low-decline assets and conventional and unconventional assets.” The company also says it expects free cash flow of about $4.8 billion in 2020, and plans to spend about $2.4 billion to buy back shares. “Canadian Natural is focused on enhanced margin growth and high return on capital projects that can deliver leading free cash flow with production and value growth opportunities.” Canadian Natural expects 2020 production of 1.14 million to 1.21 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (BOE/D), higher than the 1.09 million to 1.15 million BOE/D estimates for 2019. “The 2020 production could have been higher by 10,000 barrels per day to 25,000 BPD, if not for Alberta’s mandatory curbs.” Like many oil and gas sector experts, she agrees about unpredictable speed bumps ahead. “Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) natural gas demand is growing, supply is decreasing in the near term and production is currently constrained by takeaway capacity.” Woo is cautiously optimistic about a turnaround in the future and adds oil market access is expected to improve in early 2020. “Pipeline optimizations and expansions, rail and the North West Refinery are anticipated to provide additional market access in the short term. Enbridge Line 3, Trans Mountain expansion project TMX and Keystone XL pipelines will provide incremental export capacity and new markets in future years.”


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2019 NCC Summit First Nations support oil and gas

“WE ARE TIRED OF ACTIVISTS AND POLITICIANS SPEAKING ON OUR BEHALF AND AGAINST OUR INTERESTS,” HE

energy and natural resource projects that can help address the economic needs of our people.

Setting the record straight was a key focus of the 2019 National Coalition of Chiefs (NCC) Energy and Natural Resource Summit held in Calgary in November.

“We are tired of activists and politicians speaking on our behalf and against our interests,” he emphasizes. “Indigenous peoples have economic rights too.”

“We want to create a strong and united community of First Nations and Métis leaders to be able to speak out in favour of economic development,” NCC president Dale Swampy of the Samson Cree Nation explains with enthusiasm and positivity. “To speak out in favour of projects that will help us address poverty. The majority of First Nations in this country are in favour of responsible resource development. We need jobs, own-source revenues and business opportunities to get out of poverty.

There was much frank, open and constructive discussion and opinion sharing at the summit, when more than 80 chiefs from across Canada, several hundred Canadian natural resource industry representatives and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney met in Calgary. They were there to network and discuss the common understanding between chiefs seeking to develop their natural resources and generate economic development and the industry leaders interested in indigenous engagement and partnership in their projects.

“We want to show that it’s OK, and it’s necessary, for us to become partners and owners in the resource development industry,” he adds. “The more First Nations can work directly with industry, as equals, the better.”

The summit speakers and info sessions underscored that most of the social issues that plague First Nations have poverty at their root. There was discussion and agreement about revenue-generating opportunities for First Nations to make a dent in community poverty and that oil and gas production and transmission provides a real solution.

Swampy is open and candid about facts and details sometimes getting confused in controversy. “Many NGOs and environmentalists are using indigenous peoples to further their own agendas, for example, by using First Nations’ right to take companies or governments to court, hold up or cancel projects. And while it’s everyone’s right to fight for what they believe in, I think it’s predatory for these groups to go into communities struggling with poverty, and use them to remove one of their best chances at creating jobs and community revenues. It’s unethical. “The National Coalition of Chiefs was created to provide a strong and united voice for indigenous leaders who support

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EMPHASIZES. “INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

There’s no doubt about it: Canadian oil and gas development is often a controversial topic. One of the problems with controversies is that they are sometimes misrepresented and misunderstood. And one of the most notoriously misrepresented and clichéd controversies is the position of indigenous peoples regarding oil and gas development.

JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

HAVE ECONOMIC RIGHTS TOO.”

A key result of the summit was the launch of Indigenous Strong, the first organization of its kind comprised solely of indigenous workers committed to supporting Canada’s oil and gas industry through public rallies and social media. “In addition to facilitating a community of indigenous workers, Indigenous Strong will share and promote employment opportunities, business contracts and partnerships in the oil and gas industry to its members,” the NCC president points out. “And it will help recruit and retain more First Nations and Métis people in the workforce.”


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LOOKING FORWARD TO 2020 // REAL ESTATE

LOOKING FORWARD TO 2020 BY TAMARA ISBISTER

CALGARY’S RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE OUTLOOK

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LOOKING FORWARD TO 2020 // REAL ESTATE

H

eading into a new decade, top of mind for many Calgarians is concern over the value of what is likely their largest investment: their home. During these uncertain times, what can be expected from the residential real estate market? Should those needing to sell hold off, hoping for improved conditions? Should buyers take haste and make the most of lower prices and a glut of inventory? With more questions than answers, Business In Calgary asked the experts to shed some light. Terms such as “modest improvements,” “stability” and even “recovery” have been used to describe what is likely in store this coming year. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s (CMHC) Housing Market Outlook is conservative, yet optimistic, highlighting some of the driving factors contributing to the housing market recovery. According to the report,

TERMS SUCH AS “MODEST IMPROVEMENTS,” “STABILITY” AND EVEN “RECOVERY” HAVE BEEN USED TO DESCRIBE WHAT IS LIKELY IN STORE THIS COMING YEAR. housing activity is expected to slow in 2019 with modest improvements in 2020 and 2021. Taylor Pardy, senior analyst of economics at CMHC, credits stronger net migration, growth in the service sector and general improvements to employment rates as reasons to be optimistic. “Population growth is going to contribute to housing demand over the next two years,” says Pardy.

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LOOKING FORWARD TO 2020 // REAL ESTATE

“I DO THINK 2020 IS GOING TO BE A GOOD YEAR,” SAYS TALERICO. “I THINK THAT WE WILL KEEP GOING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION, WHERE WE ARE GOING TO HAVE SUPPLY DROP OFF, WE’RE GOING TO SEE SALES INCREASE, AND THE MARKET WILL BECOME TIGHTER. THE FIRST HALF OF THE YEAR WILL BE WHAT WE NORMALLY SEE, A GOOD MARKET BETWEEN FEBRUARY AND JUNE.” “Employment overall as of September 2019 was up 6.5 per cent relative to the previous year, which is pretty strong, and the unemployment rate has been trending downwards. Ultimately, these are the factors that will benefit Calgary in the next few years.” As for new homes, Pardy predicts high inventory levels being drawn down over time.

“Calgary has been used to seeing boom-and-bust cycles in our housing market,” Lurie explains. “This has been driven by the sometimes strong growth occurring in the energy sector resulting in a tight labour market flowing into all aspects of the market including housing.

According to the Housing Market Outlook report, “Housing starts are projected to decline before posting a moderate recovery as market fundamentals improve in 2020-21. Stronger demand in the resale market will support an increase in sales, while house prices will stabilize in 2019 before seeing modest increases over the next two years.”

“The changes in the energy sector have forced many Albertans to accept that the next boom is not occurring any time soon,” she continues. “The pace of home-price growth will also change, and the time it will take for prices to stabilize – then start on the path to recovery – may take much longer than previous cycles. The growth dynamics may shift to conditions that are similar to many other Canadian cities.”

Ann-Marie Lurie, chief economist with the Calgary Real Estate Board (CREB), says recovery is a matter of perspective, and stability may be a better term to describe what is in store. Calgarians have become accustomed to steady price increases but the current market may be the new normal, showing similarities to many other Canadian cities.

Signs of improvement are not consistent and are dependent on product type and price range, but in the short term, the market under $500,000 is expected to become balanced. “However, at the higher end of the market, the amount of oversupply is rising, as supply cannot shift enough to compensate for the reductions in demand,” Lurie notes.

ABOVE: DOM TALERICO, MANAGER AT RE/MAX LANDAN REAL ESTATE.

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JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


Do you want to grow your business? Dom Talerico, manager at Re/Max Landan Real Estate, a brokerage of 81 real estate agents in southeast Calgary, says the worst is likely in the rear-view mirror. “Over the past six months, every month we’ve had an increase from year to year in sales and a decrease in inventory of 10-12 per cent. That’s the first sign of a recovery in my mind, because now it’s starting to show a swing going the other way.”

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Of course, all predictions are dependent on many factors, mainly a stronger oil and gas sector, leaving industry experts cautiously optimistic. Encouraging indicators include the stabilization of the energy sector, greater diversification of the economy and increased net migration. “I do think 2020 is going to be a good year,” says Talerico. “I think that we will keep going in the right direction, where we are going to have supply drop off, we’re going to see sales increase, and the market will become tighter. The first half of the year will be what we normally see, a good market between February and June. We’re in the slowest part of the market right now … but this is the time when we work on business plans and start thinking about next year; what are we going to do differently.”

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Ultimately, it is all about perspective. While the outlook is “modestly” positive and improvements will require patience, it’s a step in the right direction.

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THE BIG DECISION // REAL ESTATE

THE BIG DECISION

BUILD OR BUY?

BY JOHN HARDY

B

uying a house is one of life’s biggest decisions. For some, the really hard choice comes down to whether to build or buy.

An option for all potential homeowners, when it comes to building the perfect home there are important considerations: location; selection; affordability; finding a suitable lot; and committing the time and effort to “go to the drawing boards” while being hands on with design, changes, unforeseen surprises and construction. “The choice to build or buy depends on client wants and needs,” explains Christopher York, president of Riverview Custom Homes. “It may also depend on what’s currently available to buy that meets their needs or their available time and resources for the design and rebuild process. “Some clients have been dreaming of designing their own space and the act of building is far more than a material move. Others can’t find a suitable design or lot and they determine that a custom home will get them more of what they want and need in a home. The reality is that, if people don’t have the time or energy that it takes for the design and build process, even if sacrifices must be made, moving into a ready-to-live home is likely the best option.”

ABOVE: CHRISTOPHER YORK, PRESIDENT OF RIVERVIEW CUSTOM HOMES.

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JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


According to various key indicators, the Calgary – and Canadian – trend of opting for a “ready-to-live home” (new home or resale) is gaining momentum. “Nationally, Canada has long been recognized as a safe, good place to live with a solid political system, resources, health care and a legal system that works,” says Don Kottick, CEO of Sotheby’s International Realty Canada. “Despite the geopolitical things going on, people look for safe places to live and invest their money. And there is a lot of money moving here from Mexico, Hong Kong and many expats are coming back. Migration to several Canadian urban centres is creating a dynamic real estate market.”

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He points out that, in spite of a six per cent uptick in Calgary’s overall residential sales in August 2019, as well as easing listings supply through the summer months, when all is said and done, affordability remains a key factor. Kottick notes some specific area stats, “Calgary has had a fairly uneven economic recovery, house prices have been easing and continue to cause increased activity in the under $500,000 range, while the potential of rising inventory poses an ongoing risk to Calgary’s luxury market recovery and it continues to be a buyer’s market in the $1-million-plus market.” Recent CREB numbers and broker expertise shows that some of the most active Calgary areas are the city centre, the beltline, south Calgary,

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THE BIG DECISION // REAL ESTATE

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southeast Calgary and particularly the neighbourhoods of Highland Park, North Haven Upper, University Heights and Patterson. “City centre allows for lifestyle living with close proximity to a broad range of amenities and services that suit the urban lifestyle,” explains Mary-Ann Mears, Sotheby’s Calgary managing broker. “South and southeast Calgary is more family-oriented, close to schools and parks and recreation facilities. The southeast includes newer communities. South Calgary is comprised of established neighbourhoods that can offer larger lots and more trees.” She differentiates between the build or buy decisions. “To build, consumers need to weigh the time needed to build, trust in the builder to deliver on their expectations and wants, and financial considerations. The benefits are that they can customize as they wish, ultimately allowing them to get what they want. For buying, consumers get the convenience of a shorter possession and they see exactly what they’ll get.” The Calgary-savvy Shannon Lenstra, president of Kon-strux Developments, an innovative and respected Calgary contractor and renovation company, emphasizes a basic but vital factor about making the big decision. “Cost is a huge consideration

SMWL.COM ABOVE: DON KOTTICK, CEO OF SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY CANADA.

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THE BIG DECISION // REAL ESTATE

“THE CANADIAN REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION (CREA) PROJECTS A FIVE PER CENT INCREASE IN MARKET ACTIVITY AND, EVEN THOUGH GLOBAL UNCERTAINTY WILL CONTINUE, CANADA WILL CONTINUE ITS SOLID REPUTATION AND NOT ONLY ADDRESS AFFORDABILITY BUT SUPPLY. BY NEXT YEAR, THE CALGARY MOMENTUM WILL GROW.” ~ DON KOTTICK about moving, building or buying and renovating. When it comes to moving, there are Realtor fees, lawyer fees, moving costs, downtime from work to move, relocate, pack and unpack, and any renovations the person wants to do. “Aside from costs, location, location, location matters. People move or stay in a house to be in that particular area, near their families, friends, amenities and schools,” she says. “Ultimately, it’s completely up to the shape or condition of the house, the customer’s budget and the scope of work which they want to achieve.”

(CREA) projects a five per cent increase in market activity and, even though global uncertainty will continue, Canada will continue its solid reputation and not only address affordability but supply. By next year, the Calgary momentum will grow.”

