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JANUARY 2019 | $3.50 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

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SANDIP LALLI REFLECTS ON HER FIRST YEAR AS HEAD OF THE CALGARY CHAMBER AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURE



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Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 28 | Number 1

REGULAR COLUMNS

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Remember that 2019 is an Election Year By Frank Atkins

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Real Success Means Staying Involved By Cody Battershill

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CONTENTS

By Amber Ruddy

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COVER FEATURE

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Spending Back to Prosperity a Bad Game Plan By Brad Field

A Voice for Business Sandip Lalli reflects on her first year as head of the Calgary Chamber and plans for the future. By Melanie Darbyshire

ON OUR COVER: RIGHT: SANDIP LALLI, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE CALGARY CHAMBER. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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New Year, New Vision Needed to Support Entrepreneurship in Alberta

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Calgary Chamber of Commerce The Calgary Report Current developments for Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Tourism Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, and Innovate Calgary

Marketing Matters By David Parker


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Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 28 | Number 1

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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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CONTENTS

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COMPANY PROFILES

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Calgary’s 2019 Condo Market Lingering challenges and positive momentum By Colleen Wallace

 lberta Independent Schools: A Serving Students, Parents and Communities With Directory

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Simon Lift Systems

Celebrates 20 Years

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Petro-Tech Printing

Celebrates 50 Years

Wi-Com Solutions

Celebrating Business Excellence

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Cannabis in the Workplace The misunderstood hot topic By John Hardy

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Corporate Workouts The benefits of sweating as a team By Danyael Halprin

Planning the Inheritance More than controlling from the grave By Jamie Zachary


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REMEMBER THAT 2019 IS AN ELECTION YEAR // FRANK ATKINS

Remember that 2019 is an Election Year BY FRANK ATKINS

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019 is an election year in both Alberta and Canada. It is time for voters to say to both Mr. Trudeau and Ms. Notley that you have not been acting in the best interests of the economy and it is time to elect alternative governments. It is somewhat difficult to be hugely optimistic concerning the state of the Alberta economy in 2019, but there are things that could be done. There are of course problems that we cannot directly deal with ourselves. In spite of what Rachel Notley tries to do with oil production, cutting production in Alberta may not have any effect on the price of oil. There was an initial bounce in the price, but it is not clear that this will last. Ironically, Alberta cutting production will please the extreme tree-huggers, whose goal has always been to stop production.

THE NEXT ISSUE IS THE CARBON TAX. WE SHOULD REMEMBER THAT MS. NOTLEY IS A PROPONENT OF THE CARBON TAX. I FIND IT INCREDIBLE THAT ANY GOVERNMENT WOULD INTRODUCE A TAX ON AN INDUSTRY THAT IS STRUGGLING. deal of time and energy trying to reduce emissions. A great deal of the emissions in Canada come from tailpipes of cars. So, the question becomes: why help the auto industry and not the oil industry?

The major policy initiative that would really help Alberta in 2019 would be the federal government finally stepping up to the plate on the pipeline issue. This, of course, has been badly bungled by the Trudeau administration. One major problem here is that Mr. Trudeau cannot seem to make up his mind on what he thinks about the oil industry. He appears to be in a state of disbelief that a healthy oil industry has always been vital to the health of the Canadian economy. Of course, this contradicts the view of his touchy-feely backers that oil is destroying the economy. As far as I can tell, a frim grasp of the facts always seems to escape our prime minister.

The next issue is the carbon tax. We should remember that Ms. Notley is a proponent of the carbon tax. I find it incredible that any government would introduce a tax on an industry that is struggling. At the time of writing this article, the first ministers meeting was about to convene in Montreal and the carbon tax was not even on the agenda. In a particularly smug response to opposition to the carbon tax, Canada’s minister of the environment, Catherine McKenna, stated, “Some provinces think that it should be free to pollute.” In response to this, I would state that some provinces feel good policy should always foster an environment that favours jobs and growth.

I find it amazing, but not in a good way, that when General Motors announced it was closing all operations on Oshawa, Mr. Trudeau immediately offered assistance to the displaced workers. It does not take a great deal of thought to see the hypocrisy here. The Trudeau government has spent a great

These are not the only issues that should matter in an election year, but they are two of the most important ones for Alberta. With different governments in Edmonton and Ottawa in 2019, there may be room for optimism for the Alberta economy. Frank Atkins is Research Chair of Finance & Capital Markets at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

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REAL SUCCESS MEANS STAYING INVOLVED // CODY BATTERSHILL

Real Success Means Staying Involved BY CODY BATTERSHILL

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ith all the approaching challenges of a brand-new year, let’s not forget we have an awful lot to be proud of.

If you volunteer for an organization like Canada Action, you’ve likely contributed precious time and effort to this national cause. You might also have learned that getting involved is sometimes the easy part; staying involved is a true accomplishment. But look at what this one organization has already accomplished through its network of committed volunteers: - We organized a rally outside the Calgary hotel where Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addressed a group on energy policy. Calgary Police praised the protest’s positive attitude, and estimated our turnout was in the thousands. - We built on that experience with another rally days later during an address of federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau, prompting another good, positive turnout. - Next came a rally outside the Edmonton venue where federal Minster of Natural Resources Amarjeet Sohi was speaking to the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce. The turnout was no less passionate about the importance of energy jobs to the Canadian economy. These positive demonstrations are a great example of people banding together to send a strong message to government that citizens are important, and no government can afford to ignore them.

THESE POSITIVE DEMONSTRATIONS ARE A GREAT EXAMPLE OF PEOPLE BANDING TOGETHER TO SEND A STRONG MESSAGE TO GOVERNMENT THAT CITIZENS ARE IMPORTANT, AND NO GOVERNMENT CAN AFFORD TO IGNORE THEM. No company that commits to “stop pipelines,” or that promotes the shutdown of our great, constantly evolving industry, deserves your business. If you work to undermine our nation’s economy and our families’ livelihoods, we simply won’t do business with you. With that in mind, I urge you to please go to our website at CanadaAction.ca, click on ‘campaigns,’ and sign our petition to #BoycottLush. Add your name to thousands of Canadians who have already signed, and who have said, “It’s time to speak up!” And it’s time to say “no thanks” to @ LushCosmetics. We have so much to be proud of – and so much more to do. So, let’s get ready for another Canada Action-packed year of making a real difference to this amazing country.

Every bit as important as these events are the online actions we’re driving. Take #BoycottLush for example.

Cody Battershill is a Calgary realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction. ca, a volunteer organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

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OF ENERGY

Check out our NEW bi-monthly Business of Energy feature starting in the February 2019 issue of Business in Calgary! Meaningful and engaging editorial from Cody Battershill, David Yager and other oil & gas industry experts. Digging deep with broad coverage on stories that advocate for the energy industry that affects all Albertans.

Contact Business in Calgary to be part of the April feature.

P 403.264.3270 | F 403.264.3276 info@businessincalgary.com | BusinessInCalgary.com


NEW YEAR, NEW VISION NEEDED TO SUPPORT ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN ALBERTA // AMBER RUDDY

New Year, New Vision Needed to Support Entrepreneurship in Alberta BY AMBER RUDDY

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he Alberta Advantage is often attributed to former premier Ralph Klein as a way to describe the lowtax, pro-business climate that built our province’s international reputation. But as governments have come and gone, that branding was dropped from official government documents, speeches and policy discussions. However, this doesn’t mean the vision the term inspires has disappeared from Albertans’ collective consciousness.

SMALL BUSINESSES MAKE UP 95 PER CENT OF ALL BUSINESSES IN THE PROVINCE, 35 PER CENT OF ALL PRIVATE SECTOR EMPLOYMENT, AND 25 PER CENT OF ALBERTA’S GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT.

It’s time to bring back the Alberta Advantage. In a recent survey by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), over a thousand business owners shared their perspectives. Without a doubt, the Alberta Advantage messaging still strongly resonates. When asked, “How do you feel about the provincial government bringing back ‘The Alberta Advantage’ as a way to describe the provincial brand?” two-thirds of respondents felt it was a strong vision for the province and the government should bring it back in both words and policy. One-in-five respondents believe there are elements still relevant, but it needs a major refresh if the government brings it back. Only five per cent indicated it is an oldfashioned way to describe Alberta today and we should move in a new direction. Over the past decade there have been many attempts at creating business-friendly policies ranging from an official Small Business Strategy under the former Progressive Conservative government to a reduction in the small business corporate tax rate from three to two per cent under the NDP. Nothing is partisan about supporting small business and good policies, and messaging should not be abandoned simply due to changing legislators.

As we begin to enter the fray of the upcoming election, let’s not forget about our huge demographic of hardworking business owners that create jobs and wealth, while contributing in a long list of ways to their local communities. For some reason, little time and attention is usually focused on this key demographic when we head to the ballot box. Small businesses make up 95 per cent of all businesses in the province, 35 per cent of all private sector employment, and 25 per cent of Alberta’s gross domestic product. Seventy-one per cent of Alberta small business owners don’t think their concerns will receive sufficient attention in the upcoming election campaign. Now is the chance to change that. Thoughtful policy needs to be offered and discussed during this election cycle to kick-start our economy and get business confidence back on track. Parties that fail to outline a strong small business vision do so at their peril. After all, the lifeblood of local independent entrepreneurs is truly the backbone of our economy. Let’s bring back the Alberta Advantage in a big way and once again make our business environment the envy of North America. Amber Ruddy is the director of provincial affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. She can be reached at amber.ruddy@cfib.ca. Follow her on Twitter @aruddy.

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SPENDING BACK TO PROSPERITY A BAD GAME PLAN // BRAD FIELD

Spending Back to Prosperity a Bad Game Plan BY BRAD FIELD

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he only difference between a tax man and a taxidermist,” as Mark Twain once wrote, “is that the taxidermist leaves the skin.” Canadian families are understandably feeling more than a bit bare these days. Every time they turn around, they’re being asked to pay more. More in income tax. More in CPP contributions. More in carbon taxes. The average Canadian household, according to the Fraser Institute, now spends more on taxes than any other single expense – more than housing, food and clothing combined. In 2017, the average Canadian family earned $85,883 in income. Of that, they paid $37,058 in total taxes – that’s 43 per cent of average income going to taxes. As opposed to helping make life more affordable for Calgarians, city council is piling it on. Its recent budget is raising user fees across the board. Want to take your kids to a public pool? That’s going to cost more. Fees for utilities like waste water, water and storm water? Those are going to be more expensive, too. So is throwing out your garbage, recycling and composting. The biggest hit to Calgarians’ pockets though is property tax hikes of roughly three per cent for each of the next four years. All of this is bad enough. In fact, it’s symptomatic of a city council – the highest paid in the country – losing touch with the lives and concerns of ordinary Calgarians. The move to hike non-residential property taxes by up to 10 per cent in this economic climate, however, is inexcusable. At 8.2 per cent, Calgary has the highest unemployment rate in the country outside of St. John’s. It’s clear to anyone in the business community our city is hurting. It should be clear to city council, too.

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Granted, many of the reasons for this are beyond the municipal government’s reach. Between failing to deliver a pipeline to tidewater and hostile legislation and regulations, the federal Liberals have delivered a serious blow to Canada’s energy industry. City council, however, has a responsibility not to exacerbate these challenges. But that’s exactly what it’s doing. Not all SMEs are going to be able to bear such a hefty tax hike, and even more Calgarians are going to be out of a job as a result. City hall is presenting Calgarians with a false choice: service cuts or tax and user fee hikes. Has it even considered cutting its operating budget? If not, why not? On an adjusted per capita basis, Calgary spends $500 million more annually than Edmonton. Surely some efficiencies could be found in a $4.1-billion operating budget, so Calgary families and businesses aren’t being asked to pay more at a time when they can least afford it. We can’t spend ourselves back to prosperity. Unfortunately, city council doesn’t seem to understand this simple fact. What Calgary needs is a serious plan to enhance its competitiveness, but our city council doesn’t have the experience or the expertise to accomplish this. As business people, it’s time for us to step up to the plate. We understand better than anyone why Calgary is falling behind cities like Saskatoon, so we need to start developing and advocating for solutions to attract investment and create jobs. It’s going to be up to us to get Calgary working.


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Worldplay Calgary smarts, success and growing pains It’s an exciting and outright historic chapter in Calgary’s transformation to the new normal. Just as many years ago when legions of oil and gas land men huddled at kitchen tables negotiating deals and driving the heart and soul of Calgary business, contemporary and innovative Calgary business leaders like Terry Mochar are upping their game. Mochar, CEO of Worldplay, is one of many working hard in Calgary’s technology sector as the city continues its changing business landscape while developing into a national and international IT hub. “We are really about helping organizations distribute video and the reason we do that: if you think about how the world has changed, how people are sharing ideas, how they’re building community, how they make decisions about what they buy, a lot of that is being done by video. “And as the world has shifted towards that, small [and] medium organizations are waking up realizing that nobody’s reading an extensive web page anymore or pages of text, especially the millennial generation. They’re taking in the 60-second video on what you do, who you are, why they should engage or talk about your product,” Mochar says. He makes the concept sound so simple. “Worldplay helps organizations expand, reach and engage audiences around the world using online video. We are a disruptive technology company that has revolutionized the video platform market by giving businesses affordable, white-label, enterprise tools to manage, control, distribute and monetize their video content. “When we started Worldplay, there was a need for something very simple out of the box … give a great back end for managing content but a front end for engaging with content. “That’s really what we’ve done. We’ve built a platform – a media company right in the box.”

The Calgary-based technology company has been chosen by Hockey Canada to power its video management system, providing (a rare) made-in-Canada solution. Worldplay’s Vidflex Enterprise platform now provides the technology to host and distribute all of Hockey Canada’s on-demand videos to players and fans across the country and around the world. For Terry Mochar, the late-November Hockey Canada decision is a win-win situation and achievement on several levels. “It is a testament to the strength of our Canadianmade video technology. Hockey Canada’s needs are quite complex, and our video platform meets their current requirements, with the scalability to grow with their increasing video engagement across Canada.” Is Calgary growing as an IT hub? “The Calgary technology sector continues to grow and Worldplay is proud to contribute to the economic diversification that is occurring in a changing business landscape. However, there are also some built-in challenges to being part of the growing tech sector in Calgary and attracting top-tech talent to help companies like ours to keep pace with our rate of growth. “Calgary is an amazing place to live, with a relatively affordable cost of living compared to Silicon Valley, Toronto or Vancouver. And, we have an exciting, innovative, growing technology sector,” he points out. “However, Calgary continues to get overlooked in favour of other Canadian markets because the support for technology innovation is simply not strong enough yet. In order to fuel the sector’s growth, Calgary needs to strongly communicate that story to help attract talent.”

ABOVE: TERRY MOCHA, CEO OF WORLDPLAY.

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Webber Academy President’s Breakfast Club Presenters Engage and Entertain Over Eggs at Webber Academy President’s Breakfast Club – ATB Speaker Series Webber Academy is a prestigious, private university preparatory school known for its high academic standards and traditional approach to teaching. But for the past six years it has been enriching its students’ experience in a non-traditional way. The Webber Academy President’s Breakfast Club – ATB Speaker Series invites presenters from varied backgrounds and speciality areas to address the group of guests and students over breakfast. Last year, the school hosted five breakfast club events in the school’s Performing Arts lobby that featured a diverse group of presenters. Colonel Eileen Collins, the first woman to command a U.S. spacecraft, spoke of leadership, teamwork and achieving her dreams of becoming a pilot and astronaut while ATB Financial chief transformation officer Wellington Holbrook spoke about transformation in business and the importance of adapting to change. The President’s Breakfast Club also invited Dr. Jonathan Schaeffer, then dean of science at the University of Alberta, to wow the crowd with his presentation on the future opportunities in artificial intelligence, and W. Brett Wilson, former Dragons’ Den panellist, shared stories and identified issues in business. Lastly, Peter Cowley talked about his role with the Fraser Institute, one of the top think-tanks in the world. Not to be outdone, the administration has invited impressive guests to be a part of this year’s President’s Breakfast Club – ATB Speaker Series as well. In November, Canadian recording artist Elsie Morden performed and talked about the organization she founded called No Time For That anti-

bullying society. She tours hundreds of schools each year in her fight against bullying. In December, Natalie Panek joined the club and spoke about her life as a rocket scientist and advocate for women in technology as she blazes a trail in Canadian space robotics. Dr. Sunil Verma, medical director at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre and professor and head of the department of oncology at the University of Calgary, is slated to speak to students and guests on February 12 about his groundbreaking cancer research. More speakers will be announced early in the year, ensuring students, staff and guests will be informed, entertained and well-fed all year long. ABOVE: NEIL WEBBER, PRESIDENT AND HEAD OF WEBBER ACADEMY AND COLONEL EILEEN COLLINS, THE FIRST WOMAN TO COMMAND A U.S. SPACECRAFT.

