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August 2017 | $3.50 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Past, Present and Future

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LIFTBOSS ORANGE IS GOING GREEN!!

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ince opening its doors in 2006, Liftboss Materials Handling has gone about what they do best, in a much different way than their competitors. Service has always been the focus right from the beginning, with regards to the forklift industry, growing a very strong customer base in 11 years. In 2012, they added further services becoming the Doosan® heavy equipment dealer for central and southern Alberta. More recently, Liftboss was excited to have an opportunity to quote, demo and sell a new DL350-5 Doosan loader to the Foothills Regional Landfill & Resource Recovery Centre (LRRC) to replace their old loader. The LRRC strives to do things differently, and has been working to reduce the amount of garbage that actually makes it into the landfill! For over 20 years, the site has been recycling, diverting and working with the Foothills Salvage & Recycling Society (FSRS) - and up to 30% of the material coming to the site is either recycled or reused instead of being placed in the landfill. Patrons are being greeted by an employee at the landfill bins, who will try to check each load before it’s emptied, looking for usable goods. Anything in good condition is redirected to the centre where it is sold in a thrift store-style operation. In some cases there are next-to-new building supplies that are recovered and resold to end users. An ongoing partnership between the region’s landfill and the FSRS has become a waste-reduction template for municipalities across Alberta, and many landfills are looking at how they can do the same thing. Getting their first unit on location was a huge opportunity for Liftboss, and the LRRC is very impressed with the power, comfort and design of this unit – the first Doosan machine added to their fleet. As this project is just in the early stages it will be a great opportunity to showcase how Liftboss can provide the support needed to help the LRRC grow their success in this project for years to come! Liftboss is the authorized Doosan dealer for sales, service, parts and rental for central and southern Alberta, servicing all makes and models of material handling and construction equipment. The LRRC is owned and operated by the Foothills Regional Services Commission (FRSC), which services and accepts waste from the commmunites of MD of Foothills No. 31, Town of High River, Town of Okotoks, Town Of Black Diamond, Town of Nanton, and the Town of Turner Valley.

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 26 | Number 8

REGULAR COLUMNS

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Understanding Research on Minimum Wages By Frank Atkins

12

The Delicate Dance of Social Licence and Other Intangible Government Promises By Paige MacPherson

CONTENTS COVER FEATURE

30

Past, Present and Future

Why Magazines Matter By David Yager

Resolute in Word and Deed By Cody Battershill

85 105

Leading Business The Calgary Report

Carol Kitchen takes stock of UFA By Melanie Darbyshire

ON OUR COVER: ABOVE: CAROL KITCHEN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF UNITED FARMERS OF ALBERTA (UFA) CO-OPERATIVE LIMITED. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

FIND US ONLINE! B US I N E SS I NCALGARY.COM BUSINESS IN CALGARY

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Current developments for Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Tourism Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, and Innovate Calgary

Marketing Matters By David Parker

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 26 | Number 8

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THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

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T  ime to Downsize? The ultimate decision for the retiree and the empty nester By Lorena McDonald

2  017 Business in Calgary Leaders Awards Highlights

CONTENTS COMPANY PROFILES

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D  owntown Office Towers Undergoing Interesting Metamorphosis Creative ideas take hold to battle soaring vacancy rate By Mario Toneguzzi

Statesman Group

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Celebrates 40 Years

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C  algary’s Head Offices

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O  pting for a Second Career Choice, chance and necessity By John Hardy

E  ye For Style Where to find professional fashion sense By Lorena McDonald

M  ore than Just the Stampede Calgary’s growing festival scene By Erlynn Gococo

D  ealing with Coal ...the environment, economy and people aspects By John Hardy

L  uxury Retail in Calgary Thriving through the downturn By Kim Locke


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Melanie Darbyshire Rennay Craats Lorena McDonald Mario Toneguzzi John Hardy Erlynn Gococo Kim Locke

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UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH ON MINIMUM WAGES // FRANK ATKINS

Understanding Research on Minimum Wages BY FRANK ATKINS

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t is very difficult for the average individual to understand published academic research, and published economic studies are no different. This came to the forefront recently, as there has been a renewed interest in the economic effects of raising the minimum wage. As provinces in Canada and some U.S. states have recently begun aggressive increases in the minimum wage, there has been a recent flurry of activity and new data available – starting with Seattle in 2014 – studying the effects of the increase in minimum wage. Here in Alberta we should be watching these studies very closely, as we are currently undertaking a similar policy move. Unfortunately, the studies based on the effects of the Seattle changes have produced contradictory results. The first study came from Berkeley, California, and it concluded the Seattle minimum wage changes had exactly the desired policy effect: minimum wage workers earned more money, and there was no change in employment. This conclusion was contradicted by the results of a recent study from the University of Washington. These researchers concluded the 2016 Seattle increase to $13 per hour caused employment amongst minimum wage workers to decrease by nine per cent. The Washington authors actually calculated a response parameter (which economists call elasticity): for every $1 worth of increased wages, there will be $3 worth of lost employment opportunities. One wonders how two groups of researchers can study data from what is essentially a real-world laboratory experiment, and come to two opposing conclusions. Some of this contradiction arises because the two sets of researchers did not actually have the same set of data. The authors of the Washington study had access to the number of hours worked by those receiving minimum wage, while

PERHAPS SOME MINIMUM WAGE WORKERS, WHEN FACED WITH AN INCREASE IN THEIR HOURLY WAGE, ACTUALLY CHOSE TO WORK FEWER HOURS. this data was not available to the Berkeley authors. The different data sets notwithstanding, as an economist, these types of contradictory results are embarrassingly familiar. Some economic research is becoming similar to climate change research: the authors have a preconceived idea of what is “correct” and then proceed to confirm their original opinion. You can see some of this in the reaction from some economists to the results of the Washington study. The Economic Policy Institute, which is a U.S. leftwing think tank, issued a statement that said, “There is a large body of research that shows that modest increases in the minimum wage boost wages for low income workers without causing job loss, and nothing in the UW study suggests we should revise those conclusions.” It is possible that both sides of this controversy missed an important possible conclusion from the Washington study. Perhaps some minimum wage workers, when faced with an increase in their hourly wage, actually chose to work fewer hours. Interestingly, this possibility is predicted by economic theory. The conclusion here would be that some minimum wage workers are earning enough income already. This conclusion would clearly infuriate the leftwing economists. Frank Atkins is a senior fellow at the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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THE DELICATE DANCE OF SOCIAL LICENCE // PAIGE MACPHERSON

The Delicate Dance of Social Licence and Other Intangible Government Promises BY PAIGE MACPHERSON

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here is no clearer example of politicians using fluffy, intangible sales pitches to make their tax hikes easier to swallow than the dubiousness of social licence.

Social licence, taxpayers were told, is necessary to getting Alberta’s oil to market. The only way for Albertans to gain that social licence was to suffer a little (or a lot), and swallow the bitter carbon tax pill that no one voted for. Could there be a worse news story for social licence salesmen than the election results in British Columbia? B.C.’s election eventually resulted in a NDP-Green coalition government. Among this duo’s shared commitments was bringing a halt to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. That pipeline expansion is necessary for getting Alberta’s oil to Asian markets. The NDP-Green coalition, permanent or otherwise, shows just how volatile Alberta Premier Rachel Notley’s social licence really is. The sticky question is how one is supposed to quantify socalled social licence. It cannot be measured. It is apparently a chip that taxpayers gained when the carbon tax was forced on them. But it was never guaranteed to bring any benefit, and if pipelines were indeed built, there was no way to prove it was because of social licence (as opposed to, say, actual licences that resource companies are required to earn). In return, however, the government was given a sweet deal. They got an ever-increasing, multibillion-dollar new tax, a rebate program through which they take money from all Albertans then give it back to some of them in crisp new cheques, piles of cash with which to hand out green corporate welfare, and their own expansion through new departments and programs.

The only guarantee with a carbon tax, as with most tax hikes, is that people pay more of their money to the government. Unfortunately, politicians selling policies with intangible benefits to taxpayers is commonplace. Municipal elections are coming up. Before Calgarians go to the polls in October, city politicians should be held to their actions more than their words. Councillors may talk about understanding the need for lower taxes. But their actions matter more. There’s been no firm commitment to any lasting tax relief in the city. This past year, as downtown property values dropped, suburban businesses had to make up the difference through enormous tax hikes. The city covered some of that cost, spending $45 million to cap the hikes at five per cent. But the Conference Board of Canada is predicting downtown office values will drop another 15 per cent next year – meaning business property taxpayers could be facing the same problem, with no solution in sight. As any person with a household or business budget knows reducing spending is the common-sense way to avoid increased costs. Yet, when a citizens’ panel recommended Calgary city councillors scrap their gold-plated handshakes on their way out of office – otherwise known as transition allowances – and vote annually on any pay hikes, councillors rejected the ideas, deriding the citizen-volunteer panel in the process. Entering election season, politicians are likely to talk about the need for both tax relief and shiny new spending items. There’s a good takeaway for Calgarians from the intangible social licence sales pitch and the carbon tax Albertans got in return: at all levels of government, the rhetoric runs hot. But actions speak louder than words. Paige MacPherson is Alberta director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

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WHY MAGAZINES MATTER // DAVID YAGER

Why Magazines Matter BY DAVID YAGER

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bviously, you agree. You’re reading a magazine. But print media continues to contract. Newspapers shrink. Some magazines disappear. Three newspapers that once competed – Calgary Sun, Calgary Herald and National Post – have common ownership and publish many of the same articles. More content comes from fewer sources like Reuters, Bloomberg and Canadian Press. This is bad for consumers looking for facts and analysis. Newspapers became the news in June when publishers asked Ottawa for $350 million in annual funding to subsidize journalist salaries to keep more on the payroll. This followed a proposed five per cent levy on broadband Internet to “level the playing field” among digital and print news services. This came from a parliamentary committee studying the modern media but was immediately dismissed by the prime minister. When Paul Godfrey took over Postmedia in 2009 it had about 5,400 employees and gained another 2,500 when it purchased Sun Media. Today the combined operations employ only 3,200, meaning 4,700 people lost their jobs, many reporters and columnists. The diversity of coverage and opinions has been devastated; content shrinks continuously. While newspaper readership has declined, the magazine business has fared much better and still has a strong presence in today’s marketplace. Looking at North American statistics, numerous magazine titles have disappeared over the past few years but just as many have launched bringing new content and ideas. Magazines are a critical element of a balanced media, particularly for local content. Weekly or monthly magazines have the time, space and commitment to research and publish in-depth articles; the story behind the story. Most reputable magazines have fact checkers; independent staff to verify

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every quote and fact. The best investigative articles have been exhaustively researched then published in magazines. For the many turning to digital media as a news source, the content may be diverse but it is short on depth, analysis and, too often, the truth. When Google was fined $3.6 billion by the EU for antitrust violations, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. issued a statement saying, “Google has profited from commodifying content and enabling the proliferation of flawed and fake news, to the detriment of journalism and of an informed society.” Google’s search engine will find and display anything. Rogue writers know this and exploit it regularly. It used to be difficult to put rubbish in front of eyeballs, but no longer. Meanwhile, essential “deep dive” research into complex subjects is contracting. The trend is multiple highlycompetitive digital news sources, too many of which will transit almost anything. Experienced journalists who can smell a rat are unemployed because they were paid more. Fact checkers and researchers, a key element of a legitimate print news outlet, are a dying breed. Newspapers and online publications have short news cycles. Newspapers need fresh material every day; digital media every hour. No wonder fake news can flourish. Some outlets are so desperate for content and so short of staff they publish first, verify second. It is amazing how much news nowadays is simply false. This is not to say digital media is bad, because it is not. Many legitimate and viable sources help people stay better informed at a lower cost. Very convenient when everyone has a computer in their pocket. But when you educate yourself on how the world turns, remember magazines remain a key element of the mix.


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RESOLUTE IN WORD AND DEED // CODY BATTERSHILL

Resolute in Word and Deed BY CODY BATTERSHILL

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round of applause, please, for Resolute Forest Products. Formed after the merger about a decade ago between Abitibi Consolidated and Bowater, today Resolute is a company that fully lives up to its name. Many corporations and even whole industries are sitting ducks for unaccountable employees within Greenpeace who understand that companies work hard to protect their profiles and their corporate logos. In short, Greenpeace knows companies hate controversy, and will do almost anything to avoid it. So when a corporation and its logo are attacked in the marketplace, Greenpeace expects the company will fall in line with whatever Greenpeace is selling.

FROM LOCAL FIRST NATIONS TO LOCAL MUNICIPAL LEADERS, RESOLUTE HAS MADE A LOT OF FANS, EACH ONE APPRECIATIVE OF THE STANCE THE COMPANY TOOK TO PROTECT ITS OWN BRAND AS WELL AS THE INTERESTS OF THE PEOPLE AND COMMUNITIES IN THE REGION WHERE IT OPERATES.

No more. Thanks to Resolute, Greenpeace is feeling the harsh sting of pushback.

to strict literalisms or scientific precision” and are “nonverifiable statements of subjective opinion.”

For Resolute CEO Richard Garneau, Greenpeace maligns not just a company but an entire way of life, one built on nurturing healthy forests that are the lifeblood of local people and communities. The Greenpeace attacks come in the guise of a “markets campaign,” soft, happy wording for what is effectively an all-out anti-corporate assault.

From local First Nations to local municipal leaders, Resolute has made a lot of fans, each one appreciative of the stance the company took to protect its own brand as well as the interests of the people and communities in the region where it operates.

Merriam-Webster defines “resolute” as “firmly determined in purpose” and “steadfast.” As you’d expect from a company so-named, Resolute countered by suing Greenpeace, alleging various unfair practices. Greenpeace now admits it engaged in “rhetorical hyperbole” in its attacks on Resolute, and that its words about forest destruction “can be describing figurative, rather than literal destruction.” It also acknowledges its claims “do not hew

This is an important example we can learn from. It’s long past time for the energy sector to stand up to “non-verifiable statements of subjective opinion.” We must ask our energy companies and our governments to defend our brand. Let’s take a page from Mr. Garneau’s book – and push back hard. After all, who says activists – especially ones who admit their rhetoric is over the top – have a monopoly on environmental stewardship, community health and honest information? Cody Battershill is a Calgary Realtor and founder/spokesperson for CanadaAction.ca, a volunteer-driven organization that supports Canadian energy development and the environmental, social and economic benefits that come with it.

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Bow Valley College Awards Honorary Diplomas to Two of Calgary’s Finest Bow Valley College (BVC) awarded honorary diplomas to two individuals during its spring graduation ceremonies. Eva Friesen, president and CEO of the Calgary Foundation (CF), and Paul Charette, former Colleges and Institutes Canada board member and current chair of the board of directors for Bird Construction, received honorary diplomas in business administration from BVC’s Chiu School of Business in two separate ceremonies. The honorary diplomas were presented during graduation ceremonies in which over 900 learners crossed the stage of the Jack Singer Concert Hall. “I am humbled and honoured to be chosen for an honorary diploma by Bow Valley College,” said Friesen, a community partner and organizational donor who has been leading CF since 2005, during the ceremony on June 19. “Bow Valley College plays a significant role in helping people belong to the community. Through learning and skill building, and subsequent employment, people from all walks of life get a new start on the road to success. When people are successful they feel they belong. When people feel they belong, they are more likely to be successful. Belonging is key to building a healthy community.” She added that CF exists to help build a community where everyone belongs, and that there are many intersections between CF and BVC. “Eva represents the compassionate and humanistic characteristics that are required of our health-care providers,” says Nora Maclachlan, dean of the School of Health and Wellness. “She has a realistic perspective of our health-care world.” Charette was honoured during the ceremony on June 20. “I accept this honorary diploma in business administration with a great deal of pride,” he said in his speech to the graduates, “and I must say that it is very humbling to be recognized in this way.” Charette, who grew up in a small community north of Winnipeg, spoke about the struggles of his youth and the

lessons learned from it. He then provided some sage advice for the graduates. “The recipe for success in business and life in my opinion is as follows: get a good education – you now have a great start; but in this age of a knowledgebased economy, rapidly changing job descriptions and new technologies, lifelong learning is more important today than it has ever been,” he said. He went on to say the jobs the graduates might have for the next five years could disappear, and they may be working in new jobs within the next 10 years that don’t even exist today. “You need to be well prepared,” he warned. “Paul Charette has been a leader in both the business and post-secondary sectors of the Canadian economy,” says David Allwright, dean of the Chiu School of Business. “We are extremely proud to be able to recognize Mr. Charette’s contribution to Bow Valley College by awarding him an honorary business administration diploma.” Both honorary diplomas were handed out by Laura Jo Gunter, president and CEO of BVC, which is Calgary and region’s only comprehensive community college with more than 15,000 full- and part-time students.

ABOVE: EVA FRIESEN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE CALGARY FOUNDATION, GIVES A SPEECH TO THE GRADUATES AFTER RECEIVING HER HONORARY DIPLOMA FROM BOW VALLEY COLLEGE ON JUNE 19, 2017. PHOTO SOURCE: BOW VALLEY COLLEGE

BELOW: PAUL CHARETTE RECEIVES HIS HONORARY DIPLOMA FROM LAURA JO GUNTER, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF BOW VALLEY COLLEGE. PHOTO SOURCE: BOW VALLEY COLLEGE

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New Facility in Northwest Calgary Named Shane Homes YMCA After $3.5-Million Gift The YMCA Calgary received the largest corporate gift in its 115-year history in May with an investment of $3.5 million from Shane Homes. At a naming celebration on May 26, 2017, it was announced the new City of Calgary-built YMCA currently under construction in the city’s northwest will be named Shane Homes YMCA in recognition of the Calgarybased homebuilder’s investment. “We are tremendously happy to partner with Shane Homes to bring this transformational gift to life in service of Calgarians, particularly in the northwest,” said Shannon Doram, president and CEO of YMCA Calgary. “The Shane Homes team has really stepped up to help YMCA to ensure more Calgarians belong, grow, thrive and lead in this amazing new facility.” With six health and wellness facilities and two more (Shane Homes YMCA and the Seton Recreation Facility YMCA) opening next year, five child development centres, two outdoor camp sites and over 60 community program sites serving all quadrants of the city, the YMCA Calgary serves thousands of Calgarians each year through a variety of programs and services. When Shane Homes YMCA opens in Rocky Ridge in the first quarter of 2018, it will be the largest YMCA facility in North America at just under 300,000 square feet. The new cityowned, YMCA-operated facility will provide opportunities for recreation, leisure and learning through aquatics (including an eight-lane competition pool, a leisure pool, a wave system and water slides), fitness and sports facilities (including leisure and multipurpose rinks), a 300-seat theatre, arts learning and performance spaces, multipurpose areas, licensed childcare and a Calgary Public Library. ABOVE: EXTERIOR VIEW OF SHANE HOMES YMCA AT ROCKY RIDGE, ESTIMATED OPENING DATE, FIRST QUARTER 2018. INSET: SHANE WENZEL, PRESIDENT, SHANE HOMES, WITH SHANNON DORAM, PRESIDENT AND CEO, YMCA CALGARY.

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“WE ARE STRONG SUPPORTERS OF CAUSES THAT PROMOTE HEALTH, WELLNESS AND EDUCATION, AND THAT HELP CHANGE PEOPLE’S LIVES FOR THE BETTER.” ~ SHANE WENZEL Shane Wenzel, president of Shane Homes, was on hand for the celebration. “We are strong supporters of causes that promote health, wellness and education, and that help change people’s lives for the better,” he says. “YMCA Calgary is a perfect choice to invest our support to help Calgarians thrive in a safe, active and welcoming environment.” Founded in 1979 by Cal Wenzel, the Shane Homes Group of Companies is a homebuilder and residential community developer in Calgary and Airdrie. Its three business units – Shane Homes, Nuovo by Shane Homes and Wenzel Developments – build a range of products including condominiums, street towns, duplexes and single-family homes.

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TIME TO DOWNSIZE? // REAL ESTATE

Time to Downsize? THE ULTIMATE DECISION FOR THE RETIREE AND THE EMPTY NESTER BY LORENA MCDONALD

T

ypically, downsizing from a family residence to a smaller house or condo makes perfect sense for a retiree or empty nester. Choosing to downsize can be beneficial if it is an economical option that suits one’s lifestyle. Sometimes there are unexpected pitfalls when transitioning into a smaller place because the cost of a new property or condo is underestimated. For some, the expense in real estate fees, legal fees, land-transfer taxes and moving costs can be more than initially thought. Many downsizers fail to consider extra homeowner association dues and condo fees related with new construction builds, condominiums and apartments. Extra monthly costs can incur if one does not pay attention to what these fees include, even though there are perks with having less upkeep and maintenance. Some retirees rely on their family residence as the primary source of equity, but this can backfire when real estate plummets and the price of a home becomes less than one hoped.

According to Re/Max First Realtor Karina Sunderji, one should consider options before downsizing to ensure a similar standard of living. “What I am finding is that a lot of retirees are not wanting to give up their lifestyle. They want to maintain the life that they have become accustomed to [and] are not willing to give something up in order to downsize.” There is a strong divide between those looking to downscale in square footage. Many times, retirees and empty nesters are making a lateral move where the price of a new home or condo is not necessarily less expensive than their original home. “Sometimes when retirees downsize they are moving into something that is equally expensive or more; which might not serve the purpose. They might have to overextend themselves and they might not be saving anything in doing so. We are seeing more of the story where people are modifying their houses, or making it more accessible to make a house more convenient,” explains Sunderji.

ABOVE: MCKENZIE LAKE. PHOTO SOURCE: NINA CHERNICHEN

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AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


The Perfect Getaway … Is Closer Than You Think …

Village of Radium Hot Springs

DESIGNED FOR NATURE LOVERS & OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS

• 200 Acres of breathtaking mountain valley views • Community Lake and Park • Trails & Pathways • Architectural Guidelines • Less than 3 hours to Calgary CHOOSE FROM A VARIETY OF A lot of individuals look to downsize if it improves their quality of life. So, when it came to selling their house of 27 years, retired couple Nina and Don Chernichen chose Calbridge Homes’ Villas of Riverstone because of the convenience in maintaining a smaller place compared to their larger home on McKenzie Lake. “I used to do all the things myself, but I can’t physically do it anymore. There is a lot of work having a big house with a large yard,” says 67-year-old Nina Chernichen.

• Single family lots • Homestead lots from 3 - 5 acres • Homesites ranging between $90K - $300K ONE OF CANADA’S PREMIER MASTER PLANNED MOUNTAIN COMMUNITIES!

The couple looked at different areas in Calgary, but chose Cranston’s new Riverstone development because of the parks and pathways connected to Fish Creek. “Our new place has a smaller backyard close to the riverbank. This villa will be great for us because we can have a decent size place for our dog and the convenience of easy maintenance with having a smaller place,” she adds. Another benefit to purchasing a villa was the condo maintenance fees were affordable. “The fees cover our cost in snow removal, landscaping, lawn maintenance and exterior insurance which is wonderful. So, when you think

ABOVE: KARINA SUNDERJI, RE/MAX FIRST REALTOR.

BUILDER DEVELOPER SINCE 1951

WWW.ELKPARKRANCH.COM CALL SCOTT SAUERMANN – 250-342-5889 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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TIME TO DOWNSIZE? // REAL ESTATE

HASKAYNE

MBA ‘‘

The Haskayne MBA empowered me to transition my career from engineering to business, my true passion. The program taught me how to embrace challenges and how to take control of my career. My time at the Haskayne School of Business was an excellent experience and helped push me to become stronger, a better leader and ultimately more accomplished.

Trevor Sterner, MBA’11 Senior Finance Manager ATB Financial

The Haskayne MBA. Calgary’s MBA.

about it, this is a plus because our insurance will go down about half and our utility costs will be halved too,” explains Chernichen. Calgary Real Estate Board (CREB) president David P. Brown suggests there can be benefits in buying an apartment-style complex where condo fees include utilities and maintenance. “A good Realtor will explain what a condominium fee covers, and a lot of times the homeowner will find out that it covers things they didn’t know like heat, water, sewer and even electrical. The insurance is a fraction of the cost compared to what they had before for both interior and exterior. So, there are a few good savings,” describes Brown. He recommends downsizers “sit down with a professional and look at what will exactly be right for them because there are a lot of choices out there.” New communities like Auburn Bay, Mahogany and Currie West Village are becoming popular for retirees and empty nesters. The abundant amenities, shops and pathways are a big draw for those wanting an easy lifestyle option.

haskaynemba.ca

24

ABOVE: DAVID P. BROWN, CREB PRESIDENT.

