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MAY/JUNE 2019

6 President’s Letter 18 Top Hats

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

8 22

Editor’s Note

Network Central

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 9 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

GROW

36 Cover Story IDEA PEOPLE

Handyman’s owners Doug and Carol Severson meet customer needs with flexibility and fresh ideas. PROFIT

42 Feature BALANCING ACT

Successful career women are learning to create their own definition of “having it all.”

48 Special Focus CARE AT HOME

36

The home care industry in the United States is exploding.

52 Special Section WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate

Only Online // BusinessCentralMagazine.com • Top 10 Leadership Strengths • Speed Up Your Website • Onboarding

• Marketing on a Budget

24 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Stanley Steemer

© Copyright 2019 Business Central, LLC

Business Central is published six times a year

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, 1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487

Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


President’s Letter

M

!

arch 11 was a big day for the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce! For the third consecutive cycle we were accredited with a 5-Star designation by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.* Why is that such a big deal? It means we are in the top 2 percent of chambers of commerce in the nation. So, when we tell you that you’ve made a fantastic decision to join our Chamber, we’re backed up by independent review. There are 7,000 chambers in the U.S. and only 125 of them are accredited with 5 stars. Owatonna is the only other chamber in Minnesota with that status, and we were the original. Can you tell I like to brag about our status? Who doesn’t like being the BEST?! Allow me to tell you a little more about what we were recognized for: We were commended for maintaining a 92 percent member retention rate for the past three years. We received PERFECT SCORES in four of nine areas – Program Development, Human Resources, Technology, and Facilities. We make staff development a priority.

We’ve established ourselves as an advocate for the business community in the region, as well as the state. We have productive working relationships with elected officials at every level and work to increase voter engagement and education in the region. We do an excellent job of recognizing the work of our volunteers.

Our Diversity Council promotes inclusive and supportive business practices. Our Big Ideas Group (B.I.G.) and Business Education Network Committee were recognized for creativity and excellence.

Business Central magazine was recognized for excellence and high quality.

In fact, in areas where we scored lower than we would have liked, it’s because we have made strategic decisions that a different direction from the standard was best for us. One example is establishing a political action committee. We had one 18 years ago, and it was not beneficial to our membership or our organization. We determined developing positive relationships with all candidates and working to educate and inform our members to make their own voting decisions was a better fit for our community. In all, we received 112 of 117 points – a 96 percent accreditation rating. That gets us five big stars! The report closes with this: The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce has demonstrated a good track record of operating a successful chamber and achieving desirable results for its members. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is proud to accredit the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce with our 5-Star designation. Congratulations on this remarkable achievement!

YAY!!

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826 Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Kelti Lorence, ext. 130 Membership Sales Specialist: Antoinette Valenzuela, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100 2018-19 BOARD MEMBERS Marilyn Birkland, LocaliQ David Borgert, retired, CentraCare Health Ron Brandenburg, Quinlivan & Hughes Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning, Board Vice Chair Patrick Hollermann, InteleCONNECT Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Past Board Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud, Board Chair CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Sales Manager: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

*The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce has been an accredited chamber since 1975. In 2005, the U.S. Chamber introduced the tiered accreditation standard. We have achieved 5-Star designation since the inception of that standard.

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales and Services Coordinator: Erin Statz, ext. 113 Administrative Assistant - Information Specialist: Jennifer Schroeder, ext. 170


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Editor’s Note

Learning to be Handy The first time I found a mouse in my house, I ended up feeding it rather than catching it.

T

he first time I replaced the light in my

garage door opener, it took three tries.

In an effort to eliminate this chore from

my ever-to-do-again list, I put in an LED bulb. It

didn’t work. So I tried a new incandescent bulb. It worked, which told me the problem was the

bulb, not the opener. So I tried a fluorescent bulb. That worked, too. In a surprising display of good sense, before discarding the LED bulb as bad, I

tried it in a lamp where it worked perfectly. Huh.

Editor, Gail Ivers, chats with Doug and Carol Severson at Handyman's.

The first time I tried to put up shelves I couldn’t

that I learned that drills have a clockwise and counter clockwise feature. Oops.

The first time I had to replace speakers I

couldn’t get them to hang properly. I finally figured

appeared to easily clean off every trap I put out.

I finally found a YouTube video that explained the

nuances of setting a mouse trap. No more mouse. Each time I face one of these new challenges

out that they had been installed incorrectly in the

I think someone should organize a “home

fell into place. This was a huge victory for me. As a

community ed. Changing washers in the faucets,

first place. When I corrected the error, everything

non-mechanical individual, I had reasoned out the problem, corrected for it, and finished the project. I did the happy dance.

The first time I put a rubber bumper into a

maintenance for beginners” class through

buying and switching out furnace filters, prepping a

sump-pump, starting the sprinkler system, repairing bird feeders, and the list goes on.

I mentioned this to Doug and Carol Severson at

hinge to keep the door from banging, it was

Handyman’s (see the story on page 36). It turns out

shifted and I couldn’t get the hinge pin back in

Ashley just finished a video about replacing toilet

simple and quick. The next time I did it, the door place. There I was with a heavy, solid-core door

they are a step ahead of me. Their daughter-in-law flaps. This is the first in a potential series that they

knob with both hands and lifted straight up. That

will be posting on their website. They’ve also talked about running classes for the beginning

the hinge pin. With the help of a few shims, some

Count me in. I’ll teach the mousetrap class.

that I could only align correctly if I held the door

makes it tough to use your third hand to replace

good luck and a wrenched shoulder, the pin finally slipped into place. Beware of over-confidence.

The first time I found a mouse in my house, I

ended up feeding it rather than catching it. This was not intentional. It was just that the mouse

In memoriam...

do-it-yourselfer.

Until next issue,

.

It is with sadness that we acknowledge the passing in March of Brownie Williams, Williams Integracare Clinic. Brownie was the 2011 St. Cloud Area Small Business Owner of the Year. Our sympathy goes out to his family and business associates.

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

Photo by Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

get the screws to go into the wall. It was only later


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Don Farleo, ADCo Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Tracy Knofla, High Impact Training Steve Leen, BerganKDV Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Kelti Lorence, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle - wordingforyou Jeanine Nistler, Freelance Writer Steve Penick, Stearns History Museum Margaret Wethington Arnold, Public Relations Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Story Photography Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Melinda Vonderahe, (320) 656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: People to Know •

Digging History

Your Voice in Government • Top Hat Photos

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u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Sustaining Motivation

Work and life are not just about money and career, but relationships and personal well-being. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill In How Will You Measure Your Life, Christensen offers a series of questions:

How Will You Measure Your Life? By Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon, HarperCollins, NY, 2012, ISBN 978-0-06210241-6

C

layton Christensen takes his knowledge of work and innovation and applies it to what he believes can have the biggest positive impact on your career and happiness: relationships. Christensen is the Kim B. Clark Professor at Harvard Business School, the author of seven books, a five-time recipient of the McKinsey Award for Harvard Business Review’s best article, and the cofounder of four companies, including the innovation consulting firm Innosight.

10

• How can I be sure that I’ll find satisfaction in my career? • How can I be sure that my personal relationships become enduring sources of happiness? • How can I avoid compromising my integrity – and stay out of jail? Using lessons from some of the world’s greatest businesses, he provides insights about ways to measure and ensure success in your career and your personal and family life by using the theories of business management as a guide. In life, as in business, there are plenty of people, seminars, friends, and books that are prepared to tell you how to find happiness. But they can’t all be right, so Christensen challenges readers that they must deal with the difference between what to think and how to think. The authors write: “It’s impossible to have a meaningful conversation

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

about happiness without understanding what makes each of us tick. When we find ourselves stuck in unhappy careers – and even unhappy lives – it is often the result of a fundamental misunderstanding of what really motivates us. We may need a better theory of motivation.” To use the power of proper and right motivation, we may need to ask ourselves different questions. For instance: Is my work meaningful? With this job will I have a chance to develop? Will I be able to learn new things? Will I have several opportunities to achieve and be recognized? Will I be trusted with responsibility? These things are truly motivators. This book doesn’t offer easy answers. But it does prompt, provoke, and promote great questions. A great read to help us measure our life before it is too late.

Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor at St. Cloud State University.

NEWS REEL

REGAN JOINS THE VEIN CENTER

Avita Regan joined The Vein Center Laser Treatment & MedSpa as a licensed esthetician and laser technician. With 19 years of advanced skin care treatment experience, Regan holds licensure in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Colorado.

SEN. RELPH EARNS BUSINESS AWARD

Senator Jerry Relph received the Guardian of Small Business award from the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) - Minnesota. Relph’s award was based on votes he took that supported small business during the 2017-18 session of the Minnesota Legislature.

PARAMOUNT RECEIVES GIFT

Dorothy Gorecki and her late husband, Benedict Gorecki, donated $2 million to the Paramount Center for the Arts to support the arts and the community. “The generosity of the Goreckis has my heart bursting with gratitude,” said Bob Johnson, executive director. “It will benefit Central Minnesota artists, arts organizations, and patrons as we look to expanding services and programs while keeping costs at reasonable levels.”

NEW PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERSHIP FOR COMMUNITYGIVING

The Community Foundation for Carver County has joined CommunityGiving as an affiliate foundation.


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Your Next Place, a rental placement company focusing on connecting renters with landlords and property managers, 1411 W Saint Germain Street, suite 202, St. Cloud. Pictured: Amanda Groethe, Brenden Mooney, Diane Diego Ohmann.

Culver's of St. Cloud, frozen custard and specialty burgers made with fresh, never frozen beef and dairy, 901 Hwy 10 S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Kelsey Hendrickson, Jason Miller.

Froehling Anderson, CPA firm delivering business consulting, tax, audit, and accounting services to private businesses. 400 Highway 169 S, suite 400, Minneapolis. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Kari Greene, Benjamin Koenig, Inese Mehr.

Green Thumb Etc., custom furniture upholstery custom designed in a unique style to fit in a home or a business, 301 10th Street N, Sartell. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Ashley Green, Rory Cruser.

Warnert Promotions, a full-service event marketing company specializing in a variety of promotional strategies and solutions, 2178 Quebecor Road NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, JJ Braun, Mark Osendorf. University of Minnesota Extension Regional Office, discovers science-based solutions and delivers practical education, 3601 18th Street S suite 113, St. Cloud. Pictured: Mark Osendorf, Lori Ann Vicich, Jason Miller.

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St. Cloud Surgical Center complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

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UpFront DIGGING HISTORY

NEWS REEL

PHYSICIANS RECEIVE CADUCEUS AWARD

CentraCare Health physicians, Merryn Jolkovsky, MD, and Patrick Lalley, MD, received the 2018 Caduceus Award. This award recognizes Central Minnesota physicians who exhibit humanitarian medical efforts locally or worldwide.

The Longevity of Being Okay The Wong Family and their amazing OK Café

FELIX, DICKEY JOIN CREDIT UNION

TJADEN NAMED FAMILY PHYSICIAN OF THE YEAR

Kimberly Tjaden, MD, was selected by the Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians (MAFP) as the 2019 Family Physician of the Year. MAFP has presented this award annually since 1981 to a Minnesota family physician who “personifies the highest ideals of family medicine: compassionate, comprehensive patient care and involvement in the community.”

NEW EMPLOYEES JOIN RAJKOWSKI HANSMEIER

Paul Storm and Jessica Thyen joined Rajkowski Hansmeier as associate attorneys. Storm will practice in municipal law and insurance defense, and Thyen will practice in estate planning.