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The Big Ball to Shine a Spotlight on Men’s Mental Health Contrary to the politically-correct stance of today, men can do some things better than women. Conversely, women can do some things better than men. Case in point on the latter is taking care of one’s health. Women have the guys beat hands down. It’s not uncommon for many men to have never seen a doctor. When one looks at the top 13 causes of death in Alberta – including all cancers, heart disease, accidental or unintentional injury, diabetes, stroke, chronic liver disease and respiratory disease – men lead women in every category except one: women die more frequently than men from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The reason for this is that men simply do not live long enough to die from this disease process. The inequity in gender health becomes even more staggering when one studies men’s mental health struggles. More than 500 Albertans die of suicide every year. Of those, more than 400 are men between the ages of 30 to 69. Dr. Shelley Spaner, a radiologist/partner at Mayfair Diagnostics and a board member at the Calgary Prostate Cancer Centre (PCC), is determined to change the inequity in gender health. Her passion for the cause dates back to her first clinical rotation where she met a patient she will never forget. He was a man in his mid-70s dying as a consequence of multiple preventable diseases that had gone untreated. “I thought we could have done better for him,” says Spaner. “Over my years of medical school and residency, and in my early years of practice, I have met many other memorable patients. Overwhelmingly, the patients that have stood out to me were men who presented late in their clinical course,” she adds. Roughly two years ago, Spaner launched Women for Men’s Health with the support of the Prostate Cancer Centre. Since then, the group has held several successful fundraising events with proceeds helping to expand the recently-opened Men’s Health Clinic at the PCC.

February 1, 2019 will see the group’s biggest initiative to date with the presentation of the Women for Men’s Health gala taking place at Hotel Arts. The focus of the Big Ball – as the event is cheekily named – is men’s mental health. Karen Gosbee, a tireless advocate and community leader in mental health, will be ambassador for this year’s event. Her late husband, George Gosbee, a well-known and incredibly successful Calgary businessman, committed suicide at 48 years of age in November of last year. The gala promises to be an unforgettable evening and will no doubt be a success. “We look forward to welcoming you to the Big Ball on February 1, 2019 at Hotel Arts. With your support, we will help the men in our community who are suffering silently,” says Spaner. Tickets to the Big Ball are available by visiting www. thebigball.ca.

ABOVE: HOTEL ARTS IS THE PLACE TO BE FEB. 1, 2019 FOR THE WOMEN FOR MEN’S HEALTH SPONSORED BIG BALL. THE MUST-ATTEND EVENT WILL RAISE FUNDS - AND AWARENESS - FOR MEN’S MENTAL HEALTH AT THE RECENTLY OPENED MEN’S HEALTH CLINIC AT THE PROSTATE CANCER CENTRE. PICTURED ARE WOMEN FOR MEN’S HEALTH FOUNDER AND BIG BALL CHAIR DR. SHELLEY SPANER (LEFT) WITH BIG BALL AMBASSADOR KAREN GOSBEE. PHOTO SOURCE: BILL BROOKS/CALGARY HERALD.

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“I AM A PART OF EO, AND NOW YPO, BOTH BUSINESS-BASED MEMBER GROUPS. OUR EO GROUP DECIDED TO HOST OUR FORUM RETREAT AT SUNSHINE MOUNTAIN LODGE. WE SPENT AN AMAZING WEEKEND DIVING DEEP AS A TEAM WITH OUR MODERATOR. OUR HOSTS WERE INCREDIBLE; THEY TOOK CARE OF EVERY DETAIL. WE HAD WONDERFUL ACCOMMODATIONS AND DELICIOUS MEALS, INCLUDING A FINE-DINING DINNER TO END OFF OUR WEEKEND. THE EVENT MEETING SPACE WAS PERFECT FOR OUR NEEDS AND WE EVEN FOUND TIME TO DO SOME FUN OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES ON THE HILL. I WOULD HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS TO ANYONE LOOKING FOR A TEAM-BUILDING VENUE SPACE.” ~ MARIJA PAVKOVIC-TOVISSI, CEO, MAKAMI COLLEGE


OFF

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Stampede City Sessions It’s about live music and sharing it It was in October of 2011 when Candace and Lorne Webber taped the pilot episode of Stampede City Sessions – a live music broadcast series they created and developed based on their love of live music and growing up watching the iconic Austin City Limits episodes on PBS. Together with the help of an amazing team of broadcast professionals, volunteers, sponsors, friends and media partners, they have produced over 50 one-hour episodes taped at the beautiful Webber Academy Performing Arts Centre in Calgary. The 500-seat venue provides live music fans with intimate performances featuring local, national and international recording artists. For the artists, the series provides a platform to play a fulllength concert, while recording a one-hour music special that will air on KSPS Public Television (Spokane, Calgary,

Edmonton PBS), East Tennessee PBS, WKNO Memphis PBS and WNED Buffalo/Toronto PBS. The four PBS stations provide a potential viewing audience of over four million households in the United States and Canada. Episodes are also available to watch on demand by visiting the Stampede City Sessions website at www. stampedecitysessions.com. The website also provides information on upcoming live performances and broadcast tapings.

Watch for your 2019 Property Assessment Notice Assessment notices are now available. The City of Calgary mailed the notices Jan. 3, 2019 and the assessed values are also available online. The information contained in these assessment notices will be used to prepare the 2019 property tax bills. You can check, review and compare your notice online. Plus, sign up for eNotices.

Customer Review Period (Jan. 3 - March 12, 2019) If you have any questions about your property assessment, contact Assessment at 403-268-2888 during the Customer Review Period on now until March 12, 2019.

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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CANNABIS IN THE WORKPLACE // WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

Cannabis in the Workplace THE MISUNDERSTOOD HOT TOPIC BY JOHN HARDY

I

n contemporary culture and throughout the business world, cannabis has become a hot topic. Contentious and sometimes misunderstood, there is little doubt the legalization of marijuana will add a new dimension to Canadian workplaces. Despite the megahype, Canada is only the second country in the world (Uruguay legalized marijuana production, sale and consumption in 2013) and the first G7 nation to pass a law allowing a nationwide marijuana market. By comparison, 10 U.S. states and the District of Columbia currently allow for recreational marijuana use while 30 allow for medical use. There are two diametrically unrelated business aspects about Canadian legalization: the tracking and analysis of business bottom lines; and the stealth but vital impact of legalized cannabis on business as a workplace. According to early indicators, speculators, analysts and an investor frenzy, Bill C-45 – Canada’s “cannabis law” – may already be triggering a billion-dollar business bonanza. Some projections suggest total spending on marijuana could surge by up to 58 per cent, owing primarily to the fact users seem willing to pay a premium for legal access to the drug.

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Time (and profitability) will tell. In the mainstream business-as-a-workplace side of life, there is a surge of important considerations for business owners, managers and employees. Legalized cannabis is a workplace risk, for employers and employees, a workplace-safety issue and a workplace-productivity issue. And on various levels, it is a potentially murky HR procedure and enforcement issue. “We must remember that although legalization of cannabis may be new, impairment in the workplace certainly is not,” emphasizes Richard Truscott, the plugged-in Alberta and British Columbia vice president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB). “For many years employers have been dealing with issues related to alcohol or prescription drug use by employees at or before work.” With the vital matter of workplace safety and the risk of liability, lawsuits and employee rights when it comes to medical cannabis, consultants suggest there are definitely some important steps business owners need to take to respond to the new reality of legalized cannabis in the workplace.


Divorce isn’t easy, but it’s a path to a new beginning. “Any drug or substance, legally obtained or not, that could impair a person’s ability to do their work in a safe and productive manner must be considered by the employer and covered by a clear and wellcommunicated policy,” Truscott points out. “Unfortunately, determining if someone is impaired at work as a result of cannabis use is not as easy as it is with alcohol. So, it’s critical that employers know how to identify impairment, regardless of what is causing it, and then know what to do.” According to Jeff Bradshaw, president and CEO of the Calgarybased Cannabis Learning Series, which offers workplace safety and cannabis training programs, “Businesses are not prepared. Most companies have their head in the sand. Not that they don’t want to be ready; they just don’t know the resources and the timing. Like with an insurance policy, it’s easy to ignore. You don’t think you need it ’till you need it.”

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Michelle Berg, a prominent member of the Calgary HR community and CEO of Elevated HR Solutions, agrees that in business, as in life, facts, information and being prepared is vital. “Most businesses don’t know what they don’t know, are not educated in the effects of cannabis and are somewhat in a wait-andsee game, meaning we’ll need to see a few situations go to court before we fully know the dos and don’ts…. The truth is that there is no precedent or evidence to say

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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// WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

A InvItAtIon

one way or the other what the impact will be. As long as businesses are open to learning, pivot as required and handle situations as they arise, they will be ready and equipped for the impact.” When it all comes down to it, cannabis in the workplace is about liability, not morality.

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Truscott points out small businesses typically don’t have lawyers or HR specialists on staff, so they do need support to prepare for the new reality of legalized cannabis – and differentiate between situations involving recreational and medicinal use. “Running a business means identifying and mitigating a wide range of risks. In terms of impairment in the workplace, it is critical for the employer to have clear policies in place that are proactively communicated to employees and applied on a consistent basis. There is a ton of information, resources, tools and templates that business owners can access. “The onus is on the business owner to make sure they have taken reasonable steps to deal with impairment in the workplace. And it’s never a bad idea to have proactively identified a lawyer with the necessary expertise, in case these workplace issues become legal ones,” he says. For Mark Cooper, director of communication with the Calgary Chamber, it is an aspect of business responsibility. “Businesses have an obligation to provide a safe workplace for their employees and many of our traditional industries have a strong culture of workplace safety. Most businesses have policies in place for safety-sensitive positions and for dealing with impairment and alcohol and they are making the necessary updates for legalized cannabis. “There have been a lot of changes to labour-related legislation in the province in the last few years and we think that businesses are aware and working on policies. The Chamber has been hosting workshops and webinars for members over the past year in anticipation of the changes.” There is much consultation and many experts agree with the caution that, as far as businesses are concerned, the buzz, excitement and newness of Canada’s Bill C-45 may still be triggering some misunderstanding. For office jobs, the message is essentially that nothing has changed: employees are expected to show up sharp enough to perform on the job. Unless a legitimate prescription for medicinal marijuana exists, the workplace does not need to accommodate an employee’s cannabis habit. “Some of the issues employers may now have to deal with,” Bradshaw adds, “include a possible increase in workplace accidents and impaired driving. Workplaces will also have to differentiate between recreational users, for whom a ‘no-tolerance’ policy is fair and medicinal users who have the right to be reasonably accommodated by their employer.

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// WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

“Employees do not have any rights with respect to recreational cannabis in the workplace. They do have rights when it comes down to a medical authorization,” he says. “I think there’s going to be all kinds of lawsuits with respect to an employer terminating someone’s employment because they think they’re using cannabis on the job and they really don’t know – or can’t determine – the difference between medicinal and recreational.” A recent “All Staff Memo” issued by a major Canadian employer said it bluntly but succinctly: “A person does not have a right to be impaired in the workplace.” “For large companies with their own human resource and safety departments, putting workplace rules in place to reflect the new reality of legal marijuana is not that difficult,” the CFIB’s Truscott notes. “But for small employers without expertise in this area, there is lots of confusion. Common questions include whether cannabis can be consumed on workplace premises, what responsibility an employer bears if an impaired employee or customer has an accident on site, and whether employers can ask employees to submit to a drug test. “Policy update memos and emails don’t work. If you don’t effectively train your front-line staff, it’s useless,” argues Bradshaw, who worked closely with Calgarybased Checker Cabs for last October’s introduction of Checker’s Fit for Duty campaign, stressing the importance of zero tolerance for workplace impairment. “It’s an important and proactive prevention and awareness campaign and all 900 Checker Cabs now feature Fit For Duty stickers as a pledge for staff to know and sign off on.” According to Kurt Enders, president and CEO of the Checker Transportation Group, despite the recent attention about legalized cannabis, it’s business as usual in the workplace. “We have always had a zero-tolerance policy for our drivers in regard to driving while under the influence of any substance that causes impairment, including stress, fatigue or mental and physical illness. “It’s early in the cannabis legalization stage but we are treating it no differently than alcohol for not only our 1,400 drivers but also our staff. Impairment is impairment. Safety is a priority for Checker and the customers we serve. We want our drivers and staff to be well rested, unimpaired, uninjured and physically and mentally fit to safely perform their day-to-day tasks. “This is going to be a difficult time,” Richard Truscott cautions. “Business owners can get themselves into trouble, not knowing what they don’t know.”

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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CALGARY’S 2019 CONDO MARKET // REAL ESTATE

CALGARY’S 2019 CONDO MARKET LINGERING CHALLENGES AND POSITIVE MOMENTUM

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CALGARY’S 2019 CONDO MARKET // REAL ESTATE

BY COLLEEN WALLACE

A

llowing for fluctuating regional real estate factors like the economy and consumer trends, the Calgary condo market is gaining momentum despite some speed bumps in 2018. Thanks to urban sprawl and unaffordability, condos are rising in suburban areas, close to transit hubs, shopping and services – making them a great alternative to traditional single-family homes. According to Statistics Canada, between 2011 and 2016, the growth rate of Canadian households living in condominiums was up 16.6 per cent in census metropolitan areas (CMAs). Smaller cities and towns (non-CMAs) were not far behind, with the growth rate increasing by 11.9 per cent. “When it comes to the condo market, there are many variables and factors to consider,” explains Ann-Marie Lurie, CREB chief economist. “There has been a reduction in demand due to the combination effect of new mortgage rules and stringent lending conditions, Calgary’s unemployment rates in traditional sectors and increasing competition in the Calgary rental market, although rental rates are rising, which is a positive for the condo market. “There is a Calgary pattern of activity,” she says. “Resale and detached homes, at 61 per cent, are still a majority of Calgary sales. Apartment/condos are usually in the 17 per cent range but this past year it has been lower, in the 15 per cent range.” She cites there is little value in hindsight but CREB numbers demonstrate there was a lot of condo product under construction in the past four years. Calgary’s peak condo sales were 4,805 units in 2014. By the end of last year, sales were 2,316, well below long-term averages. “Although there were drops in sales in all types of markets, the condo sector

“ALTHOUGH THERE WERE DROPS IN SALES IN ALL TYPES OF MARKETS, THE CONDO SECTOR HAS BEEN PARTICULARLY CHALLENGED OVER THE PAST THREE YEARS.” ~ ANN-MARIE LURIE has been particularly challenged over the past three years.” The condo benchmark price at the end of 2014 was $290,000. By the end of 2018, the benchmark price has dropped to $257,000. According to a recent CREB report, year-to-date apartment/condo sales are nearly seven per cent below last year and, despite the easing inventories, the months of supply remains elevated at seven months. Year-to-date apartment/condo prices have eased by 2.8 per cent and remain 14 per cent below 2014 highs. Declines occurred across all districts, with the steepest drops in the northeast, east and south districts. Like the fine layers of an onion, despite downturn and recovery trending, it is often a challenge to extrapolate the condo-specific stats and factors from the bigger Calgary real estate picture.

ABOVE: ANN-MARIE LURIE, CREB CHIEF ECONOMIST.