“Build or buy, the market has definitely changed. The renovation market has gone up, but people are still building. Both Calgary markets are still recovering from the downturn. They are hesitant and more cautious right now,” Lenstra adds. “They are waiting for the oil and gas prices to go up [and] the impact of new government policies to change to improve public perception.” Kottick cites numbers and trends from Sotheby’s 2019 Top-Tier Real Estate Report and shares cautious optimism. “The Canadian Real Estate Association

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MADAME CHANCELLOR // COVER

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MADAME CHANCELLOR // COVER

MADAME CHANCELLOR

CALGARIAN GRIT MCCREATH ON HER NEW ROLE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

A

s she sits to have her picture taken, Grit McCreath radiates an infectious, down-to-earth good humour capable of setting anyone at ease. A bright smile and sparkling eyes, McCreath, who has just been installed as the 16th chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan (USask), cracks jokes, talks about her grandsons and notes all the fanfare is quite foreign to her. “I think this is my second photo shoot,” she admits with a laugh. “Can you make me look 50?” While the pomp and circumstance associated with the new job might take some getting used to, 71-year-old McCreath – a self-described off-the-charts extrovert – is perfectly suited as chancellor. Indeed, it’s as if she’s been preparing for it all her life. “I never would have dreamt that this was going to happen,” she reveals. “But then looking back, it almost seems like I’ve been gearing up for it all along – like a culmination of my career.” A teacher for over 30 years, McCreath has deep roots in Saskatchewan, where her immigrant parents (her father was a Russian Mennonite and her mother was German) landed in 1949, when she was just a baby. Educated and taught at the post-secondary level in their home countries, both her parents ended up as students at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. “They got credit for one year of university beyond Grade 12,” McCreath says, “so, they had to continue their studies. We

[McCreath had three brothers] grew up near the university. My parents were always students and I replicated that in some ways because I’ve always been a student.” She loved school and knew from a young age that she wanted to teach. “I just gunned for it,” she recalls enthusiastically. “I got to university and couldn’t wait to get into the classroom.” During her first year teaching – one of only a few new hires in the province that year – McCreath met fellow University of Saskatchewan graduate Scott, who she has now been married to for the past 50 years. The drought of jobs in Saskatchewan, however, forced the young couple east. In Toronto, McCreath obtained a new teaching job, as she did when the couple eventually moved to Edmonton (where they had two sons) and then to Calgary in 1988. She’s taught almost every subject and grade, and eventually moved into the administration side while working at the Calgary Board of Education (CBE). “I worked at 10 schools in my career,” she marvels. “Many high-needs schools with poverty, language and some gang issues. And it was just amazing to see the difference education makes in the lives of kids who don’t have the resources.” She remains close to many of her previous students, some of whom attended her installation as chancellor, including current Saskatchewan deputy premier and Minister of Education Gordon Wyant, Q.C. “I went to an event for him just 10 days ago and he stands up to introduce his family and

LEFT: GRIT MCCREATH, CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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MADAME CHANCELLOR // COVER

then says, ‘And I’d also like to introduce Miss Hildebrandt, my teacher from Grosvenor Park Elementary School,’” she laughs. “And there I was!” Upon retirement from teaching 18 years ago, McCreath became more involved with her alma matter. She joined the university senate as a member-at-large in 2006, remaining in that role until she was elected as the senate representative on the board of governors in 2009. She sat on the board for six years until 2015, when she was named as the university’s first honorary ambassador. “It was a great role,” she says, “I visited alumni associations across the country and in the U.S., and hosted many alumni events.” The University of Saskatchewan has 159,000 alumni worldwide. It’s a fitting job for Calgary-based McCreath, considering this city has the largest number of alumni – over 10,000 – outside Saskatchewan.

“Back in the day, the economy was booming here, but not so much in Saskatchewan,” McCreath says. “So, a lot of people came out here, including Scott and me. It’s a story of people putting down roots. We often joke about it being Little Saskatchewan here; there’s a strong sense of community.” Among those alumni are business owners, executives, provincial judges and lawyers, engineers, doctors, authors, philanthropists and, of course, many teachers. “I used to do some interviewing for the CBE,” she reminisces with a chuckle, “and there was a joke that if you had a degree from the University of Saskatchewan you might have a leg-up if McCreath was interviewing you.”

ABOVE: UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN CHANCELLOR GRIT MCCREATH AT HER INSTALLATION AS CHANCELLOR. LEFT TO RIGHT: DEAN PETA BONHAM-SMITH, SASKATCHEWAN LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR RUSS MIRASTY, CHANCELLOR GRIT MCCREATH, UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT PETER STOICHEFF, HONOURABLE DON MORGAN, MINISTER OF JUSTICE & ATTORNEY GENERAL, PROVOST TONY VANNELLI, ELDER ROLAND DUQUETTE, VP INDIGENOUS ENGAGEMENT JACQUELINE OTTMANN. PHOTO SOURCE: DAVID STOBBE OF STOBBEPHOTO

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MADAME CHANCELLOR // COVER

Many Calgary alumni offspring – including one of McCreath’s own sons – have attended the university as well, something she takes great delight in. “It’s wonderful when the students decide to go back and have a little connection to mom or dad.” Among her own extended family, there are a total of 23 degrees from USask. “And you never know, one of my four little grandsons might end up there too.” As chancellor, McCreath will continue to advocate energetically on behalf of the university, which today has more than 25,700 students from 132 countries. “Our Global Institute for Water Security is the top water resources research institute in Canada and one of the most advanced cold regions hydrology centres in the world,” she says proudly. “Our public administration, veterinary sciences, environmental sciences and engineering, and agricultural sciences all rank very high as well.” She’s thrilled to be working with USask president Peter Stoicheff, as well as the “gifted faculty and leadership team,

and will continue to foster the close ties between Calgary and the university, noting the commute is negligible. “I don’t have kids at home anymore and I don’t know how to knit, so I’m not staying home to do that.” Apart from her work at USask, McCreath and her husband are philanthropists who support charities in education, the arts, the environment and homelessness. “The university has been our focus for a long time,” she says. “Students really are number one for us. Scott is the executive-in-residence at the Edwards School of Business at the U of S. We also support the arts. The Remai Modern art gallery in Saskatoon certainly is a passion of ours.” They have also both sat on the Waskesiu Foundation in Prince Albert National Park, where the family has had a cottage on the lake for years. In Alberta, she sits on the board of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in Banff, has been an integral member of the RESOLVE Campaign to end homelessness in Calgary and has been involved with the YWCA, having chaired the ABOVE: UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN CHANCELLOR GRIT MCCREATH WITH A USASK STUDENT TY ARCHER, BCOMM ‘18. PHOTO SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

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MADAME CHANCELLOR // COVER

A STRONG CALGARY NETWORK OF UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN ALUMNI BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

Calgary board in the past. She was also heavily involved with the Famous 5 Foundation. For her significant contributions to Saskatchewan, McCreath was awarded the Order of Merit in 2019, both a proud and humbling moment in her life. “I’ve spent a lot of my life realizing that we get here on the shoulders of so many people,” she reflects. “So, there is a debt of gratitude that runs deep in our family. We take the opportunity to give back.” She also keeps a grateful journal. “To live in this country, at this time, we’ve won the lottery.” Gratitude and optimism are a constant theme in McCreath’s approach to life. In her first convocation address in November, she offered three pieces of advice to the new graduands: “Be positive, the world belongs to the optimist; plan your life; and don’t forget your roots.” Living proof of her advice, McCreath embarks on this next chapter full of energy, enthusiasm and anticipation. “I’m unbelievably proud,” she humbly admits. “I have an overwhelming sense of pride and I just want to do my best.”

O

f the over 159,000 University of Saskatchewan alumni worldwide, a sizable chunk – over 10,000 – are in Calgary. For various reasons including geographic proximity, a previously robust Alberta economy and cultural and familial ties, many University of Saskatchewan graduates now call Calgary home. Gordon Rawlinson graduated with a bachelor of commerce with distinction in 1968. The CEO of Rawlco Radio – with seven radio stations in Saskatchewan and Alberta – recalls his years at the university fondly. “I loved it,” he says of his university years before coming to Calgary in 1982 after the CRTC granted him a licence for a radio station. “And I’ve been living here ever since. Our two provinces have similar approaches to life and government. The people are hard workers, sensible and solid. I’m proud to say I’m from Saskatchewan and Alberta. I’m a big supporter of the West.” With a number of old university friends living in Calgary today too, Rawlinson’s involvement with his alma matter is informal. “I attend events from time to time,” he says, “and I think it’s great how they keep the people together.” Myron Stadnyk, president and CEO of ARC Resources, graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 1985 with a mechanical engineering degree. When not studying (“engineering was a grind”), he enjoyed intramural sports, living in residence and attending the Mendel Art Gallery to see something green in the winter. He made his way to Calgary after graduation for a job with Shell. “I keep track of the University of Saskatchewan group,” says Stadnyk, who organized a 20th reunion for his classmates located in Calgary. “There are many business leaders in Alberta from Saskatchewan and we have strong connections.” He and his wife Jennifer (BEd ’86) have passed on the Saskatchewan and Alberta values of community, work ethic and transparency to their children, some of whom have also attended the U of S. Shauna Curry, CEO of the Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, graduated with an engineering degree in 1994. She followed this up with one year of commerce while president of the University of Saskatchewan Student’s Union. “The campus is beautiful,” she says proudly. “I have particularly strong memories of activities in and around the Bowl – walking through it between classes, playing grass volleyball, events, having lunch or hanging out.” Other highlights included playing intramural sports of all types and the people. “I felt very supported throughout my time at the university. Professors, the dean of engineering, the president and staff had open doors and were ready to help.” Calgary was a logical place for Curry to land given its proximity to the mountains and Saskatchewan. She was also inspired by the sense of community. “My personal connection is strong between the two provinces,” she says. “I attribute my commitment to making a difference in my community and the world, my ‘can-do’ attitude and entrepreneurial spirit to both my Saskatchewan roots and Alberta influences.”

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2020

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WORKING BEYOND NINE TO FIVE // CORPORATE HEALTH, WELLNESS & REJUVENATION

WORKING BEYOND Nine to Five

HOW TO AVOID BURNOUT

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BY ERLYNN GOCOCO

I

n a world ruled by smartphones, tablets and tech devices, how do employees learn to “turn it off” in order to find adequate work/life balance, and more importantly, sleep? According to Statistics Canada, lack of sleep is sadly common amongst Canadians, due to living in a 24-7 world that never seems to unplug. A 2005 General Social Survey of respondents 15 years of age and older highlighted that men slept fewer hours per night than women (8.1 hours versus 8.3 hours). However, the survey also revealed that women were more likely to have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep (35 per cent versus 25 per cent).


WORKING BEYOND NINE TO FIVE // CORPORATE HEALTH, WELLNESS & REJUVENATION

“EMPLOYERS SHOULD INCLUDE MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION IN THEIR POLICIES AND/OR MISSION, VISION AND VALUES,” SAY DZENICK AND KOLODYCHUK.

Unfortunately, insufficient sleep can have dire consequences and has been linked to a slew of adverse health issues including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, anxiety, depression and overall well-being. Given that today’s employees have 24-hour access to information and work, the risk of worker burnout has increased exponentially. Back in the day, employees would “clock out” and go home to be with their families. Now, employees “clock out” and go home to do more work – simply because they can. Employers have a responsibility to ensure employees have a work/life balance – and should encourage them to leave work at the office and “unplug” when possible. HR administrator Zoe Dzenick and consulting services manager/senior consultant Sharon Kolodychuk of Salopek & Associates Ltd. explain that employers can help employees avoid worker burnout by simply being aware of the signs and addressing them immediately. “Employers should include mental health promotion in their policies and/or mission, vision and values,” say Dzenick and Kolodychuk. “If employers care about the overall mental health and well-being of their staff, they need to ensure that they are

not only providing the mechanisms and means for them to decompress from work situations, but that they are also actively involved in self-care.” Eleanor Culver, president of REAL HR Inc., says, “The lines are blurred between work and personal activities. People take their work home and their personal life to work, in the form of a laptop and/or cellphone. Successful workplaces co-create the expectations around when work takes priority and when personal matters take priority, with the understanding that sometimes one pops into the other.” She echoes the idea that it was much easier to separate work from personal activities “back in the day, because your computer and phone were attached to your desk, which sat in a brick-and-mortar building.” The fact that it’s so easy to stay connected to work at all times only means that employees are putting their physical and mental health at risk. Dr. Jerome Alonso, medical director of Calgary-based Canadian Sleep Consultants, says the common symptoms of lack of sleep include, but are not limited to, irritability and low mood, difficulties with memory and concentration, and daytime fatigue and sleepiness. “This can lead to increased work-related errors,

ABOVE: ZOE DZENICK, HR ADMINISTRATOR, SALOPEK & ASSOCIATES LTD.