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

“So, he came here and he like this town because there was no restaurant in town here yet.” —Eddie Wong, OK Café owner, September 1978

O

ver 100 years before that interview, Eddie Wong’s grandfather left China for America, drawn by a dream and an ambition to succeed. In Wong’s case, the California Gold Rush inspired his grandfather to leave everything behind, even his wife and children. Family bonds remained strong with hope to reunite again, even though thousands of miles separated them. That aspiration only partially panned out. By 1865, Eddie’s father Bernard and his uncle Willie took a similar risk in coming to America. Both at some point worked on the railroad, traveling throughout the west and ultimately ending up in

North Dakota. In 1918, they reached St. Cloud. Like many Chinese who settled in Minnesota during the early 20th Century, the Wong’s saw a business opportunity. Bernard recognized that St. Cloud residents had few restaurant options, choosing an old harness shop at 511 St. Germain Street to try their fortunes. The location for what would become the OK Café had high visibility along a busy thoroughfare. Family members had defined roles and believed their ambitions would lead to financial success. Their strategy was simple. Willie prepared dishes from a menu that featured American cuisine, with some Chinese favorites

Eddie Wong serving customers at the OK Café, ca 1955; A menu from the OK Café, 1955

sprinkled in. Steaks, hamburgers, hot beef, and pork chops were mainstays. Ethnic specialties included chow mein, chop suey, egg fu yung, and fried rice. The Wongs, in time, expanded their Chinese dishes as customers became more familiar with the food. Years later, Eddie recalled this business philosophy, saying, “They never get used until they get used to it first, just like when you want to introduce a new dish, you got to let people try a lot of time before they get used to it. That’s why mother’s cooking is always the best. Go out some place else eat something new they don’t know. They don’t want to try it.” Needless to say, the Wong’s persistence

Photos ourtesy of the Stearns History Museum

Robert Felix and Vonda Dickey joined the St. Cloud Financial Credit Union. Felix is a financial advisor with extensive experience in the financial industry, spanning over 18 years in the securities industry, as well as over 15 years of lending experience. Dickey is the newest addition to the senior leadership team, bringing nearly 14 years of credit union experience and over 20 years in management.


gradually won regulars over by offering choices not seen in previous area restaurants. Family bonds played a major role in the Wong’s prosperity. Bernard contacted son Eddie in China by the early 1920s to work at the OK, but it took until 1925 for Eddie to reach St. Cloud. He stayed briefly in California, attending school and learning English before moving to the Midwest. He recalled his first OK Café job, saying, “I wait on table, do everything, right after the school, come back and work. . . and work until 10 o’clock in the evening.” These long shifts revolved around the restaurant being open 24 hours a day, a practice they did for the next twenty-five years. The Wongs’ work ethic gained respect throughout the community. This was not easy to do, especially as the only Chinese residents in town. They strived through difficulties to fit in. Eddie returned to

California, graduated from high school, and met his future wife, Esther there. By 1930, both had decided that St. Cloud should be their home. They built relationships, becoming active in Holy Angels Catholic Church and Cathedral High School as their five children matured. Family dynamics also evolved. By 1935, Bernard moved back to China, and Willie retired a decade later. Jack, Eddie’s brother, arrived to lead the kitchen and the children helped as needed. The family navigated these changes, focused on their version of the American dream. These visions went beyond what the OK Café could offer, and by the late 1980s the family scattered into other professions, leaving the restaurant business after 75 glorious years. Steve Penick is the head archivist at the Stearns History Museum in St. Cloud.

IF YOU GO...

June 14: Government Affairs The Minnesota Legislative Session Wrap Up is

Friday, June 14 from 7 – 9 a.m. at Automotive Parts

Headquarters – Training Center, 2959 Clearwater Rd, St. Cloud. This event provides an opportunity for

ORTHOPEDIC

flexibility

Flexibility is a big part of being able to move with comfort. That’s why we now have two full-service clinic locations for you to receive bone, joint, and muscle care from our team of orthopedic experts. For treatment and therapy from head to toe, choose the clinic that’s most convenient for you, and start living better.

Chamber members to connect with our legislators and share issues of concern.

There is no charge for Chamber members; $20 for

2 LOCATIONS

is Monday, June 10 for our breakfast count. The St. Cloud

1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell, MN 56377

non-members. Breakfast is included. Registration deadline Area Chamber of Commerce hosts this meeting.

For information on these or other business events,

call 320-251-2940. Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar.

3315 Roosevelt Rd. 200B St. Cloud, MN 56301

320.259.4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

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13


UpFront PEOPLE TO KNOW

NEWS REEL INSTRUCTOR RECOGNIZED

Dan Kvaal, civil/highway technician instructor at St. Cloud Technical & Community College, was recognized with the Wm. Kelley Memorial Award by the Minnesota Society of Professional Surveyors (MSPS.) This award is given to an MSPS member who has contributed greatly to the community.

GASLIGHT CREATIVE RECEIVES AWARDS

Gaslight Creative, a full-service, boutique-style advertising agency in St. Cloud, was recognized with eight awards at the 2019 American Advertising Awards Show. The annual awards competition celebrates excellence in advertising.

SCHLENNER WENNER ACCOUNTANT OBTAINS CPA LICENSE

James Fischer, tax accountant at Schlenner Wenner & Co., passed all four parts of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam, and received his CPA license. Fischer joined the company in 2016 as an intern, and now works in the Monticello office.

STEARNS BANK NAMES NEW CEO

Kelly Skalicky has been named CEO of Stearns Bank after her successful one-year transition to president of the company. She succeeds her father, Norm Skalicky, as chief executive officer.

BERGANKDV RECOGNIZED

BerganKDV was recently ranked in the top 100 firms based on revenue by the national news publication Accounting Today. The firm rose in the ranks to #80 with $55.73 million in revenue, a 6.99 percent change from 2017. The firm was also again listed as a regional leader, ranked as fifth largest in the Midwest region.

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

St. Cloud Area Leadership Graduates

Congratulations to the following people who graduated from the St. Cloud Area Chamber Leadership program in May. If you are looking for volunteers to serve on boards and committees, these individuals are a good place to start. Brent Ascheman Conway, Deuth & Schmiesing

Spencer Hegstad Coborn's Superstore

Kim Pick Cash Wise Waite Park

Jeanne Blonigen Central Minnesota Community Foundation

Michelle Henderson BadCat Digital Marketing

Curran Poganski Bremer

Sidne Bofferding Gaslight Creative, LLC

Tracy Jacobs BerganKDV

Brian Skluzacek Schlenner Wenner & Co.

Jennifer Bohnsack Marco

Jeannetta Janssen Executive Express

Kelly Travis St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors

Sanusi Cham American Axle & Manufacturing

Regan Johnson Proviant Group

David Vee Edina Realty

Debbie Clausen Thrivent Financial

Stacy Kouril Gabriel Media

Carrie Vesel ABRA Auto Body & Glass

Brady DeGagne Rasmussen College

Amanda LaFrance Remedy Beauty & Body

Luke Vossen Park Industries

Jen Flaten U S Bank

Matt Lunser GLM Displays LLC

Lindsay Frieler American Heritage National Bank

Krista Muzny St. Cloud VA Health Care System

Matt Grow Park Industries

Kim Nygaard Advantage 1 Insurance Agency

Lee Gruen Bradbury Stamm Construction, LLC

Colleen Orne Milestones

Derek Harvieux Franz Hultgren Evenson, P.A.

Jill Phillipp Mahowald Insurance Agency

DID YOU KNOW? St. Cloud Area Leadership is designed to help current and emerging leaders understand the dynamics of the community and the role leadership shares in building healthy communities. This program brings together men and women of diverse backgrounds who share a common commitment to the future of the St. Cloud area.


ABOUT THE LEADERSHIP CLASS

IN THE KNOW

Grooms leaders who will contribute to your company.

Helps employees develop greater personal vision and confidence.

Provides professional networking opportunities and enhanced community connections.

Reinforces skills and imparts new knowledge to employees.

Mike Paulsrud,

Provides greater understanding and a broader perspective of key issues in Central Minnesota.

Coborn's SuperstoreSauk Rapids

____________

Chair, St. Cloud Area Chamber Leadership Program (320) 252-2141 StoreDirector.2001 @cobornsinc.com

Encourages networking among emerging and established leaders.

____________

HOW TO APPLY

Anne Kennedy,

Applications for the Leadership program are available at StCloudAreaChamber.com, select “Programs” then “Leadership Development.” Applications must be submitted by May 31 to the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, PO Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302 or vlenneman@StCloudAreaChamber.com.

WACOSA

____________

____________

Vice Chair, St. Cloud Area Chamber Leadership Program (320) 257-5191 akennedy@wacosa.org

Individuals who represent an ethnic/minority community perspective are encouraged to apply. For more information about participating in the 2019-20 St. Cloud Area Leadership program, call Gail Ivers at 320-656-3809 or givers@StCloudAreaChamber.com.

____________

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15


UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL

ROTOCHOPPER APPOINTS NEW CEO

Tosh Brinkerhoff was named the new chief executive officer of Rotochopper, Inc. Brinkerhoff has more than 20 years of industry leadership experience with an impressive track record in heavy equipment manufacturing.

CENTRACARE HEALTH DIRECTORS SELECTED FOR LEADERSHIP AWARDS

Katy Kirchner and Kay Greenlee were selected as TRUST 2019 Forum Award winners for their roles in providing leadership excellence in health care. The Women’s Health Leadership TRUST and the 2019 Forum Awards celebrate Minnesota women and companies in health care who are advancing efforts to help the health care industry transform its future.

ST. CLOUD HOTEL NAMED BEST OF AMERICINN

The AmericInn by Wyndham St. Cloud was awarded the annual “Best of AmericInn,” recognizing the brand’s top performing hotels and their staffs.

Sustaining Motivation Business representatives participate in the Chamber’s annual trip to Washington, D.C.

I

n April, 20 representatives from the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce visited our lawmakers in Washington, D.C. This annual advocacy trip allows participants to express Central Minnesota business concerns to the Minnesota Congressional delegation. Participants attended issue briefings at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce before heading to Capitol Hill for individual meetings with elected officials and their staff members. Highlights included visits with Congressman Tom Emmer and Senators Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith. – TRB

Tammy Biery (L), Tanja Goering, U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar

U.S. Rep. Dean Philips (L), Dave Borgert, retired CentraCare Health; Mark Osendorf; Jason Bernick.

Paula Gottwalt (L); Tammy Biery; Pegi Broker-Relph; Laura Wright; Lori Kloos.

GROETHE RECEIVES EMERGING LEADER AWARD

Amanda Groethe, director of communication and marketing at Stearns Electric Association, received the 2019 American Advertising Federation of Central Minnesota’s Emerging Leader Award. Emerging Leaders are those who, though young in their careers, have already proven themselves to be making an impact in their companies and for their clients. Send News Reel items to Gail Ivers, givers@stcloudareachamber.com for possible inclusion. News Reel is compiled by Kelti Lorence.

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U.S. Rep. Angie Craig The St. Cloud Area Chamber delegation (left to right): Bennie McWilliams, ECig Lounge; Mark Osendorf, Excel Energy; Dan Ochsner, Leighton Enterprises; Steve Gottwalt, Steve Gottwalt Consulting; Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs; U.S. Sen. Tina Smith; Chamber President Teresa Bohnen; Tanja Goering, Pro Staff; John Wolak, Time Communications; Lori Kloos, St. Cloud Technical & Community College; Tammy Biery, Career Solutions; Laura Wright, Kensington Bank; Pegi Broker-Relph; Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning; Jason Bernick, Bernick’s.

U.S. Rep. Tom Emmer (L) and Jason Hallonquist


TOP HATS: MILESTONES

IF YOU GO...

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Offers professional development,

leadership and networking opportunities

for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota.

Meets the second Tuesday of every

month, noon-1 p.m. Cost is $195 for an

annual membership. Register to Kelti,

30-year Chamber Member: Townsquare Media, multimedia company, 640 Lincoln Ave. SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Dave Engberg, Matt Knutson.

35-year Chamber Member: Creative Catering, full service catering business, 405 Main Street, Rice. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Mark Larson, Jayne Greeney Schill.