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// REAL ESTATE

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The focus of Calgary condo developers and new-home builders is similar but drastically different. Their market strategy and planning varies dramatically although they share crucial attention to aspects like the uniqueness of the Calgary market, the economy, consumer confidence, demographics, affordability, last year’s mortgage stress test, the fluctuating resale market balance, Calgary’s labour market and existing inventory.

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Two of Calgary’s most popular and successful condo projects are University District, the 184-acre residential and commercial development on lands owned by the University of Calgary; and the Concord, Calgary’s newest luxury highrise and, as some say, the most grandiose condo development – at $350 million – the city has yet seen.

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“There’s still a lot of market uncertainty given rising interest rates and new lending rules,” points out Maureen Henderson, director of marketing and communications with West Campus Development Trust, developers of University District. “These variables mean that there are less qualified buyers in the market with a readiness to purchase, more competition and price sensitivity as people wait longer to save a down payment or wait for better incentives.”

ABOVE: MAUREEN HENDERSON, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS WITH WEST CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT TRUST.

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“THESE VARIABLES MEAN THAT THERE ARE LESS QUALIFIED BUYERS IN THE MARKET WITH A READINESS TO PURCHASE, MORE COMPETITION AND PRICE SENSITIVITY AS PEOPLE WAIT LONGER TO SAVE A DOWN PAYMENT OR WAIT FOR BETTER INCENTIVES.” ~ MAUREEN HENDERSON Grant Murray, senior vice president of sales with Concord Pacific Developments – developers of the Concord and its breathtaking and luxurious features and amenities – admits that although the Concord targets a unique niche market, sales have been steady but not immune from recent Calgary speed bumps. “Of course, the downturn impacted the high-end as well as the standard condo market. Most were begun when oil was $104, then down to $27 and now about $65. It wasn’t quite a sky-is-falling disaster but combined with interest rates, new rules and qualifications for new buyers, some developers pulled in the reins. “But while nobody is sure of specific reasons,” he adds, “there is a good feeling of optimism. There is growing diversity in Calgary and no speculation tax that is discouraging foreign buyers in markets like Toronto and Vancouver. For investors in Calgary, it’s only the five per cent GST. “Among the three cities we build in – Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto – when it comes to perception of value, affordability and desirability, Calgary is the place to live.” Henderson shares the Calgary positivity. “Buyers are increasingly looking for value. At University District the value proposition goes beyond the price tag for a condo or its finishes. People understand that community and building features, access to transit, open spaces, all add up to a better quality of life and they’re factoring these into the buying equation. “Many of our buyers are downsizers, people who are living in single-family homes and want the convenience and amenities available in a condominium without sacrificing square footage.”

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A VOICE FOR BUSINESS // COVER

A

VOICE

FOR BUSINESS SANDIP LALLI REFLECTS ON HER FIRST YEAR AS HEAD OF THE CALGARY CHAMBER AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURE BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

A

lmost one year ago, Sandip Lalli assumed the role of president and CEO of the Calgary Chamber. The private-sector business executive started the job at a time when Calgary sat in a precarious spot: slowly emerging from a devastating economic downturn, suffering massively discounted oil prices and debilitating pipeline restraints, facing burdensome governmental policies and decisions, and managing steep unemployment which left much of the downtown core empty. It was not, it’s safe to say, the best the city had been. Seemingly undeterred by the circumstances, Lalli assumed the role with gusto and, 10 months later, is happy she did. “The first word that comes to mind [when I think about the last year] is fantastic,” says Lalli. “Every day I wake up and remind myself that I am in such a privileged position to be able to make tangible differences to businesses, individuals and Calgary.” One reason for her optimism: the strong and positive response to the 128-year-old Chamber’s “It’s Grow Time” rally cry, unveiled in September. Aimed at inspiring and challenging the Calgary business community to look to the future and grow, the initiative features Calgary businesses from all sectors and all sizes banding together with a unified voice.

“Businesses have come on board and are united in their sense of purpose and the opportunity they have to positively influence Calgary’s future,” Lalli declares. Local heavyweights Imperial Oil, Nutrien, RGO and TransCanada have all voiced their support. There have been a lot of challenges too, not least of which has been the economy. Lalli also notes the Olympics plebiscite cycle as another low point. “I felt it was disjointed,” she laments. “The communication between all levels of government and, in turn, with the public, was frustrating to a lot of people. However, it is vital that the city fails fast from this, gets back on its feet and pushes forward.” She believes 2019 will be a significant year for the city. “With two elections scheduled, the focus is going to be all about competitiveness, investment, deal flow and supporting businesses to scale. We will advocate for change to eliminate and/or reduce the many barriers that governments have put in the way of free market economics.” Government policy over the past years, she continues, has prevented the business community from the exceptional growth it envisions. “The cost of doing business in Canada has increased while in other jurisdictions it has decreased,” she bemoans.

RIGHT: SANDIP LALLI, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE CALGARY CHAMBER. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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A VOICE FOR BUSINESS // COVER

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A VOICE FOR BUSINESS // COVER

For example, she points to the impact of sharply increasing municipal property taxes, along with other layered costs such as the minimum wage increase and carbon tax. Added uncertainty comes from the provincial royalty review and increases to corporate taxes. “At the same time, a flurry of federal and provincial unfriendly business policies and regulatory roadblocks have stifled competitiveness and stood in the way of Calgary’s economic recovery,” Lalli continues. “As examples, we point to the federal oil tanker ban, a lack of nimble response to U.S. business tax reform and a slowing of the regulatory approval process through constant shifting of the goalposts.” In addition, she notes, the proposed Bill C-69 threatens to add further regulatory delays and puts a chill on investment. “We recommend that all levels of government stop burdening businesses with increasing costs, fully consult businesses before moving the policy goalposts, and incorporate a ‘layered cost assessment’ as part of the

policy development process to mitigate current and future unintended consequences,” she appeals. During her second year at the Chamber, Lalli plans to unite more businesses under the “It’s Grow Time” rally cry, as well as continue its work on policy and advocacy. “It’s what we call being the podium of record,” she explains. “We are both an active voice for the business community, as well as a catalyst to bring forward a united voice from businesses to the ‘podium’ to advocate for business-friendly policies. We contend that what’s good for business really is good for the city.” While this city isn’t her first home, Lalli, along with her husband and seven-year-old daughter, are proud Calgarians today. “Calgary is a great place for business as we have grit,” she smiles. “We have fight, a desire to create and a stubbornness to never give in. I know our business community is one of the most supportive business communities in the country and every day something new and exciting is happening.”

ABOVE: SANDIP LALLI SPEAKS TO SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS AT THE SMALL BUSINESS WEEK EXPO, THE LARGEST EXPO SPECIFICALLY DESIGN FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZED BUSINESSES IN CANADA.

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A VOICE FOR BUSINESS // COVER

In addition to being plugged into Calgary’s business community, she sits on a number of boards, including the Royal Canadian Mint, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation and the Global Transportation Hub. Originally from Edmonton, Lalli grew up in a typical Canadian environment of family and hockey. “I grew up with my parents, grandparents and two older brothers,” she says. “My parents were very engaged in the community and that sense of always looking for opportunities to pay it forward has remained with me.” Having travelled a fair bit around the world, she’s grateful for living in Alberta and, more specifically, Canada. “My fabric of being from Edmonton and Canada shapes how I see the world,” she says. Though she never wanted to be something or someone in particular, she did have a strong feeling of wanting the world to be equitable and wanting to have the opportunity to challenge inequity in some way in the future. She also enjoyed business and was a participant in Junior Achievement, which was her first exposure to the business world. She studied at both NAIT and the University of Alberta before she sat for her chartered professional accountant, certified management accountant qualification. She then completed her MBA at Athabasca University and in 2009 was awarded her doctorate in business administration from the University of Phoenix. “I was awarded a fellow, chartered professional accounting, in 2015,” she says. “That was a great culmination of my business experience and education.” Lalli began her career as an accountant at a family counselling centre in Edmonton. She then moved to Calgary, still in the finance industry. Soon after, she was recruited by Cargill Limited, one of the largest global privatelyheld companies providing food, agriculture, financial and industrial products and services to the world. This was the start of a long and varied journey with the company that covered several roles across several countries, including the U.S., China, Japan, India, Australia, England, Switzerland, Russia, Papua New Guinea and Mexico. Her most recent role prior to joining the Chamber was as president and CEO of Calgary’s Keystone Excavating Ltd., a

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role that did not end the way Lalli originally envisioned. She was hired by the board of directors in June of 2015 to turn the 35-year-old company around and increase its value. For the previous five years, it had been in double-digit decline. The economic downturn in Alberta, however, made recovery virtually impossible. “The economic decline occurred surprisingly fast, as investor confidence in Alberta’s economy weakened and construction projects vanished at the same time current projects were being scaled back,” she explains. “Further, the increasing regulatory burden made it clear to me that the company needed a strategic change.” She considered a number of options: divest by closing the Edmonton office and reducing the Calgary office, exit the residential market (except for two legacy clients), enter the environmental reclamation industry with an additional capital commitment, or sell the entire company. “Alternatively, I considered liquidating and proceeding with a sale of assets,” she concedes. “Even though I knew that I would be working my way out of a job, I felt that a sale of assets and closure was the correct decision – but I wanted to cease operations while retaining Keystone’s legacy.” With intimate knowledge of the effects of the recession, Lalli does believe Calgary is on the other side of it today. “Because a recession isn’t all about commodity prices, it’s about the marketplace,” she explains. “And Calgary’s marketplace is on the up. There are still challenges to overcome but the economy is progressing.” It’s a crossroads moment in Calgary’s history, she says, and the goal is to enable the business community to scale up and grow. Oil and gas, she maintains, is a vital industry. “Canada is a responsible natural resources producer that sits on some of the largest proven oil and gas reserves in the world. The fact that we still only have one main customer for our product is quite frankly an atrocity. We need to consistently be demonstrating our prowess in sustainable development while continuing to raise the bar on innovation that will reduce our environmental footprint.”


A VOICE FOR BUSINESS // COVER

Governments too, she says, have a role: to unite on a responsible energy strategy that will diversify the customer base and help Canada compete globally for investment. “We are losing $80 million a day and tens of thousands of jobs and residual benefits as we dither,” she says. At the same time, while recognizing the world will rely on oil and gas for many decades to come, Lalli urges the province and business community to be brave and catalytic voices in essential conversations about the world’s future relationship with energy and how to power our lives more sustainably. Lalli encourages integrated industry, where a company solves problems within multiple industries. “Calgary has

been leading the world when it comes to agriculture, technology, energy, manufacturing, creative services and life sciences, and we will continue to be a city that focuses on growth and innovation.” She views the Chamber’s purpose, in this regard, as building a community that nourishes, powers and inspires the world. “And that’s a vision that is applicable to all businesses, no matter what size, stage of life or industry,” she adds. Though an uncertain and difficult time for Calgary, Lalli and the Chamber will continue to provide strong, measured and visionary leadership for the city’s business community. The year 2019 will be anything but boring.

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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SERVING STUDENTS, PARENTS AND COMMUNITIES // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

ALBERTA INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS:

SERVING STUDENTS, PARENTS AND COMMUNITIES

W

hat are independent schools? Who goes to them? Why should “we” pay for them? Are they held accountable by anyone? Do they serve a public good? These are only a few of the questions surrounding the topic of school choice in Alberta. Independent schools, which are referred to as private schools in legislation, are schools that are independently operated by a not-for-profit corporation or society. In a 2017-18 provincial system of 719,889 students, 28,076 (approximately four per cent) attended independent (private) schools. Another 6,563 attended community-based private Early Childhood Services sites (kindergartens) where about 75 per cent of the students have special needs. As an aggregated group, the population of students is approximately five per cent of the education system. In total, there are over 250 independent schools and ECS operators in Alberta. Parents choose to send their children to independent schools for many reasons. Some schools are operated with a special

focus on students with specific learning needs. Others are built to offer a unique type of educational approach like Montessori or Waldorf. Sometimes parents choose a school that respects and supports their child’s faith and world view (like Sikh, Jewish, Muslim or Christian), or because they desire that their child learn about their culture, or for a specific academic, athletic or other educational focus. There are those who would suggest that Albertans can’t afford to pay for educational choices such as independent schools. However, the reality is that independent schools save taxpayers millions of dollars each year. The math is quite straightforward. Every child in Alberta between the ages of 6-16 is legally mandated in the School Act to receive an education. When parents choose to place that child in a public or separate school, it costs the public purse around $13,000. Alberta independent schools receive only partial funding that equates to around $5,200 per year of public money. Therefore, each child that attends an independent school saves Albertans around $8,000 per year. Milke (2015)

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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SERVING STUDENTS, PARENTS AND COMMUNITIES // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

ALTHOUGH EACH INDEPENDENT SCHOOL IS OPERATED BY ITS OWN SCHOOL BOARD, ALBERTA EDUCATION ENSURES THOROUGH ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES ARE IN PLACE. EACH YEAR, THE SCHOOLS MUST SUBMIT AN AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENT; THIS CONFIRMS THAT THE PUBLIC DOLLARS THE SCHOOL RECEIVES ARE APPROPRIATELY SPENT ON THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF THE STUDENTS.

calculated that independent schools have saved government $750 million over the past five years alone. In order to be able to operate, many independent schools have to charge tuition in order to pay for the remaining costs of operating the school. Tuition fees will vary considerably depending on the kind of capital investments for buildings, teacher/student ratios, extracurricular program activities and other program enhancements. Additionally, there are often other fundraising initiatives that are run to help alleviate the cost of operating a school. Some schools also offer bursaries to assist parents in managing the tuition requirements. Parents from a broad socio-economic, cultural, religious and geographic background choose to send their children to independent schools. Although each independent school is operated by its own school board, Alberta Education ensures thorough accountability measures are in place. Each year, the schools must submit an audited financial statement; this confirms that the public dollars the school receives are appropriately spent on the educational needs of the students. Most independent schools are accredited; to maintain this accreditation they must teach a program of studies that is approved by the minister of education, and they must hire Alberta-certified teachers. There is also regular onsite monitoring by Alberta Education staff, and schools must annually submit education results reports, and three-year plans. Independent schools are also incredibly accountable to their parents; as schools of choice, there must be strong alignment between the needs of the student and the program being offered, or else parents will choose to place

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JANUARY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

their child in a different institution. To ensure the school is meeting the needs of the child, there is often a heightened emphasis on collaboration and parental engagement in independent schools. One of the most powerful arguments in support of independent schools is also the most basic. They serve a public good. Education, at its core, is about providing an opportunity for children to learn, grow and equip themselves to be ethical, engaged and innovative citizens. To ensure this occurs, Alberta Education surveys students, parents and teachers in all schools in Alberta each year. The results show that independent schools are very successful at meeting student needs. The 2017 data indicates that independent schools are safe and caring (93.6% vs. provincial average of 89.5%), provide excellent education quality (94.6% vs. 90.1% prov. avg), prepare students for work (93.9% vs. 82.7% prov. avg), equip students for their role as citizens (90.4% vs. 83.7% prov. avg) and promote parental involvement (90.2% vs. 81.2% prov. avg). Independent schools help educate Alberta’s students and they do so well. Their graduates become productive citizens who work together with graduates from other schools in Alberta, as well as with immigrants from all over the world, to help build a diverse, successful and inclusive society. For more information, visit the Association of Independent Schools & Colleges (AISCA) at www.aisca.ab.ca. AISCA represents approximately 90 per cent of Alberta’s publiclyaccredited independent schools as well as 65 per cent of the private early childhood services programs.


