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CommerCial ConstruCtion speCialists sinCe 1996 at Boser, we deliver a single-source construction solution. From design to move in, we effectively coordinate and deliver results for a variety of healthcare new construction & remodeling projects. But it is our certifications, thoughtful planning and attention to detail that has made Boser Construction a leader in the commercial construction industry for 16 years.

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We take construction seriously.

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Committed to continuous improvement Striving to exceed the latest quality standards — it’s part of our commitment to quality care.

www.centracare.com

  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 3


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President’s Letter Editor’s Note Business Calendar Network Central Top Hats

CONTENTS

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28 Management Tool Kit

Seven Ways to Rock Your Next Email Marketing Campaign

29 Tech News 30 TechStrategies

Four Reasons to Stop Using Social Media

36 COVER STORY HER MOTHER’S DAUGHTER

As a child Maxine Barnett’s mother taught her that everyone had gifts and a responsibility to share them. As executive director of Anna Marie’s Alliance, Barnett has spent a lifetime proving her mother right.

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This Issue 44 Feature

Boom Town Downtown

St. Cloud is experiencing a rebirth that’s fast transforming it into an important economic hub for the region.

48 Special Focus Getting Started

If you’ve been thinking about entering the construction business, now might be just the right time.

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PROFIT

Book Review The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking, Mikael Krogerus and Roman Tschappeler; translated by Jenny Piening

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How many goals aren’t accomplished because no one is driving them?

from around Central Minnesota.

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The Accountability Gap

What’s happening and who’s moving. Business news

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Economy Central presented by Falcon Bank Employment Trends

St. Cloud’s overall employment drop between 2008 and 2011 matched that of the nation, but the real news is in the details.

PROFIT

Special Section 48

11 People to Know 12 Your Voice In Government

Commercial Construction, Real Estate & Leasing

Scott Austing, Tony’s Lifetime Exteriors, Inc.

Business Priorities Creating a

health insurance exchange, securing an educated workforce, and creating tax and spending reform lead the Chamber’s 2013 legislative priorities.

16 The Trouble with Business Record Retention

Employee record retention is your business … and Uncle Sam’s

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

54 Business Spotlight

ONLY ONLINE •• The Greenest Office Building Ever

•• Employment Trends You Need to Know

•• A Perfect Elevator Pitch

•• Road Train

www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com


wgohman.com

Efficiently Expanded

Our design/build approach accommodated changes throughout the project and still allowed for an on-time, under-budget finish. The 4,100 S.F. warehouse addition connects all the vital operations into one complex, including a new loading dock and shipping/receiving office. Central McGowan is equipped and ready to handle their steady business growth.

GENERAL CONTRACTING DESIGN/BUILD CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

St. Joseph, MN • 320.363.7781 • info@wgohman.com

At W. Gohman Construction, we value helping our clients maximize their workspace. By seamlessly adding to Central McGowan in St. Cloud, our experienced team substantially increased warehouse storage and overall workflow efficiency.


PRESIDENT’S LETTER NETWORK

Lengthen Your Network Extension Cord

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Teresa Bohnen, President

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ave you ever noticed that extension cords never seem to be long enough? Particularly the ones included with iPhones and iPads. They don’t seem to have the reach needed for maximum versatility and user benefit. Unlike Apple, our Chamber provides lots of extension cords to our members. They can reach as far as you can imagine. I have been intrigued by “The Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon,” a theory that celebrity Kevin Bacon is the center of the entertainment universe, and that any actor can be linked back to him within six connections. By extension, the assumption is that almost anyone in the world can be linked to anyone else by six or seven degrees. I believe this. Anyone you want to know is within four or five introductions. You just need to make the right connections. We just completed our 7th Annual Central Minnesota Evening at the Capital. It’s an event we host each year in St. Paul to connect legislators from across the state to our volunteers and members. Some people wonder, “Why would the St. Cloud Area Chamber host an event in St. Paul for nonmember legislators?” The answer is that it provides a unique opportunity and benefit for our members.

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

Abdul [Kulane] told me he thinks our Chamber is one of the most fantastic organizations he has ever encountered. He is making connections at lightning speed. Hands are shaken, introductions are made, and names are connected to faces. The next time one of our members has an issue at the legislature, they have a new connection to contact for assistance. If that connection can’t help, they may know someone who can, or they may have an alternative suggestion for resolution of the problem – an extension cord. I recently met Abdul Kulane who owns the Language Bank, providing translation services for businesses in our community. Abdul was born in Somalia, lived in Kenya and moved around among Middle Eastern countries. He came to the US in 2006 and realized if he wanted to take advantage of all this country has to offer, he needed to be able to communicate effectively. He enrolled and graduated from St. John’s University. He’s fluent in five languages. Abdul told me he thinks our Chamber is one of the most fantastic organizations he has ever encountered. He is making

connections at lightning speed. He’s using our Chamber for what it’s best at – lengthening his network extension cord. He told me this: “I look at this country and President Obama, whose father was born in Kenya. I’ve lived in Kenya, and I’ve thought, if a white man was born in Kenya to an American father, could he come to be president there? It is an absurd notion and would never happen. The strength of this country is that everything is possible. I believe in the American Dream and that is why I am here. I have opportunity here I would have nowhere else in the world. I love this country.” I hope you get to lengthen your network extension cord to Abdul soon. I’m sure he has connections from which you can benefit. Until next issue,

Teresa Bohnen President


Main Phone 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line 320-251-2940, ext. 126 Program Hotline 320-251-2940, ext. 125 email: information@ StCloudAreaChamber.com www.StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President | Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President | Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Special Events Coordinator Virginia Kroll, ext. 105 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator Whitney Bina, ext.130 Membership Sales Specialist Open Position

Administrative Assistant Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant Cindy Swarthout , ext. 100 Administrative Assistant Sharon Henry, ext. 124 CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Executive Director Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Sales Manager Lori Cates, ext. 113 Director of Sales & Marketing Judy Okerstrom, ext. 112 Director of Sports & Special Events Kelly Sayre, ext. 128 Director of Visitor Services Jean Robbins , ext. 129 Sales & Marketing Coordinator Nikki Fisher, ext. 100 Administrative Assistant Rachel Campion, ext. 110

2012-13 BOARD MEMBERS Jim Beck Minnesota School of Business Jason Bernick Bernick’s - Beverages & Vending Gary Berg G.L. Berg Entertainment, Performing Artists & Speakers Craig Broman St. Cloud Hospital/CentraCare Health System, Board Chair Neil Franz Neils-Franz-Chirhart, Attorneys at Law Jayne Greeney Schill St. Cloud Area School District #742 Steve Hahn HahnMark, LLC John Herges Falcon National Bank, Board Vice Chair Scott Johnson Times Media

Diane Mendel Playhouse Child Care Kris Nelson Custom Accents, Inc. Rick Poganski Principal Financial Group Dr. Earl Potter, III St. Cloud State University Roger Schleper Premier Real Estate Services Jodi Speicher The Good Shepherd Community Bill Winter St. Cloud Federal Credit Union, Past Board Chair Chriss Wohlleber Le St. Germain Suite Hotel

  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 7


EDITOR’S NOTE NETWORK

Learning and Discovery

From left to right:   Editor Gail Ivers with Maasai village Chief Llu Llu. My traveling companion “Maasai Nancy” (seated) learning to thatch a roof. A Maasai conservation officer using modern technology to track – and avoid – lions. Some lions are easier   to spot than others.

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s I write this it has been exactly one month since I returned from a 17 day trip to Tanzania, Africa. (This column is just an excuse to show off some pictures!) I was there strictly for fun, to see the animals, and, as our tour company puts it, “for learning and discovery.” There are over 120 tribes in Tanzania. The most colorful, and possibly well known, are the Maasai. They are farmers who herd cattle, sheep and goats. Their colorful clothing – especially the red – helps keep them safe by scaring away the wild animals. The Maasai fall into two groups – fully nomadic and semi-nomadic. The fully nomadic Maasai live in tiny clay and dung Quonset huts with no windows and an everpresent fire in the center of the floor. Often several people will share a living space no larger than 8’ x 10’ and 5’ high. Sometimes they are in place for months. Sometimes for just a few weeks.

The semi-nomadic villages build much larger huts, still out of dung and clay, but with windows and thatched roofs. They may live in that village for several years before moving on. Because of the nomadic nature of the Maasai, many of their children do not go to school and it’s difficult for the government to enforce the country’s mandatory 7th grade education law. This lack of education and the adherence to a traditional life create many challenges for the government and the people, according to our guide. If a lion attacks a herd of cattle, the Maasai will track it down and kill it. To them it’s protecting their property. To the government it’s poaching. Recently the government has been recruiting Maasai to be park rangers. Equipped with tracking devices they can detect collared lions and direct the herders to move the cattle out of harm’s way. Learning and discovery in the Serengeti.

In some Maasai tribes, our guide told us, it is traditional for the men to beat the women. It is so pervasive that if a woman is not beaten by her husband, the other women pity her and ask what she has done that her husband doesn’t love her. “Education,” our guide said, “that is the only way to fix things. But it is a long, slow process.” Dealing with domestic abuse was a long slow process in St. Cloud, too. Well educated, modern, and not steeped in tradition, it still took many years, and dedicated women like Maxine Barnett, (see the story on page 36) to show us a better way. Learning and discovery in Central Minnesota. Until next issue,

Gail Ivers

Vice President

Editor

ON THE COVER The Sculpture, titled “You Are Not Alone,” was created for Anna Marie’s Alliance by artist Rosanne Keller.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013


Publisher Teresa Bohnen

Dr. Fred E. Hill St. Cloud State University

Managing Editor Gail Ivers

Gail Ivers St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lori Athmann Jovanovich, Kadlec & Athmann, PLLP and Central Minn. Society of Human Resource Management Whitney Bina St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Teresa Bohnen St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Mary E. Edwards, PhD Professor Emeritus, St. Cloud State University Sharon Henry St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media

110 Sixth Avenue South P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487

Sarah Sucansky

Phone (320) 251-2940 •  Fax (320) 251-0081

Mary MacDonell Belisle mary macdonell belisle – writerforhire

Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography

www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Mike Roth Northland Business Development Network, LLC

ACCOUNTING Accountant Judy Zetterlund

Brenda Schermerhorn and Nathan VanVooren Agency 128 Dawn Zimmerman The Write Advantage

WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman CORPORATE SPONSOR

For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320) 656-3808, 110 S. 6th Ave., P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed

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Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

Business Central is published six times a year 110 Sixth Avenue South; P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 • Phone (320) 251-2940 •  Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.

Hometown Commitment. Locally owned for over 100 years, our community involvement runs deep — in banking relationships that span generations and in our participation in organizations that make this community strong. From full-service personal and business banking to proven lending power with fast, local decision making, we’re known for our commitment of service and friendliness. That’s why with us, your money is safe, secure, and kept working right here at home for the good of our community. If that’s the kind of local commitment you’re looking for, let’s talk.

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Book Review People to Know Your Voice in Government Point of View Business Calendar It Happened When? The Trouble With Business

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strategies, including the Rubber

can copy out the models, fill

Band Model for dilemmas

them in, cross them out, and

with many directions, the

develop and improve them.

Personal Performance Model

Whether you need to prepare

to test whether to change jobs,

for a presentation or carry out

and the Black Swan Model

an annual performance review,

to illustrate why experience

whether a difficult decision lies

The Decision Book: 50 Models for Strategic Thinking, Mikael Krogerus and Roman Tschappeler; translated by Jenny Piening

doesn’t guarantee wisdom.

ahead of you or a prolonged

Packed with familiar tools

dispute is behind you, whether

like the Pareto Principle, the

you want to reassess your

Prisoner’s Dilemma, and an

business idea or get to know

unusual exercise inspired by

yourself better – this book will

Warren Buffet, The Decision

guide you.

W. W. Norton & Company, New York • 2012 ISBN 978-0-393-07961-6

Book is the ideal reference for flexible thinkers.” The 50 Models are organized

The models in the book fulfill the following criteria: (1) they simplify, (2) they are

into four categories: (1) How

pragmatic, (3) they sum up,

he following is from the

to improve yourself, (2) How

(4) they are visual, (5) they

publisher and is excellent

to understand yourself better,

organize, and (6) they are

(3) How to understand others

methods. The models do not

better, and (4) How to improve

provide answers, they ask

minted MBA, a chronic

others. In addition there is an

questions.

second-guesser, or just

Appendix called “Now It’s Your

someone eager for a new

Turn,” with three short parts:

with the unexpected events in

vantage point, The Decision Book

(1) Drawing Lesson 1, why you

our lives.

presents 50 models for better

should draw while you talk, (2)

structuring, and subsequently

Drawing Lesson 2, how to make

understanding life’s steady

a big impression with little

challenges. Interactive and

tricks, and (3) My Models, a

Dr. Fred E. Hill is a professor of

thought-provoking, this

place for you to list the models

Learning Resources Services,  

illustrated workbook offers

you choose to use.

at St. Cloud State University.