30-year Chamber Member: Stearns History Museum, museum and research center pertaining to the history of Stearns County and Minnesota, 235 33rd Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Carrie Essig, Peg Imholte.

30-year Chamber Member: Chamberlain Oil Company, Inc., oil distributor, 1200 29th Ave. NE, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Bill Chamberlain, Beth Putz.

klorence@StCloudAreaChamber.com.

–––––––––– May 14

Tour of ISELF building on

St. Cloud State University campus, 720 4th Ave S, St. Cloud –––––––––– June 11

Tour of Anna Marie’s Alliance,

325 33rd Ave N, Ste 105, St. Cloud

• Car, Motorcycle and ATV Accidents • Insurance and Property Damage Claims • Slip and Fall Accidents • Wrongful Death Claims

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UpFront TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS TOP HATS: MILESTONES

35-year Chamber Member: RHL-RGB Outdoor, electronic LED signs and billboards; digital, screen print and vinyl graphic services for banners, signs, displays, vehicle wraps; screen-printed and embroidered wearables, 25113 21st Ave., St. Cloud. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Troy Rheaume, Luke Cesnik.

35-year Chamber Member: Carlson Wholesale, Inc., wholesale distributor of ag-related equipment, outdoor power equipment, and shop air filtration equipment, 3780 Quail Road NE, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Tanja Goering, Tim Carlson, Tammy Buttweiler.

30-year Chamber Member: Goodwill/Easter Seals MN, providing transitional employment and industry specific training programs; mental health services; and military services including case management to veterans and their families, 50 2nd Ave. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Julie Danda, Brian Jarl.

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Senior Home Health Care, offering skilled nursing, certified nursing assistants, physical, occupational and speech therapists in the comfort of your home. 1511 Northway Dr, suite 202, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Robin Hadley, Rory Cruser.

Rolling Ridge Wedding & Event Center, an all-in-one venue with 10 ceremony locations, including an historic barn that seats 300 guests in comfort. 31101 County Road 133, St. Joseph. Pictured: Beth Putz, Randy Schmitz, Brooke Schendzielos, Tanja Goering.

HomeFront Resources, serves as a voice, educator, and connector with and for veterans, service-members and their families, 50 2nd Ave. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Barry Kirchoff, Tarryl Clark, John Donovan, Maureen Gaedy, Peg Imholte.

Leeann Chin, Asian food, 3959 2nd Street S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Amy O’Neill, Tanja Goering.

AT&T Connect Wireless, wireless, and business to business sales, 3535 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sarah Noble, Drew Keller, Kristen Beers, Beth Putz.

PeopleReady, industrial and on-demand staffing agency, 637 2nd Street S, Waite Park. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Chad Fruechte, Jason Miller.

ADCo Creative, capabilities of a full-service agency and nimbleness of a freelancer, delivering creative and strategic advertising and design solutions, 56 33rd Ave. S suite 278, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kristin Hannon, Don Farleo, April Diederich.

WhiteBox Marketing, comprehensive marketing plans, creative design, websites and public relations, 203 Cooper Ave. N suite 350, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tanja Goering, Carrie Karki, Rachael Witt, Jason Miller.

Office Max, office furniture, print/copy center, breakroom/ office supplies, 24/7 computer tech support, 2530 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Mark Osendorf, Dani Stevens, Rachel Mosey, Matt Knutson.

Assumption Community, provides a continuum of care for older adults in our community: skilled nursing home, senior apartments with services, therapy, home care, Faith in Action, and home delivered meals, 715 1st Street N, Cold Spring. Pictured: Sheri Moran, Jenny Theis, Kelsey Norman, Lindsey Sand, Laura Sakry, Amanda Groethe.


FACE OF BUSINESS: ARTHUR J. GALLAGHER & CO.

Mark Gresser has answer to “best-kept secret in town”: Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

A

A unique Wall Street company with a branch in Waite Park

after some due diligence, Gresser rea Executive Vice-Presiwas sold on the merger. dent Mark Gresser enjoys Here’s why Gallagher was apthe work. Insurance, riskpealing . . . Gallagher is global, one management, benefits and HR of the largest and fastest-growing consulting for medium-to-large insurance brokers in the world, companies may not be as exciting giving Gresser and his team of as racing snowmobiles or “almost seven the ability to network with any type of hunting and fishing” virtually any Gallagher expert you can think of but it’s a close in any niche industry in any of second. This is especially true since 35 countries. Gallagher is expected Gresser merged his company with to double its $6 billion revenue the international insurance browithin the next five years. Plus, kerage firm of Arthur J. Gallagher there is a family feel Gresser ap& Co. in 2016. preciates; a number of Gallaghers, “We launched the Charles Alincluding CEO J. Patrick Gallagher, len Agency at the kitchen table are actively involved in running the in 2010 and grew the company,” company, which was founded in said Gresser, whose wife is also a 1927. Gallagher promotes charitable business partner. The firm’s spegifting, supporting Gresser’s favorite cialty was risk management and charities, including local charity INDY surety for the construction indus(I’m Not Done try, a niche industry Yet), dedicated to Gresser knew well. supporting “war“I was hired in the riors” during their late ‘80s to help run Gallagher provides customers with the data cancer battles. Landwehr ConstrucFinally, Gallagher tion,” said Gresser, and analytics needed to make informed purchasing conducts business who finds pleasure decisions in today’s fast-paced and ever-changing in a transparent in growing busiand ethical way. nesses. insurance marketplace. “I am thrilled “But I never – MARK GRESSER to be working for thought I’d be with a company that an international firm again,” said the Cold Spring native, referring to the start of his shares my value system and puts the needs of people, businesses, career as a CPA at Ernst & Young (EY), Minneapolis. Gallagher, and communities first by providing tailored solutions for any headquartered in Chicago, approached Gresser in 2015, and risk or benefit scenario,” said Gresser.

Mark Gresser awarded 2019 Insurance Business of America (IBA) Top 65 Producer: fourth consecutive year

‘‘

‘‘

Gallagher awarded one of 2019 World’s Most Ethical Companies by Ethisphere Institute: eighth consecutive year

ARTHUR J. GALLAGHER & CO. Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Services, Inc. | 4 – 13th Ave. N., Waite Park, MN 56387 P. 320.252.1702 | F: 320.252.1707 | M: 320.292.1156 | ajg.com SPONSORED PROFILE

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UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Where Do I Start?

Here are eight great ways to help you prioritize your workflow. By Tracy Knofla 1 Stay Focused on Your Organizational Goals It’s easy to allow small tasks to get in the way of accomplishing the big goals that you set for your organization. Create innovative ways to keep your goals in sight. Use your screen saver as a reminder. Create to-do list pads with your goals prominently displayed. Create posters or signage in your workspace to help keep track of your progress on these goals. 2 Use Workflow Software If you search “workflow software solutions,” you’ll see a booming industry that claims it will revolutionize your workplace. These programs come at every price point and are customizable by trade. No matter the software you choose, it’s vital that you offer comprehensive training and ensure that all appropriate employees use the program. The success of any software comes only when it is used to its fullest benefit.

T

he Gallup Organization recently conducted a poll on the reasons for employee burnout. Unsurprisingly, the number two reason given for this burnout was “unmanageable workload.” American workers are busy, but are they busy working on the right things?

contributor

It's often difficult to figure out which project or task should take priority in your work day. While there is no universal solution to this problem, there are some techniques that will help you become savvier and more discerning when managing your time and your tasks.

3 Create “Meaningful-toYou” To-do Lists Your brain is not the best place to keep your to-do list! It was not designed to hold all of the things you need to accomplish. Relieve your brain of this responsibility by using it to create a comprehensive list – either on paper or in

a digital format. Create one that is meaningful to you. It should contain action items and deadlines for completion. Break down complicated projects into manageable tasks with relevant timelines. Many projects are managed best when you work backwards from the completion date and assign tasks and deadlines accordingly.

4 Manage Distractions Nothing makes it harder to complete your work than distractions. These distractions can include: well meaning, but chatty coworkers; continuous email alerts; your personal phone; or problems outside of work. When you need to focus on a deadline-driven project, you must seek to reduce potential distractions. That could include temporarily moving to a distraction-free workspace, turning off email alerts, putting a sign on your office or cubicle doorway alerting co-workers you need to focus, or using headphones to block out other distracting sounds. Of course, keeping your phone out of sight will help as well. Schedule regular breaks to keep your energy up. 5 Tackle the

Hard Stuff First Time management experts advise you to tackle the most difficult project on your

Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.

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to-do list first. When you take steps to work on a difficult or disagreeable task, even if you don’t finish it, you feel better about yourself and experience a sense of satisfaction just by trying. This gives you a boost to get you to your next task – typically an easier or more satisfying one.

6 Determine Your ROI on

Each Task As you review your daily to-do list, look at it with an eye toward the Return on Investment (ROI) for each task on the list. You can determine the ROI using several different lenses. Think of how it will ease your workload if you finish the task.

Will your hard work on this item give you a huge sense of relief that will last for several days? If you complete a project ahead of schedule for your supervisor, will it garner you any additional esteem? Complete the tasks first that are going to give you the greatest ROI.

7 Be Realistic, Not Idealistic An effective assessment of the time it will take to complete a task will be your most important workflow-planning tool. Realistically consider delays caused by other people, interruptions in your work routine, and the difficulty of executing the project. You probably have a strong

Realistically consider delays caused

by other people, interruptions in your work routine, and the difficulty

of executing the project.

understanding of how long a task may take, but we humans are ever-optimistic that we can get things done more quickly than we can. Set realistic timeframes for completion.

8 Celebrate Your

Accomplishments As you create a to-do list, also create a “ta-dah” list of finished projects! Acknowledging your accomplishments is important

and motivational for future achievement. That information will be helpful as you keep track of completed projects and review your work with others. Understanding the tangible outcomes from your work will keep you excited for future projects. Sources used in this article: Employee Burnout, Part 1: The 5 Main Causes

by Ben Wigert and Sangeeta Agrawal; Gallup.com

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

Network!

It was fun and games – literally – when Leighton Enterprises hosted Business After Hours in January.

Network! SCR welcomed Chamber members in February. Business After Hours hosts Scott Fitch (L), Mark Fitch, and Ryan Welty, SCR

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Kerry Peterson, Premier Real Estate Services (L) and Andy Faith, Granite Electronics


Profit! The Central Minnesota Farm Show drew thousands to the River’s Edge Convention Center in February. Photos by Sheri Wegner

Mike Johnson, St. Cloud Rox Baseball (L); Volunteer Top Hat Ambassador April Diederich, Proviant Group; Jeff Haag, St. Cloud Rox Baseball

Debbie Bertelson, Premier Real Estate (L); Jennifer Brown, St. Cloud Mortgage; Rhonda Dahlgren, Family Legacy Financial

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InSIDE THIS ISSUE:

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Management Toolkit • Entrepreneurism

Working Well • Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

TECH STRATEGIES

Social Listening

Learn what’s being said about your brand and, more importantly, what it means.

