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AUGUST 2016 | $3.50 BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Power THE

OF MUSIC

PM41126516

ANDREW MOSKER LEADS THE CHARGE TO OPEN STUDIO BELL, HOME OF THE NATIONAL MUSIC CENTRE, IN CALGARY’S EAST VILLAGE.



FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1

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49 |

CALGARY CHAMBER SECTION

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99


Andrew Obrecht, Warren Matzelle , Grady Topak | Co-Owners, YYC Cycle Spin Studio Putting a positive spin on entrepreneurship

“I wish I knew it was going to be

this much fun. Yeah, I probably would have started it earlier. Andrew Obrecht, Co-Owner, YYC Cycle Spin Studio

Together, Andrew, Warren and Grady have made it through the ups and downs of starting a business. (And it helped to have the right bank along for the ride.)

Watch these entrepreneurs’ stories and get expert insights at

atb.com / WeGrowAlberta |

#wegrowalberta

Who helps bring your ideas to life? We do. ™ Trademarks of Alberta Treasury Branches.


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Centron Cares is proud to partner with Accessible Housing (Resolve Calgary) constructing a Residential Care Facility for limited mobility residents

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Photo credit: Jager&Kokemor Photography

Cost Effective IT Solutions:

Free yourself from the burden of technology

Above: (L-R) Scott Taylor, Matt Patrick, Hunter Skibin and Andrew Bennett

In a challenging business climate it can be difficult to maintain a professional IT staff and ensure that your IT infrastructure is well maintained, up to date and properly supported. Leveraging an IT managed service provider can help control your IT costs with services that grow and shrink with the size of your company. Next Digital is one of Alberta Venture’s 50 fastest growing companies and the managed services support model is one reason for that success. Providing professional IT services at a per-user cost allows for predictable and scalable IT support solutions. “One of the benefits in our monthly managed service is that your IT support cost becomes predictable and can grow or shrink with a changing workforce,” explains Matt Patrick, Next Digital’s Calgary branch manager. “Our clients receive a personalized IT experience with an assigned support team and enjoy unlimited remote support, along with regular site visits to check in on users.” Next Digital is also a unique IT solutions organization with another differentiating aspect. In the complex world of technology you can find yourself surrounded by jargon and seemingly endless options; Next Digital prioritizes a sometimes forgotten basic business skill: listening! “An essential part of what we do is listening to our client,” Patrick points out. “We listen to their needs and their objectives. Then we design and implement a solution to meet those objectives.” The Next Digital commitment is to develop IT solutions and strategy that allow businesses – lawyers, health clinics, accountants, manufacturing, oil and gas, plumbers and association executives – to focus on growing their business and their success. “Our key role is to free our clients from the burden of technology.” It’s a refreshing mandate and a blunt explanation from John McLaughlin, managing partner of Next Digital, that the dynamic and innovative IT solutions firm is making its mark with businesses, community and non-profit organizations in Alberta and across Canada. “After all,” McLaughlin emphasizes, “technology is only one part of the equation. We work hard to develop trust and a close relationship with our clients. When we get a call, it’s usually because they need help; and because we’ve developed that trust, our clients have confidence that the problem is being taken care of.”

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 26 | Number 8

REGULAR COLUMNS

11

Jason Kenney, the Progressives and the Conservatives By Frank Atkins

99 105

Leading Business The Calgary Report

CONTENTS

110

Current developments for Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Tourism Calgary, Calgary Economic Development, and Innovate Calgary

Marketing Matters By David Parker

COVER FEATURE

24

The Power of Music Studio Bell, Home of the National Music Centre, Opens in Calgary’s East Village By David Parker

ON OUR COVER: ABOVE: ANDREW MOSKER PHOTO SOURCE: STUDIO BELL

FIND US ONLINE! B US I N E SS I NCALGARY.COM BUSINESS IN CALGARY

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@BUSINCALGARY

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

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STORY TITLE // SECTION

Supporting the visions of entrepreneurs one story at a time. Volume 26 | Number 8

85

THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

15

CONTENTS COMPANY PROFILES

85

Lear Construction Management

Celebrates 40 Years

36 39 49

H  ighlights from Business in Calgary’s 2016 Leaders Awards

R  evitalizing the Canadian Icon CP’s Hunter Harrison is on a mission! By John Hardy

C  algary’s Head Offices

F  ollowing Fort McMurray: Part 1 - Getting Ready for Restoration By John Hardy & Nerissa McNaughton

65

65 81

T  he Canada-Alberta Job Grant: Building a Better Nation – Part I By Nerissa McNaughton

T  he Pulse of Calgary’s Residential Resale Market A mid-year checkup By Melanie Darbyshire

83 8

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

T  he Business of Golf “We refuse to be part of a recession.” By John Hardy


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John Hardy

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CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Cher Compton Cole Ottmann

ADMINISTRATION

Nancy Bielecki nancy@businessincalgary.com Denise Templeton denise@businessincalgary.com

REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Richard Bronstein Frank Atkins David Parker

THIS ISSUE’S CONTRIBUTORS

www.calgaryroofingsunik.com 403.280.2803

Melanie Darbyshire Nerissa McNaughton John Hardy

PHOTOGRAPHY

Cover photo courtesy of Ewan Photo Video

Professional Development IT PAYS TO KNOW

Mark your calendar for payroll education! Teresa S., PCP - Member Prairie Region

With more than 200 federal and provincial regulations and changes each year, staying payroll compliant is one of the biggest challenges employers face. Ensure compliance and reduce the risk of audits and penalties with help from Professional Development seminars from Canadian Payroll Association (CPA). CPA offers seminars for all levels from beginner to advanced. On a variety of topics covering Learning Payroll, Taxable Benefits, Employment Standards, Pensions and more.

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

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JASON KENNEY, THE PROGRESSIVES AND THE CONSERVATIVES // FRANK ATKINS

Jason Kenney, the Progressives and the Conservatives BY FRANK ATKINS

I

have always thought that the term Progressive Conservative was an oxymoron. In economics, progressives are just tax-and-spend Liberals, or naive ideological New Democrats. It has never been clear to me how you can be either of these two and be a conservative economist at the same time. Clearly, the term PC must be a political invention, designed so that left-wing thinkers can pretend to be conservatives. This sums up the state of the Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta (PC): it is very progressive and not very conservative. This should not surprise anyone, as it has been like this for many, many years. For the last 30 years, successive PC Alberta governments have mismanaged budgets by increasing spending during resource booms, and keeping spending high when the inevitable resource bust arrives. The only exception to this was the early years of the Klein era, when spending was brought under control, and debt retired. Unfortunately, in his later years in power Mr. Klein succumbed to the tendency to increase spending during the resource boom of the 2000s. Mr. Stelmach continued to increase spending as the boom died, and Ms. Redford took deficit spending to new highs. Interestingly, Ms. Notley continued this tradition, thus showing that there is not that much difference between the New Democrats and the PCs. The fact that the PC party is full of progressives was emphasized recently when Jason Kenney announced his intention to run for the leadership of the PC party. It is very clear that Mr. Kenney is far from being a progressive, and his roots are more in line with the Wildrose party. As a federal politician, Mr. Kenney always advocated for disciplined spending and balanced budgets. He was arguably the most conservative individual in the Harper cabinet.

MR. KENNEY’S MAJOR OBJECTIVE IS TO UNITE THE ALBERTA RIGHT. THIS IS REMINISCENT OF THE FEDERAL CONSERVATIVES AFTER THE DEFEAT OF BRIAN MULRONEY. Mr. Kenney’s announcement immediately led to negative reaction. The progressives in the PC party, apparently being led by Sandra Jansen, protested by accusing Mr. Kenney of attempting to hijack the PC party. It seems that the PCs are afraid that if Mr. Kenney becomes leader, and eventually premier, some fiscal sanity may be restored to Alberta’s budget process, which must be anathema to the progressives. Mr. Kenney’s major objective is to unite the Alberta right. This is reminiscent of the federal conservatives after the defeat of Brian Mulroney. At the time there were the Joe Clark Red Tories, who were basically socialists, and the fiscal conservatives led by Stephen Harper, all trying to live under the federal Progressive Conservative banner. Uniting the right at the time involved creating a new party dominated by the true conservatives. We need something similar to happen in Alberta. What a lot of individuals do not seem willing to admit is that Alberta is in a precarious fiscal position, and we are running out of time to fix it. Successive progressive PC regimes have deteriorated the financial position of Alberta, and Rachel Notley is about to drive us towards bankruptcy. So, if fixing the fiscal problems of Alberta requires an individual like Jason Kenney “hijacking” the PC party, then we should welcome this. We need to face the reality, and fix the fiscal mess. Frank Atkins is a Calgary economist.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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MARKETING

ELBOW PARK | $2,800,000

3906

9 T H S T R E E T, S W

Contemporary & fully developed newer home in an exceptional inner city location across from Flock park and walking distance to elementary school & the river pathways. Like new, this architecturally designed, professionally decorated 2-storey home tucked away at the end of a cul-de-sac sits on a 75-foot lot and offers in excess of 4800 SF of total living space with 6 bedrooms (4 ensuite), state of the art kitchen (with Wolf & Sub-Zero appliances, walnut cabinetry, quartz countertop with waterfall finish on centre island), open-planned dining room with bar (equipped with 2 glass front wine fridges), main floor den, amazing master suite with fashion lover’s dressing room & spa ensuite and a fully developed basement with professional style gym, media & games rooms, wet bar, full bathroom & 2 additional bedrooms. The oversized attached garage is accessed via a family-sized mudroom with built-in storage & seating and the fenced yard is private & quiet with large patio and lots of space for kids & pets to play.

ELBOW VALLEY WEST | $1,698,000

166

O C T O B E R G O L D W AY

Exquisite appointments & stunning architectural details set this amazing home apart from the rest. Spoil yourself with travertine marble floors, granite counters (in kitchen & all bathrooms, wet bar & butler’s pantry) antiqued cabinetry, stone-faced fireplaces and amazing ceiling details including domed, barrel vaulted, coffered & vaulted ceilings with special paint details. 3639 SF + basement for a total of 5080 SF designed by the renowned John Haddon! This incredible home offers a total of 6 bedrooms (4 with ensuite), spectacular & huge kitchen w/ full-height antiqued cabinets (illuminated uppers & contrasting island), granite counters, walkin & butler’s pantry, high-end stainless steel appliance package & 2-sided fireplace with water feature. Special den with built-ins & leather floor, family sized mudroom w/lockers, dining room w/ tray ceiling seats at least 16 easily, basement with wet bar, wine cellar, family/games room & 2 bedrooms (1 ensuite). 1/2 acre pie lot in cul-de-sac, facing green island.

ELBOW PARK | $1,695,000

3825

8 A S T R E E T, S W

MY EXPERIENcE IS YOUR ADVANtAGE

JUST ASK ME!

A rare find in Elbow Park - If you’re looking for a new beginning then now it the time. Snap up this large, elevated lot in a prime location backing onto a treed green space in desirable Elbow Park, the perfect spot to let your creative juices run wild designing and building your dream home! This oversized inner city vacant lot measures 87.5-feet wide by 125-feet deep, which is just shy of 11,000 SF in size, that’s over a quarter of an acre! This inner city location is beyond compare. It’s a very quiet street, close to amenities, walking distance to two elementary schools and the Elbow River pathways and mere minutes to the downtown business district and all of the shops & restaurants on trendy 4th Street. The sunny, west facing backyard is very private as it backs onto a heavily treed green area. The raised elevation allows for a multitude of building options providing east, south and west exposure and the elevation provides an opportunity for a view depending upon the style of home you decide to build.


FOR ALL IT’S WORTH ®

YOUR HOME WATERMARK AT BEARSPAW | $1,499,900

70

S TO N E Y P O I NTE PL AC E

Another Trickle Creek masterpiece - this new home, with triple garage & developed basement, is ready for immediate possession with over 4200 SF of total living space. Set on a spacious .29 acre lot (82’ frontage by 151’ deep) in the wonderful community of Watermark it offers a sunny south backyard so you can soak up the sun while you watch the kids play or have the whole gang over for a BBQ. Features extensive hardwood flooring, quartz countertops, beautiful tile accents, chic lighting, tray ceilings, den with barn door and designer kitchen boasts stainless steel appliances complimented by natural wood & classic white cabinetry and accented by quartz countertops. There are 3 bedrooms, a laundry room, bonus room and an artist’s Loft upstairs. The master suite is your private retreat at the end of a long day. It offers a big walk-in closet and spa-like ensuite with free-standing tub. The basement is developed with a 4th bedroom & bathroom as well as lots of extra space for family fun in the family room & games room.

CHRISTIE PARK | $975,000

15

C H R I S T I E E S TAT E T E R R A C E , S W

Artistic design meets modern elegance in this extensively renovated 2084 SF bungalow with park-like south backyard, steps from ravine & tennis courts! Boasts new/updated: Triple pane windows, furnaces/hot water tanks, chic lighting, millwork, custom door, hardwood, 2 refaced fireplaces, Carrera marble & granite counters, renovated kitchen & bathrooms! Superb for entertaining & family living with big principal rooms, high ceilings, multiple french doors, built-in speakers & great flow. The living room is flanked by spacious formal dining room (easily seats 10) and a music room with built-ins. Kitchen, nook, family roomm & master all overlook private backyard (with 400-ft cedar deck & motorized awning). High-end appliances will make meal prep a breeze in the updated island kitchen with granite counters & classic white cabinetry. The master has an updated ensuite with marble counter, 2 sinks & heated floor. 2 other bedrooms share another updated bathroom. Basement developed 4th bedroom, full bath & family/games room.

RENFREW | $575,000 or $599,000

622 c

15 T H AV E N U E , N E

403 870 8811 |

t

403 686 7800 |

New construction, Renfrew townhomes, with 2 floorplans to choose from: 2 bedroom 1493 SF unit or 3 bedroom 1723 SF unit. Both plans offer hardwood flooring, quartz counters in kitchen & bathrooms, stainless steel appliances (including gas stove), high ceilings, stacked stone fireplace, 4 bathrooms, and upper level bonus room. Perfect plan for a young family, open main level offers a living room with fireplace, kitchen with glass-tile backsplash, quartz counters & full compliment of stainless steel appliances. Dine at the eating bar or in the dining area. Also on the main floor is a powder room. Ascend to the 2nd floor where you will find the bedrooms including a master suite with full ensuite bathroom & a generously scaled walk-in closet. The third level is a bright & spacious bonus room. Both floorplans include insuite laundry with stacking washer & dryer, balcony, full basement (undeveloped) and single garage. Close to schools, Renfrew pool, 16th Avenue & Edmonton Trail shops, services and restaurants.

www.SAMCOREA.COM

|

SAM@SAMCOREA.COM


THE HUMAN COST OF ENDLESS TAX HIKES // GUEST COLUMNIST

The Human Cost of Endless Tax Hikes BY PAIGE MACPHERSON

I

t’s no secret that small business owners in Calgary have been hit hard this year. Rising property taxes are one of the factors at play, with many business owners facing property tax hikes in the double-digits – some even in the tripledigits. The 2016 business property tax rose 3.8 per cent on top of increased assessments. Business owners across Alberta are grappling with an increasing minimum wage and increasing Canada Pension Plan payroll taxes. Restaurants are dealing with increased liquor taxes. Everyone is facing declining sales as unemployment is spiking. Darren Hamelin was the owner of Escoba Bistro in downtown Calgary, a wine bar that had been open for 20 years. Last spring, Hamelin’s property taxes were hiked by 97 per cent. Between declining sales and a bike lane slapped in front of his storefront that severely limited parking, the property tax hike was a hit. Hamelin wasn’t going to let his small business be swallowed by tax hikes without a fight. He hung a giant “For Sale $4.7 million” sign on the front of his restaurant, based on the city’s assessed value. Hamelin spent $14,000 fighting the increase. The city was demanding $67,000. He ended up paying $34,000. He won. Hamelin could stop wasting time fighting the city and get back to focusing on his business. Unfortunately, the story doesn’t end there. This year, the city was demanding $55,000 in property taxes. It came at an even worse time than last year. A slumping

Canadian dollar, a worsening downturn, a barrage of other taxes coming his way … and now this. The property tax hike was the last straw. On June 1, he told his staff that he would be closing the doors to Escoba Bistro for good after 20 years in Calgary. His 25 employees are now out of work. The incoming provincial carbon tax will make matters worse, increasing the cost of inputs, heating, electricity and driving up property taxes further. Despite a one per cent cut to the small business tax, Restaurants Canada says a carbon tax is the absolute last thing Alberta restaurants need right now. The owners of Calgary-based Atlantic Trap and Gill faced a 37 per cent property tax increase this year, which they fear will force them to close their doors. Co-owner Tracy Johnson penned an open letter to her MLA: “Our business has been here for 18 years through hard work and perseverance. If there is no way to decrease this increase in taxes we will be closing our doors. I do not understand your government, as you will now be collecting $0 per year in taxes. And you will be throwing 28 people into the unemployment line.” Nobody wakes up in the morning thrilled to pay taxes. But no one is calling on Mayor Nenshi to cut property taxes or Premier Notley to halt her carbon tax just for the sake of it. It’s because endless tax hikes have a human cost. In Calgary, we are witnessing that cost first-hand. Governments would be wise to open their eyes.

Paige MacPherson is Alberta director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, a nonprofit, non-partisan citizens advocacy group dedicated to lower taxes, less waste and government accountability. For more information, visit Taxpayer.com.

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


2016 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

Highlights

FROM BUSINESS IN CALGARY’S 2016 LEADERS AWARDS

CHRIS LARSEN HRPA; LEADER, LAURA DICKSON, WOMEN IN NEED SOCIETY (WINS); CAROLINE JOHNSON, AIR CANADA; DAN ALLEN, ATB

TREVOR WINKLER, MNP; DARCY PATRIE, SERVPRO CLEANING, A GDI COMPANY; LEADER JOE KLASSEN, JOEY’S GROUP OF COMPANIES; DR. CHERYLYN CAMERON, BOW VALLEY COLLEGE

2ND FROM LEFT: TOMIS SLISKO (ACCEPTING ON BEHALF OF LEADER DANIJEL SLISKO, UNITED GROUP)

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER LANNY WILLIAMSON, THE BEACH ADVANCED AUDIO PRODUCTION INC.

Platinum Partner

Gold Partners

Official Airline Partner

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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2016 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

16

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER YVES TREMBLAY, PRONGHORN CONTROLS

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER BOB ESPEY, PARKLAND FUEL CORPORATION

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER LYNN DONALDSON, LYNN DONALDSON & ASSOCIATES

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER KEVIN KENT, KNIFEWEAR AND KENT OF INGLEWOOD

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER GREG HABSTRITT, VETS TO GO

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER DAVID SNELL, IVRNET INC.

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


The New Adventures of

Engine 23

at the Library

In the wee hours of April 4, 2016, the doors to Calgary’s Central Library were removed to make way for Engine 23, a decommissioned 12 foot tall fire truck weighing 42,500 pounds. For the next two months, the vehicle sat behind hoarding being retrofitted in preparation for a very special assignment. On June 17th, timed for the summer break, Calgary Public Library and the Calgary Fire Department unveiled The New Adventures of Engine 23—a FREE exhibit that is the cornerstone of Central Library’s Early Learning Centre. “As a North American leader in Early Learning—with more than half a million children coming through the doors of our 18 libraries each year—Calgary Public Library believes that play is the foundation for all future learning,” said Mark Asberg, Director, Service Delivery, for the Library. “Can you imagine a more interactive, dynamic, and playful teaching tool than a fire truck?” he asked the crowd gathered for the grand opening.