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WORKING BEYOND NINE TO FIVE // CORPORATE HEALTH, WELLNESS & REJUVENATION

ON THE MENTAL HEALTH SIDE, DR. SAMUELS SAYS THOSE WHO SUFFER FROM ANXIETY AND/OR DEPRESSION WILL HAVE A HARDER TIME IMPROVING THEIR CONDITION IF THEY HAVE POOR SLEEP PATTERNS.

risk of motor-vehicle accidents and overall reduced quality of life,” explains Dr. Alonso. Dr. Charles Samuels, medical director at Centre for Sleep & Human Performance and clinical assistant professor at the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary, further explains the consequences of impaired sleep. “When workers are continuously connected either to work or personal technology use like social media, this not only intrudes into sleep time but it also affects the quality of sleep that an individual gets. When we reduce the amount of sleep and/or impair the quality of sleep, there are physical, mental, cognitive and emotional consequences. Concentration, memory and mood are negatively affected by poor quality and inadequate sleep.” On the mental health side, Dr. Samuels says those who suffer from anxiety and/or depression will have a harder time improving their condition if they have poor sleep patterns. On the flip side, those who have poor sleep patterns are at risk of developing anxiety and/or depression, over time. He goes on to say that chronic pain also can be much harder to treat in patients with sleep disorders.

“Appetite is also affected and we tend to crave high-calorie dense foods and this predisposes us to weight gain and poor weight control,” adds Dr. Samuels. “People will become irritable, sleepy and fatigued. They will tend to be more reliant on coffee and eat high-carbohydrate and high-fat foods as a result of the fatigue. The average worker will become progressively and persistently more fatigued and this will affect their energy levels and their motivation to engage in social activities or to get active and do some exercise.” In the workplace, employers can promote work/life balance by leading by example and creating realistic expectations and timelines for employees – a practicewhat-you-preach approach. Dzenick and Kolodychuk warn, “If employers push their employees beyond their capacities, they will likely see higher turnover rates, higher risk of mistakes in work and decreased overall quality of work. As well, putting unreasonable amounts of pressure on employees creates a toxic work culture and workplace conflict.” If employers really want to avoid worker burnout, Dzenick and Kolodychuk advise adopting an open-door policy and offering

ABOVE: DR. CHARLES SAMUELS, MEDICAL DIRECTOR, CENTRE FOR SLEEP & HUMAN PERFORMANCE.

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WORKING BEYOND NINE TO FIVE // CORPORATE HEALTH, WELLNESS & REJUVENATION

DR. ALONSO RECOMMENDS HAVING PROPER SLEEP HYGIENE, WHICH IS ACHIEVED BY ESTABLISHING A CONSISTENT BEDTIME AND WAKE-UP TIME, HAVING A COMFORTABLE AND QUIET SLEEP ENVIRONMENT, PREPARING FOR SLEEP WITH A PROPER WIND DOWN AND AVOIDING STIMULATING SUBSTANCES SUCH AS CAFFEINE AND TOBACCO CLOSE TO BEDTIME.

support to employees from upper management. “Touch-point meetings with employees to find out how they’re doing and what currently excites them is also helpful.” Dr. Alonso recommends having proper sleep hygiene, which is achieved by establishing a consistent bedtime and wake-up time, having a comfortable and quiet sleep environment, preparing for sleep with a proper wind down and avoiding stimulating substances such as caffeine and tobacco close to bedtime. He also suggests incorporating regular exercise, which has been proven to promote more regular sleep patterns. Dr. Samuels echoes that advice, “It’s important to recognize that sleep is important to health, first and foremost. People need to make sleep a priority then they need to figure out how much sleep per night they need to be fully rested, not how much they can get away with. Most adults need 7.5 to eight hours of sleep per day to be fully rested and function well without consequences.

“Once you figure out how much sleep you need then you have to have a strategy for maintaining a routine with a stable bedtime and wake time every day. Some people will sleep in on the weekend to “catch up” which is quite reasonable. It’s also important to put limits on screen time and make sure to have one to two hours to relax and avoid technology prior to going to bed. If you have done all of these things and your sleep is still bad then going to the pharmacy and getting a sleeping pill or using cannabis products is a very bad idea. You should seek help from your primary care provider and get proper medical advice. The use of over-the-counter medication for sleep is an indication that you need to get a professional opinion about your sleep problems,” cautions Dr. Samuels. On the work front, employers who create positive work environments that promote work/life balance and reasonable expectations will be more successful in avoiding worker burnout. “Find ways to focus on happiness and to have a little fun at work – laughter goes a long way,” says Dzenick.

ABOVE: DR. JEROME ALONSO, MEDICAL DIRECTOR, CANADIAN SLEEP CONSULTANTS.

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SURVIVING JOB LOSS // FINANCIAL PLANNING

SURVIVING JOB LOSS It’s personal, but it’s business

BY JOHN HARDY

S

udden job loss brings on a tsunami of broadsides. It is emotional, it is personal and in terms of juggling crunched finances, it is also business.

There is a consensus among health professionals that job loss, particularly sudden job loss, ranks among the highest life stressors, along with a death in the family, divorce and serious illness. Tied into the package is denial, anger, frustration, depression and grief.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2020

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NEW FAMILY PROPERTY ACT

IMPACTS COUPLES

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ore people are choosing to live together and share their lives without getting married, and in turn family law in Alberta has finally caught up to this trend. Effective January 1, 2020, the Matrimonial Property Act (the “MPA”) will be replaced with the Family Property Act (the “FPA”). “This legislative change is going to be a significant shift in the realm of family law,” says Kathleen Wells, lawyer and founder of Wells Family Law. The FPA will apply to both married and non-married couples, but with respect to non-married couples it will only apply to those who are considered adult interdependent partners (“AIP’s”). To be considered an AIP, one must establish an “adult interdependent relationship” (“AIR”) as defined by the Adult Interdependent Relationships Act (the “AIRA”). Prior to January 1, 2020, Alberta legislation offered no protection for people who chose not to marry, and instead common law couples were left with the uncertainty of having to rely on the common law principles. The previous MPA did not give common law couples any presumptive rights with respect to property,

by Rennay Craats

regardless of the duration of the relationship. There were no hard and fast rules that clearly laid out what each party’s respective entitlements may be, and the party claiming an interest in the other’s property would have to make efforts to quantify the value of their contributions to that property. The result was often an unpredictable division of assets, not to mention costly legal fees for the separated couple. In comparison, the new FPA considers whether the couple achieved AIP status and was in an AIR, but identifying what constitutes AIP status is more problematic than one may assume. As per the AIRA, becoming an AIP does not simply happen the day a couple begins cohabiting together, rather the couple must satisfy one or more of the following criteria: 1. The parties have lived together in a relationship of interdependence for a continuous period of at least three consecutive years; 2. The parties have lived together in a relationship of interdependence of some permanence, if there is a child of the relationship by birth or adoption; or


“THE BIGGEST ISSUE CONTINUES TO BE THAT MANY PEOPLE ARE NOT AWARE OF THE FPA, AND WHILE MANY LAWYERS HAVE REPORTED AN INCREASE WITH RESPECT TO COHABITATION AGREEMENTS AND LEGAL SEPARATIONS TOWARDS THE END OF 2019, MANY PEOPLE WILL INEVITABLY BE LEFT SCRAMBLING TO ADAPT TO THE LEGISLATION,” SAYS WELLS.

3. The parties have entered into an adult interdependent agreement to document their intentions to enter into an adult interdependent relationship. The Alberta Law Reform Institute cautions that couples may tend to evolve into a relationship of interdependence rather than acknowledging when or how AIP status was achieved. To clarify, “You have to be sharing each other’s lives and have a relationship of interdependence and reliance,” says Wells. With respect to this legislative change, an example of how this will reflect a significant shift in property division is simply determining the date on which property becomes divisible. Under the MPA dividing property for a separating couple was determined by the date of marriage, but under the FPA it states that if a couple was considered to be in an AIR prior to marriage, the parties are now able to go back to the date the AIR was established when claiming any proprietary interests with respect to property. “The biggest issue continues to be that many people are not aware of the FPA, and while many lawyers have reported an increase with respect to cohabitation agreements and legal separations towards the end of 2019, many people will inevitably be left scrambling to adapt to the legislation,” says Wells. The best way for couples to avoid litigation and to protect assets is by drafting and executing a cohabitation and/or premarital agreement. Such agreements clearly structure the division of

property, and additional issues such as spousal support may also be addressed. Wells concedes that it can be awkward to sit down and frankly discuss finances, property and what each party’s intent may be if a separation is to occur, however, planning for the worst is the best way to avoid misunderstandings and costs later on. Wells further recommends that couples who are contemplating marriage and/or are becoming AIPs should have their lawyer draw up a will, enduring power of attorney and a personal directive, all of which should be immediately updated should the couples’ situation change in the future. With the changes to the legislation, Wells Family Law is there to support people by offering informative seminars and free 30-minute consultations in an effort to assist clients in navigating a cohabitation and/or premarital agreement, separation, protecting property and understanding the new FPA.


SURVIVING JOB LOSS // FINANCIAL PLANNING

“WE ALL FEEL EMPATHY WHEN A COLLEAGUE EXPERIENCES A TOUGH TRANSITION, AND IT’S OK TO FEEL THAT EMOTION,” SAYS LAURA STRICKLER.

Research indicates a significant part of a person vanishes with a job loss. As many people identify themselves by what they do for a living, when the job disappears, they can lose track of who they are – and their overall purpose in life. Despite (or compounding) the emotional roller-coaster, the shock and anger, and the private stress, there’s the reality of vital money-related facts like budgets, health insurance and dealing with some unexpected (and suddenly new) tabs of life. The money side of sudden job loss often happens with invariably lousy timing. For many suddenly-displaced Canadians, job loss comes at a critical stage in life, when people traditionally accumulate wealth. According to a 2017 report on income equality by the Fraser Institute, Canadians often earn their highest incomes and build much of their wealth from their mid-40s through to their mid-60s, allowing them to build up assets critical for retirement, a period when their income and wealth decrease. Recent Statistics Canada numbers tell the unfortunate story that, last year, approximately 850,000 Canadians were laid off. Among them, about 198,000 individuals – or 23 per cent – were between 55 and 64. “We all feel empathy when a colleague experiences a tough transition, and it’s OK to feel that emotion,” says Laura Strickler, director of human resources at ADP Canada, the global provider of cloud-based human capital management (HCM) solutions that unite HR, payroll, talent, time, tax and benefits administration expertise. “This is a difficult situation and it’s important to acknowledge the gravity of what’s happening and be compassionate. “If the person is open, it can be helpful to offer some insight into the why of the difficult decision and recognize the business impact to provide context as to what

ABOVE: LAURA STRICKLER, DIRECTOR, HUMAN RESOURCES AT ADP CANADA.

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JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


SURVIVING JOB LOSS // FINANCIAL PLANNING

“THE MAIN TIPS THAT I CAN USUALLY GIVE PEOPLE IS THAT IF YOU ARE STRUGGLING WITH DEBT, THERE ARE OPTIONS AVAILABLE,” SAYS DONNA CARSON.

is happening. However, it’s important not to lose sight of the emotions a person is feeling. We all have a heart and brain, and it’s very important to address both. “Take time to reflect and ask yourself if embarking on a new career path is viable. Outplacement services and government reskilling programs are a great place to start as they can help plan out next steps and identify new skills. Talk to other people about your job search – don’t overlook friends and family as part of your job-hunting network.” HR professionals and financial planners echo caution about hasty and impulsive personal or money decisions when mood is at an all-time low. However, the crunch consequence of a job loss causes (and often forces) people to re-evaluate their personal and household budgets. Losing a job means living with less income to pay for household expenses, which ultimately results in a need to reduce spending. The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) recommends reviewing expenses and looking for areas to cut costs, freeing up more money for priority items. FCAC also emphasizes that every budget includes needs and wants. Needs are must-haves like housing and food (rent or mortgage, utilities, groceries and debt payments). Wants are a bit more discretionary (eating at restaurants, entertainment and new clothes). “The main tips that I can usually give people is that if you are struggling with debt, there are options available,” says Donna Carson, licensed insolvency trustee and senior VP at MNP. “And the sooner that we can review the options with someone, the more choices they may have. Of course I understand it: it’s a pride thing where people sometimes don’t like to talk about their financial troubles; we like to deal with that on our own. But … sitting down with a licensed insolvency trustee (LIT) doesn’t necessarily mean they have to file anything.