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

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Potter joins Sterling Park Health Care Center

Whatever your challenge, The Decision Book has a model that will help guide you toward a conclusion. Reviewed by Fred E. Hill

“Whether you’re a newly

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A Book of Questions

for our review purposes:

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

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The Black Swan Model deals

An added bonus: it really is visual! BC

Heather Potter joined Sterling Park Health Care Center as the executive director. Potter was formerly an administrator at an assisted living facility in Walker, MN where she helped lead the building from a one star to a five star rating in less than a year and a half.

Horizon Roofing receives award Horizon Roofing won a Firestone Master Contractor Award for 2012, making this the 24th award the company has won for quality. The award is presented to professionals who have a commitment to outstanding craftsmanship and longterm quality. Only 256 contractors around the nation are awarded Master Contractor every year.

Tomazin promoted Kara Tomazin, CentraCare Health System, was promoted to web development Tomazin coordinator. She is responsible for the strategic development of CentraCare Health System’s website and intranet site and also oversees the system’s web marketing department. Tomazin has been employed by CentraCare Health System since 1997.

GATR acquires third location GATR Truck Center acquired McKenna Truck Center in Des Moines, Iowa. This is the third location for the Sauk Rapids based company, which expanded to Cedar Rapids, Iowa in 2011.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Sandi Bernard

You Have It Maid! P: (320) 333-3785 E: info@youhaveitmaidmn.com Chair, Business Development Council The purpose of the Business Development Council is to provide training and education for Chamber members and their employees to help their businesses survive and thrive. Programs include Executive Dialogue Groups and a variety of seminars, workshops, and certificate programs.

Jodi Speicher

The Good Shepherd Community P: (320) 252-6525 E: jodispeicher@ goodshepherdcampus.org Chair, St. Cloud Area Leadership This nine-month adult leadership program is designed to help current and emerging leaders understand the dynamics of the community and the role leadership shares in building healthy communities.

Business Panel Topic: Business Growth and Development Thursday, May 9, 2013 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. River’s Edge Convention Center Panel Hosts include: Jeff Gau – CEO, Marco Mark Krebsbach – Managing Partner, CliftonLarsonAllen Brian Schoenborn – Managing Partner, Leonard, Street and Deinard Join us as Greater Minnesota business leaders engage in discussion about growing and strengthening local organizations and their people!

For more information, call Eric Jungels at 320.251.5420 Corporate Sponsors

Jason Miller

Rich Gallus

Designed for the “Next” generation of Central Minnesota business leaders, Next-St. Cloud members meet monthly for personal and professional development, training and networking opportunities.

The Top Hatters are the Chamber’s ambassadors, welcoming new members, congratulating members who have expanded or relocated, and serving as greeters and hosts at Chamber events.

Bea Winkler

Mike Phillips

Chamber Connection is the premier networking event for businesses in Central Minnesota. Hosted by a different Chamber member every Friday morning, Chamber Connection attracts 120 -150 people each week to network and share information about their businesses, all for the price of $1 at the door.

The Chamber Open is an annual networking event for all Chamber members. Volunteers organize the day’s activities, sell sponsorships and help the day of the Open. This year the Chamber Open is Monday, August 12 at Territory Golf Club, St. Cloud.

Premier Real Estate Services P: (320) 761-8500 E: jason@jasonmillerhomes.com Chair: NEXT-St. Cloud

Pine Cone Pet Hospital P: (320) 258-3434 E: pineconepetvet@gmail.com Chair, Chamber Connection

Servicemaster Professional Services P: (320) 252-4622 E: richg@svmps.com Chair, Top Hatters Club

www.anderson-center.org

BankVista P: (320) 257-1600 E: mphillips@bankvista.com Chair, Chamber Open

  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 11


UPFRONT NETWORK

YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

N E WS R E E L Winters joins Heartland Glass Dan Winters recently joined Heartland Glass. He has 28 year of experience Winters as a sales and project manager for Brin Northwestern.

CVB’s Sayre named 40 under 40 Kelly Sayre was named one of Connect magazine’s   40 under 40 for Sayre 2012. Sayre, director of sports/special events for the St. Cloud Area Chamber’s Convention and Visitors Bureau, (CVB) headed the 2012 Can-Am Police-Fire Games, a week-long event that brought thousands of participants, families and friends to the St. Cloud area.

Rachel Campion joins the Chamber’s CVB as an administrative assistant. Campion is a graduate from the St. Cloud State University tourism Campion program.

Rinke Noonan hires; Meuers named mediator

Van Bruggen

Eiden

Meuers

Rinke Noonan Law Firm hired attorneys Kale Van Bruggen and Molly A. Eiden. Van Bruggen earned his law degree from Drake University Law School. He practices in the areas of agricultural law, environmental and water law, and succession planning for family farms. Eiden earned her law degree and a certificate in Business Law from Hamline University School of Law. She practices in the areas of commercial transactions, real estate and creditor’s rights. John Meuers became a qualified neutral for family law as a mediator.

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Business Priorities

Creating a health insurance exchange, securing an educated workforce, and creating tax and spending reform lead the Chamber’s 2013 legislative priorities. By Teresa Bohnen

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ach year, volunteers from the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce work with policy teams from the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce to develop business priorities for the Minnesota legislative session. This year we are working with the statewide Chamber Federation on the following initiatives. –––––––– Workforce Development Our focus includes recommendations at both the K-12 and postsecondary education levels, and significant engagement by the Minnesota business community around the state. K-12 Education •• Better alignment of K-12 and postsecondary standards and assessments to ensure that students are prepared to enter postsecondary education •• Expand postsecondary options for high school students •• Integrate career and workforce awareness so that students are knowledgeable about high demand careers Postsecondary Education •• Expand performancebenchmarked funding •• Improve cost control efforts •• Produce certificates and degrees in workforce demand areas •• Improve affordability for students •• Reduce remediation at

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

postsecondary institutions •• Emphasize public investment in research and outcomes •• Engage business as a partner –––––––– Spending and Tax Reform Tax reform will be a major focus of the 2013 legislative session.  The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce will work to ensure that spending reform is at the center of the discussion.  Spending reforms should focus on: •• Adopting a priorities and outcomes approach to budgeting •• Limiting permanent spending increases to long-run trends in forecasted revenues •• Increasing progressive and means-tested spending Tax Reforms should: •• Be revenue neutral •• Advance competitiveness, stability, efficiency and help grow Minnesota’s economy •• Not add any additional costs or burdens that will impede business retention or growth •• Help competitiveness such as sales tax e-fairness and capital equipment up-front exemptions –––––––– Health Insurance Exchange We have an opportunity to work with the legislature and the Governor to implement a Minnesota health insurance exchange. Key criteria for an effective exchange include:

•• Private governance •• Financial independence •• Marketplace facilitator, not creator •• Maximum consumer choice •• Accountability and continuous improvement •• Business driven –––––––– Energy Our policy objective is to restructure electric rates so that all ratepayers pay the actual cost of service. –––––––– Environment We plan to build on our recent track record to implement additional efficiencies in the environmental review process to ensure that permits are issued in a more timely and affordable manner, while still protecting Minnesota’s environment. –––––––– Election Reform The St. Cloud Area Chamber supports moving the primary to June to drive stronger voter turn-out, ensure a more representative candidate selection process, and maximize voter and constituent contact during the campaign. BC Teresa Bohnen is president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. You can reach her with questions or comments at 320 565-3804 or tbohnen@ stcloudareachamber.com.


POINT OF VIEW

The 2013 St. Cloud State University Winter Economic Summit featured a panel presentation of local business owners and managers. The panel was organized by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, and facilitated by Chamber President Teresa Bohnen. One of the questions Bohnen asked was:

What is the biggest business challenge you face in the next few years?

L-R: Mark Krebsbach, Carlo Schwinn, Scott Johnson, Mark Held, Allison Waggoner, Larry Logeman, Teresa Bohnen

“As we move to the digital age, we don’t want to lose the loyal audience who loves print media. Also, finding specialized workers will be a challenge.” —Scott Johnson, Times Media

“Our biggest challenge will be finding employees. People don’t understand how respectable it is to become a skilled worker.”

“The greatest challenge will be helping our clients adjust to government regulations like health care and taxes.” —Mark Krebsbach,

“Gas. In 2012, we spent about $500,000 in fuel.” —Larry Logeman, Executive Express

CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP

“It will be challenging to get students to realize that skilled labor is a good career. It’s also hard to get people to accept a job in Minnesota.” —Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc.

“Finding skilled workers.” —Carlo Schwinn, The

—Mark Held, Ickler Bearing & Machine Co., Inc.

Managing IT Expenses

L.S. Starrett Company – Tru-Stone Technologies Division

Does it feel like “It’s always something...”? Is your business challenged by keeping up with IT demands? Are you looking for savings in a world where technology changes faster than ever? Marco’s team of IT experts can help. By listening to how you do business, we can develop and implement a plan that helps you manage your day-to-day IT issues. Marco offers managed services for voice, data, video, and print solutions. Let your staff get back to what you hired them for. If you’ve got IT challenges, we’re all ears.

A growing company gets back to business by letting Marco support their 100 computer users. For more information, visit www.marconet.com/BacktoBusiness marconet.com

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UPFRONT NETWORK

N E WS R E E L McGough earns award; Potts joins board McGough Construction was named the Metropolitan Economic Development Association’s (MEDA) Contractor of the Year for the third consecutive year. The Construction Partnering Program is sponsored by MEDA, the City of St. Paul and the Association of Women Contractors. McGough was recognized for the company’s partnership with Salah Tarraf and Tarraf Construction. Ken Potts, McGough Companies, was elected to the national United States Green Potts Building Council (USGBC) Board of Directors. The USGBC is a non-profit trade organization that promotes sustainability in building design, construction and operation.

Fossey

Karri

Fossey and Karri join Rajkowski Hansmeier Katherine O. Fossey and Stephanie A. Karri have joined Rajkowski Hansmeier as associate attorneys.Fossey is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School. She will practice in the areas of insurance defense, criminal law, general litigation and family law. Karri has a degree from the University of Iowa College of Law, and will practice in the areas of insurance defense and criminal law.

Can-Am Police-Fire Games earn award The 2012 Can-Am Police-Fire Games – St. Cloud earned the 2012 Reflection of the Year Award presented by the City of St. Cloud. The award recognized and honored the many organizers, volunteers, and participants of the event that was held this past June. Compiled by Whitney Bina

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BUSINESS CALENDAR MARCH/APRIL 2013 ••

Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar.

Can’t miss opportunities to influence, promote, and learn. APRIL 25TH

Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year at the Sauk Rapids-Rice Middle School, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Cost is $15, open to the public.

March 6 & April 3

Lunchtime Learning noon-1 p.m.

Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month at the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public.

March 6: Sponsored by

Central Minnesota Society for Human Resource Management (CMSHRM), with Betsey Lund, Neils, Franz, Chirhart, P.A., presenting “Employee Handbooks: Are You and Your Employees on the Same Page”

April 3: Sponsored by

Mahowald Insurance Agency, with Tim Schmidt, Rejuv Medical, presenting “Networking Unplugged”

March 14, April 9 & April 25

Business After Hours 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network!

March 14: Hosted by Westwood Professional Services, 3701 12th St. N, Suite 206, St. Cloud

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

April 9: Business After Hours EXTRA! hosted by St. Cloud Area Chamber and co-sponsored by over 50 businesses, at the Best Western-Kelly Inn, 100 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud Corporate Sponsors: Grand Casino & TDS

April 25: Waite Park Chamber

After Hours hosted at La Casita, 314 Division St., Waite Park

March 8 & April12

Government Affairs March 8 and April 12: 7:30 a.m. - 9 a.m.

A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, at the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S.

March 28 & April 25

Sauk Rapids Chamber 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance.

March 28: Hosted by Tri-County Organics at Good Shepherd Fellowship Hall, 325 11th St. N, Sauk Rapids, with a presentation by Bruce Miles, Big River Group, on “Five Best Tips for Conflict Management”

April 25: Sauk Rapids Citizen of

the Year at the Sauk Rapids-Rice Middle School, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Cost is $15, open to the public.

March 20 & April 17

Waite Park Chamber 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

For businesses interested in Waite Park issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance.

March 20: Hosted by Minnesota School of Business, 1201 2nd St. S, Waite Park, with a presentation by Shannon Templin, Minnesota School of Business, on “Top 10 Icebreakers Guaranteed to Build Support.” April 17: Hosted by Rock On

Companies, at the Moose Family Center, 1300 3rd St. N, Waite Park, with a presentation by Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage and Cloud Co-working, on “Co-working and Innovation.” For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940.


IT HAPPENED WHEN?

July 1995 Carnival of Opportunity

T

he Chamber’ Carnival of Opportunity was an annual event that showcased many St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce members. The event took place in July at the St. Cloud Holiday Inn and offered food, fun and entertainment. Today, the Chamber hosts Business After Hours - EXTRA! This annual event maintains the traditions of Carnival of Opportunity and offers free food, fun and networking. In 2013, Business After Hours – EXTRA! is cosponsored by Grand Casino Mille Lacs and TDS and features over 50 businesses. Join us on April 9 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at the Best Western-Kelly Inn. Sign up to showcase your business by contacting the Chamber. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Coldwell Banker, July 1995 •• Bonnie’s Printing, July 23, 1996 •• College of Saint Benedict, Saint John’s University and Minnesota Public Radio, July 1995. •• Sam’s Club, July 23, 1996

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UPFRONT NETWORK

THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

record retention is your business … Keep or Throw? Employee and Uncle Sam’s

A

By Lori Athmann

re you a responsible owner of a small business? Well, certainly. You understand and comply with minimum wage laws and rules that prohibit discrimination based on color, creed, gender, religion and the like. However, are you aware of the many state and federal laws regarding employee records retention? Wise employers and their human resources’ managers must familiarize themselves with these laws and demonstrate compliance. Why? For one, you respect your employees’ rights. Two, you want to avoid potential legal action against the company. And three, Uncle Sam is watching.

