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CONTENTS GROW

|

NETWORK |

PROFIT

E X P LO R I N G C E N T R A L M I N N ES OTA’ S B US I N ESS ES .

Cover Story

30

PROFIT

POSITIVITY

Melinda Tamm has a vision: Create a positive environment that allows young dancers to become strong in mind, body and spirit.

NETWORK 10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate 20 BUSINESS TOOLS Useful tips and intelligence on how to continue to grow your business

50 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Electrolysis and Laser by Robyn

36 A GREEN FUTURE Going green is becoming a business status symbol. Even better, by introducing green practices at work you can boost employee morale, attract customers, and reduce expenses.

40 CENTRAL MN GROWTH GUIDE

GROW

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0 : 6 Pr e s i d e n t ’ s Le t t e r / 8 Ed i t o r ’ s N o t e / 1 8 N e t w o r k Ce n t ra l

ONLYONLINE BUSINESSCENTRAL MAGAZINE.COM

• Courage in Crisis • Employee Development • Social Media Blunders • Irresistible Images

Celebrating 2000-2020 YEARS

From splash pads to river walks, new park projects abound in the St. Cloud area.

© Copyright 2020 Business Central, LLC. Business Central is published six times a year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, 1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Phone (320) 251-2940 / Fax (320) 251-0081. Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


I mask for my customers Who do you mask for? Wearing a face covering protects the people around you. It helps you keep germs to yourself — protecting the most vulnerable. Help slow the spread of COVID-19 — we’re all in this together.

#imaskforyou


PRESIDENT’S LETTER

No Hugging…Yet!

A

s we begin our seventh month of The 2020 Pandemic, it’s evident we’re going to be living with work and personal life adjustments for a while longer. That means masks, Zoom meetings and social distancing are going to continue into the foreseeable future. I want to stress to everyone, that we are NOT a “virtual chamber.” We are REAL. Our members are real. Our volunteers are real. Our programs are real. Our work is real. And, perhaps most importantly, our value is REAL! If you don’t believe me, then perhaps you should adjust your reality antennae. We’re being creative, innovative, thoughtful and valuedriven as we design programming and events that allow in-person contact that is safe and socially distanced. We know masks are uncomfortable and cumbersome. We ask you to wear them because we don’t know the vulnerability others at our meetings may be facing with their families or themselves. Now, with the Governor’s statewide mask initiative, we ask you to please help us meet the state requirements by conforming to our meeting and host requirements. We want all our members to be kept safe and healthy. Following our guidelines is the best way to ensure that outcome. If a member does not have a mask on at a meeting, please be aware some people have medical conditions that prevent them from wearing masks. That makes your mask even more important. I suggested we design a button or sticker that reads “Unmasked for my Health,” or something similar. However, we quickly recognized for some members that may feel Celebrating

like a button that reads “I have a disability.” We certainly do not want that, either. So please be respectful of people at our meetings and events whether they wear a mask or not. Assume the best of your fellow members. And if you are able, wear your mask and keep your distance, regardless of how much you want to hug someone. We will continue to provide real value from your membership throughout this challenge. We’ll also help you navigate ways to make our changed meeting and event formats as beneficial and fun for you as they have been in the past. Your use of the chat feature in Zoom and vigilant follow-up from discussions you may have with presenters and other participants are more vital to you than ever before. And, don’t fret. As soon as we have a vaccine, we’re designing a “Business After Hours Hug-Fest” to rebuild the bonds many of us are missing. Hugs to you all,

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

2000-2020 YEARS

LO O K I N G BAC K

The 2000 Annual Banquet

The Chamber’s Annual Banquet in 2000 included dinner and a silent auction.

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Retiring Board Chair Bob Strack, Strack Companies, presented Marj Hawkins, District 742 and an outgoing Chamber board member, with the Chamber’s gift called the Vesta.

Jeff Gerbino, humor consultant, provided the entertainment at the Chamber’s Annual Banquet in 2000. The theme that year was “Let’s Toot Our Horn!”


Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826 Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF ____________________________ President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Kelti Lorence, ext. 130 Special Events Coordinator: Laura Wagner, ext. 131 Membership Sales Specialist: Antoinette Valenzuela, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122

2020-21 BOARD MEMBERS ____________________________

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF ____________________________

Marilyn Birkland, LocaliQ

Main Phone: 320-251-4170

Ron Brandenburg, Quinlivan & Hughes, Chair

Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111

John Bryant, Geo-Comm

Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110

Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Tanja Goering, PAM's Auto

Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112

Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning, Past Board Chair

Sales Manager: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128

Ray Harrington, Pioneer Place on Fifth Joe Hellie, CentraCare

Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129

Patrick Hollermann, InteleCONNECT Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs, Board Vice Chair Brenda Sickler, Theisen Dental Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St. Cloud Colleen Zoffka, GB & Company

Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100

We know there’s no such thing as a one-size-fits-all solution to business challenges. Let's see what we can do together. You see the future you want to build for yourself, your family and your business. You see the challenges that lie ahead and what you’ll need to meet them. We see new ways to help you accomplish all of that and more. Because going above and beyond is something we do for our customers every day. bremer.com © 2020 Bremer Financial Corporation. All rights reserved. Bremer and Bremer Bank are registered service marks of Bremer Financial Corporation.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Dream Big

W

hen I was in the 8th grade, I made a list of things I wanted to do. This was started in large

part because we studied Africa in geography class and my class project was on Kenya. Using multiple National Geographics and several visits to the school library

Editor Gail Ivers with her Aunt Nancy and a view of Kenya behind them.

(sadly, the internet did not exist then) I put together a

catch up with my Tanzanian tour, I flew to England and

book about Kenya. I still remember the cover. I took a

then to…Nairobi, Kenya! A 2-hour wait in the airport

heavy piece of cardboard and covered it with burlap.

and a short flight later took me to Tanzania. Now I’m

Then I cut out pieces of felt and created a Masai warrior

not suggesting that sitting in the Nairobi airport for two

shield and the words Kenya and pasted them to the

hours is the same as seeing the country. But! I was in

burlap. I punched holes in the cover and the pages of the

Kenya. And several days later while on safari, our guide

book and “bound” it with colorful yarn.

pointed to a large, upright rock, and said “That marks the

Many years later my dad’s company organized a trip

border between Tanzania and Kenya. If you look over

to Africa and my parents decided to go. I can’t imagine

there, that’s Kenya.” I not only looked, I stepped over that

how they found it, but they tracked down my book on

invisible line.

Kenya (still no internet) and used that to prep for their

When Melinda Tamm was only eight years old, she

trip. I was crushed. They were

made a note that she wanted

going to Kenya and I didn’t get to go along. I had done the research. I had created the book. I had made a list in 8th grade of things I wanted to do and “Visit

to own her own dance studio

I made a list in 8th grade of things I wanted to do and “Visit Kenya” was at the very top. It took 40 years, but I finally made it ... by accident!

someday. She even named it: Melinda’s World of Dance. Just like my dream didn’t turn out exactly as planned, neither did Melinda’s. Hers has turned out

Kenya” was at the very top.

better than she thought! (See

My parents, however, were

the story on page 30.)

unmoved, went without me, and had a wonderful time. Regular readers of this column may remember that a few years ago I wrote about tasting banana beer in

Certainly “Owning a business” and “Visit Kenya” are hardly in the same league. Even so, there’s a lesson here: Never underestimate the power of the “to-do“ list.

Tanzania. What I didn’t mention was the round-about trip I took to get there. First, you should understand

Until next issue,

that making the decision to go to Tanzania, rather than Kenya, was wrenching. My Aunt Nancy and I looked over multiple tours and finally agreed that the Tanzania trip had more of what we were looking for than the ones to Kenya. I made peace with that decision. My plane left Minneapolis several hours late, causing me to miss my connection in Amsterdam. In order to

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Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Melinda Vonderahe

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Luke Greiner, Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University

Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media

Ari Kaufman, freelance writer

ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media

Kelti Lorence, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Cover Story Photography Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography

Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Betsey Lund Ross, Lund Ross, P.A. Jerry Mulhern, Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) Mike Roth, Mike Roth Traction Consulting Steve Penick, Stearns History Museum

ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund

Celebrating 2000-2020 YEARS

WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Melinda Vonderahe, (320) 656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

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UPFRONT GROW

|

NETWORK |

PROFIT

N E WS & P EO P L E T H AT M A K E U P T H E C H A M B E R N E T W O R K

I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : People to Know / Do It N o w ! / Dig g in g H is to ry / Yo u r Vo ice in Gove rn men t BOOK REVIEW

NEWS REEL

Unity, Inclusion, and Connection For Melinda Gates, the supreme goal for humanity is not equality but connection.

Career Solutions executive director receives award Tammy Biery, executive di-

Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill

“How can we summon a moment of lift for human beings – and especially for women? Because when you lift up women, you lift up humanity.” — Melinda Gates

F

or the last twenty years, Melinda Gates has been on a mission to find solutions for people with the most urgent needs wherever they live. She believes that if you want to lift up a society, you need to stop keeping women down. This book consists of nine chapters: A The Lift of a Great Idea B Empowering Mothers: Maternal and Newborn Health C Every Good Thing: Family Planning D Lifting Their Eyes: Girls in Schools E The Silent Inequality: Unpaid Work F When a Girl has No Voice: Child Marriage

rector at Career

G Seeing Gender Bias: Women in Agriculture H Creating a New Culture: Women in the Workplace I Let Your Heart Break: The Lift of Coming Together At the end there is an amazing resource guide of organizations that readers can support. “Melinda Gates has spent many years working with women around the world," writes Malala Yousafzai. Yousafzai is a Pakistani education advocate who, at the age of 17 in 2014, became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize after surviving an assassination attempt by the Taliban. "This book," according to Yousafzai, "is an urgent manifesto for an equal society where women are valued and recognized in all spheres of life. Most of all, it is a call for unity, inclusion, and connection. We need this message more than ever.” Gates proudly states that she is an ardent feminist. She

believes that being a feminist means believing that every woman should be able to use her voice and pursue her potential, and that men and women should all work together to take down these barriers and end the biases that still hold women back. There is ample evidence that these barriers and biases are worldwide and have existed throughout time. For Gates, equality is a milestone, not the summit. Also, the supreme goal for humanity is not equality but connection. She believes that people can be equal, but still isolated – not feeling the bonds that tie them together. Equality without connection misses the point. This equality applies to life in a family, in a community, in a business, or in other connections.

Solutions, was awarded the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Diversity Award for her leadership in promoting and celebrating equal opportunity in the Central Minnesota business community. The Chamber’s Diversity Recognition acknowledges the exceptional efforts of area businesses and representatives whose visible efforts foster greater appreciation, advancement and celebration of diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace. Career Solutions is dedicated to building a multicultural business environment that is free from bias and discrimination. Their diverse staff are encouraged to celebrate their differences and attend other community diversity trainings on a regular basis.

St. Cloud Surgical Center achieves certification, designation The St. Cloud Surgical Center achieved Advanced Orthopedic Certification by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory

Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus

Health Care (AAAHC). The center

professor at St. Cloud State

also received designation as a

University.

Blue Distinction Center for Knee and Hip Replacement through BlueCross Blue Shield of Minnesota.

T h e Mome nt of Li ft ; How Empow er in g Wom en C h an ges t h e Wor l d, Melin da G ates, Flatiro n Books , New York, 20 19, I S B N 97 81 2 5 031 35 7 7

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Send News Reel items to Gail Ivers, givers@businesscentralmagazine.com for possible inclusion. News Reel is compiled by Kelti Lorence.