Chief Zatlyny with kids on opening day

Engine 23 Storytime

“When children pretend they are racing to the scene of a fire atop Engine 23, they are actually building the ‘wiring’ and connections in their brains that help with learning to read. And reading opens doors to all the world has to offer.” Engine 23 was donated to the Library by the Calgary Fire Department, making way for a unique partnership that sees firefighters giving of their time to read to children and sharing life-saving fire safety tips during drop-in storytimes. Funds from Friends of the Library, such as Jim and Patricia Burns, are supporting the development of programming specific to Engine 23. “Just think of the impact on a three-year old having a real-life firefighter read to him or her aboard an actual fire engine,” said Bill Ptacek, CEO, Calgary Public Library.

Kids putting on their firefighting gear

“This is the kind of life-changing programming we are developing now in preparation for New Central Library. Calgary Public Library stands for world class programming, resources, and service. We standing together with incredible partners like the Calgary Fire Department to bring the very best to Calgary’s youngest citizens—the future of our great city.” For details about the free New Adventures of Engine 23 exhibit and free summer Library programming for all ages, get a copy of the July-August Library Connect, available inlibrary or at calgarylibrary.ca.


2016 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER DR. DALE MACDONALD, ELITE SPORT PERFORMANCE AND THE KNEE CLINIC

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER MICHELLE BERG, ELEVATED HR

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER JEFF APLIN, THE DAVID APLIN GROUP

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


2016 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

HASKAYNE

MBA

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER TIFFANY GORDON, COTTONWOOD GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

‘‘

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER CHARRON UNGAR, AVI URBAN, A MULTI-FAMILY DIVISION OF HOMES BY AVI

The Haskayne MBA empowered me to transition my career from engineering to business, my true passion. The program taught me how to embrace challenges and how to take control of my career. My time at the Haskayne School of Business was an excellent experience and helped push me to become stronger, a better leader and ultimately more accomplished.

Trevor Sterner, MBA’11 Senior Finance Manager ATB Financial

The Haskayne MBA. Calgary’s MBA.

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER DR. DIANA MAE MONEA, EYE HEALTH CENTRES

haskaynemba.ca BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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2016 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER NANCY E. KLENSCH, SUMMIT KIDS

2ND FROM LEFT: LEADER DAVID NOLAN, STUDIO Y CREATIONS

3RD FROM LEFT: LEADER SUZANNE WEST, IMAGINEA ENERGY

LEADER FRANK LONARDELLI, ARLINGTON STREET INVESTMENTS

MC JEBB FINK

22

DR. DIANA MAE MONEA

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

GREG HABSTRITT


2016 LEADERS AWARDS // LEADERS

KIRAN TOEWS, JOHN CHASCA

GERRY WOOD (WOOD AUTOMOTIVE GROUP), DR. JACQUELINE OTTMANN

A GREAT MEAL IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS

403-269-1600 www.centini.com LUNCH | DINNER Breakfast & Office Catering by Appointment | Special Events | Offsite Retreats | Private Dining | Private Rooms & Discreet Meetings For professional attention to the details of your event please email events@centini.com or telephone 403-269-1605

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

ABOVE: STUDIO BELL NIGHT RENDERING PHOTO SOURCE: RENDERING BY MIR.

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

Power THE

BY DAVID PARKER

OF MUSIC

STUDIO BELL, HOME OF THE NATIONAL MUSIC CENTRE, OPENS IN CALGARY’S EAST VILLAGE

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

“M

usic is a powerful tool,” says Andrew Mosker, president and CEO of the National Music Centre (NMC). “It is pleasant to listen to, relaxing, inspiring, can be used as a community builder, but it can also be good for business.” Leading up to the grand opening of Studio Bell, Mosker has been interviewed many, many times about the history, the design, the incredible features and amenities NMC will provide, but he also understands the economic impact it will have on this city.

and the Honens International Piano Competition were sharing space in Customs House, and there were talks by the board of the organ festival developing and expanding an annual program. On the advice of Irene Besse, it had purchased two collections of organs and pianos, one from a Revelstoke, B.C. collector and the other from Long Island, New York State. Mosker was hired to look after the collections in 1998, being informed that the board was not sure what to do with them but he should build a program around them.

It is estimated that NMC will attract $10 million in direct spending to this city; not bad for an idea that sprang from the dream of a young man who after realizing early on that his love of playing piano might not be his best career path, has done so much to help others live and work in Calgary while developing a new economic stream.

The organ festival wound down in 2002, but the foundation decided to put its money into what had become known as the Cantos Music Museum – and Mosker, who had been working hard with a bare-bones budget in two floors of disjointed space was able to think big about how he could develop and support a broader base where music could thrive.

Mosker earned his undergraduate history major at Concordia University and while working at CIRL 650 AM campus radio made up his mind to make a living in music. He came out West and studied at Grant MacEwan College for his prestigious performance degree in jazz piano.

His vision was to build a ‘Music City’ here.

But then he came to Calgary – the right time and the right place – when the Calgary International Organ Festival

He had a million dollars for his operating budget, which meant he could employ a program manager and begin to hold exhibitions, the popular Silent Movie Monday program, and hold performances in a small space in Customs House where it was possible to cram in around 120 people.

DukeEvans

inc

project management + facility planning

Duke Evans would like to congratulate Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre, we’re proud to be part of your success. 403.540.4638 gduke@duke-evans.com • www.duke-evans.com

Photos by Brandon Wallis, courtesy of the National Music Centre. Rendering by Mir.

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Different by Design Constructing effective tax strategies to minimize your exposure Every business has to file taxes – but you shouldn’t have to worry whether they’ve been filed correctly. Our Real Estate and Construction services team not only makes the process worry-free, but provides added value to your business. We work closely with you to customize a tax strategy and structure that seamlessly integrates with your existing business processes, while keeping you informed of regional and national tax legislation changes that could impact your industry. Our unique approach ensures compliance and identifies opportunities to reduce your exposure – so you can stay focused on growing your business. Contact Lee Thiessen, MBA at 403.537.7617 or lee.thiessen@mnp.ca


THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

And meanwhile the appreciation and importance of music was already being encouraged to some 10,000 schoolchildren each year on organized tours that were a real hit. Cantos was also busy adding to its collections. Jesse Moffatt, director of collections, says, “As a collecting institution, we are dedicated to collecting, preserving and researching Canada’s musical heritage. We are motivated to make music history accessible and continuing. The goal is

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to provide the audience with the fullest experience of music possible with our ‘living’ musical instruments.” Today, NMC stewards one of the most impressive music collections in the world, spanning over 450 years of music technology and innovation. Much has been added to the original two collections bringing the current number of objects in its care to over 2,000. And by this time not limited to 19th century pianos; it now


THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

modular synthesizer used to create special effects for the Francis Ford Coppola movie, Apocalypse Now. The owner agreed to spend time at Cantos to supervise the installation of his artifacts – and liked Calgary so much he bought a house just outside the city. But with more pieces to display and more people to care for them, as well as a growing number of programs, exhibitions and tours, there was a need to find a bigger home.

Another Exceptional Performance.

includes the Rolling Stones Mobile Recording Studio that was used to record albums by Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple, as well as the Rolling Stones. You will see Randy Bachman’s 1959 Gibson Les Paul “American Woman” guitar and the white songwriting piano on which Elton John composed his first five albums. And from a serious Los Angeles collector, Cantos acquired his entire electronic collection, including the EMU

Our work at Calgary’s National Music Center included the installation of 45,000 SQ FT of hardwood flooring with a beautiful quarter and rift White Oak with Wenge inlay staircase and multiple acoustical floor systems. Calgary Head Office / Builder Showroom 2454–91 Ave SE

Calgary Retail Showroom ABOVE: PLUGGED IN STAGE

621 Manitou Road SE 403-692-6651 | www.albertahardwood.com

PHOTO SOURCE: LEBLOND STUDIO INC.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

Mosker was given the OK to look for a better space and he concluded that the best solution was to build its own structure, designed specifically for its needs. He looked at many including space at Mount Royal University and the eight-storey tower planned for the site where the York Hotel had been demolished adjacent to the new Bow Tower. His research took him to a number of other cities and what attracted him most was the way old neighbourhoods had been rejuvenated thanks to music providing places of pilgrimage. A good example is the Museum of American Soul Music in the former Stax record label building in Memphis where the sounds of Southern gospel music can be enjoyed in a 1902 Mississippi Delta church reassembled in the museum. Next door is a music academy that has also helped to bring many music lovers and tourists to Memphis. It didn’t take long for Mosker to decide the King Eddy that had been an oasis for music lovers from all walks of life was the ideal spot for his new home. And he began to think that as there was no national facility for Canadian music, Cantos should be reinvented as a national story on an authentic site. A centre for live music, a better home for the collection, a recording studio, public programming and lectures.

integrity

knowledge

The board was enthused about his dream and set about fundraising in a big way. The city agreed to sell the King Eddy but the owner of the gas station to the rear could not be persuaded to include his lot. Fortunately Calgary Municipal Land Corporation had been established and redevelopment of East Village was well into a new planning phase. ABOVE: ANGULAR DESIGN TILES PHOTO SOURCE: BRANDON WALLIS

innovation

CONGRATULATIONS! Proud to be the Electrical Consultant for:

StudioBell home of the

National Music Centre electrical

30

consulting

services

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

• LEADING WALL AND CEILING SPECIALIST • COMPLEX AND HIGH-END SPACES • CURVED AND RADIUS WALLS/CEILING • ACOUSTIC WOOD CEILINGS AND WALLS

QUALITY, SERVICE, & COMPLETION, TOP OF THE AGENDA, EVERYDAY! WWW.MID WESTCO NTR ACTING.CA


Design with community in mind We are proud to be the mechanical design team for Studio Bell. stantec.com Studio Bell design: Allied Works Architecture

CANA Construction congratulates the National Music Centre on its new home - Studio Bell and is honoured to have been part of INNOVATION. this iconic project!

COMMITMENT.

PROVEN RESULTS. CANA Construction is proud to be an Alberta-based contractor, providing quality construction strategies and solutions for 74 years.

www.cana.ca BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

But it had yet to convince anyone to kick-start any type of construction and Mosker’s negotiations with its board resulted in NMC securing the land to the east of the King Eddy and thanks to funding from three levels of government, each offering $25 million, he was able to go ahead with an international expression of interest to design the new building. Of 66 responses from around the world, whittled down to 12, followed by an RFP to a select five, Portland-based Allied Works Architecture was selected. The result is what Allied Works principal Brad Cloepfil describes as, “A powerful instrument that exists to

emanate music and light. Nine towers form the body of the building: walls clad in terracotta rise in subtle curves that merge, part and intertwine, modelled by light, gravity and acoustics.” At the grand opening on July 1, after almost 18 years of hard work and promotion, a very proud NMC president and CEO Andrew Mosker could boast of a dream come true that already has become a national music industry treasure as home to the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame Collection, and the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame.

ABOVE: EXPLORING ICONIC CANADIAN VOICES AT STUDIO BELL. PHOTO SOURCE: BRANDON WALLIS

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Walters Group offers end-to-end solutions on complex steelwork projects across North America. We recognize that the projects we contribute to are more than just projects. They change landscapes. They support key industries. They inspire people. Walters Group is proud to have been a part of bringing the vision for Studio Bell to life, bringing vibrant new architecture to Calgary’s East Village.

www.waltersgroupinc.com

WALLWORKS ACOUSTIC ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS Inc.

2016-06-17 2:12 PM

Proud Supplier of Custom Acoustic Fabric Panels to the Studio Bell, home of the National Music Centre in Calgary

1.877.829.2550

info@wallworks.com

www.wallworks.com

Walters_Studio Bell NMC advt.indd 1

Photo by Brandon Wallis

We offer the following Acoustic and Decorative Solutions for Commercial and Residential applications: ®

FABRI-LOK Stretch Fabric Systems BARRISOL® Stretch Vinyl Ceilings ® Acoustiblok Sound Blocking Technology

Rulon® Acoustic Wood Products ® Tavapan SA Acoustic Wood Panels ® SOUND SEAL Architectural/Industrial Sound BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE POWER OF MUSIC // COVER

In total Studio Bell has been completed with 160,000 square feet of new construction offering 22,000 square feet of exhibition space and galleries plus a 4,000-square-foot, 300-seat performance hall, acoustic and sound labs and media centre. And the economic impact is being felt in many different ways. CKUA Radio, the oldest public broadcaster in Canada, has signed a 10-year lease in the King Eddy, located on the west block of Studio Bell and Cafe Rosso is the first retailer to take space. NMC became an early launch pad to promote East Village; it attracted a $10-million sponsorship from major contributor Bell; the visitor market is expected to be boosted by 150,000 per year; and it employs a full-time staff of 40 plus 350 eager volunteers, a number that is expected to climb to over 700 by year-end.

Kasian would like to congratulate the National Music Centre on their historic grand opening. We are proud to be the local architect for this monumental project.

South Health Campus

National Music Centre

kasian.com

Taylor Family Digital Library

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Calgary Courts Centre


THE POWER // COVER

Setting the stage at the NMC The hsd team were honored to provide exhibition design for Calgary’s newest and most dynamic visitor destination, creating galleries (known as stages) which amplify the rich mosaic of Canada’s music scene. The striking new building gave us an opportunity to think outside the box, defining unique environments blending sound, media, graphics and collections, which culminate in a festival-like experience. Jan Faulkner, hsd’s Creative Director comments, “You’re not walking between galleries, you’re drawn around the building by music and sound.” hsd has been providing masterplanning, interpretation and exhibit design for leading cultural heritage sites around the world for over 30 years. Current commissions include interpretative design for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St Louis, the Middle Eastern Galleries at the Penn Museum and galleries at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

The city will get a lot of traction from NMC, and hotels, taxis and restaurants will benefit greatly. And ‘Music City’ supporters will be keen to see the King Eddy bar reopen for live music and as a character event space bringing people into a rejuvenated, healthy and exciting East Village.

850 4 ST SE, CALGARY, AB T2G 1R1

NMC.CA/STUDIOBELL

Haley Sharpe Design 75 Sherbourne Street, Suite 223, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5A 2P9 +1 416 361 3338

11-15 Guildhall Lane, Leicester, LE1 5FQ, United Kingdom +44 (0)116 251 8555

info@haleysharpe.com ABOVE: LOBBY VIEW FROM SECOND FLOOR

@haleysharpe

www.haleysharpe.com

PHOTO SOURCE: BRANDON WALLIS

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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REVITALIZING THE CANADIAN ICON // HEAD OFFICES

Revitalizing THE CANADIAN ICON

CP’S HUNTER HARRISON IS ON A MISSION! BY JOHN HARDY

E

. Hunter Harrison’s determined, bold and in-yourface introduction in the 2015 Canadian Pacific (CP) annual report says it all. “The only thing I know for sure is that the things we can control will perform. That’s why this model works even better during bad times. We’re confident leaning into these headwinds because of our ability to continue improving operating margins regardless of what the macroeconomic environment throws at us.” Although annual reports are primarily targeted at shareholders, Harrison’s comment is actually a blunt, candid, genuine and honest reflection of the Calgary-based CEO’s style, approach, formula and determined vision for the revitalized and dynamic success of CP – the iconic Canadian company and one of the biggest and most influential head offices based in Calgary. Was it a daunting challenge to reinvent the wheel and reboot the legendary but slumped 135-year-old CP? “Not really!” the no-nonsense Harrison says with a deep voice and an endearing Tennessee drawl. “The challenge was CP’s record as the worst performing of the continent’s major railways. It’s the reason why I came out of retirement.” He is not only a respected railway industry veteran but he knew CP well, particularly from his 11 often bumpy years as COO and CEO of CN in Montreal. “I was energized about coming to Calgary and taking the CP reins.” It’s a well-known business caution that a maximize efficiency and change management assignment is a tough mandate and an even tougher responsibility. It’s not for the fainthearted and thin-skinned. It is never a popularity contest or a matter of ego.

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Invariably, setting and achieving goals, like Harrison’s determined push for operation efficiency, is laced with decisions and policies that achieve many positives but also trigger pushback negatives. Doing what he felt he had to do, Harrison cut a net of 4,800 jobs from the 19,500 he inherited, scrapped 400 older locomotives and 11,000 rail cars, closed some terminals and got strict about company discipline regarding work rules and safety. “If you’re not safe in this industry, you don’t stay in business. Everything we do in the field has a safety focus. CP has a strong safety culture and has been the safest class 1 in North America for the last 10 years in a row. Making sure no one gets hurt at work has always been a focus for me, and will always be a priority for CP.” Harrison is pumped and positive about his overall CP experience. “I always believed that CP was a franchise with incredible potential that had lost its way operationally. What surprised everyone, including me, was just how fast we took CP from being the bottom performer of the class 1 railways into an industry leader.” Four years into Harrison’s vision, leadership and take-noprisoners management style, CP has reported revenues of $6.71 billion and adjusted net income of $1.625 billon, as it continues a remarkable transformation of attitude, focus, performance and efficiency. The company is exceeding business plan targets and expectations and (some say) it is well ‘on track’ to make business recovery history.


REVITALIZING THE CANADIAN ICON // HEAD OFFICES

“IF YOU’RE NOT SAFE IN THIS INDUSTRY, YOU DON’T STAY IN BUSINESS. EVERYTHING WE DO IN THE FIELD HAS A SAFETY FOCUS. CP HAS A STRONG SAFETY CULTURE AND HAS BEEN THE SAFEST CLASS 1 IN NORTH AMERICA FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS IN A ROW. MAKING SURE NO ONE GETS HURT AT WORK HAS ALWAYS BEEN A FOCUS FOR ME, AND WILL ALWAYS BE A PRIORITY FOR CP.” ~ E. HUNTER HARRISON

ABOVE: E. HUNTER HARRISON, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY. PHOTO SOURCE: MICHAEL CUDJOE PHOTOGRAPHY LTD.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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REVITALIZING THE CANADIAN ICON // HEAD OFFICES

He is confident, bullish, rarely minces words and admits that one of his first and most urgent priorities was to break down layers of company bureaucracy that were getting in the way of effective decision-making, and attack CP’s operating ratio – the much-watched index of profitability that measures operating costs as a percentage of revenue. “When I started at CP, our operating ratio was north of 80 per cent,” he cringes. “This year, we’re targeting to be below 59 per cent. It’s fair to say we’re ahead of plan. With a commitment to providing the best service at the lowest cost, we have gone from industry laggard to industry leader. “We needed to establish and implement five foundations: provide service, control costs, optimize assets, operate safely, and develop people,” he says. “They allow everyone to view their decisions through the same lens. It was necessary to get people empowered to make decisions and to be invested in the process. “When we began to return the focus to the field, and demanding that each of us look for new ways to make the operation better each day, the shift really gained momentum. We saw network speed improve, delivery and schedules tighten considerably, and we were able to deliver for customers when we said we would,” he says with genuine enthusiasm and pride. Like the industry he boldly champions, Harrison is tough, rugged and a widely-respected high achiever. He is realistic and outspoken about the status and the future of the rail industry. “Rail will continue to be critical to the economic health and growth of North America. It will increase its share in transportation as people realize the value and benefit of rail over truck and road transport. Roadways are aging and highways are congested. “It’s important to remember that a single train can replace up to 280 trucks from tax-funded roads.” Despite recent speculation about rail being a viable Canadian alternative for transporting oil east, south and west, Harrison points out that crude was never a significant part of CP’s business. “At its peak, maybe six per cent of our total revenues; today it’s closer to three per cent.” As a Calgary-based senior executive, he is optimistic that conditions in the oilpatch will recover and commodity prices

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will begin to rise, for all areas of business. “The state of the global economy is at a lower level than we’ve seen for a while, and it’s not just oil that’s being impacted. CP’s business mix is diverse, but I would love to see commodity prices start to climb all around the world.” Harrison’s hard-core (and provenly effective) operations focus is infused with genuine caring about community and giving back. “It’s a huge priority. CP runs through 1,100 communities where everyone knows the CP name. Whether it’s our Holiday Train program, our mini trains or our partnerships with the CFL, LPGA and Spruce Meadows, we are always looking at ways to give back. “This spring, our company and employees stepped up to help the Red Cross and evacuees from Fort McMurray. In 2014, we launched a new community investment platform called CP Has Heart and committed over $6 million to heart health research, equipment and care across North America.” Partially because golf happens to be one of his personal passions, Harrison raves about the CP Women’s Open (CPWO), all set for Priddis Greens Golf & Country Club, August 22-28. “It’s very exciting. The CPWO is consistently drawing the strongest field on the LPGA Tour, and this year could include all three Olympic medallists from the Rio Games,” he beams. Although he is, at times, intimidatingly focused and ‘allbusiness,’ the tall, 72-year-old son of a Memphis cop (who vaguely remembers some pool parties at Graceland) is a happily married father of two daughters and grandfather of three with another on the way. He admits to giving up various guilty pleasures for the sake of fitness and health, enjoys golf and indulges a lifelong love for breeding, buying, selling and training horses at his sprawling and dazzling Connecticut Double H Farm, now managed by his daughter and son-in-law. “I’ve been in this industry for 50 years and I’ve never seen an organization that responded as quickly and as successfully as the CP team continues to do. CP is a dynamic company, and we still have more to do. I’m very excited about the future of CP. I was really proud of the work we are doing and things continue to get better each day.”


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES JOBS AND SPIN OFFS

F

or most major cities - from Calgary to Dallas, New York and Toronto, the business of attracting influential and high profile corporate Head Offices continues to be not only a key aspect of the local economy but also a barometer of the city’s business rank. The value of having head offices located in a market is undisputed. They pump cash into the local economy, create all sorts of spin-off economic activity, especially in support service areas such as law, IT, accounting, finance, logistics, engineering, and more, while their employees boost retail sales of everything from housing and cars to furniture, groceries and clothing. “According to the Sauder School of Business, the United Nations Center for Trade and Development identifies the main determinants of head office location as international accessibility, a skilled workforce, a high quality of life, low corporate and personal taxes, excellent information and communication technology infrastructure, low risk (crime, exchange rates, regulatory and tax changes) and proximity to customers,” explains the enthusiastic and knowledgeable Curtis Lester, international corporate tax partner and leader of the tax practice for KPMG’s office in Calgary. KPMG has 34 locations across Canada and with the firm’s 700 partners and more than 6,000 employees is known as a Canadian leader in audit, tax, and advisory services. Calgary’s 1.4 million population (with a business-appealing median demographic of 35.9 years) has the undisputed stats and numbers. This year, with 133 corporate head offices, Calgary is first in head office concentration, on a per capita basis. Lester cautions that corporate and personal tax rates are always a vital factor when it comes to head office locations.

cent, significantly less than the other provinces. It led to numerous head offices moving to especially Calgary from B.C. and Ontario,” he explains. “In 2015, Alberta increased its general corporate tax rate to 12 per cent, at a time when companies were having significant cash flow problems. The combined Federal and Alberta tax rate is now 27 per cent, Ontario is 26.5 per cent and B.C. is 26 per cent.” According to Mary Moran, president and CEO, Calgary Economic Development, “Calgary is actually more affordable for companies that have wanted to move into this market in the past but found it too expensive during the oil sands boom that drove the economy for much of the last decade. The cost for office and industrial space has fallen as oil and gas companies reconsidered their plans for growth in response to lower commodity prices.” More than anything else, it is the quality of our workforce that is the real allure for companies here. Having a strong community of corporate head offices in your city also increases the tax base of a jurisdiction and allows the municipality to provide increased services to the community overall,” she adds with positivity. “Head offices also contribute to their communities through the support of philanthropic or community sustainability as well as the development of a creative arts scene and athletic and tourism amenities.”

THE CALGARY HEAD OFFICE FEATURE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY KPMG

“Albertans are familiar with the ‘Alberta Advantage’, broughtin by Ralph Klein’s conservative government. At that time, the province’s personal and corporate tax rates were 10 per Financial Post 500 rankings provided by Financial Post Magazine, published nine times a year by The National Post, and Infomart, a full-service content strategy group providing media monitoring and analytics services, research, executive summaries, content solutions and corporate data to organizations across Canada.

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

Enbridge Inc.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

E

Al Monaco

8

nbridge has become a leader in the safe and reliable delivery of energy in North America and is proud to be recognized as one of the Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World. They transport energy, operating the world’s longest, most sophisticated crude oil and liquids transportation system, with a significant and growing presence in the natural gas transmission and midstream businesses, and an increasing involvement in power transmission.

Suncor Energy Inc.

S

REVENUE

33,794,000,000

www.enbridge.com

Imperial Oil Ltd.

Steven W. Williams

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

A

12

29,279,000,000

$

Agrium Inc.*

A

fter more than a century, Imperial continues to be an industry leader in applying technology and innovation to responsibly develop Canada’s energy resources. As Canada’s largest petroleum refiner, a major producer of crude oil and natural gas, a key petrochemical producer and a leading fuels marketer from coast to coast, their company remains committed to the highest standards across all areas of our business. Charles V. Magro

Rich Kruger

26,756,000,000

$

www.imperialoil.ca

Husky Energy Inc.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

H

25

16,369,000,000

www.huskyenergy.ca

Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.

18,908,010,000

Cenovus Energy Inc.

C

www.agrium.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

31

enovus Energy is a Canadian oil company. They are committed to applying fresh, progressive thinking to safely and responsibly unlock energy resources the world needs. Their operations include oilsands projects in northern Alberta, which use specialized methods to drill and pump the oil to the surface, as well as natural gas and oil production across Alberta and southern Saskatchewan. Brian C. Ferguson

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

36

13,064,000,000

$

TransCanada Corp.

W

www.cenovus.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

40

ith more than 60 years’ experience, TransCanada is a leader in the responsible development and reliable operation of North American energy infrastructure including natural gas and liquids pipelines, power generation and gas storage facilities.

anadian Natural is one of the largest independent crude oil and natural gas producers in the world. A balanced mix of natural gas, light oil, heavy oil, in situ oilsands production, oilsands mining and associated upgrading facilities, represents one of the strongest and most diverse asset portfolios of any energy producer in the world. Russell K. Girling

Steve W. Laut

REVENUE

REVENUE

12,363,000,000

$

Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd.

C

www.cnrl.com Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

67

11,300,000,000

$

Tervita Corp.

T

anadian Pacific (TSX:CP)(NYSE:CP) is a transcontinental railway in Canada and the United States with direct links to eight major ports, including Vancouver and Montreal, providing North American customers a competitive rail service with access to key markets in every corner of the globe. CP is growing with its customers, offering a suite of freight transportation services, logistics solutions and supply chain expertise.

REVENUE

6,712,000,000

40

22

grium Inc. is a major producer and distributor of agricultural products and services in North America, South America, Australia and Egypt through its agricultural retail-distribution and wholesale nutrient businesses. Agrium supplies growers with key products and services such as crop nutrients, crop protection, seed, and agronomic and application services, thereby helping to meet the ever growing global demand for food and fiber.

REVENUE

REVENUE

$

Rank: Chemical Cdn (out of 800)

$

usky Energy is one of Canada’s largest integrated energy companies. The company operates worldwide with upstream, midstream and downstream business segments. A combination of technological innovation, prudent investment, sound project management and responsible resource development allows Husky to deliver strong returns to shareholders. The company has a well-defined and growth-oriented business plan, a stable foundation.

$

E. Hunter Harrison

www.suncor.com

REVENUE

REVENUE

C

11

uncor Energy is Canada’s leading integrated energy company. Suncor’s operations include oil sands development and upgrading, conventional and offshore oil and gas production, petroleum refining, and product marketing under the Petro-Canada brand.

REVENUE

$

Asim Ghosh

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

77

ervita is a leading environmental solutions provider. Tervita dedicated employees are trusted sustainability partners to oil and gas, construction, mining, government and communities.

Chris Synek REVENUE

www.cpr.ca

www.transcanada.com

5,800,000,000

$

*2014 REVENUE REPORTED

www.tervita.com


Your business is our business KPMG advisers combine our multi-disciplinary approach with deep industry knowledge to develop practical recommendations designed to help your organization work smarter, grow faster and compete stronger.

Contact us To find out more, speak with an adviser today. Curtis Lester Business Leader, Calgary T: 403-691-8126 E: cflester@kpmg.ca

Chris Day Business Development T: 403-691-8356 E: cday1@kpmg.ca

kpmg.ca

© 2016 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 13522


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

Encana Corp.*

E

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

79

Gibson Energy Inc.

G

A. Stewart Hanlon

Douglas J. Suttles

REVENUE

REVENUE

5,651,316,000

$

Sysco Canada, Inc.*

I

www.encana.com Rank: Food Dis Cdn (out of 800)

81

5,591,982,000

$

Shaw Communications Inc.

S

Rank: Media Cdn (out of 800)

82

Bradley S. Shaw

Randy White

REVENUE

REVENUE

5,540,913,000

$

Pembina Pipeline Corp.

P

www.sysco.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

92

5,488,000,000

$

NOVA Chemicals Corp.*

N

www.shaw.ca Rank: Chemical Cdn (out of 800)

93

OVA Chemicals develops and manufactures chemicals, plastic resins and end-products that make everyday life safer, healthier and easier. Their employees work to ensure health, safety, security and environmental stewardship through our commitment to sustainability and Responsible Care to ensure effective health, safety, security and environmental stewardship.

embina Pipeline Corporation is a reliable and growing energy transportation and service provider with an exciting future. Their integrated businesses and quality assets combine with prudent financial management to form the foundation of its strategic plan. They believe in carefully managed, responsible growth that exceeds the expectations of their stakeholders. Todd D. Karran

Michael H. Dilger

REVENUE

REVENUE

4,635,000,000

$

W

www.pembina.com Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

99

4,575,240,000

$

WestJet Airlines Ltd.

W

www.novachem.com Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

103

estJet is powered by an award-winning culture of care and recognized as one of the country’s top employers. West Jet offers scheduled service to more than 100 destinations in North America, Central America, the Caribbean and Europe.

ith nearly 8,000 employees and assets of approximately $19 billion, ATCO is a diversified global corporation delivering service excellence and innovative business solutions in Structures & Logistics.

Gregg Saretsky

Nancy C. Southern

REVENUE

REVENUE

4,131,000,000

$

Crescent Point Energy Corp.

C

www.atco.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

129

4,029,265,000

$

Fluor Canada Ltd.*

F

www.westjet.com Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

133

luor is an industry leader in engineering, procurement, fabrication and construction (EPFC). With more than a century of global experience and 65 years in Canada, Fluor is the industry benchmark in building the most challenging and complex capital projects safely, on schedule and budget while building rewarding careers and stronger communities.

rescent Point is a leading North American light and medium oil producer that seeks to maximize shareholder return through its total return strategy of long-term growth plus dividend income. The Calgary-based company is a conventional oil producer with high-quality assets across western Canada and the United States. Simon Nottingham

Scott Saxberg

REVENUE

REVENUE

3,235,000,000

$

ENMAX Corp.

E

www.crescentpointenergy.com Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

137

3,142,985,000

$

Repsol Oil & Gas Canada Inc.*

R

NMAX, through its subsidiaries, makes, moves and sells electricity to residential, small business and large commercial customers and is headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, with offices in Edmonton. ENMAX Power Corporation owns and operates transmission and distribution infrastructure in Calgary and ENMAX Energy Corporation owns diverse electricity generation facilities throughout the province. Gianna Manes

3,065,700,000

www.fluor.com/canada Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

147

epsol is one of the world’s leading integrated oil and gas companies. They are present along the entire energy value chain, including exploration, production, refining, marketing, and new energy R&D.

Luis Cabra Duenas

REVENUE

42

www.gibsons.com

haw is a diversified communications and media company, providing consumers with broadband cable television, High-Speed Internet, Home Phone, telecommunications services (through Shaw Business), satellite direct-to-home services (through Shaw Direct) and engaging programming content (through Shaw Media). Shaw serves 3.3 million customers, through a reliable and extensive fibre network.

n 1977 Sysco surpassed its competitors to become the leading supplier to ‘meals-prepared-away-from-home’ operations in North America. Since then, the industry it serves has expanded from $35 billion to approximately $210 billion. Today, Sysco has sales and service relationships with more than 400,000 customers and remains committed to helping them succeed in the foodservice industry and satisfy consumers’ appetites.

$

80

ibsons is a Canadian-based midstream energy company with operations in most of the key hydrocarbon-rich basins in North America. For over 60 years, Gibsons has delivered integrated midstream solutions to customers in the oil and gas industry. With headquarters in Calgary, Alberta, the Company’s operations include the storage, blending, processing, transportation, marketing and distribution of crude oil, natural gas liquids and refined products.

ncana is a leading North American energy producer that is focused on growing its strong portfolio of diverse resource plays producing natural gas, oil and natural gas liquids. By partnering with employees, community organizations and other businesses, Encana contributes to the strength and sustainability of the communities where it operates.

ATCO Ltd.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

www.enmax.com

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

2,880,612,000

$

www.repsol.com/ca


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp.*

C Ken Lueers

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

159

Keyera Corp.

K

PC’s story in Canada began over 100 years ago and continues today with a team of nearly 2,750 full-time employees and contractors. Headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, ConocoPhillips Canada is a top-three producer of natural gas in the country, with a world-class portfolio, including assets in Western Canada and the Arctic. With interests near Fort McMurray, Alberta, they are well positioned to become a leading in-situ producer in the oil sands.

REVENUE

2,729,808,000

$

TransAlta Corp.

T

David G. Smith

165

eyera is one of the largest independent midstream operators in Canada. Its operating businesses provide a range of gathering, processing, fractionation, storage, transportation and marketing services to the oil and gas industry. Keyera’s natural gas liquid (NGL) and crude oil infrastructure includes pipelines, terminals, and processing and storage facilities in the Edmonton and Fort Saskatchewan area, a major North American NGL hub.

REVENUE

www.conocophillips.ca Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

179

2,521,080,000

$

AltaGas Ltd.

A

ransAlta is Canada’s largest publicly traded generator and marketer of electricity. With ongoing investment in renewable and cleaner power generation, TransAlta is producing more electricity with less environmental impact. As Canada’s largest wind producer and Alberta’s largest generator of renewable energy, TransAlta takes pride in reliably meeting our customers’ needs with environmentally responsible, low-cost power.

www.keyera.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

186

ltaGas is an energy infrastructure business with a focus on natural gas, power and regulated utilities. AltaGas creates value by acquiring, growing and optimizing its energy infrastructure, including a focus on clean energy sources.

Dawn L. Farrell

David Harris

REVENUE

2,267,000,000

$

Graham Group Ltd.

G

REVENUE

www.transalta.com Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

198

2,192,800,000

$

MEG Energy Corp.

M

raham Group Ltd. is an employee-owned construction solutions partner with over eight decades of experience, providing general contracting, design-build, construction management and public-private partnership (P3) services in the commercial, industrial, infrastructure, earthworks and masonry sectors.

Grant Beck

www.altagas.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

212

EG Energy Corp. (MEG) is a Canadian oilsands company focused on sustainable in situ development and production in the southern Athabasca oil sands region of Alberta. MEG has acquired a large, high quality resource base which along with a well-formulated strategic growth plan, positions them to be a strong oilsands player for many years to come. William J. McCaffrey

REVENUE

2,028,137,000

$

Inter Pipeline Ltd.

I

REVENUE

www.graham.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

228

1,925,916,000

$

Enerflex Ltd.

E

nter Pipeline Ltd’s petroleum transportation, processing and storage assets play an important role in connecting energy and petrochemical producers to markets. As one of the largest energy infrastructure businesses in Canada, Inter Pipeline has a strong track record that has produced increasing and reliable monthly cash dividends for their shareholders.

www.megenergy.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

230

nerflex is the single-source supplier of natural gas compression, oil and gas processing and electric power equipment plus in-house engineering and mechanical services expertise. The Company`s broad in-house resources provide the capability to engineer, design, manufacture, construct, commission and service hydrocarbon handling systems.

Christian P. Bayle

J. Blair Goertzen

REVENUE

1,676,300,000

$

United Farmers of Alberta Co-operative Ltd.

U

REVENUE

www.interpipeline.com Rank: Whole Cdn (out of 800)

235

1,629,032,000

$

Precision Drilling Corp.

P

FA Co-operative Limited (UFA) is an Alberta-based agricultural cooperative providing products, services and agricultural solutions to farmers, ranchers, members and commercial customers. Founded in 1909, UFA’s extensive network includes 35 Farm & Ranch Supply stores and more than 110 bulk fuel and cardlock Petroleum locations in rural Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

Carol Kitchen

Kevin A. Neveu

REVENUE

1,591,239,000

$

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

www.enerflex.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

239

recision Drilling Corporation is Canada’s largest oilfield services company, one of the largest in the United States, with a growing international presence. Precision provides high performance contract drilling, directional drilling, completions and production, and strategic support services to customers. The company’s focus on safety, efficiency and the best equipment delivers value for Precision’s customers and investors.

REVENUE

www.ufa.com

1,555,624,000

$

www.precisiondrilling.com

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

43


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

Calfrac Well Services Ltd.

C

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

247

ARC Resources Ltd.

A

Myron M. Stadnyk

Jose Fernando Aguilar

REVENUE

REVENUE

1,495,205,000

$

Ensign Energy Services Inc.

E

www.calfrac.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

261

1,428,400,000

$

Secure Energy Services Inc.

S

1,390,978,000

$

Jacobs Canada Inc.*

J

www.ensignenergy.com Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

274

REVENUE

1,310,750,000

Penn West Petroleum Ltd.

P

1,346,425,000

$

Devon Canada Corp.*

D

John Richels

www.secure-energy.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

276

evon Canada Corporation is an experienced player in heavy oil, with more than 20 years of cold flow heavy oil production in Bonnyville, Alberta and steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) heavy oil operations in the Athabasca region of northeastern Alberta. Exponential growth in our Jackfish 1, 2 and 3 operations has led to over 120,000 BOED of best-in-class production. Devon Canada is a division of Devon Energy, an Oklahoma-based oil and gas production company.

REVENUE

www.jacobs.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

282

1,293,336,000

$

Tourmaline Oil Corp.

T

www.devonenergy.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

285

ourmaline is focused on long-term growth through an aggressive exploration, development, production and acquisition program in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Their business strategy is to maximize shareholder value by increasing reserves, production and cash flows through the exploitation and development of a continually growing asset base.

David E. Roberts

Michael L. Rose

REVENUE

1,265,000,000

$

Calgary Co-operative Association Ltd.

C

REVENUE

www.pennwest.com Rank: Food Sell Cdn (out of 800)

286

1,250,276,000

$

Trican Well Service Ltd.

T

algary Co-op is one of the largest retail co-operatives in North America. With over 440,000 members, 3,900 employees, assets of $519 million and annual sales over $1.2 billion, Calgary Co-op is committed to lead in food; petroleum; home health care; pharmacy; wine, spirits, beer and travel. Ken Keelor

www.tourmalineoil.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

292

rican is an oilfield service company that provides specialized service and technology to customers involved in the exploration and development of oil & natural gas reserves. Now marking 20 years, Trican’s services are used throughout a well’s life cycle and include multistage fracturing, coiled tubing, cementing, reservoir characterization, acidizing & production enhancement, and industrial & pipeline services. Dale M. Dusterhoft

REVENUE

1,227,654,000

$

Stuart Olson Inc.

A

REVENUE

www.calgarycoop.com Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

295

1,188,068,000

$

Cervus Equipment Corp.

C

$1 billion+ organization, Stuart Olson has been empowering Canadian business since 1911. Their rich history demonstrates their reach and diversity as a full service construction and industrial services company that provides comprehensive and innovative solutions to Canada’s public, private and industrial infrastructure markets. David J. LeMay

Graham Drake

REVENUE

1,151,416,000

44

268

Rene Amirault

enn West is a conventional oil and natural gas producer in Canada. Our goal is to be the company that redefines oil and gas excellence in western Canada. Based in Calgary, Penn West operates a significant portfolio of opportunities with a dominant oil position in the Cardium, Viking and Peace River areas of Alberta.

$

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

acobs Engineering Group Inc. is one of the world’s largest and most diverse providers of technical, professional and construction services, including all aspects of architecture, engineering and construction, operations and maintenance, as well as scientific and specialty consulting. They serve a broad range of companies and organizations, including industrial, commercial, and government clients across multiple markets and geographies.

$

www.arcresources.com

ECURE is a leading North American energy services company providing safe and environmentally responsible fluids and solids solutions to upstream oil and natural gas companies operating in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, North Dakota and Colorado.

nsign Energy Services Inc. is an industry leader in the delivery of oilfield services in Canada, the United States and internationally. They are one of the world’s leading land-based drilling and well servicing contractors serving crude oil, natural gas and geothermal operators. Additional services include directional drilling, rental equipment, managed pressure drilling, oilfield manufacturing and production flow back units.

REVENUE

Steven J. Demetriou

257

RC is one of Canada’s leading conventional oil and gas companies. Their operations are focused in five core areas across Western Canada, and provide them with an extensive resource base of high quality oil and natural gas development opportunities.

alfrac is an innovative pressure pumping services provider focused on North America’s premier unconventional natural gas and light oil plays plus strategic international markets. With state-of-the-art equipment ñ in-house R&D, a diversified customer base, an expert team of employees, experienced management and record annual revenues in 2011, Calfrac is strongly positioned for continued growth.

Robert H. Geddes

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

www.trican.ca Rank: Whole Cdn (out of 800)

299

ervus is in the business of acquiring and operating authorized agricultural, industrial and commercial equipment dealerships by facilitating dealership succession. The company proudly owns the largestgroup of John Deere agricultural equipment dealers in Canada and has a significant presence in the commercial and industrial and equipment sectors through their Bobcat, JCB, JLG, AR Williams and Peterbilt dealerships across the west.

REVENUE

www.stuartolson.com

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

1,133,878,000

$

www.cervuscorp.com


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

Baytex Energy Corp.

B

James L. Bowzer

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

317

Enerplus Corp.

E

aytex Energy Corp. is a dividend-paying oil and gas corporation based in Calgary, Alberta. The company is engaged in the acquisition, development and production of crude oil and natural gas in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin and in the Eagle Ford in the United States. Baytex is committed to maintaining its production and asset base through internal property development and delivering consistent returns to its shareholders.

REVENUE

1,031,176,000

$

Rocky Mountain Dealerships Inc.

R

319

nerplus is a North American energy producer with a portfolio of high quality oil and gas assets in resource plays that offer significant organic growth potential. Enerplus is focused on creating value for their investors through the execution of a disciplined capital investment strategy that supports the successful development of theirproperties, and a monthly dividend to shareholders. Ian C. Dundas REVENUE

www.baytexenergy.com Rank: Whole Cdn (out of 800)

327

1,027,116,000

$

www.enerplus.com

Vermilion Energy Inc.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

V

350

ermilion is an oil-leveraged producer that seeks to create value through the acquisition, exploration, development and optimization of producing properties in North America, Europe and Australia. Vermilion Energys business model targets annual organic production growth of 5% or more along with providing reliable and increasing dividends to investors.

ocky Mountain Dealerships Inc. is one of Canada’s largest agriculture and industrial equipment dealership networks with branches located throughout Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Through its network of Rocky Mountain Equipment locations, Rocky sells, rents, and leases new and used agriculture and industrial equipment and offers product support and finance to its customers. Lorenzo Donadeo

Garrett A. W. Ganden

REVENUE

REVENUE

975,456,000

$

AltaLink, L.P.

A

www.rockymtn.com Rank: Utility Cdn (out of 800)

367

873,666,000

$

www.vermilionenergy.com

Canadian Energy Services & Technology Corp.

C

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

376

anadian Energy Services & Technology Corp (CES) is a leading provider of technically advanced consumable chemical solutions throughout the lifecycle of the oilfield. This includes solutions at the drill-bit, at the point of completion and stimulation, at the wellhead and pump-jack, and finally through to the pipeline and midstream market.

ltaLink is Alberta’s largest regulated electricity transmission company. Altalinks transmission system is the essential link that connects homes, farms, businesses and industries to the electricity generated across Alberta.

Thomas J. Simons

Scott W. Thon

REVENUE

REVENUE

789,396,000

$

Murphy Oil Co. Ltd.*

M

www.altalink.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

390

749,614,000

$

www.canadianenergyservices.com

Peyto Exploration & Development Corp.

P

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

393

eyto Exploration & Development Corp. is a natural gas weighted explorer and producer that is committed to building value through the exploration and development of high quality gas properties.

urphy Oil Corporation is an international oil and gas company that conducts business through various operating subsidiaries. The company produces oil and natural gas in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Malaysia and Republic of the Congo and conducts exploration activities worldwide. Darren Gee

Michael K. McFadyen

REVENUE

REVENUE

702,516,000

$

Pengrowth Energy Corp.

P

www.murphyoilcorp.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

394

690,817,000

$

Seven Generations Energy Ltd.

S

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

400

Patrick B. Carlson

Derek W. Evans

REVENUE

REVENUE

690,700,000

www.peyto.com

even Generations Energy is an independent, public-traded energy company in the early stages of developing its liquids-rich Kakwa River Project, located about 100 kilometres south of its operations headquarters in Grande Prairie, Alberta. With corporate headquarters in Calgary, Seven Generations shares trade on the TSX under the symbol VII.

engrowth Energy Corporation is an intermediate Canadian producer of oil and natural gas, headquartered in Calgary, Alberta. Pengrowth’s assets include the Lindbergh thermal oil, Cardium light oil, Swan Hills light oil and the Groundbirch and Bernadet Montney gas projects.

$

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

www.pengrowth.com

668,695,000

$

www.7genergy.com

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

45


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

Apache Canada Ltd.*

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

A

411

Parex Resources Inc.*

P

Wayne K. Foo

Grady L. Ables

REVENUE

REVENUE

636,444,000

$

www.apachecorp.com

Bonavista Energy Corp.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

B

417

626,246,000

$

MNP LLP

621,581,000

www.bonavistaenergy.com

Oando Energy Resources Inc.*

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

O

426

ando Energy Resources (OER) is one of Africa’s leading exploration and production company, listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) in Canada. The Company has successfully built a vast portfolio of oil and gas assets in selected Africa basins and acts as both operators indigenous and Multinational companies. OER holds 16 licenses for the exploration, development and production of oil and gas assets located onshore, swamp and offshore.

SMART Technologies Inc.*

S

Jason Tuffs

597,000,000

$

Canexus Corp.

C

www.oandoenergyresources.com Rank: High-tech Cdn (out of 800)

435

Rank: Chemical Cdn (out of 800)

434

R. Douglas Wonnacott

562,301,000

$

Trinidad Drilling Ltd.

T

www.canexus.ca Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

439

rinidad Drilling provides modern, reliable, expertly designed oil and gas drilling equipment operated by well-trained personnel. Trinidad’s drilling fleet is one of the most adaptable, technologically advanced and competitive in the industry. Trinidad started as a small Canadian driller in 1996 and has grown to become an industry leader operating in Canada and the United States. Lyle C. Whitmarsh

Neil Gaydon

REVENUE

REVENUE

560,941,000

$

www.smarttech.com

Northern Blizzard Resources Inc.

N

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

457

551,899,000

$

Whitecap Resources Inc.

W

orthern Blizzard Resources Inc. is a publicly traded Canadian company based in Calgary, Alberta. Northern Blizzard was founded in late 2009 and is engaged in the exploration for and the acquisition, development and production of petroleum and natural gas reserves in western Canada. John R. Rooney

492,277,000

www.trinidaddrilling.com Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

460

hitecap Resources Inc. is an oil-weighted growth company that pays a sustainable monthly cash dividend to its shareholders. Whitecap is focused on profitable per share growth on their existing assets enhanced by opportunistic and accretive oil-based acquisitions. Whitecap’s common shares are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the symbol WCP.

Grant B. Fagerheim

REVENUE

46

www.mnp.ca

anexus produces sodium chlorate and chlor-alkali products largely for the pulp and paper and water treatment industries. Their four plants in Canada and two at one site in Brazil are reliable, low-cost, strategically-located facilities that capitalize on competitive electricity costs and transportation infrastructure to minimize production and delivery costs.

MART Technologies Inc. is a world leader in simple and intuitive solutions that enable more natural collaboration. Millions of teachers, students, business people, and personnel in government agencies use their solutions to enhance teaching, learning, productivity and collaboration.

$

422

REVENUE

REVENUE

581,445,000

Rank: Account Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

$

$

M

www.parexresources.com

NP is a leading national accounting, tax and business consulting firm in Canada. With more than 60 offices strategically located in urban and rural centres throughout Canada and through partner-led engagements, MNP provides a collaborative, cost-effective approach to doing business and personalized strategies to help organizations succeed across the country and around the world.

onavista Energy Corporation is a Calgary-based oil and gas company with a proven track record of value creation. Since inception in 1997, Bonavista has consistently added shareholder value by pursuing a disciplined and effective strategy that focuses on long term profitability. Today, Bonavista is one of Canada’s largest dividend paying energy companies, with a market capitalization of approximately $3.1 billion CDN.

REVENUE

Olpade Durotoye

416

arex Resources Inc. is a Colombian focused, international oil and gas exploration and development company, headquartered in Calgary, Canada and publically listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX:PXT). The Company holds interest in several blocks in the prolific Llanos Basin and the Magdalena Basins of Colombia.

pache was formed in 1954 with $250,000 of investor capital with the simple concept of becoming a significant and profitable oil company. Today, Apache Corporation is one of the world’s top independent oil and gas exploration and production companies.

Jason E. Skehar

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

www.northernblizzard.com

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

481,588,000

$

www.wcap.ca


EXCEPTIONAL DESIGN. EXTRAORDINARY TENANT EXPERIENCE. Arlington Street Investments is the destination for exceptional live, work, play urban experiences. Our developments are thoughtfully designed, revitalize and enhance the neighborhoods in which they are built and set a new standard for architecture and design.

Leasing and Office Condo Purchase Inquiries: kerri.mcgrath@arlingtonstreet.ca Investment Inquiries: kerri.mcgrath@arlingtonstreet.ca

403.266.5000

WWW.ARLINGTONSTREET.CA


THE VALUE OF HEAD OFFICES // HEAD OFFICES

Boardwalk Real Estate Investment Trust

B

Rank: Real Est Cdn (out of 800)

465

Harvest Operations Corp.

H

Kyungluck Sohn

Sam Kolias

REVENUE

REVENUE

476,148,000

$

www.boardwalkreit.com

Lightstream Resources Ltd.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

L

484

461,600,000

$

Savanna Energy Services Corp.

S

ightstream is an oil and gas exploration and production company focused on light oil in the Bakken and Cardium resource plays. They are committed to delivering industry leading operating netbacks, strong cash flows and consistent operating results through leading edge technology applied to a multi-year inventory of existing and emerging resource play opportunities. Christopher D. Strong

John D. Wright

449,061,000

$

www.lightstreamresources.com

Paramount Resources Ltd.

Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

485

avanna Energy Services Corp. is a premiere energy services provider operating in Canada, the United States and Australia. Their primary offerings include conventional drilling, hybrid drilling, and well servicing and comprehensive oilfield services such as oilfield equipment rentals that meet the needs of their diverse oil and gas customer base. Savanna is uniquely positioned in the energy services industry, incorporating Aboriginal partnerships into it’s business.

P

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

492

446,100,000

$

Badger Daylighting Ltd.

B

www.savannaenergy.com Rank: Engineer Cdn (out of 800)

499

adger Daylighting Ltd. (ìBadger) is North America’s leading provider of non-destructive hydrovac excavation services. Badger traditionally works for contractors, engineers, and facility owners in the oil and gas, power, municipal, transportation, industrial, and commercial construction industries.

aramount Resources Ltd. is an independent, intermediate Canadian energy company. The Company explores for, develops, produces, and markets natural gas, crude oil, and natural gas liquids in Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories.

Tor Wilson

James H. T. Riddell

REVENUE

REVENUE

419,178,000

$

Canyon Services Group Inc.

C

www.paramountres.com Rank: Oil Field Cdn (out of 800)

500

404,620,000

$

Trimac Transportation Ltd.

H

www.badgerinc.com Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

502

eadquartered in Calgary, Alberta, Trimac provides Canadian domestic and international cross-border trucking services. Trimac also provides complementary logistics services through its subsidiary Bulk Plus, and repairs, maintenance and tank-trailer cleaning services through its National Tank Services division. Trimac is Canada’s largest bulk trucking services provider with operations from coast-to-coast.

ES’ business model is focused on the design and delivery of technically advanced fluids for the oil and gas industry. CES’ business model requires limited re-investment capital to grow. As a result, CES has been able to capitalize on the growing market demand for drilling and production fluids in North America while generating free cash flow. Jeffrey J. McCaig

Bradley P. D. Fedora

REVENUE

REVENUE

403,998,000

$

The Calgary Airport Authority

T

www.canyontech.ca Rank: Transport Cdn (out of 800)

512

he Calgary Airport Authority is a not-for-profit, non-share capital corporation incorporated under the Regional Airports Authorities Act of Alberta. The Authority is responsible for the management, maintenance and development of Calgary International Airport (YYC) and Springbank Airport (YBW) under long-term lease from the Government of Canada. YYC is an important economic engine for the city, region and province, generating over $8 billion per annum in economic activity.

375,525,000

$

Bankers Petroleum Ltd.*

B

396,427,000

$

Horizon North Logistics Inc.

H

Roderick W. Graham

www.yyc.com

Rank: Service Cdn (out of 800)

514

orizon North is a publicly-traded company that provides resource companies with mobile structures, camp management and catering, matting solutions, and northern marine services. With over 1,000 employees and offices and/or manufacturing plants in Calgary, Sherwood Park, Grande Prairie and Anzac, Alberta, Kamloops, British Columbia and in Tuktoyaktuk, Inuvik and Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Horizon North operates in Canada’s western provinces and three northern territories.

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

522

369,889,000

$

Gran Tierra Energy Inc.*

G

ankers Petroleum Ltd. is a Canadian-based oil and gas exploration and production company focused on maximizing the value of its heavy oil assets in Albania. The Company is targeting growth in production and reserves through application of new and proven technologies by a strong experienced technical team.

www.horizonnorth.ca Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

530

ran Tierra Energy Inc. is an international oil and gas exploration and production company headquartered in Calgary incorporated and traded in the United States and operating in South America. The company currently holds interests in producing and prospective properties in Colombia, Argentina, Peru and Brazil.

David L. French

Gary S. Guidry

REVENUE

362,174,000

www.trimac.com

REVENUE

REVENUE

48

www.harvestenergy.ca

REVENUE

REVENUE

$

475

arvest was formed in July of 2002 and has experienced significant growth and value appreciation since that time. With a balanced asset base, superior operational expertise, extensive land base and development opportunities. Their inventory of future development projects includes 1,900 future drilling locations on more than 1.1 million net acres of undeveloped land.

oardwalk REIT strives to be Canada’s friendliest landlord and currently owns and operates more than 220 communities with over 34,000 residential units totaling approximately 29 million net rentable square feet. Boardwalk’s principal objectives are to provide its Residents with the best quality communities and superior customer service.

Garth F. Atkinson

Rank: Energy Cdn (out of 800)

REVENUE

www.bankerspetroleum.com

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM

352,742,000

$

www.grantierra.com


Following Fort McMurray:

PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

BY JOHN HARDY & NERISSA MCNAUGHTON Special supplement published by Business in Edmonton.


When fire or water damage puts the things that matter most on the line, you need the very best help on the line, as well. That’s why knowing the easiest ways to contact SERVPRO® is so important. Just go to servpro.com on your mobile phone or call 1-800-SERVPRO to get the team that’s faster to any-sized disaster. We’re a leader in giving control back to homeowners, property managers and even entire communities after the ravaging effects of water or fire. So whether you’re responsible for 1,000 square feet or 100,000 – be ready for the worst, with the very best. Your trusted, local SERVPRO® professional. SERVicES in canada PROVidEd bY indEPEndEnTlY OWnEd & OPERaTEd fRanchiSES Of SERVPRO inTERnaTiOnal, llc.


FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

O

n April 29, 2016, the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo put out a media release cheerfully advising the area’s residents to engage in emergency preparedness week. The release noted that flooding, forest fires, and dangerous goods were the area’s biggest risks. Events were to include a mocked-up reception centre and a look at potential services that could be offered to evacuees during a large-scale emergency. One day later, shifting winds brought The Beast and a state of emergency to Fort McMurray, and the evacuation began. It would take until June 13, 2016, before the blaze would be classified as being “held”. At that point well over 500,000 hectares of land had burned, destroying over 2,400 structures and nearly 10 per cent of the city. Over 80,000 residents had fled, and those that returned faced a mountain of problems, including scavenging bears, fridges full of rotting food, and the worst case scenario – a charred lot where the family home once stood. Alberta rallied behind the evacuees. Donations and assistance poured in from around the world. Tales of hope and survival abounded in the news; but when the ash settled and The Beast died down, the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo faced a monumental task. Likes on Facebook for inspirational posts about rescued

pets, cheers for airlines for flying out evacuees for free, and many other tales of heroism and survival during the height of The Beast kept the media hopping, but now the real work begins. It’s time for the city to sift through the ashes and rebuild – and it won’t be easy. On the heels of the recession, is Alberta up to the task? Premier Rachel Notley thinks so. Upon request, she kindly provided Business in Edmonton readers – and those affected by the disaster – with this special message of hope. “Here in Alberta, in tough times, Albertans pull together. We address the challenges before us and emerge stronger as a whole. As residents return to Fort McMurray and begin to rebuild, they will have to call on the strength they have shown so abundantly throughout this disaster – tremendous courage under the most difficult of circumstances. The road ahead is a long one. There is still a lot of work to recover and rebuild Wood Buffalo. And it is work we will do together. Our government will be with you as you face challenges along the way. I encourage you to continue to support each other and work together as a community in the spirit that you have demonstrated over the last difficult weeks. Together, all of us will make this city strong, and whole, and even better once again.”

“Here in Alberta, in tough times, Albertans pull together. We address the challenges before us and emerge stronger as a whole. As residents return to Fort McMurray and begin to rebuild, they will have to call on the strength they have shown so abundantly throughout this disaster – tremendous courage under the most difficult of circumstances.” ~Premier Rachel Notley

FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 3


PHOTO COURTESY OF REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO.

According to Pedro Antunes, deputy chief economist with the Conference Board of Canada, “The true cost of this tragedy is the effect on people’s lives and livelihoods, the loss of homes and personal items. There is absolutely no way to suggest that Albertans will be better off, but despite the specifics of any situation, economists focus, track and calculate the economy and measure GDP based on facts and forecasts,” he explains, “and when you measure the economy as income, the massive rebuild will actually stimulate the economy. Next year, Alberta’s economy is expected to slowly climb out of a two-year recession and the Fort McMurray rebuild will actually boost the real GDP by nearly half a percentage point.” Antunes continues, “There’s no doubt about it, lost assets will be rebuilt, generating much economic activity for the area and for Alberta as a whole. The business downside, but a practical business reality of the rebuild, is that the spending will be mostly debt-financed. The funds for rebuilding and replacing lost capital will leave the provincial and federal governments with more debt, and the insurance industry absorbing what will likely be the most expensive natural disaster in Alberta, and maybe even Canadian history.”

Antunes also underscores the ironic timing of the Fort McMurray devastation, when it comes to the sheer facts and figures of the economy. He points out that before the massive fire, Fort McMurray, like Calgary and other Alberta areas, was already dealing with various broadsides of the downturn and oil price slump. For the past two years, Fort McMurray unemployment was a painful jolt. The Canadian Home Builders’ Association (CHBA), local real estate, and other statistics showed that the Fort McMurray market was suffering significant declines. In 2015, as some Fort McMurray workers left to find other careers and jobs and others stayed, hoping for the recovery, Fort McMurray new home construction starts dropped to 193 units, their lowest level in more than 20 years. MLS sales fell 43.5 per cent to 974 from 2014. This year, before the fire, there were only 13 new home starts in the first four months of 2016. According to Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, by year-end 2015, the once near-zero Fort McMurray vacancy rate in rental apartments had skyrocketed to 30 per cent.

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FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

THANK YOU. More than 1can million Canadians showed care and compassion Canadians be proud of the compassion and care they have through a donation to the Red Cross Alberta Fires response. Thanks to the generosity of individuals, groups, businesses,

From coast-to-coast, will continue to work together and the governments ofwe Canada and Alberta, the Red Cross to improve the lives of those in need. throughout their recovery.

redcross.ca/AlbertaImpact

To learn more about the Red Cross response, or if you have redcross.ca/AlbertaFiresInfo

SHARING YOUR VISION. BUILDING SUCCESS. We are more than builders. We are friends and neighbours who care about the communities in which we work and live in. Just like our commitment to quality construction, so too is PCL’s commitment in helping Fort McMurray continue its important role in building Alberta’s future. Watch us build at PCL.com

FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 5


THE MODERATE RESOLUTION IMAGING SPECTRORADIOMETER (MODIS) ON NASA’S TERRA SATELLITE CAPTURED THE GROUND TEMPERATURE ANOMALIES DURING THE FIRE. THIS MAP SHOWS HOW LAND-SURFACE TEMPERATURES DURING APRIL 26 - MAY 3, 2016, COMPARED TO THE 2000-2010 AVERAGE FOR THE SAME ONEWEEK PERIOD. RED DOTS SHOW HOTTER-THAN-AVERAGE TEMPERATURES, BLUE DOTS ARE BELOW AVERAGE AND WHITE AREAS ARE NORMAL. PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA.

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FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN BY NASA’S AQUA SATELLITE ON MAY 24, 2016. THE RED OUTLINES ARE HOT SPOTS (FIRES) AND THE WHITE, DESPITE LOOKING LIKE SNOW CAPS, ARE BILLOWS OF SMOKE. AT THIS POINT THE FIRE HAD CONSUMED APPROXIMATELY 2019 SQUARE MILES. PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA.

FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 7


PHOTO COURTESY OF REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO.

However, a silver lining is the availability of Fort McMurray workers.

knows the protocol and process of the insurance claim paper trail.

Just three or four years ago, during $100-per-barrel oil era and when business was booming, every trade, supplier, and contractor in the Fort McMurray area was working. Builders were scrambling to find workers. The timing of Alberta’s economic slowdown will now make it easier to find the staff and equipment needed to achieve the rebuild.

“It’s going to be a bit complex,” Rivait points out. “If you are in an area where 100 houses need to be rebuilt, it’s hard to have 80 builders in there.

There is an expectation that the enormous rebuild project will take at least two years or longer, depending on many factors: from insurance companies processing, approving and resolving claims (it’s a naive assumption that they will simply ‘cut a cheque’), the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo’s willingness to fast track the review and approval of permits, the planning and coordination of developers with northern Alberta weather, construction scheduling and completions. “You can’t just start building 2,000 houses all at the same time; it won’t happen,” says Jim Rivait, CEO of the Alberta branch of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association, who previously served as the vice president of the Insurance Bureau of Canada. As a result, he

“It sounds a bit odd, but on a duplex where you have two owners and two different insurance companies and the owners can determine their builder, there are some things that will have to be considered from a practical standpoint.” What this means is, if you have one builder that decides to use the opportunity to upgrade and create a stunning duplex inside and out, but the other builder chooses an economical approach and has to wait for a contractor to become available, property values – not to mention neighbourhood relations – will be affected. While the one homeowner wants to come home to a nice, restored property each day, the other may resent the sudden inequality in the look and value of the complex. Both homeowners should work together to come to a mutual consensuses, much like the way homeowners have to cooperate when it comes time to build a fence on bordering backyards, or to deal with overgrown trees that branch out over boundary lines.

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FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

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FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 9


FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 10


PHOTO COURTESY OF REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO.

PHOTO COURTESY OF REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO.

FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 11


Rivait gives another probable example showing that this issue can extend far beyond duplexes and triplexes. Consider a 12-unit townhome with different owners and no condo association. With everyone having the right to select their own builder, one unit owner could go with a premium builder and completely upgrade their unit while his or her neighbour could go with his buddy that put up a few houses once and only had time to work the townhome during the weekends. Once again, the entire look of the complex becomes unbalanced. “Ultimately, who they select is up to them, but if delays happen and costs increase, you have to do something different,” he says, noting that practicality, communication, and a coordinated response are key as the city rebuilds. Rivait provides some things for homeowners to think about when it comes time to select a company to rebuild or repair their damaged homes. “In Slave Lake, for example, builders said they could do the job in three to four months. There was no chance of that. Speak to your insurer so they can vet the builders. If you are in a car crash, you can go to your brother-in-law to fix your car and be on your way, but if you speak to your insurance agent, they have a list of preferred suppliers that have experience and guarantee their work. Insurance companies have preferred suppliers in the restoration industry too. It’s always the client’s choice, ultimately, but insurers know the real costs involved and what is required. I think recommendations from insurers would provide some security in the mind of the claimants. It would differentiate inexperienced part-time builders from the professionals. Claimants need some level of assurance that whoever is promising to build your place can actually do it. “One of the things that happened before in Slave Lake was builders and others were involved too early in the rebuilding process. Anyone building up there has to

respect that the community has been traumatized and that the community needs some time to make some decisions. Making a decision on a new home is a huge decision. It’s not like buying an iPod. Both the people and the process need to be respected for the time they need.” Rivait cautions, “[The disaster] will increase economic activity. There is no question about it, but there are things outside of housing we have to worry about. It’s businesses, too. Some might not survive.” To use Calgary’s flood, for example, 7,000 companies were affected, 23 per cent of which were SMEs. One per cent failed to reopen. Seeing how quickly SMEs could fail thanks to a natural disaster is nothing new for Madan Murthy, chief sales and marketing officer at AbleIT Inc. “Anyone that did not have an outside backup at another location or a cloud-based backup could be facing complete data loss,” says Murthy. “This may include customer information, financial details, accounting information, and other critical data – it’s potentially devastating. Our hope and prayer is that [Fort McMurray businesses] have an outside backup, which minimizes the loss based on how often they backed up their data. If a business lost their data in the fire, is there anything that can be done? “One of the first steps we would take is to check all the information, from all available drives, that is recoverable,” says Murthy. “The key is seeing if there is any salvageable component from the existing networks. If every existing machine is gone, we then look at the recovery of data that was kept manually and input that information into a database. It’s a painstaking procedure as it is a long process of analyzing what is available to us and using that as a starting point.”

“[The disaster] will increase economic activity. There is no question about it, but there are things outside of housing we have to worry about. It’s businesses, too. Some might not survive.” ~ Jim Rivait

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FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

SOME NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE COMPLETED DECIMATED, BUT HEROIC FIREFIGHTERS WORKED HARD TO SAVE EVERY SQUARE FOOT THAT THEY COULD – AND SOME AREAS REMAINED, THANKFULLY, UNTOUCHED. HERE WE SEE CHARRED REMAINS OF HOUSES OVERLOOKED BY ONES THAT ARE STILL INTACT. PHOTO COURTESY OF REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO.

Local Solutions for Recovery and Reconstruction in Our Communities We are committed to working together with the families of Fort McMurray, and surrounding communities, to rebuild their lives and strengthen the bond of the community. We are ready to assist with restoration and repairs for damaged properties, as well as turnkey construction services for rebuilding properties to help restore our community.

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Contact Information: Sean Crockett, MBA, ICD.D | Vice President, Clark Builders O 780.395.3446 | C 780.699.0151 | sean.crockett@clarkbuilders.com | clarkbuilders.com FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 13


FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY: PART 1 - GETTING READY FOR RESTORATION

It’s going to be frustrating at times, rewarding at others; some areas will innovate and be stronger and better than before, others will struggle and may have to revaluate whether or not they still want to live or operate their business in Fort McMurray. There is a long, uncertain future ahead, but one fact is clear: Albertans will work together for the best possible outcome, no matter how long it takes.

He has advice for those looking to avoid such a disaster, and for Fort McMurray businesses to protect the future of their companies.

AbleIT is keeping an eye on the developing rebuild and hopes to put their skills to good use as SMEs start reopening in Fort McMurray.

“This is the key – cloud backup. Organizations need to understand that the cloud is more secure than having your data in-house. The data is encrypted and the security levels for most clouds are better than what you will get at a bank. The main misunderstanding about cloud backups today, and what SMEs need to understand, is that the cloud is so much more secure and nobody can access it but you. Over the years the reliability of cloud backup has become so good, we can guarantee it. In the case of a natural disaster, it’s better, faster and cheaper to recover. You could be up and running within hours. “SMEs avoid developing a backup plan. They think they will not be affected and they take the good times for granted. That’s wrong. You have to have a plan.”

“We are developing a plan and our plan is fluctuating. We have not heard enough about how businesses are currently being affected, besides the oil sands situation. We are in the process right now of analyzing the impact on SMEs, which we will use to guide our plan. That may mean we have to make a trip up there and see what the scope of the damage is and what services we can provide to the companies. This is not a money making scheme for us. Do our costs need to be covered? Yes, but there is a humanity factor. We want to help. As such, we won’t charge market price and will be implementing a Fort McMurray price to ensure speedy and cost effective recovery.”

Supporting the community and our families in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. Rebuilding with you. Stronger together.

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He urges businesses to take evasive action. “The most important part of any computing system is the data, and any and all measures must be taken to protect the data. In the event of a disaster, a copy of the data must exist in a different location than that of the disaster or the data is gone, forever.” Rebuilding Fort McMurray, which is one of Alberta’s important economic hubs – is going to take time, effort, money, and cooperation among residents, all levels of government, home owners, businesses, contractors, and service providers. It’s going to be frustrating at times, rewarding at others; some areas will innovate and be stronger and better than before, others will struggle and may have to revaluate whether or not they still want to live or operate their business in Fort McMurray. There is a long, uncertain future ahead, but one fact is clear: Albertans will work together for the best possible outcome, no matter how long it takes.

FOLLOWING FORT MCMURRAY | PAGE 14


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THE CANADA-ALBERTA JOB GRANT // TRAINING & EDUCATION

THE

CANADA-ALBERTA JOB GRANT: BUILDING A BETTER NATION -Part I

BY NERISSA MCNAUGHTON

T

he Canada Job Grant brings government and business together to build a better workforce. This employerdriven approach is flexible and scalable for businesses of all sizes, allowing employers to identify key employees interested in advancing their training, and/or skill vacancies. The grant also ensures employees are being trained for Canada’s most in-demand jobs, and it helps to alleviate skilled worker shortages.

Education: The Key to Success

Alberta joined the grant program in 2014. Under the Canada-Alberta Job Grant (CAJG), employers cover a minimum of one third of the training costs, and receive up to a maximum of $10,000 in government contributions.

What can education do for you? It can change your life. Multiple studies have linked post-secondary education to higher average salaries, more consistent employment, more assets in one’s financial portfolio, and greater opportunities to work in safe and comfortable spaces (air conditioning, close to amenities, etc.), not to mention home-life stability. Basically, education improves every facet of your life. The benefits go beyond financial and personal comfort. Those with post-secondary education also have stronger support and social circles, along with higher self-esteem.

Part one of this two-part series looks at the program from the government and educational institution perspective.

However, many face barriers to education, such as a lack of funds and an unwillingness to take on a huge debt load

BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE CANADA-ALBERTA JOB GRANT // TRAINING & EDUCATION

“EDUCATION AND SKILLS TRAINING IS ONE OF THE BEST INVESTMENTS OUR GOVERNMENT CAN MAKE TO ENSURE A RESILIENT AND DIVERSIFIED ECONOMY. ~MINISTER OF LABOUR CHRISTINA GRAY

in the form of student loans. Others come from socioeconomic groups with limited opportunities, making the corporate ladder climb an especially arduous one. Now, there is a way for individuals to get the courses they need to succeed, and there’s a way for the employers they work for to help them. The result is 360 degrees of win – for the company, for the employee, and for our economy.

The Government’s Perspective Minister of Labour Christina Gray explains, “The Canada Job Grant, funded by the Government of Canada, helps employers train new or existing employees for jobs that need to be filled. In 2014, Alberta joined other provinces and territories in formally signing on to the federal program via the Canada-Alberta Job Grant (CAJG). Provinces and territories are responsible for the design and delivery of the grant.

“Education and skills training is one of the best investments our government can make to ensure a resilient and diversified economy. The Canada-Alberta Job Grant responds to Alberta’s labour challenges by supporting employers in building a strong workforce through better trained workers, and helping Albertans gain the skills they need to find good jobs. The grant was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of all business sizes, in all industries and regions of Alberta. “The CAJG is opened to businesses of all sizes, in all industries and regions of Alberta. As of March 2016, the program was widely used by small businesses, which make up approximately 43 per cent of the employers accessing the program. Applications were submitted by employers in all industry sectors, including: scientific and technical services (11.8 per cent), manufacturing (9.8 per cent), and healthcare and social assistance (8.4 per cent).”

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Put your feet up and chase your dreams.

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Get your MBA from Thompson Rivers University and build your future in a way that suits your present. Learn on campus, online, or a combination of both. Study part-time or full-time. It’s your choice.


When the going gets tough, the tough get smart. There is never a bad time to help your employees advance their skills and knowledge at Bow Valley College, building a smarter workforce and a stronger competitive edge. Even now? During tough times? Absolutely. We can give you four strong reasons this is the best time to train and get better. First, you should always be training your people. Grow your people, grow your company. A well trained team is a huge competitive edge, and that’s exactly what your company needs when the going gets tough. Second, investing in your people pays. Not only do you get a stronger workforce, it shows you value their contribution. Ask any Human Resources Manager (or anyone for that matter) and they will tell you training is a huge reward that builds loyalty, retention and has a positive impact to the bottom line. Third, the Alberta-Canada Job Grant could fund as much as 2/3 of the costs for eligible applicants (employers cover the other 1/3) for direct training. It’s part of a joint plan initiated by the Government of Canada and the Government of Alberta to ensure people are being trained in high demand areas. And fourth, the training available at Bow Valley College is excellent and flexible. We consult with hundreds of industry leaders to ensure everything we teach is relevant and valuable. The knowledge, technical ability, and workplace skills your employees learn pays dividends right away, like productivity, market share, profits, and success.

opportunities through Continuing Education with options to study part time, in-class, online, home study, or in a blended format. For example:

Intercultural Competencies for Leaders Certificate Immigrants and Indigenous peoples are transforming Calgary workplaces and creating new business opportunities – they currently make up over 1/3 of the workforce in Calgary and are growing every day. This certificate gives leaders the practical skills they need to ensure the business continues to be competitive, and can gain a competitive advantage.

Business Management Certificates These certificates build the vital skills that lead to business success. For those who are already working in business management, these certificates provide opportunities to grow their skill set, grow their careers, and grow your company.

Accounting Applications Certificates You know how important accounting is to the success of your company. So do we. Our certificates sharpen the skills necessary to control and track the numbers quickly and efficiently, keeping your organization running smoothly.

Project Management Certificate Project management is the art of getting things done, a vital skill in any organization. Our experienced instructors train your people to get it done right, on time and on budget, making them essential to the success of any project.

Bow Valley College has an extensive selection of training One final thought. When times are good and it’s too busy, you’re too busy to train. So train now when you have the time. Your people will get so good you’ll be too busy again in no time. Visit bowvalleycollege.ca/coned or email study@bowvalleycollege.ca to find out more.


Become indispensable in your business career. Continuing Education Certificates at Chiu School of Business in the areas of: Accounting | Computer Applications | Administrative Professional | Business Management | Supply Chain | Entrepreneurship | Project Management | Home Inspection | Maintenance Management | Petroleum Management | Tourism Management Join thousands of other Bow Valley College learners who have advanced their careers.

Phone: 403-410-1595 Email: continuingeducation@bowvalleycollege.ca

bowvalleycollege.ca/coned

The World Rises Here


THE CANADA-ALBERTA JOB GRANT // TRAINING & EDUCATION

It’s easy for businesses and prospective students to take part in the program.

reviewed on a case-by-case basis if the training required is not available in Alberta.

“Eligible applicants are required to be incorporated by or registered under an act of the Legislature or Parliament of Canada in order to verify that they are an operating business in Alberta,” says Gray. “Currently, the CAJG validates employers based on the Alberta Corporate Access Number (ACAN), which allows the ministry to verify the employer and their business as a separate legal entity.

“Employers are responsible for identifying appropriate training facilities and programs to deliver the training that will meet their needs. For example, some post-secondary institutions are eligible third-party training providers.”

“Training providers must be separate and distinct from the applicant. This means the trainer cannot have an employee relationship with the company. The training provider also cannot employ the individual it is training. For example, a company’s own training program would not qualify for funding. “The CAJG is intended to fund training programs in Alberta. However, requests for out-of-province training will be

To date, the response has been very positive. “We are pleased with the number of employers who have taken advantage of this program, and the number of Albertans who have been able to benefit from a vast range of skills training,” Gray affirms. “In 2015-2016, more than $16 million in funds was committed for training, resulting in over 11,000 courses for Albertans. Examples of some popular types of skills training include project management, risk management, health and safety courses, leadership skills, and driver training.”

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your business in focus

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Guide to Continuing Education and Adult Upgrading Get your copy today at adlc.ca!

For over 90 years, Alberta Distance Learning Centre | ADLC has offered Albertans paths to education that fit their busy lives. With premium print and online educational opportunities available, students from Grade 1 through 12, and adults taking life to the next level, can learn on demand with support from professional teachers.

For more information on programs and courses, visit adlc.ca 1-866-774-5333


THE CANADA-ALBERTA JOB GRANT // TRAINING & EDUCATION

An Educational Facility Perspective “The role of educational institutions in the Canada-Alberta Job Grant is to identify and promote training opportunities that provide technical, experiential or applied training that is attractive to employers because it is reacting to a current need in industry,” says Colleen Bangs, manager, career services, University of Calgary. “For example, the Aboriginal Relations Leadership Training Program offered through The Native Centre and Career Services at the University of Calgary is a 24-hour immersive training program that both students and industry professionals can use to enhance their capacity to work collaboratively

and respectfully with First Nations, Metis and Inuit communities. This program is only one week in length and builds capacity within an organization while providing professional development in intercultural competence, and it qualifies for the job grant. “It is important for industry, and for Albertans, to be supported in their continued growth during difficult economic times. This [grant] sends a message that we are progressive and forward thinking and works to prevent the creation of knowledge gaps in a province that depends highly on continued innovation and the retention of thought leaders and future leaders.”

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Look what’s offered this fall...

DOWNTOWN Good Writing is Good Business | Oct 20

How strong leaders get stronger... Let Continuing Education Business Seminars help you refresh and refine your leadership skills. This fall, take a break from the office to attend a Business

Effective Writing in the Workplace | Nov 3 Accounting for NonFinancial Managers | Nov 9

Power and Science of Coaching | Nov 15

Leading with Confidence and Courage | Nov 15

Cultivating Innovation in Your Organization | Nov 18

Developing High Performance Teams | Nov 16

Writing Winning Proposals | Nov 30

MAIN CAMPUS

days, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, and can be taken on their own, or

Emotional Intelligence Sep 28

and to register.

Time Management | Sep 29

Conquering Your Fear of Public Speaking | Nov 19

Meeting the Challenge of Leadership | Nov 24

Stress Less: Managing What’s On Your Mind | Oct 4

Perfecting the Performance Discussion | Nov 25

Mental Toughness: Training for Success | Oct 13 Do Less and Achieve More: Zone of Optimal Performance | Oct 17 The Decisive Leader | Oct 19 Coaching for Quality Performance | Oct 25

Certificate for Emerging Leaders.

Confidence in Communication | Nov 18

Fundamentals of Supervision | Oct 3

Dealing with the Difficult Conversation | Oct 13

Kishory Devine. Graduate.

Navigating Through Ethical Decisions | Nov 17

Creative Negotiating | Nov 21

Energize Your Workplace: Inspiring and Motivating People | Oct 11

I enrolled in this program not only to confirm my belief that I am a leader, but also for professional development and personal growth.

Facilitation Skills | Nov 17

Creative Conflict Resolution: Making the Most of Differences | Sep 30

Leveraging Generational Differences at Work | Oct 5

Assertiveness: Choosing the Right Balance | Nov 7 Leading Yourself and Others Through Change | Nov 7

Campus at 906 8th Ave SW. Seminars run from one to three

Go to conted.ucalgary.ca/emerging for seminar descriptions

Understanding the Power of Collaboration | Nov 2

Getting Things Done Through Influence | Nov 15

Seminar at UCalgary’s Main Campus, or the Downtown

for credit toward the Certificate for Emerging Leaders.

Creative Problem Solving | Nov 1

Mastering Work and Life Satisfaction | Nov 21

Leading with Cultural Intelligence | Nov 28 Succession Planning: Developing Leaders From Within | Dec 1 Implementing Change | Dec 5 Understanding and Developing Your Unique Organizational Culture | Dec 6 Overview of Strategic Planning | Dec 7 Financial Analysis and Planning for Non-Financial Managers | Dec 12

Get Organized! Improve Your Workflow and Boost Your Productivity | Oct 28

Looking for corporate training? All of these seminars can be adapted to group training sessions. To learn more, call 403-220-2988.

good thinking • conted.ucalgary.ca/emerging • 403.220.2988


Make the most of this opportunity with the Canada-Alberta Job Grant. Online learning is convenient, quality training to optimize skills while you remain employed benefiting both employees and employers.

PRE-EMPLOYMENT HEAVY EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN

Interest in mechanics? Enjoy fixing things? Like learning how things work? Then consider our NEW Pre-Employment Heavy Equipment Technician program. This entry level program will introduce you to electronics, hydraulics, brake systems, air brakes, safety and more. The program is 16 weeks in length, conveniently offered through a blended method; 12 weeks of theory online followed by a 1 week review and then the final 4 weeks of face-to-face practical training in our shop. In the HET shop you’ll get experience using our current hydraulic, air brake and electrical training aids.

SAGD DAWT (STEAM ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE DE-OILING AND WATER TREATMENT)

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THE CANADA-ALBERTA JOB GRANT // TRAINING & EDUCATION

Bangs believes the CAJG will have a positive effect on Alberta’s job market now and into the future. “It is a message to industry that forward motion and continued development of employees continues to be a priority for the federal and provincial government.”

More to Come The CAJG is moving Alberta’s work force in a very positive direction and will ultimately impact our economy in far-reaching ways. Next month we’ll look at the influence this program is having in the industry and workforce levels by presenting their first-person perspectives. Stay tuned and visit www.albertacanada.com/ jobgrant for more information about the CAJG and how you can make it work for you.

TRAINING SOLUTIONS FOR TECHNICAL PROFESSIONALS EPIC courses are designed and taught by leading professionals with extensive experience. Here are some upcoming courses in Calgary for 2016: Structural Design of Industrial Buildings Sept. 19-21 • CEUs 2.1 // 21 PDHs Environmental Engineering for Non-Environmental Engineers Sept. 19-21 • CEUs 2.1 // 21 PDHs Understanding the Manufactured Specifications of Pressure Piping for Inspectors, Designers and Engineers Sept. 20-22 • CEUs 2.1 // 21 PDHs Construction Management Sept. 26-27 • CEUs 1.4 // 14 PDHs Testing, Commissioning and Maintenance of Electrical Systems Sept. 26-29 • CEUs 2.8 // 28 PDHs

Learn. Grow. Succeed. Discover EPIC today. epictraining.ca/BIC • 1.855.910.9498

78

AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


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Technology: Blessing or Curse Let’s Ask an EOer

A

t work and play, it’s unanimous: technology continues to transform life and business. Technology makes life easier. And it makes business efficient. But, as most technology boosters will admit, while technology in business is a blessing, it can also be an occasional curse and problem. We asked for comment from three successful Calgary business leaders and EO Calgary members: Josh Higgelke, Jeremy Regehr and Rob Heaton. “The commoditization of hardware and the unlimited resources of the cloud is allowing businesses to go beyond merely making technology work,” says Jeremy Regehr, vice president of Calgarybased Cougar Ridge Computer Systems. “They now focus on how to actually manage and utilize their information. For forward-thinking companies, their IT is becoming an important strategic value rather than merely a necessary operational cost.” Josh Higgelke, partner and mortgage associate at Higgelke Mortgage Group, enthusiastically agrees. “Looking back, it’s a bit embarrassing to realize what an archaic system we worked with. Last December, we moved to a web-based platform and the change was instant,” he admits. “Not a day goes by when I don’t say ‘I love the technology.’ Year over year, our volumes are way up, due to our efficiencies. “We have a terrific team but, initially, I was worried about how they would embrace technology. We have a fabulous platform and we have created one of the best systems for mortgages. Our team now brings in deals because the system has been transformational.

“Our business is talking to people, all day. And the offers to get mortgages arranged is tricky. Technology has brought efficiency and organization – and we have more time to go home to our families!” “Technology has greatly changed how we do business. It allows us to do more,” raves Rob Heaton, pharmacist and owner of Cambrian Pharmacy. “Much of the technical work is taken over by the technology. We also focus more on business opportunities, thanks to the efficiencies. Technology provides so many different ways of analyzing information.” He cautions that technology does have downsides. “Sometimes there is almost too much information. And when technology goes down, we are unable to operate. “Technology increases the choices customers have for communication with the business. We get very dependent on technology and rapid responses. Well-managed technology can enhance a relationship but if not managed properly, it can also hurt the relationship. There is now an ‘instant response’ expectation from the customer.” While it’s unanimous that technology translates into tremendous business efficiency, there’s also agreement (and caution) that it also impacts business (and personal) relationships. “So many times today we can miss the importance of human relationships done face-to-face,” Regehr warns. “It’s said that 93 per cent of communication is non-verbal. Knowing when to leave the chat window or client email and when to sit down with someone can be a real game-changer for any organization.”

Contributing Members:

Upcoming Events: August 27 • GlobalFest Family Event

Josh Higgelke

Jeremy Regehr

Rob Heaton

partner and mortgage associate at Higgelke Mortgage Group.

vice president of Calgary based Cougar Ridge Computer Systems.

pharmacist and owner of Pharmacy Cambrian Pharmacy.

The international Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) is the respected, world-wide business networking group — with more than 10,000 members in 35 countries — where business leaders meet informally to brainstorm, compare notes, learn and share relevant discussions about business. EO has 122 chapters around the world, including the Calgary chapter which is the fifth largest and one of the most active EO chapters in the world.

www.eocalgary.com

|

For membership inquiries: membership@eocalgary.com


THE PULSE OF CALGARY’S RESIDENTIAL RESALE MARKET // REAL ESTATE

The Pulse of Calgary’s Residential Resale Market A mid-year checkup BY MELANIE DARBYSHIRE

H

eading into 2016, few were optimistic about the prospects for Calgary’s residential resale market. Economic conditions in the city were dismal, and the impact was already being felt in the real estate market where sales activity had taken a hit. And, the market performed pretty much as predicted through the first half of this year. Slower sales, rising inventories and declining prices have been the story. “We started off the year continuing in a weak demand scenario,” explains Ann-Marie Lurie, chief economist at the Calgary Real Estate Board. “Sales have continued to fall within the city of Calgary, off of levels that were already lower last year.” To the end of May, 7,175 sales were recorded – 10.42 per cent less than during the same time in 2015 and 36 per cent less than in 2014. Supply levels, on the other hand, rose. And unlike in 2015 – when very low inventory levels prior to the downturn softened its effects – inventory levels in January were not low, and continued to rise throughout this year. A more substantial drop in benchmark prices resulted. On a year-to-date average

to the end of May, the benchmark price moved down roughly 3.5 per cent year-over-year to $443,260. The apartment segment of the market saw the biggest pull back. From January through May, sales were down 20 per cent from 2015; this was on top of a 30 per cent decline from 2014. Meanwhile prices declined by over five per cent from 2015. In May, the apartment benchmark price was $278,500, a monthly and year-over-year decline of 0.7 and 5.6 per cent. The influx of new home product hurt the apartment segment in particular. Increasing supply in other segments of the resale market also played a role. “When you have more choice in the other products – in detached and attached products – people are choosing those first,” Lurie explains. The higher end of the detached market, which was hit first and hard last year and saw listings spike, stabilized somewhat this year as inventory levels eased off. Lurie attributes this to price drops. “It’s been enough of a price decline to encourage people to see the value in it,” she explains. “This has encouraged some of the sales and helped to reduce some of the inventory.”

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THE PULSE OF CALGARY’S RESIDENTIAL RESALE MARKET // REAL ESTATE

While the mid-range of the detached market remained relatively stable last year, it has not gone unscathed in this second year of the down cycle. Inventories increased, causing overall prices to decline. Prices have declined across the city, though geographical distinctions do exist. Steep price declines (of approximately five per cent in the detached market, for example) in the city centre caused some sales improvement there this year. Similarly, sales have improved in the northwest and west regions – again thanks to price declines. The only area to avoid year-over-year price declines was the northeast. “It’s been a bit more resilient and that was because [in 2015] there just wasn’t any supply in the mid to lower range of the market,” Lurie explains. Like Calgary, resale markets in many of the city’s surrounding communities have slowed this year. “Some of what [they] face is not just supply in their own market, but also supply in Calgary,” Lurie explains. “When you have more choices in the inner city people are going to go there.” Airdrie, for example, has seen inventories rise and sales fall. “But what’s a little bit different about it is the sales levels have actually stayed above long-term averages,” adds Lurie. According to Matt Carre, a realtor with RE/MAX Rocky View Real Estate, the number of sales in Airdrie through to June 13 was 761 – a 20 per cent drop from 2015. “Airdrie’s average sale price has stayed fairly consistent over the past three years,” Carre says. To the end of May, it was $384,810 – only one per cent lower year-over-year. Cochrane’s sales were down slightly from last year, and approximately 25 per cent lower than in 2014. “Chestermere has taken the biggest drop in number of sales,” Carre says. “[It is] down approximately 30 per cent from last year and approximately 40 per cent from 2014.” Benchmark prices fell in both communities – Chestermere saw an approximately four per cent drop to the end of May (though Chestermere’s average price is still up substantially from 2014), while Cochrane saw an approximately five per cent price drop. Lurie explains Cochrane’s more pronounced

drop: “Inventory levels have been pushing up far higher [in Cochrane] than we’ve seen in any other market.” New housing construction has likewise slowed down. In Airdrie, 233 residential building permits were issued to the end of May – 39.7 per cent less year-over-year. Cochrane issued 138 permits and Chestermere issued 64, 70 and 43.8 per cent less respectively year-over-year. Lurie is cautious about the future. “I would anticipate as we move through this year we’ll continue to see that weak level of demand in the housing market,” she says. Carre echoes her sentiments. “There is still so much uncertainty in our economy, and when people aren’t sure about the future they will usually put off making big decisions like buying and selling a house.” Not an unpredicted year, and one that has provided both opportunities and hardships in the market. As the second half of 2016 plays out, where the resale market will go is anybody’s (educated) guess. It will depend, as does everything else, on the economy.

ABOVE: MATT CARRE

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


THE BUSINESS OF GOLF // GOLF

THE BUSINESS OF GOLF “We refuse to be part of a recession.”

BY JOHN HARDY

W

The professionals who manage Calgary courses are unanimous: staff members play a key role and are usually the biggest cost of operations.

It is also a fiercely competitive, customer-driven business that is more about the total golfing experience than the business plan, budgets and the bottom line.

“The business of the golf course is the ability to fulfil client expectations which may differ on an individual basis,” explains Carolina Oxtoby, president and CEO of Heritage Pointe Properties. “It’s most important that we provide exceptional value and customer experience by hiring welltrained, friendly staff who engage with the customer to ensure their day at Heritage Pointe is the best it can be.”

hen enjoying a day of golf, it is easy to forget the game is also a business. In Calgary, it’s a short and seasonal business. A weather-driven business. A sometimes challenging business. And, in some ways, a business in transition.

“Like other businesses, ultimately the customer makes or breaks the golf business’ growth and success,” says Barry Ehlert, managing partner with Windmill Golf Group, which owns and operates Springbank Links, the Hamptons, Boulder Creek, Silverwing Links and Harvest Hills in the Calgary area as well as Edmonton’s Northern Bear Club and the Wilderness Club in Montana. “So, a vital part of our business plan is to constantly pay attention to the key aspects of customer satisfaction at our courses.

She adds, “We pride ourselves on being a public golf course with a private club environment. The Heritage Pointe team of employees are absolutely integral to the success of our business.”

“The most unique components of our business plan is our business model and our team. It’s why we are growing and successful. The Windmill Group employs some 750 full-time and seasonal staff, from the crews who trim and pamper the fairways and greens to the pros, cart maintenance and the banquet staff. “Our business model is vastly different from most other golf course models. It’s not a stand-alone, pay-and-play operation. Windmill offers different layers of programs and incentives to come back and play…. One of the biggest negatives with golf is ‘join one course/play one course.’ For us, it’s join Windmill and play all the courses.”

ABOVE: CHAD THOMLINSON BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // AUGUST 2016

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THE BUSINESS OF GOLF // GOLF

“THE BIGGEST TRANSFORMATION FOR THE BUSINESS OF GOLF IS THAT THE GAME IS NO LONGER CONSIDERED AN ELITIST SPORT. IT ATTRACTS JUNIORS AND BEGINNERS AND THE FEMALE SECTOR IS ALSO GROWING. ~ CAROLINA OXTOBY

According to Chad Thomlinson, general manager of Priddis Greens Golf and Country Club, “ From a business standpoint, the ability to hire, train and manage staff is top priority. The bottom line is that we are in the people business. And like many other businesses, it’s important to manage expenses, manage the downtimes and provide consistent high-quality conditions.

“Rumoured changes in the game have been a hot topic for about 10 years,” Thomlinson smiles. “Sure there are shifts in lifestyle trends and some courses may be making some changes. Ages may change but golf still attracts the same type of individual. It’s not about to become an easier game overnight and the business of golf can’t ignore the massive group that are the boomers.”

“When people join a private golf club, they look for relationships with each other and with club staff. Our priority is to do whatever it takes to achieve the enjoyment of our members.”

A business variable at Calgary courses is the cash flow measure and tracking of golf days and “rounds played.” Although the pay-as-you-play formula at public and semi-private courses is the major source of revenues, it’s not a factor in private clubs that rely on growing annual memberships.

As with most customer-driven businesses, the business of golf must keep tabs on the changing consumer trends that may impact the game. Some clubs have added contemporary features and services like daycare centres, fitness facilities, spas and events to attract the younger demographics without alienating the long-term, loyal and older clients. The formality for dress and course protocols have also been contemporized and there’s faint buzz about ‘the game’ being shortened, primarily to attract the younger generation who allegedly don’t spend five hours doing anything. “The biggest transformation for the business of golf,” Oxtoby points out, “is that the game is no longer considered an elitist sport. It attracts juniors and beginners and the female sector is also growing. “There has been discussion about shortening the game to 12 holes or even making the size of the cup larger, but these changes will not be accepted by the golfing population until groups like the PGA and CPGA embrace the change.” Ehlert doubts the rules will change any time soon. “There are more people than ever taking up the game. The growth and the future of golf and the business future of the game is the family and junior golfers.”

For revenue – and the overall happiness of members – Calgary weather is a factor. “Of course it has an impact but,” Ehlert shrugs, “although our revenues don’t directly depend on rounds played or golf days, our financial success is not weather-dependent. If we’re that dependent on the weather, we’re in the wrong business!” Heritage Pointe pays much closer attention to the weather. “Forecasting days-of-play in any season is difficult. We depend on historical weather patterns and data to determine a reasonable figure for course closures and staffing requirements,” Oxtoby explains. While it’s premature to judge the actual impact of the 2016 economy slump, most Calgary courses say the impact doesn’t seem to be significant. Windmill’s Barry Ehlert is indicative of the business approach to Calgary golf: “We simply refuse to be part of a recession. Never look back! Besides, those things are out of our control.”

ABOVE: CAROLINA OXTOBY

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AUGUST 2016 // BUSINESS IN CALGARY // BUSINESSINCALGARY.COM


LEAR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Celebrates 40 Years Written by Rennay Craats | Photos by Michael Cudjoe Photography Ltd.

R

yan Bazant was raised on a construction site on the knee of his father, Phil. In 1976, Phil Bazant left his position with a major Canadian construction company to form his own, Lear Construction, and Ryan saw what went into creating a successful business first hand. It started out as a small Calgary construction company, but it steadily grew as it added loyal longtime clients and attracted skilled professionals to its ranks. Ryan Bazant grew up learning the business and joined the company at an early age. He then earned a B.Sc. in engineering followed by an MBA. In 2002, Phil stepped back and turned the title of president over to his son while continuing to assist with special projects and mentorship. Having his father around has made all the difference to Ryan as he set out to grow the company.

“I was very fortunate to have him as I grew into the industry. I was lucky to have such an important mentor in my life who I could count on all the time,� says Ryan Bazant, president of Lear Construction. Lear as well as Ryan and Phil were able to complete a seamless generational succession within a family business, which they recognize is not an easy task. The guidance and support has paid off. Now, as the company celebrates its 40th year, Lear Construction Management has become a leader in the industry, employing around 100 dedicated professionals and continuing to provide clients in British Columbia and Alberta with the highest quality service and products. Over the years Lear Construction has been a major player in shaping the area, and its thousands of projects have changed the landscape of Calgary and the West, one building at a time.

Above: Standing L to R: Greg Landry (Manager, Multi Family), Jason Elvy (Business Development Manager), Shawn Hammer (Operations Manager). Seated L to R: Chris Grant (Vice President), Ryan Bazant (President), Henry Zac (Financial Controller).

40 years | Lear Construction


Chestermere Station Townhomes

“Looking back 40 years, the industry has changed a lot, and we’ve been able to change and adapt with it,” says Bazant.

has helped the company considerably in weathering economic downturns in other segments of the industry.

Adaptability

“It’s been quite successful. It also kept people employed through what otherwise could have been a very slow period,” says Shawn Hammer, operations manager.

In fact, that adaptability has greatly contributed to the company’s impressive longevity. In the early years a large number of projects were shopping centres, retail and office buildings. Later they expanded into public buildings including schools, recreational facilities and other institutional projects. Lear Construction also identified an opportunity to branch out into the multi-family arena, creating a separate division. The diversity of this expansion

As one segment of the economy slows down, the other inevitably picks up, reducing the need to downsize. In the face of the current economic downturn in Alberta, many companies are laying off staff and struggling to stay solvent, but Lear has remained busy and continues to grow.

We count it an honour to partner with

Lear Construction. Congratulations on your

40th Anniversary! Exceeding Customer Expectations since 2005

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2 | Lear Construction | 40 years

Multi-Family |

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like budgeting, planning, scheduling and value engineering. From small renovation projects to massive multimilliondollar builds, Lear Construction does whatever it takes to ensure clients are satisfied every time. Lear has maintained its small-company mentality despite its success and growth, and this prevents it from getting mired in complicated processes and paperwork. As a result, the management, staff and various contractors work together as a cohesive unit to ensure they efficiently and effectively deal with challenges. The end result is not only providing just what the client hoped for but also doing so on time and on budget. The company is heavily focused on schedule and completion, and they always keep the families who are set to move into their new home, the kids entering their new school, companies needing the office space, or seniors moving into their facilities in mind when pushing to adhere to the deadlines. In fact, the company is thriving and adding quality personnel to the team. Lear continues to focus on bringing in great new employees with experience in the industry as well as young upstarts who can learn and build their careers with Lear. The company adapts to what is happening in the economy and industry but it also adapts to the needs of individual clients. It tailors its services to the specific requirements of customers, offering expertise in all areas including project management, construction management, design assistance, general contracting services, and pre-construction services

“Our approach sets us apart,” says Chris Grant, vice president construction. “We are upfront and transparent as we drive the projects forward. We are the ones pulling the wagon versus just riding along.” Open communication with its consultants, suppliers, trades and clients is important at Lear. The team presents various construction methodologies to clients and contractors while offering suggestions about how and where they can save clients money. This transparency and dedication to clients has led to the network of solid relationships that have supported Lear Construction Management since it opened its doors in 1976.

Congratulations to Lear Construction on their 40th Anniversary! 403-236-5480

9716 44th Street SE, Calgary

40 years | Lear Construction | 3


Creating Relationships, In-house and Out

Many of these relationships have lasted through the decades too and Bazant credits the amazing people who have worked for Lear and that Lear has worked with over the years for its success.

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4 | Lear Construction | 40 years

“We’d like to thank our staff, clients, consultants, subcontractors and suppliers for helping us achieve success in our 40 years, because we couldn’t do it without them,” he says. Many staff members have been with the company for decades. One employee recently celebrated 36 years with the company while a few employees just retired after working for Lear since the very beginning. In some cases, generations of employees have joined the Lear family – fathers and sons, brothers and cousins have worked together. Lear is a family-oriented company that treats employees with respect and values their contributions. The result: a group of engaged, proactive, motivated people working toward a common goal. It also results in an investment in those employees and their futures. Being mid-sized, employees enjoy more opportunity to move up in the company. “There are definitely lots of opportunities to grow compared to larger companies that have rigid roles and where things don’t change very quickly,” says Hammer. “It’s a great place to work for somebody who isn’t looking to do the same thing over and over again, and who wants to take on extra responsibilities.”


Thank you to Lear Construction and congratulations on your 40th Anniversary.

104-10720 25th Street NE, Calgary, AB 403-250-6675 www.csminteriors.org

Congratulations

Lear Construction on 40 years!

35 Market Boulevard S.E. Airdrie, AB T4A 0K9 Phone: 403.948.5535 • Fax: 403.948.2434

Congratulations on your 40th Anniversary! Wishing you continued success.

403-936-4510 | saucltd@telus.net

40 years | Lear Construction | 5


Our Lady of Fatima School

Le ar Co nstruc tio n!

CONGRATULATIONS

Seltrek Electrical Solutions is a local family owned and operated company serving Calgary and the surrounding area since 2006.

Bay 3, 2928 -18 St NE Calgary, AB T2E 7B1 Telephone: 403.452.3101 Fax:403.475.4655 www.seltrek.ca

TIC would like to thank you for all the successful years of Partnership and look forward to many more! Congratulations on your 40th Anniversary.

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6 | Lear Construction | 40 years


earned a reputation for being trustworthy, delivering quality work and displaying a high standard of professionalism and service. They attract similarly minded consultants and contractors, creating a formidable team. As a result, new clients are eager to align themselves with Lear while established clients routinely come back year after year to work with the company on their current construction projects. These strong long-term relationships that Lear Construction has cultivated in the industry also generate leads for new business opportunities. “Our relationships with architects, developers and subcontractors create invitations for new project business development opportunities,” says Jason Elvy, business development manager.

Projects

Bazant and the management team want employees to enjoy working there as much as they do, and they strive to create a great atmosphere that fosters those feelings. The fact that so many employees stay for decades just proves that the company’s dedication to its people is appreciated. Lear also values its network of external team members who work closely with them on projects. The company has

Lear Construction’s success isn’t limited to one area or economic sector and it was garnered through completion of a variety of projects over the years. From shopping centres to schools, hospitals to nursing homes, jails to multifamily developments, office buildings to warehouses, Lear Construction has done it all. Projects fall under one of three umbrellas: commercial and institutional, retail or multi-family. On the commercial and institutional side, schools are driving business and Lear is currently working on 11 sites across Calgary and area, totalling $150 million in contracts. Catholic elementary schools in Cranston and New Brighton are almost completed, with the schools slated to open in the fall ahead of schedule. They are

Congratulations on 40 years! From your friends at

6626 Centre St SE Phone:(403) 258-0050 www.cricklewoodinteriors.com

40 years | Lear Construction | 7


also involved with four new CBE schools (Marshall Springs, Saddle Ridge, Royal Oak and the recently awarded Legacy School) plus two public school boards (Palliser and Rocky View) outside Calgary. In addition to the greenfield projects, they are at construction phase on three renovations for Our Lady Queen of Peace, Balmoral and Noble Central that will breathe new life into those institutions. “We’re excited to be building schools and providing the foundation for kids to learn, excited to be part of the process, to provide the facility that exceeds expectations,” says Bazant. The company is also involved in some innovative projects on the multi-family side. The flagship is the Axess development in Currie Barracks, which features high-end modern condominiums. This $50-million development consists of 164 upscale signature condos, 19 executive town homes and 19 studios, with phase one completing this fall. “Our client is recognized for producing high-end developments so we’re going above and beyond to ensure

Drumheller High School Major Renovation

Congratulations on 40 years! From your friends at MDL Landscaping. (403) 932-6438 • mdllandscaping.com

Congratulations to Lear Construction on 40 years of excellence!

Congratulations Lear Construction!

Bay # 18 2305 52nd Ave SE. Phone: 403-452-9636 • Fax: 403-263-9663 • www.rhinofinishing.ca

8 | Lear Construction | 40 years

3651 23 Street NE • 403-717-9996 woodcraftkc.com


development that merges commercial with multi-family condos. Adding to their success are the recently completed developments in Chestermere, Airdrie, Cochrane, High River and Lethbridge. “We’ve been very lucky with relationships that we’ve had that has brought us success in our town-house and condo developments throughout Calgary, Edmonton and the surrounding areas. We’re looking forward to a very busy year coming up,” says Bazant. Lear is breaking ground on a town-home development in St. Albert and is in the design stage of several large-scale multifamily projects in Calgary, Airdrie, Edmonton and B.C. over the next few years.

Pushing Forward

this is delivered. We pride ourselves on good-quality products for the developers,” says Greg Landry, multi-family construction manager. Lear is also working on projects in Edmonton’s former military forces base, Griesbach. The company is involved in three different developments in the area; two are town-home projects and the other is a four-storey walk-up mixed-use

Despite the company’s success, the management team is always looking at ways in which it can improve and grow. In the past year, Lear introduced new technologies to help streamline its operations and increase efficiency. It rolled out a new project management software that connects management activities directly with the accounting software to better track projects. It also revamped its safety procedures. Rather than filling out and filing paper reports, the newly implemented software system relocates the company’s safety program online in real time. Management can now monitor projects from the office and if an incident occurs, they know about it immediately.

Congratulations to Lear Construction on your 40th Anniversary!

4375 – 14th Street NE

403.276.8071

40 years | Lear Construction | 9


TEN Condominiums - 1720 10th street SW, Calgary

“It’s really bringing the sites online,” says Bazant, and Lear is taking advantage of the latest technology to be more efficient. “And it’s the quickness that we can communicate with each other and with our clients that helps the pace of the project.”

CONGRATS LEAR ON CONSTRUCTI ON 40 YEARS!

Quick communication means quick responses, and this helps Lear address any issues that arise and to stay on top of the schedule, budget and safety. These tech innovations improve efficiency, which in turn better serves clients while freeing the team up to take on more projects.

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10 | Lear Construction | 40 years

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40 years | Lear Construction | 11


Safety First

No matter how many projects Lear Construction has on the go, safety is the company’s first priority. The company’s proactive approach spans the entire operation, from the management team through to the contractors, trades and employees. It aims at keeping all employees and contractors engaged in their safety and aware of protocols. Safety considerations are worked into all procedures and aspects of the business. “We have a very rigorous safety program, and we are continually developing that,” says Landry. “It’s a very important part of our business. We need to make sure everyone gets home safely.” Lear is committed to protecting its most valuable assets – its people. To help achieve this, the company is a member of the Alberta Construction Safety Association and is involved with the Partnership in Injury Reduction program.

Environmental Responsibility

Being green is becoming increasingly important in business, and Lear Construction is dedicated to the effort. It strives to build facilities that embrace sustainable design while reducing environmental impacts. Because it is awarded many institutional and government projects, employing trusted LEED-designated professionals is critical. Lear has experience building facilities that meet LEED standards and has generated a solid portfolio of projects that support its proficiency in the area. Lear has taken its green initiatives to another level by using solar light towers on some sites in order to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. These fully automated towers not only light the area but allow crews to power their tools. These light towers reduce the cost of fuel as well as reduce noise associated with conventional generators.

ATB Financial Chestermere

The company’s environmental policies are wide reaching and incorporate everything from erosion and sediment control to preventing debris from blowing off job sites to preventing pollutants from being released into the environment.

Investing in the Industry

As invested as Lear is in the environment, it is equally invested in the construction industry itself. It is involved with the Alberta Construction Association, the Edmonton Construction Association and the Calgary Construction Association, attending committee meetings

Congratulations to Lear Construction from your sustainable building & LEED partners at 3 Point!

414 Memorial Dr NE • (403) 606-5849 www.3pointenvironmental.com

12 | Lear Construction | 40 years


and participating in roundtable discussions on important issues. In addition, Lear is also engaging high school students who may be interested in a career in construction by introducing them to the business and providing information about qualifications needed to work in different areas of it.

“The construction industry provides an exceptional and diverse range of career opportunities and we are promoting this to the next generation,” says Elvy. The Lear team is showing teens that construction is an industry in which they can start off working on job sites,

Congrats to Lear Construction on 40 years! We are proud to be a part of your success.

K&C Gravel Bay 26, 12180 - 44 Street SE. Calgary, Alberta T2Z 4A2 • (403) 279-5768

40 years | Lear Construction | 13


learn the business, and one day run a successful firm doing anything from architecture to development, design to trades. The company continues to hire recent university and college graduates plus provides a platform for apprentice carpenters who then progress to site supervision. These recruits hit the ground running and Lear is happy to support them as they grow with the company.

evolve and grow. We are fortunate and thankful that we’ve had such a long history,” says Bazant. And as did his father before him, Bazant continues to live up to the company’s tag line “building quality and trust since 1976” with every repeat client, every completed project and every relationship. Lear is very thankful for its current relationships and is always looking to develop new opportunities.

“We can start the next round of Lear employees who will be here for the next 40 years,” says Hammer.

40-Year Legacy

Ryan Bazant and the management team at Lear Construction Management are proud of reaching this 40-year milestone and are grateful to all those who have worked with them to make it happen. But for these humble leaders, it’s business as usual. While they briefly pause to appreciate how amazing 40 years in the construction business is, they are already looking ahead at what the next 40 years will bring. “We have been building on a solid foundation for the last 40 years using what we’ve learned over time and continuing to

Congratulations Lear Construction on your 40 years, it’s been a pleasure working with you! bowmark.ca

4200 - 10th Street NE, Calgary Alberta T2E 6K3 phone: (403) 250 - 3818 fax: (403) 291 - 0590 info@learconstruction.com www.learconstruction.com

Congratulations to Lear Construction on your 40th anniversary! • Access Control & Building Security Integration • Hardware • Metal Doors, Frames & Borrowed Lites • Lockers, Benches & Storage • Visual Display Units & Cabinets • Specialties • Specialty Doors & Grilles • Washroom Partitions • Washroom Accessories • Wood Doors

Congratulations Lear Construction! We wish you many years of continued success.

2731 57 Ave - Bay 12 Calgary, AB T2C 0B2 · (403) 279-2782

(403) 585-8425 • www.excelldrywall.com

Lear Construction | 40 years

www.shanahans.com


Leading Business AUGUST 2016

IN THIS ISSUE... • Member Profiles • Policy Bites: Navigating a Time of Transition and Opportunity in the Energy Industry

CalgaryChamber.com

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2016 Board of

Policy Bites:

Directors

Navigating a Time of Transition and Opportunity in the Energy Industry

Executive

A message from Justin Smith

Chair: Denis Painchaud, Director of International Government Relations, Nexen, a CNOOK Limited Company Past Chair: Rob Hawley, Partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Vice Chair: David Allen, Founder & President, Situated Co. Treasurer: Wellington Holbrook, Executive Vice-President, ATB Financial CEO: Adam Legge, President and CEO, Calgary Chamber

Directors Bill Brunton, Vice President of Marketing and External Relations, Habitat for Humanity, Southern Alberta Carlos Alvarez, Audit Partner, KPMG Lorenzo DeCicco, Vice-President, TELUS Business Solutions Phil Roberts, President, Vintri Technologies Linda Shea, Senior Vice-President, AltaLink Mike Williams, Executive Vice-President, Corporate Services, Encana James Boettcher, Chief Idea Officer, Fiasco Gelato Brent Cooper, Partner, McLeod Law LLP Desirée Bombenon, President & CEO, SureCall Contact Centres Ltd. Management Adam Legge – President and CEO Michael Andriescu – Director of Finance and Administration Kim Koss – Vice President, Business Development and Sponsorship Scott Crockatt – Director of Marketing and Communications Rebecca Wood – Director of Member Services Justin Smith – Director of Policy, Research and Government Relations Leading Business magazine is a co-publication of the Calgary Chamber and Business in Calgary Calgary Chamber 600, 237 8th Avenue S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2G 5C3 Phone: (403) 750-0400 Fax: (403) 266-3413 calgarychamber.com

The production and consumption of energy around the world is changing. As renewable energy sources become more affordable and fossil fuels more expensive to extract in an environment of depressed commodity prices, a longterm transition in global energy markets is underway. The challenge is to move energy production, transportation and consumption from fossil fuels to more renewables without significantly impacting the reliability or cost of energy to customers. At the same time, economic benefits created through diversification of traditionally fossil fuel driven economies present opportunities to industry and governments alike. The Calgary Chamber policy team along with members have worked to identify obstacles, and understand the opportunities to capitalize on emerging trends, technologies and resources to address these barriers, and help ensure the solutions meet the magnitude of the challenges Alberta faces when making a shift from a fossil driven economy to one moving towards renewable energy.

Trends Forecasted electricity demand in Alberta Electricity demand in Alberta is expected to grow by about 66 per cent over the next two decades. Anticipated industrial expansion in the oil sands will have a significant impact on electricity demand, both directly and indirectly. A growth in demand will require an expansion and reinforcement of transmission lines. Over the next decade, new transmission infrastructure is expected to increase transmission costs by 73 per cent on an electricity bill for an average home, and by 77 per cent for industrial consumers. Climbing electricity costs could encourage customers to become more independent from the grid by producing their own electricity through distributed sources, but these grid defections would simply transfer rising costs onto remaining customers. In the years ahead, maintaining an effective balance between reliability, sustainability and cost will be a critical challenge.

Renewables on the rise The world’s appetite for electricity will increase demand by more than 70 per cent by 2040, yet these is a concerted effort to reduce the environmental consequences of power generation, and

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therefore the use of renewable energy sources is set to increase worldwide. Conservative estimates suggest that, globally, the share of total energy use met by renewables is projected to grow to 20 per cent by 2040. The power sector is expected to see the fastest uptake of renewable sources, followed by the transportation sector and residential heating/cooling systems. Technological advances and stricter environmental policies will boost this outlook significantly. In the power sector, the intermittency of renewables and the relatively low cost of gas and coal make it difficult to displace established modes of electricity generation. While the cost of renewable technologies is set to decline, continued subsidies are needed to facilitate their adoption in the short-to-medium term. However, in the next two decades, wind and solar could become cost competitive thanks to significant improvements in performance due to nanotechnology and more efficient designs. From an investment perspective, the world’s power sector investment between 2016 and 2040 is expected to crest $20 billion, 60 per cent of which will be directed to renewables.

Market access

Advances in extractive technologies

Increasing Indigenous influence

Technological advances in extraction can improve economic and environmental performance in oil and gas production, and further promote industry collaboration. The successive deployment of new solutions and approaches are dramatically increasing recovery rates and reserves of oil and natural gas. Advances in technology such as steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), directional and horizontal drilling, and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing has helped enable the prolific extraction of bitumen, tight oil, and shale gas. Over the long term, innovation will make what were once unconventional extraction breakthroughs the norm. Incremental advances also help improve environmental performance, such as reducing the intensity of emissions, water use, disturbance to land, and waste. Likewise, improved environmental performance tends to improve extractive performance and reduce operating cost, especially under a more stringent carbon pricing regime. On the horizon, collaboration and technological advances in electricity conduction, solvents, or even microwaves could replace water and natural gas to generate steam for bitumen recovery altogether. In the coming year, Alberta can further cement its position as an innovation hub for the resource extraction sector.

Strategies to improve relations with Indigenous communities will be critical to any successful energy transition in Alberta. Indigenous communities and governments are seeking more involvement in matters that impact them, including economic opportunities and environmental concerns related to energy projects. Not only does the Crown have a duty to consult with Indigenous groups when natural resource development has the potential to adversely impact their treaty rights, but successful project development and execution is simply not possible without strong and equitable partnerships between communities and industry. Recently, federal courts have had the tendency to overturn project approvals if it doesn’t deem to have had sufficient consultation taken place. Increasing numbers of highly-educated Indigenous community members has translated into a growing capacity among Indigenous peoples to engage in economic development opportunities, and affect change within communities and society more broadly. As it stands, many Indigenous communities are significant players within the energy sector already, including conventional and alternative energy sources, and will be an important part of Alberta’s energy future.

There is increasing contention among political leaders and influential organizations in and outside of Canada on the benefits of proposed pipeline projects that will help deliver our province’s energy production to international markets. Politicians, environmental groups, energy companies and indigenous communities have staked out clear positions, with some of them leading efforts to delay approval and development. Proposed pipeline projects have been promoted based on economic benefits and as a means of enhancing energy security. However, pipeline infrastructure is increasingly being seen as an indirect contributor to climate change. The environmental impact of projects continues to be the focus of many critics, however, the alternatives of rail transport carries its own set of concerns. Changes to the federal environmental assessment process and the NEB review process are set to add further uncertainty to this already frustratingly slow and cumbersome regulatory space.

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Policy Bites: Navigating a Time of Transition and Opportunity in the Energy Industry

…continued

The rise of big data The quantity of information at our disposal is growing exponentially, thanks to the proliferation of sensory technologies, mobile devices and better storage infrastructure. Big data points not only to the complex data sets that organizations are now able to collect, but also to the processes that allow that data to be used more effectively. Statistical applications and increasing processing power make it possible to mine data in real time and reveal useful patterns or correlations. This information has the potential to help broaden our collective knowledge and understanding of energy issues, as well as help industry, government institutions, and citizens make better informed decisions at a faster pace, including decisions about their energy use.

Transportation revolution In the transportation sector, advanced batteries could be the cornerstone technology for more electric and hybrid vehicles. By 2040, about one-third of personal vehicles are expected to be hybrid, and electric cars are expected to make up to 5 per cent of the global fleet. However, the ability of electric motors to serve as energy storage for intermittent energy sources, and their lower operating costs relative to internal combustion engines, could promote faster adoption. Although still experimental, bioenergy is also set to rise, with biofuels anticipated to satisfy 6-14 per cent of transport energy needs by 2035.

The ‘Internet of Things’ influencing energy use From home medical devices to smart grids and beyond, the internet of things (IoT) – a term used to describe the interconnectivity between existing internet infrastructure and other physical objects monitored or controlled remotely through that network – will play a significant role in society. Some estimates suggest that by 2019, the IoT market will be more than double the size of the smartphone, PC, tablet, connected car, and wearable markets combined. There are positives to this connectivity. Smart transportation systems could lead to significant improvements in urban congestion

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and public transit, not to mention the potential of autonomous vehicles. The ability to remotely control household appliances and thermostats can help increase energy efficiency. All of these primarily consumer-facing trends will have a real impact on the traditional electricity end user, helping to drive greater penetration of distributed generation, electric vehicles, innovative appliances, and increased consumer engagement with energy overall.

Reduced energy consumption through efficiency Under current and planned policies, the implementation of energy efficiency measures is expected to reduce global energy demand by six per cent by 2040 compared to the alternative. Historically, energy use has grown in lockstep with economic expansion. Energy efficiency severs this link by reducing the amount of energy required to provide the same products or services. Underlying the push for energy efficiency are two main factors - reductions in both emissions and costs. Globally, the biggest potential areas for efficiency gains are buildings and transportation, followed by industry and utilities. Improved building envelopes (e.g. insulation) and more efficient appliances like refrigerators are set to account for most energy savings in buildings. In the transportation sector, the implementation of fuel-economy standards for personal vehicles and freight offers scope for significant fuel savings. In Alberta, commercial buildings and the extractive sector carry the most potential for energy efficiency. It is estimated that convention and unconventional production could be more efficient by as much as 13 per cent, should the sector undertake efficiency upgrades. However, the realization of the energy efficiency potential in Alberta faces a number of hurdles, including high upfront costs. The Calgary Chamber’s policy team continues to work on issues like these to ensure your business continues to be successful and competitive. Justin Smith is the Director of Policy, Research and Government Relations for the Calgary Chamber. To learn more about the Chamber’s policy advocacy go to calgarychamber.com/policy or contact us at policy@calgarychamber.com.


“Should have called

DRIVING FORCE”

Because arranging a band performance is a big enough job already!

2332–23 Street NE, Calgary

TF: 1•877•756•8349 3660–50 Avenue SE, Calgary TF: 1•877•753•8765


Chamber Member Spotlights The Calgary Chamber is proud to represent many Calgary businesses large and small; this month we are highlighting some of our industry leading members.

CMIT Solutions Through a nationwide system of more than 140 franchise units, CMIT offers small and medium sized businesses a variety of outsourced IT services. Services range from 24/7 monitoring of servers and software to Help Desk support, telecommunications and voice services to managed print, and cloud computing. CMIT Solutions has built strong relationships with worldwide technology companies such as Dell, Microsoft, and Intuit, along with access to a team of skilled IT engineers that offers small and medium sized businesses the kind of IT support that larger companies enjoy at an affordable rate. For more information visit CMITSolutions.com

23,000 extension students receive a personalized learning experience. More than 90,000 Mount Royal alumni are contributing to their communities worldwide. In keeping with their 10-year strategic plan, which looks out to 2025, the university aims to grow to 13,000 full-course load students choosing from 15 degrees and 60 majors. For more information visit Mtroyal.ca

Shaw Charity Classic Tom Watson - Bernhard Langer - Colin Montgomerie – John Daly! With the best names on the PGA TOUR Champions leading the charge, the fourth year of the award-winning Shaw Charity Classic may be the best yet. Awarded the top event on the PGA TOUR Champions in the last two years, the Shaw Charity Classic broke another record in 2015 by raising more than $3.9 million for charities in southern Alberta. For more information visit ShawCharityClassic.com

Mount Royal University Founded in 1910, Mount Royal University provides an exceptional undergraduate educational experience to its students. Over the past century, the university has carved out a distinct niche by offering smaller class sizes, specialized undergraduate programs and a robust liberal education. Today, more than 11,000 credit and almost

Ledcor Construction

Thanks The Chamber thanks the following long-standing member companies celebrating anniversaries this month for their years of support to the Calgary Chamber, and their commitment to the growth and development of Calgary. Member name

Years as a member

Ledcor Construction Limited

20

Sphinx Information Technologies Inc.

20

Canadian Project Partners

10

ELEMENT Integrated Workplace Solutions Ltd.

10

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This month Ledcor Construction celebrates 20 years of membership to the Calgary Chamber. For over 65 years, Ledcor Construction as part of the Ledcor Group has been building with integrity. The 2nd largest multi discipline construction company in Canada, Ledcor works to design, build, transport, operate and maintain projects all over North America. Ledcor is active in the construction of all types of buildings, civil (mining, dams, highways, bridges, pipeline) heavy industrial-petrochemical, oil/gas, forestry, mining, energy, hazardous waste and utilities. Ledcor is committed to building lifetime clients through accountability, innovation, quality and sustainability. For more information visit Ledcor.com


Creative trends, proven praCtiCes and ‘memorology’ A former Broadway actor, Richard Aaron knows a thing or two about showmanship. And the pioneering New York event planner urges others to weave it into their meetings and events. As the president of BizBash, North America’s leader in event and meeting ideas, news and resources, Aaron has a bottomless reservoir of advice and examples to make special events special. Often called the King of Edutainment, Aaron recently spoke at the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre. He regaled meeting and event planners from across the city with creative trends, proven practices and memorology (making events truly memorable). Here are just a few: •

special event is a unique gathering or occasion with shared rituals and A experiences and determined outcomes. It tells a story and creates a conversation. A measure of success for some meetings is the number of conversations it generates (in person and online).

ost business events have moved from being about “sell and tell” to “ask and M engage.” It’s all about experience. For example, Jeep had a course at an auto show that adults could drive through. Similar scaled-down vehicles and obstacles also let children get behind the wheel.

T he department store Target introduced men’s fashion to its stores by having a team or high-wire acrobats “walk” down the side of a building in downtown New York. “A mind stretches with new experiences,” Aaron said, “and it never stretches back.”

ame tags with micro tracking devices allow event organizers to see where and N how attendees interact with others as well as exhibits and displays. Sponsors and exhibitors want to know this information, Aaron said, so such technology will only grow.

Y our menu can be as creative as your agenda. Food walls are serving tables turned on their end. Caterers are creating bacon and S’mores buffets, cone food (think flavoured mashed potatoes in an ice cream cone, or not), chocolate-smash stations and deconstructed Bloody Marys, Marguaritas and (in Canada) Caesars.

For advice and insight on how to turn your next event into a masterpiece, contact the Calgary TELUS Convention Centre at 403.261.8500 or sales@calgary-convention.com.

calgary-convention.com


YYC Lands Global Companies as Calgary’s Transportation and Logistics Hub Takes Off BY STEPHEN EWART

C

algary is better connected to the global marketplace after series of announcements by blue-chip companies operating at Calgary International Airport.

The arrival Hainan Airlines’ first non-stop flight from Beijing to Calgary, the news DHL Express is the anchor tenant at the airport’s newest cargo facility and the opening of the De Beers Canada head office in the airport’s business centre in July underscore Calgary’s position as a transportation and logistics hub. Connectivity is critically important to Calgary’s growth and prosperity, and the comments from the companies themselves say it all. “This is a great opportunity,” Hainan Airlines vice-president Hou Wei told media at a ceremony to mark the inaugural flight with more than 200 passengers. “I do think the ties – the economic and cultural links between Calgary and China – grow ever stronger.” “We are trying to establish our presence in Canada as the leading Canadian diamond company,” said Kim Truter, CEO of De Beers Canada, when the globally renowned diamond mining company opened its Calgary office. “Calgary is perfect as sort of a centre of gravity. It puts us smack dab in the middle of Canada.” “This investment in our Calgary facility is being made to support current growth, but also the significant mid- to long-term potential we see in international express volumes to and from Alberta,” said Andrew Williams, CEO of DHL Express Canada. The airport – and the entire transportation and logistics sector that has almost 5,000 companies in the Calgary region – is a significant economic incubator for the region. Passenger volume reached a record 15.48 million in 2015 at Calgary International Airport – third highest in Canada – and the 135,000 tonnes of cargo that moved through the facilities accounted for 75 per cent of air shipments into Alberta last year.

Those numbers came even before the completion of the new international terminal, scheduled to open this October. That milestone will effectively conclude a multi-year $2-billion expansion at the airport that has included construction of the longest runway in Canada as well as adding advanced cargo and livestock handling facilities. The airport employs more than 24,000 workers on its sprawling northeast grounds and it supports 48,000 jobs across Calgary. The airport contributed more than $8.2 billion to the city’s economy in 2015. The Hainan flight is expected to support about 625 jobs in Calgary while De Beers will employ close to 70 people at its new offices. De Beers specifically cited the transportation links as a key consideration in its relocation to Calgary. Overall, the Calgary region is well positioned as the premier hub in the Pacific Northwest and is home to companies like CP Rail and WestJet. Calgary is the leading “inland port” in Western Canada with consumer companies such as Canadian Tire, Home Depot, Sobeys and Costco establishing intermodal and logistics hubs in the area. The Calgary Region Inland Port was approved by the federal government to be a foreign trade zone in 2015 and it allows manufacturers in the region’s 14 municipalities to delay paying duties on imported components until they have sold a finished product. The oil and gas industry has dominated the entire Alberta economy for several decades but it is worth recalling Calgary’s history as a transportation centre – at the crossroads of the Trans-Canada Highway and CANAMEX North-South Corridor – dates to the arrival of the transcontinental railways in the 19th century. In a region that depends on access to global markets for all of its products, services and people, a thriving transportation and logistics sector is critical to the success of industries from oil and gas to agribusiness, manufacturing and tourism.

Stephen Ewart is manager of communications and content for Calgary Economic Development.

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Tourism Calgary Launches New Mobile Kiosk to Support Visitors and Calgarians TOURISM CALGARY WILL BE ON THE STREETS AND AT EVENTS, FESTIVALS AND ATTRACTIONS THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER OFFERING ITINERARY PLANNING AND EXPERIENCE SUGGESTIONS FOR TRAVELLERS AND LOCALS ALIKE BY CASSANDRA MCAULEY

E

arlier this year, Tourism Calgary embarked on a new strategy to engage both visitors and Calgarians with the goal of sharing details about all there is to do and experience in the city and the surrounding region. As part of that strategy, Tourism Calgary developed a program to pilot a mobile Wi-Fi-enabled kiosk and summer team that will be out at events and festivals, and in easily-accessible high-traffic areas, offering experience counselling to visitors and Calgarians. “There are numerous reasons for Tourism Calgary to develop and deliver an innovative in-market engagement strategy; with eight million annual visitors to Calgary, the opportunity exists to attract repeat and new visitors, and get them to do more, spend more and stay longer,” says Cindy Ady, CEO of Tourism Calgary. “That, in addition to helping Calgarians discover, or rediscover, all that our great city has to offer and to help them experience more of it. We want Calgarians to know that our team is also here to help them plan their own Calgary and region summer excursions.”

Tourism brings an annual influx of $1.7 billion to Calgary’s economy. By providing accessible and real-time experience counselling and personalized recommendations, this program will benefit tourism industry partners including attractions, restaurants, accommodations, festivals and events, and ultimately, the visitor economy. “This summer, we’re encouraging Calgarians to get out and explore all that our city has to offer. From our music and cultural scenes, to our great restaurants, award-winning festivals and events, and our internationally recognized attractions, Calgary is the place to be this summer,” says Ady. “Tourism Calgary is here to help you plan your adventures.” The mobile Wi-Fi-enabled kiosk and a fixed location tent will be available for counselling visitors and Calgarians seven days a week through the summer. Details of their locations can be found on visitcalgary.com and through the hashtag #askmeyyc.

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It’s on like Donkey Kong! Come explore the influence of gaming at TechStock 2016 BY ANDREA MENDIZABAL

W

hether you are a nOOb (newbie), expert or just want to go FTW (for the win), don’t be a camper and save September 15 for Innovate Calgary’s, TechStock 2016, which explores how gaming has moved beyond entertainment and is making a profound impact on businesses and society. The technologies that drive the games are becoming an integral piece of technology spanning multiple industries. Simulation is playing a key role in sectors such as medical and energy, web platforms are taking areas such as education and data to new heights, and virtual reality is not only enhancing a gamer’s experience but being adapted to uses such as real estate and training. Take a nostalgic step through the world of games and see what the future will bring at Innovate Calgary’s technology showcase, where the city’s ever-expanding community of tech startups, discovery and innovation come together for a quirky and imaginative day of science, interactive tech and fun.

What to Expect? Tech Exhibition Explore some of Calgary and area’s innovative tech companies as they demonstrate how gaming technologies have influenced their business. The Calgary Game Developers Association will also showcase the work of their talented community of independent video game developers.

eLegend Student Aid Bursary (SAB) Gaming Tournament eLEGSA (eLEGEND Electronic Sports and Gaming Association) brings the first-ever student aid bursary gaming tournament to the Innovate Calgary tech community. Help raise funds in support of post-secondary students by competing for prizes and the title of Calgary’s top gamer.

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1UP

Randy’s Gaming Den – An Interactive History of the Video Game Go back in time and play some of the leading video games in gaming history. From Atari to PlayStation, games like Asteroids, Mario Bros., Pac-Man, Duck Hunter and more come back to life.

The Hexagon Board Game Café Challenge a friend with a more traditional type of game. The Hexperts from the Hexagon Board Game Café, Calgary’s newest board game café, will bring a selection of games from their impressive collection of 600-plus games. More than 350 Calgarians are expected to walk through the doors of TechStock 2016 for an afternoon of electrifying energy, interactive technology, gaming, food trucks and prizes. This annual event runs as part of Beakerhead week, a smash up of art, science and engineering where more than 100 organizations come together to put on more than 50 events throughout the city over a five-day period. To learn more about Beakerhead and for a full listing of Beakerhead events happening around Calgary, visit Beakerhead.org. To learn more about Innovate Calgary’s TechStock 2016, and to showcase a business, visit innovatecalgary.com/events/ techstock.


HANAN CHABIB DIRECTOR, CREATIVE EXPERIENCES BEAKERHEAD

“This is a place where you can SPARK actually SUCCESS AT be a bit of THE CENTRE OF ENERGY a maverick.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT:

calgary-convention.com


MARKETING MATTERS // DAVID PARKER

Marketing Matters BY DAVID PARKER

T

he good people at Wikipedia say marketing is a term to describe the communication between a company and the consumer audience that aims to raise the profile of the company in the public mind. Change the word “company” to “city” and how do cities market their value to attract businesses, capital and visitors – by being as unique as possible. So after enjoying another Calgary Stampede I would like to plead that this city – known for its western hospitality demonstrated through genuine warmth and friendliness – should return to using the White Hat as a symbol. There are those who decry its value as being almost antibusiness, but the visitors I spoke to at Stampede events just love the idea of the White Hat as being what Tourism Calgary in its promotion of its White Hat Awards calls “a symbol for Calgary and it western hospitality.” At the annual Fairmont Palliser Stampede breakfast, I challenged Cindy Ady, CEO of Tourism Calgary, on the use of the hat logo. Although I could find no graphic of a hat on her website, she was quick and proud to show me her organization’s logo on her cowboy shirt that was topped by the familiar hat symbol.

contest at the Haskayne School of Business were to be presented with a white stetson. And the release from the Shaw Charity Classic said that Jeff Maggert, Fred Couples and Rocco Mediate will be wearing their white champion’s Smithbilt cowboy hats when they return to Calgary for this year’s tournament. Add the tremendous impact of our White Hatter volunteers in welcoming people to Calgary at the airport, and it’s time we reintroduced the symbol right throughout the city in our marketing. There are many cities that could display a sign bragging about being full of energy – but our White Hat is unique and the envy of many.

In celebration of its 60th anniversary and hitting 13 major markets across the country, Fountain Tire’s Open Road Cinema Tour is being handled by Calgary’s Brookline Public Relations. Look for Tourism Calgary’s mobile kiosks across the city that will be manned by post-secondary students to assist visitors and Calgarians to better experience this city and surrounding region.

But none on the city’s website, nowhere to be seen on anything to do with Calgary Economic Development – be part of the energy – or even the TELUS Convention Centre. At the breakfast I was able to introduce Dodie Stiles to Palliser hotel manager Don Fennerty. She was bursting with enthusiasm having just White Hatted some visiting international Rotarians who were so excited to participate in the ceremony. Same story was told to me the next day of how proud visiting students from across Canada attending a business

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Parker’s Pick Tourism Calgary’s mobile kiosks promoting our city.


Hire higher. Chiu School of Business Instead of just hiring grads, hire work-ready grads from the Chiu School of Business at Bow Valley College. They can contribute from day one on the job because of what we teach them from day one at the College. We consult with hundreds of industry leaders to ensure everything our students learn is relevant and valuable, so their knowledge, technical ability, and workplace skills make them in-demand employees. It’s working – 93% of our BVC grads are on the job within 6 months of graduating. bowvalleycollege.ca

The World Rises Here.

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