Record Retention Requirements gnorance of the law is not a defense for noncompliance. Typically, your files should hold documents relating to recruitment, employee selection, compensation, benefit plans, occupational safety and health, drug and alcohol testing, discrimination charges, and leaves of absence. But be aware of the unique legal requirements for your particular business. Some laws apply based on business size, some by business type. You may be subject to state rules, federal rules, or both. There’s no one-size-fits-all listing of the types of records your business must keep. The chart on the next page shows just a few of the more fundamental requirements. Retain your employee documents for as long as the law requires. Some businesses may opt to keep their files

I

About the writer

It’s important to establish and implement a consistent policy for retaining and discarding records to avoid confusion. longer, depending on their specific situation. It’s important to establish and implement a consistent policy for retaining and discarding records to avoid confusion.

Employee Personnel Files n employee’s personnel file usually contains applications, wage/salary histories, fringe benefit information, commendations, warnings/disciplinary actions/terminations, authorizations for deductions, and employment histories

A

such as job titles, promotions, transfers, attendance records, performance evaluations, and retirement records. The personnel file should not contain medical data received in connection with workers’ compensation matters or medical leaves of absence. Those records should be maintained in a separate file. By law, employees have access to their records. They can be reviewed once every six months by a current employee and once per year by former employees, for as long as the company keeps the files. Access to the

Lori Athmann is a partner with Jovanovich, Kadlec & Athmann, PLLP and on the Board of Directors for CMSHRM.  To learn more about CMSHRM go to http://cmshrm.shrm.org/

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013


file must be provided within seven days of the request, 14 days if records are stored out-of-state, and be given during regular business hours. Also, the review must take place at or near the employee’s actual work location. A supervisor may be present. In addition to allowing access, the employer is obliged to provide copies at no charge. So, are you still a bit confused about what sort of employee records your business should retain? Central Minnesota Society for Human Resource Management is a good resource, or contact your attorney for clarification. After all, as a smart business owner or manager, you want to do right by your employees and by the company. And you certainly don’t want any trouble from Uncle Sam! BC

TYPE OF RECORD

RETENTION REQUIREMENT

Hiring documents, including applications, resumes, and refusals to hire

One year 

Promotions, demotions, transfers, layoffs, and discharge records

One year 

I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification

Three years after hire, or one year after termination, whichever is later

Employee’s name, address and occupation

Three years

Rate of pay and amount paid each pay period

Three years

Hours worked each day and week

Three years

Employee benefit plans and notices

Indefinitely

HIPAA Records

Six years from date of document or  when it was last in effect, whichever is later

COBRA Notices

Six years from date of notice (recommended)

Administration of alcohol and controlled substances testing

Five years

Discrimination charges

Until final disposition of charge

Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) records

Three years

Our Focus: Your Time Immediate care when you need it most Sometimes, your body runs on its own time—and it seems like most illnesses or accidents happen just after most clinics close. That’s why we offer after-hours health care at both of our St. Cloud locations, evenings and weekends, seven days a week. It’s the same conscientious and kind care we offer during business hours, but at a more sick-friendly time. It’s the genuine care and respect we have for our patients that make the difference.

StCloudMedical.com South Campus

320-240-2170 Northwest Campus

320-529-4741

Express Care Monday – Friday 2:30 P.M. – 9:30 P.M. Saturday – Sunday 10 A.M. – 5 P.M.

Family Medicine + OB/GYN + Pediatrics + Express Care Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation + Occupational Medicine + Surgery BusinessCentral7.5 x 4.875[ExpressCare].indd 1

6/26/12 9:53 AM   M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 17


UPFRONT NETWORK CENTRAL

NETWORK CENTRAL

Grow!

The Chamber’s business training programs range from “Keeping Customers for Life” to “Using Social Media Effectively for Business” to “Civility in the Workplace.”

David Grossman, Insperity, offers advice for retaining talent in the workplace. Holly Lee, Coborn’s, Inc., talks about how Coborn’s uses multiple social media outlets to build its brand.

Ann Kennedy, WACOSA, introduces Lunchtime Learning in December. WACOSA sponsored the program.

Dorrie Larison, Gray Plant Mooty, provides tips on how to avoid high stakes wage and hour claims.

Melanie Hartman, High Impact Training, discusses adapting to change in the workplace.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

Mike Schlough, Park Industries, discusses the importance of maintaining relationships when you’re trying to keep customers for life.

Colleen Zoffka, GB & Co, and Karla Virnig, City of Waite Park participate in the Chamber’s fall Performance Management series.

Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle – wordingforyou, shares ideas for upgrading written content for social media and websites.


NETWORK CENTRAL

Network!

The Waite Park Chamber meetings offer business information, fun, and plenty of networking.

Allan Gully, Summit Direct Carpet and Brenda Fedor, Focal Point Decorating

Brian Hart, Sandler Training; Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services; and Amanda Henry, High Impact Training

Rod Oltz, Granite City Tire & Auto; Brenda Eisenschenk, InteleCONNECT, Inc.; and Cindy Battleson, Rapids Alterations & Repair

John Riordan, DAYTA Marketing and Kirsten Freeman, 360 Chiropractic

Kathy Grochow, Bremer, and Bruce Johnson, Habitat for Humanity

St. Cloud Tech High School Chamber Singers entertain the Waite Park Chamber members at Christmas.

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TOP HATS | New Members 3rd St. Hair Company, styling for men, women, and children, 2600 3rd St. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Ron Dessellier, Tim Jansen and Kris Nelson.

Mid Continent Management, a full-service professional property management company, 3201 14th St. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Anne Callan, Shari Movold and Roger Schleper.

Great Harvest Bread Co., specializing in freshly milled, whole wheat products, 135 Division St., Waite Park. Pictured: Bob Lien, Mike and DeNae Hiltner and Jill Magelssen.

Thermal Tech Imaging, LLC, certified thermal imaging and leak detection of all residential and commercial properties, 1347 Dundas Circle, Monticello. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Dan Lageson and Roger Schleper.

L. L. Smith Jewelers, family owned retail jewelry store, specializing in fine jewelry, custom designing, 2815 W Division St., Suite 103, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Nelson, Nancy and Leland Smith.

Carlson Wagonlit Travel, assisting customers with their travel needs for over 45 years. 4201 W Division St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Jason Bernick, Missie Torborg, Carol Ruegemer and Tauna Quimby.

March of Dimes, working to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality, 2233 Roosevelt Road, Suite 11, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper and Mary Kokula.

Senator John Pederson, 2817 15th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Owen Peterson, Senator John Pederson and Diane Ohmann.

Travelers Country Club on the Mississippi, an attractive planned community that is a seasonal home for snowbirds or a weekend retreat for families, mostly park model trailers, an executive 9-hole golf course which is free to members, 11290 80th Ave. SE, Clear Lake. Pictured: Bob Lien, Charles Orvik and Beth Smith.

Thelen, a full-service marketing/ advertising/web development agency, 703 St. Germain St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Randy Tenvoorde, Becky Tenvoorde, Brooke Heilman, Ronn Paulson and Owen Peterson.

Celebrate and Support

Put a little fun on your next meeting’s agenda.

Leadership Development for girls in Central Minnesota!

Savory & Sweet Hors d’oeuvres featuring Girl Scout Cookies Wine Tasting & Silent Auction Live entertainment by Andrew Walesch

Thursday, March 14, 2013 Blackberry Ridge Event Center, Sartell

Let us make your next meeting, banquet, or special event truly memorable. With 2 spacious casino hotels, 24-hour gaming action and award-winning dining, we offer the perfect setting for your guests. For more information call Grand Casino Mille Lacs Events & Convention Center 800-626-5825, ext. 8515; Grand Casino Hinckley Events & Convention Center 877-447-2631; or visit grandcasinomn.com

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013 INFORMATION Job Number

364-12121

Trim

3.625 x 4.875”

Modification Date

November 15, 2012 1:15 PM

5:30 pm — 8:30 pm | $55 per person Tickets available online at gslakesandpines.org For more information, contact Becky Reynolds, Girl Scouts, 320 247-4561 or breynolds@gslakesandpines.org

Girl Scouts of Minnesota and Wisconsin Lakes and Pines


American Marketing Association – Husky AMA, with marketing principles in mind, we strive to enhance student life and work experiences through leadership training, professional development, community involvement, and applied promotions of shared values, St. Cloud State University, 720 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Chris Panek, Dan Brink, Ashley Barthel, Hannah Sanborn and Luke Cesnik.

Impartium, a full service interactive marketing agency offering end to end digital solutions for top brands and industry leaders, 108 Doctors Park, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Paul Nealy and Julie Forsberg.

REMAX Results, real estate, 405 33rd Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Bob Lien, Bob Rowen and Don Anderson.

Bank of America Home Loans, provides quality mortgages, refinancing and prequalifying for home loans, 254 17th Ave. N, Sartell. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Corey Schueller and Rick Poganski.

RP Enterprises, a large event planning and production company, 803 4th St. N, Sartell. Pictured: Rick Poganski, Rachel Lolmasteymaugh, Todd Fritz and Dr. Mark Roerick.

Blue Line Sports Bar & Grill, 1004 Sunridge Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Scott Widor, Ken Steinhoff, Adam Scianna, Woon HoPaek, Jason Angell and Tauna Quimby.

State Services for the Blind, a state vocational rehabilitation program that facilitates the achievement of vocational and personal independence, 1542 Northway Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Jason Dornbusch and Julie Forsberg.

Cloud Coworking, office and meeting space, 113 5th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Dawn Zimmerman, Jon Ruprecht and Diane Ohmann.

The Ad Company, an advertising, design, and consulting agency, St. Cloud. Pictured: Todd Fritz, Jason Phillippi, Justin Phillippi, Alyssa Phillippi and Jayne Greeney Schill.

Clear Water Mobile Wash, a mobile pressure washing company designed to fit any type of work that is needed, anytime of the year, from a quick car wash, to a fleet of semis, 25715 County Road 36, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, James Musech and Jayne Greeney Schill.

We’re ready for you when accidents happen. Trauma specialists at St. Cloud Orthopedics are prepared to repair your injury and guide your recovery.

re turn

(verb) go back to a former condition See also: St. Cloud Orthopedics St. Cloud Orthopedics uses the same resources and has the same expertise found at any Level 1 trauma center in the state.

1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 orthopedics redefined

Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center • Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy   M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 21


TOP HATS | New Locations, New Ownership and Expansions

22

Rock On Companies, licensed and bonded aggregate truck brokers and supplier of wholesale landscaping decorative rock and mulch, 3100 7th St. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Krystal Vierkant and Diane Ohmann.

Shift Technologies, Inc., computer networking and service company, 1136 Kuhn Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, David Zimmer, Tina Stay and Kris Hellickson.

Walking Billboards, supplier and decorator of garments and promotional products, 813 St. Germain St. W, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Wendy Verkinnes, Gary Verkinnes and Roger Schleper.

State Farm Insurance – Kristen Stebbins, 1988 County Road 134, St. Cloud. Pictured: Chris Tengwall, Bryce Deter (State Farm Bear), Angela Marini-Rakotz, Kristen Stebbins and Tauna Quimby.

National Karate, a full service martial arts school with day and evening classes for children and adults. 2835 W St. Germain St., Suite 650, St. Cloud. Pictured: Bob Lien and Christa Jordahl.

Treasure Chest Thrift Store, a non-profit thrift store donating all of its proceeds to Birthline, 2234 Frontage Road, Waite Park. Pictured: Kris Hellickson, Mary Margaret Symanietz, Mike Bitzan and Jill Magelssen.

Doherty Staffing Solutions, providing specialized temporary staffing, employee payroll, and more, 2301 Division St., Suite 500, St. Cloud. Pictured: Vickie Stommes, Ashley Olson, Elizabeth Krupke, Tracy Lemke and Bob Lien.

Uncle Sam’s Flag & Pole, 1413 Division St., Waite Park. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Rick and Tonia Zimmer and Jill Magelssen.

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

Auto Value Parts Stores, paint, body supplies, tools, small engine parts, and equipment for automotive, agricultural, and marine needs; machine shop services available, 121 29th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Nelson, Dave Stephenson and Todd Fritz.

Allied United, a wholesaler of exterior building supplies for residential and commercial building contractors, 777 Anderson Ave., St. Cloud. Pictured: Julie Forsberg, Chad Hiltner, Brenda Schroeder, Mike Parent and Inese Mehr.


TOP HATS | New Businesses

Marco, specializing in data networking and security, converged voice applications, print and document management, audio/ video systems, digital signage, and video surveillance solutions, 4510 Heatherwood Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Barry Opatz, Jeff Gau and Diane Ohmann.