ABOVE: DONNA CARSON, LICENSED INSOLVENCY TRUSTEE AND SENIOR VP AT MNP.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2020

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SURVIVING JOB LOSS // FINANCIAL PLANNING

MOST EXPERIENCED FINANCIAL PLANNERS REALIZE THERE IS A TEMPTATION TO USE RETIREMENT FUNDS DURING INCOME CRUNCHES SUCH AS A SUDDEN JOB LOSS. WHILE IT’S UNDERSTANDABLE TO DRAW ON RRSPS TO MAKE MORTGAGE, AUTO LOAN AND CREDIT CARD PAYMENTS, IN THE END IT EXACERBATES MONEY PROBLEMS. “It can be an information session to see what options are available and how they would work based on individual circumstances. Everyone’s situations are different. So, even though it is the same ‘rules’ that are followed, people have different assets, different creditors and different incomes. Getting professional advice can at least take away the fear of the unknown…. Sometimes that fear of not knowing what to do can be the biggest stress.” Sudden job loss is invariably a jolt, understandably not open to the 20/20 wisdom of hindsight. As a result, many financial planners support the need for a just-in-case emergency fund. “Strongly recommended,” MNP’s Carson says. “For job loss and irregular expenses that happen once a year. For example, property taxes, car repairs, vacation, school clothing, hockey registration, etc. The way to plan for annual expenses is to make a list of them and approximate how much they cost each year. Add them up, divide by 12 months and set aside the funds for annual expenses. Paying monthly for these expenses is a lot easier on the budget than coming up with $1,000 for school clothes and supplies all at once in August each year. “An emergency fund generally is recommended to be three to six months of your basic expenses set aside. If I was off work, can I cover the essentials for three to six months? “Retirement funds should not be the funds used for annual expenses or the emergency fund. With the recent economic downturn we’ve been living through in Alberta,” she points out, “I’m sure this has been a reality though for a lot of people. I would caution that if you are using retirement money for emergencies, it is not a fix. It’s only a Band-Aid, and likely not the right option.” Most experienced financial planners realize there is a temptation to use retirement funds during income crunches such as a sudden job loss. While it’s understandable to draw on RRSPs to make mortgage, auto loan and credit card payments, in the end it exacerbates money problems. Withdrawals for needed items today can have long-term effects, reducing available cash flow in old age by tens of thousands of dollars while adding near-term income tax penalties. Most people generally lose their job after earning income for a few months of the calendar year. An RRSP withdrawal in the same year may push them into a higher tax bracket, meaning they will likely face a significant tax bill the following spring. Compounding the matter is also the issue of health insurance. Most group plans cover employees only as long as they remain part of the insured group. When the job ends, so does the coverage. Experts urge checking with the benefits provider about switching over from the group plan to individual coverage for vision, prescription drugs outside a hospital, acupuncture, physiotherapists and dental services.

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SERVING STUDENTS, PARENTS AND COMMUNITIES // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

ALBERTA INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS:

SERVING STUDENTS, PARENTS AND COMMUNITIES

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hat are independent schools? Who goes to them? Why should “we” pay for them? Are they held accountable by anyone? Do they serve a public good? These are only a few of the questions surrounding the topic of school choice in Alberta. Independent schools, which are referred to as private schools in legislation, are schools that are independently operated by a not-for-profit corporation or society. In a 2018-19 provincial system of 727,222 students, 31,439 (approximately four per cent) attended independent (private) schools. Another 6,968 attended community-based private early childhood services sites (kindergartens) where about 75 per cent of the students have special needs. As an aggregated group, the population of students is approximately five per cent of the education system. In total, there are over 250 independent schools and ECS operators in Alberta. Parents choose to send their children to independent schools for many reasons. Some schools are operated with a special focus on students with specific learning needs. Others are built to offer a unique type of educational approach like Montessori or Waldorf. Sometimes parents choose a school

that respects and supports their child’s faith and world view (like Sikh, Jewish, Muslim or Christian), or because they desire that their child learn about their culture, or for a specific academic, athletic or other educational focus. There are those who would suggest that Albertans can’t afford to pay for educational choices such as independent schools. However, the reality is that independent schools save taxpayers millions of dollars each year. The math is quite straightforward. Every child in Alberta between the ages of six and 16 is legally mandated in the School Act to receive an education. When parents choose to place a child in a public or separate school, it costs the public purse around $13,000 in operating and capital expenses. Alberta independent schools receive only partial funding that equates to around $5,200 per year of public money. Therefore, each child that attends an independent school saves Albertans around $8,000 per year. Milke & MacPherson (2019) calculated that independent schools and home education have saved $1.9 billion over the past eight years alone. In order to be able to operate, many independent schools have to charge tuition in order to pay for the remaining costs

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2020

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SUMMIT KIDS BLAZING A TRAIL IN CHILDCARE by Rennay Craats - Photo by Riverwood Photography

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n Alberta’s uncertain economy, a business that has survived the past decade is something to celebrate, and one that has grown 700 per cent to become one of the city’s top 10 companies for growth is exceptional. Summit Kids is just that: exceptional. Since Nancy Klensch started her childcare business in 2009, it has redefined the industry in Calgary, from the quality of the programming to the dedication of the career staff to its commitment to accommodating the diverse needs of today’s families. Summit Kids has grown from 37 children the first year to its current enrolment of around 1,000 children in its daycare, before- and after-school programs and private kindergarten. Summit Kids is revolutionizing childcare and creating an environment where both children and parents can thrive. “We’re not a traditional daycare. Sure, colours and toys and play is important but we’re more than that. We’re trying to find the things that are missing in our communities today and round out these children with new experiences and new skills,” says Tyler Alton, chief operating officer and co-owner of Summit Kids. By providing an engaging, holistic, child-centric approach to childcare led by a diverse group of highly-trained and educated instructors, Summit Kids is turning the childcare industry on its ear. These programs are challenging kids from 12 months to 12 years old by connecting them to fellow Summit Kids as well as their wider community, exposing them to a huge number of activities, and encouraging them to find and pursue their passions. The private kindergarten follows the Alberta curriculum but goes far beyond what traditional schools can offer given Summit’s 10:1 ratio and the full day of dynamic learning potential available for students.


The kids across the Summit programs learn life skills like cooking and sewing on top of performing arts, photography, rock wall climbing and a wide range of unique activities that vary from location to location depending on the staff. While there is foundational programming that is consistent across all 19 locations in Calgary, Cochrane and Chestermere, the curriculum is really the people who work there. The idea is that employees introduce the things they are passionate about, whether that’s drawing or science or performing arts, and the kids get drawn into their excitement about the subject becoming inspired by them too. “Gardening, singing or knitting or whatever their passion is, we want staff to bring it in because the byproduct is a leader, teacher, mentor who is engaged and fired up and wanting to be there and sharing what means so much to them with these children. The kids feel that. They get that level of investment,” says owner Nancy Klensch. And for Summit’s founder, it has always been about investing in kids, the community and finding a better way to care for children while their parents work. Parents need childcare but Summit Kids has shifted the narrative from it being a necessary evil to being a choice to have their children in this positive, stimulating, fun environment. For many families, there has traditionally been a sense of guilt associated with childcare, but Klensch and her talented team have replaced that with one of pride; Summit families are thrilled and proud their children get to have these early learning experiences and to build foundations that will serve them in school and beyond. The programming and enriched learning found at Summit Kids is unparalleled, but what truly sets the company apart from the competition is recognizing that many jobs aren’t traditional so childcare support can’t be either. Most Summit Kids locations operate from 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. while the Riverview Daycare location is open seven days a week until 11:00 p.m. to accommodate parents working shifts or unconventional jobs. “For shift-working parents, come the weekend kids are shuffled from one place to the next. Instead, we can be that constant in their lives. We believe you raise healthy, confident children by giving them a predictable, stable environment,” says Klensch. It also gives them a sense of community. The Riverview location is one of the first to bring together the youngest and eldest members of society with a daycare facility at Bethany Care Society’s dementia care centre. It will serve to reintegrate the ages to benefit both groups. For 10 years, Summit Kids has seen the benefits, as happy, passionate, considerate children come out of its programs with the confidence to take on the outside world. “We’ve created an environment for children to thrive on their own terms,” she says. “For 10 years, we’ve been figuring out what we’re doing, and now we’re just getting started.”

summitkids.ca


SERVING STUDENTS, PARENTS AND COMMUNITIES // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

ALTHOUGH EACH INDEPENDENT SCHOOL IS OPERATED BY ITS OWN SCHOOL BOARD, ALBERTA EDUCATION ENSURES THOROUGH ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES ARE IN PLACE. EACH YEAR, THE SCHOOLS MUST SUBMIT AN AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENT; of operating the school. Tuition fees will vary considerably depending on the kind of capital investments needed for buildings, teacher/student ratios, extracurricular program activities and other program enhancements. Additionally, there are often fundraising initiatives that are run to help alleviate the cost of operating a school. Some schools also offer bursaries to assist parents in managing the tuition requirements. Parents from a broad socio-economic, cultural, religious and geographic background choose to send their children to independent schools. Although each independent school is operated by its own school board, Alberta Education ensures thorough accountability measures are in place. Each year, the schools must submit an audited financial statement; this confirms that the public dollars the school receives are appropriately spent on the educational needs of the students. Most independent schools are accredited; to maintain this accreditation they must teach a program of studies that is approved by the minister of education, and they must hire Alberta-certified teachers. There is also regular on-site monitoring by Alberta Education staff, and schools must annually submit education results reports and three-year plans. Independent schools are also incredibly accountable to their parents; as schools of choice, there must be strong alignment between the needs of the student and the program being offered, or else parents will choose to place their child in a different institution. To ensure the school is meeting the needs of the child, there is often a heightened

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JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

THIS CONFIRMS THAT THE PUBLIC DOLLARS THE SCHOOL RECEIVES ARE APPROPRIATELY SPENT ON THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF THE STUDENTS. emphasis on collaboration and parental engagement in independent schools. One of the most powerful arguments in support of independent schools is also the most basic. They serve a public good. Education, at its core, is about providing an opportunity for children to learn, grow and equip themselves to be ethical, engaged and innovative citizens. To ensure this occurs, Alberta Education surveys students, parents and teachers in all schools in Alberta each year. The results show that independent schools are successful at meeting student needs. The 2017 data indicates that independent schools are safe and caring (93.6 per cent versus provincial average of 89.5 per cent), provide excellent education quality (94.6 per cent versus 90.1 per cent), prepare students for work (93.9 per cent versus 82.7 per cent), equip students for their role as citizens (90.4 per cent versus 83.7 per cent) and promote parental involvement (90.2 per cent versus 81.2 per cent). Independent schools help educate Alberta’s students and they do so well. Their graduates become productive citizens who work together with graduates from other schools in Alberta, as well as with immigrants from all over the world, to help build a diverse, successful and inclusive society.


WONDER LIVES HERE

River Valley is an inclusive school that harnesses the innate curiosity in children to ensure that every student, regardless of age or ability will flourish academically and socially.

Pre-Junior Kindergarten to Grade 6 At River Valley School, academic success is essential, but social and character development are just as important. We offer a warm, nurturing environment where our students feel genuinely cared about and supported. This builds confidence and establishes a strong foundation for kids to explore who they are – their passions, gifts, hopes and dreams. With our Before and After School programs, River Valley offers a safe, caring environment for your child 7 AM to 6 PM (Monday to Friday) year-round, as well as a fully owned and operated bussing service.

BOOK A TOUR AT RIVERVALLEYSCHOOL.CA AND SEE WHY WE SAY WONDER LIVES HERE River Valley is accredited by Alberta Education, the Association of Independent Schools and Colleges in Alberta (AISCA) and is the only school in Alberta to offer the Arrowsmith Program for students Grade 1 - 6.


PARENTS ARE DRIVING CHOICE By Parker Grant

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lbertans know “the future is in our children.” Every child deserves access to a quality education, whether they have exceptional learning needs or not. Based on enrolment numbers, in excess of 38,000 students currently attend independent ECS operators, independent schools in Grades 1-12, or are being home educated in Alberta according to the Association of Independent Schools & Colleges in Alberta. This enrolment number continues to grow, year after year.

THIRD ACADEMY: GIVING PARENTS HOPE “Many parents contact me daily, looking for a placement for their special needs child,” says Sunil Mattu, executive director of Third Academy. “They express their deep concerns about lack of programming supports that their child needs to succeed in school, about large class sizes and long waiting lists of three years or more to get a psych ed assessment completed. Many have reached a point where they are ‘at the end of their rope.’” A passion for education runs in the family. Sunil’s father, Dr. S. Lal Mattu, founder, has a deep 50-year commitment to serving children in education and has witnessed children “falling through the cracks.” He dreamed of a school for families whose children needed something different. “Alberta has a world-class education system with many programming choices for parents to choose from,” Sunil Mattu says. “The system works because of excellent teachers who are passionate and committed in classrooms across the province.” Third Academy has been providing hope for Calgary children with special needs and their families for 23 years. Well respected within the education sector, Third Academy staff to student ratios are eight to one; psych education assessments are being completed within six weeks; psychology, speech language and occupational therapeutic services are all accessible on site; and intensive supports and individualized programming enable Third Academy’s vision of student success. “We all know someone – a brother, an aunt, a neighbour – struggling to support their child. Because, when their child is in pain, the parents are in pain,” he adds with

emotion. “Third Academy’s job is to help the family and take away the pain.” Third Academy creates a well-balanced, individualized, integrated and intensive program for each student, designed to prepare them for re-entry into their community school as quickly as possible.