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


TIME TO DOWNSIZE? // REAL ESTATE

“A GOOD REALTOR WILL EXPLAIN WHAT A CONDOMINIUM FEE COVERS, AND A LOT OF TIMES THE HOMEOWNER WILL FIND OUT THAT IT COVERS THINGS THEY DIDN’T KNOW LIKE HEAT, WATER, SEWER AND EVEN ELECTRICAL. THE INSURANCE IS A FRACTION OF THE COST COMPARED TO WHAT THEY HAD BEFORE FOR BOTH INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR. SO, THERE ARE A FEW GOOD SAVINGS.” ~ DAVID P. BROWN When it comes to advice for those looking to downsize, Nina Chernichen suggests, “You have to be ready to do it because downsizing is emotional. But, when it comes down to choosing to move because of health, or to improve your lifestyle, then you know it is the right thing.”

Ultimately, there is no perfect formula for everyone. But the key factor is to both assess individual needs and financial considerations before moving to something smaller. In the end, the decision to downsize is a personal choice that varies for everyone. So the key factor is to determine what is the best fit for your own lifestyle before making any big changes.

A GREAT MEAL IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS

403-269-1600 www.centini.com LUNCH | DINNER Breakfast & Office Catering by Appointment | Special Events | Offsite Retreats | Private Dining | Private Rooms & Discreet Meetings For professional attention to the details of your event please email events@centini.com or telephone 403-269-1605

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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2017 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

Highlights

FROM BUSINESS IN CALGARY’S 2017 LEADERS AWARDS WITH PHOTOS BY CARIS RICHARDS

TREVOR WINKLER, MNP; MARK LUNNIN, SERVPRO; LEADER SCOTT THON, ALTALINK; DAVID ALLWRIGHT, BOW VALLEY COLLEGE

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER ROB HEATON, CAMBRIAN PHARMACY

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER FABRIZIO CARINELLI, CANA CONSTRUCTION CO. LTD.

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER TIM LOGEL, CARDEL LIFESTYLES AND LOGEL HOMES

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER TODD POULSEN, ELAN CONSTRUCTION LIMITED

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER KIM CARON, EXECUTIVE MAT SERVICE LTD.

Platinum Partner

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Gold Partners

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Official Airline Partner


2017 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER SHELLEY VANDENBERG, FIRST CALGARY FINANCIAL

3RD AND 4TH FROM LEFT: TEAGHAN STACK AND MARGARET STACK (ACCEPTING FOR LEADER LOUIS STACK, FITTER INTERNATIONAL INC.)

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER GEETA SANKAPPANAVAR, GRAFTON ASSET MANAGEMENT

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER ALICE MATEYKO, HOMES BY AVI, ALBERTA, SINGLE FAMILY

CHASE MYHILL, AIR CANADA; NORMAN LEACH, DRIVING FORCE, LEADER ROD GRAHAM, HORIZON NORTH LOGISTICS INC.; MYRON FESER, ATB FINANCIAL

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER WENDY COOMBS, MOMENTUM HEALTH, EVIDENCE SPORT AND SPINE, INNOVATIVE SPORT MEDICINE

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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2017 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER JEREMY BRIDGE, PK SOUND

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER HARWINDER KANG, PRIME REAL ESTATE GROUP

3RD AND 4TH FROM LEFT: LEADER WAYNE MCNEIL, RESPECT GROUP; LEADER SHELDON KENNEDY, RESPECT GROUP

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER BRUCE RABIK, ROGERS INSURANCE LTD.

3RD AND 4TH FROM LEFT: LEADER DR. GARTH MANN, STATESMAN GROUP OF COMPANIES; LEADER JEFF MANN, STATESMAN GROUP OF COMPANIES

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER DR. MOHAMED NANJI, SURGICAL CENTRES INC.

Platinum Partner

28

Gold Partners

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Official Airline Partner


2017 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER JIM BUTTON, VILLAGE BREWERY

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER WAYNE HENUSET, WILLOW PARK WINES & SPIRITS

Fiera Capital Private Wealth is proud to welcome Anil Tahiliani to the Calgary team Anil Tahiliani, MBA, CFA Senior Vice President, Private Wealth atahiliani@fieracapital.com 403 699-9066 | fieracapital.com

Fiera Capital Private Wealth counsels wealthy Canadians and their families, as well as endowments and foundations. Providing peace of mind.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE // COVER

Past, Present and Future

CAROL KITCHEN TAKES STOCK OF UFA BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

S

ince Alberta’s earliest days, the agricultural sector has been a dominant force in this province. Its impact has been and remains wide spread. From significant economic benefits (farm cash receipts totalled $13.6 billion or 1.5 per cent of Alberta’s GDP in 2015), to cultural and social norms, to important political movements and parties – it has helped shape Alberta into what it is today. As the province has changed over its 111-year history, so has the agricultural sector. There are fewer farms today than there were 30 years ago (the 2011 federal census counted 43,234 farms, 12.5 per cent less than in 2006), while at the same time there are more large farms. Technology, consumer preferences and urbanization are just some of the factors driving change. This change is something Carol Kitchen, president and CEO of United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) Co-operative Limited, is focused on. As the head of one of Canada’s largest cooperatives – whose businesses include commercial and retail agriculture, petroleum and outdoor adventure (through its Wholesale Sports retail business) and which brought in $1.33 billion in revenue in 2016 – Kitchen’s task is great. Not only must she meet the needs of UFA’s 50,000 active members and lead the co-operative’s 1,700 employees (300 of which work at the Calgary headquarters), she must also keep her finger on the pulse of the global agricultural sector, which is never static.

“There is so much opportunity,” she says from the Airdrie UFA Farm & Ranch Supply Store – one of 34 UFA retail stores in Western Canada. These stores sell crop seed, supplies and equipment, livestock feed and equipment, automotive supplies, building supplies, pet supplies, workwear, fencing, shop equipment, and much more. “We’re at a transition now with the Barton Report and the federal government saying we need to be much more competitive in the global demand for food; and we should be.” The agriculture industry can lead, she says, by focusing more on East-West trade. “And by focusing on adding value, not just selling commodities.” Kitchen became CEO on April 1, 2015, after moving to Calgary with her husband and 12-year-old son. The last two years have been nothing short of challenging. Shortly after taking over, Alberta’s oil and gas economy took a dive and the provincial election ushered in the new NDP government. “It’s been an interesting process. I knew I wanted to make changes when I came here, and wholly expected to have the umbrella earnings from our petroleum business provided to support that,” she says. “But that wasn’t the case, and clearly we needed to make changes in several parts of our business. Don’t waste a good crisis.”

ABOVE: CAROL KITCHEN, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF UNITED FARMERS OF ALBERTA (UFA) CO-OPERATIVE LIMITED. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE // COVER

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PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE // COVER

Kitchen came from Land O’Lakes Inc., a major U.S. agricultural co-operative headquartered in Minneapolis, where she was a senior vice-president and general manager of a global dairy ingredients business unit with $2 billion in annual revenue. During her 16 years at Land O’Lakes, Kitchen held several positions including senior vicepresident of corporate strategy and business development, vice-president responsible for international growth and business controller. Originally from Illinois (she grew up on a farm), she began her career as a certified public accountant. “I’ve worked in almost all the businesses, short of Wholesale Sports, that UFA has throughout my career,” she says. She saw taking over at UFA as an opportunity to demonstrate her leadership skills and build a new team. She is also blazing fresh trails: she is the only female CEO of an agricultural co-operative in North America (UFA also has two duly-elected voting women on its board – another anomaly in the agricultural co-op world). “It’s kind of ironic that it would happen here at UFA,” she smiles, “because UFA had women in the government in the beginning. It really supported the suffrage movement.” Kitchen has indeed become well versed in UFA’s history. Founded in 1909 by farmers and ranchers, the UFA political party was elected to form the provincial government in 1921. During its 14 years in power it transferred control of natural resources from the federal government to the province – a move which helped ensure Alberta’s long-term prosperity. As fuel became an increasingly important agricultural input, UFA jumped into the petroleum business in 1953. The move proved genius as fuel would, in time, come to provide the bulk of the co-operative’s earnings. Today, UFA provides fuels, lubricants, diesel exhaust fluids (DEF) and coolants from its 110 fuel locations across Western Canada. It also delivers bulk fuel to both agricultural and commercial accounts. The commercial segment has closely followed oil and gas activity across the province. “The commercial segment is a significant part of our business,” Kitchen explains. “Prior to 2014, it comprised about 60 to 70 per cent of our fuel business. Since the downturn it’s really dropped and now the agricultural and commercial segments are more balanced.” Independent agents, with whom UFA

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contracts to run the 110 locations, were also affected. “Now we see it coming back, but it’s not coming back the way it went away. It was very broad based and now it’s pretty focused, particularly where the gas plays are.” Kitchen believes UFA must maintain a better balance between its agriculture and petroleum businesses in the future. She also plans to keep a better connection between UFA’s commercial businesses – both agriculture and petroleum – going forward. This is, in fact, one of the changes she’s made since taking over. “We’ve done a lot of restructuring,” she explains. “Historically, the business was run on a divisional basis – petroleum, agriculture and Wholesale Sports. Early last year we sorted it differently – we created a retail business and a commercial business for the entire business.” The new structure allows for a single commercial customer focus and has allowed UFA to apply the talent and expertise from Wholesale Sports in the 34 UFA retail stores. “We needed a lot more supply chain and retail expertise in our UFA retail business,” Kitchen admits, “and we had that in our Wholesale Sports business.” Acquired by UFA in 2008, Wholesale Sports is an outdoor outfitter with 12 locations in Western Canada. It specializes in hunting, fishing and camping, with firearms accounting for 60 per cent of the business. “It’s based on service,” Kitchen says. “We have employees that know the products.” She says it’s been tough, given the highly-competitive environment (Cabela’s and Bass Pro Shops – two main competitors – are in the midst of merging) and the Alberta downturn. “We’re just going to hunker down and serve our customers,” she says. “I don’t think anyone’s path in retail is very clear right now. There’s plenty of work to do while always focusing on the customer.” Changes at the UFA retail stores include improved merchandising and promotion. “We had stopped promoting the stores and now we’re back actively promoting them,” she says. “And that’s driving foot traffic.” UFA’s commercial agricultural business, Kitchen explains, is about making farmers’ operations more productive. “That can be through crop input (seed and chemicals), livestock supplies, buildings, storage – whatever they need.” It’s also


MNP welcomes Calliou Group (L to R): Germaine Conacher, Shauna McGarvey, Tracy Campbell, Adena Vanderjagt, Ryland Brennan

YOUR OPPORTUNITIES ARE GROWING, SO IS OUR TEAM

Aboriginal-Owned Consulting Firm Unites with MNP With major development projects in Canada that will impact Indigenous communities on the rise, MNP continues to grow our team by joining forces with the best within the industry and are pleased to welcome Calliou Group, an Aboriginal-owned and Aboriginal client-focused consulting firm. Together, we will have a greater ability to develop and implement innovative strategies and solutions for the benefit of Indigenous communities and all Canadians. Founded in 2008, Calliou Group has grown to become a strategic Aboriginal consultation specialist group for Aboriginal communities, government regulators and natural resource developers. With their extensive experience in working with Indigenous communities, they provide services such as land use studies, proponent discussions, review environmental assessments and reports on behalf of Aboriginal Nations. They also conduct internal ’duty to consult’ training, develop and implement consultation strategies for projects, manage and support Crown-Aboriginal consultation processes and help to oversee records of communication. Combining our two firms’ Aboriginal-focused experience and insights, along with MNP’s full-suite of accounting, consulting and tax services, we can ensure all stakeholders continue to capitalize on all opportunities. Contact Clayton Norris CAFM, CPA, CMA, Vice President, Aboriginal Services at 403.263.3385 or clayton.norris@mnp.ca


PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE // COVER

about service; UFA has approximately 50 salespeople who travel to farms for sales and service.

the bin they can’t sell it and they can’t spend that money with anybody else.”

Weather has been another difficulty since Kitchen started, with a drought in 2015 and a very wet fall last year. “There were a million acres in Alberta that weren’t harvested,” she says. “That really diverts farmers’ interests when thinking about the next spring. It also impacts their cash flow, because if they don’t have crop in

There has been some improvement. “Grain storage sales have been really good this year because we had a good crop when it came off the field.” Included in Kitchen’s plans for UFA’s commercial business is growth of its cattle and livestock business. “We don’t have as much market share as I think we should,” she laments. “We’re ABOVE: CRAIG HARRISON, STORE MANAGER OF THE AIRDRIE UFA FARM & RANCH SUPPLY STORE. PHOTO SOURCE: EWAN PHOTO VIDEO

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PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE // COVER

approved to add anhydrous ammonia (effective for adding nitrogen to the soil but challenging from a regulatory and safety perspective) to its offering. Widely used in the U.S., Kitchen sees it as a competitive advantage. In the short run, Kitchen’s focused on getting back to the customer and serving them as one. “One UFA providing solutions to what customers need. We want to be able to sell them fuel, fence posts, fertilizer and provide financing – be a bit of a one-stop shop.” Technology is another factor she’s watching. “Whether it be precision farming and the digital transformation in agriculture or the digital transformation in retail – there’s transition and it will impact our stores.” Changes in the regulatory and trade environments, Alberta’s global competitiveness and the diversification of the economy are major concerns. As a member of the agricultural advisory committee for Calgary Economic Development, she’s had several meetings with officials from the provincial government. “They’re working hard, but you’ve got to send the message,” she says. “You have to tell people you’re open for business.” She is also a board member of AgForLife LLC, a Calgary-based nonprofit that supports agriculture awareness and farm safety. The reason for UFA’s longevity? “Part of it is we’re very connected to the communities we do business in,” Kitchen says. “We invest some of our members’ money into things that matter to them.” These include 4-H Alberta, AgForLife and the Calgary Stampede (to which UFA gave $103,000, $100,000 and $60,000 respectively last year).

trying to reinvigorate that business.” No wonder, since cattle and calves account for the largest proportion of Alberta’s total agricultural cash receipts ($5.23 billion in 2015).

It’s also because UFA does its job well. “Agricultural cooperatives were started to create value for their members – helping farmers do something they couldn’t do on their own,” Kitchen says. “Farmers still need that. We aggregate their demand and get them a better price and the service they need.” This, she believes, leads to long-term relationships with members.

Last year, in a joint venture with CHS (a $30-billion U.S. agricultural co-operative), UFA opened a fertilizer-blending facility in Sexsmith operating under the name Bridgeland. “That market was underserved,” Kitchen explains. “So we built the facility and it’s operating well.” The plant is

Whatever Alberta’s future holds, the agricultural sector will have a role to play. While it may be different from the one it played 100 years ago, it will most certainly be important. UFA, its members and the products and services they provide will comprise an essential part of that role.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE TALENT IS THE BIG DRAW

I

n business terms, having a corporate head office located in the area is much more than business bragging rights and business prestige.

For business dynamics, momentum and clout, head offices are a potent competitive edge and a multifaceted win-win situation for a major business community. “Corporate head offices bring disproportionate value to a city because they serve as catalysts to spur economic activity and help to attract or support other companies – their peers as well as their customers – that create a more vibrant and diverse economy,” explains the plugged-in and enthusiastic Mary Moran, president and CEO, Calgary Economic Development. “It adds significantly to a city’s wealth. Companies tend to cluster corporate head offices to act as a magnet for investment. The cluster of head offices in downtown Calgary has created an ecosystem where companies can compete, collide and cooperate on innovation and business. “Cities around the world are trying to create head office scenarios that occurred organically in an eight-block radius in downtown Calgary.” Experts like Moran, business leaders and consultant agree – and caution – that setting up (or relocating) a corporate head office in any market is anything but basic or straightforward. “Each company will have its own criteria but the low cost of doing business – from the relatively low tax burden to affordable and available real estate – is a major factor in attracting companies to Calgary. Calgary has the allure of a young population (36.4 years) and highly-educated workforce (second among cities in Canada for educational achievement). “The workforce is experienced in complex world-scale industries, and companies routinely list talent as Calgary’s number-one attribute.”

The realities of Calgary’s two-year downturn have taken a toll but may also be a business positive. “Calgary is actually on sale right now. Companies that couldn’t afford to move here during the oil boom can now take advantage of the exceptional workforce, the unbeatable quality of life and incredible opportunities for businesses to prosper.” At the moment, Calgary is home to 124 of the FP500 companies on the TSX. About 10 companies from the list have closed their doors in the past year, mostly due to consolidation in the oil and gas sector. But, as Moran proudly and enthusiastically points out, Calgary remains second to only Toronto for the total number of head offices in Canada. And there’s the solid and consistent fact of Calgary business life. On a per-capita basis, Calgary has more corporate headquarters than any city in Canada. Business leaders and analysts emphasize that the location of head offices in Calgary is vital for the new business normal of the city’s diversification. “The large number of head offices in Calgary has led to development of top-quality firms in areas such as legal, accounting, risk, IT and HR services that are critical to head offices,” Moran points out. “There are strong transportation links for products and executives, including air connections to all the major business and finance capitals in the world.” The CED’s Mary Moran underscores the unmeasurable business value of head offices. “In Calgary, the large concentration of head offices speaks to the rich history of entrepreneurial thinking that continues to attract ambitious people from around the world to the city who are motivated to succeed.”

Financial Post 500 rankings provided by Financial Post Magazine, published nine times a year by The National Post, and Infomart, a full-service content strategy group providing media monitoring and analytics services, research, executive summaries, content solutions and corporate data to organizations across Canada.

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CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

Enbridge Inc.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

E

Al Monaco

8

nbridge has become a leader in the safe and reliable delivery of energy in North America and is proud to be recognized as one of the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World. They transport energy, operating the world’s longest, most sophisticated crude oil and liquids transportation system, with a significant and growing presence in the natural gas transmission and midstream businesses, and an increasing involvement in power transmission.

REVENUE

Suncor Energy Inc.

S Steven W. Williams

34,560,000,000

www.enbridge.com

Imperial Oil Ltd.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

A

15

26,822,000,000

$

Husky Energy Inc.

H

fter more than a century, Imperial continues to be an industry leader in applying technology and innovation to responsibly develop Canada’s energy resources. As Canada’s largest petroleum refiner, a major producer of crude oil and natural gas, a key petrochemical producer and a leading fuels marketer from coast to coast, our company remains committed to the highest standards across all areas of our business.

Rich Kruger

Asim Ghosh

REVENUE

25,049,000,000

www.imperialoil.ca

TransCanada Corp.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

33

usky Energy is one of Canada’s largest integrated energy companies. The company operates worldwide with upstream, midstream and downstream business segments. A combination of technological innovation, prudent investment, sound project management and responsible resource development allows Husky to deliver strong returns to shareholders. The company has a well-defined and growth-oriented business plan, a stable foundation.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

W

39

12,919,000,000

$

Cenovus Energy Inc.

C

ith more than 60 years’ experience, TransCanada is a leader in the responsible development and reliable operation of North American energy infrastructure including natural gas and liquids pipelines, power generation and gas storage facilities. For more information visit: www. transcanada.com or check us out on Twitter @TransCanada or http://blog. transcanada.com.

www.huskyenergy.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

41

enovus Energy is a Canadian oil company. They are committed to applying fresh, progressive thinking to safely and responsibly unlock energy resources the world needs. Their operations include oilsands projects in northern Alberta, which use specialized methods to drill and pump the oil to the surface, as well as natural gas and oil production across Alberta and southern Saskatchewan.

Russell K. Girling

Brian C. Ferguson

REVENUE

REVENUE

12,505,000,000

$

www.transcanada.com

Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.

C

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

49

12,134,000,000

$

Parkland Fuel Corp.

10,523,000,000

$

Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd.

C

www.cnrl.com Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

73

Robert B Espey

6,266,000,000

Shaw Communications Inc.

N

Rank: Media Cdn (out of 800)

88

haw is a diversified communications and media company, providing consumers with broadband cable television, High-Speed Internet, Home Phone, telecommunications services (through Shaw Business), satellite direct-to-home services (through Shaw Direct) and engaging programming content (through Shaw Media). Shaw serves 3.3 million customers, through a reliable and extensive fibre network. Shaw Media operates one of the largest conventional television networks in Canada, Global Television, and 19 specialty networks.

REVENUE

www.cpr.ca Rank: Chemical Cdn (out of 800)

90

OVA Chemicals develops and manufactures chemicals, plastic resins and end-products that make everyday life healthier, easier and safer. Their employees work to ensure health, safety, security and environmental stewardship through our commitment to sustainability and Responsible Care to ensure effective health, safety, security and environmental stewardship. NOVA Chemicals and its employees practise a culture of dignity, respect, openness and honesty with one another and in the communities where we live and work.

REVENUE

4,653,400,000

http://www.parkland.ca

S

Bradley S. Shaw

NOVA Chemicals Corp.*

72

arkland Fuel Corporation is one of North America’s fastest growing independent marketers of fuel and petroleum products. We deliver gasoline, diesel, propane, lubricants, heating oil and other high-quality petroleum products to motorists, businesses, households and wholesale customers in Canada and the United States. Our mission is to be the partner of choice for our customers and suppliers, and we do this by building lasting relationships through outstanding service, reliability, safety and professionalism.

$

Keith Creel REVENUE

6,232,000,000

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

anadian Pacific (TSX:CP)(NYSE:CP) is a transcontinental railway in Canada and the United States with direct links to eight major ports, including Vancouver and Montreal, providing North American customers a competitive rail service with access to key markets in every corner of the globe. CP is growing with its customers, offering a suite of freight transportation services, logistics solutions and supply chain expertise.

$

www.cenovus.com

P

anadian Natural is one of the largest independent crude oil and natural gas producers in the world. The company continually targets cost effective alternatives to develop our portfolio of projects and to deliver our defined growth plan, thereby creating value for shareholders. A balanced mix of natural gas, light oil, heavy oil, in situ oilsands production, oilsands mining and associated upgrading facilities, represents one of the strongest and most diverse asset portfolios of any energy producer in the world.

REVENUE

$

www.suncor.com

REVENUE

$

Todd D. Karran

13

uncor Energy is Canada’s leading integrated energy company. Suncor’s operations include oil sands development and upgrading, conventional and offshore oil and gas production, petroleum refining, and product marketing under the Petro-Canada brand. A member of Dow Jones Sustainability indexes, FTSE4Good and CDP, Suncor is working to responsibly develop petroleum resources while also growing a renewable energy portfolio. Suncor is listed on the UN Global Compact 100 stock index and the Corporate Knights’ Global 100. Suncor’s common shares (symbol: SU) are listed on the Toronto and New York stock exchanges.

REVENUE

$

Steve W. Laut

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

4,884,000,000

$

Gibson Energy Inc.

G A. Stewart Hanlon

www.shaw.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

92

ibsons is a Canadian-based midstream energy company with operations in most of the key hydrocarbon-rich basins in North America. For over 60 years, Gibsons has delivered integrated midstream solutions to customers in the oil and gas industry. With headquarters in Calgary, Alberta, the Company’s operations include the storage, blending, processing, transportation, marketing and distribution of crude oil, natural gas liquids and refined products. The Company also provides oilfield waste and water management services. Gibsons is the second largest industrial propane distribution company operating in Canada under the Canwest Propane and Stittco Energy brands.

REVENUE

www.novachem.com

4,594,181,000

$

www.gibsons.com

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

37


CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

Pembina Pipeline Corp.

P

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

102

WestJet Airlines Ltd.

W

embina Pipeline Corporation is a reliable and growing energy transportation and service provider with an exciting future. Their integrated businesses and quality assets combine with prudent financial management to form the foundation of its strategic plan. They believe in carefully managed, responsible growth that exceeds the expectations of our stakeholders. Michael H. Dilger

Gregg Saretsky

REVENUE

4,265,000,000

$

ATCO Ltd.

www.pembina.com Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

109

4,122,859,000

$

Encana Corp.*

E

Fluor Canada Ltd.*

F

www.atco.com Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

146

3,866,350,000

$

ENMAX Corp.

Gianna Manes

ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp.*

C Ken Lueers

www.fluor.com/canada Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

158

Repsol Oil & Gas Canada Inc.*

A

2,801,000,000

$

Keyera Corp.

K

David G. Smith

www.conocophillips.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

169

2,508,973,000

TransAlta Corp.

166

T

www.keyera.com Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

172

Dawn L. Farrell REVENUE

2,397,000,000

2,426,075,000

$

$

Graham Group Ltd.

Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

G

182

AltaGas Ltd.

A

2,195,315,000

www.transalta.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

183

ltaGas is an energy infrastructure business with a focus on natural gas, power and regulated utilities. AltaGas creates value by acquiring, growing and optimizing its energy infrastructure, including a focus on clean energy sources. For more information visit: www.altagas.ca

raham Group Ltd. is an employee-owned construction solutions partner with over eight decades of experience, providing general contracting, design-build, construction management and public-private partnership (P3) services in the commercial, industrial, infrastructure, earthworks and masonry sectors. The company has offices throughout North America and employs over 1,300 professionals and office staff. As one of Canada’s largest construction companies, Graham has the resources, capacity and expertise to undertake projects of every scope, scale and complexity.