Image Builders, promotional advertising products, screen printed and embroidered items, incentives and premiums, online company sales, 2907 Clearwater Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Julie Zniewski, Traci Aschenbrenner, Lisa Landowski and Mark Kadlec.

All State Communications, specializing in low voltage cabling, voice/data networks, security systems, paging, fire alarm, CCTV, nurse call, and fiber optics, 5114 Marson Drive, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Jared Gapinski and Kris Nelson.

Top Talent Solutions, a new staffing agency providing clerical and administrative professionals for temporary, temp-to-hire and direct hire positions, 2301 W Division, St. Cloud. Pictured: Bob Lien, Leah Vagle and Tad Schoeppner.

Wells Fargo Advisors, retirement planning for businesses and individuals, 50 14th Ave. E, Suite 102, Sartell. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Dan Chapman and Tasha Chapman.

Tri-County Organics, a compost site specializing in yard waste, leaves and grass clippings, 40 35th Ave. NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Kevin Johnson, Jamie Phenow and Jill Magelssen.

ePromos Promotional Products, high-impact promotional products, custom apparel and corporate gifts. 3001 Clearwater Road, Suite 1, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Sheila Johnshoy, Cydney Reuter, Susan Bendel-Bridson and Jason Bernick.

Biology 701, LLC, restaurant and bar, 701W St. Germain St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Bob Lien, Nicole Hunter-Severson and Roger Schleper.

Jovanovich, Kadlec & Athmann, PLLP, a full service law firm, practicing in the areas of employment law, real estate, family law, estate planning, municipal law, criminal law, bankruptcy law and general litigation, 1010 W St. Germain, Suite 420, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Alicia Thieschafer, Brenda Wolbeck, Barb Zierden, Susan Kadlec, Jessie Sogge, Lori Athmann and Kris Hellickson.

Wal-Mart, 3601 2nd St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Dr. Mark Roerick, Sarah Klein and Chris Panek.

WORKING WITH PEOPLE, NOT JUST NUMB3RS

MIKE WENNER, Partner, C.P.A. and SHELLEY GAETZ, C.P.A. with Jeff and Barb Larson of Guardian School Bus

“Working with Schlenner Wenner & Co. has been a long-term commitment for us. For the past 20 years, Mike, Shelley, and their team have made us feel comfortable and always put things in terms we can understand. In this complicated world, it’s nice to have a relationship that is easy.” -Barb & Jeff Larson St. Cloud 630 Roosevelt Rd. Ste. 201 P.O. Box 1496 St. Cloud, MN 56302 320.251.0286

www.swcocpas.com An Independently Owned Member, McGladrey Alliance

Looking for Meeting Space? Conferences | Meetings | Presentations | Receptions | Trainings | Workshops SCSU Welcome Center Advantages:

Adjacent parking Conference planning services Flexible catering options Personalized customer service Registration services available State-of-the-art technology

SCSU Welcome Center Location:

355 Fifth Avenue South (4 blocks north of campus) St. Cloud, Minnesota Contact:

320.308.6100 welcomecenter@stcloudstate.edu

www.scsutraining.com/rentwc   M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 23


TOP HATS | Milestones 25 year Chamber member Quality Inn, 4040 2nd St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Nelson and Kullen Schroht.

30 years in business Gruber’s Quilt Shop, full service quilt shop, with retreat center, cafe, and coffee shop, 310 4th Ave. NE, Waite Park. Pictured: Julie Forsberg, Sue Poser and Inese Mehr.

25 year Chamber member Henkemeyer Coatings, commercial and industrial painting, floor coatings and wall covering contractor, 1838 Plainview Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Owen Peterson, Mike Henkemeyer and Kris Nelson.

30 years in business Preferred Credit, Inc., national consumer finance company for direct marketers, 3051 2nd St. S, Suite 200, St. Cloud. Pictured: John Gaetz, Greg Windfeldt, Steve Windfeldt and Diane Ohmann.

100 years in business St. Cloud Floral, flowers and gifts for business and personal occasions and special events and holiday gifts, 515 St. Germain, downtown St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Nelson, Duane Paurus, Rhoda Paurus and Owen Peterson.

30 years in business Robert’s Fine Jewelry, 300 4th Ave. NE, Waite Park. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Bob Lien and Julie Forsberg.

100 years in business Stearns Bank, 4191 2nd St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Nelson, Donald Weeres, Norman Skalicky, Tom Williams and Jason Bernick.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

25 year Chamber member Creative Catering, 405 Main St., Rice. Pictured: Rick Poganski, Mark Larson and Shannon Templin.

25 year Chamber member Northway Dental Associates, 1500 Northway Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Doctors Greg Lehman, Gary Thompson, Jeff Flemming, and Sarah Layne; Roger Schleper. Not pictured: Doctors Tom Como, Bruce Kudak, Rolf Jacobson and Brent Deragisch.

40 years in business St. Cloud Overhead Door Co., sale and installation of garage doors, openers, loading dock equipment and specialty doors, 2150 Frontage Road S., Waite Park. Pictured: Todd Fritz, Gary Bechtold and Kris Nelson.


TOP HATS | New Members 25 year Chamber member Royal Tire, 3955 Roosevelt Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Pat Duininck, Paul Duininck and Chris Panek.

25 year Chamber member Dale Gruber Construction, commercial and industrial building, and remodeling, 120 Osseo Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Dale Gruber and Kris Hellickson.

65 years in business St. Cloud Bakery, specializing exclusively in fresh baked cookies, pies and pastries since 1947, 1408 St. Germain St, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Jeff Westerlund, and Della Ludwig.

65 years in business The Camera Shop, full-service photo finisher, passport photos, 25 7th Ave. S, St. Cloud and 223 3rd St. NE, Waite Park. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Ginny Olmscheid, Frank Ringsmuth and Della Ludwig. 25 year Chamber member Rice Building Systems, design/ build commercial/industrial general contracting firm, 1019 Industrial Drive S, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Shannon Templin, Jennifer Rice and Rick Poganski.

25 year Chamber member Townsquare Media, radio station, 640 Lincoln Ave. SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Nelson, Dave Engberg, Bob Hughes, Jim Maurice and Roger Schleper.

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Kumon Math & Reading Center, an after-school math and reading program that unlocks the potential of children so they can achieve more on their own, 2820 2nd St. S, Suite 160, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jason Bernick, Catherine Maland and Jayne Greeney Schill.

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Call The Vein Center today for your complimentary consultation and ask about our cosmetic spider vein treatments. like us on facebook

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Entrepreneurism Going Green Management Toolkit Tech News Tech Strategies Economy Central presented by Falcon Bank

BUSINESS TOOLS

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RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

ENTREPRENEURISM

The Accountability Gap How many goals aren’t accomplished because no one is driving them? By Mike Roth

I

f you’re like most companies, you’ve probably tried to visually display how your company is structured or organized. So what’s the best way to do that – with an accountability chart or an organizational chart? An accountability chart is an organizational chart on steroids. It includes the five major “accountabilities” of each role. It’s vitally important in all companies that everyone knows who is accountable for what. Whether there is a customer service problem or there is no toilet paper in the facility, you don’t want your employees guessing who owns the problem.  Some responsibilities are clear – sales for example. But some aren’t. For example: •• Who decides whether to fund a major new project? The CFO (if one exists) or the owner or both? •• Who owns managing the outsourced website design team? The marketing director or the engineering manager?

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•• Who decides what commission rates to pay? The VP of sales or the CFO or the owner? How much time gets wasted because of this accountability knowledge gap? How many goals don’t get accomplished on time because no one is driving them? There should be only one owner for all major responsibilities and everyone should understand who owns what. After all, if everyone is responsible then no one is responsible. An organizational chart where roles and

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

responsibilities are clarified is called an accountability chart. Take a look at how your business is structured and ask yourself these questions: •• Will the way you’ve structured your organization foster good communication throughout the organization and rapid decision-making to advance each function of your business? •• Are the lines of accountability clear – does everyone know who they report to?

•• Are roles and responsibilities absolutely clear for every seat in your organization? Does each person know what you expect from them? The added clarity will help your company grow. BC Mike Roth is a professional EOS implementer and owner of Northland Business Development Network, LLC. Contact him at 320-492-7326, Mike.Roth@ NBDNLLC.com, www.nbdnllc.com

To see an Accountability Chart visit www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com


GOING GREEN

Green Jobs Aid MN’s Recovery Did the recession take a toll on the emerging green economy in Minnesota? Developing sectors are generally hit the hardest by economic downturns because an unfavorable investment climate hurts new technologies and products more than established ones. In fact, the number of green job opportunities in Minnesota held steady between fall 2009 and spring 2011. Not only that, but they offered higher quality employment opportunities than the rest of the economy.

BY THE NUMBERS

89%

The percent of job vacancies in green industries that are full-time

79%

The percent of job vacancies in green industries that are permanent/non-seasonal

31%

The percent of job vacancies found in companies related to energy and resource efficiency

3%

The percent of job vacancies found in water treatment and conservation companies

Source: Minn. Department of Employment and Economic Development. For the complete report visit www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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Brian Hart 220 Park Avenue South, Suite 100 St. Cloud, MN • 320-224-2121 www.brianhart.sandler.com S Sandler Training Finding Power In Reinforcement (with design) and Sandler Training are registered service marks of Sandler Systems, Inc. © 2013 Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

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BUSINESS TOOLS G R OW

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

SEVEN WAYS TO ROCK Your Next Email Marketing Campaign Email marketing is an affordable opportunity to get your message out to a variety of audiences. By Brenda Schermerhorn and Nathan VanVooren

T

o maximize your success with an email campaign, you need to be as efficient as possible. Here are seven tips to help you get the most out of your next email marketing campaign: 1 Plan: Planning an email marketing campaign is no different than any other type of marketing campaign. You need to know who your target customer is, how they can benefit from what you have to offer, what the optimal timing is to reach them, and what action you want them to take. 2 Write powerful subject lines: You have only a brief moment to grab your reader’s attention. Effective subject lines can be creative and informative — just be careful to avoid words that might get your message flagged as spam. Need an idea? Looks like the headline of this article got your attention! 3 Create a clear call-to-action: Make it obvious to your readers what you want them to do by placing your call to action in a prominent spot of your message. Make it easy for them to respond as well. One click to contact you will go farther than creating a long trail for them to follow. Then monitor customer click-

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throughs so you can determine your campaign’s success or adjust the call-to-action in the next message. 4 Personalize your salutation: We’ve all received letters in the mail addressed to “Current Resident.” And we all know where letters like that end up. Make your message stand out by including your recipient’s first name. Speaking directly to your reader by name increases your chances of having your message read. 5 Craft BRIEF and well-written content: Keep your message short, sweet, and to the point. Stay focused on how your offer can benefit the reader. Make it valuable information — too valuable to delete. Write in a way that’s easy to digest (bullet points help). Balance content with images and colors that attract attention. 6 Test, test, test: See what subject line gets the best open rate with a small sample and use the winner with the rest of the list. A little work goes a long way in getting more messages read. 7 Include social media links: If your recipients like your email content, they’ll probably

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

Effective subject lines can be creative and informative — just be careful to avoid words that might get your message flagged as spam. like your social media content (and may even share it with their friends). Give them the chance to connect with your social media sites by including these links in your emails and promoting content that’s valuable to them. A successful email marking campaign works best when

used with a larger marketing strategy and other tactics to ensure you achieve the best coverage with the audience you want to reach. BC Brenda Schermerhorn is an account manager and Nathan VanVooren is a writer at Agency 128, a full service advertising agency in St. Cloud.


Photo courtesy of goggle.com

TECH NEWS

Wake Me When We Get There

Are self-driving cars the future of transportation? The California state legislature approved a bill that will allow autonomous vehicles, like Google’s self-driving “robot car,” to hit roads and highways in as little as two years. Nevada became the first state to allow such vehicles when it issued three autonomous-vehicle licenses to Google in May. The theory goes that if humans are taken out of the driving process, accident rates could plummet. Source: CBC News

FROM FLASH DRIVE TO SMART DRIVE

Gigmark Interactive Media is turning the flash drive into a smart drive. When connected to an online content management and analytics reporting system the Gigmark’s flash drive is transformed into an intelligent interactive marketing platform that produces real analytics. This two-way internet chatter allows businesses to update content no matter where the drive is or who is using it. And, because the original information always resides on a portable drive, the content is available whether the user is online or not. Source: Entrepreneur

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LEAD APRON, ANYONE? Researchers at the University of TexasDallas have designed an imager chip that could turn mobile phones into devices that can see through walls, wood, plastics, paper and other objects. Due to the obvious privacy concerns, the researchers are focusing their efforts on uses in the distance range of less than four inches. Consumer applications could range from finding studs in walls to authentication of important documents. Businesses could use it to detect counterfeit money. Manufacturing companies could apply it to process control. Just in case it falls into the wrong hands, you might want to keep your lead screen handy. Source: Science Daily

Steve Domine, Dave Kahlhamer, Tom Ethen, Robin Studniski, and Nate Lloyd

Call 320.253.6607 www.scr-mn.com

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BUSINESS TOOLS

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G R OW

TECH STRATEGIES

Four Reasons to Stop Using Social Media Social media is a tool, but it can be consuming – and not deliver an ROI for your business. By Dawn Zimmerman

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’ve read the articles about the desire to stop allowing social media to consume so much personal time (121 billion minutes last year, up from 80 billion the year before), and those questioning the worth for businesses. Here’s my take with four reasons why your business may want to stop using social media:

You don’t like pictures. It’s long been known that pictures outweigh the worth of words and social media platforms like Pinterest and Instagram are proof. Pinterest sends more traffic to business websites than any other social media platform. Instagram is becoming more visible on Facebook, but it is Twitter where it has gained its power. Last year it became the top tool for active users on Twitter. Images now need to be an integral part of a social media strategy for a business. It takes some out-of-the-box thinking for businesses – and probably more time to create the

content. Capturing meaningful moments that share the business personality and value is a starting point on places such as Facebook. Places like Pinterest, on the other hand, require delivering valuable information visually. For a grocery store, that may mean creating boards with fun snacks to make for kids or creative appetizers for a particular season. It is not about pushing promotions or products, but it does lead to sales.