Proven Proven Results - Tax Planning Results - Cash Flow Planning - Tax Planning Strategic Planning - -Cash Flow Planning - Strategic Planning

Michael R. Gardner, D.D.S. (Dr. Gardner) Gardner, D.D.S. (Dr.Conway, Gardner) hasMichael workedR.with the CPA firm, has worked with thePLLP CPA(CDS), firm, Conway, Deuth & Schmiesing, for the Deuth & Schmiesing, PLLP (CDS), for the past 40 years. His dental practice team is past trained, 40 years.committed His dental practice team is highly to excellence, trained, committed to excellence, andhighly fiercely dedicated to the patients they and fiercely dedicated to the serve. Dr. Gardner states, “I relypatients on CDSthey for Gardnerthey states, “I rely on CDS for all serve. sorts Dr. of advice, have steered me all sorts of advice, they have steered me right at every turn. They are my counselor, right friend, at everyand turn.last, Theybut arenot my least, counselor, coach, my coach, friend, and last, but not least, my accountants.” accountants.” In 1980, CDS was there to help Dr. Gardner In 1980, CDS was there to help Dr. Gardner with his initial business set up and financwith his initial business set up and financing. Throughout the years, CDS provided ing. Throughout the years, CDS provided numerous accounting and advisory servnumerous accounting and advisory services to to Dr.Dr. Gardner including ices Gardner includingfinancial financialforeforecasts, cash flow projections, and casts, cash flow projections, andfinancing financing models asas hishis business continued models business continuedtotogrow. grow. TaxTax services were provided services were providedfor forboth bothhis his practice and personally totoDr. practice and personally Dr.Gardner Gardnerand and hishis wife, wife,Sandy. Sandy.The Thebusiness businessadvisory advisory services provided byby CDS services provided CDShave havehelped helpedDr. Dr. Gardner thrive Gardner thrivethroughout throughouthis hisbusiness business lifecycle. lifecycle.

years they have grown to one of years they leading have grown to one of Minnesota’s accounting firms, Minnesota’s leading accounting firms, with 75 team members across Minnesota. with 75 team members across Minnesota. As I entrusted more and more of my As I entrusted more to and more ofhave my business procedures CDS, they business to CDS, they haveIt more thanprocedures exceeded my expectations. more thanaexceeded my expectations. It has been great partnership and I feel has been a great partnership and I feel very fortunate to have connected with very fortunate to have connected with them. It is a remarkable firm. I really them. It is a remarkable firm. I really attribute my success to the significant attribute my success to the role CDS and the people atsignificant CDS have role CDS and the people at CDS have played.” played.” The coronavirus pandemic has impacted us The coronavirus pandemic has impacted us all, but especially businesses like Dr. Gardall, but especially businesses like Dr. Gardner’s. When the Coronavirus Aid, Relief ner’s. When the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Act (CARES (CARES Act) Act) and Economic Economic Security Security Act was signed into law, CDS proactively was signed into law, CDS proactively reached offering business business reached out out to to clients clients offering advisory CDS experts, experts, Rick Rick advisory services. services. CDS Conway collaboratedwith with Conwayand and Bill Bill Fenske, Fenske, collaborated Dr. the opportunities opportunities Dr.Gardner Gardner to to analyze analyze the available the solutions solutions that that available and and found found the worked Dr. Gardner Gardner worked best best for for his business. business. Dr. said, few months monthsof ofthe the said,“During “During the the past few COVID-19 pandemic, the entire team at entire team at When When Dr. Dr. Gardner Gardner COVID-19 pandemic, CDS helped me immensely.” CDS helped me immensely.” brokeground groundon onhis his broke newdental dentalpractice practice new Business Advisory Services. buildinginin1996, 1996,Rick Rick Business Advisory Services. building Businesses that that are proactively Businesses proactively contemcontemConway,a afounding founding Conway, platingtheir theirpost-COVID-19 post-COVID-19 futures and plating futures andare are Partner CDS, was therewith witha ashovel shoveltoto Partner at at CDS, was there making plans plans accordingly accordingly will be better making will be better show support. show hishis support. positioned to to thrive thrive in positioned in any any crisis crisis and and beyond. Many Many companies companies are The quality accounting, businessadvisory advisory beyond. are making making The quality accounting, business those plans plans now. now. CDS CDS provides services, employee benefits,HR, HR,payroll, payroll, those provides many many services, employee benefits, services to help small tax, and wealth management support tax, and wealth management support services to help small that CDS provides, allows Dr. Gardner to to large-sized that CDS provides, allows Dr. Gardner to to large-sized do what he loves best– focus on his businesses: financial SATISFACTION do what he loves best– focus on his businesses: financial SATISFACTION patients and team members. Dr. Gardner planning, budgeting, GUARANTEED! patients and team members. Dr. Gardner planning, budgeting, GUARANTEED! states, “When I first started with CDS, forecasting, cash flow states, “When I first started with CDS, forecasting, cash flow they were a two-person firm. Over the planning and projections, they were a two-person firm. Over the planning and projections,

capital and debt structure optimization, capital debt reviewand of tax lawstructure changes optimization, and the impact review of tax lawand changes andplanning. the impact on businesses, benefits on businesses, and benefits planning.

A legacy of service and integrity. AOur legacy of service andtrained integrity. network of highly profes-

Our network trained professionals offersofa highly team approach to help sionals offers a team approach to helpthe businesses recover and thrive despite businesses recoverof andthe thrive despite the financial impact pandemic. From financial impact of the pandemic. From CDS, clients receive big-firm resources CDS, clientsin receive big-firm resources wrapped local-firm responsiveness, wrapped in local-firm responsiveness, delivered by experts familiar with you, and delivered by experts familiar with you, and vested in your business. Our core values – vested in your business. Our core values – integrity, quality, collaboration, innovaintegrity, quality, collaboration, innovation, and kindness – guide our actions tion, and kindness – guide our actions every day. every day.

Dr.Gardner’s Gardner’s Advisory Team Dr. Advisory Team

Michelle Hanson RickConway Conway Bill Fenske Michelle Hanson Rick Bill Fenske Payroll Tax/ConsultingBusiness Business Advisory Payroll Tax/Consulting Advisory Services Services

Jen JenBurnett Burnett Employee Employee Benefits Benefits

We needs. Weunderstand understandour ourclients’ clients’ needs.

At WeWe AtCDS, CDS,we wegogobeyond beyondcompliance. compliance. collaborate to develop strategy, look forfor collaborate to develop strategy, look hidden opportunities, and anticipate hidden opportunities, and anticipate challenges. We’re proud to provide our challenges. We’re proud to provide our clients with solutions to make their clients with solutions to make their organizations more efficient and profitable. organizations more efficient and profitable.

Exceeding Expectations Expectations — Exceeding — Proven Proven Results Results

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Karla Hemmesch Chance Hooper Karla Hemmesch Chance Hooper Bookkeeping Wealth Bookkeeping Wealth Management Management


NETWORK

UPFRONT

NEWS REEL

PEOPLE TO KNOW

St. Cloud hotel named best of AmericInn AmericInn by

Leadership by Doing

Wyndham St. Cloud

Ron Brandenburg, Quinlivan & Hughes, chair of the Chamber Board

was awarded “Best of AmericInn,” an annual award that recognizes the brand’s top performing hotels and their staffs.

BerganKDV earns national awards, named Top Firm BerganKDV won two categories of the 2020 Marketing Achievement Awards, coordinated by the Association for Accounting Marketing (AAM.) The firm was recognized for the “Here’s to the Doers” digital advertising campaign and their newly updated website. BerganKDV Wealth Management was ranked as one of the Top Firms by assets under management (AUM) from Accounting Today Magazine. The firm’s AUM also qualifies them for the 2020 Billion Dollar Club.

Northland Capital announces new president Northland Capital appointed Brian Eschmann as the company’s new president. A recognized and long-standing member of the Equipment Leasing and Finance Association (ELFA), Eschmann has expertise building high-performing sales teams with Schneider National and U.S. Bank Corporate Payment Systems prior

R

on Brandenburg’s goal is to make a contribution. A shareholder with the law firm of Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A., Brandenburg took over as Chair of the Board of Directors of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce on Sept. 1. His one-year term concludes Aug. 31, 2021. “The Chamber of Commerce has always been near and dear to my heart,” Brandenburg said, “but I wasn’t as involved in the past as I would have liked. When I was asked to serve on the Board I thought ‘Here’s an opportunity for me to be more involved.’ I wasn’t thinking about the leadership role, so much as the opportunity to contribute.” Brandenburg serves on a number of boards in the area and always seeks to be as involved and helpful as possible. “I made a conscious decision early in my life to live in a community where I could make a difference,” he said. “St. Cloud is the right

size for me to do that. If you want to become involved in this community you can.” Unlike past years when the Chamber’s new Board chair has had an opportunity to run planning meetings prior to filling the leadership role, COVID-19 prevented groups from meeting. “It’s hard to have an itinerary when things are changing so fast,” Brandenburg said. “We’re learning along with others how to get through these times. I guess if I have a goal it would be to continue to advance the discussion and help take the Chamber where the members want us to go.” Brandenburg sees member involvement as one of the Chamber’s greatest

strengths. “Members have a voice in this Chamber. There’s leadership in the staff, clearly, but that role is more about here’s where we’re at and what we think we need to do. How we get there is driven by the members. That’s the kind of Board I like to be involved in.” The Chamber Open, Star Celebration, and Business Awards program are a few of the activities Brandenburg has participated in over the years. “The Business Awards Committee is one of the most fulfilling committee assignments I’ve been involved with. You have the opportunity to meet these entrepreneurs who have made significant accomplishments, and see how proud they are of what they’ve done, mostly under the radar. Every year I’m impressed by what business people in our communities are doing — locally, nationally, even internationally. There are so many great businesses — I wish we could give them all awards.” — GMI

to serving 10 years as the president of Trans Lease, Inc.

Minnwest Bank adds staff Minnwest Bank recently hired

Co-worker problems?

Brianna Knowles

Look at the bigger picture.

as the assistant vice president of commercial lending.

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HELP IN THE WORKPLACE

BusinessCentral Magazine.com // S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0

I

s it one co-worker who you’re struggling with, or multiple? Perhaps corporate culture or someone in the ranks above you is encouraging this type of behavior. When employees can’t trust that their opinions will be heard fairly, they may sway towards negative emotions.


DO IT NOW!

Master Manipulators Dealing with passive-aggressive or manipulative co-workers is never easy. Here are a few tips to help.

M

aybe you just started a new job or recently gained a co-worker. You’ve mostly enjoyed the change in your work environment, but haven’t quite found a comfortable way to interact openly and honestly with everyone else around you. How can you uncover the true source of this uneasiness and best work through it? A Recognize the source. It can be tough to spot a passive-aggressive or manipulative employee.

Sometimes it’s a simple comment that seems unnecessary, or makes you worry about your job performance. Take notice if your mood, conversation, or body language changes when certain people are in the room. B Understand their motivation. Perhaps this person struggles to deal with conflict, and this is their best way to communicate disagreement. Maybe they feel wronged, threatened or offended.

Do your best to objectively look at their actions and take note of patterns, instigators, etc. C.Be honest. When you do notice passiveaggressive or manipulative comments and actions, say something. By keeping quiet, you’re not only allowing, but encouraging, the behavior to continue. Approach the topic yourself if you are comfortable or speak with a supervisor or HR to reach a resolution.

Borrow

D.Build a relationship. Now that you better understand the root of the issue, try building a relationship with that co-worker. Maybe the individual has personal issues that contribute to the workplace demeanor. Maybe the person works best when approached a certain way, and you were doing the opposite of that. Once someone sees you as a friend rather than foe, the individual should feel more comfortable approaching you directly with thoughts and concerns. —Compiled by Kelti Lorence

With Us

For personal or business lending that’s as carefree as a day in the park, come on over to Farmers & Merchants State Bank.

Because friendly still counts.

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NETWORK

UPFRONT

NEWS REEL

DIGGING HISTORY

Gunderson receives IWF Ovation Award, Bloss promoted

Main Street Man

shareholder

Self-taught architect, Allen E. Hussey, left an indelible mark on Central Minnesota.

of BerganKDV,

By Steve Penick

Heather Gunderson,

received an Ovation

the firm Bergan Paulsen, now

I think Hussey was the best Main Street storefront designer in the state during the 1880’s and '90’s.

BerganKDV. Since that honor,

— Paul Clifford Larson,

she has continued to focus on

public historian,

diversity and inclusion initiatives

author, and historic

and inspiring other females to

building consultant,

event. Gunderson received the recognition in part because she was the first female partner with

achieve excellence. Jeff Bloss, shareholder at BerganKDV, was named as the firm’s CPA Services Solution Leader.

SCFCU hires new chief operations officer St. Cloud Financial Credit Union hired Theresa Tschumperlin to their executive leadership team as the chief operations officer. She is accountable for operational efficiencies, development of a new business division, and leadership of the technology division of the credit union. Tschumperlin is a graduate of St. Cloud State University with degrees in finance and accounting.

SPIRE promotes giving coordinator SPIRE recently promoted Abby Patterson to the role of giving coordinator. She is responsible for facilitating all giving efforts on a corporate and community level to ensure time, talents and treasures are being used to improve lives.