WILLOW HOME ED: A RISING STAR Homeschooling is another extremely popular form of independent education. National figures show steady increases, with more than 10,000 Alberta students being homeschooled. Third Academy has built a solid foundation for Willow Home Ed, its traditional homeschool division. With over 600 registered homeschoolers for the 2019-2020 school year, Willow Home Ed has experienced phenomenal growth over the past four years. “We started small, with only two home education managers (HEMs),” explains Willow’s associate principal, Joe Smith. “This year, we have a staff of 12 HEMs serving families across Alberta, with large cohorts in both Calgary and Edmonton.” Willow’s HEMs are all Alberta-certified teachers who support parents in providing a home education program to their children. “They are more than just teachers,” Smith points out. “All of our HEMs have homeschooled some of their own children, so they have valuable first-hand experience delivering homeschooling as parents. They understand the uniqueness of each child and what it takes for them to succeed.” At Willow, the driver of the homeschool program is the parent and the educational choices are almost limitless. “Albertans are fortunate that when it comes to homeschooling, Alberta Education supports parental choice. At Willow, we can help parents tailor a program that meets all provincial requirements while providing the flexibility parents demand to further their children’s passions.” Willow Home Ed students are highly diverse. “Our students are competitive athletes, accomplished artists, successful entrepreneurs and adventurers as well as students with different abilities and everything in between. Each family has their own reason why they choose to homeschool and we’re here to support them,” Smith adds.


Joe Smith, Willow’s associate principal and Sunil Mattu, executive director of Third Academy. Photo by Courtney Lovgren.

“Willow supports families of all compositions and creeds in every community across Alberta.” Willow’s success is based on leadership and service. One example is that home education managers do at least two in-home visits per school year, to discuss and review the student’s program and progress. “It’s important for us to see homeschool families in their settings in order to develop understanding, build relationships and truly know our students,” he points out. “We are committed to ensure that support is only a phone call, text message or post away.”

lease a space in southeast Calgary) will ensure that Third Academy leaves a legacy to support Calgary and Alberta students for many years to come. “Third Academy is a federally-registered charity and we have just launched a $5-million Dream School capital campaign,” Mattu says with excitement and pride. “We have made an offer on a new school building that will eventually provide spacious classrooms, break-out rooms, labs, a full-size gym, a playground, green space, outdoor athletic facilities and much more to enhance Third Academy’s special needs education environment. Willow students will also have access to these new facilities.

Willow Home Ed: it’s “home education, your child’s way.”

THE DREAM SCHOOL Third Academy has embarked on an ambitious project, because owning a bricks-and-mortar school (they currently

“Be part of making this Dream School come true,” Mattu implores. “Whether you are ‘paying it forward,’ know someone who would benefit from the programming choices Third Academy/Willow Home Ed offers or just ‘have a heart’ for kids with special education needs, you can ‘make a difference’ today.”

403-288-5335 | INFO@THIRDACADEMY.CA 3, 510 – 77TH AVE. SE CALGARY, AB T2H 1C3 WWW.THIRDACADEMY.CA | WWW.WILLOWHOME.CA


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Airdrie Koinonia Christian School

Bright Path Early Learning Inc

Calgary French & International School

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Preschool, ECS, Grades 1 - 12 77 Gateway Drive NE Airdrie T4B 0J6 Phone: (403) 948-5100 • Fax: (403) 948-5563 connect@akcs.com www.akcs.com

Early Learning Childcare 201, 200 Rivercrest Drive SE Phone: 1-188-808-2252 kearns.dale@gmail.com www.brightpathskids.com

Accredited Preschool, Jr. K, ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 12 700 - 77 Street SW, Calgary, AB T3H 5R1 Phone: (403) 240-1500 • Fax: (403) 249-5899 www.cfis.com

Calgary Academy

Calgary Islamic Private School Akram Jomaa Campus

Akiva Academy Accredited Nursery, Pre-Kindergarten, ECS, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7- 9 140 Haddon Road SW, Calgary, AB T2V 2Y3 Phone: (403) 258-1312 • Fax: (403) 258-3812 office@akiva.ca www.akiva.ca

Alberta Chung Wah School

Calgary Academy Collegiate

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 10- 12 #270, 328 Centre Street SE, Calgary, AB T2G 4X8 Phone: (403) 271-8033 • Fax: (403) 288-8887 info@albertachungwahschool.ca

For students looking for greater challenge, change and complexity in their learning Grades 5-12 403-686-6444 admissions@calgaryacademy.com www.calgaryacademy.com/learnmore

Aurora Learning Calgary

Calgary Chinese Alliance School

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 3 – 12 Unit 137, 5305 McCall Way NE, Calgary, AB T2E 7N7 Phone: (403) 277-9535 Calgary.admin@sterling.education

Banbury Crossroads School Accredited / Eligible for Funding J/K,ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 B1 #201, 2451 Dieppe Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3E 7K1 Phone: (403) 270-7787 • Fax: (403) 270-7486 general@banburycrossroads.com www.banburycrossroads.com Offers Home Education Program Offers Home Education Blended Program

Bearspaw Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Jr. K, Sr. K, Grades 1 – 12 15001 - 69 Street NW, Calgary, AB T3R 1C5 Phone: (403) 295-2566 • Fax: (403) 275-8170 info@bearspawschool.com www.bearspawschool.com

Bethel Christian Academy Accredited ECS, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 2220 - 39 Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6P7 Phone: (403) 735-3335 • Fax: (403) 219-3059 tbetts@encountergod.org

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For students with learning difficulties Grades 2-12 1677 93 St SW, Calgary AB T3H 0R3 403-686-6444 admissions@calgaryacademy.com www.calgaryacademy.com/learnmore

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1 – 12 150 Beddington Boulevard NE, Calgary, AB T3K 2E2 Phone: (403) 274-6923 • Fax: (403) 275-7799 chineseschoolcalgarychinesealliance.org

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades K-12 2612 - 37 Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T1Y 5L2 Phone: (403) 248-2773 • Fax: (403) 569-6654 info@cislive.ca Principal: Mr. Asad Choudhary

Calgary Islamic School Accredited / Eligible for Funding K, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9 225 - 28 Street SE, Calgary, AB, T2A 5K4 Phone: 587-353-8900 • Fax: 587-353-8999 info.omar@cislive.ca Omar Bin Al-Khattab Campus

Calgary Jewish Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Nursery - Grade 9 6700 Kootenay Street SW, Calgary, AB T2V 1P7 Phone: (403) 253-3992 • Fax: (403) 255-0842 info@cja.ab.ca www.cja.ab.ca

Calgary Chinese Private School Accredited / Eligible for Funding K, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7-9, Grades 10 - 12 128 2nd Ave SW, Calgary, AB T2P 0B9 Phone: (403) 264-2233 • Fax: (403) 282-9854

Calgary Italian School Calgary Italian School Accredited Language School Age 5 – Grade 12, Adults 416, 1st Ave NE Calgary AB T2E 0B4 Phone: (403) 264-6349 clcic@shaw.ca www.italianschoolcalgary.com

Calgary Mandarin School Accredited Grades 10 – 12 #110, 138 - 18 Ave SE, Calgary, AB T2G 5P9 Phone: 587-718-8138 • Fax: (403) 228-5330 changclaire@yahoo.com

JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Calgary Quest School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 3405 Spruce Drive SW,. c/o Spruce Cliff Elementary Calgary, AB T3C 0A5 Phone: (403) 253-0003 • Fax: (403) 253-0025 info@calgaryquestschool.com

Calgary Waldorf School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Preschool, ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9 515 Cougar Ridge Drive SW, Calgary, AB T3H 5G9 Phone: (403) 287-1868 • Fax: (403) 287-3414 info@calgarywaldorf.org www.calgarywaldorf.org

Chinook Winds Adventist Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 10101 - 2nd Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3B 5T2 Phone: (403) 286-5686 • Fax: (403) 247-1623 lmelashenko@cwaa.net


Think Innovation Think Master’s Leaders in innovation and creativity for over 20 years.

Master’s is preparing students to be Future Ready with skills essential for the world of tomorrow on a foundation of Christian values and academic excellence.

Master’s Academy

Master’s College

Top ranked elementary school by the Fraser Institute

Top ranked high school by the Fraser Institute

Focus on core academic competencies and the development of students as Master Learners.

One-of-a-kind program that develops Imaginal Leaders who are seers and creators of the future.

The foundational layers of Master’s Profound Learning Model are Ownership and Mastery.

A university prep school with over 95% of our graduates qualifying for the Rutherford scholarship and university entrance.

Grades K-6

Academic Excellence is achieved by empowering students to identify and close learning gaps using Profound Learning tools and strategies.

Registrar: 403-242-7034 ext 2100 4414 Crowchild Trail SW www.masters.ab.ca

Grades 7-12

Small classes build strong community.

Master’ s Academy & College


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Clear Water Academy

Greek Community School of Calgary

Montessori School of Calgary

Accredited / Eligible for Funding/ Catholic Junior Kindergarten, Kindergarten - Grade 6, Grade 7 - 12 2521 Dieppe Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3E 7J9 Phone: (403) 240-7924 admissions@clearwateracademy.com clearwateracademy.com

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades K - 6 1 Tamarac Crescent SW, Calgary, AB T3C 3B7 Phone: (403) 246-4553 • Fax: (403) 246-8191 admin@calgaryhellenic.com; greekschool@calgaryhellenic.com www.calgaryhellenic.com/Our-School

Accredited / Eligible for Funding, A.M.I accredited Preschool (3-6 yrs), Grades 1- 6 2201 Cliff Street SW, Calgary, AB T2S 2G4 Phone: (403) 229-1011 • Fax: (403) 229-4474 admissions@msofc.ca www.montessorischoolofcalgary.com

Columbia College

Janus Academy

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 10 – 12 802 Manning Road NE, Calgary, AB T2E 7N8 Phone: (403) 235-9300 • Fax: (403) 272-3805 Columbia@Columbia.ab.ca www.columbia.ab.ca

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1 - 12 2223 Spiller Road SE, Calgary, AB T2G 4G9 Phone: (403) 262-3333 • Fax: (403) 693-2345 contact@janusacademy.org www.janusacademy.org

Delta West Academy

Khalsa School Calgary Educational Foundation

Accredited / Eligible for Funding JK, K, Grades 1- 12 414 - 11A Street NE, Calgary, AB T2E 4P3 Phone: (403) 290-0767 • Fax: (403) 290-0768 www.deltawestacademy.ca

Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7 - 9 245228 Conrich Road, Calgary, AB T2M 4L5 Phone: (403) 293-7712 • Fax: (403) 293-2245 cheryl.steadman@khalsaschoolcalgary.ca

Eastside Christian Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS – 9 Home Schooling Options 1320 Abbeydale Drive SE, Calgary, AB T2A 7L8 Phone: 403-569-1003 • Fax: (403) 569-7557 admin@eastsidechristianacademy.ca www.eastsidechristianacademy.ca Offers Home Education Blended Program

Edison School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 Site 11, P.O. Box 2, R.R. 2 Hwy 2A, 1KM North of Okotoks AB T1S 1A2 Phone: (403) 938-7670 • Fax: (403) 938-7224 office@edisonschool.ca www.edisonschool.ca

Equilibrium School Accredited / Eligible for Funding 707 - 14 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 2A4 Phone: (403) 283-1111 • Fax: (403) 270-7786 school@equilibrium.ab.ca www.equilibrium.ab.ca

Foothills Academy Accredited - For students with Learning Disabilities Grades 3 - 12 745 - 37 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4T1 Phone: 403.270.9400 • Fax: 403.270.9438 intake@foothillsacademy.org www.foothillsacademy.org

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Calgary German Language School Society Accredited Preschool - Grades 12, Adult Classes located at Bowcroft Elementary 3940 73rd Street NW, Calgary, AB T3B 2L9 germanlanguageschoolcalgary@gmx.com www.germanlanguageschoolcalgary.com/index.html Beatrice Binmore (Chair) Steve Zitterer (Secretary) Dagmar Blaettermann (Treasurer)

Lycée Louis Pasteur Calgary’s Premier Private French School Preschool to Grade 12 4099 Garrison Blvd. SW, Calgary, AB T2T 6G2 Phone: (403) 243-5420 • Fax: (403) 287-2245 admissions@lycee.ca www.lycee.ca “The International French School”

Maria Montessori Education Centre of Calgary (MMEC) Accredited / Eligible for Funding Toddler, Preschool, ECS, Grades 1- 9 2634 12 Ave NW, Calgary AB T2N 1K6 Toddler, Preschool, ECS 1721 29 Ave SW, Calgary AB T2T 6T7 403-668-8538 info@mmec.ca www.mmec.ca

JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Mountain View Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 3915 34 Street NE, Calgary, AB T1Y 6Z8 Phone: (403) 217-4346 • Fax: (403) 249-4312 Office@mountainviewacademy.ca www.mountainviewacademy.ca

New Heights School and Learning Services Accredited / Eligible for Funding D.S.E.P.S. | ECS, Preschool (2 ½ - 6 years), Grades 1– 12 4041 Breskens Drive SW, Calgary, AB T3E 7M1 Phone: (403) 240-1312 info@newheightscalgary.com www.newheightscalgary.com

North Point School for Boys Accredited - Independent School that taps into boys’ natural curiosity and energy as a foundation for live-long learning. Grades K-9 2445 – 23rd Avenue SW Calgary, AB T2T 0W3 Phone: 403-744-5214 info@northpoint.school www.northpoint.school

Phoenix Education Foundation Accredited Kindergarten (k), Home Education (1-12) BlendEd (1-9) Online (1-9) 320 19 Street SE, Calgary, AB T2E 6J6 Phone: (403) 265-7701 • Fax: (403) 275-7715 info@phoenixfoundation.ca Offers Home Education Program

Renert School Accredited/ Funding Available Grades K-12 14 Royal Vista Link N.W Calgary, AB T3R 0K4 Phone: (587) 353-1053 info@renertschool.ca www.renertscool.ca


Grades 7-12

Unparalleled Real-World Learning Opportunities We offer French Immersion, Institute Programs, International Travel Studies & more! Visit www.westislandcollege.ab.ca to learn about all of the opportunities available.