You do not think you will ever Tweet. Even the Pope tweets. Tweeting does not need to be in your 90-day plans. But it no longer can be on the “never will do” list. While it is a communication tool that will take some getting used to for most businesses, it likely will be one of the top communication methods for businesses in the future. If you’re not open to getting uncomfortable and changing the way you do business, social media is not for you. You’re not measuring it. One of the greatest values of

One of the greatest values of using social media for business is the ability to track results and adjust your plans accordingly in real time. using social media for business is the ability to track results and adjust your plans accordingly in real time. On Facebook for an example, you can see what posts are gaining the most interest and which ones are not – right now. The same goes for Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and blogs. Knowing what content is of interest allows you to hone in and be more effective. If you’re not paying attention to the analytics available for the content

About the writer Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in helping organizations shape and share their stories.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

you create or the ads you publish, you’re getting less of a return on your investment of money and time than you could be getting.

You want someone else to do it all. Social media as a strategy can have many moving parts and various parts can be outsourced. But social media is becoming a core marketing function for businesses and effectively using social media in business requires some thought and engagement from company leaders. Even if most of the administration is outsourced, you still need to be connected to the content strategy and know the results it’s having. BC


TECH NEWS

JUST SAY NO

SmartBrief on Entrepreneurs recently asked their readers: Do you give recommendations on LinkedIn?  No - 44.44% Though the “Yeses” combined were a greater  Yes, but rarely – 30.92% percentage of the answers, No! was the firm  Yes, sometimes – 22.71%  Yes, often – 1.93% answer from almost half of the respondents.

Shape-Shifters at Orchestra Hall All music is different, and some things may just sound better than others in a given location. But morphing the shape and size of ceilings and walls may change all that. A concept called Resonant Chamber works sort of like origami. To see the shape-shifting tiles in action, visit www. BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Patterns of triangles can be activated to change their arrangement to dynamically adapt to the sound of individual performances. The ceiling would have three types of panels: Bamboo plywood to reflect sound, porous plastic to absorb it and a hollow panel with a loudspeaker inside to broadcast it.

Source: Popsci

Bus Central ad_St_Cloud_JanFeb2013.qxp_Layout 1 11/28/12 2:29 PM Page 1

Continuing to Make a Difference!

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PRESENTED BY FALCON BANK

Employment Trends

St. Cloud’s overall employment drop between 2008 and 2011 matched that of the nation, but the real news is in the details. By Mary E. Edwards, PhD FIG. 1 - EMPLOYMENT BY PLACE OF WORK

FIG. 2 - EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY, PART 1.

(PERCENT CHANGE IN NUMBER OF JOBS, 2008-2011)

FIG. 2 - EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY, PART 2.

(PERCENT CHANGE , 2008-2011)

(PERCENT CHANGE , 2008-2011)

40%

5%

10%

12%

35%

4%

10%

30% 3%

5% 8%

25% 20%

2%

0%

6%

15%

1%

4%

10% 0%

-5% 2%

5% 0%

-1%

-10%

0%

-5%

-2%

-10% -3%

-15%

-15%

-4%

-20% Total employment

Wage & salary employment

United States

Minnesota

Proprietors employment

Farm proprietors employment

Nonfarm proprietors employment

-20% Farm employment

Nonfarm employment

Private nonfarm employment

Mining

Utilities

Construction Manufacturing

FIG. FIG. 22 -- EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT BY BY INDUSTRY, INDUSTRY, PART PART 3. 3.

FIG. FIG. 22 -- EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT BY BY INDUSTRY, INDUSTRY, PART PART 4. 4.

(PERCENT (PERCENTCHANGE CHANGE,,2008-2011) 2008-2011)

(PERCENT (PERCENTCHANGE CHANGE,,2008-2011) 2008-2011)

15% 15%

10% 10%

12% 12%

8% 8% 9% 9% 6% 6% 6% 6%

4% 4%

2% 2%

3% 3%

0% 0% 0% 0% -2% -2% -3% -3%

-4% -4%

-6% -6%

-6% -6%

S

Health Healthcare care & &social social assistance assistance

Arts, Arts, Accommodation Accommodation entertainment, entertainment, & &food foodservices services & &recreation recreation

tories about unbearable unemployment continually saturate the national news, but economies in different regions are affected in different ways by general economic downturns. Regional differences are based on the specific industry mixes and local comparative advantages. Figure 1 shows employment “by place of work” with data from employer surveys. Between 2008 and 2011, (the latest data available from the Bureau of Economic Analysis) total employment

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Retail trade

Transportation & warehousing

Information

Finance & insurance

Real estate & rental & leasing

St. Cloud MSA

12% 12%

Administrative Administrative& & Educational Educational waste wastemanagement management services services services services

Wholesale trade

Other Otherservices, services, except exceptpublic public administration administration

Government Government& & government government enterprises enterprises

Federal, Federal,civilian civilian

Military Military

fell in the US by 2.1% with a similar percentage decrease for St. Cloud and a slightly smaller total employment drop for Minnesota. That is where the similarity ends. St. Cloud’s drop in wage and salary employment is about half that of the nation. However, the number of local nonfarm proprietors plunged by 3.1% between 2008 and 2011 compared to a 4.3% growth nationally and 1.2% growth statewide. St. Cloud’s overall employment drop between 2008 and 2011 of

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

State State& &local local

State State

Local Local

Figure 1: The employment change by industry between these three regions shows vast differences. Employment in the St. Cloud MSA (Stearns and Benton Counties) expanded most in mining, civilian federal government, educational services, utilities, farming and real estate rental and leasing (Figure 2 - Parts 1-2). St. Cloud’s employment between 2008 and 2011 fell for several other industries in the list, but local employment in construction and retail trade dropped proportionately less than the state and nation. However, local employment in information, accommodation and food service, as well as other services except public administration (Figure 2 - Parts 3-4) fell by a greater amount than in the state or nation. Since 2008, local employment in the information industry plunged twice as far as in the nation or state.

an amount identical to the nation’s, masks the details that highlight St. Cloud’s strengths as well as two disturbing local trends. The first is the dip in the proportion of local nonfarm proprietors compared to a consistent rise of entrepreneurs in the state and nation. Perhaps St. Cloud should seriously consider the new concept of Economic Gardening—assisting existing firms and helping local start-ups explore new niches within the local and global economy.

The second is the lack of growth of the nine industries shown in Figure 2: Parts 3-4. What is hampering the growth of these industries in the St. Cloud area and how can those barriers be overcome? BC Mary E. Edwards, PhD, is Professor Emeritus, Economics, St. Cloud State University

Online now To view the tables that accompany these charts,   visit www.Business  CentralMagazine.com

Economy Central presented by

Data Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, CA25N Total Full-time and Part-time Employment. Last updated September 25, 2012-- new estimates for 2011; revised estimates for 2009-2010.

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ECONOMY CENTRAL

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ECONOMIC INDICATORS TRENDS Sartell St. & Cloud

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RESIDENTIAL BUILDING RESIDENTIAL PERMITS BUILDING PERMITS

Commercial Building Permits

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permits No. of permits 37 57 No. 24 of35 32 42 41 17 45 27 59 46 43

47

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING RESIDENTIAL PERMITS BUILDING PERMITS

$2,489,399

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Compiled by Sharon Henry, data Sauk current as of 2/10/13 Waite Park Rapids

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$2,622,544

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SM OA NM DJ

No. of98permits 62 118 25 127 62 105 128 97 160 37 157 12 182 117 215 144 145 95 46 92 122

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Sartell St. Augusta Waite P Sauk Rapids

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No. of98permits 46 92 122 62 118 25 127 62 105 128 97 160 37 157 12 182 117 215 144 145 95

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26 No. 21 of40 48 45 43 No. 16 of35 permits permits 37 57 24 32 42 41 17 45 27 59 46 43

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RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL

St. CloudWaite Park Sauk Rapids

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St. Augusta St. Augusta

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$2M

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11 No. 14 of 7permits 1 83

91

64

53

32

32

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BENTON COUNTY $0

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No. of permits 7

11

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2.0 of permits 32No. 33 22 57 121 19 22 61

0.6$900

$1.5M

ST. CLOUD $1,200 $2,500

M D

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91

64

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32

32

D -0.6J

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J D A J S F OM N A DM $0 $60,000 D J No. of permits 7

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2

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13

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S O $0 M JD

JJ

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9

9 of 6permits 11 78 No.

18 11

16 14

12 7

121

J A $30,000

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41

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73

0.0

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D -0.8 1

1st Quarter

-1.0 J F 3rd Quarter

0

1

2nd Quarter

M A M 4th quarter

J

J A $30,000

2.5 $60,000

oss Domestic United ProductStates Nonfarm Jobs $60,000 $1M

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UNITED STATES QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP - MONTHLY % CHANGE 1.9% 2.0 120

20,000

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2.5 A MS

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0.4 D O N D $0 MD J J J F AM S A OM 0.5N J D J 0.2 1No. of 0 permits 0 01 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0

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1.9% 2.0 o. of permits 1

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N/A

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1

0

1

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1st Quarter

ST. CLOUD

$150,000

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40

D

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MD -0.6 JJ

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UNTRY WIDE

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MINNESOTA

nemployment Rates Unemployment Rates Economy Central presented by

$150,000

2.5 0.5%

D

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COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMIT COMMERCIA $2M

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Minnesota Nonfarm Jobs Minnesota Nonfarm$30,000 Jobs

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STEARNS COUNTY2012 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP $120,000 $120,000 3.5 50

Local Nonfarm Jobs Local Nonfarm Jobs 3rd D Quarter

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M N

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No. of permits 1

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Lodging Dollars Food & Beverage Tax Tax Collections St. Joe St. Augu ST. CLOUD ST. CLOUD

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Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Gross Domestic Auctions Product

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7 12

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$30,000 Unemployment Rates Unemployment Non Farm JobsRates

30

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50,000

0.8

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odging TaxHome Dollars Sales Closed - Total ST. CLOUD

11 18 14 16

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Gross Domestic United ProductStates Nonfarm Jobs

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COUNTRY WIDE COUNTRY WIDE 2011-2012 % CHANGE COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED $150,000 10% $150,000 10% 0 0 $0 0 $2M $0$2M $0 J J A S O N D A S O N D D J F M A 10% M $2M J J D A J S F OM N A DM D J F M A $2M MD JJ JF AM SA OM NJ DJ D J F M A M 2.0% NGE 2012 QUARTERLY % CHANGE UNITED IN REAL STATES GDP - MONTHLY % CHANGE STEARNS COUNTY2012 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP $120,000 $120,000 3.5 3.5 1.5% 1.0 50 $1.5M

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Gross Domestic United ProductStates Nonfarm Jobs

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COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED $5M $1M

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ITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS AL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL $2M $0

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Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Sales Closed - Total Home Sales Closed - Total Lodging TaxHome Dollars BENTON COUNTY ST. CLOUD ST. CLOUD Waite Park Sauk Rapids ST. CLOUD St. Augusta Waite P

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED $3M $3MCONSOLIDATED 12

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COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED$3M COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED $3M

57 5924 4335 36 3234 4116 45 7 59

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Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Sartell BENTON COUNTY Sauk Rapids

$1.5M

St. Cloud

$5M $5M$1M $1M J J F A MS A O MN J D J A S

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Median Housing Prices

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ST. CLOUD

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

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Median Housing Prices the number of Northstar Local Nonfarm Job MINNESOTA BENTON AND STEARNS COUN train boardings in 2012 $200,000 the number of Link bus boardings in 2012 $150,000

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123

$60,000hopping -0.5 0.5 People are on board the Northstar Link Commuter 6% -1.0 Bus 0.0 in record numbers to travel in the Highway 10 corridor $30,000 St. Cloud -1.5 Minneapolis/St. Paul between St. Cloud and Minneapolis. Minnesota