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Airdrie Koinonia Christian School

Calgary Chinese Alliance School

Calgary Waldorf School

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Preschool, ECS, Grades 1 - 12 77 Gateway Drive NE Airdrie T4B 0J6 Phone: (403) 948-5100 • Fax: (403) 948-5563 connect@akcs.com www.akcs.com

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1 – 12 150 Beddington Boulevard NE, Calgary, AB T3K 2E2 Phone: (403) 274-6923 • Fax: (403) 275-7799 chineseschoolcalgarychinesealliance.org

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Preschool, ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9 515 Cougar Ridge Drive SW, Calgary, AB T3H 5G9 Phone: (403) 287-1868 • Fax: (403) 287-3414 info@calgarywaldorf.org www.calgarywaldorf.org

Akiva Academy Accredited Nursery, Pre-Kindergarten, ECS, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7- 9 140 Haddon Road SW, Calgary, AB T2V 2Y3 Phone: (403) 258-1312 • Fax: (403) 258-3812 office@akiva.ca www.akiva.ca

Alberta Chung Wah School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 10- 12 #270, 328 Centre Street SE, Calgary, AB T2G 4X8 Phone: (403) 271-8033 • Fax: (403) 288-8887 info@albertachungwahschool.ca

Aurora Learning Calgary Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 3 – 12 Unit 137, 5305 McCall Way NE, Calgary, AB T2E 7N7 Phone: (403) 277-9535 Calgary.admin@sterling.education

Banbury Crossroads School Accredited / Eligible for Funding J/K,ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 B1 #201, 2451 Dieppe Avenue SW,Calgary, AB T3E 7K1 Phone: (403) 270-7787 • Fax: (403) 270-7486 general@banburycrossroads.com www.banburycrossroads.com Offers Home Education Program Offers Home Education Blended Program

Bearspaw Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Jr. K, Sr. K, Grades 1 – 12 15001 - 69 Street NW, Calgary, AB T3R 1C5 Phone: (403) 295-2566 • Fax: (403) 275-8170 info@bearspawschool.com www.bearspawschool.com

Bethel Christian Academy Accredited ECS, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 2220 - 39 Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6P7 Phone: (403) 735-3335 • Fax: (403) 219-3059 tbetts@encountergod.org

Calgary Academy Empowering unique learners to unleash their potential while pursuing lives of passion and purpose. Kindergarten-Grade 12 1677 93 St SW, Calgary, AB T3H 0R3 403-686-6444 admissions@calgaryacademy.com calgaryacademy.com

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Calgary Chinese Private School Accredited / Eligible for Funding K, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7-9, Grades 10 - 12 128 2nd Ave SW, Calgary, AB T2P 0B9 Phone: (403) 264-2233 • Fax: (403) 282-9854

Calgary Chinese School Accredited Grades 10 – 12 #110, 138 - 18 Ave SE, Calgary, AB T2G 5P9 Phone: 403-461-9797 • Fax: (403) 228-5330 changclaire@yahoo.com

Calgary French & International School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Preschool, Junior Kindergarten, Kindergarten, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 12 700 - 77 Street SW, Calgary, AB T3H 5R1 Phone: (403) 240-1500 • Fax: (403) 249-5899 www.cfis.com admissions@cfis.com

Calgary Islamic Private School Akram Jomaa Campus Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades K-12 2612 - 37 Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T1Y 5L2 Phone: (403) 248-2773 • Fax: (403) 569-6654 info@cislive.ca Principal: Mr. Asad Choudhary

Calgary Islamic School Accredited / Eligible for Funding K, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9 225 - 28 Street SE, Calgary, AB, T2A 5K4 Phone: 587-353-8900 • Fax: 587-353-8999 info.omar@cislive.ca Omar Bin Al-Khattab Campus

Calgary Jewish Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Nursery - Grade 9 6700 Kootenay Street SW, Calgary, AB T2V 1P7 Phone: (403) 253-3992 • Fax: (403) 255-0842 schneiderw@cja.ab.ca www.cja.ab.ca

Calgary Quest School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 3405 Spruce Drive SW,. c/o Spruce Cliff Elementary Calgary, AB T3C 0A5 Phone: (403) 253-0003 • Fax: (403) 253-0025 info@calgaryquestschool.com

JANUARY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Chinook Winds Adventist Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 10101 - 2nd Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3B 5T2 Phone: (403) 286-5686 • Fax: (403) 247-1623 lmelashenko@cwaa.net

Clear Water Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding JK, K, & Grades 1- 12 2521 Dieppe Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3E 7J9 Phone: (403) 217-8448 • Fax: (403) 217-8043 clearwateracademy.com

Columbia College Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 10 – 12 802 Manning Road NE, Calgary, AB T2E 7N8 Phone: (403) 235-9300 • Fax: (403) 272-3805 Columbia@Columbia.ab.ca www.columbia.ab.ca

Delta West Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding JK, K, Grades 1- 12 414 - 11A Street NE, Calgary, AB T2E 4P3 Phone: (403) 290-0767 • Fax: (403) 290-0768 info@deltawestacademy.ca www.deltawestacademy.ca

Eastside Christian Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS – 9 Home Schooling Options 1320 Abbeydale Drive SE, Calgary, AB T2A 7L8 Phone: 403-569-1003 • Fax: (403) 569-7557 admin@eastsidechristianacademy.ca www.eastsidechristianacademy.ca Offers Home Education Blended Program

Edison School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 Site 11, P.O. Box 2, R.R. 2 Hwy 2A, 1KM North of Okotoks AB T1S 1A2 Phone: (403) 938-7670 • Fax: (403) 938-7224 office@edisonschool.ca www.edisonschool.ca

Equilibrium School Accredited / Eligible for Funding 707 - 14 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 2A4 Phone: (403) 283-1111 • Fax: (403) 270-7786 school@equilibrium.ab.ca www.equilibrium.ab.ca


WEBBER ACADEMY P R E PA R I N G S T U D E N T S T O T H R I V E

IN UNIVERSITY AND BEYOND

HOW TO EXCEL IN JUNIOR HIGH e secret is to be well prepared before leaving Grade 6. at means being fast in mental arithmetic and skilled with computers. It means being able to read rapidly and to write and spell with confidence. It means doing homework promptly, without fuss, by sheer force of habit. it means always tackling the toughest assignments first because the rest then seem easy. ose taught such habits and skills, in or before Grade 6, gain an incalculable advantage. If they are firmly on top of their school work - instead of it being on top of them- they’ll be better balanced, happier and more likely to excel.

#1 SCHOOL BASED ON 2018 PAT'S AND DIPLOMA EXAMS #1 Private/Charter School #1 Preschool #1 Summer Camp

Learn more at WebberAcademy.ca Information Evenings January 17 and February 21, 2019 at 7:00 PM


WONDER LIVES HERE

River Valley is an inclusive school that harnesses the innate curiosity in children to ensure that every student, regardless of age or ability will flourish academically and socially.

River Valley School has two campuses:

Our Early Learning Campus offers full-day programs for 3-year-olds to Kindergarten. A half-day or part-time option is also available for our 3-year-olds.

The Elementary Campus offers Grades 1 - 6

BOOK A TOUR AT RIVERVALLEYSCHOOL.CA AND SEE WHY WE SAY WONDER LIVES HERE

River Valley is accredited by Alberta Education, the Association of Independent Schools and Colleges in Alberta (AISCA) and is a Canadian Accredited Independent Schools (CAIS) Candidate School. River Valley is also the only school in Alberta to offer the Arrowsmith Program for students Grade 1 - 6.


At River Valley School, academic success is essential, but social and character development are just as important. We offer a warm, nurturing environment where our students feel genuinely cared about and supported. This builds confidence and establishes a strong foundation for kids to explore who they are – their passions, gifts, hopes and dreams. While regularly ranking among Alberta’s top schools, we are as different from other schools as our students are from one another. How we teach each student is based on who they are, how they learn and what engages them. All of our classes have a low pupil teacher ratio, maximizing instructional time and the personalization of learning. Our students are immersed in inquiry and project based learning experiences that challenge them to question, explore and create. In addition to core subjects, students enjoy enriched programming in Music, French, Art, Health, Drama, Library, Physical and Outdoor Education. Being a school that values innovation and best practice, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are integrated within the curriculum including coding for grades 1 – 6, robotics, augmented reality, app/web design and a 1:1 iPad program in Grades 4 - 6. There is also a school-wide use of the Seesaw App for “in the moment” parent, child and teacher communication. With our Before and After School programs, River Valley offers a safe, caring environment for your child 7 AM to 6 PM (Monday to Friday) yearround, as well as a fully owned and operated bussing service.

Today’s students are tomorrow’s leaders, innovators, healers, educators, visionaries, artists, entrepreneurs, and environmental stewards. Let’s work together to prepare your child for success in our rapidly changing world.


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Foothills Academy Accredited - For students with learning disabilities Grades 3 - 12 745 - 37 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4T1 Phone: 403.270.9400 Fax: 403.270.9438 Email: info@foothillsacademy.org www.foothillsacademy.org

Greek Community School of Calgary Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades K - 6 1 Tamarac Crescent SW, Calgary, AB T3C 3B7 Phone: (403) 246-4553 • Fax: (403) 246-8191 admin@calgaryhellenic.com www.calgaryhellenic.com/Our-School

Calgary Italian School Accredited Language School Age 5 – Grade 12, Adults 416, 1st Ave NE Calgary AB T2E 0B4 Phone: (403) 264-6349 clcic@shaw.ca www.italianschoolcalgary.com

Janus Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1 - 12 2223 Spiller Road SE, Calgary, AB T2G 4G9 Phone: (403) 262-3333 • Fax: (403) 693-2345 contact@janusacademy.org www.janusacademy.org

Khalsa School Calgary Educational Foundation Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7 - 9 RR6 Site 1 Box 2, Calgary, AB T2M 4L5 Phone: (403) 293-7712 • Fax: (403) 293-2245 cheryl.steadman@khalsaschoolcalgary.ca

Calgary German Language School Society Accredited Preschool - Grades 12, Adult Classes located at Bowcroft Elementary 3940 73rd Street NW, Calgary, AB T3B 2L9 germanlanguageschoolcalgary@gmx.com www.germanlanguageschoolcalgary.com/index.html Beatrice Binmore (Chair) Steve Zitterer (Secretary) Dagmar Blaettermann (Treasurer)

Lycée Louis Pasteur Maternelle (3-5 yrs old), Elementary (Gr. 1–5), Collège (Gr. 6–9), Lycée (Gr. 10-12) 4099 Garrison Blvd. SW, Calgary, AB T2T 6G2 Phone: (403) 243-5420 • Fax: (403) 287-2245 bureau@lycee.ca www.lycee.ca “The International French School”

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Maria Montessori Education Centre of Calgary (MMEC)

Renfrew Educational Services Park Place Centre

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Toddler, Preschool, ECS, Grades 1- 9 2634 12 Ave NW, Calgary AB T2N 1K6 Toddler, Preschool, ECS 1721 29 Ave SW, Calgary AB T2T 6T7 403-668-8538 info@mmec.ca www.mmec.ca

Accredited / Eligible for Funding, ECS for typical children and children with disabilities ECS for typical children and children with disabilities 3688 – 48th Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Montessori School of Calgary Accredited / Eligible for Funding, A.M.I accredited Preschool (3-6 yrs), Grades 1- 6 2201 Cliff Street SW, Calgary, AB T2S 2G4 Phone: (403) 229-1011 • Fax: (403) 229-4474 admissions@msofc.ca www.montessorischoolofcalgary.com

Mountain View Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 3915 34 Street NE, Calgary, AB T1Y 6Z8 Phone: (403) 217-4346 • Fax: (403) 249-4312 Office@mountainviewacademy.ca www.mountainviewacademy.ca

New Heights School and Learning Services Accredited / Eligible for Funding D.S.E.P.S. | ECS, Preschool (2 ½ - 6 years), Grades 1– 12 4041 Breskens Drive SW, Calgary, AB T3E 7M1 Phone: (403) 240-1312 info@newheightscalgary.com www.newheightscalgary.com

North Point School for Boys Accredited - Independent School that taps into boys’ natural curiosity and energy as a foundation for life-long learning. Grades K-9 2445 – 23rd Avenue SW Calgary, AB T2T 0W3 Phone: 403-744-5214 info@northpoint.school www.northpoint.school

Phoenix Education Foundation Accredited Kindergarten (k), Home Education (1-12) BlendEd (1-9) Online (1-9) 320 19 Street SE, Calgary, AB T2E 6J6 Phone: (403) 265-7701 • Fax: (403) 275-7715 info@phoenixfoundation.ca Offers Home Education Program

Renfrew Educational Services - Child Development Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities 3820 – 24th Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T3E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

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Renfrew Educational Services Thomas W. Buchanan Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities and grades 1-6 for children with disabilities 75 Sunpark Drive SE, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 ext 1601• Fax: 403 201 8212 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Renfrew Educational Services Bowness Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities 8620 48th Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Renfrew Educational Services - Janice McTighe Centre Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS for typical children and children with disabilities and grades 1-6 for children with disabilities 2050 - 21 Street NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6S5 Phone: (403) 291-5038 • Fax: (403) 291-2499 renfrew@renfreweducation.org www.refreweducation.org Door-to-door busing available

Renfrew Educational Services Assessment and Therapy Services For children, adolescents and adults Assessment, Counseling, Treatment and Consultation OT, PT, SLP, Psychology, Assistive Technology / Minimal wait time Extended hours / Offered at any Renfre

River Valley School Accredited / Eligible for Funding 3 year old “Tots” – Grade 6 3127 Bowwood Drive NW, Calgary, AB T3B 2E7 Phone: (403) 246-2275 • Fax: (403) 686-7631 admissions@rivervalleyschool.ca www.rivervalleyschool.ca


Now accepting applications for Jr. Kindergarden to Grade 12

clearwateracademy.com

Book a Personal Tour Today!

Top Ranked School for the last five years! admissions@clearwateracademy.com 403-240-7924


DIRECTORY // PRIVATE AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS

Rundle Academy

The Third Academy – North Campus

Calgary Girls School

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 4-12 4330 - 16 Street SW, Calgary, AB T2J 4H9 Phone: (403) 250-2965 • Fax: (403) 250-2914 contactus@rundle.ab.ca www.rundle.ab.ca For students with learning disabilities

Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 Bay 3, 510 – 77th Ave. SE Calgary, AB T2H 1C3 Phone: (403) 288-5335 • Fax: (403) 288-5804

Grades 4 - 9 6304 Larkspur Way SW, Calgary, AB T3E 5P7 Phone: (403) 220-0745 Judi.hadden@calgarygirlsschool.com www.calgarygirlsschool.com

Rundle College Primary/Elementary School Accredited / Eligible for Funding • K-6 7615 – 17 Avenue SW Calgary, AB T3H 3W5 Phone: (403) 282-8411 • Fax: (403) 282-4460 Email: contactus@rundle.ab.ca www.rundle.ab.ca

Rundle College Junior Senior High School Accredited / Eligible for Funding • Grades 7 - 12 7375 - 17 Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T3H 3W5 Phone: (403) 250-7180 • Fax: (403) 250-7184 Email: contactus@rundle.ab.ca • www.rundle.ab.ca

St. John Bosco Private School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9 712 Fortalice Cres SE, Calgary, AB T2A 2E1 Phone: (403) 248-3664 • Fax: (403) 273-8012 stjohnbosco@shaw.ca

Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School Developing well-balanced students for a life of purpose by inspiring excellence in scholarship, leadership and character. Offering both International Baccalaureate (IB) and Alberta Learning curriculum. Alberta’s only Kindergarten to Grade 12 full IB indep RR 2, Okotoks, AB T1S 1A2 Phone: 403-938-8326 admissions@sts.ab.ca www.strathconatweesdsmuir.com City-wide busing. 200-acre campus minutes from Calgary

Tanbridge Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding • K - Grade 9 178003 – 112 St. W. Foothills, AB T2S 0V8 (Corner of Hwy 22x and 53rd Street) Phone: (403) 259-3443 info@tanbridge.com www.tanbridge.com Busing available

The Chinese Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 10 – 12, Saturday classes from Kindergarten to Grade 12. Classes held at: Sir John A Macdonald School, John G. Diefenbaker High School, St. Mary’s High School Office & Mailing Address: 191, 1518 Centre St.. NE Calgary AB T2E 2R9 Phone: (403) 777-7663 • Fax: (403) 777-7669 thechineseacademy@gmail.com “The largest heritage language school in Alberta.”