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Renfrew Educational Services - Child Development Centre

Renfrew Educational Services Assessment and Therapy Services

Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities 3820 – 24th Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T3E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

For children, adolescents and adults Assessment, Counseling, Treatment and Consultation OT, PT, SLP, Psychology, Assistive Technology / Minimal wait time Extended hours / Offered at any Renfrew KimLaCourse@renfreweducation.org

Renfrew Educational Services Park Place Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding, ECS for typical children and children with disabilities ECS for typical children and children with disabilities 3688 – 48th Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Renfrew Educational Services Thomas W. Buchanan Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities and grades 1-6 for children with disabilities 75 Sunpark Drive SE, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 ext 1601• Fax: 403 201 8212 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Renfrew Educational Services Bowness Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities 8620 48th Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Renfrew Educational Services Janice McTighe Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities and grades 1-6 for children with disabilities 2050 - 21 Street NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

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Tanbridge Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding • K - Grade 9 178003 – 112 St. W. Foothills, AB T2S 0V8 (Corner of Hwy 22x and 53rd Street) Phone: (403) 259-3443 info@tanbridge.com www.tanbridge.com Busing available

River Valley School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Pre-Junior Kindergarten (3 years) - Grade 6 3127 Bowwood Drive NW, Calgary, AB T3B 2E7 Phone: (403) 246-2275 • Fax: (403) 686-7631 admissions@rivervalleyschool.ca www.rivervalleyschool.ca

Rundle Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 4-12 4330 - 16 Street SW, Calgary, AB T2T 4H9 Phone: (403) 250-2965 • Fax: (403) 250-2914 contactus@rundle.ab.ca www.rundle.ab.ca For students with learning disabilities

Rundle College Primary/Elementary School AAccredited / Eligible for Funding • K-6 7615 – 17 Avenue SW Calgary, AB T3H 3W5 Phone: (403) 282-8411 • Fax: (403) 282-4460 Email: contactus@rundle.ab.ca www.rundle.ab.ca

Rundle College Junior Senior High School Accredited / Eligible for Funding • Grades 7 - 12 7375 - 17 Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3H 3W5 Phone: (403) 250-7180 • Fax: (403) 250-7184 Email: contactus@rundle.ab.ca • www.rundle.ab.ca

St. John Bosco Private School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9 712 Fortalice Cres SE, Calgary, AB T2A 2E1 Phone: (403) 248-3664 • Fax: (403) 273-8012 stjohnbosco@shaw.ca

Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School STS develops well-balanced students for a life of purpose by inspiring excellence in scholarship, leadership and character. STS offers academic excellence as Alberta’s only full, K – Grade 12, IB independent school. STS offers a rich learning environment where students can expect more, including: small class sizes, integrated learning, over 90 co-curricular activities, city-wide busing and scholarships, in unique, rural surroundings. RR 2, Okotoks, AB T1S 1A2 Phone: 403-938-8326 • admissions@sts.ab.ca www.strathconatweesdsmuir.com City-wide busing. Small class sizes. 220-acre campus minutes from Calgary.

JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

The Chinese Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 10 – 12, Saturday classes from Kindergarten to Grade 12. Classes held at: Sir John A Macdonald School, John G. Diefenbaker High School, St. Mary’s High School Office & Mailing Address: 191, 1518 Centre St.. NE Calgary AB T2E 2R9 Phone: (403) 777-7663 • Fax: (403) 777-7669 thechineseacademy@gmail.com “The largest heritage language school in Alberta.”

The Third Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 Bay 3, 510 – 77th Ave. SE Calgary, AB T2H 1C3 Phone: (403) 288-5335 • Fax: (403) 288-5804 info@thirdacademy.ca www.thirdacademy.ca

Tyndale Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 28 Hart Estates Blvd. NE, Calgary, AB T1X 0L3 Phone: (403) 590-5881 • Fax: (403) 590-6998 tcs@tyndalecalgary.ca

Webber Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding JK and Kindergarten, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 1515 - 93 Street SW, Calgary, AB T3H 4A8 Phone: (403) 277-4700 • Fax: (403) 277-2770 hblake@webberacademy.ca www.webberacademy.ca

West Island College Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 - 12 7410 Blackfoot Trail SE, Calgary, AB T2H 1M5 Main: (403) 255-5300 • Fax: (403) 252-1434 Admissions: (403) 444-0023 admissions@mywic.ca www.westislandcollege.ab.ca


RUNDLE COLLEGE

The best awaits.

Our students: study in classes of 6-15 students. • are engaged in co-curricular activities. • are passionate in athletics, academics, arts, and languages. • are world travellers. • are leaders and citizens of character. • are university prepared. •

Book a tour to experience the best that awaits.

www.rundle.ab.ca


A Leader in Learning Disabilities since 1979

Find Understanding Build Confidence Maximize Potential We teach the full Alberta Education curriculum to students in grades 3 to 12 with a diagnosed Learning Disability. We provide a warm and welcoming learning environment. Small class sizes with specially trained staff provide individualized accommodations and supports to ensure that students succeed academically, emotionally and socially. Academics are supplemented with a wide variety of extracurricular activities.

Contact Us Today! 745 - 37 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4T1 403-270-9400 foothillsacademy.org


TEACHING BOYS curious, eager, & energetic

the way BOYS LEARN

Environments & Experiences

to challenge & engage BOYS

North Point School for Boys taps into boys’ natural curiosity and energy as a foundation for life-long learning. A strong academic program is just the beginning – we fuel motivation through real-life learning, digital platforms, and outdoor adventure developing well rounded, self-motivated, independent learners.

WE OFFER Enhanced Math and Science program through Financial Academy and STEM Academy Annual Business Fair PEP Hockey Academy Grades K-9

WE SPECIALIZE IN Personalized Learning Small Class Sizes

Active Learning Character Development

OPEN HOUSE

2445 – 23 Avenue SW, Calgary T: 403.744.5214 www.northpoint.school

WEDNESDAY FEB 26 @ 7PM

register: www.northpoint.school/admissions


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Yufeng Chinese School

Calgary Christian School

Edge School

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 708 44 Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T2K 0J4 Phone: (403) 289-7876 • Fax: (403) 210-0261

Preschool - Grade 12 Elementary Campus (Preschool - Grade 6): 2839 - 49th Street SW Secondary Campus (Grades 7-12): 5029 - 26 Avenue SW Calgary, Alberta Phone: (403) 242-2896 admissions@calgarychristianschool.com www.calgarychristianschool.com

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 4-12 33055 Township Road 250, Calgary, AB T3Z 1L4 Tel: (403) 246-6432 • Fax: (403) 217-8463 info@edgeschool.com Website:www.edgeschool.com

Alternative Banff Hockey Academy Grades 7 – 12 • College bound hockey athletes Box 2242 Banff, Alberta T1L 1B9 Phone: 1-888-423-6369 • Fax: (403) 760-0868 registrar@banffhockey.ab.ca www.banffhockey.ab.ca

Calgary Girls School Grades 4 - 9 6304 Larkspur Way SW, Calgary, AB T3E 5P7 Phone: (403) 220-0745 Judi.hadden@calgarygirlsschool.com www.calgarygirlsschool.com

Glenmore Christian Academy Accredited JK to Grade 5, Grade 6-9 16520 – 24 Street, SW, Calgary, AB T2Y 4W2 (403) 254-9050 admissions@gcaschool.com www.gcaschool.com

Heritage Christian Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 12 2003 McKnight Boulevard, NE , Calgary, AB T2E 6L2 Phone: (403) 219-3201 • Fax: (403) 219-3210 www.hcacalgary.com

Master’s Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6 4414 Crowchild Trail SW, Calgary, AB T2T 5J4 Tel: (403) 242-7034 • Fax: (403) 242-3515 www.masters.ab.ca

Master’s College

independent, alternative, virtual

URSA offers tailored online, blended, and traditional home education programming choices anytime, anywhere, your child’s way. Accepting Applications Now for September 2020! For more information contact Sunil Mattu - Executive Director smattu@goursa.education www.goursa.education

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JANUARY 2020 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 7- 12 4414 Crowchild Trail, SW Calgary, Calgary, AB T2T 5J4 Tel: (403) 242-7034 • Fax: (403) 242-4629 www.masters.ab.ca

Menno Simons Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 9 7000 Elkton Drive, SW, Calgary, AB T3H 4Y7 Tel: (403) 531-0745 • Fax: (403) 531-0747 linda.best@pallisersd.ab.ca www.mennosimonschristianschool.ca

Trinity Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 9 #100, 295 Midpark Way SE, Calgary, AB T2X 2A8 Phone: (403) 254-6682 • Fax: (403) 254-9843 www.tcskids.com


TODAY’S EDUCATION

FOR TOMORROW’S LEADERS!

Calgary French & International School students graduate as active leaders, enriched learners, and global citizens fluent in 3 languages. For children aged 3 through Grade 12, we nurture students in a welcoming environment and provide a robust educational experience, all in a full French immersion setting. With half and full day Preschool and Junior Kindergarten, full day Kindergarten, Before and After School care and bus service to every corner of the city and surrounding area we support the lifestyle of today’s busy families. See the CFIS difference today by booking a visit at CFIS.com

700 77th St SW Calgary, AB T3H 5RI 403.240.1500 | www.CFIS.com


Creating beautiful, healthy smiles is what we do! Five full-time hygienists Open lunch hours and early mornings Call today for your consultation and your start to a more beautiful smile. An amazingly convenient location you can walk to from your urban home or office, saving you valuable time and money. If you choose to drive, dedicated parking is available!

General Dentistry

DOWNTOWN DENTIST • Cosmetically related dental services • Emphasis on Prevention • General Dentistry • Tooth Whitening • New Patients & Emergencies Welcome • Direct Billing of Insurance Plans Conveniently located under the Calgary Tower, 430 Tower Centre, 131-9 Avenue SW

403-265-3146 | www.drgalan.com


The Calgary Chamber is the voice of the business community. We double down on commerce and work with businesses to create catalysts for growth.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2020

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As we mark the start of a new decade, it is my firm belief that there has never been a more important time for businesses to take the lead in solving the most urgent issues facing our society. Last year was one of political upheaval. We had a provincial election, which brought about a change in government in this province, followed by a federal election, which resulted in a Liberal minority government. These major political events, while vital to the health of our democracy, have also resulted in a narrowed vision where politics is overpowering the need for rational, solution-oriented policy. As we look to 2020 and beyond, it is my ask that we, as Calgary’s corporate community and business leaders, put politics behind us and move towards a better future by doing what we do best as businesses: serving as the visionaries of our future economy and our future communities. At the Calgary Chamber, we’ll be kicking off 2020 in a strong way with Canada’s Agriculture Summit, which is taking place on January 16. The purpose of the summit is to explore one clear, crucial concept: that Canada can nourish the world “AND” have sustainable agricultural practices while remaining globally competitive. This is the natural extension of our natural resources initiative and it further rallies us to “AND” conversations. We will showcase the significance of agriculture and agri-food, which contribute over $100 billion to the Canadian economy every year. It will be an opportunity for discovery and discussion around the innovative technologies that are shaking up the industry, the scale and competitiveness that make Canadian agriculture and agri-food world class, and how we can continue to protect and grow our presence on the global stage. The event is open to all and tickets are available at www.calgarychamber. com/event/natural-resources-agriculture-summit. From a governance perspective, we welcome Brent Cooper, partner at McLeod Law, as the new board chair for the Calgary Chamber. Our board of directors are all passionate volunteers who generously donate their time, expertise and insights to build a business community that nourishes, powers and inspires the world. We look forward to working with them in the year ahead. Over the course of 2020, we will continue to engage at the federal, provincial and municipal levels of government for public policies that enable businesses to be globally competitive and for our communities to thrive. Municipally, we will further call upon and continue to advocate strongly for long-term structural changes to the property tax system in order to enable Calgary businesses to thrive. These include the reduction of costs, the increased effectiveness and impact of local government, and the sale of city-owned land. In addition, we will be working to foster a productive relationship with the province to ensure Calgary’s economy grows. At the provincial level, we will be engaged in pre-budget consultations and look forward to the tabling of the provincial budget in the spring. Our key focus will be ensuring that businesses of all sizes are reflected and benefit from policy changes, and that we continue to take tangible steps towards boosting competitiveness and providing responsible fiscal plans. Innovation needs to be at the heart of the spring budget. And finally, federally, we will evolve and expand on the key priorities of our federal election platform, developed in partnership with the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce. With the Liberal minority government and its cabinet now fully in place, we look forward to advancing important public policy initiatives that boost Canada’s competitiveness in a rapidly-changing global economy. One of our top priorities will be creating the framework and proposal for a vision for all our natural resources, from oil and gas to renewable resources to agriculture. Canada can be a leader in natural resource development “AND” fight global climate change at the same time. I look forward to 2020 and all that it will bring. As the podium of record, the Chamber offers opportunity for meaningful conversations between policy-makers and our business community, as well as deeper connections within our business community. To stay connected and informed, I invite you to join us as we rally to grow the Calgary economy. Connect with us online at www.calgarychamber.com.