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Wage offers are highly correlated with some job characteristics, $150,000 like whether a job is full-time or part-time. Perhaps the most widespread correlation is with wage and a job’s education $100,000 requirements. Job vacancies with no educational requirement St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul offered a median wage $9.00 per hour, or an annual salary of Rochester $50,000 $18,720 for a full-time position. On the other hand,St. Cloud job vacancies Minneapolis/St. Paul requiring education 0% beyond the baccalaureate levelRochester offered a median wage of $31.04, or an annual salary of $64,563 for a full-time position. On average, the higher the education and/ or Gross experience required of a job opening, the higherSheriff the medianDomestic Product ’s Foreclosure Auc 2012 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP STEARNS COUNTY wage offer. This trend has remained constant in Minnesota 3.5 over 12 years job Minnesota vacancy data collection. Nonfarm Jobs Unemployment Rat Food of & Beverage Tax3.1% Collections $1M

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Economy Central presented by

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013


BY GAIL IVERS // PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI, BDI PHOTOGR APHY

  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 37


BUSINESS PROFILE

ANNA MARIE’S ALLIANCE BUSINESS ADDRESS:

44 28th Ave N Ste E PO Box 367 St. Cloud, MN 56302-0367 PHONE: (320) 253-6900 FAX: (320) 253-5563 PUBLIC EMAIL: info@annamaries.org WEBSITE: www.annamaries.org EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR:

Maxine Barnett BUSINESS DESCRIPTION:

Anna Marie’s Alliance consists of five programs addressing domestic abuse in a five-county central Minnesota region: Anna Marie’s (emergency shelter), Children Exposed to Violence Initiative, Jill Eckhoff Transitional House, School Youth Program, and Criminal Justice Advocacy Program. ADULTS SERVED IN 2010-11: 1,500  ADULTS SERVED IN 2011-12: 2,016 CHILDREN SERVED IN 2010-11: 260 CHILDREN SERVED IN 2011-12: 683 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 32 NUMBER OF VOLUNTEERS: 80 BUDGET: $2 million SOURCES OF FUNDING:

Violence Against Women Act, a federal grant administered through the state (At the time of publication, funding for the VAWA was still being heard in Congress and there was question about whether or not it would be approved.); community fundraising; ¼ owner of the Bingo Emporium (the profits are used to fund four area not-for-profit groups) SERVICE AREA: 

Stearns, Benton, Sherburne, Wright, and Mille Lacs counties

38

O

ne of the first things you notice when you walk through Anna Marie’s shelter are the children. Children of varying ages eating snacks at the dining table, playing games in the play room, being rocked by parents and staff, running through the halls with mothers close behind…. The place is full of children. It’s not uncommon for women to tolerate domestic abuse right up until it involves their children. But Anna Marie’s offers more than simple shelter for women and children. It also offers one of the most comprehensive children’s services programs in the country, according to Executive Director Maxine Barnett. “Many times we think of the woman and what she’s gone through,” Barnett said. “People forget about the kids and how hard it is on them. We have a program here very specifically for helping children heal.” The St. Cloud shelter is the only one in the U.S. that has a child psychiatrist who visits the shelter to work with the children. “We’ve learned that the kids do better when they’re in their own environment,” she said. The shelter also offers a wide variety of on-site activities for the children, including Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. The children are able to go to the St. Cloud Area Family “Y” and to the Boys & Girls Club. “We did a presentation at the World Conference on Domestic Violence because what we’re doing with the children is so successful,” Barnett said.

THAT DOESN’T HAPPEN HERE

T

here was a time when programming for children in trauma was the least of Barnett’s worries. Instead, she was spending her time convincing people that domestic abuse existed. Barnett moved to St. Cloud in 1968. Always oriented toward issues of social justice, she became part of a group of women who met to talk about women’s issues. Domestic violence was one of those issues. “In the 1970s there was a shelter in Minneapolis and one in St. Paul and that was about it,” Barnett said. “We started exploring what could be done in St. Cloud – funding,

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

grants, even a small place for women to stay.” The group approached the St. Cloud City Council for help, hoping for some funding or possibly an older HUD (Housing & Urban Development) house that could be redeveloped. What they heard was: We don’t have battered women here. “They told us that any problems that did exist could be taken care of with counseling,” Barnett said. “What they didn’t understand is that without a safe refuge, women wouldn’t talk about it – that can be risky – even lethal.” So Barnett and the group of women decided to take a different approach. They worked with a professor at St. Cloud State University to do a survey of Wright, Sherburne, Stearns, and Benton counties. “The survey asked ‘Did they know anyone in a bad relationship?’ ‘Had they had personal experience with domestic violence?’ And the response was really high,” Barnett explained. “With that documentation we went back to the City Council.” But they didn’t go armed with just the survey results. They brought respondents with them to the meeting. “We wrote to survey respondents and asked them to come to the meeting and lots of them came,” Barnett said. “I mean, a lot of them came. At that time there were no limits on how long testimony at council meetings could last and we kept bringing people up. It got to be 11 pm. Midnight. 1 a.m. Finally one of the council members said, ‘Just give them something so we can go home.’ And that’s how we got our start.” The first shelter was a small threebedroom house by St. Cloud State University. “It was small, but it was a start and a way to reach people,” Barnett said. “We were instantly full.” The demand was so great that Barnett and her associates arranged for 15 private homes to also take in women in need. “That wasn’t ideal,” according to Barnett, “because it’s important for the women to come together and share their experiences. They need to know that they aren’t alone.” With this demonstrated need, the St. Cloud Housing and Redevelopment Authority worked with the shelter to find a larger house near SCSU. This one could hold 13 people. After a few years, a neighbor next door to the shelter moved out. This home was also


turned into a shelter and the houses were physically connected. “Now we could hold 18 or 20 people. We also had our offices there. We were there for 16 or 17 years until we determined with the board of directors to build something that would be more suitable for our needs.” By this time, of course, the recognition of domestic violence had changed dramatically. No one said “That doesn’t happen here” when the topic of funding came up. Barnett, other shelter directors, and concerned citizens had successfully lobbied the Minnesota legislature to establish new laws around domestic violence and orders for protection.

HER NAME WAS ANNA MARIE

“W

e had more community support – not major donors – but regular givers that made us confident we would be able to do something,” according to Barnett. The board purchased property and work began to raise funds for the building. One day Barnett received a call from a gentleman who wanted to meet with her to talk about the building project. He was from

“It got to be 11 pm. Midnight. 1 a.m. Finally one of the council members said, ‘Just give them something so we can go home.’ And that’s how we got our start.” –MAXINE BARNETT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ANNA MARIE’S ALLIANCE California, but was in St. Cloud visiting his mother and had read about the project in the paper. During the meeting the gentleman explained that his mother, whom he greatly respected, had been an abused wife. She had four children and eventually left her husband. Her name was Anna Marie. The gentleman appreciated what the shelter was trying to do and he wanted to make a donation. He offered to give $500,000 to the building fund. “That was really something,” Barnett said. “I didn’t know if he was legit. Was he putting me on? Who was this guy? I didn’t know him, had never heard of him. So I checked him out. I made some calls and I was told if he said he wanted to donate the money, we could count on it. That

The first shelter was a 3-bedroom house by SCSU.

  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 39


gift really helped us get additional donors.” In fact, they were able to build the new shelter without any debt and opened in 2000. Anna Marie’s Shelter, named after their benefactor’s mother, can hold 35-40 people depending on the ages of the children and is generally full, according to Barnett. Top: Today Anna Marie’s Alliance has 32 employees, including those shown here: (L-R) Margaret Bushinger, Maxine Barnett, Kim Salitros, Patty Hackett, Victoria Williams, Ashley Grahek; (seated) Michelle Hafstater-Rosenberger. Barnett is scheduled to retire in March after 34 years at the helm. Inset: The original staff of Woman House. Barnett (third from right) was hired in 1979 as the first executive director of the shelter.

40

WE ALL HAVE GIFTS

T

hough women’s issues have been at the forefront of Barnett’s life for 34 years, it was never her intention to make it her life’s work. One of 11 children, she grew up in South Dakota near an Indian reservation. “My mother was dedicated to the fact that we all have gifts to give and we need to share them to benefit others,” Barnett said. “She would talk about how we weren’t taking care of the people in our own state and that the poverty on the reservation was unimaginable.” The idea of a life of service, particularly on a South Dakota Indian reservation, was always in the back of Barnett’s mind. Immediately out of high school she entered a convent. “That was really good for me,” she said. “It helped me formulate my direction. Right before my final vows I decided to leave and go to college, but that

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

experience was really good for me and I’ve never regretted it for a minute.” She went to the College of St. Mary in Omaha, then attended graduate school at Marquette University in Wisconsin. Her first teaching job was for an inner city junior high school for African-American children in Milwaukee. “This was the height of the Civil Rights movement in Milwaukee. It was a time of great unrest. I was there when there were marches and burnings,” Barnett said. It was also a time when there was a movement in the black community to decrease the number of white teachers and professionals in the lives of black children. “I was one of two white teachers in our school. I never felt threatened,” she stressed. “The other teachers and the students and parents were wonderful. I understood their position. I knew people who were housekeepers, but who would have wanted more education if they had been given the opportunity.” She recalled being invited to tea by one of the parents. “They had a room just for guests,” she said. “It was clear they were very poor, but so gracious.” After one year she left that position and returned to South Dakota where she taught at a boarding school on an Indian reservation.


TIMELINE 1966 Maxine Barnett spends a year

teaching at an inner-city school in Milwaukee 1967 Barnett moves to South

Dakota and spends a year teaching at the Crow Creek Indian Reservation 1968 Barnett moves to St. Cloud 1972 Barnett teaches at

St. Augustine and St. Anthony Schools in St. Cloud; she begins meeting with a group of women interested in women’s issues, including problems of domestic abuse

Courtesy of Maxine Barnett

Left: Anna Marie’s Alliance is the only women’s shelter in the U.S. that has a child psychiatrist who visits the children on-site; Right: Woman House built a new facility in 1999, opening their new location in 2000 as Anna Marie’s Alliance.

“I had known for a long time that I wanted to be part of helping the Native American population,” Barnett said. And she found that her mother had been right. “There was so much poverty.” Even though women’s issues were still not on her radar as a career, knowledge of domestic abuse always simmered under the surface. “When I was growing up a neighbor lady would come over and my Mom would hide her,” Barnett said. “Her husband would come and beat on the door. Yes, it was scary – and risky – but it was something my mother just did. And she’d call the police if she needed to. One day they moved away and we don’t know what happened to them.” Even during her teaching days she knew of students whose mothers were abused. “On the reservation it was related to alcohol. In the inner city it was related to how hard life was,” she said. After a year at the Indian reservation, Barnett moved to St. Cloud and taught school. In 1977 she took a job with Stearns

County as a case aide, visiting families in their homes to determine what type of services and financial assistance they might need.

I LIKE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

E

ver since arriving in St. Cloud she had worked to secure a shelter for battered women. In 1979, the volunteers who had succeeded in creating a shelter determined to hire an executive director. Barnett’s colleagues at the county urged her to apply. “I decided to do it, but only so they knew that I wanted to work there. I didn’t want to run the place.” Five women were brought in for interviews, all at the same time. “We had to run a group with the other applicants as if they were women in the shelter. We had to go into a room alone and write a letter to the editor about why we needed a shelter. It was a five hour interview,” she said. To Barnett’s surprise, the board offered her the job. “I told them no,” she said. “I told them I had mislead them, I wanted to work

1977 Barnett starts working for

Stearns County Social Services as a case aide 1979 The first battered women’s

shelter, a three bedroom house near St. Cloud State, opens with seven staff and a budget of $137,000. It is called “Woman House,” and one night provides shelter for eight women and their 13 children. Woman House coordinates nine safe homes in St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids and Watkins, in addition to the shelter. 1980 Woman House moves to a

larger home in St. Cloud that can hold 13 people 1983 Woman House expands into

an adjacent house. In addition to the staff, the facility can now house 18-20 women and children. 1999 Woman House purchases

property to build a new shelter. A gift of $500,000 allows the facility to be built without debt. The program is renamed Anna Marie’s Alliance. 2000 Anna Marie’s Alliance opens in

their new facility and new location 2013 Anna Marie’s Alliance now has

a $2 million budget and a staff of 32. They shelter over 2600 women and children annually. In March Barnett retires as executive director.