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The Third Academy – South Campus Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 Box 4 Site 22 RR8, Calgary, AB T2J 2T9 Phone: (403) 201-6335 • Fax: 403-201-2036

Tyndale Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 28 Hart Estates Blvd. NE, Calgary, AB T1X 0L3 Phone: (403) 590-5881 • Fax: (403) 590-6998 tcs@tyndalecalgary.ca

Webber Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding JK and Kindergarten, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 1515 - 93 Street SW, Calgary, AB T3H 4A8 Phone: (403) 277-4700 • Fax: (403) 277-2770 psutherland@webberacademy.ca www.webberacademy.ca

West Island College Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 - 12 7410 Blackfoot Trail SE, Calgary, AB T2H 1M5 Main: (403) 255-5300 • Fax: (403) 252-1434 Admissions: (403) 444-0023 admissions@mywic.ca www.westislandcollege.ab.ca

Yufeng Chinese School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 1- 6, Grades 7- 9, Grades 10 – 12 708 44 Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T2K 0J4 Phone: (403) 289-7876 • Fax: (403) 210-0261

Alternative

Edge School Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 4-12 33055 Township Road 250, Calgary, AB T3Z 1L4 Tel: (403) 246-6432 • Fax: (403) 217-8463 info@edgeschool.com www.edgeschool.com

Glenmore Christian Academy Accredited JK to Grade 5, Grade 6-9 16520 – 24 Street, SW, Calgary, AB T2Y 4W2 (403) 254-9050 admissions@gcaschool.com www.gcaschool.com

Heritage Christian Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 12 2003 McKnight Boulevard, NE , Calgary, AB T2E 6L2 Phone: (403) 219-3201 • Fax: (403) 219-3210 www.hcacalgary.com

Master’s Academy Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 6 4414 Crowchild Trail SW, Calgary, AB T2T 5J4 Tel: (403) 242-7034 • Fax: (403) 242-3515 registrar@masters.ab.ca www.masters.ab.ca

Master’s College Accredited / Eligible for Funding Grades 7- 12 4414 Crowchild Trail, SW Calgary, Calgary, AB T2T 5J4 Tel: (403) 242-7034 • Fax: (403) 242-4629 registrar@masters.ab.ca www.masters.ab.ca

Banff Hockey Academy Grades 7 – 12 • College bound hockey athletes Box 2242 Banff, Alberta T1L 1B9 Phone: 1-888-423-6369 • Fax: (403) 760-0868 registrar@banffhockey.ab.ca www.banffhockey.ab.ca

Calgary Christian School Preschool - Grade 12 Elementary Campus (Preschool - Grade 6): 2839 - 49th Street SW Secondary Campus (Grades 7-12): 5029 - 26 Avenue SW Calgary, Alberta Phone: (403) 242-2896 admissions@calgarychristianschool.com www.calgarychristianschool.com

JANUARY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Menno Simons Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 9 7000 Elkton Drive, SW, Calgary, AB T3H 4Y7 Tel: (403) 531-0745 • Fax: (403) 531-0747 linda.best@pallisersd.ab.ca www.mennosimonschristianschool.ca

Trinity Christian School Accredited / Eligible for Funding ECS, Grades 1- 9 #100, 295 Midpark Way SE, Calgary, AB T2X 2A8 Phone: (403) 254-6682 • Fax: (403) 254-9843 www.tcskids.com


A Leader in Learning Disabilities since 1979

Find Understanding Build Confdence Maximize Potential We teach the full Alberta Education curriculum to students in grades 3 to 12 with a diagnosed Learning Disability. We provide a warm and welcoming learning environment. Small class sizes with specially trained staff provide individualized accommodations and supports to ensure that students succeed academically, emotionally and socially. Academics are supplemented with a wide variety of extracurricular activities.

Contact Us Today! 745 - 37 Street NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4T1 403-270-9400 foothillsacademy.org


THIRD ACADEMY IT’S SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION, YOUR CHILD’S WAY BY RENNAY CRAATS

T

hird Academy does things differently and gets incredible results. A number of students return to mainstream schools to finish their education and children who would have otherwise dropped out of school now graduate and go on to post-secondary institutions or enter the workforce. Alumni have returned to talk to children about their experiences and successes, serve on the board of directors or gain university or college practicum experience in the hallways they once walked as students. Dayna Johnsen’s experience at Third Academy has changed her life and enabled her plans for the future. When she first arrived, she suffered from social anxiety and had been bullied for years. Her attendance was spotty and her grades suffered. Third Academy provided the support and help she needed to succeed. Now the 11th-grader is a confident, bright young woman whose great grades will help her get into university to become a mental health nurse. “I have struggled but when I came to this school I realized everyone has their issues,” she says. “Now, I want to help others. I want to make others believe that they’re not worthless.” In the five years since high school senior Dante Hillier came to Third Academy, he has also overcome his behaviour and learning issues. Teachers are accessible and take the time to explain lessons in a way that makes sense for Hillier and his confidence and his grades are both up.

ABOVE: HIDDEN HERO GALA, HONORING PETER MAHER INSET: SUNIL MATTU EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AT THIRD ACADEMY

“I love the small classes. Teachers help you understand things really well. It’s a great environment. If you’re struggling in school, you should consider Third Academy,” he says. Students like Hillier and Johnsen – and the thousands of others who came before – are the reasons Sunil Mattu is so passionate about Third Academy. He has seen his children transform, lives change, families heal, and young people flourish and go on to great things.

“I remember all their faces and I know all their stories over the past 20 years,” Mattu says. “Third Academy offers hope for our families and their children. With an intensive, individualized program delivered by committed and caring professionals, we heal children and enable them to realize student success. Our kids are making their dreams come true, each day, one step at a time.”

Third Academy 403-288-5335 INFO@THIRDACADEMY.CA WWW.THIRDACADEMY.CA 3, 510 – 77TH AVE. SE CALGARY, AB T2H 1C3


Today’s education for tomorrow’s world

Alberta’s Top French Immersion School Calgary’s only preschool to Grade 12 school One convenient campus in Cougar Ridge Developing each student’s full potential intellectually, emotionally, artistically, physically and socially

Book a tour or open house now at www.cfis.com


RUNDLE COLLEGE

The best awaits.

Our students: study in classes of 6-15 students • are engaged in co-curricular activities • are passionate in athletics, academics, arts, and languages • are world travellers • are leaders and citizens of character • are university prepared •

Book a tour to experience the best that awaits.

www.rundle.ab.ca


environments & experiences to challenge and engage your boys K-9

e! ey ar h t o r wh boys fo g n i t p e Acc

OPEN HOUSE FEB. 27

www.northpoint.school/admissions


Launch your child on an Inspiring Journey at

Delta West Academy DWA

AWD

HERE ARE THE FACTS

“

In 2018 Delta West Academy students in Grade 6 and 9 vastly outperformed their provincial peers in every single subject and especially in Math. We can inspire your child to be a

�

life-long achiever... to be successful in

Our Grade 6 Math Acceptable is 28.1% higher and the Excellence is 41% higher than the provincial results

anything they choose to do.

Grade 9 Math Acceptable is 42% higher and the Excellence is 18.8% higher than the provincial results!

MRS. C. TILTMANN PRINCIPAL B.ED.

Delta West Academy teachers will work with your children to achieve higher standards.

BOOK YOUR PERSONAL TOUR TODAY! 414 11 A Street NE Calgary AB T2E 4P3 Phone: 403.290.0767 | Fax: 403.290.0768 | E-mail: info@deltawestacademy.ca


CORPORATE WORKOUTS // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

CORPORATE WORKOUTS THE BENEFITS OF SWEATING AS A TEAM BY DANYAEL HALPRIN

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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CORPORATE WORKOUTS // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

C

olleagues who work out together perform well together.

That’s the philosophy driving many businesses to sign up for fitness classes as a group. Healthy body + healthy mind = happy employee and less turnover. And who doesn’t love a free class? It’s a win-win for everyone. With the multitude of activities and studios available in Calgary – dryland surfing, spin, boxing, boot camp – it makes this kind of team bonding pretty hard to resist. The male staff at Glacier initially put up some resistance to joining the Barre Belle class in which their female co-worker enrolled them, but they put their egos aside and channelled their inner dancer. “Within five minutes all the guys were huffing and puffing and keeled over and we couldn’t keep up with the girls,” says co-founder and CEO Matt Diteljan of Glacier, a Calgary media company that specializes in advertising for colleges and universities to high school students. Exercise allows co-workers to flex their talent and character trait muscles in a different context than in the conventions of the workspace; and here the four male Glacier employees showed up for the early-morning workout with a positive attitude and ready to take on a new challenge. And to do one better, Diteljan had to do the class in cut-off denim shorts because of a bet he’d lost. “Daisy Dukes are not the most flexible shorts to do pliés in,” laughs Diteljan. Location, location, you know what they say. The staff at personal injury law firm Litwiniuk & Company considers themselves lucky that they need only ride the elevator down a few floors to sweat together. Located in the same building as Lagree YYC, they’ve been doing the core-strengthening workouts weekly since they moved into the Britannia building in March 2016. The Lagree method is performed on a moving platform that uses a system of springs, straps and cables for optimal resistance training. It’s generally a group of nine women, the Original Gangsters (OGs) they call themselves, who attend the 45-minute lunchhour class. Case manager and OG Neily Soutar says working out midday is a great way to clear the mind and connect with her colleagues and she always returns to her desk feeling refreshed. “We push each other’s limits and laugh at each other when our legs are shaking so badly in a lunge it looks like we’re doing a jig!” says Soutar.

THE MALE STAFF AT GLACIER INITIALLY PUT UP SOME RESISTANCE TO JOINING THE BARRE BELLE CLASS IN WHICH THEIR FEMALE CO-WORKER ENROLLED THEM, BUT THEY PUT THEIR EGOS ASIDE AND CHANNELLED THEIR INNER DANCER.

PREVIOUS PAGE: ONCE YOU’RE IN THE BOXING STUDIO, THERE ARE NO SUITS, NO TITLES, NO SUPERIORS. YOU’RE WITH A GROUP OF COLLEAGUES AND EVERYONE IN THERE IS ONE. PHOTO SOURCE: BUILDWORKS CANADA

ABOVE: MATT DITELJAN, CO-FOUNDER AND CEO OF GLACIER.

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FOCUS ON EMPLOYEE WELLBEING WITH A CORPORATE WELLNESS RETREAT You rely on your employees to work hard for you, but health problems and burnout can cause retention issues and wreck havoc on your bottom line. More employers are recognizing the need and benefit of focusing on employee health and wellbeing. Your employees are realizing it too, as they pursue a more balanced and healthy lifestyle.

Working with our wellness lead, Dr. Strauss, our 3-day workplace communication retreat can be run as a stand-alone program or incorporated into your sheduled meetings at the Resort.

Hosting your next retreat at Sparkling Hill Resort makes it easy to stand apart from the competition. Our 10,000 sq. ft. of business facilities offer teams an impressive venue for productive meetings, while our 40,000 sq. ft. KurSpa provides a peaceful space for your employees to recharge and focus on their personal renewal.

On-site team building options such as yoga, meditation and guided hikes are available to help your group come together as a team, while nearby off-site activities including skiing, wine tours, helicopter tours, water sports, and 36 holes of the best golf in Canada can be arranged to give your group a taste of the best Vernon, BC has to offer.

Corporate retreats are designed around your organization’s specific goals and schedule to leave your attendees feeling revitalized and ready to return to work with new perspectives and healthier habits.

Give your team a boost and start planning your corporate wellness retreat today. Request more information on our website at sparklinghill.com/corporate-retreats.

Contact our Senior Corporate Sales Specialist to get started at sales@sparklinghill.com.


CORPORATE WORKOUTS // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

Litwiniuk places a strong emphasis on personal development and creates many such opportunities for its employees. The firm has brought in meditation and yoga instructors and hosted psychology and fitness lunchand-learn seminars at its café which doubles as a learning centre. “I believe that if you take care of yourself personally, both physically and psychologically, then that’s going to translate into your work life,” says owner and managing partner Todd Litwiniuk. For the past few years, 10 to 15 employees have been attending a boot camp twice a week after work at Method Fitness in Mission. Very much a believer in leading by example, Litwiniuk brings intention and intensity to the boot-camp sessions. The family-run law firm sets quarterly and yearly goals for the business and similarly encourages its employees to create ones for their professional and personal lives. Says Litwiniuk: “I want to work with people who are driven to take care of themselves. As long as you’re always striving for something, that’s the most important thing.”

“Work hard, play hard together” is a great business mantra and the most important thing about it is that it’s a continuum of care. “It needs to be part of a bigger strategy and not a one-off,” says Janet Salopek, president and founder of Salopek & Associates, a business and human resource consultancy in Calgary. Organizations indeed observe many benefits to providing a wellness program to their employees. It creates another opportunity for co-workers to build relationships with each other and, as a result from knowing each other better, they collaborate better thus increasing productivity, says Salopek. Competitiveness is one of Glacier’s core values and it’s a fierceness embodied by their eight-person team in the multisport league they play in through the Calgary Sport and Social Club. Diteljan delights in this attribute, having observed his teammate’s layout on the gym floor to catch the Frisbee in a game of Ultimate, or take a slapshot at the net from half court in a heated moment in floor hockey, accidentally hitting the goalie in the head (a move that resulted in the said player

ABOVE: GLACIER DOES BARRE BELLE.

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We’re more than a gym,

We’re a community. Don’t just take it from us,

See what our Members have to say. “

#members

I joined Repsol Sport Centre in 2012 when I started working at a company nearby. I noticed that most of my co-workers r would leave to work out at noon while I sat, ate my lunch and epsolsportcentr e.com/mem stared at my computer. My team suggested I join them to go ber-spotlig hts work out one day and I have been going ever since. Working out at lunch gives me a much-needed mental break as well as some of the much sought after “me” time. I find that I am much more productive when I am able give my brain that short mental break away from the office. Another benefit is that I generally feel better after working out. Don’t get me wrong I do also feel sore after but it’s a good kind of sore. I suppose the most realistic, albeit selfish reason I work out, is because I love to eat... a lot. Now, I will admit that as I am getting older I cannot just eat whatever I want and when I want. But working out allows me my tasty indulgences as well as keeps me from looking like or at least feeling like a marshmallow. Repsol Sport Centre is a great place to keep physically active and its proximity to the office makes it a natural choice. Ted Aumentado There are great activities for everyone no matter the fitness Member since Octobe r 20 level so you don’t have to just pick heavy things up, then put “Mid-day workouts ke 12 ep me sharp at work. them back down. From swimming, badminton, fitness classes ” and everything in between there seems to be something for everyone. I find it’s very difficult to get bored here, even when you are coming 5 times a week. READ MORE at repsolsportcentre.com/member-spotlights

potlights

WHEN YOU BECOME A MEMBER THIS JANUARY YOU GET: ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

No rate increase guarantee for 1 full year! Free polka dot crew socks! Not 3, but 5 guest passes! Unlimited access to 95+ Group Fitness classes a week! Free parking! Free fitness gear with our Loyalty Reward Program!


CORPORATE WORKOUTS // CORPORATE HEALTH & WELLNESS

RATHER THAN ORGANIZE THE SAMEOLD TEAM-BUILDING EVENTS, NAGLE FINDS THE BOXING WORKOUT TO BE A FUN AND NOVEL WAY TO CONNECT WITH COLLEAGUES AS WELL AS GET IN A LATE-AFTERNOON WORKOUT – AND JUSTIFICATION FOR THE BEERS AFTER. Admittedly not the most athletic guy growing up, Nagle says the 45-minute cardio, boxing and strength-training workout is ideal because it eliminates the element of selfconsciousness and it’s designed for all ages and fitness levels. It’s very much about creating an individual mindset and space within the high energy of the group.

being ejected from the game). They’ve made it to the finals a number of times. Do I hear a challenge? They compete in a different sport each week and the team member who’s particularly skilled in that sport will step up to lead the others, giving each member the opportunity to take on a leadership role. Diteljan says their team rallies well together in competition, a cohesiveness that carries over into the professional realm. In fact, Glacier was a finalist in the 2018 Calgary Chamber’s Company Culture Award recognizing employee engagement, satisfaction and retention. “Yo, Adrian!” is how the UNDRCARD experience begins for Adrian Nagle the moment he steps into the beltline boxing studio. The office instantly becomes a distant thought as the present transforms into a nightclub, a fight club, in a dimly-lit room with throbbing beats. It’s all about you and the punching bag.