David Harris REVENUE

REVENUE

38

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

ransAlta is Canada’s largest publicly traded generator and marketer of electricity. With ongoing investment in renewable and cleaner power generation, TransAlta is producing more electricity with less environmental impact. As Canada’s largest wind producer and Alberta’s largest generator of renewable energy, TransAlta takes pride in reliably meeting our customers’ needs with environmentally responsible, low-cost power.

Luis Cabra Duenas REVENUE

$

www.enmax.com

eyera is one of the largest independent midstream operators in Canada. Its operating businesses provide a range of gathering, processing, fractionation, storage, transportation and marketing services to the oil and gas industry. Keyera’s natural gas liquid (NGL) and crude oil infrastructure includes pipelines, terminals, and processing and storage facilities in the Edmonton and Fort Saskatchewan area, a major North American NGL hub.

$

t Repsol, we realize that better energy in our lives means greater progress for society, so we work every day to bring you energy that is more efficient, more innovative, more sustainable, and accessible to everybody.

Grant Beck

151

NMAX, through its subsidiaries, makes, moves and sells electricity to residential, small business and large commercial customers and is headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, with offices in Edmonton. ENMAX Power Corporation owns and operates transmission and distribution infrastructure in Calgary and ENMAX Energy Corporation owns diverse electricity generation facilities throughout the province. Since 2007, ENMAX has been named one of Alberta’s Top Employers. ENMAX Energy is currently the retailer of choice for both The City of Calgary and The City of Edmonton.

REVENUE

REVENUE

2,615,550,000

Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

PC’s story in Canada began over 100 years ago and continues today with a team of nearly 2,750 full-time employees and contractors. Headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, ConocoPhillips Canada is a top-three producer of natural gas in the country, with a world-class portfolio, including assets in Western Canada and the Arctic. With interests near Fort McMurray, Alberta, they are well positioned to become a leading in-situ producer in the oil sands.

$

www.encana.com

E

Simon Nottingham REVENUE

2,875,382,000

116

Douglas J. Suttles

luor is an industry leader in engineering, procurement, fabrication and construction (EPFC). With more than a century of global experience and 65 years in Canada, Fluor is the industry benchmark in building the most challenging and complex capital projects safely, on schedule and budget while building rewarding careers and stronger communities.

$

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

REVENUE

4,045,000,000

www.westjet.com

ncana is a leading North American energy producer that is focused on growing its strong portfolio of diverse resource plays producing natural gas, oil and natural gas liquids. By partnering with employees, community organizations and other businesses, Encana contributes to the strength and sustainability of the communities where it operates.

ith nearly 8,000 employees and assets of approximately $19 billion, ATCO is a diversified global corporation delivering service excellence and innovative business solutions in Structures & Logistics (workforce housing, innovative modular facilities, construction, site support services, and logistics and operations management); Electricity (electricity generation, transmission, and distribution); Pipelines & Liquids (natural gas transmission, distribution and infrastructure development, energy storage, and industrial water solutions); and Retail Energy (electricity and natural gas retail sales). More information can be found at www.ATCO.com.

$

107

REVENUE

W

Nancy C. Southern

Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

e are proud to be Canada’s most trusted airline and one of very few airlines globally that does not commercially overbook. Together with our regional airline, WestJet Encore, we offer scheduled service to more than 100 destinations in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and Europe and to more than 175 destinations in over 20 countries through our airline partnerships. WestJet Vacations offers affordable, flexible vacations to more than 60 destinations and the choice of more than 800 hotels, resorts, condos and villas. Members of the WestJet Rewards program earn WestJet dollars on flights, vacation packages and more. Members use WestJet dollars towards the purchase of WestJet flights and vacations packages on any day, at any time, to any WestJet destination with no blackout periods – even on seat sales. WestJet is publicly traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) under the symbol WJA. For more information about everything WestJet, please visit westjet.com.

www.graham.ca

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

2,189,700,000

$

www.altagas.ca


CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

Crescent Point Energy Corp.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

C

200

MEG Energy Corp.

M

rescent Point is a leading North American light and medium oil producer that seeks to maximize shareholder return through its total return strategy of long-term growth plus dividend income. The Calgarybased company is a conventional oil producer with high-quality assets across western Canada and the United States. Scott Saxberg

1,946,500,000

$

REVENUE

www.crescentpointenergy.com

Inter Pipeline Ltd.

I

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

213

1,861,893,000

$

Secure Energy Services Inc.

S

nter Pipeline Ltd‘s petroleum transportation, processing and storage assets play an important role in connecting energy and petrochemical producers to markets. As one of the largest energy infrastructure businesses in Canada, Inter Pipeline has a strong track record that has produced increasing and reliable monthly cash dividends for their shareholders.

1,824,600,000

Devon Canada Corp.*

D

247

REVENUE

www.interpipeline.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

252

1,410,063,000

$

United Farmers of Alberta Co-operative Ltd.

1,366,075,000

$

Calgary Co-operative Association Ltd.

www.devonenergy.com Rank: Food Sell Cdn (out of 800)

O

281

REVENUE

1,181,246,000

Cervus Equipment Corp.

C

Carol Kitchen

1,330,627,000

Enerflex Ltd.

Seven Generations Energy Ltd.

S

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

E

J. Blair Goertzen

www.calgarycoop.com

289

nerflex is a single-source supplier of natural gas compression, oil and gas processing, refrigeration systems, and electric power generation equipment – plus related engineering and mechanical service expertise. The Company`s broad in-house resources provide the capability to engineer, design, manufacture, construct, commission, and service hydrocarbon handling systems. Enerflex has approximately 1,800 employees and operates out of Canada, the United States, Latin America, the Middle East, Australia, Southeast Asia, and Europe.

Rank: Whole Cdn (out of 800)

294

1,130,604,000

$

Tourmaline Oil Corp.

T

www.enerflex.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

303

ourmaline is focused on long-term growth through an aggressive exploration, development, production and acquisition program in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Their business strategy is to maximize shareholder value by increasing reserves, production and cash flows through the exploitation and development of a continually growing asset base. Michael L. Rose REVENUE

www.cervuscorp.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

306

1,066,819,000

$

Precision Drilling Corp.

P

even Generations Energy is an independent, public-traded energy company in the early stages of developing its liquids-rich Kakwa River Project, located about 100 kilometres south of its operations headquarters in Grande Prairie, Alberta. With corporate headquarters in Calgary, Seven Generations shares trade on the TSX under the symbol VII.

www.tourmalineoil.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

329

recision Drilling Corporation is Canada’s largest oilfield services company, one of the largest in the United States, with a growing international presence. Precision provides high performance contract drilling, directional drilling, completions and production, and strategic support services to customers. The company’s focus on safety, efficiency and the best equipment delivers value for Precision’s customers and investors.

Patrick B. Carlson

Kevin A. Neveu

REVENUE

1,059,400,000

www.ufa.com

REVENUE

REVENUE

1,109,939,000

258

FA Co-operative Limited (UFA) is an Alberta-based agricultural co-operative providing products, services and agricultural solutions to farmers, ranchers, members and commercial customers. Founded in 1909, UFA’s extensive network includes 35 Farm & Ranch Supply stores and more than 110 bulk fuel and cardlock Petroleum locations in rural Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. For more information about UFA, visit UFA.com or for more information about UFA locations, visit m.UFA.com.

$

ervus is in the business of acquiring and operating authorized agricultural, industrial and commercial equipment dealerships by facilitating dealership succession. The company proudly owns the largestgroup of John Deere agricultural equipment dealers in Canada and has a significant presence in the commercial and industrial and equipment sectors through their Bobcat, JCB, JLG, AR Williams and Peterbilt dealerships across the west.

$

Rank: Whole Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

wned by our members, Calgary Co-op is one of the largest retail cooperatives in North America. With over 440,000 members, 3,900 employees, assets of $519 million and annual sales over $1.2 billion, Calgary Co-op is committed to lead in food; petroleum; home health care; pharmacy; wine, spirits, beer and travel. In 2014, through the Co-op Community Foundation and community initiatives, Calgary Co-op invested over $4.2 million into local youth programs, education, environment, preventative health and poverty relief. For more information please visit www.calgarycoop.com

$

www.secure-energy.com

U

evon Canada Corporation is an experienced player in heavy oil, with more than 20 years of cold flow heavy oil production in Bonnyville, Alberta and steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) heavy oil operations in the Athabasca region of northeastern Alberta. Exponential growth in our Jackfish 1, 2 and 3 operations has led to over 120,000 BOED of best-in-class production. Devon Canada is a division of Devon Energy, an Oklahoma-based oil and gas production company.

REVENUE

$

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

Rene Amirault

$

Graham Drake

www.megenergy.com

ECURE is a leading North American energy services company providing safe and environmentally responsible fluids and solids solutions to upstream oil and natural gas companies operating in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, North Dakota and Colorado.

Christian P. Bayle REVENUE

Ken Keelor

205

EG Energy Corp. (MEG) is a Canadian oilsands company focused on sustainable in situ development and production in the southern Athabasca oil sands region of Alberta. MEG has acquired a large, high quality resource base – which along with a well-formulated strategic growth plan, positions them to be a strong oilsands player for many years to come. William J. McCaffrey

REVENUE

John Richels

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

www.7genergy.com

951,411,000

$

www.precisiondrilling.com

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

39


CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

AltaLink, L.P.

Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

A

Scott W. Thon

330

ltaLink is Alberta’s largest regulated electricity transmission company. Our transmission system is the essential link that connects homes, farms, businesses and industries to the electricity generated across Alberta. Our more than 800 employees are committed to maintaining top quality and reliable electrical transmission services for Albertans, and to providing innovative technical and financial solutions to enable Alberta’s growing electricity market. On December 1, 2014, Berkshire Hathaway Energy purchased 100 per cent of the equity ownership in AltaLink L.P. (AltaLink)

ARC Resources Ltd.

A

941,249,000

$

www.altalink.ca

Rocky Mountain Dealerships Inc.

Myron M. Stadnyk

R

Rank: Whole Cdn (out of 800)

333

937,800,000

$

Stuart Olson Inc.

David J. LeMay

Garrett A. W. Ganden

930,435,000

$

www.rockymtn.com

Ensign Energy Services Inc.

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

E

345

909,622,000

Vermilion Energy Inc.

V

Lorenzo Donadeo

Robert H. Geddes

859,702,000

$

www.ensignenergy.com

Enbridge Income Fund

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

E

374

nbridge Income Fund Holdings Inc. is a publicly traded corporation. The Company, through its investment in Enbridge Income Fund, holds high quality, low risk energy infrastructure assets. The Fund’s assets include a portfolio of liquids transportation and storage businesses, Class A units entitling the holder to receive defined cash flows from the Southern Lights Pipeline, a 50 percent interest in the Alliance Pipeline and interests in more than 500 megawatts of renewable and alternative power generation capacity.

REVENUE

E

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

386

REVENUE

693,335,000

$

Peyto Exploration & Development Corp.

828,507,000

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

C

www.vermilionenergy.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

379

alfrac is an innovative pressure pumping services provider focused on North America’s premier unconventional natural gas and light oil plays plus strategic international markets. With state-of-the-art equipment – inhouse R&D, a diversified customer base, an expert team of employees, experienced management and record annual revenues in 2011, Calfrac is strongly positioned for continued growth. Jose Fernando Aguilar

734,514,000

$

MNP LLP

M

www.calfrac.com Rank: Account Cdn (out of 800)

396

NP is a leading national accounting, tax and business consulting firm in Canada. With more than 60 offices strategically located in urban and rural centres throughout Canada and through partner-led engagements, MNP provides a collaborative, cost-effective approach to doing business and personalized strategies to help organizations succeed across the country and around the world. Jason Tuffs REVENUE

www.enerplus.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

398

651,000,000

$

Baytex Energy Corp.

B

eyto Exploration & Development Corp. is a natural gas weighted explorer and producer that is committed to building value through the exploration and development of high quality gas properties.

Darren Gee

Edward D. LaFehr

REVENUE

40

352

ermilion is an oil-leveraged producer that seeks to create value through the acquisition, exploration, development and optimization of producing properties in North America, Europe and Australia. Our business model targets annual organic production growth of 5% or more along with providing reliable and increasing dividends to investors. Vermilion trades on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol VET.

$

nerplus is a North American energy producer with a portfolio of high quality oil and gas assets in resource plays that offer significant organic growth potential. We are focused on creating value for our investors through the execution of a disciplined capital investment strategy that supports the successful development of our properties, and a monthly dividend to shareholders. We are a responsible developer of resources that strives to provide investors with a competitive return comprised of both growth and income.

650,058,000

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

www.enbridgeincomefund.com

Enerplus Corp.

$

www.stuartolson.com

REVENUE

REVENUE

P

336

$1 billion+ organization, Stuart Olson has been empowering Canadian business since 1911. Their rich history demonstrates their reach and diversity as a full service construction and industrial services company that provides comprehensive and innovative solutions to Canada’s public, private and industrial infrastructure markets. With clients in commercial development, oil and gas, mining, health care and education, to name just a few, the 4,000 dedicated people of Stuart Olson have a positive and lasting impact on businesses and communities across Canada.

$

nsign Energy Services Inc. is an industry leader in the delivery of oilfield services in Canada, the United States and internationally. They are one of the world’s leading land-based drilling and well servicing contractors serving crude oil, natural gas and geothermal operators. Additional services include directional drilling, rental equipment, managed pressure drilling, oilfield manufacturing and production flow back units.

Ian C. Dundas

Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

REVENUE

747,000,000

www.arcresources.com

A

ocky Mountain Dealerships Inc. is one of Canada’s largest agriculture and industrial equipment dealership networks with branches located throughout Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Through its network of Rocky Mountain Equipment locations, Rocky sells, rents, and leases new and used agriculture and industrial equipment and offers product support and finance to its customers.

$

331

RC is one of Canada’s leading conventional oil and gas companies. Their operations are focused in five core areas across Western Canada, and provide them with an extensive resource base of high quality oil and natural gas development opportunities.

REVENUE

REVENUE

Perry F. Schuldhaus

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

www.mnp.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

407

aytex Energy Corp. is an oil and gas corporation based in Calgary, Alberta. The company is engaged in the acquisition, development and production of crude oil and natural gas in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin and in the Eagle Ford in the United States. Approximately 79% of Baytex’s production is weighted toward crude oil and natural gas liquids. Baytex’s common shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol BTE.

REVENUE

www.peyto.com

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

601,979,000

$

www.baytexenergy.com


CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

Oando Energy Resources Inc.*

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

O

Pade Durotoye

414

P

ando Energy Resources (OER) is one of Africa’s leading exploration and production company, listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) in Canada. The Company has successfully built a vast portfolio of oil and gas assets in selected Africa basins and acts as both operators indigenous and Multinational companies. OER holds 16 licenses for the exploration, development and production of oil and gas assets located onshore, swamp and offshore.

REVENUE

581,445,000

www.oandoenergyresources.com

Canadian Energy Services & Technology Corp. Oil Field Cdn Rank: (out of 800)

C

419

anadian Energy Services & Technology Corp (“CES”) is a leading provider of technically advanced consumable chemical solutions throughout the lifecycle of the oilfield. This includes solutions at the drill-bit, at the point of completion and stimulation, at the wellhead and pump-jack, and finally through to the pipeline and midstream market. CES’ business model is relatively asset light and requires limited re-investment capital to grow. As a result, CES has been able to capitalize on the growing market demand for drilling fluids and production and specialty chemicals in North America while generating free cash flow.

REVENUE

567,726,000

$

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

415

enn West is a conventional oil and natural gas producer in Canada. Our goal is to be the company that redefines oil and gas excellence in western Canada. Based in Calgary, Penn West operates a significant portfolio of opportunities with a dominant oil position in the Cardium, Viking and Peace River areas of Alberta. David E. Roberts REVENUE

$

Thomas J. Simons

Penn West Petroleum Ltd.

575,000,000

$

Whitecap Resources Inc.

W

www.pennwest.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

433

hitecap Resources Inc. is an oil-weighted growth company that pays a sustainable monthly cash dividend to its shareholders. Our company is focused on profitable per share growth from our existing assets enhanced by opportunistic and accretive acquisitions with future growth potential. Whitecap’s common shares are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbol WCP. Grant B. Fagerheim REVENUE

www.canadianenergyservices.com

Parex Resources Inc.*

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

P

436

535,977,000

$

Murphy Oil Co. Ltd.*

M

arex Resources Inc. is a Colombian focused, international oil and gas exploration and development company, headquartered in Calgary, Canada and publically listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX:PXT). The Company holds interest in several blocks in the prolific Llanos Basin and the Magdalena Basins of Colombia. Wayne K. Foo

www.wcap.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

457

urphy Oil Corporation is an international oil and gas company that conducts business through various operating subsidiaries. The company produces oil and natural gas in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Malaysia and Republic of the Congo and conducts exploration activities worldwide. Michael K. McFadyen

REVENUE

REVENUE

530,655,000

$

www.parexresources.com

Weatherford Canada Ltd.*

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

W

460

484,022,000

$

SMART Technologies Inc.*

S

eatherford delivers innovative technologies and services designed to meet the world’s current and future energy needs in a safe, ethical, and sustainable manner. Grounded by our core values and inspired by our world-class people, we are committed to being a trusted business partner to those we serve. Neil Gaydon

David J Butter

www.murphyoilcorp.com Rank: High-tech Cdn (out of 800)

462

MART Technologies Inc. (NASDAQ: SMT, TSX: SMA) is a world leader in simple and intuitive solutions that enable more natural collaboration. Millions of teachers, students, business people, and personnel in government agencies use our solutions to enhance teaching, learning, productivity and collaboration. We are an innovator in interactive touch technologies and software that inspire collaboration in both education and businesses around the globe. To learn more, visit smarttech.com.

REVENUE

REVENUE

470,375,000

$

www.weatherford.com

Apache Canada Ltd.*

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

A

463

456,857,000

$

Boardwalk Real Estate Investment Trust

B

www.smarttech.com Rank: Real Est Cdn (out of 800)

469

oardwalk REIT strives to be Canada’s friendliest landlord and currently owns and operates more than 220 communities with over 34,000 residential units totaling approximately 29 million net rentable square feet. Boardwalk’s principal objectives are to provide its Residents with the best quality communities and superior customer service, while providing Unitholders with sustainable monthly cash distributions, and increase the value of its trust units through selective acquisitions, dispositions, development, and effective management of its residential multi-family communities. Boardwalk REIT is vertically integrated and is Canada’s leading owner/operator of multi-family communities with over 1,500 Associates bringing Residents home to properties located in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Quebec.

pache was formed in 1954 with $250,000 of investor capital with the simple concept of becoming a significant and profitable oil company. Today, Apache Corporation is one of the world’s top independent oil and gas exploration and production companies. The journey to this point was fueled by Apache’s contrarian approach to business. Sam Kolias

Grady L. Ables

REVENUE

REVENUE

454,475,000

$

www.apachecorp.com

Badger Daylighting Ltd.

B

438,846,000

$

Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

www.boardwalkreit.com

491

adger Daylighting Ltd. (“Badger”) is North America’s leading provider of non-destructive hydrovac excavation services. Badger traditionally works for contractors, engineers, and facility owners in the oil and gas, power, municipal, transportation, industrial, and commercial construction industries.

Paul Vanderberg REVENUE

404,202,000

$

www.badgerinc.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

41


CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

Trimac Transportation Ltd.

H

Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

498

The Calgary Airport Authority

T

eadquartered in Calgary, Alberta, Trimac provides Canadian domestic and international cross-border trucking services. Trimac also provides complementary logistics services through its subsidiary Bulk Plus, and repairs, maintenance and tank-trailer cleaning services through its National Tank Services division. Trimac is Canada’s largest bulk trucking services provider with operations from coast-to-coast. Jeffrey J. McCaig

Garth F. Atkinson

REVENUE

396,427,000

$

Gran Tierra Energy Inc.*

www.trimac.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

503

REVENUE

383,281,000

Trinidad Drilling Ltd.

T

Brent Conway

Bankers Petroleum Ltd.*

B

362,144,000

Kinder Morgan Canada Inc*

www.grantierra.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

516

www.trinidaddrilling.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

K

537

REVENUE

335,225,000

Trican Well Service Ltd.

T

David L. French

362,174,000

$

Bonavista Energy Corp.

B

338,373,000

$

Long Run Exploration Ltd.

L

Jeff Tooth

www.kindermorgan.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

547

42

545

William E. Andrew

327,493,000

$

Birchcliff Energy Ltd.

B

www.trican.ca

www.longrunexploration.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

558

irchcliff Energy Ltd. is a focussed, low cost intermediate oil and gas upstream producer with operations concentrated in the Peace River Arch area of Alberta, where the company primarily targets the prolific Montney/Doig Resource Play. Birchcliff owns and controls its infrastructure, has a large land base and is committed to an environmentally sustainable future. Birchcliff’s production is 78% natural gas. Birchcliff’s common shares are listed on the TSX under the symbol ìBIRî.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

578

308,044,000

$

Raging River Exploration Inc.

R

arvest is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Korea National Oil Corporation (KNOC). Harvest is a significant operator in Canada’s energy industry offering exposure to exploration, development and production of crude oil and natural gas (Upstream) and an oil sands project under construction and development in northern Alberta (BlackGold). KNOC is a state owned oil and gas company engaged in the exploration and production of oil and gas along with storing petroleum resources.

287,300,000

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

REVENUE

$

www.bonavistaenergy.com

ong Run Exploration is a Calgary-based intermediate oil and natural gas company focused on light oil development and exploration in western Canada. The company is guided by a strong management team with a proven track record of delivering organic growth; growth through acquisition and optimization; and implementing new technology in resource plays and enhanced recovery.

A. Jeffery Tonken

H

535

Jason E. Skehar

Dale M. Dusterhoft

Harvest Operations Corp.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

REVENUE

325,179,000

www.bankerspetroleum.com

onavista Energy Corporation is a Calgary-based oil and gas company with a proven track record of value creation. Since inception in 1997, Bonavista has consistently added shareholder value by pursuing a disciplined and effective strategy that focuses on long term profitability. Today, Bonavista is one of Canada’s largest dividend paying energy companies, with a market capitalization of approximately $3.1 billion CDN.

rican is an oilfield service company that provides specialized service and technology to customers involved in the exploration and development of oil & natural gas reserves. Now marking 20 years, Trican’s services are used throughout a well’s life cycle and include multistage fracturing, coiled tubing, cementing, reservoir characterization, acidizing & production enhancement, and industrial & pipeline services.

$

515

REVENUE

inder Morgan Canada Limited (KML) owns an interest in or operates an integrated network of pipeline systems and terminal facilities in Canada, including the Trans Mountain Pipeline system and its dock facility Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, British Columbia, the Puget Sound and Jet Fuel Pipeline systems, the Canadian portion of the Cochin Pipeline system, the Vancouver Wharves Terminal in Vancouver, B.C, and numerous terminal facilities in Edmonton, Alberta. KML focuses on stable, fee-based energy transportation and storage assets that are central to the energy infrastructure of Western Canada. For more information, please visit www.kindermorgancanadalimited.com.

$

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

ankers Petroleum Ltd. is a Canadian-based oil and gas exploration and production company focused on maximizing the value of its heavy oil assets in Albania. The Company is targeting growth in production and reserves through application of new and proven technologies by a strong experienced technical team.

rinidad Drilling provides modern, reliable, expertly designed oil and gas drilling equipment operated by well-trained personnel. Trinidad’s drilling fleet is one of the most adaptable, technologically advanced and competitive in the industry. Trinidad started as a small Canadian driller in 1996 and has grown to become an industry leader operating in Canada and the United States. Through a joint venture, Trinidad also has the opportunity to operate drilling rigs in other international markets such as Saudi Arabia and Mexico.

$

www.yyc.com

REVENUE

REVENUE

Ian D. Anderson

390,024,000

$

ran Tierra Energy Inc. is an international oil and gas exploration and production company headquartered in Calgary incorporated and traded in the United States and operating in South America. The company currently holds interests in producing and prospective properties in Colombia, Argentina, Peru and Brazil. Gran Tierra’s strategy is focused on establishing a portfolio of drilling opportunities to exploit undeveloped reserves to grow production, as well as undertaking exploration drilling to grow future reserves.

$

501

he Calgary Airport Authority is a not-for-profit, non-share capital corporation incorporated under the Regional Airports Authorities Act of Alberta. The Authority is responsible for the management, maintenance and development of Calgary International Airport (YYC) and Springbank Airport (YBW) under long-term lease from the Government of Canada. YYC is an important economic engine for the city, region and province, generating over $8 billion per annum in economic activity.