Sandip Lalli President & CEO Calgary Chamber

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WE CAN DO MORE TO NOURISH THE WORLD.

Canada’s Agriculture Summit January 16, 2020 7:30 am - 4:00 pm Big Four, Stampede Park Calgary, Alberta

Presented by:

Canada’s natural resources include more than oil, wind, hydro, and solar – they also include agriculture and farming. Agriculture and agri-foods contribute over $100 Billion to the Canadian economy every year. Broader understanding of the competitiveness, innovation and GDP contribution of agriculture is critical to ensuring the industry remains top tier in the global market. We are continuing our AND focus with natural resource development AND sustainable agriculture practices. Canada can nourish the world and become a global leader in sustainable agricultural practices. Join us as we work towards creating a framework for a national vision for our agricultural natural resources. Tickets on sale now: calgarychamber.com/event/natural-resources-agriculture-summit/


Canada’s Agriculture Summit Speakers

Cherie Copithorne-Barnes Director, Caglary Stampede

Curt Vossen President & CEO, Richardson International

Michael Hoffort President & CEO, Farm Credit Canada

Chris Terris VP Strategy, TELUS

Chuck Magro President & CEO, Nutrien

Jeff Vassart President, Cargill Limited

Jon Sweat VP, BASF Canada

Ray Price President, Sunterra

Tickets on sale now: calgarychamber.com/event/natural-resources-agriculture-summit/

Scott Bolton President & CEO, UFA


Breaking the Personal Hygiene Routine: A Calgary Growth Story

W

hen you think of your morning routine, you probably visualize brushing your teeth, washing your face, applying deodorant, chugging some caffeine and dashing out the door to work. In this hazy start to the day, have you ever stopped to think about what you are putting into your body? Calgary sister duo, Neige and Pippa Blair, have – and they’re on a mission to change it! Enter Routine Cream, an all-natural skincare company, with the flagship product being natural deodorant. Neige Blair, co-founder of Routine, envisioned the idea for the company when she couldn’t find a deodorant that worked. Leveraging her talent for developing self-care products, Neige started combining ingredients, and sharing the product with friends and family. “I was convinced I had a product that the world needed, but I was hesitant to start a business as deodorant isn’t necessarily ‘sexy,’” says Neige. Neige tapped into her creative side and gave each of the deodorants a personality through scents, including: Cat Lady and Like a Boss. After determining the product and the creative, Neige paired up with sister-in-law Pippa, bringing Pippa’s analytical lens to the company. Ever since a December 2011 craft fair, the two have been busy building Routine. Being an all-natural skincare company, Routine is creating an emphasis on social, environmental and health awareness among consumers. Using natural ingredients like dietary magnesium, sodium bicarbonate, activated charcoal and prebiotics, citizens (Routine’s unique name for their customers) gain confidence by smelling how they want, without the chemicals. Routine is also reducing waste with all products being sold in refillable containers and 18 months ago successfully launched a Canadian refill program. Demand for the product has increased exponentially with Routine earning international attention and expanding to distribution retailers as far away as the Middle East and Europe. “Convincing people to touch their armpits has been our biggest obstacle,” says Pippa, “Since the ’50s, media has made the armpit sinful, dirty and something not to be touched.” For eight years, they’ve been changing opinions and shifting the

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status quo, encouraging people to love their armpits. “Touch ’em up we say!” While continuing to educate consumers, they are also overcoming obstacles inside their business. Since inception, they have worked from five different manufacturing locations across Calgary and are in the final stages of completing a new facility called Co-Lab, which will be used for future product development. Being a family business, it is obvious that community is at the root of Routine’s success and it’s something the company hopes to nourish with the new Co-Lab space. “We want to offer a place for local businesses to rent and prevent some of the challenges we experienced,” shares Neige. This new facility will be a home for other local Calgary businesses, creating a larger community of like-minded companies. Routine’s community shows up every day through their citizens, with Neige and Pippa receiving “love letters” of feedback on how well the product works on a daily basis. “Ultimately, they’re telling us our deodorants have provided them with confidence to live their lives without worrying about whether or not they will smell,” says Neige. Looking into the future, Routine has plans to expand deeper into the U.S. market while continuing to grow market share and brand awareness in the EU and the UAE. The goal is to open flagship Routine stores in major North American cities where citizens can refill all their routine products from an expanded product line including deodorants, body and home-care products. Topping off their success, this past fall Routine was named the ATB Small Business of the Year as part of the Calgary Small Business Awards. “We hope this award will inspire a new generation of ‘made-in-Calgary’ entrepreneurs. Anything is possible, especially when we are surrounded by such creative, supportive people within this innovative city,” finishes Pippa. Look for Routine in stores across Calgary including: Calgary Co-op, SPUD Calgary, Community Natural Foods and more. To learn more about Routine, visit www.routinecream.com.


Photo by Riverwood Photography

SERVING CALGARY FOR HALF A CENTURY BY RENNAY CRAATS 69


ATCO Commons Building

J

ust as many great companies before it, Custom Electric got its start with two guys in a garage. Electricians Vern Kemble and Heinz Weiss began moonlighting in 1967 to save money to one day open their own shop, and in 1970, they joined forces to create Custom Electric Calgary Ltd. With little more than a truck, determination and some tools and the expertise to wield them, Kemble and Weiss built their business from the ground up.

Manulife Place

“It started out as strictly residential, wiring houses,” says Gord Bandy, president of Custom Electric. “In the early 1970s, they started picking up small commercial jobs and built up the commercial side of the company.”

BUILDING THE BUSINESS After only a year, the partners outgrew their garage office and leased a building in Forest Lawn to facilitate their burgeoning growth. Their expansion took the company beyond Calgary in 1974 with a branch in B.C., and Custom Electric Calgary and Kalmala Custom Electric in Vernon thrived until they separated the businesses in 1977; Kemble took over Calgary operations and Weiss ran the British Columbia location. Continuing to grow the Calgary company, Kemble again sought partners to help the business prosper. He brought in Rick Kuzek, Ken Jones and Phil Chromartie in 1981 and together they built Custom Electric’s reputation in the city while constructing its permanent (and current) location on 27th Avenue NE. Over the next decade, Vern Kemble began selling shares to Kuzek, Jones and Chromartie and by 1992, they were equal partners. Soon after, they bought Vern Kemble out and the Custom Electric founder retired in 1993.

New Horizon Mall

Jones and Chromartie followed suit in 1999 with their own retirements leaving Kuzek as the sole owner of Custom Electric. “He developed his 10-year exit strategy by creating an employee-owned company,” says Bandy. “He started selling

CUSTOM ELECTRIC • PAGE 2


off shares in Custom Electric and named three other gentlemen to step in as senior management to help him run the company. Fred Schum, Stu Hay and Brian Phelps started acquiring more shares than anyone else to retain the management team,” he says. The team prided itself on providing quality services in all areas of the business, implementing the company motto of “Service with Economy” as a strategy to grow. With solid leadership, Custom Electric expanded from residential to commercial and ultimately to industrial jobs across Western Canada. Its robust service department accentuated the company’s focus on meeting customers’ needs and the company earned the reputation for standing behind its work.

Scott Gibson, Doug Miller, Richard Fleurant and Gord Bandy

With ISO and COR certification along with proactive training in the field – from first aid and lift training to fall arrest and H2S training – as well as significant leadership and safety excellence training for most team foremen, Custom Electric is definitely a leader in the industry.

Schum retired in 2008 and Rick Kuzek stuck to his plan to retire in 2010, leaving Hay and Phelps as the company’s major shareholders. When Hay retired in 2012, Richard Fleurant and Gord Bandy were brought into senior management, and once Phelps retired four years later, Scott Gibson and Doug Miller joined to round out the team. Together, the four-person management team is leading Custom Electric into the next phase as it celebrates 50 years in business.

It’s no wonder, then, that staff tend to stay put. Last year, management gave out a 40-year service award to an employee, adding him to the company’s long list of staff with 30 and 35 years of service.

THE PEOPLE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

These assets are the keys to the company’s success. Custom Electric’s culture of community involvement with such organizations as Habitat for Humanity, the Calgary Drop-In Centre and various charity events, its dedication to the industry through association affiliations and its team approach to business attracts the best people in the industry – and the company wants to keep them. Unlike many competitors who do blanket layoffs at the end of projects, Custom Electric repositions its resources to other jobs or seeks out additional projects to ensure they can carry their staff forward. Staff appreciate the respectful, supportive culture at the company and in return work hard to exceed the standards set by the founders. In fact, close to 100 of the staff believe so strongly in the company that they are shareholders in the employee-owned business.

Over the years, many people have shaped the company’s path as it evolved into a full-service electrical contractor in the region. The company has weathered the stormy Alberta market, riding the economic highs and persevering during the lows. Custom Electric has gone from a small residential electrical business to one with around 300 employees in two locations with expertise in managing and executing large and small commercial, residential and industrial projects. While much has changed in its five decades in business, the dedication to providing the best possible value for clients never faltered. To achieve that, Custom Electric invests heavily in its staff to ensure every interaction with clients is a positive, productive one. Employees apply the high standards engrained in the company’s culture on every job to deliver clients a costeffective, quality product on schedule, all the while staying safe through a superior safety program. The company’s two full-time safety officers have done an exemplary job implementing the award-winning program, and the results are impressive. On average, Custom Electric employees put in 500,000 man-hours a year and over the last three years, it boasts 0 lost time accidents and 0 lost time days in 2019. “Safety is part of the culture and it’s hugely important. We’ve maintained one of the highest safety records in the industry,” says Scott Gibson, partner at Custom Electric.

“One of our strengths is to drive on long-term employees. We don’t hire and lay off. We try to train our people so they become an asset at Custom Electric for a long time,” says Richard Fleurant, operations manager at Custom Electric.

“A big part of the employee ownership is most of our supervision in the field has an ownership stake within the company so they have a vested interest in making sure our projects are successful and high quality,” says Gibson.

DOING IT DIFFERENTLY Over the years, many of these projects established the company’s reputation as they shaped the Calgary landscape, and Custom Electric’s expertise and opinions grew more highly valued in the industry. The team is called in at early conception stages to provide developers, owners and general contractors with information to make the project successful.

CUSTOM ELECTRIC • PAGE 3


Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre

which involved replacing the emergency systems in an occupied hospital, to the 520-store New Horizon Mall, which the company worked on from pre-construction through budgeting and design to eventual tender. It recently completed some key downtown buildings as well. Custom Electric was involved with Studio Bell from the early design stages. The $10-million electrical contract required years of budgeting and design-assist before construction of the now landmark building even began. The company also completed work on the 27-storey Manulife Place office building, which is a state-of-the-art tower incorporating the newest technologies connected through an integrated building system.

With the company’s vast experience spanning five decades, they have seen it all and can use their historical data to help clients accurately plan future projects. “Our clients have diverse needs of different types of electrical services so we’re that one-stop shop,” says Doug Miller, business development manager for Custom Electric. “We can provide clients with those early numbers and early tests of their ideas accurately and quickly.” Custom Electric is known for its expertise from pre-design stages through to operations and project management. It also has a full-time BIM technician to create 3D modelling of projects to detect any design and system conflicts between trades, provide input on constructability and create sequencing schedules. “We could have upwards of 10 electricians in the shop prefabricating materials directly from the 3D model the BIM technician produces,” says Gibson. “Whole systems are prebuilt, disassembled, shipped to site and then reassembled.” Custom Electric is leading edge, saving clients time and money with their innovations. And throughout the process, the team advocates for the client to protect the project’s budget, schedule and design integrity in an effort to deliver exactly what clients want. The relationships that result from this process carry on past the turnover date, and Custom Electric has enjoyed repeat business from loyal clients over the years. The company fosters great relationships with clients in all sectors of Calgary’s business community and have produced incredible projects with them.

PROJECTS Custom Electric has been attached to everything from the challenging Rockyview Hospital expansion and renovation,

Custom Electric teams are currently working on the $24-million electrical project at the MacKimmie Complex at the University of Calgary. It will be the first net-zero targeted building in Western Canada, and Custom Electric is implementing intricate mechanical systems, a huge solar array on the roof to generate power and energy-efficient lighting control systems. On the industrial side, Custom Electric completed the Bearspaw and Glenmore water treatment plants, building and modernizing those facilities while they maintained operations. These types of jobs are challenging and complicated, and that’s exactly why clients go to Custom Electric. The company has a reputation for skill and work ethic, and clients can count on Custom Electric to get the job done. That was especially true during the 2013 flood. The company was called on Sunday afternoon and it deployed crews to the Saddledome Monday morning. It provided three shifts of 25 people working 24-7 for three weeks to start with and then finished the job within 69 days to allow the Calgary Flames to start their season. “The flood speaks to the depth of our resources and that we can perform under pressure – and have the manpower to be able to do that,” says Gord Bandy. Custom Electric proudly services every client with the same high levels of service and quality, whether they are a homeowner needing a breaker replaced in their panel or a client with a $40-million electrical contract. For 50 years, Custom Electric has brought quality, service, integrity and innovation to its residential, commercial and industrial clients across the province. With its strong reputation in the industry and diverse client base, Custom Electric will continue to be a leader in electrical contracting for decades more.