“When you’re in there, you’re in complete control of your own destiny,” says Nagle, the business development manager at BuildWorks Canada, a procurement and business development platform for the western Canadian construction industry. Nagle first started taking groups of employees to UNDRCARD a few years ago at his previous position with the Chamber of Commerce. Rather than organize the sameold team-building events, Nagle finds the boxing workout to be a fun and novel way to connect with colleagues as well as get in a late-afternoon workout – and justification for the beers after. The attitude, intentions and ethics that one demonstrates in their workouts are indicative of how an individual handles themselves in the other aspects of their lives. “What I’ve noticed is that everyone has fight in them,” says Nagle. “No one gives up and that’s really huge because you know when you’re working with these people that they have the same attitude in their office job.” Cue “Eye of the Tiger.”

ABOVE: ADRIAN NAGLE, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER AT BUILDWORKS CANADA.

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2018 MEDICAL CHAMPIONS

Divergent Health Care The Medical Team To Get You Back In The Game DR. JASON NANDA, DC | DR. TARNDEEP ATHWAL, MD @divergenthealth

D

/divergenthealth

ivergent Health Care prides itself in providing a different approach to patients, utilizing an integrative model of practice through evidence-based research to treat people with chronic pain and sport injuries. The Calgary clinic, founded just over a year ago, sets itself apart by designing a personalized pain management and rehabilitation programs for patients. “Our ultimate goal is to offer patients alternate treatments for pain relief when most conservative methods have failed,” says Dr. Jason Nanda, founder and chiropractor of the clinic. “The key is offering a multi-disciplinary approach to pain that leverages evidence based treatments.” At Divergent, patients see the true benefits of multi-disciplinary collaborations as they are assessed by a medical doctor and a chiropractor, both of whom specialize in pain and injuries to attain the best possible outcomes. Treatment options

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May/June 2018

include regenerative injection therapies and shockwave treatments. “By combining multiple modalities that are supported by research, we are able to offer the most comprehensive treatments possible to get people back on their feet and enjoying life,” says Dr. Nanda. Dr. Tarn Athwal, a primary care physician, reviews patient cases at the clinic to complete the team. Dr. Athwal holds advanced training in regenerative treatments such as prolotherapy and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. “Chronic pain is the body’s way of telling you something is wrong and both these treatments can be utilized to help the body heal old injuries and target the root cause of pain. We’re talking muscle pain, joint pain or ligamentous injuries,” says Dr. Athwal. The three main metrics in how progress is measured at Divergent are: reduction in pain, improvements in

mobility/functional status, and decreased reliance on pain medications. “What makes Divergent different is our culture. We pride ourselves on being able to work as a team to accurately identify the source of pain and then begin to target these areas with our pain programs” says Dr. Athwal. “At the end of the day, it’s quite rewarding to be able to offer patients something other than a pill for pain management.” Call today and get the Divergent team on your side.

DIVERGENT HEALTH CARE #240, 8835 Macleod Trail South Calgary, AB, T2V 0R6 403.909.8111 www.divergenthealth.ca

impactmagazine.ca


PLANNING THE INHERITANCE // FINANCIAL PLANNING

Planning THE INHERITANCE More than controlling from the grave BY JAMIE ZACHARY

I

n the estate planning industry, it’s often referred to as ruling from the grave – the legal practice of creating a set of conditions that govern the distribution of assets after death.

Yet experts say it’s much simpler than that. In fact, it’s about being able to sit together at the table for a family meal. “The ideal goal of estate planning is after you’re gone, all of your family and beneficiaries still want to get together for Christmas dinner,” says David Beavis, president of the Estate Planning Council of Calgary. “Estate litigation has become huge today because of the fighting that happens when people haven’t had simple conversations beforehand.” Beavis, who is also president of Counsel Financial, says he’s seen it all during his 30 years in the industry. He’s dealt with disputes between families, executors, beneficiaries and charities. He’s seen blended families were there’s multiple kids from multiple marriages hold up wills in court for years. And he, like others in the industry, are ABOVE: DAVID N. BEAVIS, PRESIDENT OF COUNSEL FINANCIAL AND PRESIDENT OF THE ESTATE PLANNING COUNCIL OF CALGARY. PHOTO SOURCE: COUNSEL FINANCIAL

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PLANNING THE INHERITANCE // FINANCIAL PLANNING

“IN MY EXPERIENCE, THE MOST SUCCESSFUL PLANS ARE WHERE THERE’S A GOOD DISCUSSION AMONG THE FAMILY MEMBERS WELL IN ADVANCE, THE PARENTS TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE CHILDREN’S WISHES AND THE CHILDREN REALIZE WHAT THE PARENTS WANT TO DO.” ~ DAVID BEAVIS

preparing for a new wave of litigation, such as surrogate parents fighting for rights as beneficiaries. Yet as complicated as inheritance planning will get, the primary component of successful inheritance planning boils down to talking with your family in advance to discuss your wishes, he says. The goal should be to reveal potential blind spots, whether that be succession of a family business or the classic example of dividing up the family cabin. You don’t want anything to be a surprise, says Beavis. “People lead very complicated lives. Just imagine people who get married, divorced, remarried, have kids, become estranged….” he says. “In my experience, the most successful plans are where there’s a good discussion among the family members well in advance, the parents take into account the children’s wishes and the children realize what the parents want to do.” From a technical perspective, estate planning experts say trusts are common mechanisms clients use to protect the family’s wealth. Trusts are legal entities that are controlled by trustees who manage the distribution of assets to beneficiaries according to specified criteria. In these situations, the beneficiaries don’t own the assets – yet. Instead, the trust owns the assets until they are distributed – which could come in the form of incremental payments at specified ages, or discretionary payments for education or emergency situations. Trusts are common in cases where significant assets are being distributed to a minor. If you’re considering leaving an inheritance to your children through a trust, the first step should be education, adds

Katharine Zhang, a Calgary-based associate with Walsh LLP. “We often encourage parents to have their kids get legal advice if they are going to be receiving company shares or a large inheritance from their family and are thinking of starting a family of their own, as there are certain rules about how inheritances can be divided, or can be exempt, from being considered ‘matrimonial property,’” she says. And not just children, but spouses too, adds Shannon Galon, barrister and solicitor with Kahane Law Office. “It boggles my mind how people just don’t want to talk about it,” she says. “I’ve encountered situations, particularly with older generations, where the husband has passed away unexpectedly and the wife, who has been a stay-at-home mom, has been expected to execute the estate but knows nothing. It’s a good way of losing assets.” Another way to structure inheritances is through an annuity. Henry Villanueva, legal counsel with MacMillan Estate Planning Corp., likens an annuity to an insurance policy that guarantees for the beneficiaries a certain amount of money over a regular basis. “It’s like making sure your kid has an allowance for the rest of their lives. This is usually given in cases where the child has challenges,” he says. “For example, we work with an affluent family who has a disabled daughter who needs a lot of care. What we did in their case was for the other siblings who were pretty independent, we gave them their lump sum inheritance. For the daughter who needed a lot of care, we made sure that she had a home and that we set up an annuity where she would receive $7,000 every month for the rest of her life.”

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PLANNING THE INHERITANCE // FINANCIAL PLANNING

Zhang adds that in these cases, it’s important to make sure your beneficiary designations for any policy are up to date, and reflect your intentions. “We see a lot of instances where policies name one child to the exclusion of others,” she says. “Or all the children but one child has predeceased, creating a different distribution result than what was originally intended. If you’re unsure, it’s best to speak with either the insurance provider or an estate adviser to fully understand what the implications may be of a designation.” Beavis similarly recalls a wealth client he worked with early on in his career. “They had already gone through a detailed estate planning process to distribute their business assets wherein they had moved assets around to a number of different trust companies,” he says. “But they had done it 10 years ago, and now the way they wanted to go about it was almost the complete reverse of what they had originally intended. You have to be careful to keep on top of it.” Villanueva points to a further alternative of directing funds to a non-profit organization – the benefit being generous tax advantages. “Here in Canada, we have pretty awesome donation tax credits,” says Villanueva. “We have … families that choose to donate a certain percentage of their net worth to charities because instead of paying ‘x’ amount of taxes to the government, they can donate ‘x’ amount to a charity and not pay that tax. At least they know where those tax dollars are going.” He brings up the added scenario in which some of these families have established foundations or charities. When they donate money to those organizations, they are giving their family control over how those funds are distributed to the respective causes. “It’s often referred to as ruling from the grave, but what you’re really trying to do with any form of inheritance planning is protect beneficiaries from themselves,” says Villanueva. “In many cases, it’s also about protecting that wealth for their grandchildren.”

“IT’S OFTEN REFERRED TO AS RULING FROM THE GRAVE, BUT WHAT YOU’RE REALLY TRYING TO DO WITH ANY FORM OF INHERITANCE PLANNING IS PROTECT BENEFICIARIES FROM THEMSELVES.” ~ HENRY VILLANUEVA “Even things like a trust company, the perception is you need several million dollars to have one; you don’t,” says Galon, noting her clients vary widely in everything from age and wealth to marital status. “Trusts can simply act as an uninterested third party in managing estates where there is a dispute. “It really boils down to, no matter your situation, trying to plan for as much as you can, when you can.”

Inheritance planning should not be viewed as exclusive to the rich and famous, either, says Galon, noting everyone should have at least a will in place. ABOVE: HENRY VILLANUEVA, LEGAL COUNSEL WITH MACMILLAN ESTATE PLANNING CORP. PHOTO SOURCE: MACMILLAN ESTATE PLANNING CORP.

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Chamber members champion Calgary, powering the growth that drives our city. Thousands of members work together to help make Calgary one of the best places to live and work in the world.


W

elcome to 2019! We are in for a very interesting year full of optimism and conviction.

I had the privilege of speaking with the Business in Calgary editorial team for this issue’s feature story, where I talked about some of what we expect in 2019 and the Chamber’s plans to be right in the thick of it. Thank you to the Business in Calgary team for your ongoing support of the Chamber and the wider business community. I am excited to continue to work with you all and hear your stories of growth, innovation and discovery. This year we will see two major elections: the provincial election and the federal vote in the fall. Both of these elections will generate a number of vital public conversations around policies that have an impact on our local economy and of course, the business community. We will ensure the Chamber’s voice is heard and is influencing the platforms of those vying for public office. I believe Calgary is at a crossroads in our history. To reach our potential we need to work together to really get deal flow going again, both into and within our community. Our international reputation for business competitiveness needs to get back onto steady ground and the next 12 months are going to have a significant impact on this objective. I encourage you all to read our “year ahead” feature on the next pages to learn more about these issues and what these elections may see. The Chamber will be hosting a number of political events, as well as issuing opinion pieces and political platform recommendations, for both elections. We will also be telling your business stories so keep them coming. I would like to recognize Goldray Glass for carrying the It’s Grow Time momentum! Their attitude is exactly what we need to regain market share and competitiveness. Sign up for our regular e-newsletters at www.calgarychamber.com/newsletters to keep informed on all that is happening. I would also like to draw your attention to the two programs profiled on the following pages: Ignite and CEO Peer Mentoring. The Chamber has a goal to be the catalyst for business growth and transformation. One of the ways we support this goal is by running programs for businesses of all sizes and stages. These two programs have proven to be incredible ways to grow a business – read more about them and get in touch with any questions or to sign up. Remember, the Chamber is here for you so talk to us. Together we are one business community, one team, one voice. I always love hearing about the daily success stories from our community so please don’t hesitate to get in touch. It’s grow time! Sandip Lalli President & CEO Calgary Chamber


Policy CALGARY CHAMBER DOUBLES DOWN ON COMMERCE

to advocate for the government to stop layering costs on business at a time when they simply cannot afford them.

With 2019 shaping up to be a big election year provincially and federally, the Calgary Chamber intends to double down on commerce and double down on advocacy by focusing on five key policy areas: (1) building a competitive operating and investment environment, (2) improving trade and access to markets, (3) supporting innovation, (4) reducing impact of government policy, and (5) advancing workforce and productivity. These challenges are consistent across all business industries, and are not limited to a single level of government. Following is a look at what the Chamber is working on going into the new year.

On the topic of the 2019 provincial election, the Chamber will be releasing a detailed platform focused on business competitiveness that highlights the critical issues the business community is facing. This platform will include tangible recommendations that we want all political parties in Alberta to incorporate into their platforms. We are looking forward to ensuring the business issues are at the forefront of the 2019 provincial election.

MUNICIPAL Non-residential property taxes continue to be a significant issue for Calgary businesses. The high vacancy rate in downtown office space and the corresponding drop in assessed property value has resulted in drastically increasing the costs for businesses located outside the downtown core. With further increases coming for property taxes between 2019-2022, non-residential properties located outside of the downtown core will continue to feel the negative effects of this shift in tax burden. The Chamber will be working with the city to help find an approach to limit the tax increase on business while continuing to advocate for a reduction in the residential to non-residential property tax ratio. The Calgary Chamber proposed the first Non-Residential Phased Tax Program (PTP) that directly benefited businesses. The Chamber will continue to advocate for more action from the city to reduce the cost of doing business in Calgary. PROVINCIAL In December 2017, the Calgary Chamber released its Layered Cost Assessment that outlined how policy changes layered on from all levels of government increase costs on business. In Alberta, we have seen minimum wage increases, a carbon levy, corporate tax increases, and employment and labour code changes all put in place at a time when unemployment remains high and consumer spending low. Going into the provincial election in 2019, the Chamber will continue

FEDERAL The federal government plays a prominent role in shaping a competitive business environment for Canada. With an election coming up in the fall of 2019, the Chamber will work to ensure the voice of the Calgary business community is heard by all parties. The Fall Economic Update on November 21 showed progress from the federal government on improving the Canadian business operating environment but fell short in addressing the country’s most significant competitiveness and market-access issues. However, there were some highlights in the update. The federal government adopted policy tools that are in line with the recommendations made by the Chamber. The government is now allowing the full cost of machinery and equipment used in the manufacturing and processing of goods to be written off immediately for tax purposes, which will result in a drop of the marginal effective tax rate for new business investment in Canada. It also introduced an accelerated investment incentive that will benefit Canadian businesses. The Chamber was also encouraged to see increasing funding to assist businesses in diversifying their exports, setting an ambitious goal of increasing Canada’s overseas exports by 50 per cent by 2025, and steps taken towards improving trade within Canada. While these are good first strides, the Calgary Chamber will continue to advocate for business-friendly policies to all levels of government, specifically those that address competitiveness, lagging productivity, regulatory inefficiencies and a lack of market access.


In 2019, the Calgary Chamber will continue to advocate for the government to make improvements to Bill C-69. The uncertainty around building major projects in Canada has resulted in a chill on foreign investments, international companies divesting from Canada, and a business environment that has become increasingly uncompetitive. On behalf of the business community, the Calgary Chamber submitted a letter to the Senate committee recommending the bill be sent back to the House of Commons for further amendments.

MOVING FORWARD Building a competitive operating environment is not the sole responsibility of one level of government. All levels – municipal, provincial and federal – implement policy that can either hinder or harm competitiveness for the business community for all sized organizations. An election year as big as 2019 offers the opportunity to shape the landscape for success for the near future. The Calgary Chamber is committed to be the business voice advocating for the growth of our business community.

Ignite GET A DEPARTMENT OF TAKING MY BUSINESS TO THE NEXT LEVEL As a business owner, business chief executive or founder, you are faced with questions daily about where to take your business. What products to launch? What customers to target? Should you pivot directions? The Ignite business accelerator is here to help. Ignite is designed for businesses that want to grow but aren’t quite sure of the next steps. It is designed for business leaders who want to scale-up their existing operations or kick-start a new revenue stream. Participating companies work with an experienced facilitator to learn a set of tools and strategies to test and validate new ideas and develop a business model focused on growth for their business. Ignite can be a simple, low-cost way to de-risk a new venture and prove (or disprove) its viability. Hippo Hug, a local Calgary company, entered Ignite in September 2018. Hippo Hug makes weighted blankets that provide deep-pressure sensations designed to reduce anxiety and instil a sense of calm. Started in 2011 as a one-person shop, Hippo Hug has seen exponential growth selling over 500 blankets in 2016. Hippo Hug entered Ignite with a goal to increase production and tap into a new market. “It was an intense program that showed us, while we are great at creative thinking, we are not so great at focused business thinking,” says Leslie Brooks, president of Hippo Hug.