By Dawn Zimmerman

W

hat’s being said about your brand matters. It affects your ability to grow and achieve your goals – no matter what they are or who your customers are. It may be tempting to turn away or even plug your ears. But those who lean in and become active social listeners gain information that makes them better today — and tomorrow. Social listening is the process of monitoring

individual digital conversations to uncover and understand what customers are saying about your brand, your competition and your industry. It has been named consistently among the top trends for 2019. More brands are taking notice, developing social listening strategies, and accessing tools to improve their efforts. The concept of social listening is not new. Audience and market research have long been essential to effective marketing. But the information

available today continues to grow exponentially, thanks to our digitally-wired, social world. As brands begin using social media channels, they naturally become social listeners. They pay attention to what’s being said, analyze metrics, identify trends and adjust accordingly. But the use of social listening in 2019 is far more than that. New technology, including artificial intelligence, and new applications are making it easier for brands to track, analyze and act on the information – almost in real time – making social media an even more powerful sales tool. What can be monitored? Social media channels are often the focus, but social listening extends well beyond them to also include everything from blogs and review sites to forums, videos and news sites. ReviewTrackers, for example, focuses on review sites, providing a look at more than 85 sites from Amazon and Google and alerting users when a new review has been posted. BrandWatch, on the other hand,

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based strategic communications company that specializes in social media. She can be reached at dawn@writeadv.com

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hones in on the tone and impact of conversations across millions of data sources and sends email alerts when a key conversation is taking place. Why do brands care? While the features, functionality and pricing models for social listening services vary, they’re all focused on providing leaders with information to make better decisions. Then they use this information to take action. Some key uses include: • Gain and evaluate feedback • Develop appealing offers or content • Learn what people think about your competition and how you compare • Hone public relations campaigns • Test one marketing campaign against another • Identify pain points or needs that lead to new products and services • Engage customers more effectively • Assess brand lift • Prevent a public relation issue (crisis management) What is your social listening strategy? Start by identifying clear goals for what you want to achieve. The common areas of


TECH NEWS

Video Trends

focus include brand monitoring, product development, competitive analysis, influencer marketing, crisis management, and customer service. Be specific. Your goals will help determine which tool or tools would be the best fit. Don’t try to tackle everything at once.The tools provide the information, but someone (or more likely, a team of people) still needs to pay attention and respond. Be focused on your use and evaluate your performance before expanding. You can start small and still see an impact. Social listening does not need to be overly complicated. It just needs to be consistently done and acted upon. Where will your social listening take you in the next year?

It’s time to add closed captioning to your videos. With the power of artificial intelligence, video will soon be more searchable and as a result more popular than ever. Futurists predict that personalized video messages will start replacing chat, email and phone calls as ways brands communicate with customers.Videos will be created to thank a customer, deliver support or follow up on customer questions. Source: SmartBrief

They Know Us

Watch for new collaborations between device manufacturers and digital assistant (DA) platforms. Researchers at MIT, Stanford, and the University of Texas at

Austin are building infrastructure so that our devices will be able to listen and

watch: They’ll know the places we go, the people we interact with, our habits, our

tastes and preferences, and more. Marketers, credit card companies, banks, local government agencies, political campaigns and many others can harness DAs to

deliver critical information. Big Brother is watching…and her name is Alexa. Source: Future Today Institute, 2019 Trend Report for Journalism, Media & Technology

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BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Save a Slice for Print

The opportunity to make an impact with traditional print advertising could be bigger than ever. By Don Farleo

PRINT READY

Here are a few good arguments for keeping print in the plans. Print Creates Trust When you take the time and energy to commit your message to ink and paper, it has permanence and inherent credibility.

A

s a young advertising art director in the ‘80s, I was weaned on print advertising (smile if you know what a keyline is and like the smell of rubber cement). Though computers were beginning to find their way to creative departments in these years before widespread email and Internet connectivity, they were still primarily used to design print advertising. Print was king, especially in the business-to-business marketing world where budgets didn’t allow for television and radio advertising. Soon, slices of digital expenses started appearing in our budget pies. Today, those digital slices are a lot bigger, and for good reason. Digital is, and should be, the centerpiece of most businesses’ marketing initiatives. We work, play, learn, share, and shop online. So, does print still have a place in our digitally dominated marketing world? Yes. And, ironically, with businesses putting more emphasis on digital marketing than ever before, the opportunity to make an impact and grow your brand with traditional print advertising could be bigger than ever.

contributor

Not too long ago, junk mail clogged mailboxes, piled on desks, and often went directly to the circular (waste bin) file. That also has transitioned to digital. Online users are interrupted with a relentless storm of blinking ads and intrusive pop-ups, not to mention the perpetual lure of emails, texts, and social media feeds. Throw questionable content into the mix, and it makes sense that while people are online, they have shorter attention spans, more distractions, and less trust. Remember, print lasts. Yes, you can share online content with a click, but publications, posters, and other types of printed material are tangible items that are often passed on to others and held onto for months or even years. This has given traditional print advertising an unexpected new superpower: the strength to help businesses stand apart from their competition. Print will never return to its former glory as king of the marketing mountain. But thoughtful, creative, and well-executed print campaigns should still be considered as an important slice of your businesses marketing pie.

Don Farleo is owner of ADCo Creative, a full service advertising agency based in St. Cloud.

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Print Builds Brands Print gives you the ability to better control the more tangible and aesthetic aspects of your brand, from fonts and colors to images and textures—visual elements that can be inconsistently presented across various devices. Print is Remembered Digital content is often scanned quickly. Readers tend to spend more focused time with a printed publication, brochure, or mailer, so your message is more likely to have higher recall. Print is Engaging Print gives you the ability to focus on specific interests and industries to reach audiences that are already receptive to your message. Print is Personal Think of the litany of emails you receive and delete daily. Now think of receiving a personal letter or a welldesigned marketing piece in the mail. Which is more likely to break through the clutter and make a more favorable impression? Print Drives Online Print advertising can effectively encourage people to interact with your brand online. In fact, the online shopping giant, Amazon, mailed a 70plus page printed catalog to millions of customers this past holiday season.


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Source: Plenty; Global Ag Investing

lenty is a new kind of farm for a new kind of world. They’re working to bring local produce to people and communities everywhere by growing the freshest, best-tasting fruits and vegetables while using 1 percent of the water and less than 1 percent of the land of conventional agriculture. Their field-scale indoor farms combine crop science with machine learning, IoT, big data, climate creation technology, and heirloom seed stock. In 2017, the company raised $200 million in ag tech funding, making it the largest agriculture technology investment in history. Earlier this year the company announced it would open its next organic farm in the Seattle area. In August 2018, Plenty officials announced its first restaurant collaboration. Creator, a San Francisco restaurant serving $6 robot-prepared burgers, started serving indoor-grown greens from Plenty. With an aggressive growth strategy, Plenty has been sourcing locations in China, Japan, and the Middle East. It began building its first overseas facility in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in August.

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BusinessTools ENTREPRENUERISM

Learning to Spend

Prioritizing is a good first step when determining how to spend your company’s limited budget By Steve Leen Just because you have money to spend doesn’t mean you have to spend it.

When a business is young, it is harder to secure financing.

I

think if you ask any business owner what the hardest and most stressful part of starting a business is, you will hear “managing cash flow.” Typically, owners know their products or services better than anyone else in the company, but they are often not trained in accounting, marketing, human resources, or many other hats they need to wear on any given day. There are also an endless number of needs, which means prioritizing your spending is crucial. A good first step is to look at where you are currently spending money and determine if those expenses are generating the results you were hoping for. A common one to assess is

contributor

advertising because it’s hard to know what expenditures are leading to sales. Reach out for data analytics or start polling your customers to see how they found you to help fine tune your advertising decisions. Beware of repetition. A business might be paying for phone lines they haven’t used for years, but pay it monthly when it shows up on a bill. Prepare a list of needs and look at potential return for each item. Have a brainstorming session with employees, then go down the list assigning a dollar amount and time to complete, (also noting if it is a one-time expense or recurring) and what the potential benefits or return

could be. A common example is replacing incandescent lights with LED lights. Potential rebates, alongside lower, ongoing monthly expenses, can provide better lighting on top of a fairly quick ROI. You may find that some items can be accomplished without spending any money. If hiring and retaining employees is an issue, consider options like more flexible work hours or remote work. If your business is new and you have more time than money, then volunteer where your customers or prospects might be involved. You have a chance to find customers, build up your network, and give back when the only expense is your time. Other items might be small or take only a little initial work, like setting up a SIMPLE plan. These are similar to 401(k) plans, but take less work to setup and maintain each year. And they can help attract and retain workers. In some cases, not spending money can cost you more in

the long run. Consider the owner who is good at sales, but spends significant time on the books. If that owner hired a bookkeeper, it would free time to focus on increasing revenue. The new revenue impact could more than offset the additional expense of the bookkeeper. Just because you have money to spend doesn’t mean you have to spend it. When a business is young, it is harder to secure financing. If you can show positive cash flow for a consistent period of time, then your chances of finding someone to back you increases. This might allow you to secure a loan to facilitate growth and cross items off your list more quickly than you would have organically. Bottom line, most owners feel too busy to analyze their expenses, including how they allocate their time. I challenge you to spend just one hour this month evaluating your spending and I think you will find that the effort pays for itself.

Steve Leen, CPA, CGMA, is a tax partner at BerganKDV. He has 18 years of CPA service focusing on helping business owners through the entire business cycle.

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TECH NEWS

C-Tattoos

It’s the stuff of cyberpunk science fiction — tattoos adorned with flashing lights and sophisticated circuitry.

T

hey’ll monitor our vitals, we’re told, and feed us personalized health advice in real time. They’ll wire our biology to the web, and put the Internet of things at — on, in — our fingertips. They’ll enhance our five senses, and perhaps even give us new ones. We already have biocompatible materials that allow electronics to seamlessly fuse with the body. We’ve already developed e-tattoos that can control a smartphone. If you like to be on the bleeding edge of technology, you’re going to love this stuff. If you’re a little more reluctant, it probably creeps you out. Either way, check out the short video Circuits, the first episode of Glimpse, a new original sci-fi series from Futurism Studios (a division of Futurism LLC) and DUST.

Source: Futurism.com

You can find it at BusinessCentralMagazine.com.

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BusinessTools WORKING WELL

Innovate

If you’re looking for the latest in medical innovation, you’ll find it right here in our own backyard.

Lasers hings are changing in ophthalmology, too, according to Dr. John Dvorak, Dvorak Eye Clinic, who specializes in cataract, glaucoma, and refractive surgery. Micro (minimally) Invasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) is an innovative surgical approach often coupled with cataract surgery. Its various procedures, assisted by MIGS microscopic-sized devices and tiny incisions, are used for trabeculectomy and shunt surgeries to reduce pressure on the optic nerve. There are fewer surgical complications with MIGS, and patients often discontinue one or two eye-drop medications. Dvorak explained that there are now five types of prescription eye drops for glaucoma treatment. Breakthrough drugs include Aerie Pharmaceutical’s Rhopressa and Bausch + Lamb/Nicox’s Vyzulta. The Femtosecond laser, now used in cataract surgery, facilitates blade-free incisions while optical light replaces ultrasound for precise measuring of the cornea and length of the eye. The outcome is more accurate, Dvorak said, and surgery time is reduced to less than 10 minutes. Since the FDA’s approval of multifocal intraocular lens implants (IOLs), patients’ vision can now be corrected for both up-close and far vision during cataract surgery. “Patients will eventually

T

By Mary MacDonell Belisle

I

nnovation is subtle. One day, you’re using traditional methods and tools, the next you find everything has changed. Of course, innovation hasn’t occurred overnight, but the trajectory of change has consistently been forward, and we marvel because it’s happening right in our own backyard. X-ray Tech r. Benjamin Nemeth, Nemeth Orthodontics, said the biggest change in orthodontics has been to digital. The digital imaging machine takes lightning-fast