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1985

A

lmost one hundred years after Allen E. Hussey’s death, Paul Clifford Larson’s words celebrated a self-taught architect who built his career from the ground up. Hussey was first a builder, trained as a draftsman who planned to advance his career into something more. He had limited access to a formal architectural education. Instead, he took advantage of his opportunities, leaving an enduring mark on Minnesota’s built environment. Hussey was born in Ohio in 1829 and was already pursing drawing as a hobby by the time he was 10. He continued to advance his skills, practicing technical building while living in Cincinnati. Even at this early stage, Hussey remained grounded in his work, and exhibited a humble nature that became a characteristic throughout his career. In 1856, prospects pulled him west to St. Cloud where he founded an

5th Avenue South, east side, St Cloud, 1907

architectural firm with a branch in Minneapolis. The firm quickly established its credibility as St. Cloud experienced a building boom until the Civil War stifled economic growth. Hussey then joined the 7th Minnesota, Company I, overcoming war injuries and returning home to expand his business. And expand he did. Hussey’s projects covered a broad spectrum of styles from private residences to multi-story commercial buildings. His versatility allowed him to accept contracts from Brainerd, Little Falls, St. Paul/ Minneapolis, and of course, the St. Cloud area. Hussey’s use of varied materials such as cut glass, intricate brickwork, and granite created aesthetically pleasing lines. These elements were put in place by local craftsmen, including many bricklayers who learned the trade in Germany. One, like the

1873 St. Mary Help of Christians Catholic Church in St. Augusta, integrated local granite throughout its exterior. In Albany, he incorporated both brick and stone together in 1889 for Seven Dolors Catholic Church. It featured classic Gothic lines with pointed spires, ribbed vaults, and detailed sculptures. Public response matched this achievement. The St. Cloud Times proclaimed, “When completed it will be one of the handsomest churches in the county, a credit to the town and the builder.”

A E Hussey ad in the Der Nordstern, Feb. 18, 1885

Photos courtesy of the Stearns History Museum.

Tribute at the Iowa Women’s Foundation (IWF) virtual


St. Mar y Help of Christians Catholic Church, ca 1910

Commercial buildings became his hallmark, especially in St. Cloud. Several on St. Germain Street such as the 1890’s Bruener and Heimann buildings revealed Hussey’s advancing skills. But the Victorian structures of the McClure and Searle buildings were perhaps his most celebrated. On the east side of 5th Avenue, just south of St. Germain, the threestory structures completed in the 1880s melded colors and materials together. The St. Cloud Journal-Press wrote, “its rooms show it to be one of the most handsomest and most tastefully

2020-07_QH_Half-Page-Directory-Ad_v1.pdf

1

7/21/20

finished buildings in the entire State.” Each was heated by steam and lighted with gas lamps. Wainscoting featured the beautiful wood grains of cherry and ash. Hussey also used contemporary innovations. An elevator provided a modern convenience for those occupying the space. Completed over several years, the buildings immediately defined the downtown as a signature in design and craftsmanship. Many of Hussey’s buildings remain as a testament to his skill during the latter half of the nineteenth century. His work covered residences such as the

Foley and Foote houses on St. Cloud’s southside. Commercial buildings and schools continue to serve their communities. The St. Cloud Journal-Press summed up Hussey’s character stating, “Very few people outside of cities realize the great advantage to be derived when building, by having their work planned, sketched, and specified in detail by a scientific architect.” Eloquent words about someone who began his career at age 10. Steve Penick is the head archivist at the Stearns History Museum in St. Cloud.

9:33 AM

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NETWORK

UPFRONT

NEWS REEL

YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

UI Fraud Brenny Transportation named top workplace Brenny Transportation was

Unemployment Insurance fraud is not new, but lately it’s been in the news. The following guidelines can help you determine what to do if you suspect UI fraud. By Jerry Mulhern

named one of the Top Workplaces

file an application. This can still result in fraud, but is different than identity theft by a stranger.

in Minn. by the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Top Workplaces recognizes the most progressive companies in Minn. based on employee opinions. The analysis

Steps for Employers 1 Report the fraud, or suspected fraud, to the MN DEED office. B Have employees report the fraud. C Keep your employees’ information secure.

included responses from over 76,000 employees at Minnesota public, private and nonprofit organizations.

CentraCare announces vice president; Foundation announces new board members Santo M. Cruz, J.D., is the new senior vice president and general counsel at CentraCare. Cruz will lead the health system’s legal and compliance functions, reporting to President and CEO Ken Holmen, M.D. Cruz has served as CentraCare’s associate general counsel and vice president of community and government relations since 2018. CentraCare Foundation announced new board members with terms starting July 1, 2020: Tamara Congdon, MD, Medical Director, St. Benedict’s Community; Jan Dingmann, CentraCare Paynesville, Regional Development Committee; Mark Raitor, CentraCare Sauk Centre, Regional Development Committee

Wayne joins CentraCare investment committee Chris Wayne, vice president and partner at Laraway Financial, recently joined the CentraCare Investment Committee.

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U

nemployment Insurance (UI) fraud occurs when applicants lie while applying for and receiving benefits. The biggest area of fraud is applicants who say they didn’t work when they actually did. With the help of employers, we catch this and hold applicants who are overpaid, then collect back the money. Another area of fraud results when someone uses another person’s information to apply for benefits. Bad people steal enough information to apply for benefits as someone else. The information is correct for the victim and our systems may see this as a valid application. It’s important to note that there has been no data breach from Minnesota UI systems. ID thieves find their victims’

information elsewhere, then use it to apply for benefits. • Because these imposters have the victim’s real/ correct information, UI processes the application. The victim first finds out when they receive mail from us confirming they applied for benefits. • Some of the people know they were previously the victim of ID theft, some don’t. Either way, they should immediately take action. • While we do our best to catch the imposters before any payment is sent out, we can definitely prevent payment once the victim notifies us. Sometimes applicants give their personal information to a friend, family member, or (former) significant other, who then uses that information to

Steps for Victims 1 Review the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) steps on identity theft. B Contact the credit bureaus to discuss fraud and steps for securing your credit or placing a credit freeze. C Consider contacting the Social Security Administration (SSA) to notify them your Social Security Number (SSN) may have been breached. D File a police report. Jerry Mulhern is the director of Program Partnerships at the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).

For links to report UI fraud in Minnesota, and to review guidelines on identity theft from the FTC and SSA, visit BusinessCentral Magazine.com


IN THE NEWS

TO P H ATS

National Safety Award Winner

B

NEW MEMBERS Guaranty & Title Co., full services closings for those looking to purchase, sell, refinance or build a new home, 1101 2nd Street S, Ste 105, Sartell. Pictured: Tim Schmidt, Bridget Vee, Sascha Gebault, Amber Killmer, Jason Miller.

NEW OWNERSHIP Livea Weight Control Center, customizable approach to weight loss, 216 Division Street, Waite Park. Pictured: Tanja Goering, Carrie Clauson, Ashley Ehlert, Jason Miller

renny Specialized, a division of Brenny Transportation, received a Platinum award from Great West Casualty Company as part of their annual National Safety Awards program. The National Safety Awards program recognizes motor carriers in similar operations with awards based on their year-end preventable crash results. Carriers are eligible to receive a Platinum, Gold, Silver, or Participatory award.

----------------------

Leadership Structure Changes for APH

A

utomotive Parts Headquarters, Inc. announced a new leadership structure including new senior management roles and responsibilities. Jesse Westrup joined the company as chief operating officer; Dennis Gregory was named executive chairman; and Josh Bartlett has moved into the newly created position of chairman emeritus.

Improving Lives

ONE SCREENING AT A TIME

Colonoscopy screenings significantly decrease colon cancer mortality rates, which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths. Manuel R. Moran, MD, who performs these minimally invasive procedures at St. Cloud Surgical Center, urges everyone age 50 or older to have a colonoscopy.

It is not necessary to wait months for a colonoscopy appointment, and it’s never a good idea to wait until you have symptoms,” says Dr. Moran. “Most of the time, colorectal cancers are preventable with colonoscopy screenings, early detection, and removal of growths.” Call 320-229-3201 to schedule your screening colonoscopy. We accept most insurance plans.

Manuel R. Moran, MD

Colorectal Surgery Specialist St. Cloud Surgical Center

Better Care, Better Costs, Better Recovery… Better YOU. 1526 Northway Drive, St. Cloud, MN 56303 |

PH

800.349.7272 | stcsurgicalcenter.com

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NETWORKCENTRAL GROW

|

NETWORK |

NETWORK!

PROFIT

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E ST. C LO U D A R E A

M O R E O N E V E N T S : Fo r i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h e s e o r o t h e r b u s i n e s s e v e n t s , c a l l 3 2 0 -2 51 -2 9 4 0 o r v i s i t S t C l o u d A r e a C h a m b e r. c o m a n d c l i c k o n “ C a l e n d a r.”

The Waite Park Chamber kicks off a return to in-person networking complete with masks and social distancing. The July meeting was hosted by the St. Cloud Rox on a sunny Wednesday afternoon at the Municipal Athletic Complex (MAC).

Brittany Liberty, Central Minn. Mental Health Center (L); Kayle Ellison, Anna Marie's Alliance; Amanda Henry, St, John's Prep; and Brady DeGagne, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Minn.

Jim Janochoski, Stone Holding Company

Eric Alf, Express Employment Professionals, enjoys lunch courtesy of the Rox.

Mike Johnson, St. Cloud Rox Baseball updates the Waite Park Chamber on plans for the Rox’s season.

Tauna Quimby, Tri-County Humane Society (L) and Jennifer Noble, St. Cloud School District

Chisel

Socially-distanced networking

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Jeremy Salzbrun, H&S Heating (L) and Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy


GROW! Business Adaptability webinar featuring CDI, Simplicity Health, St. Cloud Surgical Center and St. Cloud Orthopedics.

Staying current on business information via teleconferencing.

Bill Worzala, St. Cloud Orthopedics, discusses the clinic’s changing response to care due to COVID-19 during the Business Adaptability webinar.

The June Legislative Wrap-up put Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs in the host seat during this teleconference update.

Teleconferencing opens the door for the chambers of St. Cloud, Minnesota and Florida to enjoy a Meet & Greet.

June 2020 Legislative Wrap-up

THERE’S NO STOPPING THE FUTURE OF TECHNOLOGY.

JOIN US NOVEMBER 12, 2020 IT professionals, business owners and community leaders, save the date for nVision 2020.

netcenter.net/nVision2020

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BUSINESSTOOLS GROW

|

NETWORK

|

PROFIT

R ES O U RC ES T H AT H E L P YO U R B US I N ESS G RO W

I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : M a n a g e m e n t To o l k i t / E n t r e p r e n e u r i s m / Ec o n o m y Ce n t ra l b y Fa l c o n B a n k

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Employer of Choice If you’re having trouble attracting employees, ask yourself these questions. By Mike Roth

A

sk business leaders what one of their biggest concerns is and they will put hiring and retaining good people near the top of the list almost every time. It will be followed up with statements like: • There’s no loyalty anymore. • Nobody wants to work. • Millennials don’t have any ambition. • It’s not like it used to be. I contend that while there are lots of people challenges, the real reason you are dealing

with them is that you haven’t put enough effort into solving the actual problem – becoming a place where people want to work. Picture yourself as the employer of choice. What does that look like? • You have great people in your organization. • You have people calling you asking you to let them know when there’s an opening. • Your reputation in the market draws people to you.

Contributor ________ Mike Roth is the president of Mike Roth Traction Consulting, a business consulting firm, and a certified implementer for the Entrepreneurial Operating System. He can be reached at mike@mikerothtraction.com

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Does that describe your company? No? I want to challenge your thinking about the difficulties of building a great organization and about what it takes to become a place where great people are knocking on your door. How do you get from where you are to being the employer of choice? Solving the “People Issue” takes hard work and time. That’s why most people don’t solve it. There are no quick fixes or easy solutions. Here’s an example: You run a 40-person manufacturing company in Minnesota that has five “bad apple” workers, but

restrict yourself to those with manufacturing experience. There are a lot of great people out there. You must create an environment that attracts the right people, and then obsess about what you need to do to keep them. Ask yourself some tough questions: • Do you have the kind of culture that people want to be part of? • Do you know what your culture is? • Do you have a compelling vision that people want to make happen? • Is your structure clear and everyone knows who is doing what?

How do you get from where you are to being the employer of choice? Solving the “People Issue” takes hard work and time. you can’t let them go because you don’t have replacements or even applicants. According to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, there are over 158,000 people in Minnesota working in manufacturing at a median wage of $18.07 per hour. Take a minute to process that. You need to find and replace five people out of 158,000 prospects, and that’s only if you

• Are you holding everyone accountable and communicating with them about what’s working and what’s not working? • Are you continuously looking to improve the team or do you only think about it when someone quits? Getting the right people in the right seats has to be your priority for the long-term. Make a commitment today that you are going to fix this!


photo @cloudminds

TECH NEWS

Robots Join COVID-19 Battle

Source: The Daily Mail

C

hina has unveiled its first 'intelligent' makeshift coronavirus hospital, which sees 5G-powered robots providing round-the-clock care for patients. Six different types of droids have taken up posts at the facility to reduce medics' heavy workload and prevent cross-infection between doctors and patients. The intelligent machines can take patients' temperature and deliver meals to them. They can also patrol and disinfect hospital areas.

Anti-Surveillance Fashion

Source: Slate

T

he world knows a lot more about your face than you realize. As facial recognition tech takes hold in more parts of our daily lives, eluding surveillance may be desirable even if you aren’t engaged in protesting. You might want to be able to hop over to the grocery store without an N95 mask obscuring half your face to thwart recognition technology. Enter anti-surveillance fashion. Artists, designers, and computer vision experts are creating the principles behind antisurveillance couture. If the current anti-surveillance garments become more popular, you might see the same design elements incorporated into everyday clothing, because face it, surveillance is not going away.

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BUSINESSTOOLS

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Going Green

More Americans agree on going green than you might think.

W

hile the United States is deeply divided on many issues, there is remarkable consensus on climate change. Researchers at Stanford University conducted a study on climate change with ABC News and Resources for the Future, a Washington, D.C.,based research organization. The poll showed that Americans don't realize how much they agree about global warming: Despite 74 percent of Americans believing the

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world's temperature has been rising, respondents wrongly guessed 57 percent. Breaking the numbers down along party lines, although Republicans and Democrats differ on the issue, the poll revealed that the gap is not as large as people perceive. Survey respondents included Republicans, Democrats, and independents and showed that the proportion of Americans who say the issue is extremely important to them personally is at an all-time high.


WWW.DESIGNELECT.COM

• ARE YOU AN XCEL CUSTOMER? • DID YOU KNOW TIME IS RUNNING OUT ON SOME OF THE BEST LED LIGHTING REBATES? • NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE THE SWITCH TO ENGERGY EFFICIENT LED LIGHTS • CONTACT US TODAY FOR A RETURN ON INVESTMENT ESTIMATE

By the Numbers

L

arge majorities of Americans support certain public policy approaches to impact climate change, and oppose others, according to a survey by Stanford University. For example, the public objects to increasing taxes on gasoline and electricity designed to reduce consumption.

81%

CONTACT US FOR ALL YOUR COMMERCIAL WIRING NEEDS THINKING OF SOLAR AS AN OPTION FOR YOUR BUSINESS?

Believe that the country should try to cut the greenhouse gases that trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere to meet the target in the Paris Climate agreement.

67% Say the federal government should require companies to pay taxes for every ton of greenhouse gases they emit.

78% Say that a tax should be levied on oil, coal, or natural gas imported by a company from another country.

81% Support tax breaks to companies that produce electricity from water, wind and solar power.

ELECTRIC, INC.

PH-320.252.1658

24-Hour Emergency Service

Business Broker ––––––––––––– Sell your business Find a business Access to over 300 Franchises Commercial Property If you are Buying or Selling 4Confidential Business Analysis 4Confidential Network & Advertise the Sale 4Sale Structure

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69%

Marv Soldner

40+ Years of Business Experience in Minnesota __________

Say the better way for the government to encourage job creation is by developing renewable energy rather than encouraging fossil fuel use.

320-267-9626 / msoldner@tworld.com www.tworldminnesota.com

78% Believe that oil companies have not been honest about their products’ role in global warming and think the companies have tried to cover it up.

21% Believe that protecting the traditional energy industry is the better way for job growth. Source: Stanford University

COVID-19 Resources ––––––

StCloudAreaChamber.com > COVID-19 Resources

#SeeYouSoon StCloudAreaChamber.com

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ENTREPRENEURISM

Defining Independence The Department of Labor and the IRS actively prosecute employers who misclassify workers. If you don't understand the difference between "employee" and "independent contractor," it's time to learn. By Betsey Lund Ross

S

mall and large employers have vastly different needs, but they both rely heavily on workers to perform services or produce products. When evaluating staffing needs, some employers look to independent contractors (sometimes referred to as a “1099” in reference to the tax form an independent contractor uses to report his or her various income) to perform tasks. However, 10-20 percent of U.S. employers wrongfully classify at least one worker as an independent contractor. Various state and federal labor laws, like the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), provide

certain rights to “employees.” But if a worker is hired by an employer as an independent contractor, the worker is not entitled to certain protections such as minimum wage requirements, overtime pay eligibility, and child labor standards. Additionally, when workers are misclassified, state and federal governments lose revenue from income taxes and unemployment insurance. For these reasons, the Department of Labor and Internal Revenue Service work aggressively and collaboratively to enforce wage and hour laws.

Contributor ________ Betsey Lund Ross is an attorney and shareholder with Lund Ross, P. A. in St. Cloud, working in the areas of business law, employment law, and estate planning. You can find her online at Lundrosslaw.com

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Properly Classifying Workers The Department of Labor has long relied on the “economic dependence” test to determine whether workers are - no matter what you call them - employees or independent contractors. Although cases are reviewed on a case-by-case basis and with a fact-specific inquiry, the economic dependence standard focuses on these factors (followed in parentheses by my recommended considerations): ––––––– The nature and degree of the potential employer’s control. (Who finds the worker’s clients or customers? Can the worker reduce or increase his or her hours without the employer’s approval? Is the worker required to attend weekly staff meetings?) ––––––– The permanency of the worker’s relationship with the potential employer. (Is the worker being hired for a specific project that will terminate once completed? Or is the worker performing continuous and on-going services with no real end date?) ––––––– The amount of the worker’s investment in facilities, equipment, or helpers. (Does the employer provide the worker’s computer, cell phone, office supplies, office space, etc. or is the worker required to provide these items?)

––––––– The amount of skill, initiative, judgment, or foresight required for the worker’s services. (Are the worker’s tasks or responsibilities unique or are the duties that of a general office assistant?) ––––––– The worker’s opportunities for profit or loss. (Does the worker rely almost entirely on the employer for increased earnings? Or does the worker control his or her increased earnings or profit?) ––––––– The extent of integration of the worker’s services into the potential employer’s business. (Are the worker’s services performed daily, weekly, seasonally, etc.? Does the employer rely heavily on the services of the worker or only minimally?) Although none of these factors have more weight than another, the key focus of the inquiry is the amount of control the employer exercises over the worker. The more control the employer has, the more likely the worker is an employee and not an independent contractor. For an employer to truly hire an independent contractor, the employer must be willing to give up some control over the worker or, alternatively, hire the worker as an employee.


TECH NEWS

TECH NEWS

MARTIAN FLYOVER

Hands-free Handles

Source: Universetoday.com

T

he European Space Agency’s Mars Express spacecraft provides a stunning view of one of Mars’ most eye-popping craters. The agency combined topography information from the stereo channels of the Mars Express’ High Resolution Stereo Camera to generate a three-dimensional landscape, which was then recorded from different perspectives and turned into a video. The end result provides a sense of what it would be like to fly in an airplane on another planet.

T

wo architectural designers have created a device that adapts door handles for hands-free opening. The curved plastic device attaches onto "fire escape-style" pull door handles via a pair of cable ties. The idea is that instead of opening the door with their hands, users loop their arm through the adaptor and pull the door open. This is one of many creative approaches around the world designed to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Just one question, are they still called handles if you don't use your hands? Source: Dezeen

View the video at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

The Choice is Yours... Choose the Best! Working with buyers, sellers, Realtors, Lenders and Builders throughout Central and Greater Minnesota

Back Row L to R: Mary Weis, Mary Schneider, Brenda Roettger

Front Row L to R: Melanie Walz, Sue Lentner, Jan Carlson, Mary Jo Schepers

Professional Residential & Commercial Closing Services Title Insurance / Construction Disbursing Experts Abstracting / Tax Deferred 1031 Exchanges

122 12th Ave. N / St. Cloud, MN 56303 / 320-253-2096 208 Red River Ave. S. / Cold Spring, MN 56320 / 320- 685-4280

1-800-892-2399 / tricountyabstract.com

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Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

The COVID-19 Economy Almost one in every five workers in Central Minnesota has applied for Unemployment Insurance. By Luke Greiner

W

ith the global economy suffering a sudden and unexpected negative shock from the COVID-19 pandemic, Central Minnesota’s economy could not escape the virus – or the fallout from efforts to slow its spread. Faring just slightly better than the state in terms of Unemployment Insurance (UI) applications as a percentage of the total labor force, the economic impact has been difficult to fathom and not shared equally. From March 16 through May 16 more than 76,700 workers in Central Minnesota applied for UI, the equivalent of one in every five workers. Occupation Odds The chances of being laid off as a result of the pandemic containment measures are largely dependent on the type of occupation workers are in.

Food preparation and serving occupations accounted for the largest share of claims in Central Minnesota, with 10,676 claims filed for various occupations within the field. For perspective, that’s just over 70 percent of total employment for the occupation group. Over half of the food preparation and serving claims were from food and beverage serving workers such as waiters and waitresses, bartenders, and fast food workers. Likewise, when the retail trade sector began closing doors, retail sales workers filed over 4,500 UI claims in Central Minnesota, along with more than 2,000 sales representatives and other types of sales workers. When elective surgeries were put on hold, many health care establishments were forced to begin laying off health care

Contributor ________ Luke Greiner is a regional labor market analyst at the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).

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workers. Health care support occupations had 27.5 percent of employment laid off, with big losses in occupations such as massage therapists, dental and medical assistants, dentists, medical equipment preparers and transcriptionists. However, higher level health care workers - such as pharmacists, physicians, RNs, paramedics - fared better, with only about 20 percent of those workers filing UI claims since March 16th . Overall, new claims have dropped substantially — 67 percent — between April 11 and May 16. One troubling exception is claims from production workers. Many manufacturing sectors were deemed critical and were allowed to continue operating throughout the pandemic. However a spike in claims occurred during April and has remained elevated, even increasing slightly during the first

three weeks of May. Anecdotally, a share of the claims from production workers are the result of large animal processing plants temporarily shuttering operations in order to implement COVID-19 safety measures. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to slow the spread of the virus are likely to have lasting impacts, but the most negative effects are being concentrated in certain industries and the occupations they employ. Workers in retail sales, and food and beverage serving occupations are filing a disproportionate number of claims, but so far the vast majority of layoffs are considered temporary.

To read the complete review of Central Minnesota's Economy through COVID-19, visit BusinessCentral Magazine.com

BY THE NUMBERS

Central Minnesota's Unemployment Claims 2,778 vs 5,270 ––––– Initial UI claims in April for Central Minnesota have averaged 2,778 over the previous decade, even including the peak of 5,270 claims in 2009 during the Great Recession. In April of 2020, there were 38,405 claims.

1,262% and 1,929% ––––– For context, that’s 1,262 percent over the historical norm, and a staggering 1,929 percent over the previous April. In addition to the astonishing amount of claims filed in April, another 35,060 claims were filed in March, a 1,062 percent increase over the 10-year average.


July 2020 Jan Feb December Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

2020

December

November

October

TOTAL: $36,614,442*

St. Cloud Sartell

TOTAL: $178,724,272

2020

383 338 119 $231,596,447 $116,566,743 $23,900,786

July December

50

36

279

June $13,856,200 $12,784,000 $1,985,049 November

Food and Beverage 14

2019

Sauk Rapids 34 May $16,509,793 October

55 $24,841,483

$6,804,206 ST. CLOUD

Waite Park 83 136 79 Apr September $7,260,629 $15,234,330 $3,250,201

TOTAL: 765*

2018

TOTAL: 1823

1500

St. Augusta 7 7 6 Mar August $1,587,313 $271,600 2020 $90,700 St. Joseph Feb July Jan

70 61 $18,129,160 $9,026,116

June *Total as of 8/18/2020

2000

$2M

$200M $200M $300M TOTAL: $178,724,272

TOTAL:1815

TOTAL: $632,368*

TOTAL: $1,604,677

TOTAL: $1,566,952

$1.5M

Home Sales Closed in St. Cloud Area

ST. CLOUD

September

15 $0

$500k

$583,500

2019

May and St. Joseph. Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, Apr

2019-2020

2018

Non FarmMarJobs

Unemployment Rates

2019-20 % CHANGE

Source: positivelyminnesota.com

Source: positivelyminnesota.com $0 $500k

Feb 6%

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

Jan

May

April

3%

March

$300M

February

January

$200M

December

November

October

$200M

September

August

$150M

July

$100M June

May

$50M April

March

$0M

February

January

12%

Food and Beverage

Commercial 2018 2019 2020* August #/$ #/$ #/$

TOTAL: $288,822,542

15%

500

B U I L D I N G P E R M I T S BY C O M M U N I T Y

TOTAL: $36,614,442*

$150M

50 $875,041

0

November

1000

$1M $100M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

500

$500k

$50M

51 $3,555,967

2018

98 73 $6,043,519 $3,304,271

February

October

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH TOTAL: $288,822,542

$0M

73 $5,979,717

December

Commercial Building Permits

2020

2019

January *Total as of 8/18/2020

$80M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2018

September

St. Augusta 72 March $6,469,120

Commercial Building Permits

2020

500

Waite Park 46 39 8 April $1,509,887 $1,084,477 $796,184

St. Joseph

$70M

357

Sauk Rapids 174 165 117 May $8,409,293 $8,585,270 $3,195,294

TOTAL: $66,467,193

$60M

August

$50M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

Sartell 380 309 188 January$20,426,812 $18,954,216 0$7,025,150 June

2020

$40M

2018

607

2019

$30M

597

2018

$20M

Home Sales Closed

$25,555,950 $25,977,770 $19,094,144 February July 2020

0

$10M

August

St. Cloud

$60M $70M $80M TOTAL: $63,885,721

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

$0M

July

September

2020

$0 2018

June

$50M

May

$40M

2019

2018

2019

$30M

April

$20M

March

$10M

2019

Residential 2018 2019 2020* March #/$ #/$ #/$

2020 $0M

May October

BUILDING P E R M I T S BY C O M M U N I T Y April

TOTAL: $34,541,779*

2018

June November

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

Residential Building Permits

TOTAL: $63,885,721

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH TOTAL: $66,467,193

2018

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD

Central presented by ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

COLOR KEY:August

TOTAL: $34,541,779* Compiled by Shelly Imdieke, data current as of 8/18/2020

2019

41,779*

Economy September

ECO N O M I C I N D I C ATO R S & T R E N D S

2019

Home Sales Closed

October

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2019

885,721

$300M

Residential Building Permits

November

E PARK,

467,193

$80M

E PARK,

4,442*

24,272

22,542

0M

December

0%

9%

-3% -6%

6%

-9% 3%

-12% 0%

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

*Total as of 8/18/2020; St. Cloud and Mpls rate for June were not reported at time of print.

J

F

M

A

M

J

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

-15%

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0 // BusinessCentralMagazine.com

27


$300M

GROW

1000

E PARK,

500

41,779*

0

885,721

January

1500

COLOR KEY:

Jan December Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

ECO N O M I C I N D I C ATO R S & T R E N D S

December

September

TOTAL: 765*

December

ST. CLOUD

November

Food and Beverage Tax Collection October

TOTAL: $632,368*

September

TOTAL: $36,614,442*

October

September

August

July

June

November

May

April

March

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

November

ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH UD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

August

August

2020 July

2020

July

1500

2000

December

Tax Withholding Calculator

TOTAL: $632,368*

August

information from the July

Minnesota Department $2M

and Economic May

Development (DEED), April

TOTAL: $1,566,952

a lot of Minnesotans have been receiving

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

unemployment this year.

$500k

TOTAL: 26* $1.5M

$1M

$2M

2020 TOTAL: 123

December

IRS penalty.

November

that only applies to the

October

Even if you said yes,

TOTAL: 115

September

to help you avoid an August

withhold additional taxes

taken out. Guess what?

July

the option to have taxes June

to have your employer

May

determine if you need

unemployment you had April

When you signed up for

March

tool that can help you

January

February

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2019

$2M

March

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions $0

TOTAL: 765*

$1.5M

TOTAL: 1823

TOTAL:1815

June of Employment

TOTAL: $1,604,677

2000

$2M

2018

October

September

1500

$1M

TOTAL: $632,368*

$500k

TOTAL: $1,604,677

TOTAL: $1,566,952

$1.5M

$0

November

Based on unemployment

TOTAL: $1,748,626

2019 Source: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud *Total as of 8/18/2020

$1.5M

Source: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud *Total as of 8/18/2020

1000

$1M

2020

2018

$1M

BY THE NUMBERS

TOTAL: $1,599,444 Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

$500k

January

Home Sales Closed in St. Cloud Area

Jan

$0

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

February

Feb

TOTAL: $357,444*

2020

2020

ST. CLOUD

March

500

$500k

Lodging Tax Dollars

0

$300M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2018

TOTAL: $1,566,952

Mar

Housing/Real Estate sources: St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors, http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. *Total as of 8/18/2020

2019

2019

April

ST. CLOUD

$200M

2018

2020

2019

2018

$0

$150M

May

TOTAL:1815

Apr

TOTAL: $288,822,542

500 $200M

2019

May

2018

0

TOTAL: $1,604,677

June

TOTAL: 1823

June

TOTAL: $178,724,272 2019

standard unemployment.

2018

If you also received the 0

30

60

90

120

SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

150

additional $600 boost, you'll be paying taxes

Residential 2018

2019

2020

on that come filing time

Stearns Co.

84

102

20

for 2020. Not sure what

Benton Co.

31

21

6

that means? The IRS has

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office *Total as of 8/18/2020; There were no reported auctions in April & May 2020.

28

2000

BUSINESSTOOLS

Home Sales Closed in St. Cloud Area ing Permits 6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, October WAITE PARK,

M

467,193

$80M

$80M

$70M

E PARK,

$60M

4,442*

$50M

24,272

22,542

0M

$40M

BusinessCentral Magazine.com // S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0

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You can find the link at BusinessCentral Magazine.com ––––– Remember, when it comes to the IRS, ignorance is no excuse.


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COVER STORY

Positivi

30

BusinessCentral Magazine.com // S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0


ty

ME LIN D A TAMM H A S A V IS IO N: CR E ATE A P O S I TI VE EN VIRON MEN T TH AT A LLOW S YO U NG D A NCE R S TO BECO ME ST RON G IN M IND, BO DY A ND S P I R I T.

S

ix-foot squares are clearly marked on the floor. Signs are posted regarding sanitizing hands and wearing masks. Parents have been called. Permissions for touch/no-touch behavior secured. The return-towork plan is reviewed daily. It is July 13 and Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio is ready to reopen. The studio closed on March 16 when the State of Minnesota issued a “Stay Safe at Home” order, shuttering gyms, dance studios, hair salons, restaurants and so much more. Dancers were working hard on a spring recital that was now in jeopardy. “We pivoted immediately,” Melinda Tamm, owner of the studio said. “We told parents we were going to hold for a second to get the teachers trained. We trained that week, did some test runs with solos and families, and got them used to Zoom. The

following week we went virtual in class.” That’s when the state-wide shutdown was announced. “We provided computers and sent them home with teachers and said ‘You’re now in charge. We’re going live from your houses and apartments.’” This is not a contingency Tamm remotely contemplated when she first talked with her fiancé, now husband and business partner, about opening a dance studio. “We went for a walk one evening,” Derek Tamm said. “She was frustrated with her job at the time and expressed interest in starting her own business, specifically a dance business. I had no foundation for what that meant. In my mind it was some hobby she would do after hours.” But Melinda Tamm’s vision was much larger. “In the scope of four months she went from idea to grand opening,” Derek said. “Melinda hatched the idea, wrote

BY GAIL IVERS // PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI, BUTKOWSKI DIGITAL IMAGING

Being a woman in business is a great place to be. Be who you are and be bold about it.

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0 // BusinessCentralMagazine.com

31


COVER STORY

Personal PROFILE Melinda Tamm, 40,

CEO, Ms. Melinda's Dance Studio Hometown: Grew up in Sartell, currently lives in Corcoran Education: B.S. from St. Cloud State University in Education, minor in dance, emphasis in kinesiology Work History: 2006-Present: Owner/CEO of Ms. Melinda's Dance Studio; 2004-2006: Catering and sales manager at the Holiday Inn and Suites, St. Cloud Family: Husband Derek, children Connor and Colton Hobbies: Traveling, game nights with family, and enjoying time at their cabin

Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Be willing to think outside the box, work extremely hard, and push yourself to think bigger every day, while staying true to who you are. 32

BusinessCentral Magazine.com // S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0


the business plan, secured the name, marketed the students and how she sees them grow from to find the students and remodeled an empty two-years-old, to in some cases adults with space to accommodate the students. Most children and careers of their own. The students business consultants would say that’s crazy, are like children to her, like she is trying to but it’s turned out to be a pretty good decision raise good, healthy, responsible kids.” for her.” Tamm personally develops new curriculum It may not have felt so great at the time. each year. “I spend a lot of time researching Forty-five days before how hormones in food and Tamm’s first dance season changes in the environment was supposed to start, impact muscle strength and her lease fell through. She bone structure,” she said. scrambled to find a new “I learn what skills we can Company Name: building, but her number teach kids at what age, and Ms. Melinda’s Dance one choice was filled with at what age they understand Studio Inc. 454 Great Oak Dr, over 100 cubicles that different concepts to be Waite Park, MN 56387 needed to be removed and sure we challenge, but don’t 320-257-TOES (8637) the space remodeled. overwhelm them. Ensuring msmelindas.com The other big challenge, that our curriculum is CEO: Melinda Tamm right away, was recruiting constantly changing and Ownership: students, she said. “I said growing is a huge part of Melinda and Derek Tamm from the start that I would what separates us from the Business Description: Dance studio offering classes not reach out and recruit competition.” for ages 2-19 in ballet, jazz, from other studios. I want Tamm is also adamant tap, pointe, Hip-Hop, and students to come to me about rules and respect acrobatic arts. because they believe in — at all levels. “It’s black Number of employees: 30 my mission and vision and and white here,” she said. Number of students: 850 what I’m going to do that “I have rules. Those rules is different in the dance can sometimes be bent, industry.” Registrations but never broken. And we Tamm owns a classic started slowly, primarily by expect respect — teachers car, a 1972 Buick word of mouth. “It was one to teachers, kids to kids, Riviera, and applied kid here, maybe two kids teachers to kids, parents to to join the there, then within a week of teachers — respect all the St. Cloud Antique opening there was this huge way around.” Auto Club known as snowball effect of kids and That means people know the Pantowners. families coming in.” where she stands, especially     her staff. Dance teachers are primarily young women, often in college or a first job, according to Tamm. “I am very direct when I tell them ny conversation with Tamm regarding what I expect from them. And my expectations business or dance, returns to her mission are always high — not to intimidate or control and vision. “I know exactly where I stand on them — but to make sure they grow. I want what I want to see for the growth of kids,” them to do more, push more, dream more.” she said. “Of course I would love everyone to Certainly the months of online teaching get along and be happy — kumbaya, right?” caused by COVID-19 restrictions demanded she laughed. “But the vision is really coming more of the staff than even Tamm could have together as a community of dancers, as one. anticipated. “One of our teachers has the Tiny The mission is that we’re teaching students Tots, which is two and three-year-olds,” Tamm lifelong lessons. Our students are lifelong said. “She had 96 percent retention rate for learners, not just dancers.” her classes — which is amazing — and to have “The passion she has for her students a two year old online taking a class....That’s is unmatched,” husband Derek said. While pretty amazing. But it was the innovation of parents are certainly customers, they pay the the teachers, and knowing this isn’t ideal, tuition after all, that’s not who Tamm talks and being ok with telling the parents we miss about all the time, according to Derek. “It’s seeing them in person, and saying thank you

Business PROFILE

Fun fact:

Vision Driven

A

Championing Women When Melinda Tamm was 10 years old she dreamed of starting a dance studio called Melinda’s Dance World. “I always knew I wanted to do something in dance, but it was like a wild dream,” she said. And yet, in 2006, that wild dream became reality when she opened Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio, serving 49 students. Four months after telling her soon-to-be-husband she wanted to start a business, Tamm had established the company, found and remodeled space, and welcomed her first students. Since those early days, Tamm has expanded three times and currently owns her 15,000 square foot studio. During the 2019-20 school year she had just shy of 800 students, with two full time employees, and 38 part time dance instructors. Growing her business is exciting, according to Tamm, but that’s only half the story. Her goal when it comes to both students and instructors is to help them develop self-confidence and leadership skills through dance. “Providing a quality dance education is our top priority,” Tamm said, “but we also strive to provide a place for students to be themselves, while learning to become strong leaders in the dance classroom and in their communities.” More than just a business owner, Tamm still does a lot of teaching and all the choreography for her award-winning teams. She’s also worked with three other dance studios, helping their owners with business plans and creating financially viable companies. Because of her combination of entrepreneurship, leadership, and support of female-dominated clientele and staff, Tamm was named the 2020 Business Central Mark of Excellence - Women in Business Champion.

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0 // BusinessCentralMagazine.com

33


COVER STORY

TIMELINE 1985 Melinda Tamm takes her first dance lesson

2000-2001 Tamm earns a spot with the Minnesota Viking Cheerleaders

July 2006 Tamm opens Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio with 50 students. Over the next four seasons she increases the business to four classrooms and 250 students.

2007 Tamm takes dancers to perform at Disney World in Florida

2010 Ms. Melinda’s relocates, doubling in size

2012 Tamm organizes students to dance for the first time at the CentraCare Foundation’s annual fundraiser, Holly Ball

2014 Tamm purchases property in Waite Park for a new studio, begins the design phase, and gives birth to her first son

2016 Tamm breaks ground in November for a new 15,000 square foot studio and gives birth to her second son

March 2020 Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz issues an executive order that closes most public businesses, including gyms and dance studios, due to the novel coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19). Tamm sends teachers home with computers and within a few days begins offering virtual online dance lessons to students.