Ignite created the opportunity for Hippo Hug to look inwards, change some business processes, build a strong team and create a foundation for growth. “The program solidified our team thinking, preparing us to tackle problems and prepare for growth,” adds Brooks. Ignite guides you through a deep exploration of your business operations and growth initiatives to deliver a researched, tested and validated growth strategy in less than 60 days. The Calgary Chamber runs five, 60-day cohorts a year with the next cohort starting March 7, 2019. To learn more about Ignite and how it could benefit your business, visit calgarychamber.com/ignite.


MOVING. PICTURES.

GETS THE BIG PICTURE. It’s simple: your clients need to know your story. So trust Ewan. He’s a storyteller with elevated ideas and a down to earth approach. Ewan has the experience, creativity and insight to ensure your clients see the big picture. Think big. Get more. Hire Ewan.

PHOTOVIDEO

ewan.ca ewannicholson


CEO Peer Mentoring GET YOUR OWN DEPARTMENT OF INSIGHTS It can be lonely as a leader running your business. Who do you turn to when you need to talk through challenges facing your business? Who can share their experience and learnings with you? The Chamber has a program to support you and help you grow! CEO Peer Mentoring puts you at a table with your peers, in a safe, private environment to discuss business challenges and opportunities. Utilizing the Edward Lowe Foundation’s internationally-recognized methodology of peer-learning programs, you will learn from business decisions others have made. CEO Peer Mentoring gives you the opportunity to leverage the experience of your peers to support positive outcomes for you and your business. Megan Stanley of Dogma Training and Pet Services started CEO Peer Mentoring inJanuary 2016. Stanley was looking to take her business to the next level and was lacking a support network of individuals who had, or were going through, similar business issues. “I was looking for similar-sized businesses and people from varying backgrounds for support, and to learn from their experiences,” says Stanley. By building a community of like-minded individuals, Stanley was able to learn from varying experiences and perspectives, while challenging herself to look at opportunities in a different light. “I’ve made some great connections from the program and also felt it was a great way to keep my focus on monthly goals,” adds Stanley, “The support and lessons from the other members have been invaluable and have had a direct impact on the growth of my business.” Each Peer Mentoring “table” is made up of a consistent group of participants, who sign up for the year-long program. Meeting once a month, leaders get to know each other and their businesses in depth over the course of the program.

The CEO Peer Mentoring program gives you access to seasoned leaders who will share invaluable insights that you can use to grow your business and become a stronger leader. The ultimate business coaches! To learn more about CEO Peer Mentoring visit www.calgarychamber.com/ceo-peer-mentoring.


SIMON LIFT SYSTEMS SOARING HIGH FOR 20 YEARS S BY NIKKI GOUTHRO

imon Billo caught the entrepreneurial bug early. He’d learned a thing or two about the value of hard work and responsibility as a young man working The Albertan paper route. In the humble newspaper-delivery business, Billo garnered many fundamental principles of success – take care of your customers, assume responsibility for your actions and fix any problems that come up. He and his brother woke up at the crack of dawn to deliver the day’s news to their customers – rain or shine.

Twenty years ago, the success story of Simon Lift Systems, a highreach rental equipment company began when a wise, business-savvy friend planted the seed in Billo’s head. ABOVE: GENIE Z-135 (135 FT SELF PROPELLED ROUGH TERRAIN BOOM). LEFT TO RIGHT TOP OF BOOM: MATTHEW BILLO, JOSHUA BILLO. LEFT TO RIGHT (LOWER) CHERRYL, PITOGO, DARREN GROHN, DAVID WERKLUND, SIMON BILLO, JENNAFER BILLO AND JULIE BILLO.

“I was working for a local meat-packing company in a sales and marketing role and I really didn’t care for it,” says Billo. “My friend, Dave Werklund, had his own business and so I proposed that he let me work for him, but there were no positions for me at that time.”

SIMON LIFT SYSTEMS INC. || 20 YEARS

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GENIE Z-135 - MAINTENANCE WORK ON OIL RIG.

Instead of turning his back, Werklund suggested Billo start a business of his own. “I saw that he had a knack for customer service and an obvious attention to detail,” says Werklund. “It was easy to see that Simon would be a great leader and entrepreneur. So, I recommended that he look into the rental industry.” At the same time, with a young family to take care of, Billo was pondering the idea of going back to school. His mother and biggest supporter told him: “There are two kinds of schools in life, Simon: the formal kind and the working kind.” “Once we had made the decision to get into the rentals industry, we decided to take a ‘business’ trip to Holland to shop for inventory. Looking back, I think it might have been an excuse to just go have fun. But we did bring back a few pieces that we won at an auction,” chuckles Billo. Billo credits Werklund’s mentorship with much of his success over the last two decades. “The people who influenced me most in life and in business are my parents and Dave,” he says. “They all really helped reinforce the importance of acting with integrity, being transparent and building mutual respect,” he says. And in today’s fast-paced, technology-driven world, a homegrown success story built on these traditional values is a refreshing change of pace. “Simon always had a desire to learn and would willingly take my advice,” says his friend Dave

POWERFULLY RELIABLE Proudly providing businesses with high-reach rental equipment for 20 years BOOK YOUR RENTAL TODAY: 403.261.2039

©2018 Interstate Batteries

SIMON LIFT SYSTEMS, INC. 2720 5th Ave NE, Calgary, Alberta T2A 4V4 www.simonlift.com

SIMON LIFT SYSTEMS INC. || 20 YEARS || 2


FROM BOOM LIFTS TO SCISSOR LIFTS TO TELESCOPING LIFTS, SIMON LIFT SYSTEMS’ MISSION IS TO PROVIDE SAFE, RELIABLE, INNOVATIVE LIFT SOLUTIONS WHILE OFFERING EXEMPLARY CUSTOMER SERVICE. Werklund, the founder of what is known today as Tervita Corporation, as well as a recent inductee into the Order of Canada in recognition of his outstanding lifetime achievement. “I’ve been on this journey of inspiring others to have solid leadership principles and to help them succeed.”

DAVID WERKLUND AND SIMON BILLO

From boom lifts to scissor lifts to telescoping lifts, Simon Lift Systems’ mission is to provide safe, reliable, innovative lift solutions while offering exemplary customer service. The company specializes in both indoor and outdoor high-reach equipment and serves a variety of industries including heavy and light construction, oil and gas, residential and commercial building, window installation and recently, film and television. And every piece of that equipment is in pristine condition. “If you’ve invested in something, you take care of it,” says Billo. “We won’t send out a machine with dirty windows, even if it’s intended for outdoor use. It becomes unsafe. I believe that attention to detail plays a huge part in our success – we look after and take pride in our equipment, and it shows.”

Congratulations to Simon Lift Systems on your 20th Anniversary. Thank you for helping us reach the top!

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IN UNIVERSITY AND BEYOND

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Being the successful bidder on long-term rental projects such as the new South Health Campus in southeast Calgary, as well as the expansion project on Foothills Medical Clinic in the northwest, were transformational projects for Billo’s venture and have paved the way for continued growth. “Dave advised me to not be afraid to be competitive when the market needed us to be,” says Billo. “If you know your market well and can still attend to and exceed your customers’ needs, it builds trust and loyalty. And as my mother said: ‘If you want something then ask yourself, what are you prepared to do to earn it?’” Simon Lift is a lean company with a team that works together like a well-oiled machine. They multitask, share responsibilities and do what it takes to get the job done right. As a proud family man, Billo is pleased to have all three of his children and his wife contribute to the company’s success. His sons Joshua and Matthew work in the shop as service technicians, and his wife Julie and daughter Jennafer assist with clerical support and other tasks within the office. As an active member of the community, Billo is involved with the Calgary Rowing Club and was recently appointed as a board member. As for the future, well Billo would be proud to see any of his children take over the business that he built from the ground up. Way up.

JOSHUA BILLO, SIMON BILLO AND MATTHEW BILLO STAND ON A SKYJACK 3219 COMPACT SCISSOR IN 1998 DURING THEIR FIRST YEAR OF BUSINESS.

2720 5th Ave NE, Calgary, Alberta T2A 4V4 Rentals : (403) 261-2039 | Accounting : (403) 261-2059 | Fax : (403) 261-2041

www.simonlift.com

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Congratulations Simon Lift Systems on 20 great years! Wishing you many years of continued success.

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HALF-CENTURY OF SERVICE FOR PETRO-TECH PRINTING by Rennay Craats with photos by Riverwood Photography

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t was a whole different world – and a whole different business – when Petro-Tech Printing opened its doors 50 years ago. In 1967, Petroleum Technicians provided seismic mapping and blueprints for the oil and gas sector and needed someone to reproduce the maps. Dan Costea was hired to do the reproductions and within two years he had bought into the business and added printing presses. Oil and gas faltered but the printing side continued to grow. “At the time, all the things that computers do today, we were doing it by hand,” says Derek Costea, Dan’s son and general manager of Petro-Tech Printing. As the industry changed, so did Petro-Tech. It welcomed the booms and rode out the busts of oil-driven Calgary, attracting clients from other sectors and embracing the introduction of technology and high-efficiency equipment along the way. The late 1990s were difficult, and while Petro-Tech remained standing after the recession, it was left battered. Derek, who joined the company in 1981, and his father wanted to move forward and grow, and to do that they needed to incorporate

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big presses into Petro-Tech’s services. They looked for partners who shared their vision in order to make it a reality. “We joined forces with Prolific Group out of Manitoba, who purchased a majority of us in 1999, and what that brought to the table was the big presses. It worked really well and we’re still partners today,” says Derek Costea. Prolific had a location in Red Deer with large presses, so PetroTech could provide clients with another service option while avoiding the overhead that comes with operating such large machines. It was a great partnership and over the next two decades it helped Petro-Tech evolve and prosper in a rapidlychanging market. As oil and gas companies went digital with their operations, the original mapping reproduction business became obsolete. Petro-Tech adapted their business model and then did so again during the most recent recession. Its repertoire now includes printing of everything from large-format projects like signage, posters and banners to business cards and stationery for companies across the city and across sectors.


Derek Costea, general manager of Petro-Tech Printing.

them to focus on how to best meet clients’ needs rather than on generating sales. Today, meeting needs means staying abreast of trends and technology. Petro-Tech offers online ordering (Hyperprint.com), which conveniently tracks inventory levels and alerts clients when they are running low on stock. It is also upgrading equipment when, after 40 years in the same location, it moves its shop next fall. “It’s a great thing. We’re going to change some of the equipment and upgrade, so we’re new and refreshed,” he says. Petro-Tech boasts a state-of-the-art UV printer that uses less power, no solvents and latex ink that dries instantly allowing for same-day delivery on large outdoor jobs. The hybrid machine prints directly to boards or from rolls to accommodate any project. Derek Costea is also bringing in metallic ink printers and incorporating gold and silver foiling to ride the newest wave in printing. Petro-Tech Printing has seen it all in the past 50 years – from drilling maps to 160-foot banners to metallic mail marketing packages – and as it celebrates a half-century in business, this local institution is proud to continue to meet Calgary’s printing needs.

“We’ve diversified from oil and gas into everything else. If it has anything to do with print or marketing or advertising or the web, we’re on it. We’ll find a way to do anything,” Derek Costea says.

But what clients want isn’t always reflected in what they provide to printers. Rather than just printing the files “as is,” Petro-Tech offers file correction to ensure clients truly get what they want every time. Whether it’s a matter of incorrect settings, compression issues or colour inconsistency, PetroTech provides a breakdown of the problems clients should address before proceeding, and clients can choose to do it themselves or hire the printers to make the corrections. Derek Costea is happy to go the extra mile, honouring his father’s commitment to quality service. With a slogan, “Where Service Makes a World of Difference,” clients know they are going to get a quality product on time and on budget. And many clients are long-term ones, dating back decades and singing Petro-Tech praises to their colleagues. This word-ofmouth marketing has kept the company busy and allowed

621-4th Avenue S.W. Calgary, Alberta T2P 0K2 Phone (403) 266-1652

petro-tech.ca CELEBRATING

That “do-anything” attitude of the staff, many of whom have been with the company for decades, is what has carried Petro-Tech since the 1960s. Unlike most printing shops, Petro-Tech doesn’t restrict itself to four-colour projects. To ensure proper colour matching and brand consistency, it can print to a specific pantone colour to give clients exactly what they want.

Congratulations to Petro-Tech Printing on 50 years! We look forward to your continued success. # 209, 2577 Bridlecrest Way SW, Calgary, Alberta T2Y 5J4 Ph: (403) 221-9300 | Toll Free: 1-888-508-0077 | Fax: (403) 221-9309 PHSP@puhlemployeebenefits.com | www.puhlemployeebenefits.com

Petro-Tech Printing | 50 years


W E H E A R YO U • LO UD AN D C LEAR

Wi-Com Solutions Finds Success in Communications & Community by Rennay Craats Photos by Riverwood Photography

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hen Dave Langerholz started Wi-Com Solutions in 2009, he had a modest vision for the company: a small business that provided quality wireless communication solutions to a local clientele. Now, nine years later, he has acquired six different companies, four of which were purchased in the last year.

Salmon Arm and Whistler. It has grown to become a Platinum Dealer and Manufacturer Representative with Motorola Solutions.

“I never set out to be about store count or headcount – but now I’m in six locations. The plan was to grow the business organically; these acquisitions allowed us to grow a lot faster,” says Dave Langerholz, president of WiCom. He isn’t done yet; in some ways he’s just getting started. The change of heart came out of necessity more than by design. He started out by purchasing product from his former employer of nine years, TAC Mobility, but he wanted to buy directly from Motorola. The only way in was through acquisition, so Wi-Com bought Motorola dealer Tridon Communications in Banff. WiCom Solutions started as one of the first Bell dealers in Western Canada and has since been named Bell Dealer of the Year twice. Langerholz was soon given the opportunity to purchase TAC, which he enthusiastically accepted. TAC

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Dave Langerholz was a trailblazer in the industry, being one of the first mobility dealers and helped start the dealer network on the two-way radio side. Langerholz was proud to build upon this 30-year legacy and his own 18-year participation, and now Wi-Com is one of the largest two-way radio, mobility, satellite and IoT companies in Western Canada. Calgary-based Wi-Com is serving the communications needs of clients across Western Canada with locations in Banff, Lethbridge, Kelowna,

Wi-Com has the privilege of servicing more public safety agencies than any other company in Western Canada providing communications solutions for all three levels of government to equip such entities as Parks Canada, Alberta Health Services, City of Calgary Police, Fire, and Parks and Rec, and City of Lethbridge. Wi-Com – a born-andbred western Canadian company – is also a dominant player in health and education, oil and gas, construction, transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, forestry, tourism and hospitality across the territory. “We definitely grew through acquisition, but we also grew by being really strong community partners. It’s a big source of pride for me,” Langerholz says. Wi-Com is involved in countless community events across Western Canada, from large productions like the Calgary Stampede requiring 1,500 two-way radios, to GlobalFest, the Calgary International Film Festival, the Calgary Marathon and the Spartan Race series across Canada. It supports hundreds of charity events


Wi-Com Solutions Derrik Johanneson, Jamie Hall, Sam Pal, David DeGroot, Phil Gash & Dave Langerholz.

like the Mother’s Day Run, the Kidney March and Alberta Children’s Hospital events. The company has also provided emergency equipment during floods and wildfires to aid in evacuating citizens locally and in foreign countries during natural disasters. Langerholz is proud of the company’s community spirit and excited to be part of as many community events as possible. “It’s how we give back. All these events make us better collectively,” he says. “We want to help everybody. It’s the power of ‘yes.’” Saying “yes” to these communities has encouraged clients to say “yes” to Wi-Com as well. The company has grown significantly since it opened its doors, nearly doubling in size and revenue over the past year. It now boasts a cache of over 5,000 high-quality two-way radio rentals for clients to employ across their digital networks. With a staff of only 20, Wi-Com has emerged as a major player in the industry and plans to continue to grow by offering better service, knowledge and product

than the competition, employing the homegrown advantage.