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

pictures. The digital scanner provides impressions of the patient’s entire mouth, imaging the bite within minutes. This image is sent to a digital lab, which prints a 3D replica of the patient’s teeth. Correct data helps Nemeth fit patients with plastic aligners, braces, or a combination of the two. Previously, the patient’s only option was braces. With more accurate information, the aligner is now an option, too. Innovation has meant less pain and shorter treatment times. “The same general principles of orthodontics are in operation, we’re just more patient friendly,” said Nemeth, who predicts all dental offices

sit in front of a machine that will do the work, with the doctor remotely using the laser to engage the eye,” predicted Dvorak. Clinical trials are underway using lasers to modify acrylic lenses for patients with previous cataract surgery. Robotics n my career, we’ll see more autonomy to the robot, more autonomous function than we see now, and the application will expand into more of orthopedics,” said Dr. Andrew Mulder, a surgeon at St. Cloud Orthopedics. Mulder uses Stryker’s Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology for knee and hip replacements. Prior to replacement surgery, Mulder explained, a CT scan is made of the joint. Data is collected and used to create a 3D virtual model of the existing knee or hip. This model is loaded into the Mako software to make a pre-operative plan. In surgery, Mulder registers the patient’s unique anatomy and range of motion to the 3D plan and makes adjustments. He guides the Mako arm in the removal of arthritic bone as the robot sets virtual boundaries and visual cues to guide him. The artificial joint is then put into place. Previously, patients would spend up to four nights in the hospital, said Mulder. Now, he performs three to eight surgeries in a day at the St. Cloud Surgical Center. The St. Cloud Surgical Center epitomizes the

“I

Photo courtesy Dvorak Eye Clinic

will soon have 3D printers and will fabricate aligners on-site.


day-surgery concept, and medical professionals travel to St. Cloud to see how it operates and observe the surgeons who use the facility, including Dr. Joseph Nessler, a consultant for Stryker. According to CEO Darci Nagorski, St. Cloud surgeons helped drive the Stryker innovation. The center houses three surgical robots of the seven in use statewide––two Stryker and one Navio Surgical System for knee replacement. St. Cloud Hospital owns two. A Xenex “germ zapping” (pulsed Xenon ultraviolet light) robot is used in operating and patient care rooms to lower infection rates by 50 to 100 percent. “Out of 1,000 same-day

surgery patients, 13 experienced infection, 15 stayed overnight, and there were zero falls,” said Nagorski. “These are extremely good stats.” Implants uring a one- to two-hour surgery, St. Cloud Ear, Nose & Throat’s doctors Ronald Hanson and Amy Dearking treat sleep apnea patients with an innovative implant surgery, designed for those who cannot tolerate C-PAP machines. The Inspire Medical Systems hypoglossal nerve stimulator (essentially a tongue pacemaker) is placed surgically under the skin of the upper chest wall. When

D

A Xenex “germ zapping” (pulsed Xenon

ultraviolet light) robot is used in operating and patient care rooms to lower infection rates by 50 to 100 percent.

activated, the device works with the body’s physiology to regulate sleep, Hanson said. A mild electrical impulse stimulates the hypoglossal nerve to the tongue, which contracts, pulling the tongue forward to open the airway. The device is active one month after implant, and controlled by a hand-held remote. One of 26 principle investigators during the

initial global study, prior to FDA approval in spring of 2014, Hanson was awarded a Certificate of Excellence from Inspire in November, one of only eight U.S. doctors to be recognized in this way. Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance writer who does

business as marymacdonellbelisle– wording for you.

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31


BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

How Work Gets Done

Field Nation is helping provide security for a growing freelance economy .

M

ynul Khan founded Field Nation in 2008, operating out of a pet food warehouse. The company matches businesses with on-site, on-demand contract workers. He discussed his business model at the 2019 St. Cloud State University Economic Winter Institute. Khan saw that a business modeled after the Gig Economy could provide a solution to struggling companies and unemployed workers. The Gig Economy, named after “gigging” or holding short-term positions as opposed to permanent jobs, allows companies to hire “ondemand” workers to complete temporary or project-based

“gigs” (jobs), supplementing their income or providing a primary source of work. Khan came to St. Cloud from Bangladesh, encouraged by a friend who told him that St. Cloud State University offered in-state tuition to international students. He took advantage of this opportunity to complete his college education in America, but kept his options open by planning to transfer out of St. Cloud after a one-year trial period. “After only one semester, I was blown away by the quality of education, and decided to stay,” Khan said. “My inspiration behind Field Nation truly came from the St. Cloud area.” He graduated from SCSU in 2004

Mynul Khan, founder of Field Nation, joined the Winter Institute audience remotely during a blizzard in February.

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

with a degree in computer science. During the recession, companies in Central Minnesota needed workers but couldn’t afford the benefits and wages associated with permanent employees. They began hiring project workers to keep production moving. Also, at this time, millennials entered the workforce, pursuing jobs out of passion rather than job security, no longer following one career path but moving positions frequently. This does not necessarily make millennials frivolous or fleeting, according to Khan. While older generations view a full-time job as safe, younger generations may see one career path as risky. For instance, if they do not enjoy their choice, the career becomes irrelevant due to the advancement of technology, their position is cut because of unpredictable economic changes, they learn of a new opportunity, or any number of other factors, millennials value the ability to move quickly and freely to new positions. In 2012 Field Nation expanded into Canada, and in 2014 the company was named to Inc.’s “500 List of FastestGrowing Companies.” An acquisition of Field Solutions in 2015 brought in $30 million in equity funding, and a partnership with Girls Who Code in 2016 continued growth. The company’s most recent office expansion was completed

By Kelti Lorence

in 2018. Field Nation today coordinates nearly 1,000 client companies and 150,000 contract workers. One million work orders have been completed in the company’s first decade. Between a growing population and an incoming generation with new views on job security, the Gig Economy is only going to get bigger, according to Khan. “We maintain an eight-minute median fulfillment time,” he said. “Within eight minutes of a company placing a work order, we will have it filled with a nearby employee.” While the idea of on-demand employees may raise the concern of consistency and quality, Field Nation boasts a 99.5 percent quality ranking. In addition, this option of temporary employees saves companies 30-40 percent in salary and benefit expenses. Field Nation is not currently operating in Khan’s homeland of Bangladesh, as their infrastructure is unable to host the necessary resources. However, nearly 100 employees run an office in Dhaka, Bangladesh, which operates Field Nation’s internal system. “St. Cloud welcomed an 18-yearold foreign student,” Khan said. “The community here gave me love and support. Every time I am in the St. Cloud area, I come with a heart full of gratitude.” Kelti Lorence is the

communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.


$80M

TOTAL: $66,467,193

$40M

$80M

$900000

TOTAL: $64,636,469*

TOTAL: $288,822,542

TOTAL: $288,822,542

St. Augusta

13 September Mar $2,107,200

St. Joseph

August 56 Feb $19,525,262

7 $1,587,313

2017 1

70 $18,129,160

June

2017

November

December

$0

October

Jan

September

J

August

June

M

July

May

Feb

April

1.0%

March

1.5%

February

4%

$500k

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2018�19 % CHANGE

$300M

$0

2018

Non FarmMarJobs January

$250M

**

Apr

2.0%

December

November

October

September

$200M

$2,100

** 2019

July *Total as of 4/8/19; **Jan St. Joseph data was not available at time of print.

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

$150M

Food and Be

ST. CLOUD Waite Park 73 83 10 October Apr $6,403,398 $7,260,629 $820,984 TOTAL: 1789

$300M

2018

Sartell 32 34 6 November May $14,128,688 $16,509,793 $12,636,852

TOTAL: $221,316,488

August

$100M

July

$50M

June

May

April

March

$0M

February

January

5%

ST. CLOUD

Sauk Rapids 44 50 3 December $89,959,156 $13,856,200 $322,000 June

May

2018�2019

Food and Be

St. Cloud 341 383 77 $89,192,774 $231,596,447 $50,854,533 July

Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

Unemployment Rates

500

Commercial 2017 2018 2019* #/$ #/$ #/$ August 2019

2018

2017

**

November

TOTAL: 1752

$250M

**

$6,043,519

January 0 *Total as of 4/8/19; ** December St. Joseph data was not available at time of print.

2000

$200M

2017

98

$4,433,502

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: $221,316,488

TOTAL: $64,636,469*

$150M

1500

TOTAL: $133,773*

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

$100M

140 February

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$50M

St. Augusta 88 72 7 March $6,116,630 $6,469,120 $188,495

October

Commercial Building Permits

$0M

2018

Waite Park 70 46 2 April $4,244,281 $1,509,887 $8,131

1000

$600000

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2017 2019

$70M

Commercial Building Permits .55

2019

2018

$60M

500

18 $886,380

Sartell 199 174 12 May $7,908,010 $8,409,293 $349,008

St. Joseph

$50M

0

380 $20,426,812

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$30M

299 June $15,947,945

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

January

Sauk Rapids

2017

$10M

622 597 53 July 2019 $32,230,127 $25,555,950 $1,318,961

500

$300000

$0M

February

St. Cloud

2016

2017

March

Residential 2017 2018 2019* 2017 August #/$ #/$ #/$

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

$0

TOTAL:$70,880,396

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

2015

.55

2018

2017

2016

2018

December

$70M

November

$60M

Home Sales C

2018 October

$50M

September

$40M

August

$30M

July

$20M

June

$10M

October April

May

$0M

April

2019

TOTAL: $2,750,975*

November May

March

2017

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec February

TOTAL:$70,880,396

2019

July December June

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

880,396

COLOR KEY:

TOTAL: $66,467,193 2018

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

Economy Central presented by August

2019 Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 4/8/19

Residential Building Permits

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL: $2,750,975*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

908,072

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

832,866

316,488

669,534

111,110

Residential Building Permits

D

J

$500k

0.5% 0.0% -0.5%

3%

-1.0% -1.5% -2.0%

2%

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

-2.5%

J

F

M

A

J

A

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

S

O

N

F

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

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33


396

072

866

BusinessTools

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

Jan November Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

February January

The Minnesota job market appears to be peaking

34

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

Economy Central presented by

December

* Information for 2019 was not released at time of print.

November

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

October

Jobs lost in Minnesota over the past 12 months, making Feb. 2019 the first month to show an annual job decline in the state since July 2010. September

Construction jobs cut in February, though the industry trend has been upward

1,364 August

Minnesota's Unemployment rate in February

July

3.1%

3,800

June

Jobs cut in February

The national unemployment rate in February May

$2M

8,800

3.8% April

$1.5M

Workers in Minnesota

Source: Minn. Dept. of Employment and Economic Development

$2M

Employment

March

2017

December

March

February

TOTAL: $1,623,035

November

April

TOTAL: 1789

May

TOTAL: 1752

Source: Online accounting company FreshBooks

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2018

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

business owners June in the same industries.

2000

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,748,626

October

July earning gap persists even when comparing male and female

3 million

TOTAL: *

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

August

professions, such as house cleaning, catering, or child care, the

BY THE NUMBERS

Lodging Tax Dollars

September

it may be true that women often start companies in lower paid

TOTAL: $1,523,946

$1M

August

September

120

*Cumulative total as of 4/8/19

$500k

2017

28 percent less than their male counterparts do. And while

TOTAL: *

100

$2M

On average, female October entrepreneurs earn (or pay themselves)

TOTAL: 111

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office

$0

July

November

TOTAL: 125

Benton Co. 27 94 1 $0 $500k $1M $1.5M

2019

June

Glass Ceiling

Residential 2017 2018 2019 2017 Stearns Co. 84 31 18

ST. CLOUD

May

SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

2016

December

TOTAL: 19*

TOTAL: $1,566,952

80

$1.5M

DID YOU KNOW?

TOTAL: 1655

60

TOTAL: $133,773*

40

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

20

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

2018 0

$1M

1500

2019

2017

April

$900000

2018

$500k

* Information for 2019 was not released at time of print.