  M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 3 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m 41


PERSONAL PROFILE at the shelter, not lead it.” She shared the conversation with her county colleagues who again urged her to take the job. “A couple of days later they called again, and I said yes.” That was in 1979. Though Barnett had never run a business, leading the shelter became her passion. “You have to remember that when I started, we weren’t this big,” she said. “I learned how to run this organization when it was much smaller. And as we grew I hired the right people to fill in the areas where I wasn’t as strong – facilities, finances, counseling – a skilled director hires the right people.” Barnett could write and she was a trained teacher, so grants, public speaking, and advocacy became well-honed skills. “I wasn’t a numbers person, but I wasn’t hired for that,” she said. “I had no trouble saying this is what we need and why, and

MAXINE BARNETT AGE: 70 TITLE/ROLE: Executive Director,

Anna Marie’s Alliance HOMETOWN: Sioux Falls, SD EDUCATION:  BA, College of

St. Mary, Omaha NE; MS in psychology, St. Cloud State University; Graduate work at Marquette University in WI WORK HISTORY: Taught school in a variety of places, including Wisconsin, South Dakota, and St. Augustine and St. Anthony Schools in St. Cloud; case aide for Stearns County; executive director of Woman House, which later became Anna Marie’s Alliance.

working to get the community on-board with our program.” That, not surprisingly, makes Barnett’s short, and humble, list of accomplishments. She counts among her successes, “Getting the doors open in the first place, and getting a positive response from the community that this is an issue that needs to be addressed. And creating community partnerships,” Barnett said, then added, “Working with law enforcement – they are so good now, we are truly partners. It used to be that unless they actually saw him hit her, their hands were tied. I think the police were as relieved as anyone when we finally got some laws on the books.” Barnett has seen many changes during her tenure at Anna Marie’s, not the least of which has been in the women themselves. “Many of the early women who came here were in longer-term

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years ago. “Josh has a unique combination of integrity, work ethic, and personal charisma that is a natural attraction for clients and professional colleagues.” Longnecker learned from his father to respect professionals like Tamm, who’ve earned positions of O.D. authority and to benefit from their wisdom. In addition, Longnecker has an innate, relentless desire to succeed in any position. In fact, in his second year with Northwestern, he attained “Million Dollar Round Table” status, an industry wide designation exclusive to top leaders in the life insurance and financial service prevention necessary for overall health fields, based on sales production. As Managing Director, believe in ‘Golden Rule Miller Dr. eyes. the and the health of Longnecker will continue to serve clients in his personal Optometry,” says Dr. Danise Miller, practice. However, his primary focus will be to recruit, is tenacious about answering patients’ who’s committed to professional develop, and retain top sales talent in Minnesota. questions. personal and education, service, patient Dr. Miller “I’m grateful for the mentorship I’ve received,” said he American is out there if you’re willing enrichment. feel in DreamPersonal enrichment. “I imagine howtoI’d Behavioral Longnecker. “To see individuals realize more than they work hard, beisdisciplined, do theinright specialty pursuing aand the patient’s chair.” thing,” said Josh Longnecker,Behavioral Optometry thought possible in their careers and in their personal Optometry. new Managing Dr. Miller Professional service. and financial lives is what gets me up in the morning.” Director at Northwestern Mutual, St. Cloud. “There is explores how vision applies to thinking State to change your Of course, some mornings he and his wife Missy are graduated from St. Cloud opportunity personal, professional, and and learning. — mary macdonell belisle in Bio-Medical awakened by Josie, age one, and Nolan, age three. lives.” University with a B.A.financial her doctorate It is for the wellbeing of the family, and his own took his opportunity with Northwestern Science. She then earnedLongnecker INC. personal achievement, that Josh Longnecker goes OPTICIANS, of Optometry. WIMMER Mutual. His natural abilities and Business Management from the Michigan College & JoelofWimmer, to work everyday at Northwestern Mutual – securing degree, coupled mentoring his fatherproprietors and with with the Jon Dr. Miller has been working St. St. Germain W. the 901plus futures, enhancing lives, and creating legacies. a boss believed in him, application of years; twowho for

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Wimmer Opticians MN 56301 St. Cloud, Northwestern Mutual’s practice of nurturing leaders, have — mary macdonell belisle she has been practicing optometry for 320.252.5404 coalesced to advance him in three swift years. only 10 years. Her office is the 5 p.m. “Josh was quick to perform, so, we tapped7him a.m.on– the – Friday Monday with an NorthwesterN Mutual downtown private practice shoulder early on,” said Derek Tamm, Chief–Development 12 p.m. 8 a.m. Saturday 3315 Roosevelt Rd, Ste. 300, St. Cloud, MN 56301, on-site optometrist.Officer. Tamm recruited, developed, and continues to 320.223.6639, www.joshualongnecker.com glasses listens to in a position She Longnecker • Prescription Exams he Patient education. mentor himself held a few Securing futures. Enhancing lives. Creating legacies. Complete Repairs • Contact lenses patient concerns; she throroughly Name brand frames explains medical conditions and the

LLC, the publisher. © 2012 Business Central, Reprinted with the permission of of this document is strictly prohibited. all rights reserved. Any reproduction

DEADLINE: MARCH 28, 2013

The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company – Milwaukee, WI (Northwestern Mutual) – has helped clients achieve financial security for more than 150 years. Northwestern Mutual and its subsidiaries offer a holistic approach to financial security solutions including: life insurance, long-term care insurance, disability insurance, annuities, investment

m a z i n e . c oServices, l M a g Investment products, and advisory products and services. Subsidiaries LLC, broker-dealer, registered investment adviser, member FINRA e s s C e n t r aMutual B u s i nNorthwestern • w w w.include: J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 •

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FOR PROOF ONLY This is your APPROVED AD FOR YOUR RECORDS Magazine ad will run: Business Central Magazine, Mar/Apr 2012 Ad Size: Full Page Bleed - 8.25” x 10.75” M A G A Z I N E Proofing Contact: Yola Hartmann, 320.656.3813 email: production@BusinessCentralMagazine.com This copy is FOR PROOF ONLY and does not reflect the image quality of the final printed piece. Photos or images may appear fuzzy due to the low-res format of this file. This proof is for your records and serves as confirmation that this ad will run in the issue noted above and is correct to the best of your knowledge. If this is not the ad you intended to run, please re-send your ad on a return e-mail to Yola within 24 hours of receipt.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

Date emailed: 2/17/12


Barnett has seen many changes during her tenure at Anna Marie’s, not the least of which has been in the women themselves. ..... “Today we see more younger women because they know there’s a safe place available to them.” –MAXINE BARNETT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ANNA MARIE’S ALLIANCE relationships – 20 and 30 years,” Barnett said. “They didn’t know there was a way out and if you don’t know there’s a place available to you , you don’t reach out because you could be in worse trouble. Today we see more younger women because they know there’s a safe place available to them.” Barnett also says they see more women who are interested in becoming self-sufficient; in securing an education and finding work. Big changes are in the works for Anna Marie’s. Barnett plans to retire this

month. “I’m not running out of steam,” she said. “But it’s the right time. The agency is in a good place. I feel excellent about our leadership team. Our finances are in good shape. Of course we can always use more funding, but, we’re not grappling for every dollar just to keep the doors open. It’s the right time for me and the right time for the agency.” Her initial plans are to do some traveling. Her many siblings are scattered across the United States giving her a chance see the U.S. and family at the same time.

She plans to be involved in community volunteerism, though not at the shelter. “That’s too hard on the new director,” she said. But whatever she chooses, it will still be in human services, because in the end, she’s her mother’s daughter and she still has talents to share. “I like to make a difference,” she said. BC Gail Ivers is Vice President of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and Managing Editor of Business Central Magazine.

It’s Never Been Easier.

WANTED: Membership Sales Specialist The St. Cloud   Area Chamber of Commerce has an immediate opening   for a part time membership sales specialist. Contact Judy Zetterlund for details: jzetterlund@  StCloudArea  Chamber.com   or 320-656-3806.

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FEATURE PROFIT

BOOM TOWN DOWNTOWN

St. Cloud is experiencing a rebirth that’s fast transforming it into an important economic hub for the region.

BY MARY MACDONELL BELISLE • PHOTOS BY SUE DROPP

Wake up, Central Minnesota. Something BIG is happening in downtown St. Cloud. This progressive, livable city is fast becoming a destination and an important economic hub for the region – this during an economic downturn. Gone are the silos and isolated pockets of endeavor. They’ve been replaced by a new spirit of collaboration, resulting in a renaissance for the historic heart of the city. Could this be the eve of a new golden age? “You’re seeing that rebirth, revitalization,” said St. Cloud Mayor Dave Kleis. “The economy is coming back. In the last few years, there’s been a feeling of partnership … And partnerships build other partnerships.” “Our region is poised to make tremendous gains in economic and community prosperity, and ultimately, the quality of life for us all,” said Sonja Gidlow, Greater St. Cloud Development Corp. (GSCDC), noting the development of a vibrant Downtown St. Cloud is one of the agency’s 2013 initiatives. Downtown St. Cloud has done well through collaborations built on communication and a shared commitment to growth. Today St. Cloud’s vacancy rate is 5.8 percent, while the national average is 16 percent. Approximately 450 downtown businesses employ nearly 5,000 individuals. Around 2,000 people live on the east and west sides of the Mississippi River in the city’s core. Plus, various initiatives have led to highly visible new construction– including the Public Library and Law Enforcement Center, and the opening of new businesses.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013


“A healthy, active, successful downtown makes a positive message to future residents, businesses, and investors,” said Pegg Gustafson, president of the Downtown Council. “The reverse is also true, which is why a strong, implementable vision for St. Cloud’s Downtown is so important.”

Women’s Fifth mag AvenueMarch Live & SCSU 7.5”x4.875” “ e for where you’re from,” said

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attorney Brian Schoenborn, of the commitment he and the Coborn family, SCSU President Earl Potter III, and Mayor

Kleis share to connecting the campus with downtown. Schoenborn observed in 2006 that St. Cloud didn’t feel like a college town of 35,000 student residents. Furthermore, Fifth Avenue, originally St. Cloud’s main street, wasn’t being used as a “front door” for the campus. So, the Fifth Avenue LLC partnership was born. Construction of the new Granite City Crossing Bridge and the opening of Fifth Avenue South in 2009 were beneficial. To date, most phases of the project have been completed: the Holiday station;

Coborn Plaza (455 student apartments) with retail stores and SCSU Welcome Center; the 200 block (Chipotle, Noodles, Verizon) and 100 block (EnduRUNce Shop, Cloud Co-working, Brother’s Bar & Grill) development, which garnered the partners a 2012 Heritage Preservation Award. Still pending is Phase V, a mixeduse development near City Hall. Schoenborn also leads development efforts for SCSU’s National Hockey and Event Center. Initially, $15 million was used this past year to renovate the

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FEATURE PROFIT

southern section of the 23-year-old center, along Herb Brooks Way. The next $15 million phase will concentrate on locker rooms, training spaces, fan amenities, and technical upgrades to accommodate family shows, speakers, and sports events.

miles along First Avenue S. and University Drive S. to Montrose Road at Clearwater Road. Construction will add .75 miles to the north end of the trail, ending at Cathedral High School’s boat launch.

River’s Edge Convention Center & Beaver Island Trail

D.B. Searle’s, Regency Plaza

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he River’s Edge Convention Center – the City’s $22 million expansion of the former Civic Center – boasts 180,000 sq. ft. of space, including 19 meeting rooms, a ballroom, and exhibit space. The expansion almost doubled the size of the original building and added parking. Further plans include ramp construction behind Mexican Village. Also pending is the Beaver Island Trail expansion, said Mayor Kleis. Currently, the paved recreational path covers 2.5

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ecause of our universities, we have a community with a thirst for growth, opportunity, and entertainment,” said Dan Barth, part owner with his brother Mark, of D.B. Searle’s, Pioneer Place on Fifth, and DMR/Pioneer Teleproductions. The Barth brothers committed to downtown in 1999 when they bought Pioneer Place. Their goal “from day one” was to collaborate with other theaters and the visual arts community. “I’m happy to say, it has happened,” said Barth, noting that the brothers’ recent purchase of D.B. Searle’s Restaurant is a natural outgrowth

of the burgeoning arts activity downtown. “Downtown at night is to be embraced and to have fun with,” said Barth. Regency Plaza, across from the Paramount, will remain part of the nighttime entertainment scene, thanks to Scott Warzecha and his partners, Scott Baynes and Matt Riley, who bought the building in November. The three also own Netgain Hosting, a healthcare information technology company that located downtown in 2000. Tentatively, the first floor of the Plaza will be an art gallery. The mezzanine will house professional offices. The third and fourth floors will remain a restaurant and grand ballroom. Netgain will use the lower level to house 25-30 employees and an additional 75-80 staff within the next 3-5 years.

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arzecha committed to the downtown with his move from the Corporate Center to the Federal Building in 2005. “The City, HRA, and the Downtown Council were able to have me look no further than my own backyard,” said Warzecha, who is comfortable downtown. He assisted his father at Dom’s Watch Repair, attended Cathedral High School, and ate caramel rolls at Dan Marsh Drug. “Downtown just felt like a part of me.” The Federal Building was tornado proof, a good buy at the right time, the City offered incentives, and Qwest (CenturyLink) with its high-speed Internet connectivity and bandwidth was crucial, according to Warzecha. Over a dozen businesses like Netgain, ING Direct, and GeoComm have located and expanded downtown because of the city’s core connectivity. In fact in 2007,


Minnesota Real Estate Journal designated downtown as “Silicone Prairie.” St. Cloud’s technology infrastructure ranks with Rochester and the Twin Cities, according to Gustafson of the Downtown Council.

Visioning future needs

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t. Cloud’s champions are focused on the future. Downtown should continue to capitalize on connecting its various districts, said Gustafson. And

St. Cloud needs a more robust housing addition, medium to upscale for the young corporate individuals, noted Barth. Key is being able to walk the city, including along the river. Placing-making and the branding piece needs attention, acknowledged Mayor Kleis, and the City needs to make sure that “we don’t do anything to prevent progress.” Downtown should be more connected to the university

and committed to preserving its history, said Schoenborn. Finally, noted Gidlow, the City’s master plan of 2003 requires updating to shape a vibrant 24/7/365 downtown. “Residents need to look at downtown with a new eye,” encouraged Warzecha. “It’s a beautiful place.” BC Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance St. Cloud writer and owner of Wording for You.