REVENUE

G

Gary S. Guidry

Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

Neil Roszell

www.birchcliffenergy.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

595

aging River Exploration Inc. is a junior oil and gas producer currently focused in the Kindersley area of Saskatchewan. The experienced management of RRX has had a successful track record of building four previously successful oil and gas production companies including Wild Stream Exploration and Wild River Resources which were both sold to Crescent Point Energy Corp. RRX commenced active operations with the closing of an arrangement agreement with Crescent Point on March 15, 2012.

REVENUE

www.harvestenergy.ca

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

267,811,000

$

www.rrexploration.com


CALGARY’S HEAD OFFICE EDGE // HEAD OFFICES

DIRTT Environmental Solutions Ltd.

Rank: Manuf Cdn (out of 800)

D

Mogens Smed

596

IRTT is a leading technology-driven manufacturer of highly customized interiors. DIRTT combines its proprietary ICEƆ3D design, configuration and manufacturing software with integrated in-house manufacturing of its innovative prefabricated interior construction solutions and an extensive Distribution Partner network across two continents. DIRTT is underpinned by a strong entrepreneurial culture and provides a unique, end-to-end customer solution for the inefficient and fragmented construction industry.

REVENUE

267,030,000

$

NuVista Energy Ltd.

N

Horizon North Logistics Inc.

H

Roderick W. Graham

www.dirtt.net Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

607

250,935,000

$

Canyon Services Group Inc.

C

www.nuvistaenergy.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

614

246,870,000

$

www.canyontech.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

629

237,342,000

$

torcoil.com

Northern Blizzard Resources Inc.

N

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

637

orthern Blizzard Resources Inc. is a publicly traded Canadian company based in Calgary, Alberta. Northern Blizzard was founded in late 2009 and is engaged in the exploration for and the acquisition, development and production of petroleum and natural gas reserves in western Canada.

John R. Rooney

Andrew M. Phillips

REVENUE

REVENUE

224,200,000

$

High Arctic Energy Services Inc.

W

www.prairiesky.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

644

213,965,000

$

Balancing Pool

Perry F. Schuldhaus

Tim Braun

$ Rank: Environ Cdn (out of 800)

647

ewalta Corporation is based in Calgary and provides innovative engineered waste management solutions to the oil and gas industry. The company operates a network of facilities in Canada and the U.S. as well as works on customer sites where it mobilizes equipment and people to process material. Newalta is in the sustainability business, where its innovation and customer-driven approach add value to the customer’s bottom line.

Bellatrix Exploration Ltd.

B

www.enbridgeincomefund.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

652

ellatrix Exploration Ltd is a Calgary, Alberta-based intermediate energy producer focused on exploration and development of light oil and liquids-rich natural gas opportunities in some of the most exciting plays in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin.

Raymond G. Smith REVENUE

REVENUE

205,449,000

645

nbridge Income Fund Holdings Inc. is a publicly traded corporation. The Company, through its investment in Enbridge Income Fund, holds high quality, low risk energy infrastructure assets. The Fund’s assets include a portfolio of liquids transportation and storage businesses, Class A units entitling the holder to receive defined cash flows from the Southern Lights Pipeline, a 50 percent interest in the Alliance Pipeline and interests in more than 500 megawatts of renewable and alternative power generation capacity.

207,301,000

208,000,000

$

N

Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

REVENUE

Newalta Corp.

www.northernblizzard.com

E

ith 20 years of experience in the oil and gas industry and a catalogue of success that continues to grow, High Arctic Energy Services is your first choice for specialized pressure and well control services. Founded in 1993, High Arctic Energy Services has expanded significantly over the years in response to our clients’ operating requirements.

$

617

ORC’s corporate strategy is to provide a sustainable monthly dividend combined with cost-effective per share growth in reserves, production, and cash flow achieved by: Focusing on high quality, tight light oil resource plays. Positioning the company for material growth and exposure in light oil resource plays utilizing a three-phased strategy of Resource Capture, Delineation, and Production Growth. Maintaining a strong balance sheet. Attracting and retaining top quality technical and corporate staff with proven track records.

REVENUE

rairieSky Royalty Ltd. (“PSK”) was formed to acquire fee simple mineral title lands predominately in Alberta with the objective to generate significant free cash flow through indirect third party oil and gas investment at a relatively low risk and low cost to PSK. As a result of the initial public offering, PSK became one of the largest independently-owned portfolios of fee simple mineral title in Canada, with approximately 6.6 million acres.

John L. Barkhouse

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

T

Brett Herman

P

www.paramountres.com

TORC Oil & Gas Ltd.

Bradley P. D. Fedora

PrairieSky Royalty Ltd.

608

aramount Resources Ltd. is an independent, intermediate Canadian energy company. The Company explores for, develops, produces, and markets natural gas, crude oil, and natural gas liquids in Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories. The Company also holds securities of public and private entities, including Trilogy Energy Corp., MEG Energy Corp., Marquee Energy Ltd., RMP Energy Inc., and Strategic Oil & Gas Ltd. The Company’s heavy oil assets were spun off into a 100% owned subsidiary, Cavalier Resources Inc., in January 2012.

REVENUE

REVENUE

239,566,000

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

P

ES’ business model is focused on the design and delivery of technically advanced fluids for the oil and gas industry. CES’ business model requires limited re-investment capital to grow. As a result, CES has been able to capitalize on the growing market demand for drilling and production fluids in North America while generating free cash flow.

$

www.horizonnorth.ca

Paramount Resources Ltd.

James H. T. Riddell

Jonathan Wright REVENUE

248,193,000

606

orizon North is a publicly-traded company (TSX: HNL) that provides resource companies with mobile structures, camp management and catering, matting solutions, and northern marine services. With over 1,000 employees and offices and/or manufacturing plants in Calgary, Sherwood Park, Grande Prairie and Anzac, Alberta, Kamloops, British Columbia and in Tuktoyaktuk, Inuvik and Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Horizon North operates in Canada’s western provinces and three northern territories.

REVENUE

uVista is an oil and natural gas company actively engaged in the exploration for, and the development and production of, oil and natural gas reserves in Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Our primary focus is on the scalable and repeatable condensate-rich Montney formation in the Alberta Deep Basin (Wapiti Montney).

$

Rank: Service Cdn (out of 800)

www.newalta.com

199,605,000

$

www.bellatrixexploration.com

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

43


DOWNTOWN OFFICE TOWERS // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATIONS

DOWNTOWN OFFICE TOWERS UNDERGOING

Interesting Metamorphosis CREATIVE IDEAS TAKE HOLD TO BATTLE SOARING VACANCY RATE

I

BY MARIO TONEGUZZI

magine after a long, hard day at the office taking the elevator down to another floor in your building – a social gathering spot – where a keg of beer is waiting.

Or taking some time off during the day from behind your desk to go visit your dog a few floors below. That day is here as landlords look for cutting-edge ideas to attract downtown office tenants in a depressed market. Aspen Properties is at the forefront of this innovation with its redevelopment of the former Encana Place Tower directly across the street from the Fairmont Palliser Hotel. “Most of the market today wants something different than the traditional office building,” says Scott Hutcheson, executive chairman of the board for Aspen Properties in Calgary, which owns and manages office buildings in Calgary and Edmonton.

“In difficult times, we innovate. It’s just the nature of the human being. With this building we have the opportunity. It became empty in February of this year … so we determined it was time to create something very different in this market than what exists. The more creative we got, the more fun we had.” That creativity has led to an enjoyable gathering place in stark contrast to the office buildings of the past. There will be a dog park on the third-floor outdoor plaza which includes walking, sitting and bathing areas for people’s pets. A social gathering place will have foosball, billiard and pool tables. A 7,000-square-foot fitness facility will be available for tenants to squeeze in a workout. Want to play some basketball or golf? Tenants will have access to half a basketball court on the mechanical level on

ABOVE: COMMERCIAL OFFICE LOUNGE AREA BY LIGNUM INTERIORS. PHOTO SOURCE: MEGAN IRONSIDE

44

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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DOWNTOWN OFFICE TOWERS // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATIONS

the top of the building as well as putting surfaces on the rooftop. Bicycles will be in place for tenants to travel the downtown. Work on the 400,000-square-foot, 28-storey tower, originally built in 1981, will be completed by October. What Aspen Properties is doing with the former Encana Place Tower may be the wave of the future in downtown Calgary. A necessity perhaps, given the city’s economic climate. A collapse in oil prices took its toll on the local economy, plunging Calgary into a recession in 2015 and 2016. Companies reacted by cutting thousands of jobs, particularly those in the oilpatch and located in downtown Calgary. Less office space was needed and the past two years has seen the vacancy rate soar. At its peak, the downtown vacancy rate was a minuscule 0.3 per cent in the second half of 2006. Today, it is 24.7 per cent, according to Barclay Street Real Estate. Calgary’s economy sinks or swims depending on the waves in the oilpatch. So does the downtown office market. That’s clear when you take into account how much vacancy has spiked since the third quarter of 2014 when it was 6.4 per cent. Todd Throndson, managing director and principal of Avison Young in Calgary, says Aspen’s redevelopment is one of the city’s most unique initiatives. “They’re looking at creative ideas. Really, what they’re trying to create with their building is a knock-off of Silicon Valley – what a lot of IT firms have done to make their environments interesting and attractive, especially for the younger demographic working force,” says Throndson. “They’re really looking at changing what an office space can do for an environment. That’s the most intriguing and interesting metamorphosis of an office building that I have seen in the marketplace today.” ABOVE: FITNESS FACILITY AND CORPORATE YOGA STUDIO BY LIGNUM INTERIORS. PHOTO SOURCE: MEGAN IRONSIDE

OPPOSITE PAGE: TODD THRONDSON, MANAGING DIRECTOR AND PRINCIPAL OF AVISON YOUNG IN CALGARY.

46

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


DOWNTOWN OFFICE TOWERS // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATIONS

“THEY’RE REALLY LOOKING AT CHANGING WHAT AN OFFICE SPACE CAN DO FOR AN ENVIRONMENT. THAT’S THE MOST INTRIGUING AND INTERESTING METAMORPHOSIS OF AN OFFICE BUILDING THAT I HAVE SEEN IN THE MARKETPLACE TODAY.” ~ TODD THRONDSON

Bruce Gatzsch, vice-president of Lignum Interiors in Calgary, has seen a trend in recent years with his local project management, construction management and general contracting company of about 16 employees. The company focuses on office improvements, specializing in interior renovations. In the current market, landlords have embarked on various projects in their office towers to attract and keep tenants.

“They’re trying to spruce up old buildings as well. They’re also trying to make it attractive for tenants to step up … so people cannot only move into a building for cheaper rent but also into a nicer space,” says Gatzsch. “Employee retention is still a key even for a very healthy job market. What we’re finding too is a lot of spaces have to compete to keep the good people in the oil and gas industry. They are spending money – frugally. But they are spending

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BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

47


DOWNTOWN OFFICE TOWERS // CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATIONS

“WE’VE GOT A BEAUTIFUL SPACE TO WORK IN. IT BROUGHT DOWN OUR OVERHEAD. IT PUT US CLOSER TO OUR CLIENTS. IT WAS A VERY PRACTICAL DECISION FOR US…. EVERYBODY HAS BEEN REALLY PLEASED WITH THE TRANSITION.” ~ JILL TRUSCOTT

money on trying to develop nice offices and stretch the dollars that way.” For Lignum, which is busier now than it has been in the past, that means work on stairwells, elevators and the rethinking of cubicles in offices so space is more productive and more collaborative. “I think in the future we’re going to see technology and 3D printing become more prevalent so that the designers can play a lot more and do a lot more fun and organic designs,” says Gatzsch. “That will definitely challenge traditional contractors and hopefully some of us can step up to the occasion and make some really great spaces.” Soaring vacancy rates have obviously put downward pressure on rental rates in the downtown office market, making the core a much more attractive proposition for companies wanting to move into the heart of the city. Jill Truscott, manager of sales and marketing with Wolf Custom Homes, says the homebuilder moved its offices from the suburbs to the downtown earlier this year. The company has its corporate office now in the heart of downtown Calgary in Bankers Hall. Prior to the move, it was located in the southeast near the Deerfoot Inn and Casino. “We’ve got greater access to the clients that we’re working with. A lot of our clients are professionals working in this area. It just made it easier for everyone to exchange information and get together and have discussions,” says Truscott. “We’ve got a beautiful space to work in. It brought down our overhead. It put us closer to our clients. It was a very

practical decision for us…. Everybody has been really pleased with the transition. It was a good move for all of us – our clients, our vendors and for us as a team to work together in one spot.” Kris Hong, a downtown leasing associate with Barclay Street Real Estate, says there’s just so much competition and options in the market today. Landlords are taking the opportunity to turn vacant space, that has been on the market forever, into an amenity to attract new tenants. “They’re trying to be more creative,” says Hong. And Aspen Properties is leading the charge in this direction. As of June, it had offers to lease on 50 per cent of its redeveloped building. It purchased the building two years ago with a vision of repositioning it to take advantage of a changing market. Construction began in the summer of 2016. Besides all the work done inside the building, the entrance will be spruced up and not look like a traditional office lobby. A Plus 15 is being built from the building to the Bankers Court tower. It is a vision of moving office towers away from being just a place of work to playful, fun places. “And very different than the feeling that office towers have historically had,” says Hutcheson. “It’s just really fun to be working outside of the box and what we’ve all done for so many years, and now to reinvent the way an office building feels has been really fun for us.”

ABOVE: JILL TRUSCOTT, MANAGER OF SALES AND MARKETING WITH WOLF CUSTOM HOMES.

48

AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


THE FACE OF REAL ESTATE SHOWCASING CALGARY’S FINE HOMES FOR OVER 25 YEARS... Whether you are buying or selling, Sam is your trusted source for real estate advice and will work with you to get exciting results.

403 870 8811


ONE STORE SERVING THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND OUR GUESTS SINCE 1948

• THE FINEST ON SITE TAILORING • CALL AHEAD VIP PARKING • NON COMMISSION FASHION PRESENTERS THE WESTIN

403-266-4417 • SMWL.COM

401 - 4TH AVE S.W CALGARY, ALBERTA


SPRINGBANK | $8,500,000

209

PI N N AC LE R I DG E PL AC E , S W

Crafted by exceptional artisans & boasting only the finest of imported & local materials this 14,000 SF Tuscan villa inspired home is less than 10 years old & yet it almost instantly transports you to Europe with an incredible sense of old world tradition & authenticity. With a 1,000 SF gym, 1500 SF professional style theatre, gourmet kitchen, elevator, 7 bedrooms, pool house, sport court, 5 car garage, opulent main floor master wing & south facing courtyard this home is ideal for a large family or as an executive retreat. It has been featured in the National Post, Best Home Alberta, was one of the sets used in the award winning Fargo min-series & most recently was leased to Leonardo DiCaprio during the filming of The Revenant. Ideal location on 2 acres overlooking the beautiful Rocky Mountains yet just a few minutes away from shopping & services, 10 minutes away from the Springbank airport & some of Calgary’s very best private schools, 20 minutes from downtown core and a mere 40 minutes away from Banff.

BEARSPAW | $4,900,000

103

WOODL AN D L AN E , SW

9341 SF, on the pond! This incredible home sits on 2 exquisite acres with stream, pond & dream treehouse! Thoughtfully designed, beautifully crafted bungalow with loft, walkout, elevator, oversized 4 car garage (with workshop & storage) & 5-star hotel inspired pool room with hot tub, wet bar, gym & wall of sliding doors opening wide to a patio with pond views. Boasting programmable lights, sound, security, blinds, water feature, pool features, sprinklers, heating & cooling. Impressive in every way with stunning curb appeal, chef ’s kitchen (Butler’s pantry, induction cooktop with pot filler & espresso maker), elegant master wing (sitting room, bar, walk-in, laundry & steam shower), den, homework room & ensuite guest room on main. Walkout features a family/games room, wet bar, recycle/pet wash room, laundry, 4 bedrooms & mudroom. Secure pool room with huge mosaic tiled pool (hard cover, water & fibre optic light features) and juice bar.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

|

SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


MARKETING

BEARSPAW ELBOW PARK | $4,900,000 | $3,350,000

703

T H I RT Y- S E C O N D AV E N U E , S W

Elbow Park masterpiece set on a beautiful, park-like lot (over 13,000 SF) in a superb location - this is truly an urban oasis and you’ll feel transported from the hustle & bustle of the city as soon as you step inside the gate! This home has been professionally, lovingly renovated by an architect (to the studs with updated insulation, plumbing, garage, kitchen, ensuite, wiring, copper piping, 6” walls + entire basement & mechanical redone in 2013/14 & roofing in 2017) yet maintains all the charm & character expected in a home of this vintage. This home boasts a triple garage (with loft), huge outdoor entertaining space with fireplace, a chef ’s kitchen with Calcutta marble countertop, white cabinets & high-end stainless steel Wolf & Sub-Zero appliances (48” Wolf range w/ 2 ovens), generously proportioned formal living spaces, 4+2 bedrooms, 5 fireplaces, renovated spa/6-pcs ensuite with heated Carrera marble flooring & renovated basement with wine room, family & games rooms, bedroom, bathroom, gym (could be 6th bedroom) & hobby/work room.

MY EXPERIENcE IS YOUR ADVANtAGE

JUST ASK ME!


WORTH ®

YOUR HOME

FOR ALL IT’S

BEARSPAW | $3,350,000

16

WOODL AN D RI S E

Hidden 4 acre country retreat tucked into the trees & backing pond in Bearspaw. This sprawling 8013 SF estate has 5 ensuite bedrooms (+ space for a nanny), walkout basement & parking for 12 vehicles! This stately home with circular drive is sure to impress. The main living area is a huge kitchen (antiqued cabinetry, beamed ceiling, stainless appliances, wine fridge, wet bar), grand vaulted living room & formal dining room w/ windows on 3 sides. The main floor master suite is a secluded retreat w/ private balcony, pond views, dressing room & ensuite w/ fireplace, freestanding tub & multihead steam shower. A den & large mud/laundry & a guest bath complete the main. the nanny suite (bedroom/bath/living room) has its own stairway. while 2 more ensuite bedrooms, library & gym make up the rest of the upper level. The walkout is home to 2 ensuite bedrooms, media, games, family, wine rooms & 2nd laundry. There is also a detached 1600 SF shop/garage.

BRITANNIA | $2,995,000

711

C R E S C E N T B O U L E VA R D , S W

Contemporary & new, with 4 car garage! This very special home offers 6169 SF of luxurious living space with 5 ensuite bathroom, sitting on a 75’ wide lot. The huge kitchen is a chef ’s dream with quartz counters, Wolf & Subzero appliances, a walk-thru pantry & window wall overlooking south backyard. The open living room has a fireplace & the formal dining room has a tray ceiling & ample space to entertain. A wet bar/serving station will make entertaining easy. A den, organized mudroom & chic powder room complete the main. Hardwood thru most of main & upper. Upstairs there is an impressive laundry room & 4 adult-sized bedroom incl. the Master Retreat with huge walk-in & spa ensuite w/ free-standing tub & steam shower. Basement developed with bedroom/ensuite, family room, wet bar, media room & gym w/ hydration station. Lastly the oversized 4 car garage has in-slab heating, glass doors & room for a lifts to include more cars.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

|

SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


MARKETING

BEARSPAW| $2,995,000 BEL-AIRE | $4,900,000

1231

B E L A V I S TA C R E S C E N T, S W

Truly one of the most exquisite homes Calgary has to offer! This 4768 SF Bel Aire home sits on 1/3+ acre & exhibits rare details that are right out of “Town & Country.� The beautifully manicured south backyard with pool is a private oasis sure to impress & the redesigned, expanded + totally renovated 2-storey (in 2008) offers exquisite craftsmanship & features an incredible kitchen (Sub-Zero & Wolf appliances, glass front wine fridge), dazzling living areas, palatial master suite (w/ sitting room/walk-in & spa bathroom), 3 + 1 bedrooms, richly panelled library, huge gym, mudroom, oversized triple garage, superb built-ins, all new electrical/lighting, plumbing, windows/doors, exterior, home automation system with audio/video inside & out, spectacular, automated salt water pool (virtually maintenance-free), heated cabana, fullservice outdoor kitchen w/ Viking/Sub-Zero appliances & commercial grade heaters. This property raises the bar for renovated/redesigned family homes in a prime inner-core location. World class!

MY EXPERIENcE IS YOUR ADVANtAGE

JUST ASK ME!


WORTH ®

YOUR HOME

FOR ALL IT’S

BRITANNIA | $2,800,000

807

F O RT Y- S E V E N T H AV E N U E , S W

Contemporary 2014 build, steps from boutique shops in highly coveted Britannia with 4 ensuite bedrooms & a 4 car garage, on a generous 74’ wide lot with sunny south backyard! West Coast design meet modern elegance in this light & open residence & over 5630 SF of living space. Spoil yourself with high-end appliances (induction range, multiple dishwashers, glass front wine fridge), heated floors, custom window coverings, a sculptural staircase of steel, wood & glass, extensive built-ins (large mudroom, several walkin closets), quartz counters, stone backsplash, glass railings, chic lighting, home automation system, in-floor heating & central a/c. Entertaining oriented main level with large dining room, open kitchen, glass wall den. 4 bedrooms, 4 ensuite bathrooms, bonus room & laundry room upstairs. Basement developed with media/games room & 5th bedroom + bathroom. Minutes from downtown & walking distance to river valley pathways.

SPRINGBANK HILL | $1,695,000

85

S L O P E S P O I N T, S W

Spectacular contemporary home on an exclusive cul-de-sac in a gated community. Perfect those who want a distinctly urban home in the country. Offers stunning indoor & outdoor living spaces with undeniably awesome views and a boutique hotel look-and-feel. Finished with high-end imported, designer fixtures & fittings this property offers 4000 SF of living space with no detail overlooked during design & construction. Notice the 15’ island in the custom kitchen, the 24’ long skylight & the 9’ long fireplace in the ultramodern living & dining rooms. Both the main & upper levels have floor-to-ceiling windows allowing you to enjoy the views. The 682 SF master suite has a spa-like ensuite with open shower, free-standing tub & heated flooring. The walkout is finished with a huge exercise room, 2 more bedrooms, ensuite bathroom, media room & laundry. 1/3 acre lot w/ huge covered patio, walled courtyard entryway & deck with outdoor fireplace.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

|

SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


MARKETING

BEARSPAW | $1,695,000 HILLHURST $4,900,000

NEST

4 2 6 , 4 2 8 O R 4 3 0 11 T H S T R E E T, N W

Three units to choose from, offering luxury in the heart of Kensington! this incredible, architecturally designed new executive tri-plex features outstanding, highend fixtures & fittings, spectacular interior design (by Monica Stevens Interior Design) and a location second to none, perfect for those who appreciate walkability/ pedestrian friendly living it is set on a quiet, tree-lined street just steps away from trendy shops & restaurants, Riley Park, c-train & Bow River. Walk/bike to nearby SAIT, Jubilee auditorium for a concert, ballet or opera or to downtown from this inner city retreat with bedrooms (2 master suites) & 4 bathrooms, rooftop deck, city views & developed basement. Showcasing exceptional finishes thru-out if offers: Wolf & SubZero appliances, Empire kitchen & bath millwork, Ann Sacks designer backsplash, Caesarstone counters, site-finished white oak hardwood, European plumbing fixtures, 10� baseboards, 9 & 10’ ceilings, Legrand electrical outlets, ICF party-walls & foundation, heated garage & basement floor.

MY EXPERIENcE IS YOUR ADVANtAGE

JUST ASK ME!


WORTH ®

YOUR HOME

FOR ALL IT’S

SPRINGBANK HILL | $1,595,000

208

F O R T R E S S B AY , S W

5300 SF of total living space & lots of extras/upgrades, near Calgary’s most prestigious schools! Heated 3 car garage, developed basement (in-floor heat), 4 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, exotic stone counters, 2 A/C, wet bar, in/ outdoor speakers & kitchen w/walk-thru pantry, island/eating bar & Bosch/ Viking stainless steel appliances! Main floor has den (TV & french doors), living room (TV & built-ins), formal dining room (coffered ceiling), mud room (lockers) & 2 pc bath. There are 3 bedrooms, laundry & bonus room up. The master has huge walk-in & spa ensuite w/ fireplace, heated floor, free-standing tub, big shower, private toilet & his/her marble vanities. 2 more bedrooms (both with built-in closet organizers) share a 4-piece bathroom with natural stone countertop. There is a media room (w/ built-ins), gym, games room, wet bar (granite counter, built-in microwave & bar fridge), 2-piecec bath & bedroom w/ walk-in closet & 3-piece ensuite downstairs.

PRIDDIS GREENS | $1,295,000

108

H AW K S L A N D I N G D R I V E

Breathing room for the soul! Your private hideaway from the hustle & bustle of the city this architecturally designed walkout bungalow is tucked into the trees & boasts a spectacular backyard oasis & peekaboo views of Priddis golf course & the mountains. Leafy views from huge windows give a treehouse-like atmosphere while a 4-season ‘screened in porch’ makes you feel like you’re at the cottage. But this estate is anything but rustic; it features a chef ’s kitchen, big dining room, grand living room (25’ ceiling) & master suite with fireplace, sitting area, dressing room & jet tub ensuite. A 2-piece bath & mudroom with access to the oversized triple garage complete the main. Upstairs is a loft/sitting room & a 2nd ensuite bedroom. The walkout features in-floor heating & offers 3 bedrooms, 3-piece bath, family/games rooms (wood-burning fireplace) & access to the gorgeous, low maintenance yard with babbling brook, firepit, stone patios, pergolas & a dog run.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

|

SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


MARKETING

RICHMOND | $1,275,000

2105

N I N E T E E N T H S T R E E T, S W

A stunning renovation, worthy of a spread in Style at Home magazine! This ultra-chic 2-storey is perched on the ridge with city views & a gorgeous, low-maintenance, walled “secret garden” with waterfall, extensive perennial plantings & a big deck. Inside you’ll find extensive updates feature: kitchen (site finished with high-end appliances), bathrooms (including steam shower adjacent to gym), dark hardwood & porcelain tile, designer paint & lighting, plumbing & heating systems, custom window coverings, fireplace feature wall & extensive site-finished built-ins! Plan offers chef ’s kitchen w/ Thermador & Miele appliances, quartz counters & glass backsplash, living room w/modern fireplace, formal dining has a dramatic light fixture & city views, 2 bedrooms upstairs including the tree-house inspired master suite w/ fireplace, sitting room, amazing closet & spa bathroom. Basement has gym, 3rd bedroom & spa bathroom with steam shower.

DISCOVERY RIDGE | $1,195,000

55

D I S C O V E RY R I D G E L A N E , S W

Top-drawer location right on Griffith Woods Park! This property sits right on this 93 hectare natural forested area with walking/running pathways. Designed to take full advantage of the tranquil Griffith Woods park views from most principal rooms this 2-storey home with developed walkout basement offers almost 4000 SF of living space with 3+1 bedrooms, den, formal dining room, great room with fireplace & chef ’s kitchen with granite counters, Miele espresso maker, gas stove, wine fridge, 2 ovens. Upstairs there are 3 ensuite bedrooms, including master w/ sitting room with park views & fireplace that is shared with the ensuite (with steam shower). 2 big bedrooms share a Jack & Jill ensuite bathroom. Walkout is developed with family room, games room, gym area, bedroom (w/walk-in closet) & 4 piece bathroom (w/in-floor heat). There are built-in speakers throughout & home has updated hardwood, fresh paint + updated deck & stairs to grade.

MY EXPERIENcE IS YOUR ADVANtAGE

JUST ASK ME!


WORTH ®

YOUR HOME

FOR ALL IT’S

RICHMOND | $1,100,000

2423

31S T AV E N U E , S W

This sleek & contemporary home is walking distance to trendy Marda Loop & minutes to DT! With clean lines, big windows, chic lighting, hardwood (main & upper), quartz counters, high ceilings & southern exposure it’s a bright, beautiful home. It has 4 bedrooms (3 ensuites) + den. The main is home to a den, living room (fireplace), dining room, mudroom & white kitchen with designer backsplash, quartz counters & stainless appliances (6 burner gas stove). The 2nd level is for the kids with 2 ensuite bedrooms & bonus room. The top floor is your private retreat with balcony, neighbourhood views, walk-in closet & incredible ensuite w/ heated tile, free-standing tub, oversized shower enclosure (seat & dual heads), private toilet, built-ins & floating vanity w/ 2 sinks, quartz counter & under-cabinet accent lighting. Basement offers 4th bedroom, full bath, family/games room and wet bar. Soak up the sun in your low-maintenance yard with deck/patio.

RICHMOND | $995,000

2413

2 4 A S T R E E T, S W

Clean lined, contemporary new home with city views, glass walls, Jenn-air appliances, steam shower & extensive built-ins! This is elevated inner city living with an open plan & lot of space for a family (a dedicated floor for the kids with 2 bedrooms, bonus room & a homework area). Great curb appeal is just the start. Main has party sized kitchen w/ 2 islands, high-end appliances (including gas stove & wine fridge), quartz counters & wide plank hardwood that flows into the dining & living (w/modern gas fireplace). Built-in seating & storage off back & front entryways makes for convenient daily living & glass doors open to the landscaped & fenced backyard. The 2nd floor has 2 bedrooms (w/ walk-in closets), bonus room, full bath & study area w/ builtin desks. The top floor is your private boutique hotel inspired master suite w/ balcony, views, huge walk-in (w/ built-ins) & ensuite with steam shower, free-standing tub, heated floor, his/her quartz topped vanities.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

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SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


MARKETING

DISCOVERY RIDGE | $895,000

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D I S C O V E R Y R I D G E B AY , S W

Light & bright, with developed walkout, west backyard & 3100+ SF of living space! This home has 3 bedrooms, den & walkout developed with a nanny in mind (4th bedroom & kitchen/wet bar). Neutral paint, white millwork, marble accents, granite counters & hardwood (main & upper). Main flr has den, formal dining room, & great room with island kitchen, nook & family room. White kitchen w/ marble backsplash, granite counters & stainless appliances (incl. gas range ). The breakfast nook has marble floor & opens to large deck. Family room has window seat, built-ins & gas fireplace w/ cabinet above for TV. There are 3 bedrooms & vaulted bonus room w/builtin desk, entertainment unit & gas fireplace upstairs. Master has walk-in & 5-piece ensuite. Walkout with 4th bedroom, 3-piece bath, family room, flex space, storage (could be 5th bedroom) & kitchenette/wet bar. Beautiful west backyard w/ walled stone patio & deck with glass rail & stairs to grade.

WEST SPRINGS | $895,000

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W E N T WO RT H H I L L , S W

Great room plan, 3 + 1 bedrooms, big west backyard & a fully developed basement (wet bar, media/games room, 4th bedroom & bath) are all yours to enjoy in this terrific home! Walking distance to elementary/middle schools, near shops/restaurants, Canada Olympic Park + a quick commute to DT. Family friendly & open plan w/ hardwood flooring flowing from the vaulted living room, into the spacious dining room (with built-in speakers) & island kitchen w/ walk-thru pantry &stainless appliances (gas stove w/ oven + warming drawer). A mudroom, den (w/ french doors) & guest bathroom complete the main. There are 3 bedrooms (all with walk-in closets) & bonus room upstairs. Basement is finished to the same standards as above grade & offers a granite topped wet bar (glass-front wine fridge & dishwasher), media room, full bathroom & 4th bedroom (with walk-in closet). Fenced yard with stone patio offers lots of space for kids & pets to play.

MY EXPERIENcE IS YOUR ADVANtAGE

JUST ASK ME!


WORTH ®

YOUR HOME

FOR ALL IT’S

ASPEN WOODS | $890,000

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A S PE N S TON E G ROV E , S W

Spoil yourself with superb mountain views in this thoughtfully designed home w/ developed walkout basement & oversized, heated garage with builtin work-bench & lots of storage features! View side of the house has wall-to wall windows & an oversized 33’ deck perfect for entertaining. Hardwood (Merbau, one of the hardest of woods) flows thru Island kitchen (stainless steel appliances), big breakfast nook, living room (gas fireplace), formal dining, foyer (walk-in closet) & back hall leading to guest bath, 3 pantry closets & family sized mudroom. There are 3 bedrooms & bonus room up. Master has hardwood, fabulous views, walk-in closet & 5-pc ensuite (heated tile). Walkout finished w/ family/games room, den, 3-pc bathroom, hobby/ storage Rm & cold Rm (or future wine cellar). Built-in speakers, custom pull up/down pleated shades, central A/C, 2 stone fireplaces, french doors, low traffic street, steps to tot lot, schools, shops & restaurants.

SILVER SPRINGS | $599,000

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S I LV E R C R E E K C R E S C E N T, N W

Spacious 2-storey split with attached double garage & extensive updates including bathrooms, new flooring, paint &most windows replaced, custom window coverings, gas fireplace and a new kitchen with granite counters, tile backsplash and stainless steel appliances package! Great location, family friendly low traffic street walking distance to transit, shopping & Crowchild Twin Arenas. Gleaming hardwood flows thru foyer, living room, dining room and into the island kitchen with eating bar & computer desk. There is also a main floor den/homework room, family room, mud/laundry room & powder room. There are 3 bedrooms up (with new carpeting & updated bathrooms) including big master suite with 4-piece ensuite featuring 2 raised bowl glass sinks & a private toilet & oversized glass shower enclosure. 2 other bedrooms share another updated bathroom. The basement has a rec room & storage space. There is an RV pad & patio in the fenced yard.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

www.SAMCOREA.COM

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SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


PARKHILL | $1,098,000

COUGAR RIDGE | $1,050,000

206

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COUGAR RI DGE L AN DING, S W

F O R T Y- S E C O N D AV E N U E , S W

Lock & leave, carefree living at it’s finest! End unit villa backing onto ravine & boasting panoramic views (including river valley & DT core), energy efficient geothermal heating/cooling, huge stone deck w/glass railing & infrared heaters & underground parking for 3 cars! Wraparound windows w/ motorized blinds) offer tranquil views of the ravine & the city beyond. The main level features a vaulted great room, island kitchen w/ high-end appliance package, 2 bdrms, 2 baths, den (w/ built-ins & leather flooring) & flex room. The spa ensuite features dual vanities, cultured granite jetted tub & shower. Downstairs is a big media/ family room, 3-pc bath & finished hobby/storage room.

Live, work & play in this incredible inner city townhome located mere steps away from Stanley Park & short walk to C-train for a stress-free commute to downtown! End unit with an amazing kitchen & wet bar, open planned living & dining rooms, 2 master suites, 2 balconies, developed basement (w/ 3rd bedroom & full bath), entry level office + foyer & a double attached garage with heated driveway. Features ICF construction, R38 solid insulation, steel beams, concrete subfloors, in-floor heating, A/C, Poggenpohl cabinetry, quartz counters, and high-end stainless steel appl (incl. Miele built-in double ovens & microwave drawer, integrated Miele fridge, wine fridge & gas cooktop).

BELTLINE | $650,000

ASPEN WOODS | $525,000

#630

304

72 0 - 13 T H AV E N U E , S W

A S C OT C I R C L E , S W

Refined living in the exclusive enclave of “The Estate” is yours to enjoy in this expansive 2 bedroom + den suite offering 2066 SF of beautifully appointed living space featuring new hardwood flooring, updated lighting, built-ins, renovated kitchen w/ centre island, & stainless steel appliances and a large master suite, big walk-in closet & updated ensuite bathroom w/ heated tile. Spacious living room opens to dining area & is flanked on either side by french doors opening to a private den & family room. Ideal for those who appreciate elegant surroundings, this grand building offers 24-hour concierge, salt-water pool, huge outdoor area, newly renovated gym & direct access to Ranchman’s Club.

Corner unit with west, south & east exposures, ravine views & an oversized double attached garage! The best home in the complex this wonderful suite boasts Hunter Douglas wooden shutters & blinds, hardwood, entry level den/flex room, living & dining room with fireplace, kitchen with upgraded stainless steel appliances (incl. slide-in ceramic top stove with 2 ovens), 2 pantry closets, quartz counters. There are 3 bright bedrooms upstairs including the king-sized master suite with wrap-around windows, ravine views, walk-in closet & ensuite bathroom with, oversized shower & quartz countertop. 2 other bedrooms share a 4-pc bathroom with quartz counter.

COACH HILL | $475,000

WEST SPRINGS | $429,900

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1605

C OAC H S I D E T E R R AC E , S W

WENT WORTH VILL AS, SW

Backing directly onto a treed greenbelt tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac. It has low condo fees & is a 2 minute walk to shopping & restaurants, close to schools, parks & transit. Features granite counters thru-out, rich hardwood, 3 bathrooms, 2 master bedrooms. The foyer has in-floor heat for a warm welcome. It leads to a dining room & well designed kitchen with vaulted ceilings, stainless steel appliance package, granite counters & glass door to south facing deck with BBQ gas line. The big living room has a gas fireplace & hardwood floor. There are 2 master suites upstairs, both generously scaled and with walk-in closets and full ensuites w/ tile flooring & granite counters. The basement & oversized single garage both offer ample storage.

Freshly renovated and move in ready, 1258 SF bungalow + developed basement, double attached garage (heated) and an enclosed sunroom with spectacular city views! This spacious end unit is sure to impress with central a/c, updated lighting, flooring, paint, millwork, kitchen (stainless steel appliances, & quartz counters), new carpeting and 2 fully renovated bathrooms on the main floor. At the back of the house is a gorgeous kitchen, tiled sunroom & a sitting room with french doors & superb views. Master bedroom ensuite w/ oversized shower enclosure & the 2nd bedroom is serviced by another renovated bathroom. The basement has new carpet & is developed with a large family/ games room, wet bar, full bathroom, storage & workshop areas.

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403 870 8811 |

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403 686 7800 |

MISSION | $995,000

#M06

318 - 2 6T H AV E N U E , S W

Huge terrace + completely renovated suite! An amazing find, this positively stunning, fully renovated 1771 SF home comes with your own 1889 SF terrace. The interior was thoughtfully designed and completely rebuilt. It features porcelain tile & hardwood flooring, custom cabinets, Caesarstone countertops, Swarovski crystal lights & cabinet pulls, custom bath fixtures & a chef’s kitchen with imported cabinetry & high-end appliance package. The spa-like ensuite is your private retreat at the end of a long day. There are 2 bedrooms, sunroom, 2 bathrooms, 2 u/g parking spots, large living & dining rooms. Across from the river & steps from trendy 4th Street shops/restaurants.

ASPEN WOODS | $489,000

#216

45 A SPENMONT HEIGHTS, SW

Brand new & extensively upgraded in a picture perfect location, overlooking the water in trendy Aspen with tranquil views from both levels. Spoil yourself with a gourmet kitchen that features deep-toned cabinetry, tiled backsplash, waterfall edge casearstone counters & high-end stainless steel appliances . This spacious suite has chic lighting fixtures, custom blinds, in-floor heating & 3 bathrooms. There are 2 master suites (1 on each level for maximum privacy), 2 ensuite bathrooms, a big living room, separate dining room. The unit comes with 2 parking spots, storage & a balcony. Aspen Landing are a short walk away & the c-train is close by for a stress-free commute to downtown.

DOWNTOWN | $415,000

#201

701 - 3 R D AV E N U E , S W

This sophisticated condo boasts an amazing 750 SF balcony! With a mid-century modern look & feel this suite features builtin speakers, book-matched walnut cabinets/doors, walnut floor, quartz counters, heated ensuite floor, a steam shower, 2 bathrms, stainless steel appl. (gas stove) & modern gas fireplace. Your condo fee includes electricity & concierge to make life easy & convenient in this very exclusive building. Natural woodwork is warm & intimate while 9’ ceilings & a window wall make the space light & airy. The master suite shares the 2-sided gas fireplace & has a wall-to-wall built-in, big walk-in & 5-pc spa bathroom with (his/her sinks), deep tub, heated floor & tiled steam shower. Steps from River pathways & Prince’s Island Park!

www.SAMCOREA.COM

|

SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


AD SPACE


SAM


OPTING FOR A SECOND CAREER // TRAINING & EDUCATION

Opting FOR A

SECOND CAREER BY JOHN HARDY

CHOICE, CHANCE AND NECESSITY

T

hroughout Alberta, and particularly in the Calgary area, the perfect storm continues to fuel the hot trend of pursuing a second career.

For years, the decision to opt for a second career was usually done by choice or chance. Unfortunately, for at least the past two years, many Albertans are refocusing on a second career out of necessity. Of course human nature and an urge for change is a constant when it comes to looking for a second career. But the jarring impacts of the oil price slump and the ripple effects still taking their toll on many aspects of Calgary’s economy and job market are also combining with the Canadian (and North American) generational trend of older workers staying in the workforce longer and often looking for second careers. Some because they want to, and others because they need to. According to Statistics Canada, 3.6 million Canadian workers are age 55 and over and represent more than 20 per cent of Canada’s workforce – an increase of 1.2 million since 2006. “Traditionally, there have always been career-changers changing career paths for various reasons,” says Kelly Ma Rosso, counsellor with SAIT Student Development and Counselling. “Anecdotally, particularly in the past couple of years, there seems to be more people planning a career change due to circumstances beyond their control; factors like the ongoing economic climate and getting laid off. “For many it’s distressing but for others it can actually be a time to reinvent themselves. Planning a second career can be a creative and exciting opportunity. To find a career to be passionate about and even a career more aligned with personal goals, values and interests can be invigorating.”

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OPTING FOR A SECOND CAREER // TRAINING & EDUCATION

“It requires unemployed Albertans trying a second career to be open to change and seek ways to utilize current skills sets and expertise, and a willingness to transfer skills and knowledge to become part of the growth of new business sectors.” She tracks the Calgary-area trends with professionalism, positivity and enthusiasm. “If history is an indicator, people displaced from the energy sector will use this as an opportunity to invigorate other parts of our economy.” A new aspect of the current second-career trend is that it’s happening on virtually every workplace level: management, the plant, the field, the shop floor and mid- and senior management. “Although it’s more and more common in the Calgary market,” explains Andrea Torraville, MBA career consultant at the Haskayne School of Business, “it is a North American trend. Career pivots are increasing due to many factors including economic shifts, emerging career options and changes in professions. “Various recent business studies and projections show more than three careers in a working person’s lifetime. The Haskayne MBA program has seen a significant increase in individuals transitioning to a second career. Market conditions are the number one factor. A close second is a desire to have more options available in the future.”

Tamara McCormick, business lead with Career Connection – the in-demand, provincial government-funded career and employment resource centre at Bow Valley College committed to helping individuals achieve career objectives – agrees with the relatively recent reasons for the popularity surge in second careers. “The Alberta economy continues to undergo significant adjustments related to the downturn in energy prices and the various implications for all businesses directly or indirectly affected by the energy service sector.

There’s a consensus as well as caution from experience that the decision to target a second career involves much more than desire, drive and determination. It takes job market flexibility, creativity and a grasp of reality. “Because of the variety of possibilities, meeting with a career coach or even a trusted colleague can really help the career-changer make the shift, looking at where skills and experience could take them in another company, in the same industry or to an entirely different line of work,” McCormick points out. “It is a good time to look deeper into what you’ve done, who you are and where you want to go. Is there ABOVE: TAMARA MCCORMICK, BUSINESS LEAD WITH CAREER CONNECTION AT BOW VALLEY COLLEGE. BELOW: ANDREA TORRAVILLE, MBA CAREER CONSULTANT AT THE HASKAYNE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS.

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Look what’s offered this fall...

Be a better leader. This fall, let Continuing Education Business Seminars refresh and refine your leadership skills. Seminars run from one to three days, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, at the University of Calgary Main Campus in the city’s northwest, or the Downtown Campus at 906 8th Ave SW.

· Accounting for NonFinancial Managers

· Effective Writing in the Workplace

· Mastering Work and Life Satisfaction

· Assertiveness: Choosing the Right Balance

· Emotional Intelligence

· Meeting the Challenge of Leadership

· Becoming Empowered Through Coaching NEW · Coaching for Quality Performance · Coaching to Different Styles NEW · Confidence in Communication · Conquering Your Fear of Public Speaking · Creative Conflict Resolution: Making the Most of Differences

· Energize Your Workplace: Inspiring and Motivating People

· Mental Toughness: Training for Success

· Facilitation Skills

· Mentoring Skills

· Financial Analysis and Planning for NonFinancial Managers

· Overview of Strategic Planning

· Fundamentals of Supervision · Get Organized! Improve Your Workflow and Boost Your Productivity · Getting Things Done Through Influence

· Power and Science of Coaching · Recognizing Psychological Health Issues in the Workplace NEW · Stress Less: Managing What’s On Your Mind

· Good Writing is Good Business

· Succession Planning: Developing Leaders From Within

· Implementing Change

· The Decisive Leader

· Cultivating Innovation in Your Organization

· Integrative Listening: The Leader’s Edge

· Time Management

· Dealing with the Difficult Conversation

· Leading Yourself and Others Through Change

Come prepared to share your experiences and perspectives through group exercises, discussions and interactive learning experiences. Seminars can be taken on their own, or for certificate credit. Learn more about the Certificate for Emerging Leaders at conted.ucalgary.ca/emerging.

· Creative Negotiating

Looking for corporate training opportunities? All of these seminars can be adapted to group training sessions for your organization. To learn more, call 403.220.2866 or email contedcorporate@ucalgary.ca.

· Developing High Performance Teams

· Creative Problem Solving

· Do Less and Achieve More: Zone of Optimal Performance

· Leading with Confidence and Courage

· Understanding and Developing Your Unique Organizational Culture · Writing Winning Proposals

Go online for dates, descriptions and other details, and to register.

I was looking to improve and enrich my leadership skills. The content of these seminars seemed promising and now that I’ve completed the program, I’d say the promise was fulfilled.” Raafat El-Hacha. Graduate. Certificate for Emerging Leaders.

403.220.2866 • conted.ucalgary.ca/emerging


OPTING FOR A SECOND CAREER // TRAINING & EDUCATION

something you’ve always wanted to do? Where do you spend your free time? What are you most passionate about?” And readying for a second career also involves challenges after the vital decision is made. For many it has been years, sometimes decades, since the routines of a classroom, listening, making notes, doing assignments and homework. Most facilities have made adjustments in the programming, second-career classroom and prioritizing the wants, the needs and the comfort zone of the “mature student.” There are subtle but key aspects to consider, beyond the clichéd but important speed bumps of suddenly being back in a classroom setting. “The biggest adjustment is returning to a student mindset,” notes Michael Wright, Haskayne’s associate dean of graduate programs. “Reading all of the materials, studying and completing course deliverables requires diligent time management and a level of commitment that people have often forgotten about from their previous schooling. “It’s important while making a career transition to spend the time setting goals, doing research and really understanding what is involved in making the big change. Taking the time to meet with career or academic advisers helps manage most expectations.” “No doubt about it,” SAIT’s Ma Rosso says, “career-changers invariably face potential challenges. When undergoing a transition, by choice or necessity, the career-changer will process the grief of leaving a career. There will be selfreflection to prioritize needs, income, work-life balance and making short- and long-term goals. “As the new normal sets in, they will have to make decisions based on personal needs and values.” “Transitioning into a second career requires a growth mindset,” Torraville emphasizes. “Anyone looking to make a career change needs to have clear goals to help develop an effective and workable plan of action. It’s the crucial first step. Second careers often require the acquisition of new

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AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

knowledge and skills. Programs like the Haskayne MBA have career consultants who work with students one-on-one, to successfully make the career shift.” Despite popular stereotypes and false assumptions, being tech-savvy is no longer limited to certain careers. It is a basic fact of working life, from corporate, industrial and the service sector to all levels of management. McCormick emphasizes, “Technical depth of skills will always be important, as well as communication skills, the ability to work in a team environment and flexibility to work around change.” “Re-entering the classroom could be exciting and challenging,” Ma Rosso adds. “But technology has changed so much and content delivery is different from what it was even 10 years ago. The extra time needed for studying or completing projects may surprise some, but having timeand self-management skills from a previous career can be very helpful in managing a new routine.” The experts agree that some career transitioning still involves adapting generations who occasionally have a tough time embracing technology into entrenched “we-havealways-done-it-this-way” traditions and that most second careers now acknowledge (and outright require) technology as a basic workplace skill. “Technology has become a foundation in our society today and having the ability to learn and adapt to new technologies is vital,” Torraville points out. “We are finding increased requirements to have more advanced technological skills in key professions. The ability to adapt, learn and keep up with technology will be an important asset to transitioning to any new career.” In the Calgary job market, the trends, the facts and the numbers tell the dynamic second-career story. As just one recent example, according to the 2015-16 BVC annual report, enrolments grew by more than nine per cent over the previous year.


EYE FOR STYLE // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

EYE FOR STYLE WHERE TO FIND PROFESSIONAL FASHION SENSE

BY LORENA MCDONALD

D

eciding what to wear can be nerve-racking for most people – especially when trying to dress regularly for work. Not only are buying clothes expensive, but it can also become a daunting daily task. So, where can someone get fashion advice? According to “Bad Peace” blogger and influencer, Andrea Margarita Benavides, most people can get inspiration from stylists like herself, or from social media sources like Pinterest and Instagram. People can become easily confused when it comes to choosing clothes because fashion trends always change. “A lot of people who come to me don’t know how to dress because the fashion industry is constantly changing and sometimes there are unique pieces that come out that people have a hard time figuring how to wear,” she says. Many individuals get overwhelmed when shopping, particularly when choosing to buy business clothing. Understanding a particular work environment and dress

policy is valuable prior to buying key wardrobe pieces. “Office spaces vary between industries – corporate fashion really fluctuates because some corporate dress is more professional than others that are more casual – but one main consideration is to dress to impress especially for a job interview,” explains Benavides. Overall impressions are important when it comes to getting a job. Therefore, choosing the right style is essential in a professional setting. “One thing I post on my blog all the time … is making it your own because there are no rules when it comes to fashion; but in a corporate environment things can become more grey depending on the policies,” she states. Another good way of getting expert advice is to shop at stores where consultants are available to help. Thomas Jeffery Men’s Wear provides fashion advice depending upon a person’s requests.

ABOVE: ANDREA MARGARITA BENAVIDES, BAD PEACE FASHION BLOGGER AND INFLUENCER. PHOTO SOURCE: ANDREA BENAVIDES

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Simons Offers Newest Downtown Fashion Destination Poutine and maple syrup are nothing compared to Quebec’s latest offering to the West. In March, the Quebec-based retailer, Simons, opened its first Calgary store at The CORE downtown. Simons renovated the 1919 Lancaster Building on Stephen Avenue, perfectly marrying the retailer’s contemporary style with the history of the location. And history is important to Simons. It was founded in 1840 in Quebec City by John Simons, the son of Scottish immigrants, and has stayed in the Simons family ever since. “We are the oldest remaining family-owned business in Canada,” says Philippe Normand, vice president of marketing for La Maison Simons Inc. “Brothers Peter and Richard Simons, the family’s fifth generation, head the company.” The Simons family is in touch with what Canadians want in fashion and strives to give them a little bit more. Simons offers its own fashion brands for men, women, and the home that include Le 31, Contemporaine, Twik, Icône, Miiyu, DJAB, i.Fiv5, and Simons Maison, each targeting a different demographic and style. The store also features popular Canadian and international designer brands like Hugo Boss, Vivienne Westwood, Alexander McQueen, and Denis Gagnon. “One of the things that sets us apart is that we support emerging Canadian talent,” Normand explains. While Simons prides itself on travelling the world to find the best designs to carry, it also offers an assortment of products from new designers, like Malorie Urbanovitch, and UNTTLD, in order to help launch their careers. Contemporaine Private label

The designs are artfully arranged over the five floors of the 95,000-square-foot space, with each department projecting a personality of its own to reflect what it offers. And what Canada’s

Le 31 Private label

fashion authority offers is everything that’s needed to dress a Calgary professional. “We have a diverse selection of clothing that ranges from fashion items at $10 to evening dresses at $1,200. We have most extensive assortment in the industry,” Normand says. Simons specializes in tailoring for men and women, and with a convenient downtown location, Calgary’s businesspeople can pop in during lunch and peruse the incredible array of business attire from top designers. Friendly and knowledgeable staff are happy to assist customers and the store’s alteration services ensures a perfect fit. Simons wants to make sure customers are satisfied ‘‘We want clothing to with their experience, and that be highly fashionable experience goes far beyond the clothing racks.

but at a value that can’t be beat.’’

Art and culture are an important aspect of the company, and the newest Simons location incorporates original artwork into its design. A three-storey mural by local artist Maya Gohill extends along the escalators while a large graphic mural by Megan Jentsch and a portrait by Chris Cran help establish a Calgary vibe. Simons is invested in its new home. The company is involved with the Calgary Stampede chuckwagons and is committed to rejuvenating The CORE. It is also committed to bringing style and fashion—whether that’s in the form of athletic apparel, evening clothes, home fashions, or accessories—to Calgary shoppers. “We want clothing to be highly fashionable but at a value that can’t be beat,” says Normand. With the most coveted designers, an incredible selection, and an amazing staff, shoppers have quickly discovered that their new favourite store is Simons.


Proudly Canadian with over 175 years of passion for fashion

Discover the

new fall collection at our store in The CORE or at simons.ca


EYE FOR STYLE // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

“We believe that it is more important to service our customer’s needs rather than just make a sale. We are prepared to go to our customer and provide direction whether it be individual or at the office for many,” explains Len Hamm, owner of Thomas Jeffery Men’s Wear. Such services are particularly helpful for men looking for convenience and ease in shopping. Many customers prefer stores where sales associates provide quick advice without being too pushy. “The first thing they want is an atmosphere that gives great service that is hassle-free. They want to deal with people who know what they are talking about and can direct them properly and quickly, as most men do not like to shop,” he adds. Even though today’s media sources influence the average person, there are benefits to working with a consultant who can provide the right guidance. This is especially true when a stylist can provide feedback on current trends. “We go to great lengths to training our staff about what is happening in the world of fashion. We do not believe in commission sales as it is our belief that our customer should buy the products for his or her needs,” says Hamm. Similarly, the employees at O’Connors Men’s & Women’s

Clothing & Footwear have many years of professional experience in the retail industry. Sales associates go on buying trips to deepen their understanding of different clothing styles. “We offer personal customer service that is very important to us and our clients, as well as a great deal of knowledge for their needs,” explains Joanne Richardson, O’Connors retail buyer and manager. Getting advice from a well-seasoned fashion consultant can provide the right education about putting a professional look together. Also, learning how to choose key fashion pieces and accessories for business apparel is valuable. Richardson believes, “Selection, fit and a professional look will always be the hallmark of a proper wardrobe. Having said that, office and corporate cultures are changing and adapting now more than ever. Understanding the greater variety of workplace attire is key to helping clients maintain and build their professional clothing choices.” Sometimes one can emulate someone else’s style to achieve a desired look. Many people get their fashion sense from what their business colleagues are wearing. “People always notice someone who is well put together and LEFT: LENN HAMM, OWNER OF THOMAS JEFFERY MEN’S WEAR. MIDDLE: JOANNE RICHARDSON, MANAGER AND BUYER OF O’CONNORS MEN’S & WOMEN’S CLOTHING & FOOTWEAR. RIGHT: PAULINA RAMIS, FASHION CONSULTANT, PAULINA RAMIS STYLE CONSULTING.

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EYE FOR STYLE // DRESS FOR SUCCESS

“SELECTION, FIT AND A PROFESSIONAL LOOK WILL ALWAYS BE THE HALLMARK OF A PROPER WARDROBE. HAVING SAID THAT, OFFICE AND CORPORATE CULTURES ARE CHANGING AND ADAPTING NOW MORE THAN EVER. UNDERSTANDING THE GREATER VARIETY OF WORKPLACE ATTIRE IS KEY TO HELPING CLIENTS MAINTAIN AND BUILD THEIR PROFESSIONAL CLOTHING CHOICES.” ~ JOANNE RICHARDSON

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WHEN IT COMES TO WHAT CORPORATIONS ARE LOOKING FOR IN PROFESSIONAL DRESS, RAMIS BELIEVES “THEY ARE EXPECTING A LOOK TO REFLECT PROFESSIONALISM WHERE THE CLOTHING DOESN’T PLAY A MAIN ROLE, BUT ACCENTS PERSONALITY TO LOOK SHARP YET CAPABLE.” I always encourage them to ask that person where they shop – hopefully it’s with us! Of course, social media continues to dominate, but people still take many fashion cues from magazines and TV shows,” she explains. Still, dressing properly for a workplace environment can be challenging if there are no clear parameters or guidelines to follow. “I believe that a person looking to be hired by a firm should do his or her homework about that company,” says Hamm. For many, the challenge of knowing what clothing attire is appropriate for work can be confusing. Buying traditional pieces that are interchangeable is both cost effective and practical. “Most people want to make sure they are dressed appropriately for the workplace they are in. People do not understand that dressing casually for men is more difficult than shopping for dress clothing. One of the best ways to start is by buying a sport coat and building out from there,” he explains. Having versatile clothing is important today especially with the high cost of fashion. Many individuals prefer to buy something that is more expensive if it is of good quality. Ultimately, comfort is key when selecting stylish business clothes. “There is a definite trend to more comfortable clothing. Technical-blended fabrics that are easier to care for are increasing in demand. People want their wardrobes to be multifunctional – like throwing on a pair of slim-cut dark denims at 5 p.m. with a work blazer and then going out for drinks,” adds Richardson. Designing a wardrobe that is age appropriate, comfortable and suitable for work can still be difficult if one does not have the patience, time and skillfulness to pick out clothes. But getting fashion advice does not mean one’s entire clothing apparel needs to be changed or thrown away. Sometimes simply updating or adding a few new pieces can make a difference.

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“I work with all women who are in need of a fresher look or want to update their wardrobe because they are bored with their existing clothes and want new ideas. Sometimes it is easier to bring in a third party like me because I am objective, rather than to do it yourself,” explains Paulina Ramis, owner of Paulina Ramis Style Consulting. As a personal stylist, Ramis focuses on helping her clientele feel confident and comfortable. “I try to give my clients the tools to dress appropriately for their profession or business. At the end of the experience, they feel comfortable that they are presenting the right image to clients, peers and colleagues,” she says. When it comes to what corporations are looking for in professional dress, Ramis believes “They are expecting a look to reflect professionalism where the clothing doesn’t play a main role, but accents personality to look sharp yet capable.” Wearing clothes with confidence is essential when dressing professionally for work. Interestingly, the right type of business apparel can help one feel more poised and self-assured. “I like to pass along the concept of ‘own your style’ which not only represents what you do, but embodies (one’s) personality. When shopping, selecting investment pieces is a great starting point. These are building blocks of any wardrobe. I always incorporate less-expensive items that will provide versatility during the week. Know where to splurge and where to save,” adds Ramis. There are plenty of clothing stores and services available for finding fashion advice, but Ramis believes “Being comfortable in what you wear makes a significant impact on your behaviour and how you carry yourself.” Finding the right style may never be easy, but there are different options available for people wanting help with putting a professional look together. Surely, fashion might be in the eye of a beholder. But in the end the only thing that matters is how personal style makes one feel.


MORE THAN JUST THE STAMPEDE // ARTS & CULTURE

MORE THAN JUST THE STAMPEDE

BY ERLYNN GOCOCO

CALGARY’S G R OWI N G F ESTIVAL S C E N E

C

algary is known around the globe for its Cowtown roots and the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth – the Calgary Stampede. It’s worth noting, however, that our city’s festival scene appears to be vibrant and strong. From the Lilac Festival to Sled Island and the Calgary International Film Festival (CIFF) to Oxford Stomp, the list goes on and on.

100,000-plus visitors each year, with other festivals like CIFF and Sled Island growing very rapidly.” He goes on to say that the level of public awareness and enthusiasm for these events is at a completely different level than it has been in the past. In 2016, CIFF set a record attendance for their 12-day festival, hitting 36,700 attendees, representing a four per cent increase over the previous year.

“Our city has created a great festival culture – one that is diverse and connects to all individuals within our community,” says Sid Mark, president of the Rotary Club of Calgary Downtown. “For sustainability and growth purposes, Rotary is excited to join Stampede Entertainment Inc. and the Calgary Exhibition & Stampede in forming Rotary Stampede Live so that our Stampede Shaker and Oxford Stomp barbecues can continue to add to Calgary’s cultural and festival scene.”

The growth of the festival scene in Calgary not only puts us on the map, but it brings a significant economic benefit to the city as well. CIFF alone, according to Schroeder, brought in more than $2.8 million in economic activity across Alberta, of which more than $2.1 million occurred in Calgary (Source: 2015 Economic Impact Study conducted by Tourism Calgary). “And that’s just one small part of the impact of festivals and events. The aggregate economic benefit dwarfs the public sector investment made in supporting these festivals. Everyone benefits from the restaurants and hotels to the city’s parking revenues downtown.”

CIFF’s executive director, Steve Schroeder, boasts, “Calgary currently hosts a number of events that routinely draws

ABOVE: SLED ISLAND PARTYGOERS. PHOTO SOURCE: BOBBY BARBARICH

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MORE THAN JUST THE STAMPEDE // ARTS & CULTURE

“Festivals are big economic drivers: they create jobs, provide business to a variety of local suppliers and contribute significantly to the tourism industry,” confirms Maud Salvi, executive director of Sled Island, a local five-day music and arts festival that attracts over 30,000 attendees, both local and from out of town, in more than 35 local venues.

corporate budgets and entertainment dollars, but our goal is to keep our community together, celebrate our resiliency and continue to raise money for local charities.”

Salvi says an economic impact assessment produced by the Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance in 2015 showed that Sled Island generated $3.4 million in economic activity for Alberta that year. Salvi says about 30 per cent of their audience comes from out of town and spends on average $685 on accommodations, food and shopping. She also echoes Schroeder’s comments and says hotels, bars, restaurants, music venues and other local businesses all benefit from this economic impact.

And though some of us may not consider ourselves as “festival-goers,” Geoff Gordon, a local executive producer who most recently produced the award-winning Blake Reid Band documentary, No Roads In, believes, “As humans, we have an innate appreciation for art.” But he says that ironically, it remains very challenging to earn a living as an artist or a musician. “One of the best ways, and in many cases, one of the few practical ways for an artist to create awareness is to participate in local events or festivals. The more people attend local festivals, the more support the festivals can, in turn, offer to artists regarding opportunities to perform and showcase their talent.”

In celebration of Rotary’s 60th year of Stampede barbecues, Mark says Rotary of Calgary Downtown is offering special pricing for their events. “This is our gift back to the community for their long-standing support of the events. Recent economic times have understandably put pressure on

Gordon adds that festivals like CIFF offer independent films the important opportunity to start building public awareness and to be seen by industry influencers. “As a performing band with an independent film, if accepted to a film festival, we can look for opportunities to perform in conjunction with the film festivals.

ABOVE: MOVIE SCREENING AT CALGARY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. PHOTO SOURCE: CALGARY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

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MORE THAN JUST THE STAMPEDE // ARTS & CULTURE

SCHROEDER SAYS HE’S BEEN INVOLVED WITH FESTIVALS IN CALGARY FOR 22 YEARS AND IT HAS TRANSFORMED “UNRECOGNIZABLY” FROM WHEN HE STARTED.

development profile. If we want to be like Austin, Nashville, Seattle or Toronto, we need to know that we’re in competition for a talented workforce. Festivals and events are a factor when people decide where they want to live,” says Schroeder.

We can promote the band, the film and the film festival in a unique and highly synergistic manner. This opportunity would not be possible if it were not for festivals like CIFF.” Aside from the economic advantages, festivals also provide social and cultural benefits as they play an important role in the social fabric of the city because of the large amount of people they bring together. “Volunteering at festivals is a popular choice for newcomers to meet like-minded individuals and create friendships,” says Salvi. “It’s an opportunity to gather and engage with their peers as well as with a large audience. From a cultural standpoint, they bring attention to the city and its artistic scene and contribute to shaping its image and reputation on a national and international level.” Rotary engages over 1,100 volunteers to host the Stampede Shaker and Oxford Stomp events. This, in turn, promotes community building and social opportunities for its volunteers. “Since the vast majority of festivals occur in the core, the benefits are there. There’s a huge intangible level on which this operates. Quality of life, which includes arts, culture and entertainment offerings, is a major attractor for new businesses and a skilled workforce locating itself in the city. A vital downtown is the cornerstone of any city’s economic

And as the city’s festival scene continues to grow, it’s important to understand just how much it has evolved over the last decade. “There are way more festivals in Calgary now than there were a decade ago, in a wide array of disciplines, which is great. Having more events and festivals throughout the year makes it possible for seasonal workers to move from one to the other and remain in their line of work for most of the year. It also helps attract people to Calgary. Overall it contributes to a more vibrant city,” says Salvi. Schroeder says he’s been involved with festivals in Calgary for 22 years and it has transformed “unrecognizably” from when he started. “When I started, the Calgary International Film Festival didn’t exist, the High Performance Rodeo was a tiny boutique event, Lilac Festival was a quaint neighbourhood street party and Comic Expo, Sled Island and the Calgary Fringe Festival didn’t even exist. The festivals that did exist were by and large very small and had a low profile compared to today’s events.” It doesn’t appear that Calgary’s vibrant festival scene will slow down any time soon and, according to Schroeder, we can also expect to see music as a major part of the city’s national and international brand. “With a critical focus on the Music Mile, Folk Festival’s new Block Heater winter festival, the rapid growth of Sled Island, the new Studio Bell (home of the National Music Centre), and our own popular Music on Screen film series, let’s continue to rightly put our focus on music as a key part of what’s distinctive about Calgary.” ABOVE: STEVE SCHROEDER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CALGARY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. PHOTO SOURCE: CALGARY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

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DEALING WITH COAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

DEALING WITH

Coal

THE ENVIRONMENT, ECONOMY AND PEOPLE ASPECTS BY JOHN HARDY

V

olumes of legendary wisdom are popular reminders that the only sure thing about life is change.

There is also consensus that, despite circumstances, situations and specifics, change isn’t always easy. The Alberta government’s recent decision to fast-track the phasing out of coal is a big change on various levels. Although just announced last fall, there are already many questions about the revised provincial policy and its impact on key factors such as the environment, health care, the industry and the economy and how it will affect Alberta residents and taxpayers.

ALBERTA’S CLIMATE CHANGE PLAN ALREADY CALLED FOR ALL BUT SIX OF THE PROVINCE’S 18 COAL-FIRED ELECTRICITY POWER PLANTS TO SHUT DOWN BY 2030. THE SIX NEWER FACILITIES WERE ALLOWED TO OPERATE UNTIL AS LATE AS 2061.

While respected groups like the Fraser Institute and the Coal Association of Canada vigilantly analyze the relevant government and industry details and numbers, their focus also highlights other aspects of the coal phase out.

Alberta’s climate change plan already called for all but six of the province’s 18 coal-fired electricity power plants to shut down by 2030. The six newer facilities were allowed to operate until as late as 2061.

More subtle but crucially important human aspects, like the effect of carbon taxes on the cost of living and consumer confidence, particularly in a slowly rebounding area such as Calgary which is still dealing with the damage of the oil price downturn and the dramatic people-impact on once-vibrant communities like Grande Cache.

The phase-out plans have now been accelerated.

The province is committed to replace coal-fired electricity with natural gas-fired power and a mix of renewables, including solar, wind and hydro. Provinces such as Ontario have already phased out coal, but Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia plan to continue burning it for decades.

For the massive and vital business that is Alberta power generation, the phase out is a huge spike in the cost of doing business. It’s the key reason why, starting this year, the province is compensating TransAlta Corp., ATCO Ltd. and Capital Power Corp. a total of $97 million annually over 14 years (paid from the carbon levy on heavy emitters and the new, broad-based carbon tax on gasoline and heating bills) as they transition faster to cleaner forms of energy. The government is still negotiating with Enmax, Calgary’s cityowned utility.

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DEALING WITH COAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

“THE ALBERTA COAL PHASE OUT IS PURELY A CHOICE BY THE GOVERNMENT TO HELP ALBERTA MEET ITS GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION REDUCTION TARGETS.” ~ KEN GREEN

The total cost of the compensation is expected to be over $1.36 billion. “The coal phase out in Alberta was not expected to happen as quickly as the government has mandated,” explains Ken Green, senior director of natural resource studies at the Fraser Institute, the highly-respected Canadian public policy think tank. “I believe that the coal-fired generators here had at least another decade of economic viability. “The Alberta coal phase out is purely a choice by the government to help Alberta meet its greenhouse gas emission reduction targets.” Robin Campbell, president of the Coal Association of Canada and former government whip and minister of environment and parks, is also concerned about the accelerated timing of Alberta’s phase out. “There were indications that government was moving towards a more conscientious approach to coal energy. The federal government brought in regulations that mandated the phase out of some older plants, but it also allowed for exemptions. There was an openness to a dialogue. “Five years ago, I don’t think anyone could have predicted Alberta would be where it is today,” he warns. Although fiercely proud of all things western, many Alberta energy industry and other business leaders often squint about the Ontario example of phasing out coal from electricity generation. In 2005,

“THERE WERE INDICATIONS THAT GOVERNMENT WAS MOVING TOWARDS A MORE CONSCIENTIOUS APPROACH TO COAL ENERGY. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BROUGHT IN REGULATIONS THAT MANDATED THE PHASE OUT OF SOME OLDER PLANTS, BUT IT ALSO ALLOWED FOR EXEMPTIONS. ~ ROBIN CAMPBELL ABOVE: KEN GREEN, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCE STUDIES AT THE FRASER INSTITUTE. BELOW: ROBIN CAMPBELL, PRESIDENT OF THE COAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.

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DEALING WITH COAL // NATURAL RESOURCES

The Grande Cache Spirit There’s usually a bit of a wait for a table, especially on Fridays and Saturdays, at Grande Cache Pizza, the popular local hot spot. The regulars don’t seem to mind. It’s been a friendly people-place for years, and the food is great! Lately, although it may be subtle, the wait is not as bad as it used to be. Against all odds, Yvonne Rempel, Catie Layes and Shawn Slaney are long-term residents and gung-ho Grande Cache boosters. They begrudgingly admit that, especially with the government’s accelerated phase out, it’s getting tougher and tougher to keep the spirit. Rempel, who is now a respected town councillor, has lived in Grande Cache since the 1997 boom years when rents were high, vacancy scarce and there were lots of jobs. “Grande Cache’s legacy is being a coal-mining town,” she smiles. “At its peak, it employed more than 700 people. Grande Cache Coal is now in receivership and many local ‘coal families’ are just hanging on, hoping it will be sold and reopen this summer. “The town is working hard to diversify our economy but the impact on local property values is significant. Many families are commuting for work or had to forfeit their houses when they moved away for jobs. To date, Grande Cache has seen a 17.3 per cent decline in population, with 54 homes in foreclosure and about 40 homes for sale,” Rempel says. Shawn Slaney moved to Grande Cache 39 years ago. Now, with two grown kids and six grandchildren, she’s still positive and upbeat but also realistic and resilient. “You’ll never meet nicer people than in Grande Cache,” she beams. “My husband worked in the mine for 23 years. Every shutdown affected us. “I always worked outside of the mine, so we were able to hang on. But the government phasing out coal makes us wonder about the mine ever reopening. It sure has been a morale roller-coaster.”

Ontario phased out coal-fired power plants, to impact greenhouses gases and the environment and an annual saving of $3 billion in health care. The change was complex, complicated and expensive. Just 12 years later, various studies show modest effects on Ontario air quality and only marginal improvements in health-care stats while the Ontario government manages public outrage about the skyrocketed costs of electricity. “The economic impact of a phase out depends on what replaces coal,” explains Ross McKitrick, professor of economics at the University of Guelph, senior fellow with the Fraser Institute and the co-author of the Fraser Institute’s key coal phase-out report. “In Ontario, they could have just added gas capacity since there is surplus baseload through hydro and nukes, and the costs would have been manageable. But they went the renewables route instead, and gave revenue guarantees which resulted in soaring power prices and the current crisis.

Catie Layes is a married mother of three who grew up in the golden years of Grande Cache. “My dad worked in the mine, got laid off and there were lots of ups and downs,” she points out. “My husband works in oil and gas so the coal situation didn’t affect our family, directly.

“Any time a cheap and reliable source is replaced with a costly and unreliable one, it has to be expected that the costs will go up,” he cautions. “These changes have a history of turning out worse than forecast.”

“But I can’t deny that, for a while, it was depressing, nerve-racking and hopeless in our community. But we’re optimistic that, despite the phase out, the mine will eventually be sold and improve the mood and morale of the town.”

Campbell warns about the social impact. “Ultimately, we lose jobs and we lose talent when we wholesale cut out an industry like the current government is doing with coal. Mining is the third-largest employment sector in the province. That talent will go away and move to other provinces.”

ABOVE: YVONNE REMPEL, GRANDE CACHE TOWN COUNCILLOR.

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LUXURY RETAIL IN CALGARY // CITY MALLS

LUXURY RETAIL IN CALGARY THRIVING THROUGH THE DOWNTURN

BY KIM LOCKE

I

n the best of times and the worst of times, it seems there will always be a demand for luxury. There has always been a segment of society that has the disposable income to spend on quality items, and retailers have learned to capitalize on this desire for status as more and more people aim to be like the one per cent. Throughout the worst of the recession, and despite that our economy is still depressed, the Calgary luxury retail market is thriving. The $280-million expansion of Chinook Centre in 2010 attracted the first wave of global luxury brands to the mall, and there are now well over a dozen true luxury stores at Chinook alone, anchored by Nordstrom, which arrived on the scene in 2014. Some might question whether there is room for so many luxury retailers in Calgary, particularly right now. Hudson’s

Bay Company sure thinks so. HBC acquired Saks Incorporated in 2013 and entered the Calgary market last fall, with a Saks OFF 5TH location at CrossIron Mills. Next, in the midst of the worst of the downturn, it announced Calgary would be the second Canadian city to have a Saks Fifth Avenue, betting on long-term prosperity for the city. In the spring of 2018, the full-price luxury store will open at Chinook Centre in the space previously occupied by Target, and a second Saks OFF 5TH location will open at Market Mall. Analyst Bruce Winder is a principal of Retail Advisors Network. Commenting on the expansion of Saks into Calgary, he indicates the Canadian market is somewhat underserved in terms of luxury retailers. Although Calgary is in a downturn, there is still a great deal of wealth here, and he suggests that even in this current market there is probably enough room for several retailers to go after the luxury segment. ABOVE: NORDSTROM RACK OPENS IN DEERFOOT MEADOWS IN EARLY 2018. PHOTO SOURCE: NORDSTROM, INC.

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LUXURY RETAIL IN CALGARY // CITY MALLS

Luxury retailers are of course always seeking to expand their brands far beyond the actual one per cent. As Winder points out, “Luxury is cool. It’s made its way down into the upper middle class as well.” In March, Simons opened a five-level store in the Core downtown. Over the past five years, the family-owned Quebec retailer has been aggressively expanding across Canada, following the trend to provide upscale brands and accessible luxury to more and more Canadians. Unlike other luxury retailers, however, Simons caters to a wider variety of consumers at the same location, offering an assortment of price points under the same roof. Nordstrom and Saks Fifth Avenue have a different strategy to cater to the consumer that wants the name but not the price. Nordstrom Rack, HauteLook and Saks OFF 5TH are separate entities that offer premium brands at lower price points. Aspirational shoppers flock to off-price stores in droves and this segment is an important component of a long-term strategy to attract a broader demographic. Mike Koppel, EVP and CFO of Nordstrom, Inc., indicates Rack customers tend to be younger than full-line customers. Last year alone, he says, Nordstrom acquired six million new customers through Rack, nordstromrack.com and HauteLook, and these customers end up migrating to the regular price business. Winder explains the retail industry is a reflection of society as a whole. “There has been a polarization of wealth, and retail is going that way, too.” It is evident that consumers just can’t seem to get enough these days of luxury and the appearance thereof. From social media feeds profiling the jet-setting lifestyles of trust fund-reliant teens and young adults, to celebrities touting their favourite luxe brands, consumers receive continual messaging encouraging them to subscribe to the one-percenter lifestyle.

Online, too, is a key growth engine. At Nordstrom, last year’s online sales of $2.5 billion represented a whopping 25 per cent of full-price sales. As for Saks, the Canadian market is one of its leading ship-to markets and it is banking on replicating this success through its brick-and-mortar stores, which it sees as creating an “all-channel experience.” Holt Renfrew does a strong online business too, but with respect to off price, the brand has shifted its strategy. It had

ABOVE: NORDSTROM RACK CARRIES LUXURY BRANDS AT MORE AFFORDABLE PRICES. PHOTO SOURCE: NORDSTROM, INC.

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LUXURY RETAIL IN CALGARY // CITY MALLS

been working toward expanding its off-price hr2 brand across Canada, but recently announced it will instead be phasing out this segment. How this will affect the brand in Calgary remains to be seen. In addition to being the only Calgary luxury department store that lacks a lower-priced option to introduce new consumers to the brand, it may face additional challenges given its downtown location. The ongoing exodus of lunchtime shoppers with plenty of income at their disposal may threaten its future viability here, especially as more and more luxury retailers come to the city. The trend in Calgary is that luxury retail is moving out of downtown to areas that are more easily accessible to consumers with more convenient parking. Like Saks, Nordstrom too, has identified mall space out of the core to launch its off-price model, and will be opening a 26,000-square-foot Nordstrom Rack in Deerfoot Meadows next spring. Chinook Centre has of course positioned itself as the hub for luxury in Calgary and is targeted for yet another expansion. Last month, the Calgary Planning Commission considered a land use amendment application for the southeast parking lots bordering Macleod Trail. A successful application would allow for the expansion of the mall area as well as multipurpose towers over 30 storeys high. It’s part of the new

Chinook Station Area Redevelopment Plan for the area around the mall and east through to the bordering industrial area. City planner Breanne Harder indicates the recommendation to the commission was for approval, and suggests such a plan is long overdue. “Since 2008 there has not been a lot of development,” she says. “The idea is to revisit the vision for the area and make it easier for landowners to invest in the area.” It’s clear the city supports revitalizing the area, making it a transit hub, and cementing it as a premium shopping destination. When Saks Fifth Avenue opens next spring, it and Nordstrom will together contain almost 25 per cent more floor space than the Bay; this is the first time a Calgary mall will be anchored by predominantly luxury retail. So what’s next for the future of luxury retail in Calgary? Chinook remained one of the top 10 most productive malls in Canada in 2016. Its luxury anchor, Nordstrom, has indicated its Canadian strategy has been successful and that Canadian full-line store sales (buoyed by Trunk Club and Jeffrey) grew 40 per cent from the 2015-16 fiscal. Clearly, luxury is here to stay in the city. From wealth earned during the boom to maxing out personal credit cards, consumers keep spending on premium items, and there are still plenty of people who aspire to that one per cent.

ABOVE: NORDSTROM RACK AIMS TO INTRODUCE A WIDER DEMOGRAPHIC OF CONSUMERS TO THE NORDSTROM BRAND. PHOTO SOURCE: NORDSTROM, INC.

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Leading Business AUGUST 2017

IN THIS ISSUE... • Policy Bites - NAFTA Renegotiations Just Around the Corner - What does it mean for your business? • Upcoming Events • Member Profiles

Join the Chamber at Canada’s largest small business celebration. The Small Business Calgary Conference October 19, 2017 - BMO Centre CalgaryChamber.com

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2017 Board of

Directors

Policy Bites NAFTA Renegotiations Just Around the Corner What does it mean for your business?

Executive Chair: David Allen, Founder & President, Situated Co. Vice Chair: Phil Roberts, President, Vintri Technologies Inc Past Chair: Denis Painchaud, International Government Relations Treasurer: Wellington Holbrook, Chief Transformation Officer, ATB Financial CEO: Adam Legge, President and CEO, Calgary Chamber

S

ince Confederation in 1867, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) may be the most important document Canadian policy-makers have ever signed. Since it came into effect in 1994, the North American economy has more than doubled, cross-border investments have skyrocketed, and trade between the three countries has nearly quadrupled.

Directors Linda Shea, Senior Vice-President, AltaLink Bill Brunton, Vice President, Habitat for Humanity, Southern Alberta Mike Williams, Executive Vice-President, Encana James Boettcher, Chief Idea Officer, Fiasco Gelato Brent Cooper, Partner, McLeod Law LLP Desirée Bombenon, President & CEO, SureCall Contact Centres Ltd Mandeep Singh, Audit Partner, Deloitte Jason Hatcher, Managing Principal, Navigator Greg Garcia, President and CEO, Calgary Elite Roofing Brian Bietz, President, Beitz Resources Management Adam Legge – President and CEO Michael Andriescu – Director of Finance and Administration Kim Koss – Vice President, Business Development and Sponsorship Scott Crockatt – Director of Marketing and Communications Rebecca Wood – Director of Member Services Zoe Addington – Director of Policy, Research and Government Relations Leading Business magazine is a co-publication of the Calgary Chamber and Business in Calgary Calgary Chamber 600, 237 8th Avenue S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 5C3 Phone: (403) 750-0400 Fax: (403) 266-3413 calgarychamber.com

Businesses in Alberta have especially benefited from the agreement. Alberta has become the second most dependent province on the agreement, sending over 90 per cent of our goods exports to either the United States or Mexico. But NAFTA has been much more than just an engine for economic growth. It has become the model for liberalized trade and peaceful cooperation for the rest of the world. All this could change come August 16, 2017 when the United States has declared the NAFTA negotiation period can officially begin. At this time, nobody is certain what a renegotiated NAFTA may mean for Canadians. In fact, no one is certain of what issues will even be brought to the negotiating table. Given the uncertainty around our most important trade agreement, many businesses are justifiably concerned. While there is good reason for concern, a modernized and more liberalized NAFTA can provide benefits to our provincial economy. Let’s look at some potential issues and where some improvements can be made. Issues to watch for While a softwood lumber agreement may be kept separate from NAFTA negotiations, how the U.S. has handled Canadian softwood lumber could foreshadow a new protectionist measure that may be introduced into the agreement. The inclusion of “tariff snapback” provisions would allow a country to impose duties on imports that can be proven to seriously hurt their domestic businesses. Negotiations will likely include country-of-origin rules. Specifically, how much North American, or strictly American, content is required to avoid tariffs on manufacturing goods. “Buy American” provisions may also limit Canadian businesses’ access to U.S. public projects. Rules around e-commerce may also be amended that could have a large impact on Canadian retailers. Canada currently has one of the most punitive duty systems in the world, taxing online purchases over $20. Compare this low limit with America’s $800 tax-free limit, and it’s easy to see why the U.S. may push to increase the value of tax-free foreign goods that Canadians can buy online. Is a renegotiated NAFTA all bad? Liberalizing trade in the mid-’90s greatly benefited all three countries, but nearly half of the 2,000-plus pages (roughly 900 pages) in NAFTA are geared towards restricting trade. While there are certainly additions to NAFTA that may harm Canadian businesses, an updated, modernized and liberalized NAFTA may not be all bad. The agreement is far from perfect and there are some outcomes that could benefit all participants.

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Given that the agreement is more than two decades old, many aspects of commerce and international trade have changed since the mid-’90s and a modernization of the agreement may be warranted. Many Canadian businesses may significantly benefit if changes are made to the current visa section that increase the ease of attaining visas. Currently, the number of jobs that are eligible for easy access to visas do not come close to covering the entire modern economy. Rather, the list of jobs eligible for easy access to visas reflects the types of jobs common in the early ’90s. Businesses have complained about the onerous paperwork associated with transferring workers between branches located across national borders. Perhaps one of Canada’s most controversial policies – dairy protections – may also be on the chopping block. Canada currently slaps up to a 270 per cent tax on some foreign dairy products that enter Canada over our low-quota allowance. Reducing these protections would not only benefit our trading partners, but many Albertans would benefit from lower prices, cheaper input costs and perhaps greater access to foreign markets. Conclusion NAFTA negotiations can begin as early as August 16. This 2,000-plus page document has undoubtedly contributed to Canada’s prosperity over the last two decades. As such, there is good reason for Canadians to be concerned. However, an updated NAFTA that covers the entire modern economy and opens borders could significantly benefit business in Alberta. Much of the concern has stemmed from the protectionist rhetoric from the U.S. presidential campaign. While it is true Mr. Trump has openly touted the benefits of certain protectionist policies – that would no doubt harm Canadians – his number one priority is increasing American jobs and competitiveness. No other agreement has done this better than NAFTA. In fact, roughly 14 million American jobs are dependent on trade with Canada and Mexico. This is a message our policy leaders and negotiators must continue to echo. Trade is not a zero-sum game. Let’s not go into negotiations looking to leave as “winners.” Instead, by identifying and addressing current restrictions on trade and labour mobility, we can all be better off. BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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Upcoming Events Con’t For details and to purchase tickets for any of the Calgary Chamber’s events, please visit CalgaryChamber.com.

2017 2017 Small Business Calgary Conference October 19, 2017 12:30 am – 9:30 pm BMO Centre

Amazing things happen when entrepreneurs get together! Every year in the third week of October, each community across the country celebrates Small Business Week to recognize the many contributions that small businesses make to our local economies. Last year, the Calgary Chamber hosted the largest and most impactful celebration in the country, and this year we are set to do it again! The highlight of Small Business Week Calgary is the Small Business Calgary Conference. This full-day conference kicks off with the Small Business Calgary Showcase. The showcase is a trade show-style business display, and this year will include exciting new features like a pop-up clothing store, an innovation hub featuring the latest technologies, and a health and fitness display area with live fitness demonstrations from some of our city’s newest and most exciting fitness brands. The conference also includes professional development opportunities with a variety of small business-focused learning workshops. From digital marketing to small business banking strategies that help you grow faster, the afternoon workshop series includes a variety of topics all meant to help make your business the very best it can be. The evening portion of the event is the Small Business Week Calgary Awards dinner where the city’s greatest small businesses get to shine and be recognized. The Small Business Calgary Conference is an event you will want your entire team to attend. Come celebrate our city’s greatest small businesses with over 1,000 other business leaders! To register, visit smallbusinessweekcalgary.com.

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AMVIC Licensed


Chamber Member Spotlights The Calgary Chamber is proud to represent many Calgary businesses large and small; this month we are highlighting some of our industry leading members.

ConocoPhillips Canada

ConocoPhillips Canada is the Canadian division of ConocoPhillips, one of the world’s largest independent exploration and production companies based on production and proved reserves. Throughout its 110 years of history in Canada, ConocoPhillips has remained committed to innovation and responsible energy development. Headquartered in Calgary, the company is focused on developing its world-class portfolio including the Surmont oilsands project in the Athabasca region of northeastern Alberta, and exciting opportunities in the liquids-rich BlueberryMontney in northeast British Columbia. For more information, visit Conocophillips.ca.

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC)

CIBC is a leading Canadian-based global financial institution with 11 million personal banking, business, public sector and institutional clients. Across personal, small business banking, commercial banking and wealth management, and capital markets businesses, CIBC offers a full range of advice, solutions and services through its leading digital banking network, and locations across Canada, the United States and around the world. For more information, visit CIBC.ca.

Thanks The Chamber thanks the following long-standing member companies celebrating anniversaries this month for their years of support to the Calgary Chamber, and their commitment to the growth and development of Calgary.

Member name

Years as a member

RBC

75

Axia FibreNet

15

Stirling Benefit Plans

15

LivingWorks Education

15

Marlborough Financial Corporation Ltd.

15

Harvest Ventures Inc.

10

Lemmex Williams Training Inc.

5

Lake Bonavista Dental Associates Ltd.

5

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AUGUST 2017 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Mount Royal University

Mount Royal University has carved out a distinct niche by offering smaller class sizes, a robust liberal education and unique undergraduate programs. Founded in 1910 and located in Calgary, Mount Royal grew into a vibrant college in the 1930s, and became a mid-sized university with a greater focus on bachelor degrees in 2009. Today, nearly 12,000 credit students choose from 12 bachelor degrees and 32 majors, as well as certificate and diploma programs. By 2025, Mount Royal University’s goal is to become a “first-choice” institution, with more than 16,000 credit students (13,000 full-course load students) choosing from 15 degrees and 60 majors. For more information, visit Mtroyal.ca.


Burns & McDonnell

Burns & McDonnell is a full-service engineering, architecture, construction, environmental and consulting solutions firm, with offices worldwide, including Calgary and Toronto. A staff of 5,700 includes engineers, architects, construction professionals, planners, estimators, economists, technicians and scientists, representing virtually all design disciplines. They plan, design, permit, construct and manage facilities all over the world in multiple industries, including power, oil and gas, and environmental. Burns & McDonnell has one mission in mind – to make clients successful. For more information, visit Burnsmcd.com.

Bennett Jones LLP

Bennett Jones is one of Canada’s premier business law firms and home to over 380 lawyers and business advisers in nine offices – Calgary, Toronto, Edmonton, Ottawa, Vancouver, Doha, Washington D.C., Bermuda, and a representative office in Beijing. With exceptional experience in complex cross-border and international transactions, Bennett Jones is well equipped to advise foreign businesses and investors with Canadian ventures, and connect Canadian businesses and investors with opportunities around the world. For more information, visit Bennettjones.com.

Axia FibreNet

This month, Axia SuperNet celebrates 15 years as a Calgary Chamber member. For over a decade, Axia FibreNet has focused their business on areas where access to high-bandwidth fibre infrastructure did not exist. Their success has been in their ability to develop networks using the most technologically advanced, expertly engineered fibre technology to provide customers with superior performance and control. They have focused primarily on rural communities to bridge the digital divide by building the most reliable digital infrastructure – resulting in clear economic, communication and educational benefits in these communities. Axia FibreNet has done this for customers in Alberta, Massachusetts, and as far away as France. For more information, visit axia.com

Helping to make Calgary businesses more successful.

Margot Micallef, President and founder of Oliver Capital Partners and Calgary Chamber member.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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Let’s Ask an EOer

CRE: Calgary’s Barometer of Business

S

peculation. Positivity. Negativity. Guesswork. It’s all part of forecasting Calgary’s business climate. But with so many factors and variables, such strategizing is like the weather – it is constantly changing.

an EO Calgary member. “Clients often comment about how many ‘for lease’ signs they see. But after a focused search, they are often astonished at how few spaces actually fit their criteria.

Although many business strategists have their own measures and formulas, the trend of commercial real estate (CRE), particularly downtown stats, has always been accepted as a telltale barometer of Calgary’s economy.

“In boom times, this is even more amplified. In years like 2008, the market couldn’t build enough space to keep up to demand. The end result is that leasing rates and sale values rise. In 201314, the market was heating up to that same point before the oil price started its downward slide in the last quarter of 2014.”

“An increase in downtown commercial office leasing usually signifies increasing levels of business confidence, that people are hiring again and moving forward with investment decisions,” explains Warren Phipps, real estate broker, co-founder of Mountain Park Real Estate and an EO Calgary member.

“The Calgary CRE market has always largely been tied to the highs and lows of the oil and gas industry,” Phipps notes. “High oil prices drive business growth, which results in increased hiring levels and places increased demand for office space to accommodate the increased headcount.

Despite the popular myth the downtown is all about giant corporations, small businesses significantly impact commercial real estate.

“When oil prices drop, especially so severely, the reverse happens. It’s a function of supply and demand, intertwined with a critical global economic event.”

“When small business does well it can be seen as a direct reflection on the health of the economy,” says Jodena Rogers, vice president of corporate services at Emerald Management & Realty, and an EO Calgary member. “Businesses occupy space, make upgrades and lease improvements. They pay high rents. The true impact of small businesses shows when small businesses start to struggle. Commercial investors see receivables increase, vacancy is created, businesses fail and in some cases close, and tenants scramble to renegotiate the terms of their leases.”

As Rogers underscores from experience, when the going gets tough, the tough get going. “During ups and downs, commercial landlords must be responsive to market conditions, remain competitive with lease rates and improvements, and stay on top with marketing strategies.”

As most Calgary business leaders agree, it’s ultimately a ripple effect. “Commercial real estate is definitely affected by the ups and downs of the Calgary and Alberta economy,” says Bob Sheddy, broker of record, owner of Century 21 PowerRealty and

Positivity laced with realism tracks the last half of 2017 and readies for 2018. “Many businesses suggest it’s ‘the new normal,’” Sheddy says. “Accountants, doctors, service trades and other businesses are seeing growth.” “In 2018, diversification is the key for Calgary business. And we look forward to the opportunities that come with a diversified Calgary,” adds Rogers.

Contributing Members:

Upcoming Events: August • No events

Warren Phipps

Jodena Rogers

Bob Sheddy

Calgary real estate broker, co-founder of Mountain Park Real Estate and an EO Calgary member.

vice president of corporate services at Emerald Management & Realty, and an EO Calgary member.

broker of record, owner of Century 21 PowerRealty and an EO Calgary member.

The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

|

For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


Varsity Landing

Varsity Gym

Toscana Day Pool - Arizona

Metropolitan Suite

Statesman Group in a Class all its Own by Rennay Craats

Statesman Group || 40 Years || 1 93


I

n a city teeming with developers and homebuilders, it takes something special to set a company apart. Garth Mann’s out-of-the-box thinking, incredible work ethic and go-get’em attitude does just that for Statesman Group of Companies. When Mann was studying at the University of Toronto and the University of Waterloo to become an optometrist, he subsidized his education with a summer job doing construction. He enjoyed it so much that even after graduating and establishing two practices, he continued developing projects as an entrepreneur. “I had energy to burn and speculating in the development and restaurant business in my spare time gave me a real sense of accomplishment,” says Dr. Garth Mann, CEO and president of the Statesman Group of Companies. Statesman was incorporated in 1976 and over the years it grew – so much so that Mann knew he had a decision to make.

Photo by Tammy Hanratty Photography Inc

Jenna Gorgas, Kevin Ingalls, Rob Mah, Tracy Slobodian, Mike Sali, Heather Smith, Brad Lohman, Nicole Dyer, Phil Farion, Garth Mann and Jeff Mann.

In his early 40s he found his future vision had more to do with development of properties than it did improving the vision of his many patients. Mann told his wife he was going to retire from optometry at 42 years old and put all of his focus into property development and building. The rest, as they say, is history. This career change has proven to be a profound one, both for Mann and the communities he serves. Over the past 41 years his companies have left their mark in Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Washington state and Arizona. In the early years, Statesman focused on single-family homes across Calgary and in 1984 it became the first developer in Western Canada to build a maintenancefree villa lifestyle community. The warm reception this style of project received prompted Mann to expand the model to such areas as Priddis Green, Pump Hill Landing, Confederation Park, Glenmore Landing, Highwood in High River, Silver Springs and many communities in between.

Almor Testing Ltd. Almor TestingServices Services Ltd.

Almor Testing Services Ltd. 7505 40St StSE SE 7505 –– 40 7505 –T2C 402H5 St SE Calgary, AB 2H5 Calgary, AB T2C Calgary, AB T2C 2H5 403.236.8880 P.P.403.236.8880 P. 403.236.8880 general@almor.com E.E. general@almor.com E. general@almor.com

Proud to be in association with Statesman Group

ProudProud to beto inbe association withwith Statesman Group in association Statesman Group Congratulations on 40 years of continued success! Congratulations onyears 40 years of continued success! Congratulations on 40 of continued success!  Field & Lab Testing (CSA Certified Lab)  Mix & Structural Pavement Designs  Subsoil, Ground Water & Failure Investigations  Moisture

Field & Lab Testing (CSA Certified Lab)  Mix & Structural Pavement  Field &Lab Testing (CSA Certified Lab)  Mix &Monitoring Structural Pavement Density Soils Profiles  Earth Construction & Control Designs  Subsoil, Ground Water & Failure Investigations  Moisture Designs  Subsoil, Ground Water & Failure Investigations  &Moisture  Soils  Concrete Asphalt Grouts  Liquid Asphalt  Emulsions  Mortar Density Soils Profiles  Earth Construction Monitoring Control Density Soils Profiles  Earth Construction Monitoring & Control  Serving Soils  Concrete  Asphalt  Grouts  Liquid Asphalt  Emulsions  Mortar Construction Industry for Over 40 Years  Soils  Concrete the Asphalt  Grouts  Liquid Asphalt  Emulsions Mortar Serving the Construction Industry for Over 40 Years

Serving the Construction Industry for Over 40 Years

2 || Statesman Group || 40 Years


Rhino Finishing Materials is proud of our partnership with Statesman Corporation! Congratulations from our team to yours!

It’s in our name, “Finishing Materials” and it’s what we know. With well over 50 years combined experience in doors and interior products, Rhino Finishing Materials Inc. is your destination for the best knowledge and service, when it comes to your interior finishing needs. We offer complete on site walk throughs, prior to ordering. We check the finest details, from custom wall thicknesses, to shortened rough openings. We catch it all. We pride ourselves in offering the best turn around, at the best price.

Rhinofinishing.ca | 403.452.9636 | Bay #18 2305 52nd Ave SE | sales@rhinofinishing.ca


Continued success and best wishes to all the Staff & Management Team at Statesman Group.

Municipal Engineering | Project Management | Infrastructure Design Storm Water Management | Erosion and Sediment Control p: 403.276.1001 |F: 403.276.1012 | jubileeengineering.com 4 || Statesman Group || 40 Years

Mann recognized that following the demographics and psychographics of the baby boomer generation provided a growth opportunity. Statesman became one of the first companies to focus on the varying needs of an aging population without sacrificing style and amazing amenities. Since the 1990s, the group has extensively developed senior housing, offering everything within the Manor Villages from complexes for mature adults to supportive-care facilities. “We ended up with a company with experience as a general contractor that knows how to develop and build and accomplish multi-level buildings. However, we also had this background in the health-care profession, which proved to be a huge advantage,� says Mann.


CONGRATULATIONS STATESMAN ON THIS ANNIVERSARY AND CONTINUED SUCCESS!

WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE BEEN PART OF YOUR SUCCESS ALONG THE WAY!

Photo by Tammy Hanratty Photography Inc

CHANGING THE SYSTEM Mann’s experience in health care was influential to the trajectory of the company. He studied the Canada Health Act with all of its various political nuances instituted by the provinces over the years and pinpointed a serious issue. As the population ages, it draws from the provincial health-care budget to a point where Canadians spend about 80 per cent of an actuarial assessment in the last 10 years of life. Now that the boomers are hitting their 70s, governments are facing huge budget deficits that require intelligent planning in order to protect the Canada Health Act. Across Canada about 28 per cent of people have chronic conditions, and that number jumps to almost 60 per cent for Canadians over 65 years of age. These conditions, such as cardiorespiratory diseases, Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain autoimmune disorders, obesity, anxiety, depression and even some cancers, are preventable.

At Canwest Flooring you get big company buying power and installation capacity with small company installation care and delivery. Our clients value our effective management across Western Canada through local execution, single point of contact and consistent service.

· Hospitality · Development & Construction · Property Management · Multifamily · Retirement Living

Unit 1, 2419 52nd Ave SE p | 403.253.4441 Calgary |Canmore |Edmonton Regina |Winnipeg |Vancouver www.canwestflooring.com

Statesman Group || 40 Years || 5


It has been a huge undertaking, but the Statesman team set out to try to change the system to provide better health care of the population including seniors, while lessening the burden on the government. Mann started a new company called Advanced Medical Group by Statesman, by developing a state-of-art 160,000-square-foot facility in London, Ontario. Seniors in residences are supported on the upper two floors and medical practitioners and specialists including pharmacy, laboratory, pain therapy, vision care, dental care and even surgical suites are on the main and second floors. It is a progressive community complex for patient-centred care.

Advanced Medical Group

“Our vision and mission statement for Advanced Medical Group is to balance traditional medicine with lifestyle medicine to implement changes in patients’ lifestyles and to add life to years, perhaps even without medications. Lifestyle medicine is far less expensive to solve health issues than many traditional pharmaceutical resolves for preventable chronic diseases.” Mann hopes to expand the model across the country to help the impending health-care crisis. “We think we’re going to prove that we can save the government millions and

6 || Statesman Group || 40 Years

Advanced Medical Group - Spa


possibly billions of dollars every year through innovative lifestyle treatment programs. The most important factor is Mi-VitalsTM which is our proprietary portal app monitoring patients for life.”

recreation centre – has proven to be an asset to the community,” says McArthur. “Many of our customers have been chasing their dream for a long time. Now they want to step back and enjoy a good quality of life.”

STANDING OUT IN A CROWD From the very beginning, Statesman has offered a unique way of doing business. It has always been about offering the lifestyle customers want and need. All Statesman sales professionals ask the most important question, “How Do You Want to Live?”

And that quality life can be lived in a variety of different styles of home. Do you want a weekend getaway? Statesman has it.

Statesman strives to check all the boxes that meet the needs of the occupant, whether that is hiking trails or yoga classes or an on-site café. Each location is designed differently and the programs offered reflect the needs of the population living there. The company’s slogan, “What a Beautiful Way to Live,” goes beyond just building a home; the Statesman team literally looks at how people live their lives, not just how they live inside their dwellings.

Prefer a single-family cottage, or a villa, a vista town home or a terrace-style condo overlooking the Bow Valley escarpment? Statesman has “the views” to fit every lifestyle and budget.

“Everything is about improving the overall quality of people’s lives. It’s one of the things that dramatically separates us from other developers,” says Jamie McArthur, sales professional for Statesman. “The opportunity to live the kind of quality life that our customers want to live – such as with a sports and wellness

Looking for an investment property? Statesman makes it easy to own a suite and rent it out to get a great return on your investment.

WHAT’S NEW AND EXCITING Statesman Group has developed communities for all needs and demographics. At 432 one- and two-bedroom suites, the Metropolitan is one of the largest purpose-built apartment complexes in Canada. Located on 11 Avenue and 12 Street SW, these luxury apartments appeal to recently singles and millennials. With a billiards room, two outdoor courtyards, on-site pub, exercise centre offering Pilates and yoga classes, and a great pet area, residents hardly have to leave their building. It has proven so popular that Statesman is extending the Met brand into the U.S. market.

CALL:

Freeze Maxwell Roofing

Commercial & Residential

Freeze Max well Roofing is proud to congratulate The Statesman Group on their 40th Anniversar y and look for ward to a continued successful partnership! 4635 - 1 Street SE, Calgar y, Alber ta T2G 2L2 ph: 403.253.0101 • fax: 403.258.2812 www.freezemaxwellroofing.ca

Proud to congratulate Statesman Group on their 40th anniversary. Here’s to many more years of partnership and success! Installation | Design | Service Project management | Inspection

columbiafire.ca | 403-202-5822 or 403-938-4220 info@columbiafire.ca

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE ENTIRE TEAM AT STATESMAN GROUP ON 40 TERRIFIC YEARS IN BUSINESS. WE ARE PROUD TO BE PART OF YOUR SUCCESS!

PRODUCTS Carpet Hardwood Laminate Ceramic & Stone LVP and WPC

SERVICES Interior Design Assistance Schedule/Project Management Installation Estimates Floor Leveling

104-10720 25 TH STREET NE | 403.250.6675 Statesman Group || 40 Years || 7


The Statesman Group is involved in the health and wellness tourism and sports tourism movements as well, offering three incredible resort locations for customers and guests to visit for a vacation and their kid’s hockey or indoor soccer match. These properties are fantastic second homes or a grand place to recuperate and rehabilitate after a health issue. These recreational centres will have the infrastructure in place to help people recover from a health issue and work closely with local hospitals for proper support.

Pine Ridge

Statesman is planning new recreation centres in Pine Ridge Mountain overlooking Lake Windermere, British Columbia, with 700 residential units; Toscana Resort on two golf courses in Scottsdale, Arizona, will have 1,600 residential suites; and Pleasant Harbor Marina overlooking Puget Sound in Washington state provides views for over 800 sea-view villas and terraces. Statesman is breaking ground next year on its Currie Green Park Village, which will be a lifestyle community for seniors to enjoy life with dignity. Statesman will bring customers the best quality marketplace cuisine after redeveloping the 1936 historic Mess Hall. It’s clear the developer is certainly unlike any other.

Pine Ridge Suite

CONGRATULATIONS STATESMAN GROUP ON YOUR CONTINUED SUCCESS! BFL CANADA Insurance Services Inc. is proud to be your insurance partner. We look forward to supporting your future endeavours. • Commercial Insurance • Surety • Risk Management • Employee Benefits Consulting

1.888.451.4132 Ann Donald adonald@bflcanada.ca 403.451.4134

8 || Statesman Group || 40 Years

bflcanada.ca Greg Cortese gcortese@bflcanada.ca 403.398.2420


GYPSUM DRYWALL (SOUTHERN) LTD.

CONGRATULATIONS STATESMAN GROUP on your 40 years of great success, continual growth and forward thinking leadership! Gypsum Drywall (Southern) Ltd. is proud to have been part of your journey for many years. We are honored to work with you on past, present and future projects and wish you continued success in your future endeavors!

Box 177, De Winton, Alberta T0L 0X0 P | 403.995.2526 • F | 403.995.2528 gypsum@platinum.ca CALGARY • EDMONTON • FT. MCMURRAY • REGINA • KELOWNA


Photo by Tammy Hanratty Photography Inc

Dr. Garth Mann and Jeff Mann

GIVING BACK TO CALGARIANS One of Statesman’s most unique projects is its new 262-suite Fish Creek Park Manor Village that offers elegant residential options for seniors. Independent living and assisted living seniors can enjoy the amenities and services available to preserve their independence. Fish Creek Park Manor Village provides large suites with healthy diets and exercise classes including mindfulness and meditation classes to enhance memory with aging. “We want to give back to Calgarians by developing this community as an educational centre for mitigating memory loss with aging,” says the Manor’s director, Brad Lohman. Weatherguard Metals Ltd. would like to thank Statesman Group for their partnership and Congratulations on your success! Metal Cladding Metal Roofing Roof and Custom Flashings Aluminum Composite Panels Foam Insulated Panels

“Our Studies of Aging curriculum will address the needs for educating care providers in subjects of anatomy and physiology for properly understanding the aging process.” Seniors from southern Alberta will find comfort in the skills brought forward with the opening of the Manor Village at Fish Creek Park in early 2018. Calgary’s media is also waiting for this opening event where experts from around the globe will have electronic access to collaborate on current research data. “Our support team is convinced that vascular dementia is mitigated when treated early,” Lohman says.

CONGRATULATIONS STATESMAN GROUP ON YOUR 40TH ANNIVERSARY! Wishing you continued success from all your friends at Zone 3 Business Solutions. · Photocopiers & MFP’s · Mailing Systems · IT Solutions · Support & Supplies

p: 403-203-9304 | f: 403-203-1075 #102-4215 72nd Avenue SE weatherguardmetals.ca 10 || Statesman Group || 40 Years

Custom Commercial Metal Siding and Roofing

403.454.0119 | www.zone-3.ca


SUPPORTING THE FUTURE The Manor Village Group has done astonishing things over the past years but it is not finished yet. All of the Mann family is involved in Canada and the United States, dedicated to showing that keeping seniors isolated at home ends up costing the government more money for longterm care than it would to support programs for improving wellness and stimulating activities without loneliness, as is often seen with many seniors living alone for too long.

maintain the U.S.-based operations. While Garth Mann is not in any hurry to hand over the reins, he is confident that they will be in good hands with the next generation. “I still really enjoy the visionary aspect in terms of developing new opportunities. Eventually I will pack it in but right now, I still offer something that benefits the company,” says Dr. Mann. 7370 Sierra Morena Blvd SW Calgary, AB T3H 4H9 Phone: (403) 256-4151 statesmancorporation.com

Dr. Mann’s son Jeff Mann maintains the business in Calgary and the Mann daughters Allison, Alana and Alissa,

Congratulating Statesman Group on 40 years in the industry!

Hoover Mechanical would like to thank Statesman Group

From all of us at

for their partnership and Congratulations

Maidment Land Surveys Ltd.

Land Surveyors/Land Development Consultants

on their success

www.maidment.ca

1-3640 61st Ave SE, Calgary AB 403.217.5655 hoovermechanical.com

403.286.0501

We at take pride in our partnership with Statesman Group and wish them the very best on their 40th Anniversary and for many years to come!

Whether your business requires complete IT infrastructure management or customized solutions designed, delivered or managed in partnership with your in-house staff and existing suppliers, Glenbriar ensures consistent high-quality service that puts your needs first. Your success is our reward.

IT SERVICES • UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS • MANAGED SERVICES • CLOUD SERVICES

Proudly supporting Statesman Group with technology solutions. Congratulations on your 40th Anniversary and we wish you many more years of success! Jade Stone is Canada’s largest fabricator and supplier of natural stone countertops. We deliver the best natural stone countertops and our selection of granite, quartz and marble is unparalleled. Our state-of-the-art production facility and showroom allows us to provide the best countertop experience. Visit our Calgary showroom:

technologies inc.

6429 79th Ave SE | 403.287.0398 info@jadestone.ca | www.jadestone.ca

1100, 736-8 Ave SW | 877-233-7309 | www.glenbriar.com Statesman Group || 40 Years || 11


Congratulations to Statesman Group for 40 successful years in business. We look forward to supporting you in the years to come.

FENCING | DECKING GARAGES | FRAMING FINISHING

Congratulations to the Statesman Group on 40 successful years. We are proud to be a part of your journey.

4544-8A Street SE | 403-277-2080 | sales@lumberking.ca www.lumber king.ca

Congratulations to Statesman Group on their 40th Anniversary! EQUIPMENT RENTALS EQUIPMENT SALES REFUELING SERVICES FUEL CLEANING SERVICES Unit 105, 616 71st Ave SE Calgary, AB T2H 2R1 403.803.6254 | www.newwestequipment.com Otis is the world’s leading manufacturer and maintainer of people-moving products, including elevators, escalators and moving walkways – a reliable name for more than 160 years. Proudly supporting Statesman Group Congratulations on your 40 years of success!

HILCO Projects Inc. Providing Innovative and Cost Effective Site Servicing Solutions to the Statesman Group. Hilmer Collado, P.Eng. 403.606.0218 | hilcoprojects@gmail.com

CONGRATULATIONS TO STATESMAN GROUP ON 40 SUCCESSFUL YEARS FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT SIGNATURE LIGHTING & FANS

WWW.OTIS.COM 3500 Blackfoot Trail SE www.signaturelighting.com (403) 243-4294

MCW CONGRATULATES STATESMAN ON 40 YEARS OF SUCCESS! OUR SERVICES • Mechanical and Electrical Engineering • Energy Management • Commissioning

WWW.MCW.COM

12 || Statesman Group || 40 Years

Congratulations Statesman Group on your 40th anniversary!

• Subdivisions – Municipal and Rural • Highway Construction • Industrial and Commerical Sites • Golf Course Paths and Parks Paths • Design-Build Paving Projects


A STRONGER LOCAL FOCUS The Calgary TELUS Convention Centre (CTCC) has long been a hub for visitors to the city attending meetings and conventions. Over the coming year, the CTCC will evolve to become more than a destination for regional, national and international meetings and trade shows. It will welcome more people for a wider spectrum of local community events and exhibits. “Our goal is to see the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre be a bigger, more vibrant part of the community and the downtown core,” says Heather Lundy, CTCC executive director Rejuvenation. “We’re working with several groups to broaden our community support and connections.” Those groups include the Calgary Arts Development Authority, Calgary Downtown Association, City of Calgary and Tourism Calgary. The results of collaborating with them, and other groups, are already visible. For example, the CTCC and Tourism Calgary are jointly operating a visitor information centre on the main level of the CTCC’s north building. In partnership with the Calgary Downtown Association, the CTCC will house The Door, an artwork by Paul Magnuson described as “augmented known reality” that reveals new images, colours and patterns each time it’s opened. Also on display at the CTCC is a sculpture known as The Painters (formally titled So the Bishop Said to the Actress), on loan from the City of Calgary’s Public Art department. Plus, two exhibits curated by the U.S. Consulate will be displayed this fall at the CTCC to commemorate 150 years of U.S. and Canadian relations. Lundy says the combination of these and other installations and upgrades as well as a greater variety of events, shows and exhibits will change the visitor

experience at the CTCC. And they will signal a stronger community focus at the CTCC. “Conventions and convention-goers are changing, so it’s natural we change too,” Lundy says. “People often see convention centres as blanks walls and clean canvases that only come to life with big events and out-of-town delegates. We’re working to make the CTCC ‘alive’ year round for visitors, residents and community groups. Increasingly, we’re more than a place where visitors come—we’re a place where Calgarians also come.”

calgary-convention.com BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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Startup Calgary Drives the Next Generation of Economic Development BY STEPHEN EWART

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uch of the attention around spurring economic growth in Calgary has focused on efforts to attract leading companies from around the globe. It’s a critically important element in the task of building a more diverse and sustainable economy.

activities and programming. Its activities range from Startup Drinks – a monthly discussion of the world of startups – Startup Weekend and the Ask an Expert series to the celebration of local startups and leading entrepreneurs each November called Launch Party.

Recruiting those game-changing companies – like Silicon Valley tech accelerator RocketSpace – is a big deal but it’s not the half of it.

In 2016, 46 companies applied to pitch their ideas to the 700 attendees at Launch Party. Both numbers established record levels of interest.

Supporting the new generation of entrepreneurs who are emerging in this city with a legendary “can-do” attitude and rich history of creating millionaires and billionaires is equally important to a vibrant local economy that is driving innovation.

Structural changes in the economy and technological shifts in all industries are changing the way we do business. In Calgary, there’s little expectation that the big energy companies are going to bring back the large staffs they geared for growth during the oilsands boom.

To better serve early-stage entrepreneurs, Calgary Economic Development recently announced Startup Calgary would become part of the organization.

There are now an estimated two dozen coworking spaces in Calgary as workers find new ways to compete and collaborate. The ATB Entrepreneur Centre has also opened to provide resources and advice to businesses and the University of Calgary just opened the Hunter Hub for Entrepreneurial Thinking.

Startup Calgary is one of more than 20 Startup communities in Canada that use the “Startup” brand and provide access to training, knowledge exchange, tools and resources. Startup Calgary is an advocate and collective voice for the local entrepreneurial movement. The three-year pilot project to bring it into Calgary Economic Development follows Edmonton Economic Development acquiring Startup Edmonton in 2014 and the Economic Development Office of the City of Seattle acquiring Startup Seattle the same year. The transfer of Startup Calgary’s programs to Calgary Economic Development was approved by city council in April. As with Edmonton and Seattle, Startup Calgary will retain its name and its brand identity. Since its launch in 2010, Startup Calgary has connected with hundreds of local entrepreneurs through its networking

Calgary Economic Development worked closely with Startup Calgary and Innovate Calgary to support the sustainability, capacity and velocity of the innovation ecosystem. Transferring the delivery of the Startup programing to Calgary Economic Development will increase efficiency. Since its launch, Startup Calgary has referred eight companies it has worked with to business accelerator programs and another four companies to the Alberta Innovates and National Research Council voucher programs. In a shifting world, where entrepreneurs and small businesses are driving much of the growth, Startup Calgary plays a key role onboarding them into the innovation ecosystem. Stephen Ewart is manager of communication and content for Calgary Economic Development.

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Tourism Calgary’s Mobile Information Strategy Supports Visitors and Calgarians BY ERIN MURRAY

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fter a successful pilot year in 2016, Tourism Calgary continues to educate visitors and Calgarians about what they can experience in the city and the surrounding region through a mobile information strategy. In many cities, Visitor Information Centres provide maps and industry partner brochures, including attractions, restaurants, accommodations, festivals and events for visitors and locals. Tourism Calgary exited its fixed-location Visitor Information Centre in the Calgary Tower in early 2016 in favour of a mobile approach – bringing information to where visitors and Calgarians are. This innovative strategy brings the expertise and resources of a Visitor Information Centre into high-traffic areas of the community. Providing accessible and real-time experience counselling and personalized recommendations benefits the tourism industry and ultimately, the visitor economy, a $1.6-billion industry in Calgary. In 2017, Tourism Calgary launched a Destination Strategy with a goal to make Calgary the Ultimate Host City. Through the stakeholder engagement and research process, an opportunity was identified for Calgarians and visitors to be better aware of events, festivals, performances and experiences available to them. Awareness of events throughout the calendar year helps entice visitation, while contributing to an active and vibrant community for all Calgarians. The strength of these events contributes to the quality of life, pride of place and well-being of the city through economic stimulus, job creation, opportunities for volunteerism and participation and exposure to new and different experiences. In order to measure the level of engagement with Calgarians and visitors, the mobile information team tracks the volume of people they talk to (counsels) and the number of industry partners they mention during their conversations (referrals).

In 2016, referrals to industry partners were up 68.4 per cent from the previous year. To maximize the number of people engaged, a hybrid model of roaming and semi-fixed location was implemented for 2017. Free, large-scale public events saw the best levels of engagement and will be a key focus for the rest of the summer. During the Canada Day 150 celebrations, 591 people were counselled, up 40 per cent from July 1, 2016, and 1,433 industry partners were mentioned. Common visitor requests include itineraries, information about city tours, nearby restaurants, upcoming events or inquiries about attractions like the Calgary Tower or keystone experiences like the Calgary Stampede. Calgarians take the opportunity to test the counsellor’s knowledge about the city, asking questions like, ‘when was McMahon Stadium built?’ Visitors and Calgarians alike are pleased to receive brochures and little-known offerings, such as attraction coupons. They are also interested to know that they can ask the team about what is going on in the city by using #askmeyyc on Twitter. In 2016, over 18,000 pieces of literature were distributed by the roaming team during the two-month pilot. The mobile team was in market earlier this year – mid-May versus July – and is open later – often until 7 p.m. some days – in order to reach a wider audience. Preliminary numbers show an increase in referrals – 20,770 from May 19 to July 1, 2017 in comparison with 16,386 from July to September of 2016. The mobile Wi-Fi-enabled kiosk and other roaming staff will be available for counselling visitors and Calgarians seven days a week through the summer. Details of locations can be found on visitcalgary.com or by searching #askmeyyc on Twitter.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2017

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RBC Social Enterprise Accelerator BY KERRI SAVAGE

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mobile escape room, recycled denim yoga mats and science education. These are a few of the offerings from the wide range of startups that participated as part of the first RBC Social Enterprise Accelerator Program. The RBC Social Enterprise Accelerator (SEA) is a sixmonth program for Calgary-based startups for whom the combination of social impact and profitability is core to their mission and business model. Innovate Calgary delivers the program that focuses on accelerating impact, profitability and technology. There is no cost for participants as SEA is generously supported by RBC. “Social entrepreneurs are innovative game-changers, focused on creating businesses that blend sustainability, profitability and social impact,” says Jeff Boyd, regional president, RBC. “We believe we have a role to play in creating an environment where social enterprise can thrive.” Each startup was matched with a business adviser from within Calgary’s innovation ecosystem. These mentors bring decades of business, technical and entrepreneurial experience to the accelerator and help address specific business challenges, with the goal of increasing impact and growing revenue. “At the start of the program, most of the entrepreneurs have a very clear understanding about the social impact they are creating but aren’t aware of how to turn it into a viable, profitable business,” says Peter Garrett, president of Innovate Calgary. “That’s fundamentally what this program is about – creating viable businesses that have that strong social impact. It is important to come together and help these companies build, grow and deliver their social mandates.”

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A demo day held on June 13 saw the companies pitch their products and services to RBC executives, investors, potential customers and high-profile entrepreneurs from the Calgary community. Participants included: Calgary Sexual Health Centre’s WiseGuyz program; Enable; Green Event Services; Mindful Mental Training; Mobile Escape; Nomad EcoProducts; and STEM Learning Lab. “When I joined the accelerator about seven months ago, we were trying to figure out the coating on our machinewashable, recycled denim yoga mat,” says Zachary Champoux, founder of Nomad EcoProducts. “Since then, we’ve expanded our product line and we have received the green light to employ at-risk women from the Calgary Dream Centre to teach a skill. Providing a vocation is a huge developmental factor in people who are recovering. It’s not just about yoga mats; it is about sustainable markets and sustainable labour.” Pam Krause from the Calgary Sexual Health Centre’s WiseGuyz program has her eyes set high after experiencing the benefits of the accelerator. “We started out in this program wanting to learn about business planning, IP and legal, and with all the support, we are on our way to having a trademark and implementing our business model canvas. Our dream is to create a training institute and take this across Canada [to] provide this program to boys within their local area. We can provide a very strong curriculum and evidence and research to support the program. We know this could greatly impact society.” RBC will continue to champion social enterprise and innovation with support for a second accelerator, planned for the fall. Visit innovatecalgary.com for details on how to apply.


Spark success at your centre of energy.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT:

calgary-convention.com


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

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n response to the big announcement by Publicis Group that it was taking a year-long break from entering award shows, Calgary’s WAX Partnership has decided to have some fun while using it as an opportunity to recruit new talent. It is offering a “One-Year Break” to creative staff who might want to be associated with an agency that has a great track record in winning awards. Wax’s international awards include Cannes Lions, One Show Pencils as well as Canada’s secondever black pencil at the D&AD awards. In a tongue-in-cheek video, WAX announced it was offering a guaranteed one-year contract. The successful candidate will get a break from their agency plus get to live in Calgary where there is world-class skiing, a wonderful life/work balance and where a rodeo party lasts two whole weeks. And their work gets entered into 2018 award shows. Design director Monique Gamache, who recently judged this year’s Communication Arts Design Annual, says, “At WAX, we’re driven to continually create work that’s world class, and award shows are a measure of that pursuit.” Creative director Nick Asik adds, “To have to take a year off from entering shows can be a career setback for many young creatives.”

Strut Creative is excited to report that it is developing an online version of the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada in collaboration with the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. The atlas will feature a series of maps dating from precontact to the present day, exploring themes such as indigenous languages, demographics, economics and culture. Strut has also been busy with its Calgary clients including the rebranding of Penn West following its substantial restructuring over the past year. Working with their executive team, Strut developed a new brand strategy to

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reposition the company under its new name of Obsidian Energy. Also within the energy space, Strut has designed and developed a new website for Petroleum Services Association of Canada (PSAC). The mobile-responsive site features information on Canada’s petroleum services industry and practices as well as a Q&A-style section on hydraulic fracturing, helping to dispel common myths about the practice. And the agency has hired Keri Smith, formerly with Edelman, as its new account director, taking over leadership duties of Strut’s account team.

Along with partner Matt Wright, president of V-Strategies Jeff Bradshaw has launched Mammoth VR, a content creation and technology development studio focused on creating larger-than-life virtual reality and immersive 360-degree experiences. It has many potential commercial applications as a training tool and would be a big boost to Calgary’s hospitality industry in promoting such realistic tours of the area.

Cam Marshall, former design-lead at Lululemon in Vancouver where he led the redesign of its e-commerce platform, has joined Calgary-based FLIPP Advertising as digital creative director. Marshall will work out of FLIPP’s Vancouver office but service its full client roster.

Parker’s Pick The wonderfully-talented Dave Kelly; a superstar MC who did such a fine job at the 2017 Business in Calgary Leaders Awards.


Amplify : Courage

Dave Cree is reinventing social enterprise at CMNGD. See his story at atb.com/cmngd


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