1725 - 27th. Avenue N.E., Calgary Alberta, T2E 7E1 403.291.3303 | info@customelectric.com www.customelectric.com CUSTOM ELECTRIC • PAGE 4


Serving Calgarians for 30 Years

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algary is a city of extremes, and with hot summers paired with bitterly cold and snowy winters, those extremes can do a number on a roof. For 30 years, Sunik Roofing has been battling the city’s challenging environment to help extend the life of its customers’ roofs. “If Sunik shingle’s your roof then we have a deal where we come back at no charge between year two and three to do a visual inspection – a roofing tune-up. We’d recommend this for all roofs,” says Nick Sims, Sunik Roofing president. Whether it’s an aging roof or a new one, homeowners should have a professional come out for annual or biennial visits to ensure there aren’t issues after a tough winter. Sunik’s trained professionals know what damage can occur from heavy snow loads, ice, wind and the effects of thawing and refreezing so they can identify and repair trouble spots to avoid costly repairs later. The team examines the roof thoroughly, looking for everything from exposed nails to curled or buckled shingles. As part of the maintenance package, Sunik re-tars plumbing collars and vents, checks the chimney, flashings and valleys, examines skylights to ensure they are sealed, and keeps an eye out for envelope

issues like condensation buildup in the attic from plugged or faulty vents. Sunik’s roofers evaluate the general condition of the roof during this inspection, offering advice on what needs repair and how homeowners can limit wear on the shingles to prolong the roof’s life. They recommend caution when going out on roofs to clean or hang Christmas lights. “I’ve seen homeowners get up on their roof and ruin a whole section from washing windows, so minimizing foot traffic is helpful,” he says. Older or damaged roofs may need to be replaced, and the nine-time Consumer Choice Award-winning roofer is available to offer the best solutions. Sims recommends products that are more forgiving in this punishing climate, including rubber shingles and class-4 shingles that hold up against the elements, including hail, better. A roof’s best defence against the ravages of weather is maintenance and prevention, and Sunik Roofing’s spring package offers homeowners peace of mind while saving them money down the road.

Consistency, Quality, Craftsmanship

Come in and talk to us about your project!

Our showroom is open from Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm | www.prestigerailings.com “We’re passionate about bringing spaces to life. Together with you.”

2777 Hopewell Place NE Calgary (403) 250-1020 • Toll Free: 1-800-382-8502

30 years in Business

www.sunik.com 403.280.2803

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2020 Foresight: The New Decade and the New Economy

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s we enter a new decade, in the midst of the transformation to an increasingly digital economy, it is an opportunity to take stock of where we are as a city and where we are going. The economic headwinds Calgary has confronted in the last five years are well documented. Less evident is the momentum that emerged in 2019 around implementation of Calgary in the New Economy and how the strategy created by Calgarians for Calgarians is setting a foundation for sustained prosperity. The vision is to be the city of choice in Canada for the best entrepreneurs to solve some of the world’s biggest challenges – cleaner energy, safe and secure food, more efficient transportation and better health solutions. The opportunity for Calgary is to lead the digital transformation of Canada’s industrial sectors. Calgary in the New Economy was the common thread connecting numerous announcements by business, governments and post-secondary institutions in 2019 that set a course to future-proof our city and our economy. One major announcement came in early December when a $30-million gift from philanthropist David Bissett was allocated to the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) to establish a new school and programs focused on advanced digital technology. “This significant contribution will enable SAIT to support our students and our industry partners, to develop the mindset, adaptability and knowledge to use and create technology to drive us forward,” says SAIT president and CEO Dr. David Ross. “It’s going help us accelerate industry and our economy.” Dr. Ross is a member of the board of directors for Calgary Economic Development and a member of the CEO roundtable for the economic strategy. SAIT’s school of advanced digital

technology will support two of the areas of focus for Calgary in the New Economy – innovation and talent. There was significant momentum in the first full year of implementation of the strategy launched in October 2018. A study from Calgary Economic Development revealed companies in this city will lead the $18.4-billion spend on digital transformation in Alberta through 2022. There were headlines for Suncor Energy and Cenovus Energy entering into agreements with Microsoft and IBM respectively but the spend is across all sectors. Other major milestones: the emergence of the Clean Resource Innovation Network as a catalyst for pursuit of zero-emission energy; the opening of the Life Sciences Innovation Hub at UCalgary; and Platform breaking ground in East Village as a place for enterprise companies to meet entrepreneurs and startups. City council also approved moving forward with expansion of the BMO Centre and a new Event Centre in the Rivers Culture and Entertainment District. Onex Corp.’s purchase of WestJet Airlines and the commitment to keep its headquarters in the city while making Calgary a major hub was encouraging. Also, local success stories Solium Capital and Parvus Therapeutics attracted $1 billion deals in fintech and life sciences, while our growing cluster of crop science innovation expanded with global leaders BASF and Bayer joining Nutrien. Calgary in the New Economy has momentum, but we still have a long way to go. This isn’t a change; it’s an economic transformation. The decade ahead will present many opportunities and to take advantage, Calgarians need to work together, speak with one voice and build on the economic foundation now in place.

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Tourism Calgary Focuses on Promoting City’s Competitive Advantages to Secure More Meeting and Convention Business CALGARY TO BECOME HOME TO THE LARGEST CONVENTION FACILITY IN WESTERN CANADA IN 2024

BY BRIDGETTE SLATER

O

ur city will soon become home to the largest convention facility in Western Canada once the BMO Centre expansion at Stampede Park is complete in 2024. With this focused investment on creating purposeful hosting facilities that support the revitalization of Calgary’s Culture and Entertainment District comes a significant opportunity for Calgary and for growing the visitor economy. Second in Canada only to Toronto’s convention facility, the one-million-square-foot BMO Centre at Stampede Park will provide Calgary with a significant competitive advantage that will enable Tourism Calgary and its stakeholders to secure larger pieces of meeting and convention business that were previously out of reach. By hosting higher-tier conferences and trade shows, Calgary – and Calgarians – will benefit from new and repeat visitation, increased visitor spending and broader awareness of our city’s key industries. In November 2019, Calgary Stampede benchmarked the annual economic impact of its existing year-round activities – including 1,200 world-class meetings, conventions and events – at $540 million. Construction of the BMO Centre expansion alone is anticipated to generate $402 million in economic activity for Alberta. Once complete in 2024, the expanded facility is projected to bring in $223 million for the province annually and provide more than 1,750 full-year jobs. With this significant opportunity for our city on the horizon, Tourism Calgary remains committed to promoting Calgary’s competitive advantages to secure more meeting

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and convention business. In 2019 alone, Tourism Calgary worked diligently alongside stakeholders, meeting planners and local champions to secure 48 additional meetings and conventions that will take place in Calgary through 2027. Some noteworthy business wins secured for Calgary include, but are not limited to: • The 2020 De Havilland/Viking Air All Operators Conference, which will be hosted in October 2020 and will generate an estimated $3.6 million in economic impact for Calgary. • The 2021 United Church of Canada General Council Meeting. Ministry personnel representing 16 regions across Canada will congregate in July 2021, and will inject an estimated $1.7 million into Calgary’s economy. • The 2022 Western Arts Alliance, which will take place in August 2022 and will generate an estimated $1.5 million in economic impact. Calgary has a long and proud history of hosting international meetings and conventions that promote local industries and the destination, while contributing to the economy. As ultimate hosts, Tourism Calgary is eager to welcome these events, and delegates from around the world, to our city for engaging and memorable convention experiences. To learn more about Tourism Calgary’s efforts to attract, develop, promote and activate events, see visitcalgary.com/ industry-partners.


Four-Day Workweek? It’s happening!

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ome think a four-day workweek is great. For many it’s wishful thinking. Others are cautious. And for a few, it’s a “let’s see how it goes” reality.

chronic stress in the workplace and people never get a chance to relax or recover.”

The average full-time employee spends 44 hours per week (8.8 hours a day) at work, yet HR studies indicate people can’t effectively focus on a task for more than four or five hours at a time, before productivity starts slipping. According to North American research, companies utilizing a four-day workweek have better employee retention, morale and productivity. With studies indicating employee loyalty is dropping, employee retention is key in today’s world. Besides, the 40-hour week is an antiquated concept, brought about in the 1930s to protect workers who were putting in excessively long hours with no overtime or minimum wage. Almost 100 years later, it may not fit with the contemporary workplace. “How important is well-being or lifestyle?” asks Neil Bailey, general manager of LD&A, formerly Lynn Donaldson & Associates, the respected Calgary-based construction, design-build company, and an EO Calgary member. “Do you work to live or live to work? As the visionary of our company, I feel it is my role to help our community of people to live the best life they can.” Alexander Gramatzki, an EO Calgary member and CEO of Live Timeless, a proactive wellness company delivering exponential technologies and health tests to the office, underscores it’s all about staff. “The four-day workweek allows employees to spend more time reflecting on what matters in life. And reflecting is more important than reacting. The more energy we have, the more we can output. There is a lot of

For EO Calgary member Shawn Freeman, founder and CEO of Calgary-based TWT, one of the IT world’s fastest growth and most respected managed service providers, “Employees have the freedom to live their own lives outside of the office, allowing them to come to work refreshed and motivated - if there is a culture fit, a team member would experience productivity in a structure such as this. “We know, based on Parkinson’s law, that it’s human nature to expand workload to the time we have to complete it. It has been said that work left to the last minute to complete will only take a minute to do.” “If everyone is running on 20 per cent energy every day,” Gramatzki adds, “then the output will always be poor. If a fourday workweek allows energy levels to increase to 90 per cent, then the productivity will be nine times better each of the four days. I would rather have four days at 90 per cent than five days at 20 per cent.” As with so many aspects of business (and life), technology is key. “Technology may very well be the reason we can entertain a four-day work structure,” Bailey points out. “The accessibility of our people may just give our clients and trades the access they need on a Friday, assuming a Monday-to-Thursday workweek.” “Technology is an effervescent; forever changing,” Freeman emphasizes. “What makes the industry so unique is the demand for innovation and for its service providers to keep up with it.”

Contributing Members:

Alexander Gramatzki

Neil Bailey

Shawn Freeman

CEO of Live Timeless

General manager, LD&A, formerly Lynn Donaldson & Associates.

Founder and CEO, TWT Group

The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

|

For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

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arketing matters to a growing number of Calgary companies. Cidnee Stephen, president of the Calgary Marketing Association (CMA), reports the association posted more positions this past November and December than throughout the rest of 2019. CMA is also looking after a growing number of members, some 2,000 employed in corporate marketing plus suppliers, individuals and marketing students of post-secondary institutions. Stephen believes that makes CMA the secondlargest marketing association in the country next to Toronto. Within CMA there is a peer group of directors and senior managers who try to meet regularly and participate in a CMO’s Forum. A second group of agencies not afraid to collaborate with each other, bond together with the Agency Forum. Stephen and her vice president, Jan Wood, organized a public event and two closed-door sessions in December – attended by more than 300 people – featuring Bret SanfordChung of U.S.-based Forrester Research who shared her company’s advertising and marketing predictions for 2020. CMA has become a busy and influential organization and is hiring two additional staff to help with events and communications.

Following several years in digital and social media with North American and international companies such as Nestlé, Hewlett Packard and the World Economic Forum, Coty Walker has been with Sandbox Brand Marketing for almost four years. Joining as digital director, she now takes care of day-to-day running of the company as vice president operations and client services. And she has started the year upbeat and busy with major client Sobeys. Sandbox worked with Safeway across Western

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Canada for many years and has been retained by Sobeys – which runs its Canadian wholesale division out of Calgary – to help direct its brand marketing arm. A newer account is Brunel Commercial Interiors, a Calgary leader in retail manufacturing and fixtures across Western Canada with a 50-year history that is moving to more than double its plant size.

Karen Pearce, president of McCann West, reports the agency has defended its Bayer Crop Science business and added three more portfolios to its roster: Traits, DEKALB seed business and the digital farming software platform Climate FieldView. Although this is a McCann national account most of the business will be handled out of the Calgary office.

Lana Rogers has picked up a couple of interesting new accounts to add to her PR and media consulting portfolio. Kidoodle.TV is a Calgary-based tech company getting global recognition for its safe streaming for kids, now available in 140 countries with millions of app installs. And The51 is a new company founded by three Calgary female business professionals who are raising capital and investing in female entrepreneurs to help women throughout the province start new businesses.

Parker’s Pick The choice of a Calgary artist – Rhys Douglas Farrell – to create a mural for AVLI on Atlantic.


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Profile for Business in Calgary

Business in Calgary - January 2020  

Business in Calgary - January 2020  

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