Food and Beverage Tax Collection ST. CLOUD

January

1000

$600000

2019

February

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

$0

TOTAL: $1,523,946

500

$300000

Jan $200M $250M $300M Housing/Real Estate sources: St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors, http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. *Cumulative total as of 4/8/19

March

2000

2015

Feb 1500

0

1000

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

500

ST. CLOUD

$0 0

April March

2017

Mar

TOTAL: $1,566,952

May

TOTAL: 1789

Apr

February

2018

2017

2016

TOTAL: $221,316,488

June

2018

May

2017

July

TOTAL:1815

June

TOTAL: *

August

2019

August

TOTAL: $288,822,542

2018

January

TOTAL: 166* September

July

October

ST. CLOUD September

October

TOTAL: $64,636,469*

2019

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

$150M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

November 6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

ding Permits ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

M

$100M

488

534

110

$250M

.55


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36

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9


THEN & NOW

IDEA PEOPLE Handyman’s owners Doug and Carol Severson meet customer needs with flexibility and fresh ideas. By Jeanine Nistler // Photos by Joel Butkowski PART ONE: NOW

E

xcitement, enthusiasm and empowerment are essential tools for hardware store owners Doug and Carol Severson. They get excited about fresh ideas and enthusiastically embrace opportunities to grow the business and empower their Handyman’s Hardware employees. Add the Seversons’ energy to the elements of this equation and you get the winners of the St. Cloud Area Chamber’s 2019 Small Business Owners of the Year award. The Seversons credit their employees – past and present – with playing big roles in the company’s success. “We can’t do it without all the staff we’ve had throughout all the years,” Carol said. Just how many years is “all the years?” Well, Doug’s parents, Stan and Deloris, founded Handyman’s in 1965. Doug hung out there as a child and performed small tasks assigned by his

BUSINESS PROFILE

Handyman’s Hardware 604 East St. Germain St., St. Cloud (320) 390-7130 handymans@handymansinc.com handymansinc.com

folks. He went full time in the mid1970s, becoming a shareholder in 1983 and moving up to president in 1993. Doug’s sister, Deb Backus, joined the team in 1984, and became a shareholder and secretary/treasurer. She now is headed for a June 30 retirement. Family remains an important part of the Handyman’s formula for success. Carol, a long-time educator, helped at the store from time to time until 2005, then got increasingly involved in the business. “It just kind of evolved little by little,” said Carol, who now handles accounts payable and is the office manager. The Seversons’ son Patrick, who previously worked the sales floor, now works with accounting, technology and more. “He wears many hats,” Doug said. The Seversons’ daughter-in-law, Ashley Severson, married to oldest son Gordy, joined the Handyman’s team this winter in sales and marketing.

Business Description: Supplier of hardware, plumbing and maintenance products and services to residential and commercial customers. Service area: Statewide Founders: Stan and Deloris Severson Owners: Doug and Carol Severson

Not every family could make this work. In fact, Doug noted that intergenerational family business success statistics aren’t pretty. “None of it is a simple task,” Doug said. “We’ve been very sensitive to opening up the lines of communication and not push anything. When you’re at Christmas and you’re talking about when a shipment went out or it’s Easter and a truck broke down; it’s not ideal.” Doug said he and Carol “try to be cognizant of not always talking business at family gatherings.” But they never want to stamp out a good business idea, even if it comes up at the family cabin. “We’re both kind of idea people,” Carol said. “Our kids are the same. We say, ‘We could do this, or we could do that.’ We know we can’t do all of it. It’s exciting that there are so many options because we can make the decisions ourselves as a small business and we can pursue any of the ideas.”

Family members in the business: Doug is president; Carol is office manager; Doug’s sister, Deb Backus, will retire June 30; son Patrick handles Accounting; daughter-in-law Ashley Severson handles Marketing/Sales.

General Manager: Mark Held

Number of employees: 18, including Doug and Carol

Sales: Commercial 70% of revenue; retail 30%

Outside Sales: Paul Wesenberg and Bryan Hansen Department Heads: Thomas Nix, Steve Bjork, Jean Keehr

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

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37


“WE TREAT PEOPLE KINDLY AND THEN THEY KNOW THAT’S THE WAY WE EXPECT IT. WE SURROUND OURSELVES WITH PEOPLE WHO THINK THE WAY WE DO AND KNOW OUR VALUES AND KNOW HOW WE WOULD ANSWER A QUESTION.” — DOUG SEVERSON

PERSONAL PROFILE

Doug Severson 58, president, Handyman’s, Inc.

Family: Wife Carol; son and daughter-in-law Gordy and Ashley; son Patrick; daughter and son-in-law Natalie and Kyle Ross. Grandchildren Elijah and Finley Education: Finance degree from St. Cloud State University Hobbies: Family time, traveling, golfing, spending time at the cabin

BEST ADVICE:

The Seversons, Carol said, encourage a free flow of ideas among the entire Handyman’s team, not just those connected by blood or marriage. “We don’t like to hear, ‘We’ve always done it that way.’ There might be a new way or a better way or a different way.” There is one way, however, to which the Seversons are firmly committed: They lead by example. Doug will perform any task that’s needed – and employees are expected to do the same, without being asked. Doug spoke of his appreciation for and admiration of an employee in his mid-60s who recently pitched in to help unload multiple truckloads of merchandise in the rain – without compliant. Handyman’s employees “observe the way we act. We treat people kindly and then they know that’s the way we expect it,” Doug said. “We surround ourselves with people who think the way we do and know our values and know how we would answer a question. We expect employees

to be compassionate with customers and make thoughtful decisions.” The Seversons’ compassion carries over to community involvement. They make donations to silent auctions and other fund-raisers, support area churches and community festivals, and give staff time off to volunteer. The bread and butter for many hardware stores is the homeowner who shops when he or she needs specific items for specific tasks. A hammer and nails here. Lawn fertilizer there. Plastic window coverings for those long Minnesota winters. At Handyman’s, this type of retail trade makes up just 30 percent of the revenue. Seventy percent is commercial business, with Handyman’s serving the owners and maintenance staff of apartment complexes, nursing homes and the like. The store opens at 7 a.m. on weekdays, catering to the repair people who need to pick up supplies before hitting the road to their 8 a.m. service appointments. And if one of those apartment complexes or nursing homes has a middle-of-the-night need for a

When I was appointed “ president in 1993, I was thinking, ‘Now I have to provide for all these families.’ Carol responded, ‘Your responsibility is to provide a great place to work; the staff is responsible for their families.’ ”

38

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

TIMELINE 1965 Stan and Deloris Severson open Handyman’s Hardware at 404 East St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. The store’s sales area is 3,000 square feet. Stan and

Deloris are the only employees. Mid-1970s Doug Severson begins working at the store.


hardware item to stem an emergency, Handyman’s offers 24-hour on-call service. If Handyman’s feels that a plumbing or heating pro or another specialist could better handle a customer’s problem, the staff doesn’t hesitate to say so. “We try not to get in over our head,” Doug said. The store has 780 active accounts – all over the state. A self-described ‘people person’ Doug likes to work directly with customers and likes to travel. So he’s generally the one who makes personal calls on clients who are a long way off, such as northern Minnesota. “They’re primarily health care and schools,” Doug said. He’ll make an appointment with an existing client, often delivering product as part of the sales call, and then he’ll stop in and visit with prospective clients in the region.

Because Handyman’s carries items that most hardware stores don’t have in stock, he is often able to pick up new customers during these visits. Handyman’s ships products daily and frequently delivers goods, even what the sales staff aren’t scheduled to make a call. “We very rarely want to say ‘no,’ ” Doug said. If Handyman’s doesn’t stock what a customer needs, the team will order it. If another vendor won’t deliver a product, “we will deliver it when you want, today, tomorrow, two weeks from now.” The Handyman’s team prides itself on providing great advice and great service, as well as convenience. “So much of it is relationship-based,” Doug said, “with our staff, with our customers. … Our customers are going to be a lot more successful if we’re there to guide them.”

1975 Handyman’s moves to a larger location at 604 East St. Germain, where it remains today.

1983 Doug becomes a shareholder and is named Handyman’s vice president.

1982 Doug joins the operation full time.

1984 Doug’s sister, Deb Backus, joins the

“It’s gratifying to be able to hear stories about how we were able to help find a product or fix a problem somebody was having,” Carol added. What lies in Handyman’s future? “I would love to have 850 accounts by next year,” Doug said. “We’re set up so it isn’t a big effort to add four new accounts in a week.” Carol said that they also want to increase sales among existing customers – and she wants to see the “hometown hardware feel” grow as well. “Having a general manger who knows everything in place for a couple of years and having successfully implemented new office technology, it’s kind of an exciting time,” Carol said. “Now we can grow with what we have. Lots of things can happen now.”

operation, becoming a shareholder and is named secretary/ treasurer. Handyman’s adds a 4,500-squarefoot warehouse.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

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39


PART TWO: THEN

D

oug Severson got his start in business at a very early age. He was 5. It was 1965. Doug’s parents, Stan and Deloris Severson, had just opened Handyman’s Hardware and young Doug was cheap labor. The kid would work for a candy bar. A decade later and barely in his teens, Doug became an official part-time Handyman’s employee. He steadily grew into more challenging tasks and greater responsibility. He did whatever needed doing – and moved into a full-time role in 1982, becoming a Handyman’s Hardware shareholder in 1983. Ten years later, he was named president, a title he retains today.

Along the way, Doug earned a degree in finance from St. Cloud State University, got married, became a father and, within the past two years, a grandfather. Fifteen years ago, when Handyman’s was celebrating its 40th anniversary, Doug recalled his early days in the store – and noted that his children (then ages 16, 14 and 11) were the ones working for candy bars. “It’s still in the fun stage for them,” Doug said at the time. “They can all run the cash register and help customers. They’re gaining confidence.” Doug said it was impossible to predict whether any of them would join the team when they reached adulthood. “I hope so,” he said. “But it’s up to them.”

Fast forward to today: One of the Severson kids, son Patrick, has joined the Handyman’s business. So has son Gordy’s wife, Ashley. And Doug’s wife, Carol, who used to help out every now and then, now is the office manager. The business has grown quite a bit in size, scope and revenue since 58-year-old Doug was 5. When Stan and Deloris opened the original store at 404 East St. Germain Street, they did it all, ordering, stocking shelves, answering customer questions, ringing up sales. Today, Handyman’s employs 18 people (counting Doug and Carol). They even have a general manager, a position created in 2016. There are many hands on deck, yet Doug appreciates the variety of rolling up his sleeves in the store or warehouse, and meeting with customers on site or at their places of business, in addition to handling ownership and presidential duties. He’s felt that way all along. Back in 2014, he told a magazine writer that “if I had to do just one thing – run the cash register all day – I wouldn’t like that. … A customer calls and asks you to research a product. You meet with customers in the store. You call on customers in the field. You drive to a totally different town where you don’t know anyone and call on potential customers that you may have met at a trade show or who will know you because you sent them literature. Every day is different.”

TIMELINE 1993 Doug becomes president, Deb vice president. The building is expanded by 6,000 square feet.

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2005 Handyman’s celebrates 40 years in business in east St. Cloud; Carol Severson joins the team full time.

2012 Handyman’s builds a seasonal warehouse for storage and staging deliveries.


“I CAN’T TELL YOU HOW OFTEN PEOPLE TELL US THEY WERE REFERRED HERE FROM SOME OTHER COMPANY AND TELL US ‘I FINALLY FOUND IT AT YOUR PLACE.’ " — CAROL SEVERSON

And every day brings new opportunities and challenges. The Internet has touched more than brickand-mortar department stores such as Herberger’s and discount stores such as ShopKo. Handyman’s sales have been flat and the Seversons are exploring online sales as a way to grow their business. That’s not as easy as it sounds. As an independent hardware store, Handyman’s has no corporate backing to create an online ordering system. With thousands of individual items available for purchase, just maintaining a database with photos is a daunting task, to say nothing of creating an entire virtual storefront. Doug says Handyman’s best customers are 50- to 60-year-old guys who handle maintenance for schools and are unwilling to go online to look for the parts they need, but Doug knows that those fellas will be replaced when they retire by young individuals who want to shop only online. This can be double frustrating, according to Carol, because so many people end up at Handyman’s when they are looking for just that right item. “I can’t tell you how often people tell us they were referred here from some other company and tell us ‘I finally found it at your place.’