June 2020 Tamm reopens her studio following state guidelines and offers both in-person and virtual lessons for students. 34

for coming on-screen tonight with me. That helps keep them coming back.” Tamm’s expectations aren’t just around dance. “This is a long season,” she said. “They have to make sure that they’re healthy in spirit, in mind, and physically, too. That’s one of the reasons I ask them about volunteering and community involvement.”

Sometimes it’s just about encouragement for Tamm. “I enjoy going out to high schools, middle school, elementary schools and talking to students about education or business. Maybe sitting on a panel talking about being an entrepreneur. Sometimes it’s just reading a book to kids! Gerald the Giraffe who can dance...it has those life lessons in it.”

Giving Back

Not Just a Fancy Costume

C

ommunity involvement, particularly hen Tamm talks about her studio supporting and promoting the arts, is a she talks about the fun of seeing the passion for Tamm. “I love sitting on boards that can create art because I feel like the arts really students arrive with smiles on their faces. Or if foster people as humans,” she said. She sits they had a bad day, watching it melt away as they on the board of directors for the Paramount focus on dancing. She talks about how wonderful Center for Performing Arts where she has the it is to watch them succeed...and to help them opportunity to learn about arts programs, but when they don’t. “It’s even refreshing to hear also share her opinion on who should be on stage. and see them when they don’t have the most success,” she said, “because “I even have opportunities they learn how to go on and to sponsor shows,” she said. know that it’s not going to break Last winter she sponsored a them. It’s going to make them professional ballet company stronger.” that also offered a master “Everything through class for student dancers. dance, I think, is a life lesson,” “The students could see Baggenstoss said. “You’re not what these professionals going to get first place all the do and maybe get that extra time. You’re not always going to push to do more than just be make the team you want to be a high school dancer.” on. That’s how life is. All these Tamm’s other major things I have my girls doing is volunteer activity involves preparing them for their futures. supporting the CentraCare I love that they are learning — Foundation’s Holly Ball. through dance — that they She provides dancers and won’t get everything they want, serves on the planning board. but they can still be successful.” “Volunteerism is more than Forming strong dancers in donating money,” Tamm said. mind, body and spirit is definitely “It’s about time and heart. part of Tamm’s vision. “People It’s important for youth to — Best business advice Melinda received from her want to be surrounded with that see that. And if they see you sister, Christy Vierzba positive atmosphere and they doing it personally as a leader, want to give it to their children,” they think it’s cool and hip. Tamm said. “We’re helping They learn that volunteering is a good thing to do and they’ll reap the benefits of create strong women, and I say women because the vast majority of our students are female. having that positivity in their lives.” “Melinda pushes the kids to think big while They’re not sexualized, and that’s a big thing she’s doing these other things like Holly Ball now with social media. How do you let kids know and the Paramount,” Lori Baggenstoss said. there’s more to art than just a fancy costume? Baggenstoss has three children who attend The costume is an expression of the art, it’s not Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio. “She shows them who you are. We have to keep on that every day.” you can do more than just be at the studio. You can give more and set your dreams bigger.”

BusinessCentral Magazine.com // S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0

W

Focus on what is important to you and your business, not what others are doing. Pave your own path.


Joining the NFL Being an NFL cheerleader isn’t just about being on television. Melinda Tamm, owner of Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio, should know. She spent two years with the Minnesota Viking Cheerleaders.

Ms. Melinda’s has about a dozen male students and two male instructors. Boys who stay with dance are able to get into lifts and partnering, Tamm said. “They can embrace their muscles because guys have different muscles than girls and how they use those muscles makes performance pieces stronger and more elegant.” Tamm also has two sons who are regulars at the studio. “My three-yearold says ‘Hey ladies!’ and walks right into the classroom and is excited about the people. My five-year-old walks into a classroom and wants to be by himself and show off his muscles in the mirrors.”

Looking Ahead

D

uring an interview in March, Tamm talked about the studio’s future with no thought of COVID-19. “The future is very bright. I say that because I know that the teachers we have now and the students that we currently have, they all — 100 percent — get my vision and mission. And the students are young — ages six to 12. Those are our future — the future teachers, the future parents.” And now, when you can’t have a conversation without the pandemic creeping into it? “For summer enrollment we’re at about 95 percent of last year,” Tamm said. “Of course we always want to grow it year over year, but we won’t increase it this year.” Even so, the week before summer classes were to begin — socially distanced and in six-foot squares — business was booming. “People’s other sports

are cancelling,” Tamm said. Plus, Tamm is offering hybrid classes — students can choose to participate in person, or Zoom into the class and participate virtually. “I think when you’re a small business owner, every day is a challenge,” Tamm said. “What’s going to be thrown at you today and how are you going to overcome it? And be able to wake up the next day and start all over again? This is just another challenge.” Tamm has taken advantage of the Payroll Protection Program and received a small grant for operations. She also has the advantage of owning her building, which is new. When designing the building they took the extra step to install an HVAC system that allowed for full control over airflow and air quality. They also put in automatic light switches, now viewed as one less thing to touch. These seemingly small things have turned out to be good planning for a pandemic. There’s no time to focus on the negatives, according to Tamm. That’s one of the benefits of being a small business. You see a challenge and you can just deal with it. Another is being on the front lines when the fun begins. “There are so many rewards to this business,” she said. “You have to look at it as a gift each and every day. Even the small things — they’re gifts.”

“Being an NFL cheerleader is pretty cool because there aren’t many of us,” Tamm said. “You try out with a lot of women and you have to shine. My first season there were over 600 women who tried out and 28 of us made the team. And you have to try out every year. “You’re looked at as entertainment for the game — part of the game-day experience,” she said. “But within the organization you are required to do so much more. You’re required to do outreach programs and volunteer, you’re required to go out on appearances. You need to know a lot about football. If someone asks you who made the scoring touchdown, you need to know. You need to know players and their positions.” All those requirements were part of the fun for Tamm. The hard part was saying goodbye. “That is one of the most difficult decisions — realizing as a dancer when it’s time to stop the performance,” she said. “It’s a hard decision because you’re used to being in the spotlight or on the stage. For games we could be in front of over 64,000 people. Fortunately, I still get to do the things I love, I’m still totally involved in dance. I’m just doing it on a different platform.”

Gail Ivers is vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and editor of Business Central Magazine.

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0 // BusinessCentralMagazine.com

35


F E AT U R E

A Green Future

Going green is becoming a business status symbol. Even better, by introducing green practices at work you can boost employee morale, attract customers, and reduce expenses. By Kelti Lorence

BY THE NUMBERS

Winner, Winner... Sustainable employers experience higher employee, customer and investor support:

N

o doubt you've heard the phrase "going green," but what does it actually mean? More importantly, why should a business care about it? Companies ‘go green’ by making concentrated efforts to reduce their negative environmental impact. This can be implemented on a variety of levels, from small changes like turning off lights in empty rooms to large company-wide recycling programs. Climate Change is Real Despite increased discussions around climate change, it can be difficult to see the importance in major cultural change when the effects are not yet visible in your backyard. Dr. David Easterling, supervisory physical scientist, NOAA/NCEI, spoke about “The Scientific Basis for Climate Change” at St. Cloud State University's 2020 Winter

36

Institute. He observes weather and climate change through sea, earth and space instruments and reports a global temperature increase of 1.2 degrees since 1979. “Greenhouse gases have increased steadily since the industrial revolution as we began to burn more coal, wood, and automobile gas,” he said. Through detection and attribution studies, scientists can often source humans as the influence of negative climate change. “Obviously there would be climate change even without people present,” Easterling agreed. “But it has been observed that recent spikes in increasing temperatures have happened around times of human influence and industrial growth.” In short, dramatic changes that have been detected in the climate correlate with changes in human activity. Dr. John Mahowald, cardiologist at CentraCare in

BusinessCentral Magazine.com // S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0

St. Cloud and another Winter Institute speaker, anticipates Minnesota could become a treeless prairie if climate change is allowed to continue at the current rate. “According to the Environmental Quality Board, Minnesota saw $800 million in healthcare costs due to air pollution from greenhouse gases in 2013, and it's estimated this will be the annual expense,” he said. Rural parts of the state are experiencing battles with torrential rain and droughts leading to food and water insecurities, and ultimately a spike in mental health crises. While these numbers sound scary, they can be mitigated through policy and behavior. Costs vs. Benefits A common roadblock in the decision to implement sustainable practices is that the expense upfront will not be recovered

72%

of 8,000 supplier companies say climate change presents risks that could significantly impact their production.

55%

better employee morale, and 38% higher employee loyalty in companies with strong sustainability programs.

25 – 50%

reduction in average employee turnover because of greater corporate responsibility performance.

LOWER COST Good ESG standards (environmental, social and governance factors) lower the cost of capital and improve operational and financial performance. Source: Harvard Business Report survey


BY THE NUMBERS

warming as a serious threat. Seventy-three percent say they would spend more for sustainable products, clearly highlighting the importance of green practices to this generation. Start by Starting The first step is simply to start, according to Reggie Vanlonden, owner of SuperGreen Solutions of Central Minnesota. “Let your scope and robustness of efforts grow as you grow. All humans crawl, then walk, then run. This is the same. Consider making your first step to develop a strategic plan of action for your business. Sit down with your team and determine the root issue – not just the symptom,”

Pandemic Hits Clean Energy Jobs In 2019, clean energy employed 61,800 Minnesotans. As with many industries, COVID-19 has changed all that.

Source: 2020 Clean Jobs Midwest

in the proceeding paybacks. According to a Harvard Business Review from 2016, this is a common misconception. In addition to the actual dollar savings through practices such as energy efficient lighting, businesses that embed sustainability efforts clearly see positive impacts on business performance. Companies that implement sustainable practices show their employees they care for their well-being. Not only does overall morale improve, but businesses are more likely to attract the next generation of employees. According to two Gallup reports, millennials, who make up the largest portion of the workforce, view global

1,147

2.5x faster

The number of new jobs added in Minnesota’s clean energy industry in 2019. This was the third highest increase in the Midwest

The speed at which clean energy jobs grew compared to overall statewide employment in 2019

11,500 The number of workers in clean energy-related companies who lost their jobs within the first three months of the pandemic

37% Clean energy jobs located in Greater Minnesota

59.3% Clean energy jobs provided by construction

Congratulations TAMMY BIERY LO CA L F O C U S . G LO BA L R E AC H .

2020 DIVERSITY AWARD WINNER, TAMMY BIERY Tammy Biery, executive director at Career Solutions, was awarded the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Diversity Award for her leadership in promoting and celebrating equal opportunity in the Central Minnesota business community.

Presented by

Granite Equity Partners is a missiondriven private investment holding company focused on growing companies while enhancing local communities. The Granite Companies are owned, headquartered, and rooted in Minnesota. This is our local focus. We source, market, service, and develop business around the world. This is our global reach. 320.251.1800

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37


F E AT U R E

Partner Up to Increase Your Impact The SmartWay Transport Partnership aims to cut fuel consumption, reduce noxious emissions, and increase overall savings, while lowering operating costs. ––––– As part of SmartWay, ATS evaluates and monitors operational performance through the FLEET Performance Model. ––––– The annual impact nationwide among all participants is a decrease of about 150 million barrels of oil, the equivalent of taking 12 million cars off the road.

DID YOU KNOW

“One of the first steps we took to build green practices was to join the SmartWay Transport Partnership Program.” —Mary Besser, director of administration, Anderson Trucking Service.

Vanlonden said. “Too often people get caught up in trying to solve the problem right in front of them, which often fails to address the true cause in the long run.” Write out all the solutions on a timeline and start by making one change today, Vanlonden advised. "Repeat this change daily until it becomes a natural part of your company's culture and habit, then add a second change." Share your plans with your employees, customers,

shareholders, and community. Even if it takes time to achieve your ultimate goal, you stand to gain loyalty and support with transparent, consistent effort. Remember that permanent change takes concentrated focus, but don’t be afraid to take on this challenge. "Engaging employees in daily green habits can positively impact customer experiences. Take care of your employees and they will take care of your customers,” Vanlonden said.

strategic. creative. effective. To help you and your business goals finally see eye to eye, let WhiteBox Marketing put our expertise to work just for you. Welcome to today’s modern marketing firm.

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Strategic Marketing • PR • Branding Creative Campaigns • Web Digital Media • Social Media Consulting Services

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meta13.com • 320-230-1223

The Strong Approach There are two approaches to sustainability leadership, Jennifer McMillin, director of sustainability, Cleveland State University, explained to the Winter Institute audience. They are weak or strong. A weak approach assumes natural and manmade capital can be substituted, which develops an unconscious habitual disregard for the well-being outcomes generated. A strong approach considers sustainable methods,


restructuring and building an economic system that is embedded in social and ecological systems. Strong approach leadership is the road less taken, McMillin said, but it could be the most important influencer in the fight for our planet. Patchwork solutions will only hold for so long. Local Leadership Anderson Trucking Service (ATS) has seen a number of benefits from incorporating sustainability into their culture. In 2005 the company developed a formal environmental policy: “ATS aims to be one of the leading global transportation companies that provides an optimal balance between our impact on the

environment and our customers’ service expectations, the economic needs of our companies and employees, employee health and well-being, and our corporate social responsibility.” Today they work toward this goal by participating in the SmartWay Transport Partnership Program, building efficient office buildings, incorporating green habits into their employee-engagement strategies, and supporting customers in environmentally focused businesses. For example, moving wind energy equipment requires specialized equipment. ATS partners with domestic and international manufacturers and project managers to offer this service, and is the largest carrier in

the United States, hauling one out of every three energy components transported. These practices result in significant annual cost savings. Equally important, customers want and expect sustainable standards to be upheld. ATS plans to continue their efforts by evaluating solar heating devices for their corporate office, purchasing equipment that meets EPA emissions guidelines, and seeking new ways to support and protect the environment.

to Catherine Wolfram, professor and associate dean for academic affairs, University of California. She believes we need both technological and policy solutions that work to truly combat climate change and preserve our home. “We should want to get our processes and efforts right,” Wolfram told the Winter Institute audience, “because other parts of the world are following in our footsteps.” Kelti Lorence is the communications and workforce development

Advocate for Green The single most important thing an individual can do to address climate change is to advocate for policy makers who are committed to the issue, according

coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

For the sources used in this story, visit BusinessCentral Magazine.com

I am happiest when I am helping others succeed. Proud to serve the businesses that advertise in Business Central ADVERTISE TODAY! Contact Melinda Vonderahe Associate Publisher, 320.656.3808 MelindaV@BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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SPECIAL FOCUS

Proposed Lion’s Park Splash Pad

GROWTH GUIDE

THE PROJECTS

Sartell:

Park Place From splash pads to river walks, new park projects abound in the St. Cloud area. By Ari Kaufman

I

n case you haven’t looked around recently, Central Minnesota is expanding. In fact, we are the fastest-growing region in the state. A strong economy, with affordable housing and beautiful terrain has brought an influx of people here from around the state, country and world. Our region added more than 150,000 residents the past two decades — a 25 percent increase — and roughly double the growth rate of Minnesota as a whole during the same time frame. We also maintain the highest

40

Heritage Park Skate Plaza

job growth rate since 2000 of any Minnesota region. So what is on tap for expansion and growth in the five-city area? Last spring, Waite Park sought to preserve its granite history by transforming an abandoned quarry into a park with a 5,000-seat outdoor

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entertainment venue for the community to enjoy. With interstate proximity for visitors and connections to regional trail systems, it has multiple uses and can host various events. Construction is nearing completion, though COVID-19 has set the opening back 2021. “The Ledge Amphitheater is a new, beautiful outdoor venue located between two quarries that helps showcase the unique landscape of the area,” said Facilities Event Coordinator Meredith Lyon. “It offers our guests a serene

Later this year, Watab Park will be enhanced. In 2021, expect new bike and walking trails with a beach at Sauk River Park. The opening of Linear Park along the Mississippi River will be in 2022.

St. Cloud:

The new Heritage Park Skate Plaza, located just east of the Stearns History Museum, is expected to open any day. The city set aside money from the Costco sale to replace the original park.

Sauk Rapids:

New riverfront parks are expected to be opened in the next year or two.

Waite Park:

“The Ledge” has a tentative completion goal of late spring/ summer 2021.


Spotlight: Exciting Redevelopment Opportunities on the East Side of St. Cloud

Gateways to Growth in St. Cloud

Prominent Location Spurs Initial Investment, Helping Redevelopment Get a GREATER Start with Runnings and The Shoppes at Lincoln Place The City of St. Cloud’s Economic Development Authority recently completed the “East End Vision,” outlining the redevelopment opportunities in this prominent area of our city. And so far, that road map has proven quite useful for the first couple of investors, while intriguing many more. We’ll be welcoming Runnings as early as this fall in the location of the former Shopko, and Midland Atlantic Properties will lease to Caribou and other businesses once they redevelop the current Gateway Motel property that sits along Lincoln Avenue. Beyond that, anything is possible. Midland Atlantic Properties has owned the Cash Wise and Westside Liquor properties near Target on the east side of town since 2017, and are in the process of finalizing the purchase of the Gateway Motel, which sits at the busy intersection of Lincoln Avenue and Highway 23. They were happy to hear the news of Runnings purchasing the nearby Shopko building, and in turn, their development story will likely inspire others. “We loved the corner, the city, the market, and the corridor,” said Clayton Riney, Development Manager at Midland Atlantic Properties. Midland anticipates closing on the purchase of the Gateway Motel property in October, and will break ground shortly thereafter on demolition and new construction. Midland’s new multi-tenant space will be known as “The Shoppes at Lincoln Place,” with the endcap space slated to be leased to Caribou Coffee. “We are uniquely invested in the area, and are excited to see the Gateway property serve the community more widely,” said Riney. He foresees other neighborhood service-oriented retail businesses leasing the remaining 2800 SF of the 5200 SF property. “The City of St. Cloud’s Economic Development Authority has been instrumental in guiding us through the processes that have allowed us to be where we are today,” added Riney.

Why St. Cloud’s East End? For investors and developers alike, there are many reasons that the East Side is an ideal place to grow: •

High-traffic corridor with close proximity to Hwy 10 and Hwy 23, and downtown St. Cloud

St. Cloud as a whole is on an upward growth pattern, including Downtown and Business Parks

City support in leveraging redevelopment resources

Three distinct Catalyst Sites have been identified, which help developers take the “fast track” to moving in and putting their vision in place

This area is part of a federally designated Opportunity Zone, which may provide tax benefits on capital investments

How & When To Inquire For brokers, investors, or business owners looking to see what St. Cloud has to offer, the City’s Economic Development Authority is ready to discuss opportunities. “The redevelopment investment in St. Cloud’s key gateways and corridors—including the East End—is happening quickly, and it’s really exciting to see,” said Cathy Mehelich, Director of St. Cloud’s Economic Development Authority.

Interested? To explore development & redevelopment opportunities in St. Cloud, please contact Cathy Mehelich at the City of St. Cloud’s Economic Development Authority: CALL 320.650.3111 EMAIL cathy.mehelich@ci.stcloud.mn.us VISIT ci.stcloud.mn.us/economicdevelopment

SPONSORED PROFILE


The Ledge

Riverfront Parks

42

nature walk from the parking lot to the front gates through our trails that overlook one of our quarries. The Ledge was built as a must-see destination to attract visitors to spend time in our community attending concerts, musicals, exhibitor shows and other

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The Ledge

events while supporting local businesses. We're looking forward to opening with national acts, local talent and a number of other special events.” To the north in Sartell, three distinct park projects are in the works. This year, Watab Park is receiving a new splash pad,

updated park equipment, two new full-size sport courts , and a new pool house shelter. Within the next calendar year, the city plans to use approximately $450,000 in grant funding for new fat-tire bike trails, trail upgrades, signage and a beach at Sauk River Park. Sartell also plans to establish Linear Park along the Mississippi River, including new paved trails along the water. “Our intention for uplifting the Sauk River Park and Linear Park is to create an outdoor attraction for all residents from Central Minnesota” Director of Community & Economic Development Scott Saehr, who also serves as assistant city

The Ledge photos courtesy of Alliance Building Corporation.

SPECIAL FOCUS


administrator, explained. “Both the Mississippi River and Sauk River create an amenity that most communities don’t have, and Sartell hopes to provide an opportunity for people to experience it.” Across the Mississippi in Sauk Rapids, city planners are developing what they consider to be one of the prettiest spots in the region. Lions and Southside Parks — currently more than 10 acres — will be re-constructed to create a multi-purpose facility to host a diversity of events like concerts, weddings and presentations. Seating will be built into the natural landscape, which already lends itself for a stage-type area.

“These are beautiful parks but also under-utilized,” according to Todd Schultz, Sauk Rapids community development director. “Considering how unique a rapids area on the Mississippi is, people weren’t using it. We want to attract more people to this beautiful destination.” A smaller building, made of glass and overlooking the river, is being proposed to accommodate parties of up to 25 people. A splash pad, “more like a ‘miniBellagio,’ with knotholes mounted in a cement pad, shooting water in the air at various heights,” Schultz said, should add artistic flare and offer a place to cool down on summer days. The

properties will be connected to several winding trails. If you've driven by 33rd Avenue and 2nd Street S in St. Cloud and wondered about the construction, the answer is...a new Skate Plaza at Heritage Park. The facility will replace the original skate park, taken down in 2019 in preparation for the new Costco store. The old park was built a decade ago via a community-led fundraising campaign. The new Tier 1 venue will be over 20,000 square feet with a large plaza and bowl at various depths. It will also include a shade structure, seating, public bathrooms and lighting. With preliminary design and budget approved December 2018,

construction began last summer. Fun Fact: The plaza will be the largest public skate park in the upper Midwest. “St. Cloud already set a precedent for alternative sports facilities, and due to enthusiasm, we now have the most stateof-the-art park in Central Minnesota,” Park and Recreation Director Scott Zlotnik said. “It will be the newest, and I think the best, in our state.” A former school teacher and historian, Ari Kaufman has worked as a journalist in various roles since 2006. He has pubxlished articles in a dozen newspapers, written three books and currently resides with his wife in St. Cloud.

• • • •

Business Conflicts Contract Disputes Property Disputes Partnership & Shareholder Disagreements • Insurance Coverage Issues • Marital Dissolutions

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GROWTH GUIDE

Goal Setting If you’ve been trying to find time to work on your goals, there’s no better time to start than today.

I

t’s easy to feel energized about your goals on New Year’s Day. Unfortunately, it’s just as easy to let days slip by here and there, filled with work and life events – and no forward progress toward your goals. Here are four strategies for helping you reach your long-term goals. 1 Connect your long-term goals to

your core values.

It’s easier to stick with goals you truly believe in. As you develop long-term goals, start by deciding on your personal core values, and build goals from these values. B Remove the decision to work towards them every day.

C Break your long-term goals into short-term tasks.

Every major project needs to be broken down into milestones and specific tasks in order to get done. Breaking large goals into smaller, more manageable chunks makes them feel more realistic.

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D Skip the messy middle by

We are committed to providing

starting at the finish line

our customers with quality solutions

Research has shown that people who define their path from the end backward are not only more likely to succeed, but they’re more confident in their choices.

and services for their roofing, heating, ventilating and air conditioning needs. COMMERCIAL HVAC // COMMERCIAL ROOFING // ARCHITECTURAL SHEETMETAL 1431 Prosper Drive, Waite Park, MN mcdowallco.com 44

// 320.251.8640

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The Bottom Line: Goals are how we

paint the picture of a future we’re motivated to work toward.

Source: https://blog.rescuetime.com/mental-strategies-long-term-goals/

When it comes to staying committed to long-term tasks, help yourself avoid fatigue by reducing the number of daily decisions you must make. Instead, try building habits and routines into your lifestyle that actively help you work towards your goals daily.


THE NUMBERS

Cost of Living Central Minnesota’s cost of living slightly above average in 2019.

T

he St. Cloud area experienced a slightly above average cost of living during 2019, according to the Cost of Living Index of 266 urban areas. The composite index is based on six components – housing, utilities, grocery items, transportation, health care, and miscellaneous goods and services. The "all items" index for St. Cloud was 101.4, just 1.4 percent above the national average (100.0) for the quarter.

The Cost of Living Index, which is compiled and published quarterly by C2ER - The Council for Community and Economic Research, measures regional differences in the cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non-consumer expenditures, for professional and managerial households in the top income quintile. It is based on more than 50,000 prices covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected three times a year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Small differences should not be interpreted as showing any measurable difference, according to C2ER. Due to challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, C2ER did not do a 1st Quarter 2020 report.

COST OF LIVING INDEX COMPILATION FOR 2019-2020 MINNESOTA AND OTHER UPPER MIDWEST CITIES CITY

All Items

Grocery Housing Utilities Transpor- Health Misc. Goods Items tation Care & Services

St. Cloud, MN

101.4

117.2

78.8

102.8

96.5

119.6

111.4

Minneapolis, MN 106.2

103.3

101.7

97.6

104.3

105.5

113.7

St. Paul, MN

107.1

103.1

104.9

96.4

103.1

106.1

114.4

Mankato, MN

91.4

101.6

66.5

98.4

100.7

114.8

99.6

Cedar Rapids, IA 95.8

94.5

82.1

102.2

96.4

107.0

103.8

Eau Claire, WI

96.4

93.8

77.4

108.3

107.1

111.7

104.2

Pierre, SD

100.7

103.9

110.6

91.9

98.3

101.0

94.6

Least Expensive Urban Communities

Most Expensive Urban Communities New York (Manhattan) NY

237.4

Harlingen TX

75.4

San Francisco CA

196.6

McAllen TX

76.2

Honolulu HI

191.8

Kalamazoo MI

77.7

New York (Brooklyn) NY

180.4

Muskogee OK

79.4

159.0

Memphis TN

80.4

Washington, D.C.

WE BUILD PROJECTS AND PARTNERSHIPS THAT LAST We work as a dedicated partner with each and every client. You have our promise to be here long after the job is done to ensure and maintain the integrity of our work. Perhaps that’s why many of our clients call on us again and again to expand their facilities and build new ones. Do you have an upcoming building or development project you’d like to discuss? We would be happy to sit down with you and learn more about your business.

MAINTENANCE SERVICES | REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT + BROKERAGE ARCHITECTURE | SELF-PERFORMING FIELD SERVICES CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | GENERAL CONTRACTOR

SAUK RAPIDS GLENCOE MANKATO FARGO 320.252.0404 | RICECOMPANIES.COM

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GROWTH GUIDE

Business Expenses Dale Gruber Construction can build or remodel a space that is personalized to fit your needs, budget and business.

General Contractor

Design-Build

320-251-4956

Taxpayers who pay work-related expenses out of their own pocket may be able to deduct them.

Commercial Construction & Remodeling

DaleGruberConstruction.com

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enerally, employee business expenses are deductible if they are more than two percent of adjusted gross income. In most cases, they go on IRS Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. Other key points about employee business expenses: A.They Must be Ordinary

THE IDEAL CHOICE

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RIVER ’S EDGE APARTMENTS- OTSEGO, MN This project consisted of a 97 unit, 4 story building. It has tuck under and detached garages, as well as mini-storage. A fitness center, theater room and outdoor patio plaza with pergola are just a few of the beautiful features of this property. 3709 Quail Road NE, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 (320) 253-3524 46

Let us build your needs. www.alliancebuildingcorporation.com

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and Necessary

People can only deduct unreimbursed expenses that are ordinary and necessary to their work as an employee. An ordinary expense is one that is common and accepted in the industry. A necessary expense is appropriate and helpful to a business. B.Expense Examples Some potentially deductible costs include: • Required work clothes or uniforms not appropriate for everyday use. • Supplies and tools for use on the job. • Business use of a car. • Business meals and entertainment. • Business travel away from home. • Business use of a home. • Work-related education. This list is not all-inclusive. Special rules apply for reimbursed expenses by an employer.


C Educator Expenses K-12 teachers may be able to deduct certain expenses. These may include books, supplies, equipment and other materials used in the classroom. They are an adjustment to income rather than an itemized deduction. In other words, people do not need to itemize to claim them. If you have done this in the past you may want to review the list in light of COVID-19.

70 YEARS 3 GENERATIONS 1 NAM E We’ve been building communities since 1950. While many tools, technology, and materials have changed, the one thing that remains the same is our reputation for getting the job done right. Throughout our 70-year history, we’ve been honored to be involved in the planning, development, and construction of many area businesses and community projects.

4 Keep Records. The IRS urges people to keep good records for proof of income and expenses and also as a reminder not to overlook anything.

NEW!

Let us assist you with your next project.

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | info@wgohman.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR

| DESIGN/BUILD | CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | BUILDING + REMODELING

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Business Awards Reception Wednesday, September 9, 2020 4 p.m. - registration 4:30 p.m. - program The Park Event Center $20 per person, light hors d’oeuvres, cash bar

Finding innovative solutions to challenges that face our clients. Development / Architectural Design / Construction Services

-----------Honoring: 2020 St. Cloud Area Small Business Person of the Year Bruce Hagberg, owner riteSOFT

-----------2020 Business Central Mark of Excellence: Woman in Business Champion Melinda Tamm, owner Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio Sponsored by Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac

-----------2020 Entrepreneurial Success Award

SINCE 1874

Richard Hobbs, President Simonson Lumber PO Box 1228, St. Cloud, MN 56302 / 800.772.1758 / www.millerab.com

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GROWTH GUIDE

HMA Architects

Arasan Apartments

2020 Growth Guide –––––––––––– Central Minnesota is constantly expanding. Here is a snapshot of some of the area businesses and new projects. ––––––––––––

Alliance Building Corp.

HMA is working with Trident Development and Lyon Construction on the design of a new 138-unit Class-A apartment building located in Shakopee, MN. The project will feature below grade parking, community rooms, exercise facilities, a roof top terrace as well as a variety of unit types. The project is expected to be complete by late 2021.

www.hma-archs.com

City of St. Cloud

Dale Gruber Construction

Sartell, MN –––––––––––––––––––––– Website:

City of St. Cloud: Economic Development Authority

Liberty Bank Minnesota

–––––––––––––––––––––– About the project:

The St. Cloud Economic Development Authority (EDA) stands ready to work with you as your first-stop for business development assistance.

Coming Soon! Edward Jones Office Building

City Hall - St. Cloud, MN ––––––––––––––––––––––

alliancebuildingcorporation.com

This project is set to open fall of 2020 and will consist of a new 2,235 SQFT office building.

New construction, additions, or remodels. Let us build your needs!

–––––––––––––––––––––– Services offered: Site selection for large

or small business; Business start-up, expansion & relocation resources & financing; City development & permit assistance

www.ci.stcloud.mn.us/ economicdevelopment

48

Shakopee, MN –––––––––––––––––––––– Architect: HMA Architects Contractor: Lyon Construction –––––––––––––––––––––– About the project:

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Sartell, MN –––––––––––––––––––––– General Contractor:

Dale Gruber Construction

–––––––––––––––––––––– About the project:

Dale Gruber Construction remodeled the exterior of Liberty Bank Minnesota. Our team built a cupola, constructed columns made of Versetta Stone and added a new architectural metal roof. The project also included the installation of high output blue LED lights throughout the exterior; making the bank a nice focal point as you enter the city.

DaleGruberConstruction.com


Miller Architects & Builders

Rice Companies

Encore On The Park

Coborn’s Marketplace

Finding innovative solutions to Luxury Apartments challenges that face our clients. St. Cloud, MN

Rinke Noonan Attorneys at Law

Otsego, MN –––––––––––––––––––––– General Contractor & Architect

–––––––––––––––––––––– Development / Architectural Design / Construction Services

Estate Planning Practice Expansion

Rice Companies

General Contractor:

–––––––––––––––––––––– Architect: Cole Group Architects –––––––––––––––––––––– About the project: 105 luxury apartment homes:

studio, 1, and 2-bedroom. Lobby fireplace, mail center, community room, 3-season porch, patio, sport court, and fitness center. Also includes a resident business center, yoga room, and game room. Modern interior finishes. Opening the summer of 2021.

millerab.com

St. Cloud, MN –––––––––––––––––––––– About the team:

–––––––––––––––––––––– Completion Date

Miller Architects & Builders

Opening fall of 2020

WE’RE ON THE ––––––––––––––––––––––

GROW About the project:

45,000 SF Next-gen concept Grocery Store, with liquor, pharmacy and fuel located in a 20 acre new retail development with multi-family and retail users.

AGAIN

ricecompanies.com

The Estate Planning team at Rinke Noonan has expanded their comprehensive services to offer basic wills. Under the direction of Stefanie Brown, the team evaluates each situation individually to ensure clients are receiving the best, most economical plan for their situation. They offer many options and implementation of the latest estate planning tools.

www.rinkenoonan.com/estateplanning

INTRODUCING OUR NEW FARGO LOCATION

SINCE 1874

800.772.1758 / www.millerab.com Sauk Rapids

1019 Industrial Drive S

Strack Construction

Glencoe

3301 11th St E

Mankato

901 Summit Ave

Fargo

4141 38th Street SW

W Gohman Construction

Architecture | Construction Management | Self-Performing Field Services Maintenance Services | Real Estate Brokerage + Development

320.252.0404 | RICECOMPANIES.COM

Blattner Energy Expansion FDA Lactose Dryer

Litchfield, MN –––––––––––––––––––––– General Contractor: Strack Construction

–––––––––––––––––––––– About the project:

The new Lactose Dryer is a key piece of the puzzle that will allow FDA to process in excess of 7,500,000 pounds of milk each day. This process allows lactose to be dried into a high quality edible powder. The end product is widely used in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

www.strackco.com

–––––––––––––––––––––– About the project:

W. Gohman assisted in expanding Blattner Energy’s headquarters building in Avon, Minn. The 72,466 sf new building addition adds 135 new offices and work stations, multiple collaborative group spaces, parking lot expansion, 10 new conference rooms, catering kitchen, work lounge, recreation spaces, A/V labs and a new auditorium. This building addition was safely tied into an existing, fully occupied building with the least amount of disruption to daily operations. In addition, W. Gohman was able to maintain Blattner’s current sustainable energy efforts and fortify their existing and new facilities for future growth.

wgohman.com

COMMERCIAL HVAC, ROOFING, ARCHITECTURAL SHEETMETAL We are committed to providing our customers with quality solutions and services for their roofing, heating, ventilating and air conditioning needs. 1431 Prosper Drive, Waite Park, MN 320.251.8640 // mcdowallco.com

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PROFIT

BUSINESSSPOTLIGHT TIMELINE

E L E C T R O LY S I S A N D L A S E R B Y R O B Y N

1990

More than Cosmetic

Robyn Soltis attends the St. Cloud Beauty College for cosmetology

By Gail Ivers

Soltis works in the Twin Cities at an electrolysis salon

Personal experience drew Robyn Soltis to electrolysis. Helping clients return to full lives is her reward.

1991-1994

1994

PERSONAL PROFILE

Robyn Soltis, 48 Hometown: Silver Lake (near Hutchinson) Education: St. Cloud Beauty College, cosmetology and aesthetician with electrology classes Family: Husband Darcy; four children Hobbies: Spending time at their lake cabin

Soltis returns to St. Cloud, working full time at the J.C. Penney hair salon as a stylist; she establishes Electrolysis by Robyn and does electrolysis part time

1997 Soltis quits the hair salon and does electrolysis full time

2000 Soltis moves her business from what is now DanTree Court in Waite Park to her current location

2001 Soltis attends a laser training center in Naples, FL and adds laser hair removal to her services

Business Central: Why did you choose this business? Soltis: I have polycystic ovaries. As a result when I was 15 it caused me to have excess facial hair. We had no money to get the hair removed, but my mom still took me to Minneapolis to have it done. I loved the woman who helped me. BC: Who are your clients? Soltis: Almost anyone. Of course, there’s the cosmetic work, but it’s a lot more than just cosmetic. I have people who don’t work because of unusual hair growth. I had one client who had nose cancer and had a skin graft. The skin graft had hair on it and the client wouldn’t leave the house because of all the external nose hair. Boys who are 16 to 20 years old can sweat a lot and end up with ingrown hairs. Those become infected and have to be surgically removed. If we remove the hair before that happens it can save them a lot of pain. I’ve worked with women who shave their whole bodies every day before going to school.

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BC: Has that changed over the years? Soltis: Oh, yes. There has been a huge increase in the amount of hair on people’s bodies. Women are getting hair on the top of their noses, ears, chest hair, hip bone to hip bone hair – coarse, black hair. There are more steroids in pre-processed foods and that’s contributing to it. A lot of things contribute to the hair growth – family genes, hormone imbalances, pre-processed foods, medical treatment… BC: What is the difference between electrolysis and laser? Soltis: With electrolysis you do one hair at a time and you have to treat every hair. It’s cheaper up front, especially for small areas. Laser you treat by the area, so a 9-18 mm area, and you can’t treat red or white hair. It’s cheaper in the end for large areas. BC: What do you like best about your work? Soltis: It’s a very rewarding job. No one comes here for fun. They come here for results and I can give them results.

March 2020 Soltis closes her business due to Minnesota’s “Stay Safe at Home” order. She is able to reopen in June with minimal changes (“We’ve always had good sanitation.”) and a busy schedule of clients.

AT A G L A N C E

Electrolysis & Laser Hair Removal by Robyn 4 13th Avenue N Waite Park, MN 56387-1036 (320) 252-5224 stcloudhairremoval @gmail.com stcloudhairremoval.com Business Description: Permanent hair removal using electrolysis and laser Owner: Robyn Soltis Opened: February 4, 1991 Joined the Chamber: February 18, 2004


in one stop Enjoying 24-hour access to her business account.

Building a man shed with a construction loan. deerwoodbank.com 320.252.4200 Deerwood Bank NMLS#408174

Saving for a bike. Candy!

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Profile for St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

September/October 2020 Issue  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

September/October 2020 Issue  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

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