“We want every transaction to be a five-star transaction,” he says. “It’s the service, the support, the execution, the reliability, the dependability – it’s about doing it right.” Wi-Com strives to not only attract new customers but to keep existing ones happy as well. By listening carefully to what clients need, what they aren’t currently getting and the factors influencing their decisions, Wi-Com strives to find the best solution. The best solutions are those backed by the best products, so Wi-Com often invites executives from Apple, Samsung, Bell and Motorola to meetings with clients. While WiCom may deal in other company’s products, it does far more than just throw boxes on the shelf for resale. The professionals at Wi-Com package and bundle products in a way that allows them to better meet clients’ needs and, in some cases,

presents options that no one has thought of before. “The status quo just isn’t good enough,” he says. “It’s never just about the box for us; it’s about providing better end-to-end solutions.” From VHF and UHF to RoIP and VoIP, GPS, RFID and IoT using SaaS, TEM and MDM, Wi-Com has the alphabet soup of emerging information technologies designed to make businesses more efficient so they can optimize their operations and how they interact with their customers. Wi-Com is driven by change, and Dave Langerholz and his team relish the ever-changing nature of communications technology. In a constantly evolving technology business, Wi-Com Solutions is the constant for clients, providing the best cutting-edge equipment and support so clients can evolve and succeed as well. Head Office #3, 5608 – 1 St. SE Calgary, AB T2H 2W9 403.250.8474 | wicom.ca


Prestige Railings and Stairs Ltd. Prestige Railings and Stairs continues its “rise and run” to the top of the stair and railing industry in Alberta as we once again have received the Consumer Choice Award for Business Excellence in both Calgary and Edmonton. For well over a decade, Prestige has been privileged to receive these awards – a constant reflection of our dedication to quality and a sincere effort to exceed customer expectations – every step of the way.

achieve the goals and visions of each individual customer. Whether it be a starter home with a feature railing or a commercial property with 10 stories of interior railing that needs retrofitting, Prestige is the only call you need to make. For well over 25 years, Prestige has been pleased to set the highest standards in the industry and will continue to raise the bar and focus on improving the product and the process. While the customer doesn’t realize it in most cases, Prestige is the only stair and railing company to be a member of the Architectural Woodwork Manufacturers Association of Canada.

Prestige continues to build the highest quality stairs in the industry and we pride ourselves on helping our customers realize their dreams in creating a focal point in their homes with unique designs and extraordinary craftsmanship.

This speaks to the Prestige commitment to constant evaluation and improvement in an industry where we already set the bar for quality. The Company’s vision of being the most respected, reliable and sought after provider of all things stairs and railings to the residential and commercial construction industry, is the focus of everything we do. While the awards are a nice pat on the back and a huge morale booster, we know the work to improve never stops.

Prestige offers an extensive variety of quality products, all the way from glass stair treads and stainless steel components to spindles featuring Swarovski crystals; from LED accent lighting to interior and exterior spiral stairs. Prestige continuously works with architects and designers, builders, contractors, and building and home owners to

Consistency, Quality, Craftsmanship Photo by Jean Perron Photography

Come in and talk to us about your project!

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Our showroom is open from Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm | www.prestigerailings.com “We’re passionate about bringing spaces to life. Together with you.”

www.sunik.com

2777 Hopewell Place NE Calgary (403) 250-1020 • Toll Free: 1-800-382-8502

403.280.2803

JANUARY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


A REFINED FOCUS TO ENHANCE YOUR CORPORATE BRAND There’s an old proverb that says you’re known by the company you keep. It refers to the influence others have on your own reputation… and although it’s an ancient text, its relevancy is as strong as ever. Today organizations strive to present their brands and reputation in a way that aligns with their audience. Their brands are built on how they are perceived and they are influenced by every interaction. Decisions once made with little thought for their affect on the brand must now be given serious consideration. Consider shareholders and investors — they want to feel appreciated for their investments. For current or potential customers and employees, they too want to feel appreciated. As such, companies must ensure all that they do enhances their brand and reputation for all stakeholders. From the perspective of the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC), that includes consideration for where

companies host their corporate events for shareholders, customers and even employees. According to international event planners TGP, “your event venue says much about your organization because it’s about first impressions”. Choosing to host a staff gala at a lower end pub or hotel may be convenient and cheap, but it likely won’t show your staff that they are truly appreciated. When it’s time to bring together stakeholders for your AGM, the venue you choose may say more about your company than you ever thought. A New York based event production firm confirms that “selecting an event venue that doesn’t mesh well with your brand values can actually undermine the event and its success”. For the CTCC, our focus on providing a high-end experience for corporate clients and their valued guests is what sets us apart from others. While we understand that we are not the first choice for every event in Calgary, we are the perfect fit for those corporate clients who value an upscale experience that not only protects their brand, but enhances it.

calgary-convention.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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Efficiency and Economic Growth Vital to Energy Sector Regulation

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o many things critical to business success are beyond our ability to influence but creating a regulatory environment that propels industry forward is something we can control.

BUSINESS HAS LONG COMPLAINED

The years of dire warnings from the energy sector and investment community about pipeline delays and regulatory uncertainty impacting the business environment in Alberta hit home with a vengeance during 2018. The lack of progress on key infrastructure projects led to price discounts on Canadian crude oil, at times, in excess of $50 a barrel.

REGIMES DISCOURAGE

It is costing the country billions of dollars and resolving this issue must be a top priority for all orders of government in 2019. The impact of the historically wide “oil price differentials” on the Canadian economy was evident when Finance Minister Bill Morneau released a budget update in November. At the same time, he proposed a sweeping review of all federal regulation to ensure “efficiency and economic growth” are considerations in project assessments. From food production to manufacturing to energy transportation, Morneau was adamant that citizens will always be confident “Canada’s regulatory system protects first and foremost the health and safety of Canadians.” He was also clear “competitiveness considerations” must be taken into account in the decisions. Business has long complained Canada’s overly complex and slow-moving regulatory regimes discourage investment. Nowhere is it more evident than in the struggling energy sector. Done properly, regulatory reform could provide a much-needed economic stimulus for Alberta. The economic strategy for Calgary implemented in 2018 identifies business environment as one of four key elements for economic growth and a well-functioning regulatory regime is a critical element in any thriving business ecosystem.

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JANUARY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

CANADA’S OVERLY COMPLEX AND SLOW-MOVING REGULATORY INVESTMENT. Morneau has said Ottawa would introduce a “regulatory modernization bill” in 2019. It is also proposing a strategy for export diversification that boosts international exports by 50 per cent by 2025. The lack of market access is widely seen to be driving away investment in energy, and new pipelines to tidewater for oil and natural gas would go a long way to meeting Ottawa’s goals. The challenge for Calgary is the encouraging words don’t match reality. Ottawa’s proposed reforms of the National Energy Board are in stark contrast to the concern expressed for other, smaller contributors to Canada’s economy. The federal Bill C-69 is creating uncertainty and hampering investment. The economic impact of energy infrastructure appears to be an afterthought, at best, in the legislation. It replaces the National Energy Board with the Canadian Energy Regulator and shifts reviews to the newly-created Impact Assessment Agency of Canada. Industry and the Government of Alberta say the new process does little to support timely decision-making or a positive investment climate. At a time when industry isn’t investing in our energy sector due, in part, to what it sees as an onerous and costly regulatory process, the Government of Canada needs to treat all sectors of the economy equally and fairly. The energy sector makes an incredible contribution to Canada’s economy and deserves the same chance to innovate and expand as other industries.


Tourism Calgary Kicks Off the Second Year of its Three-Year Strategic Plan BUILDING ON THE FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED IN 2018, TOURISM CALGARY FORGES AHEAD

BY BRIDGETTE SLATER

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nveiled in 2017, Calgary’s Destination Strategy articulates Calgary’s competitive advantages and marketplace position. Furthermore, it establishes key recommendations and the strategic framework from which Tourism Calgary developed its 2018-2020 strategic plan; a three-year approach focused on aligning the organization’s efforts and achieving the vision of making Calgary the Ultimate Host City. The 2018-2020 strategic plan defines Tourism Calgary’s role as marketers, advocates, hosts and activators and describes how the organization will meet the needs of visitors, Calgarians and its stakeholder community. With 2018 marking the start of seven new organizational key performance indicators (KPIs), the first year of the plan served to establish baseline measures. As Tourism Calgary moves into the second year of its three-year plan, these metrics will be used to gauge the organization’s success.

advocate, collaborator and leader. In February 2018, over 800 Tourism Calgary stakeholders were surveyed to gauge sentiment about the organization and determine how it could further support partners and the industry. Results indicate that 90 per cent of stakeholders believe the organization is an effective champion for the industry. As the sector’s primary advocate, Tourism Calgary will continue to communicate what’s important to its stakeholders and represent them to the community, travellers and government partners throughout 2019. As ultimate hosts, Tourism Calgary supports the attraction, development and delivery of sport, culture and major events. As of October 2018, a record 88 Tourism Calgary-supported events were hosted – exceeding previous records with one quarter left in the year. Building on the momentum of 2018, Tourism Calgary will continue attracting events, while ensuring the ones the city hosts already are successful and sustainable.

As marketers, Tourism Calgary is focused on increasing the likelihood that travellers will visit Calgary within two years. While 2018 served as a baseline year for this KPI, Tourism Calgary established strong ambassadors for the city and leveraged the power of storytelling to generate consumer demand. Building on the framework established in 2018, Tourism Calgary will continue to amplify positive stories that promote Calgary’s offerings and inspire visitors to share their experiences.

As activators, Tourism Calgary’s goal is to increase the proportion of Calgarians who believe tourism is an important contributor to the economy and to quality of life. In 2017, Calgary welcomed 6.9 million visitors who contributed $1.6 billion to the local economy and supported jobs in multiple industries. Guided by its vision to make Calgary the Ultimate Host City, Tourism Calgary looks forward to advocating for the industry, developing the destination and marketing Calgary to the world into 2019.

The nature of the tourism industry, coupled with funding realities, demand that Tourism Calgary function as an

To learn more about Tourism Calgary, and to read the 20182020 strategic plan, see visitcalgary.com.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // JANUARY 2019

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A New Year for Calgary Business F

rom turning over a new leaf and other quirky folklore to official business aspects like the fiscal calendar, does the new year even matter anymore? “It’s hard to deny that a new year is inherently special,” grins Amanda Hamilton, an EO Calgary member and the creative director/founder of Amanda Hamilton Interior Design, specializing in residential, restaurant, retail and office design. “The turning over of a calendar year brings forth renewed energy and signifies the opportunity to create a fresh start. “Also, year after year, the majority of us break resolutions within hours, days or weeks of starting them, reserving the tradition of setting new goals to only the most stubborn! Instead of focusing on the new year as a catalyst for change, or the first of the month, or next Monday, or after you get that new beach body or your big raise or any other excuse you might be making to avoid doing something now, I strive to “just do it, now.” Nike can take credit for the first half of that phrase while reality gets credit for the rest. “The best time to start, is now, and that is relevant for both business and personal goals.” In business and social life, part of the new year mystique centres around starting fresh with a clean slate. “I look forward to the start of a new year,” admits Brett Ryder, vice president of Evolution Presentation Technologies and an EO Calgary member. “Our team comes back from the holidays feeling refreshed and our customers bring us the projects that they have been waiting to start on. Jumping into these new challenges and opportunities is a great way to kick off the new year.” EO Calgary members Arjen Kaput and Jodi Bloomer, cofounders of Canadian Fiber Optics, are positive, practical and consider the new year as opportunity.

Contributing Members:

“Construction slows down and it gives us a chance to engineer new builds and design new jobs,” Bloomer says. “There are many positives, and some challenges, for Calgary business in 2019. Alberta is generally starting to pick up, business is getting lean and businesses are conservative with their spending. New year or not, it may not be over yet. “In general there is an optimism, a desire for change and evolution,” she adds. “People are cautiously optimistic. Some of the positives are the skilled and capable people; some have worked across different industries.” Kaput is in synch with the practical positivity. “Many of the traditional oil and gas jobs are not coming back. The opportunity is how do we reinvent the market? There is so much talent in this city. Alberta is rethinking things and there’s lots of things to be optimistic about. Alberta is always upswings and downswings. At the top of the upswing it’s tough to think about the downswing.” Ryder hopes the new year brings an end to referencing the downturn. “Anyone involved in business in Calgary is well aware of the realities of the last few years, but we do see some ambitious entrepreneurs who refuse to let the general economy determine the pace at which they grow their businesses. I’d love to see more of this in 2019.” Hamilton is revved about Calgary business in 2019. “While the struggle has been very real for many business owners, entrepreneurs have become more creative and an increased number of freelancers and professionals in general are entering the market, looking for opportunities outside of traditional markets. With a restored sense of confidence and increased resilience, business owners are primed to make 2019 an outstanding year for change in our city.”

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Brett Ryder

Amanda Hamilton

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The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

|

For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


The table’s been set and we’re serving a new standard for hosting corporate galas, meetings and events. It’s a standard that enhances our client’s brand in the mind of their most valued people, and it’s what you’d expect to find only at the Centre.

calgary-convention.com


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

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od Anderson, president and CEO of Sandbox Brand Marketing, has decided to concentrate his time on his company’s business growth and development and as a result handed over the task of leading the day-to-day client service delivery to Coty Walker. Formerly director of digital marketing, Walker has been appointed as vice president of client services and operations while continuing the growth of the agency’s digital arm. After graduating from the University of Calgary with a focus on marketing, Walker moved to Switzerland where she worked on accounts such as Nestlé and Hewlett-Packard and earned a master of science in international management from HEC Lausanne. Sandbox has also welcomed Jacqui Hickman as a new account manager, moving from dHz Media; she reports being busy in her new role and staff are enjoying working with new client, TEC Canada, helping with its member generation and digital marketing strategy.

The health and safety manager at ARC Resources felt there had to be a better way to communicate hundreds of pages of regulations. He called on Studio Forum and Katherine Stewart and her team worked for 18 months to create an app that solves the challenge with a click of a button. It works so well, it was presented to CAPP with much applause. Studio Forum was launched seven years ago by Stewart and her co-principal and creative director Kylie Henry after both left Foundry Communications, wanting to “do our own spin on things.” Working at that time out of home, they secured their first three clients within two weeks and have never looked back.

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JANUARY 2019 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Their latest successful project included creating a new brand and interactive website for private natural gas company Jupiter Resources which looks great.

Stephen Nykolyn had been a senior account manager with advertising agencies in this city for 20 years but was itching to go out on his own. He met creative director Jesse Coderre at a networking function, they clicked right away and after sharing visions and due diligence, launched BANK together as co-founders. They hit the ground running with success in being awarded a contract by Attainable Homes Calgary, a non-profit organization created and owned by the City of Calgary to help moderate-income Calgarians attain quality home ownership.

Melodie Creegan took her Mosaic Communications to Inglewood for a change of atmosphere but it didn’t take long for her to relocate back to the core with a move into The Edison tower across from the Fairmont Palliser – back into the heart of the action. New work includes teaming up with Kimberley Van Vliet to help promote her ConvergX conference in Calgary at the Sheraton Eau Claire from February 5-7 and working alongside Joan Lee and her team at Vecova on a rebranding and capital campaign for its proposed new facility across from the University of Calgary on 32 Avenue NW.

Parker’s Pick William Joseph Communication’s 15th anniversary – from two staff to over 25 across four offices.


They stepped up and helped us expand internationally. Arnon Levy, GuestTek CEO First company in the world to put internet connections into hotel rooms. Now in 107 countries across the globe.

Get connected at

atb.com/corporate


Business in Calgary - January 2019  
Business in Calgary - January 2019  
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