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SPECIAL FOCUS C O N S T R U CT I O N

GETTING STARTED C

If you’ve been thinking about entering the construction business, now might be just the right time. and registering with the right government agencies.

GET LICENSED, BONDED, AND INSURED

Protect yourself, your business and your clients by ensuring you have the right licenses and permits, business insurance, and surety bonds. FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF WITH CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY REGULATIONS

From energy efficiency standards to workplace safety regulations, the

construction industry is heavily regulated. DEVELOP AN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) requires that construction workers are provided a safe workplace free from recognized hazards. Fortunately, the OSHA. gov website offers a variety of tools and services that can help you comply and develop a safe workplace. These include on-site consultations, training, and more. CONTINUED ON PAGE 50.

STARTING A BUSINESS

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION SERVICES

Start by familiarizing yourself with the basic steps involved in planning and forming any kind of business, including planning your business strategy, incorporating,

Turn the page to learn more about the variety of Commercial Construction, Real Estate & Leasing Services available in Central Minnesota.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION, REAL ESTATE & LEASING

New Name, New Location, Same Quality Care. CentraCare Health System LOCATION 1555 Northway Drive St. Cloud, MN 56303 PROJECT COMPLETION April 2013 WEBSITE www.centracare.com DESCRIPTION Welcome to CentraCare Northway – a family of services formerly housed at Whitney Court. A new location for these services: CentraCare Family Health Center, CentraCare ClinicNorthway Family Medicine, and CentraCare Pharmacy-Northway. (Formerly known as Mid-MN Family Medicine Center, CentraCare Clinic-Heartland, and CentraCare PharmacyHeartland.) These clinics provide family medicine to meet the health care needs of all ages, while the full-service retail pharmacy serves as a local, convenient resource. CentraCare Family Health Center is proud to be the only clinic in the area that accepts all patients including those who are underserved or underinsured. Join us at our open house 5 – 7 p.m. May 2

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Marco, Inc. Boser Construction, Inc. Cherrywood Advanced Living

Cherrywood Advanced Living allows each resident to customize their advanced personal and medical care needs in a small home setting with 24/7 nursing care. LOCATION West St. Cloud, MN PROJECT COMPLETION Summer 2013 WEBSITE www.boserconstruction.com DESCRIPTION This is the 3rd Cherrywood Advanced Living facility Boser Construction, Inc. has built in MN since 2011. 15,400 square foot facility with 10 master suites with private bath.

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

New Corporate Headquarters LOCATION 4510 Heatherwood Road, St. Cloud, MN 56301 GENERAL CONTRACTOR Rice Building Systems, Inc. ARCHITECT Rice Building Systems, Inc. PROJECT COMPLETION July 2012 WEBSITE www.marconet.com DESCRIPTION 80,000 sq. ft. building off I-94 is a professional gateway to south St. Cloud. 7.2 acre property with 37,000 sq. ft. of warehouse space and outside walking track.

Source: U. S. Small Business Administration

onsidering starting a construction business? Now might be the time, with market forecasts (courtesy of IBISWorld) predicting a steady rise in the value of the construction industry over the next five years – 12.5 percent annually for residential construction and 13 percent for private non-residential construction. If you’re interested in starting a construction, home improvement, or contracting business, here are some business and regulatory basics you need to be aware of.


SPOTLIGHT : RICE BUILDING SYSTEMS

Rice Building Systems Acquires 50-Year-Old Minnesota Firm

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ice Building Systems Inc. recently acquired longtime construction firm, Raske Building Inc. The acquisition expands Rice’s reach into southern Minnesota and increases its workforce by 20 percent. “We need to expand to keep up with our growing customers,” said Chris Rice, president of Rice Building Systems. “The addition of Raske and its employees gives us additional capabilities to continue to serve our customers at a high level.” Rice is working with Coborn’s Inc. on some of the grocery chain’s largest development projects to date. “We have been working with Coborn’s for

decades and feel honored to be a part of this next chapter in their growth in North Dakota,” said Jennifer Rice, third generation owner. This marks the first acquisition for the third-generation familyowned business and comes as Rice continues to post record growth. Rice has tripled its sales and doubled its workforce in the past four years. “We believe in servicing our customers and helping them grow,” Chris Rice said. Rice Building Systems has become one of the few firms that provide businesses complete construction services and has been behind some of the region’s top building

Rice Building Systems Inc. 1019 Industrial Drive South Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 Phone: 320-252-0404

Business Description: Rice is one of the few firms that provide businesses complete construction services from in-house architectural

“We need to expand to keep up with our growing customers. ” projects like the new Marco headquarters and Fifth Avenue Live! development. COMMON ROOTS Rice and Raske share a more than 50-year history in the construction business and multiple generations of family ownership. Earl Raske started Raske Building Systems in 1959 in Cosmos and grew it into a leading general contracting, design-build firm in the west metro area and southern Minnesota.

design to construction management to selfperforming field crews. Learn more at RiceBuildingSystems.com

Earl Raske died in 2011, leaving the business to his three children and long-time business partner, Sam Davis. “Earl and Sam built a business grounded in integrity and taking care of customers even after the job is complete,” Chris Rice said. “We share those values at Rice and look forward to bringing our expertise in design, construction and land development to the community that Raske has served so well.” Rice Building Systems started in 1953 in Sauk Rapids with a focus on building lasting relationships. Today, the third generation continues to provide construction services to many businesses that their grandfather worked with. — Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage Inc.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION, REAL ESTATE & LEASING

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 48.

FINDING AND HIRING LABOR The construction industry generally secures labor from four sources – subcontractors, hired employees, labor brokers, or independent contractors. Of course, the law differs in how you work with each of these. For instance, while there are no specific laws governing how you work with subcontractors, you may wish to

draw up a contractual agreement and ensure that they, too, are licensed, bonded, and insured. BC If you are considering starting a construction – or any business – there are many resources available through the U.S. Small Business Administration, including the following guides: 10 Steps to Starting a Business, Construction Industry Guide, and Workplace Safety and Health guide.These and much more can be found at www.SBA.gov.

Q&A

Walking the Talk

Commercial contractors and non-residential construction companies have faced significant challenges since the onset of the Great Recession. How are they getting along today? Business Central asked Bob Strack, Strack Construction, and Janet Artmann, McGough Construction, to give us their take on the industry today. Business Central: What’s been the biggest change in the industry in the last two years? Bob Strack: Technology. Our ability to communicate multiple forms of correspondence from changes, drawings, details and project specific daily work

directives all in real time. This minimizes error, saves time and money, and ensures a successful project for our clients. Janet Artmann: The biggest change has probably been the dramatic increase in the usage of virtual planning tools in the construction of building projects.   CONTINUED ON PAGE 52.

Rice Building Systems

Coborn’s Caribou Drive-Thru

GLTArchitects

CentraCare - River Campus Remodel LOCATION 1200 Sixth Avenue North, St. Cloud ARCHITECT GLTArchitects PROJECT COMPLETION January 2013 WEBSITE www.gltarchitects.com DESCRIPTION Extensive remodel improves patient care and optimizes work flow. Includes 1st Floor Entry, Lab/Imaging; 2nd Floor Bariatrics; and 3rd Floor Neurology/Neurosurgery.

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Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

LOCATION Coborn’s Superstore Pinecone Road Sartell, Minnesota GENERAL CONTRACTOR Rice Building Systems ARCHITECT Rice Building Systems PROJECT COMPLETION November 2012 WEBSITE Ricebuildingsystems.com DESCRIPTION A new 1,445 SF Caribou Coffee was added to the Coborn’s Superstore on Pinecone Road in Sartell, MN. The existing space that was home to the video department, was remodeled and turned into a coffee shop with a drive-thru and a large shared conference room that can be used to host meetings.


Winkelman Building Corp Teal’s Market

LOCATION Cold Spring, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Winkelman Building Corp ARCHITECT Hagemeister Mack Architects PROJECT COST/COMPLETION DATE $3.142 Million / January 2011 WEBSITE www.winkbuild.com DESCRIPTION This 38,000 sf marketplace, built with a mixture of precast concrete, stone and granite, incorporates a grocery store, pharmacy, deli, bakery and liquor store.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION, REAL ESTATE & LEASING

BY THE NUMBERS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 50.

Specifically, the on-site field supervisory personnel now   have technology tools that allow them to more effectively plan and execute the construction activities. This is resulting in dramatic increases in efficiency which lead to reduced schedules and cost savings.

BC: In what ways have you changed how you do business as a result of the recession? Strack: We have been more selective, and we focus on specific markets that were/ are reflecting a more stable forecast. Artmann: To manage the reduced margins and profits experienced during the downturn, we have deployed a number of new technologies,

including virtual planning tools, to enhance our overall efficiency. The tools have improved our ability to provide rapid and interactive planning information through the preconstruction phases of projects.

CentraCare’s impact on the local economy continues to gain strength.

BC: What’s been your favorite project to work on and why? Strack: I personally enjoy projects when the client’s thought process and approach is in sync with mine… fortunately for me that has been most of them! Artmann: We have a number of great projects we are working on and have worked on over the years. One of the current interesting projects we will be completing later this summer is the Integrated Science & Engineering Laboratory facility for the College of Science and Engineering at St. Cloud State University. BC

$1.139 b

$225 m

The cost of the most recent expansion at the St. Cloud Hospital

CentraCare’s total assets

300,000 sf the size of the St. Cloud Hospital expansion

$878m

CentraCare’s fiscal 2012 revenue

240

The number of employees CentraCare Health System added between July 2011June 2012

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LOCATION St. Cloud, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Miller Architects & Builders ARCHITECT Miller Architects & Builders PROJECT COMPLETION June 2013 WEBSITE www.millerab.com DESCRIPTION 13,350 sf. adolescent overnight facility with dining hall, kitchen, and group rooms. Rooms for 25 children.


COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION, REAL ESTATE & LEASING

Strack Companies

SilverCrest Office Complex

W. Gohman Construction Co.

Grand Market and Woodland’s Bank Addition and Remodel

LOCATION Sartell, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Strack Companies

ARCHITECT HMA Architects

PROJECT COMPLETION August 2013

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University of Minnesota-Morris on the Green Prairie Living and

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT PROFIT

AT A GLANCE

One-on-One

Ask Scott Austing to do a presentation to a group of people and he’ll   most likely say no. Invite him in for a cup of coffee at the kitchen table   and he’ll offer to bring the cookies.

Tony’s Lifetime Exteriors, Inc. 1200 39th Ave NE, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379-9651  Phone: (320) 252-9086; 1-800-728-9086  Fax: (320) 252-5279  Email: info@tonyslifetime  exteriors.net tonyslifetimeexteriors.net Owner: Scott Austing Business Description: Residential exterior contractor, doing business in Central Minnesota for over 37 years. Products: siding, roofing, windows, rain gutters,   vinyl decks, sun rooms, vinyl fence, doors Number of employees: 14 Chamber member since 1974  

PERSONAL PROFILE Scott Austing, 48 Family: wife of 22 years, Sandy; three boys ages 19, 16 and 14 Education: Some college, lots of on-the-job training

By Gail Ivers

Business Central: What is your biggest business challenge? Scott Austing: Balance. I have the kind of personality that doesn’t lend itself to moderation. This summer when the storm hit Albany, I worked sunup to sundown. Balance is a real challenge, but my wife Sandy helps with that. BC: I thought you might have said getting through the winter. Austing: No.We’re not particularly seasonal – we’re much more limited by the number of daylight hours, rather than the temperature. It’s snowing today and we have 7-8 guys working in the snow. The level of quality doesn’t go down – I know because I worked on a crew all winter.

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BC: What are some of the changes you’ve seen in the last 30 years? Austing: It feels to me like we have to be more professional. It used to be that you worked out of the back of a truck. Now people expect professional crews, professional service on the phone, follow-up, problems handled…I haven’t figured out if the customer has changed or the business. The Internet has probably made this business evolve the most. Customers have researched your company, your products, they even Google me personally. It’s kind of odd. I’m not a tech guy. I’m a sit at the kitchen table guy.

BC: You position yourself as very shy, yet your primary responsibility is sales. Austing: When I go into someone’s house I know more about the product than they do. I know I’ll be able to answer their questions. That’s the part of the business I like best – sitting around the kitchen table working with the customers and helping them feel comfortable with what we can do. I always try to treat people well and fairly. If you don’t treat people nicely, you’ll run into them at the grocery store, and then what do you do? BC

BEST ADVICE

My dad said: Do what’s right. If you do what’s right it’ll always work out.

Business Central Magazine  ••  MARCH/APRIL 2013

Hobbies: Kids’ activities; going to their “little bitty cabin on a little bitty lake”

TIMELINE 1973 Erv Austing and Al Moritz purchase   Tony’s Aluminum from   Tony Milbauer 1983 Scott Austing, Erv’s son and Al’s nephew, starts installing siding for the company during the summers 1988 Scott starts working for Tony’s full time 1989-90 Tony’s purchases a gutter machine 1993-94 Tony’s purchases a seamless siding machine 1996 Erv dies suddenly; Scott becomes a partner in the business with Al, and CEO of the company 2007 Tony’s adds roofing to their list of products and services following a hail storm in Central Minnesota 2009 Scott Austing purchases the business from Al


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March/April 2013