Our challenge is to get them to think of us first.” While an online presence might help with that, it carries its own set of challenges, according to the Seversons. Another change over the years: physical expansion. The 1965 version of Handyman’s Hardware featured just 3,000 square feet of retail space and a wee bit of storage. Handyman’s in 2019 boasts 10,000 square feet of retail space and a 20,000-square-foot warehouse. Handyman’s Hardware has grown and changed in many ways since Stan and Deloris opened the store’s doors in 1965, yet the second and now third generations of Seversons strive to maintain the hometown hardware store feel. They appreciate the loyalty that many of their customers have shown – and the Seversons show it in return, by patronizing their customers’ businesses. The Handyman’s Hardware of 2019 continues the legacy that Doug’s parents started – when Doug was just a tot. Jeanine Nistler is a former St. Cloud

PERSONAL PROFILE

Carol Severson

58, office manager, Handyman’s, Inc. Family: Husband Doug; son and daughter-in-law Gordy and Ashley; son Patrick; daughter and son-in-law Natalie and Kyle Ross. Grandchildren Elijah and Finley Education: Master’s degree in Education from St. Cloud State University Hobbies: Family time, travel, sewing and crafts

communications professional now living and working in the Twin Cities.

BEST ADVICE:

From my parents: “ ‘Sometimes you need

2014 The Seversons remodel the back half of the building, adding a new shipping and receiving area, new offices, staff lunch room, and meeting space. Some of the retail space is enhanced.

2016 Handyman’s hires a general manager. 2016-17 Handyman’s prepares for and implements new point-of-sale inventory system.

2019 Doug and Carol Severson are named the 2019 St. Cloud Area Small Business Owners of the Year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

to sleep on decisions,’ meaning it’s OK to take the time needed to make a good decision.”

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9 //

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FEATURE

BALANCING ACT

Successful career women are learning to create their own definition of “having it all.” //// By Margaret Wethington Arnold

Peace

Confidence

Values Priorities

Core Beliefs Tough Choices

Relationships Live in the Moment Faith Leadership

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hey are just words, but for three professional business women – Diane Hageman, Karen Pundsack and Regan Stommes –they represent a balancing act. They are words experienced through growing careers, raising families, caring for aging parents, contributing to the community and figuring out what’s next. They are meaningful words that have brought joy, tears, security and accomplishments. They are words universal to successful business women, but take on such individual meaning. They are words that represent decades of hard work, change, transitions and always … a balancing act. How have these three women found confidence – and peace – with their choices over the course of their careers? What lessons or advice would they offer for other business women trying to balance work and life, or arrive at a work/life “fit?” First, a warning from an expert: “There is no ‘one’ way, no ‘right’ answer,” according to Phyllis Moen, Ph.D., founding director of the University of Minnesota Advanced Careers Initiative (UMAC), director of the Life Course Center and the McKnight

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Self-Care Gut Feeling Family Learning

Presidential Chair Professor of Sociology. “In this environment, women must make hard choices about how to spend their time, talents and energy.” (For more from Dr. Moen, see the “Choices” on page 50.) Hard Choices iane Hageman has had a successful 36-year career in public relations, working in the higher education, nonprofit and health care markets. She has made tough choices along the way raising two children and caring for elderly parents, all while being a super volunteer in the community. “My ability to stand up for myself and stake my claim has helped me in my career,” Hageman said. “I made a decision in my career to leave a very good leadership position knowing that I couldn’t give all the attention to everyone who needed it, both professionally and personally. I decided to put my stake in the ground and say this is what I have to do right now.” As a fellow in the UMAC program, and as part of a class assignment, Hageman did an introspective look at her life and work. How she arrived at career decisions and

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where she is at in her work came into focus and has given her peace and confidence in her decisions. “It turned out that my top two values are family and relationships,” Hageman said. “I’m in a field that is very much relationship based and it turned out that my gift in media relations also has a strong value on relationships. For me it has been about aligning my professional goals with my personal values.” Karen Pundsack admits having a hard time separating her personal life from her career. They have evolved at the same time. “It doesn’t sound very balanced, but a lot of the decisions I’ve made that have gotten me where I am today had more to do with what was right for my family and for my kids,” Pundsack said. Now executive director of the Great River Regional Library (GRRL), a system that has 32 branch libraries covering six counties and 5,000 square miles, Pundsack started her career part time in the library system so she could spend time with her children when they were young. She took on a full-time role when her youngest was in third grade. When her youngest was in junior high, she received


her master’s degree in library science. “I did the online courses so I could study and still be there for my kids,” she said. “I was doing coursework while my daughter was at dance,” she smiled. “I blended the two and did what made sense for me to grow professionally and also be a mom full time.” Like Hageman, Pundsack has had to make tough choices. Her highly visible leadership role has flexibility if she needs to take time off, but at times her job has to come first. She reflected on the time when her children’s senior high and junior high band concerts were the same night as the GRRL Board of Trustees meeting. “I didn’t get to go to the concerts… but you just balance it as they come up and try very hard to not get in those positions. I’ll try to move a meeting, but sometimes I just can’t be at a family event.” Regan Stommes is in the business of helping people, so she knows that she is making the right choice in her life and work when people are happy and thriving.

TAKEAWAYS

If you spend your time thinking about the future, you’re not going to be in the present. Take each moment as it comes and know your priorities.” —Karen Pundsack, Great River Regional Library

Not losing sight of my morals and values gives me peace. Making that choice makes me feel better and a more confident leader. It’s making sure that we are thriving and I’m leading in a way that works for me.” —Regan Stommes, Opportunity Matters

When you go through life, it’s about relationships. I had the opportunity to learn this relatively early in my career working for the Sisters of St. Benedict. The role of daughter, wife, mother, and now a grandmother, for me are far superior labels.” —Diane Hageman, Hageman Communications

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FEATURE

As the CEO of Opportunity Matters, Inc., (OMI) people generally mean everything. “If people are happy and if they’re making progress in their lives, that’s success,” Stommes said. “Whatever that means for them, because each person’s going to have a different goal they are moving toward. But everyone should be moving forward.” Twenty years ago Stommes started at OMI, a nonprofit organization assuring individuals with disabilities have full participation in every aspect of the community. She was just out of college and worked her way up from direct care to CEO. “I’m a hands-on leader because I’ve done or understand pretty much every role here,” she said. That has helped Stommes relate to her staff, and also model that everyone has options. “Choice is always number one. People make choices every day and you

have to do that with everything in life,” she said. “If you don’t have something outside of work, it’s hard to make your own priorities. If you have other things in your life, you know where to put your priorities.” Stommes, a mother of three, acknowledges that even though she looks at things in terms of percentages, in the end it is about making a choice about what’s most important to you. “It’s important for me to be there for my kids right now and my job is flexible enough to offer that,” she said. She also admits that not everyone has that choice. “Then you need to find the right career for you that allows for those things,” she said. “You might have to find a different field or job if it’s not going to meet what you want outside of work.” When she knows there are still projects to do, Stommes will work evenings or weekends, or give up a couple of hours of sleep.

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Hageman often wonders about her early career mentors and what decisions they made. She quickly acknowledges these women, 10 to 20 years her senior, didn’t have the opportunity to make decisions on what to have and what not to have. Today, the choices are different. And although the balancing act is difficult and lives in a world of hard choices, what is evident with Hageman, Pundsack and Stommes is the confident, live-inthe-moment approach these successful business women have towards their career and family life. For them, it’s all possible as long as you uniquely find what is right for you. Margaret Wethington Arnold is a solo public

relations practitioner with 34 years of public

relations and project management experience. She can be reached at mjwarnold@ mjwarnoldpublicrelations.com


Helping Businesses Grow is Hendricks’ Passion

With a passion for entrepreneurs, Wendy Hendricks has devoted her career to helping businesses grow. Through Hendricks Marketing and as the associate publisher of Business Central Magazine, Wendy has watched businesses expand and flourish throughout the St. Cloud area. Now Hendricks is taking that passion one step further through her work as a realtor and commercial consultant at Premier Real Estate Services.

Hendricks’ strong connections in the business community and years of marketing expertise will help her provide exceptional insight for her real estate clients as they grow their businesses. At Premier Real Estate, she specializes in commercial real estate sales, leasing, and business brokerage. And her desire to help businesses grow will continue to fuel her work at Hendricks Marketing and Premier.

Embarking on this new venture means that she will be stepping down at Business Central Magazine after 19 years.

“As a business owner, I respect the risk that often comes with commercial real estate and work closely with my clients providing them with the assurance and confidence in their decision,” she said.

Many of my friendships are because of my involvement with the Chamber

Hendricks said she is thankful for the friendships made and the work done by all the contributors to the magazine. She appreciates the support from those at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and will remain an active member.

‘‘

‘‘

— Wendy Hendricks

“After 19 years with the magazine, it’s a bittersweet moment for me to step away,” Hendricks said. “But I believe in growth and part of that growth is moving on.”

WENDY

320.293.6379 HENDRICKS

“Many of my friendships are because of my involvement with the Chamber,” she said. “I look forward to continuing to work with my business associates on their marketing and real estate needs.”

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SPONSORED PROFILE


SMART BUSINESS: QUINLIVAN & HUGHES

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Quinlivan & Hughes Attorneys Share Best Advice

ike many industries, the number of women holding leadership positions in the legal field continues to lag behind men. That’s not the case at Quinlivan & Hughes. The full-service law firm is setting a new standard in the legal profession with its long line of leading female attorneys and its leadership by a female CEO. Serving as leaders in their industry and community, these attorneys share some of the best advice they’ve received:

Be part of the solution, not part of the problem.”

Never stoop to conquer.”

Dyan Ebert, CEO

Laura Moehrle

Employment Law, Insurance Defense

Actions speak louder than words.” Kirstin Erickson

Estate Planning Real Estate Law

Insurance Defense, Professional Liability

“ “ “ “ “

Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted.” Jolene Schley

There is no substitute for preparation.” Jessie Sogge

Premises Liability, Personal Injury

Don’t limit yourself.”

Michelle Draewell

Insurance Defense, Professional Liability

Be yourself (everyone else is taken).” Melinda Gau

Employment Law, Estate Planning

Estate Planning

You can plan a pretty picnic, but you can’t predict the weather.” Cally Kjellberg-Nelson

Employment Law, Insurance Defense

Established more than 90 years ago, Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A., ranks among the oldest and largest law practices in Central Minnesota. The firm’s legal teams are known as leaders in both their industries and the community, serving organizations and individuals in these key areas: 1740 WEST ST. GERMAIN STREET, ST. CLOUD, MN 56301 305 CEDAR STREET, SUITE 101 MONTICELLO, MN 55362

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// M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

• Employment Law

• Business Law

• Premises Liability

• Estate Planning

• Government Liability

• Insurance Defense

• Personal Injury

• Real Estate Law

Learn more at Quinlivan.com or by calling (320) 251-1414. M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

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1


SMART BUSINESS: GASLIGHT CREATIVE

Digital and Traditional Marketing Experts Gaslight’s creative solutions and down-to-earth approach make them industry leaders

‘‘

‘‘

Photography by YuppyPhoto

I

n 2009, the economic in her or his field; Together, landscape was not favorable they form a team that is difor starting a new business. verse in its abilities, customerEstablished businesses were focused and agile. Known for struggling, cutting employees their creative solutions and and closing their doors. But down-to-earth approach, the like many others who wanted Gaslight team can assist busito be in control of their own nesses on a per-project basis or destiny, Jodie Pundsack and act as an outsourced marketKelly Cane took a leap of faith ing department. and formed Gaslight Creative “We’re marketing consulon June 1, 2009. tants, writers, designers, illusDespite the economy, Jodie trators, web developers, social and Kelly began growing their media gurus, SEO specialists, business, one project at a time. and yes, sometimes we’re enThey built their portfolio by velope stuffers, too,” said KelWe’re marketing consultants, writers, performing pro bono work, ly. “Every Gaslight team memdesigners, illustrators, web developers, volunteered in the community, ber goes above and beyond for social media gurus, SEO specialists, and yes, and began adding employees their clients everyday.” sometimes we’re envelope stuffers, too. to serve a wide variety of local, While many of the market– KELLY CANE regional and national clients. ing tools have changed in the “As we grew our business, last ten years, Jodie and Kelly digital strategies became an important part of the media mix and believe the core of their business has remained the same. we responded to this need by adding staff to provide these services,” “We started this business because we wanted to use our talents remembers Jodie. and passion to help businesses grow,” adds Jodie. “While the tools Today, Gaslight Creative is a team of ten award-winning, talented we use may change, finding innovative and creative solutions to marketing professionals. Individually, each team member is a leader communicate will always be at the core of what we do.”

10TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Gaslight Creative invites the Central Minnesota business community to their 10th Anniversary Celebration to be held on Thursday, May 30 from 4pm to 8pm at their offices in Downtown St. Cloud.

Gaslight Creative is a team of award-winning creative professionals experienced in integrated marketing strategies, including marketing consulting, branding, advertising, website development and digital. ––––––––––––– GaslightCreative.com 320.257.2242 SPONSORED PROFILE

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BY THE NUMBERS

SPECIAL FOCUS: Senior Health & Living

HOME CARE SERVICES IN THE U.S.

The home care industry in the United States is exploding.

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he home care providers industry is among the fastest-growing healthcare industries in the United States. Home care saves patients billions of dollars every year by treating them in their own homes instead of in hospitals. An aging population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, growing physician acceptance of home care, medical advancements and a movement toward cost-efficient treatment options from public and private payers have all fostered industry growth, according to IBISWorld. Over the past five years, IBISWorld reports that the U.S. home care providers industry has grown by 3.9 percent to reach anticipated revenue of $98 billion in 2019. At the same time, the number of businesses

has grown by 5 percent and the number of employees has grown by 4.6 percent. As Baby Boomers age, entrepreneurs are entering the home care market with new approaches to help seniors age at home. From technology to family care, new business models appear every year. One model, followed by New York based Hometeam, turns all caregivers into company employees, complete with healthcare benefits, 401(k) plans, vacation, and a career progression path. While it’s a costly model compared to the traditional independent contractor system, owner Josh Bruno’s stated mission is to overhaul the senior in-home care industry. The company’s proprietary software matches caregivers with seniors based on Story continues on page 50.

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$98 BILLION Total expected revenue in 2019

463,595

Number of businesses

3.9%

Annual Growth 2014-2019 in the number of companies offering home care

2,049,748 Industry employment

Source: IBISWorld

Sources: Fortune, Honor, Hometeam, IBISWorld

Care at Home


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SMART BUSINESS: INSIGHT EYE CARE

AdaptDx testing can detect early macular degeneration, before vision loss occurs

(l-r) Dr. Savannah Johnson, Dr. Burt Dubow, Dr. Bennett Nelson, Dr. Anna Malikowski and Dr. Greg Friederichs

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ave you noticed that your eyes are having trouble adjusting to light? Or that you don’t like to drive at night? Insight Eye Care, a leading provider of optometric services and vision care products in Central Minnesota, was the first in Minnesota to offer the AdaptDx® instrument to help detect and monitor age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The AdaptDx® is a simple, non-invasive test that measures the time it takes a patient’s vision to adjust from bright light to darkness, a process known as dark adaptation. With the AdaptDx®, doctors at Insight Eye Care can diagnose AMD before any vision loss occurs

With the AdaptDx, doctors at Insight Eye Care can diagnose age-related macular degeneration before any vision loss occurs – and put a plan in place to help preserve vision.

– and put a plan in place to help preserve vision. Savannah Johnson, O.D, joined Insight Eye Care in early 2018. She is pleased that they now offer this diagnostic tool to their patients. “Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness, and more than twice as common as glaucoma. It is a chronic disease that causes a part

of your retina called the macula to slowly deteriorate as you get older and makes it difficult to recognize faces, read, watch TV and drive,” Dr. Savannah Johnson noted. “Many patients over age 50 are having trouble seeing or driving at night – and this can be the first symptom of AMD. With the AdaptDx®, we are able to quickly and easily measure dark adaptation to detect AMD in its earliest stages.”

AdaptDx® is allowed by insurance if patients are experiencing symptoms. In addition to night vision issues, other symptoms include difficulty reading in dim light, distorted or blurry vision or recent changes in vision. “I am excited to be a part of a practice that is an industry leader. This instrument helps us detect disease three years before we are able to see problems with the macula. It detects functional changes before we see structural changes. Our patients do appreciate this attention to prevention,” Dr. Johnson said. “While there is not yet a cure for AMD, there are several lifestyle changes and supplements that have a proven track record of delaying the progression of the disease.”

Insight Eye Care is the leading provider of optometric services and vision care products in the St. Cloud, Paynesville and Becker communities. Our mission is to use the best in technology, teamwork and compassion to serve those who choose personal, professional quality eye care. Our technicians will make sure you get the best products available for your vision needs. Our experienced doctors and staff offer comprehensive vision examinations and specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide array of eye diseases, conditions and problems.

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SPECIAL FOCUS: Senior Health & Living

personality, interests and experience with certain illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Each caregiver is also armed with an iPad to keep a detailed record of the senior’s sleep schedule and daily activities. Hometeam then collects the data and shares it with the client’s physician. Home care agency, Honor, is the founder of the Honor Care Network, a pioneering national network of home care agencies. Backed by $115 million in venture capital funding, this San Francisco company is the first to bring scalable workforce management and technology expertise to local home care agencies. The company is building a national home care network by

partnering with local agencies and other providers along the care continuum. Their partners stay independent and in control of their brand and client relationships, while Honor shares their pool of caregivers, manages recruiting, scheduling, and payroll, and takes over other back office duties for their partners. About 10,000 baby boomers will turn 65 years old every day for the next 20 years, and the American senior population will double in size, according to the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the U.S. Census Bureau. That means there’s plenty of opportunity for businesses to try out new ideas that serve seniors and their families. —GMI

SPECIAL FOCUS: Women in Business

Choices

Women are learning they might be able to have it all, just not necessarily at the same time.

(l-r) Dr. Savannah Johnson, Dr. Burt Dubow, Dr. Bennett Nelson, Dr. Anna Malikowski and Dr. Greg Friederichs

ABOUT US: Our experienced eye doctors offer comprehensive vision examinations and specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems. We use advanced diagnostic technology and vision correction products to care for our patients in the St. Cloud, Paynesville, and Becker communities.

AT A GLANCE: Insight Eye Care • www.insighteyecare.us St. Cloud 206 W Division Street Waite Park, MN 56387 320-253-0365

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hyllis Moen, Ph.D., director of the University of Minnesota Advanced Careers Initiative (https://lcc. umn.edu/umac) is a nationally recognized expert in careers, gender, families and well-being and quoted extensively on the subject in national media. She shared the following with writer Margaret Wethington Arnold when asked about women and the balancing act: “I think the ‘problem’ lies not with women (or men) but in the way work is organized … as if all workers have

full-time homemakers to care for their children, aging parents, homes, and spouses. But almost all women, and increasingly most men, have no such backup on the home front! Add to this the ratcheting work demands and communication technologies connecting workers to their managers 24/7 – and ‘success’ at work and home is increasingly hard to come by.” –––––––––––––– “Some manage by seeking flexible jobs. Or scaling back on their career aspirations. Others try to reduce the family side of the work-family equation by training their kids to be selfsufficient, hiring someone to clean the house, or buying prepared meals. Still others by having fewer kids or having them early or else late in life. The

problem is the career-building years are also the family-building years.” –––––––––––––– “But work is changing. Younger women (and men) want to have personal and family time, and will take or remain in jobs that let them have a life as well as a paycheck.” –––––––––––––– “My advice, and my experience, is that one doesn't have to do everything all at once. Taking a longer view may ease the stress of believing one must have it all, do it all.” —MWH For more on this topic, see the feature story: Balancing Act, on page 42. Read on for our Women in Business Directory

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2019 WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY Introduces you to some of the women who are Redefining Business

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2019 WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY Introduces you to some of the women who are Redefining Business

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Business Spotlight AT A GLANCE

Oddly Satisfying

Owning the Stanley Steemer franchise has allowed Colleen Kelley and Scott Sorenson to achieve both their own goals and that of their customers. PERSONAL PROFILES Colleen Kelley, 56

Hometown: Richfield, Minn.

Education: Normandale Community College, U of M, Dakota County Vo-Tech in sales and marketing

Family members: Married to Scott Sorenson; son Derek, 27, who works in the business; daughter Caitlin, 23, who is going to school for a medical degree

Scott Sorenson, Colleen Kelly, Derek Sorenson, Drew Deadrick By Gail Ivers

Business Central: How did you get into this business? Colleen: Scott was working at Stanley Steemer in Minneapolis. His uncle checked it out and said it was a good company and a good opportunity. We were dating and Scott had the company knowledge and I had the marketing knowledge so we thought we should give it a try. BC: Did you always want to own your own business? Colleen: Yes. I always knew I would. I saw how prosperous the franchise was in the Cities and I said, “Let’s do this!” Scott: I enjoyed what I was doing at the time. I don’t know that I set out to own a business, but at the time we could do it, so we just went with it. Derek: I didn’t really plan to get into the business. I worked summers during school and it just hit me: I want to do this.

TIMELINE 1986

Scott begins working at Stanley Steemer in Minneapolis

1988

Colleen and Scott purchase the Stanley Steemer franchise for

54

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 9

Hometown: Richfield, Minn.

Education/work experience: 1981 graduate of Richfield High School; active military 1981-85; military reserves 1985-1989 Family hobbies: Fishing and boating

BC: What has been your biggest business challenge? Colleen: The recession was hard. We had to cut back hours. Instead of six days a week we went to four days a week, so everyone had full days. Then about five years ago, all of a sudden it went wild around here. BC: What do you find most rewarding? Scott: Watching people grow and succeed. We have really good employees. And hitting customer goals. It feels like you’re really doing something. Drew: It’s oddly satisfying. It’s rewarding when you can see the difference you make in someone’s home. And believe me, we can make a really big difference. Colleen: We’re like a family around here. We go fishing together and do things socially.

Stearns and Sherburne counties; they move to St. Cloud

1990

Colleen and Scott purchase the franchise for Douglas County

1992

Scott Sorenson, 57

Colleen and Scott purchase the franchise for Kandiyohi County

2005

Colleen and Scott purchase the franchise for Crow Wing County

2018

Colleen and Scott purchase the franchise for Wright County

Carpet Cleaning

3835 40th Street S St. Cloud, MN 56301-8801 (320) 253-1723 (320) 656-0620 (fax) Stanleysteemer.com Business Description: Cleaning of carpet and upholstery; tile and grout; hardwood floors; linoleum and vinyl; leather upholstery; water damage restoration; car, boat and RV cleaning; air duct cleaning; commercial and residential services Owners: Colleen Kelley and Scott Sorenson Office Manager: Derek Sorenson: “I did one year at St. Cloud State, but the money was too enticing so I came to work fulltime.” Air Duct Manager: Drew Deadrick: “I was just out of the army and had my carpets cleaned. They offered me a job. I didn’t have anything better to do so I came here. That was two years ago.” Number of employees: summer – 20; winter – 8 In business since 1988

FUN FACT

Stanley Steemer is the first professional carpet cleaning service to earn the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America’s (AAFA) asthma and allergy friendly certification in three categories: carpet cleaning, tile and grout cleaning, and hardwood cleaning.


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2915 2nd St. S. P.O. Box 160 St. Cloud, MN (320) 654-9555

525 Hwy 10 S. P.O. Box 160 St. Cloud, MN (320) 257-5000

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Profile for St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

May/June 2019 Issue  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

May/June 2019 Issue  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine