Page 1

Joan Schatz


Open for businesses.

Your Dedicated Business Partner Partner with someone who has the resources and dedication to help your business succeed. Whether your company is a startup or a well-established business, CMCU can help take your business to the next level.

CMCU is open for your business.

888.330.8482 | mycmcu.org Equal Opportunity Lender. Federally Insured by NCUA.


CRAFTSMANSHIP IS OUR MIDDLE NAME

WE ARE PROUD TO BE A WORLD LEADER IN THE MANUFACTURING AND SERVICING OF SHOP AND FIELD-FABRICATED STORAGE AND PROCESSING TANKS, VESSELS, AGITATORS AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS. DCI, Inc, is a world leader in the manufacturing and servicing of shop and field-fabricated storage and processing tanks, vessels, agitators and integrated systems. DCI’s planning, design, manufacturing, and field fabrication

teams are made up of individual craftsmen with knowledge and skills involving the latest technologies in the industry. Each member of the DCI team fills a specialized role, and has the expertise that only years of experience can provide.

BECOME A PROUD MEMBER OF THE DCI TEAM TODAY!

dciinc.com 320.252.8200

YS ALWA NG I LOOK IG FOR T RS E WELD


memorable + entertaining

APPRECIATION OPPORTUNITY for your clients and employees Let GREAT Theatre help you show appreciation for your valuable employees and/or clients with an EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW PERFORMANCE of a Broadway quality blockbuster musical for up to 400 guests. Plus, gain brand exposure with your COMPANY NAME IN LIGHTS on the marquee at the historic Paramount Center for the Arts.

limited availability of presenting sponsorships Other sponsorship levels also available. Contact Debbie Erickson at GREAT Theatre Debbie@GreatTheatre.org 320.258.2787


BANKING FOR COMPLEX SITUATIONS. Dr. Troy and Dr. Shari at Persona Dental want their patients to feel like Persona is their dental home. They educate patients on their options and help them make the dental decision that is best for the patient.

what was going on. They took it and coordinated everything they needed internally, then called me back with the solution. It’s so personal and so easy.” “I don’t bank anywhere else. Deerwood has all the capabilities I need,” he said.

Dr. Troy and Dr. Shari say their experience with Deerwood Bank is similar in process. “Deerwood understands our goals, educates us on the options, and helps us make the best decision for our practice,” Dr. Troy says.

How Deerwood Bank is different, in Dr. Troy’s words:

1. Expertise in healthcare. “When Dr. Shari was buying into the practice, Denise and Jacki’s experience was invaluable to us. They’ve worked with so many healthcare practices on similar situations, so they were able to advise us.”

Deerwood Bank’s Business Banking Solutions

Dr. Shari, who was not banking with Deerwood at the time, approached a few other banks, hoping to gain insight and options for their transaction. “I kept getting shot down by the bigger, corporate banks because they didn’t understand our situation. They had never dealt with dental practices; we didn’t fit in their ‘box’ of comfortable transactions,” Dr. Shari said. “It was incredibly frustrating. I could never talk to anyone local who made the decisions to even explain our situation.” Jacki Templin and Denise Rosin, Persona Dental’s Deerwood Bank bankers, were no strangers to dental transactions, mergers, and practice buy-ins. “They

2. They find ways to make things work. “When I went to other banks, they always seemed to be looking for the problems in our situation. Deerwood thinks outside of the box and does the research to find ways to make things work.” had done this before. They really understood what we wanted to do and helped us get it done. They were so easy to work with. They presented us with a couple of different ways to structure the process and educated us on the pros and cons,” Dr. Troy said.

3. Small-town feel. “Almost everyone knows me by first name at Deerwood Bank. It’s a lot of trust to put into someone and something—and Deerwood has all of my trust personally and professionally.”

Dr. Shari added that local decision-making makes a huge difference. “We can call our bank and our bankers any time and talk to the right person. We don’t have to talk to different people every time we call,” she says. Now, Dr. Troy and Dr. Shari own the practice, and the real estate, together.

“Deerwood Bank has all the services and products I need—personally and professionally.”

In addition to Deerwood Bank providing nice and simple banking for Persona Dental, Dr. Troy uses Deerwood for all of his personal banking needs as well, from his personal checking to his mortgage. When Dr. Troy built his existing practice building, he borrowed against the equity in his home to pay for the down payment. “It was a complex transaction,” he said. “And Deerwood made it a piece of cake for me. I called them to let them know

deerwoodbank.com | 320.252.4200 2351 Connecticut Ave, Ste. 100, Sartell, MN 56377 131 6th Ave S, Ste 100, Waite Park, MN 56387

&

Dr. Troy was a solo-practitioner serving clients in Sartell since 2008. By 2018, his practice grew to the point where he needed to bring on a partner in order to meet patient demands. Dr. Shari had been working with him for a few years and had an opportunity to buy into the practice. “We had a really unique situation,” Dr. Shari said. “I was buying into the dental practice, but also buying into the real estate property where the dental practice is located.”


JULY/AUGUST 2019

8 19

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

President’s Letter

Top Hats

10 24

Editor’s Note

Network Central

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 9 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

GROW

38 Cover Story FUN SIZE!

Brenda Eisenschenk, InteleCONNECT, may be small in stature, but her positive attitude and generous heart have made life better for the people around her. PROFIT

44 Feature

COMING TOGETHER

Some things change – leadership, programs, street names. But after 150 years, the Chamber’s fundamental role of bringing people together for a healthy business environment remains as strong as ever.

50 Special Focus CELEBRATE. PLAN. ENGAGE.

2019 Waite Park State of the City address had a little something for everyone.

38 12 UPFRONT

Valuable information designed to guide and educate

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com • Thought-provoking Interview Questions • Make Mobile Meaningful • Delegation Tips

• Simplifying Social Video

26 BUSINESS TOOLS

Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Russ Panek, All Surfaces Professionals

© Copyright 2019 Business Central, LLC

Business Central is published six times a year

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, 1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487

Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


Convenient

walk-in care Open 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.

7 days a week, including most holidays • Minor illnesses and injuries • Vaccinations • Minor skin conditions Visit centracare.com for a full list of conditions treated Services available for patients 18 months or older

LOCATIONS COBORN’S • SARTELL • FOLEY • SAUK CENTRE CASH WISE • WAITE PARK


President’s Letter

Ode to Our Leaders

S

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826

ince becoming president of

Program Hotline: 320-656-3825

your Chamber of Commerce, I have had the privilege of

working with 20 volunteers who have filled the role of Chair of the Board.

These individuals generously shared

their experiences, skills and character with our organization.

Sandy Neutzling (1998-99) chaired

information@StCloudAreaChamber.com Past Chamber Board chairs met in May to reminisce and look to the future. (Front row L-R) Jim Davis, Bernie Perryman, John Herg es, Gail Ivers, Sandy Neutzling, Melinda Gau, Teres a Bohnen (Back row, L-R) Diane Hageman, Bill Winter, Ron Brandenburg, Chuck Rau

the search committee that hired me. She has a very special place in my heart. She is a good friend and mentor who is still on my speed dial when things get tough . . . . and for the occasional glass of wine.

Bob Strack (1999-00) and David Leapaldt (2000-01) served during our

build-out years in our previous location. It was handy having an excellent developer and an architect in charge to remind me that stairs go up AND down, depending on your perspective.

We’ve also been fortunate to have two attorneys, John Babcock (2001-02)

and Melinda Gau (2009-10) and a CPA, Loren Viere (2003-04) steering the ship to ensure our financials, bylaws and staffing policies are all in line.

We enjoyed leadership from our largest companies, such as Bankers Systems,

Chuck Rau (2005-06), and CentraCare, Jim Davis (2008-09) and Craig Broman (2012-13), and from several small businesses: Diane Hageman (2004-05),

StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Kelti Lorence, ext. 130 Membership Sales Specialist: Antoinette Valenzuela, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Amber Sunder, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100 2018-19 BOARD MEMBERS Marilyn Birkland, LocaliQ David Borgert, retired, CentraCare Health Ron Brandenburg, Quinlivan & Hughes Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning, Board Vice Chair

Greg E. Theis (2006-07), Pam Raden (2007-08) and Kris Nelson (2014-15).

Patrick Hollermann, InteleCONNECT

Bureau and our relationship with the City of St. Cloud, as we ensure financial

Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District

Our hospitality community has helped us focus on our Convention and Visitors

Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction

integrity as the fiscal agent of lodging tax meant to bring conferences and leisure

Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University

we’ve enjoyed leadership from the beverage and beer industry from Bernie Perryman

Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs

travelers to the area: Kim Poganski (2002-03) and this year Chriss Wohlleber. And, (2010-11); now owner of Batteries Plus Bulbs) and Jason Bernick (2015-16).

Historically, chambers of commerce engage leadership from the financial

services industry, and we have had two Board Chairs from this sector: Bill Winter (2011-12) and John Herges (2013-14).

And then there's Roger Schleper (2016-18). He is the only Board Chair who has

served a two-year term – somewhat by accident. Our vice chair that year, Dolora

Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Past Board Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St. Cloud, Board Chair

Musech, and her husband sold their business to Bernie Perryman (2010-11)

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF

Works, by the way.) As a result, the Nominating Committee asked Roger to serve a

Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111

through a deal brokered by John Herges (2013-14). (That’s the way Your Chamber second term to give the organization some needed leadership stability.

That’s a lot of Board Chairs with a lot of history, and I love reminiscing

with all of them.

Until next time,

Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Sales Manager: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128 Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales and Services Coordinator: Erin Statz, ext. 113

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

8

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Administrative Assistant - Information Specialist: Jennifer Schroeder, ext. 170


Editor’s Note

The Stability of Change Wendy is embarking on a new career in real estate sales. We are sorry to see her go and will miss her, and we wish her well.

W

endy Hendricks has been with

Business Central Magazine since the third issue and has been

instrumental in our success.

Though officially an independent sales

consultant with Business Central, Wendy has been a true partner in the magazine: sharing ideas for stories, rigorous in her demand for

quality, protecting our advertisers’ rights, and encouraging creativity and celebration of our milestones. It was Wendy who insisted we

needed a party to celebrate Business

Central’s 15th birthday in 2015. This is a milestone that few magazines see.

It was Wendy who reached out to

every advertiser when our publishing

our ‘stability’ volunteers. Reliable, fun, creative, compromising, available, and always there.

I remember when her daughter was born, Brenda

attended a meeting with both children in tow. We

We found ourselves in the unexpected

in a temporary conference room where the white

position of becoming a publisher and every contract had to be re-signed within a month. That was Wendy.

It was Wendy who arranged for a

visit to Sentinel Printing, so we could

were in the midst of an office build-out and met board was on the floor leaning against the wall.

While daughter Rachael slept, son Mathew amused himself drawing on the white board and Brenda ran the meeting.

Brenda has served as chair of the Chamber

see Business Central “hot off the press.” The

Connection, the Star Celebration, the Waite Park

the magazine from story creation to printed and

Ambassadors, and is currently chair of the Sauk

opportunity to experience at least one issue of

bound publication is one that I will always cherish. Now, after 19 years, Wendy is embarking on a

new career in real estate sales. While we are sorry to see her go and will miss her, we wish her well. While we say good-bye to Wendy, we are

Chamber, the Membership Division, the Top Hat Rapids Chamber. She has also served on the

Chamber Board, the Technology, Education, and

Communication Conference Committee, and the Marketing Committee.

Change is good for people and for organizations,

pleased to welcome Melinda Vonderahe to

but sometimes you need stability, too. And sometimes,

associate publisher and is responsible for all sales

time…and her name is Brenda.

our Business Central team! Melinda joins us as

and sales-related functions for the magazine. As

many of you know, Melinda was the president and publisher of Times Media for three years. You can find her contact information on page 11.

All of this change makes me grateful for

Brenda Eisenschenk, InteleCONNECT. (See the

story on page 38). Brenda has been a Chamber

10

volunteer since 1999. I think of her as one of

partner, Metropolitan Media Group, got caught up in the Tom Petters’ debacle.

Wendy Hendricks catching Business Central ”hot off the press“

Wendy Hendricks (L), Gail Ivers, Teresa Bohnen, and Yola Hartmann celebrating Business Central's 15th year.

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

when you’re lucky, you get them both at the same Until next issue, .


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Kelti Lorence, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle - wordingforyou Ryan McCormick, Great River Regional Library Jeanine Nistler, Freelance Writer Chris Panek, Christine R. Panek, CPA Pat Plamann, Schlenner Wenner and Co. Jessie Storlien, Stearns History Museum Amber Sunder, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Melinda Vonderahe Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Story Photography Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Melinda Vonderahe, (320) 656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

Celebrating 150 years of serving students and the people of Central Minnesota. stcloudstate.edu/150 CONGRATS! ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER ON 150 YEARS 19_SCSU_BusCentral_7.5x4.875_Chamber_Sesq150 final.indd 1

6/3/19 9:43 AM J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

11


UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Your Voice in Government

• Digging the Past

Do it Now! • Top Hat Photos • The Trouble with Business

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Stress Control

Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill

Improving personal and professional performance can be as simple as disconnecting for a few minutes every day.

A

Stress Less, Accomplish MORE; Meditation for Extraordinary Performance by Emily Fletcher, HarperCollins, NY, 2019, ISBN 978-0-06274750-1

In our high-stress, overworked lives, we think the answer to accomplishing more is to do more. But the best advantage we can give ourselves is to do less – to spend a few minutes a day giving the body and brain deep, healing rest. Did you know that a brief meditation can offer rest that’s five times deeper than sleep? This makes those who practice more productive than if they took an hour-long nap or had a cup of coffee. —From “Stress Less, Accomplish MORE: Meditation for Extraordinary Performance”

12

uthor Emily Fletcher teaches a powerful trifecta of mindfulness, meditation, and manifesting to improve personal and professional performance. She provides brief, but powerful exercises to help you stop stress. In this book, her manifesting tools help readers discover crystal clear goals for the future. Mark Hyman, M.D., director of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine, and New York Times bestselling author, says “Emily Fletcher is my meditation teacher, and to say I was shocked by what her style of meditation did for me is an understatement…for the few minutes I put into meditation each day, I get back three hours of quality work.” Chapter 3, Stress Makes You Stupid, is a good place to start. Stress is good when it enables our bodies to survive for another day. Good stress can be viewed as short-term activities that wake up the body and rejuvenate cells. But it’s a poor metric by which to evaluate a life.

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Some say that there is no such thing as a stressful situation, only stressful responses to a given situation – in other words a stressful reaction. Fletcher moves away from using the word stress in talking about all the pressures of our personal and professional responsibilities and prefers to call them demands. She teaches the Z Technique of reducing stress: • Mindfulness helps you deal with stress in the present moment. • Meditation gets rid of stress from the past. • Manifesting helps create dreams for the future. In Mindfulness, we come to our senses. In Meditation, we trust our body and intuition. In Manifesting, we practice gratitude for all the relationships we enjoy – including a good night’s sleep. Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor at St. Cloud State University.

NEWS REEL

METRO BUS ANNOUNCES NEW COO

Metro Bus appointed Dave Green as the new chief operations officer. In almost three years at Metro Bus, Green has led successful initiatives to improve employee performance and morale, upgrade Metro Bus facilities, and increase the safety of passengers and equipment.

LOVITZ RECEIVES “SERTOMAN OF THE YEAR” AWARD

Matt Lovitz, market sales leader at BerganKDV, was named Sertoman of the Year by the St. Cloud Area Sertoma Club. The St. Cloud Sertoma Club is a service club of men and women who contribute their time and financial support to hearing, children and veterans causes in the St. Cloud area and beyond.

SCHRUP NAMED 2019 COMMUNITY CAREGIVER

Minnesota Physician, a medical business journal, named Dr. Tom Schrup, MD, CentraCare Health, as a 2019 Community Caregiver. Dr. Schrup received this recognition for his volunteer work providing critical wellness visits and consults to homeless youth at Pathways 4 Youth, a newly opened homeless youth resource center in St. Cloud.


MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

Chamber Open: August 12

Join us at the 73rd annual Chamber Open. Network in the sun and on the golf course, then relax and enjoy dinner and awards at 5 p.m. Registration is required. Territory Golf Club, 480 55th Ave SE, St. Cloud; shotgun start at 11:30 a.m.

LIVE better

PEOPLE TO KNOW

Four people to know Brenda Eisenschenk InteleCONNECT

Chair, Sauk Rapids Chamber ––––––––––– The Sauk Rapids Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, promotes a healthy business environment in the community of Sauk Rapids. Volunteers and committee members work in cooperation with member businesses, local government, the public school system and other community organizations. Programs include the Sauk Rapids State of the City address. ––––––––––– (320) 257-7400 // brenda@inteleconnect.net

Chase Larson Falcon National Bank

Chair, Star Celebration ––––––––––– The Star Celebration is the Chamber’s annual volunteer recognition celebration. Committee members are responsible for planning the event and soliciting sponsorships. ––––––––––– (320) 223-6300 // clarson@falconnational.com

Orthopedic care is about more than bones, muscles, and joints. It’s about improving your quality of life. We’re here to help patients work toward their goals with today’s best treatment options, like nonoperative therapy, regenerative medicine, and robotic-assisted surgical technology. Let’s work together to help you move with comfort once again.

2 LOCATIONS 1901 Connecticut Ave S. Sartell, MN 56377 3315 Roosevelt Rd. St. Cloud, MN 56301

Sara Draxler-Gainsforth Consumer Directions

Chair, NEXT- Chamber’s Emerging Leaders ––––––––––– NEXT- Chamber’s Emerging Leaders provides networking and educational opportunities designed for the NEXT generation of business leaders in Central Minnesota. ––––––––––– (320) 257-8328 // saradg@yourfse.com

Josh Vraa Viking Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

Chair, B.I.G. (Big Idea Group) ––––––––––– B.I.G. supports and enhances Chamber activities by promoting engagement with fresh and contemporary event and program ideas. Programs include Bags and Brew and Mystery Night Out. ––––––––––– (320) 251-4602 // JSVraa@vikingcocacola.com

320.259.4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

13


UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

STEARNS ELECTRIC WINS NATIONAL COMMUNICATION AWARDS

Stearns Electric Association’s communication and marketing team was recognized with two gold awards of excellence in industry communication. Amanda Groethe and Whitney Ditlevson received a Gold Award in the Best Total Communication Program category for their work in building awareness for electric vehicles on their “Road Trip: Recharged.” The team also received a Gold Award in the Best Use of Digital Story Telling category for their safety campaign “This Is My Why.”

MORTENSON JOINS KENSINGTON BANK

Tracy Mortenson joined Kensington Bank as a mortgage lender.

MEYERS ELECTED FELLOW

David Meyers, a shareholder with Rinke Noonan Attorneys at Law, has been elected a Fellow of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers. Founded in 1978, the College is comprised of more than 1,000 lawyers distinguished for their skill, experience and high standards of professional and ethical conduct in the practice of real estate law.

METRO BUS OPERATOR TAKES FIRST AT NATIONAL BUS COMPETITION

Todd DeZurik, Dial-a-Ride Operator for Metro Bus, took first place at the 30th National Community Transportation Association of America Roadeo. DeZurik placed third in 2018, and first in 2017.

A Sight to Behold

Natural light, learning neighborhoods, and open spaces mark Tech High School’s entry into the modern world of learning. By Teresa Bohnen

T

he new Tech High School grand entryway and spacious common areas lead visitors to the back into distinct learning “neighborhoods.” Natural light streams in from large windows, and the lights automatically adjust to perfect brightness for optimal learning. The theater is near the entrance, so visitors have a short walk and don’t need to traipse through the entire building to see a play or musical show. The music and arts areas are spacious and flexible. The Family and Consumer Science area (aka: home economics) is integrated to allow passersby to observe what is happening inside. The industrial arts areas are open and encourage collaboration.

Almost every classroom has three 70” monitors for viewing and learning. The walls are white boards where students and teachers can freely write. Even the classrooms themselves have architectural features that are learning opportunities. The science and biology areas open into the surrounding outdoor landscape, encouraging students to explore their environment and bring it inside to study under a microscope. Labs and study areas are flexible and encourage collaboration among students and teachers. The athletic facilities are fabulous. The gymnasiums can be subdivided, and the locker rooms are designed to allow separate space for home and away teams.

The swimming pool and viewing area are impressive, especially if you’ve ever been to a swim meet at the old Tech. I found myself wondering when the area would begin smelling like wet teenagers. That big orange “T” in the middle of the football field somehow assured me that our community and our Chamber made the right decision in supporting this terrific learning environment for our children. My daughter excelled at the old Tech and still acknowledges how much those experiences shaped who she has become. And yet I wonder how much MORE could she have experienced in this new space? Our Chamber supported the levy referendum that allowed our school district to build the new Tech High School, citing workforce development, student learning and preparation, and new learning environments for career opportunities of the future. I have no doubt

SPECIAL NOTE: Congratulations to Superintendent Willie Jett for his patience,

persistence and vision for our district and this facility. Congratulations to architect David Leapaldt, IIW, for designing a facility that is certain to change the lives of all students who spend their days there.

14

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Photo ics consulting.

NEWS REEL


our investment will pay off for our students and our community. And yet, there is more to be done. Please take the opportunity to tour Tech High School when it opens this fall. Be proud of what our community has done to secure a better future – for our children and for our businesses! Then look at Apollo High School. It used to be a state-of-the-art school. It’s obvious now that significant upgrades must be made so all our students have similar learning opportunities. Let’s complete the job we started.

• • • • •

POINT OF VIEW // BUSINESS CENTRAL ASKS READERS:

What is changing or has changed in your industry within the past 20 years?

“How we connect with current and potential customers has changed drastically with the introduction of social media. We have begun to brand and market our Facebook account, rather than our Yellow Pages, especially as our incoming customer average age decreases.” —RaeAnn Waytashek, Advantage 1 Insurance Agency

“One area that has rapidly changed over the last 10 years and is looking to potentially be the biggest disrupter since penicillin is regenerative medicine. We are now able to use someone’s own biologics to help relieve joint pain and heal tendons/ligaments.” —Christine Holzheimer, Rejuv Medical

“The technology and electronics behind farming and farm equipment has improved quite a bit over the past two decades. Operations are becoming increasingly automated and efficient, allowing for increased production at a faster rate.” —Gene Vanselow, Midwest Machinery Co.

Preparing & Drafting Loan Documents Collections Replevin/Foreclosures Work-Out or Restructuring Negotiations Creditors Rights

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

15


UpFront DIGGING THE PAST

NEWS REEL MARCO PURCHASES ACCENT BUSINESS SOLUTIONS

Marco announced its acquisition of Accent Business Solutions, a copier/printer company in Wisconsin. The company has eight locations throughout Wisconsin.

Picture Perfect

For over 30 years, photographer Carl Fritz captured the faces of St. Cloud in pictures. By Jessie Storlien

AIS PLANNING HIRES NOBLE

Sarah Noble joined AIS Planning as an associate advisor, bringing eight years of experience in the financial services industry in both operations and advising roles.

CREDIT UNIONS MERGE

CORAN PROMOTED TO MARKET PRESIDENT

Matt Coran has been promoted to St. Cloud market president of business banking at American Heritage Bank. With over 15 years of experience in commercial lending at American Heritage, Coran serves as the senior leader in business banking for the greater St. Cloud area. American Heritage also known as the Log Bank, has two St. Cloud bank locations with branches also in Clearwater, Avon, Long Prairie, and Browerville.

16

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

I

f it’s true that a picture is worth a thousand words, then Carl Fritz contributed volumes to the St. Cloud area during his 40 years as a studio photographer. Carl was born Sept. 17, 1904 to Charles and Mary Fritz on the family farm in Nobles County. When auto magnate Sam Pandolfo began building a housing development, Carl’s parents brought the family to St. Cloud for Charles’ new job with the Pantown construction crew. In St. Cloud, Carl attended St. Mary’s grade school through 8th grade. He worked several odd jobs before starting at Guy’s Photo Shop when he was 20 years old. He liked photography right from the start, he told the Stearns History Museum (SHM) in a 1978 interview.

His first job at Guy’s was making picture frames and developing film, sometimes as many as 400 rolls a day. In 1941 he bought the studio, gradually growing into the portrait work and business management functions of owning the studio by taking classes in both subjects. His hard work and diligence paid off when he was recognized as one of Minnesota’s best photographers by the Minnesota Photographers Association, as well as being elected president of the association in 1946. Carl was not only interested in creating a thriving business. He also cared about the people in the community. When

Left: Carl Fritz, standing in Carl Fritz Studios after fire, St Cloud

Above: Carl Fritz, St Cloud, ca 1940

people came into his studio without enough money to pay for a portrait, Carl would trade for something they could spare, like wood or chickens. The secret to his success was simple, Carl said. “We made so many friends by treating them nice, and that’s how our business got so good.” Carl’s specialty was portraits. He took hundreds

Photos ourtesy of the Stearns History Museum

St. Cloud Financial Credit Union and Starcor Credit Union have announced their intention to merge. The merger process was pre-approved by regulators and affirmed by a vote of Starcor members in May. Final regulatory approval is anticipated in the coming months. The merged credit unions will become one organization under the St. Cloud Financial name, with approximately $200 million in assets, and serving over 21,000 members with six branch locations.


of portraits of area business people, covered countless weddings, and photographed many high school seniors during his time running the studio. In his SHM interview, Carl explained his technique for securing the best portraits of his clients. “I would get down alongside of my lens, and I would just get down there and talk to the people for the kind of experience I wanted. I never asked the customer to look into the camera. They were always looking at me when I was talking to them. That’s the way I got expressions from

them.” Some of these photos were entered in state and national competitions and won awards. Ultimately, Carl had 42 photos judged in the national photography convention. In addition to his work as a photographer, Carl was a member of the St. Cloud Chamber of Commerce, Crosier Apostolate, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, St. Anthony’s Parish Holy Name Society, St. Cloud Serra Club, and Knights of Columbus. In 1947 a fire damaged part of the studio and some of the equipment. In 1968, a second devastating fire

destroyed the business and all of the equipment, negatives, and prints. The loss was immeasurable. Customers were unable to reorder past prints and all pending orders were lost, including those of about 50 Tech High School seniors. However, Carl rebuilt and continued business as soon as possible, taking wedding photographs just days after the fire. Four years later, in 1972, he sold the studio and retired, leaving a legacy of a photographer who took the time to get perfect portraits of his customers.

Marlene Fritz, St. Cloud, 1952

Jessie Storlien is an archivist at the Stearns History Museum, www.stearns-museum.org

Make A Better Choice:

FOOT & ANKLE SURGERY The average person takes 8,000 to 10,000 steps per day. Our feet support our weight, act as shock absorbers, propel our legs forward and help us keep our balance on uneven surfaces. At St. Cloud Surgical Center, our surgeons provide comprehensive care for foot and ankle conditions for all ages, including Bunionectomy, Hammertoe Correction, Achilles Tendon Repair, Toe Reconstruction, and Ankle and Fibula Fracture.

St. Cloud Surgical Center complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. Interpretalk 1-877-386-9235 & Keystone Interpreting Solutions (TTY: 1-651-454-7275)

Better Care, Better Costs, Better Recovery… Better YOU.

Spanish: ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Pida asistencia de un empleado. Somali: KA DIGTOONOW: Haddii aad ku hadasho somali, gargaarka aad heli karto lacag la’aan. Fadlan weydiiso caawimaad ka xubin shaqaale ah.

1526 Northway Drive, St. Cloud, MN 56303 |

PH

800.349.7272 | stcsurgicalcenter.com

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

17


UpFront DO IT NOW!

NEWS REEL CENTRACARE HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PHYSICIANS PARTNER

CentraCare Health and the University of Minnesota Physicians have formed a new partnership to expand orthopedic services in Central Minnesota. Full development of the orthopedic program, including a comprehensive orthopedic center, will occur over the next several years.

INTELECONNECT, INC. HIRES PROJECT MANAGER

Patrick Hollermann recently joined InteleCONNECT, Inc. as the new project manager. Hollermann brings to InteleCONNECT more than 30 years’ experience in project management, training, business analysis, and leadership.

RINKE NOONAN ELECTS SHAREHOLDER Rinke Noonan Law Firm elected Alex Mastellar as shareholder. Mastellar concentrates his practice in the areas of agriculture, environmental construction, employment and labor law.

HOFFMAN RECEIVES CAREGIVER OF THE YEAR

Home Instead Senior Care named Barb Hoffman the 2019 North American CAREGiver of the Year. Hoffman was recognized for the extraordinary energy, talent, spirit and hard work she brings to serving others. Send News Reel items to Gail Ivers, givers@businesscentralmagazine.com for possible inclusion. News Reel is compiled by Kelti Lorence.

Maintaining Balance

Keeping your work and personal life separate can be a challenge, but these five tips can help.

D

oes your morning look like this? You wake up to the alarm on your cell phone, respond to texts while sipping your coffee, double check your meeting time through your car phone on the way to the office, only to arrive and sift through a stack of emails for half an hour, all while trying to make a mental grocery list of what you need for dinner that night – and it’s not even 10 a.m. yet.

Technology is wonderful and frustrating at the same time. It can increase the speed of closing a deal or forming a new connection, while adding the stress of quick decision-making and frequent additions to your already full schedule. Yet when we attempt to disconnect, we begin to feel like a lost child in a grocery store. A 2017 study from the American Psychological Association shows the average employed adult spends roughly 40 percent of the work day and 47 percent of any days off connected to at least one device. While 65 percent agreed that taking a “digital detox” is important to their mental health, only 28 percent actually make this happen. — KL

WE ALL NEED A BREAK FROM WORK!

Ready to break this cycle? Follow these five strategies to help separate your work from your personal life: 1 Establish boundaries. Everyone thinks they need their answer five minutes ago. Until the people you do business with understand you have a personal life, you’ll never be able to effectively escape work time.

2 Use a virtual receptionist. Sign up for the free Google Voice service. This collects, then re-routes, all incoming calls allowing you to deal with the urgent calls now, and the rest at another time.

3 Separate your work spaces. Do NOT mix your working area with your living area. Dedicate a specific area for your work. 4 Keep a notepad of ideas. Write down the idea, then get back to your life! 5 Manage your emails. Disable push notifications during your time off. “Out of sight = out of mind.”

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Chamber’s 150th Anniversary Celebrations July 10: Booth at Summertime by George, held at Lake George Park, 1101 7th St. S, St. Cloud, from 5 – 9 p.m.

August 27: An ice cream and pizza party for the whole community, hosted in partnership with St. Cloud State University, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. at Beaver Island Brewing Co., 216 6th Ave. S, St. Cloud 18

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

The Lofts Condominiums, feature a community room, fitness center and roof top space, 523 W Saint Germain St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Audrey Fouquette, Sarah Noble.

Metropolitan Transportation Network, Inc., school bus service with newer fleet of buses equipped with two-way radios, GPS and cameras, 1306 10th St. N, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Crystal Siltman, Rick Stanoch, Tanja Goering. Deltaware Data Solutions, an emerging technology company that focuses on the performance and integration of private, hybrid, and public cloud, 20965 S Diamond Lake Road suite 102, Rogers. Pictured: Matt Knutson, Kristina Sowers, Roger Lund, Bernie Perryman.

Counselor Realty/Trompeterbuilt Properties, residential sales and property management, 281 Little Rock Road NW, Rice. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Kami Fritz, Aaron Trompeter, Jamie Dullinger, Michael Higgins, Kristin Hannon.

Rollie's Rednecks and Longnecks, listed in the top 25 Honky Tonks in the nation; live bands every week, breakfast, lunch, and dinner, 940 35th Ave. NE, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Jason Miller, Hannah Hogrefe, Amanda Hogrefe, Tauna Quimby. Home Instead Senior Care, for individuals capable of managing their physical needs, but need non-medical assistance such as light housekeeping, meal preparation, errands, transportation and personal care, 406 Great Oak Drive, Waite Park. Pictured: Jason Miller, Jason Crane, Caryn Stadther.

Redefining Commercial Real Estate We’ll keep you engaged every step of the way.

LEASING | SALES | DEVELOPME NT

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

320.257.5400 | RICEPROPERTIES.COM

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

19


UpFront TOP HATS: NEW BUSINESS

New member: Interim Healthcare, independently-owned home care, hospice and nursing services including lymphedema and wound care, 525 Highway 10 S, suite 2, St. Cloud. Pictured: Matt Knutson, Erica Johnson, Sarah Noble.

Crooked Pint Ale House, an urban pub with the feel of a local neighborhood restaurant, full menu and a generous selection of beer, wines, and spirits, 58 Division Street, Waite Park. Pictured: Sarah Noble, Darin Agnew, Mark Osendorf.

Twenty4Seven Fire and Security, fire alarm and security systems that work on all low voltage systems, 20 32nd Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Rich Halloran, Jason Miller.

Allied Chiropractic, P.A., specializing in sports performance, injury prevention, and family wellness, 1011 2nd Street N suite 202, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jason Miller, Dustin Emblom, Diane Diego Ohmann.

Farmers Insurance District 02, supporting current and future agents, 700 Commerce Drive suite 140, Woodbury. Pictured: April Diederich, Rocky Smith, Luke Cesnik.

Stearns Bank has everything the large banks have, but they also have the people behind it, which is very important to me. STEARNS BANK CUSTOMER

Odegard Benefit Services, LLC, insurance agency specializing in employee benefit plan design, underwriting and day to day management, 21308 John Milless Drive, suite 102, Rogers. Pictured: Paul Hollermann, Jim Odegard, Bernie Perryman.

strategic. creative.

effective. To help you and your business goals finally see eye to eye, let WhiteBox Marketing put our expertise to work just for you. Welcome to today’s modern marketing firm.

Jim Urseth, President Reliable Premium Managment, Waite Park, MN

WhiteBox Marketing

info@whitebox.marketing 320-270-0722

Fast and friendly service. We Get the Job Done! ® Visit StearnsBank.com today

www.WhiteBox.Marketing

Follow us

| 800-320-7262 Member FDIC

20

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Strategic Marketing • PR • Branding Creative Campaigns • Web Digital Media • Social Media Consulting Services


TOP HATS: NEW BUSINESS

Granite City Neighbors, a mobile platform connecting our community by promoting commerce, loyalty, safety and unity, 11859 89th St. NW, Annandale. Pictured: Mark Osendorf, Brad Hagfords, Liz Kellner.

Jolie Olie's Sweet Shoppe, catering, lunch, brunch, breakfast, special occasions, anniversary parties and celebratory events, 1728 9th Ave. SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Jolane Wood, Matt Knutson.

Kami Fritz - Counselor Realty, investments and property management, 15633 122nd Street, Becker. Pictured: Patrick Hollermann, Aaron Trompeter. Kami Fritz, Peg Imholte.

New ownership: Pioneer Place on Fifth, a professional theatre and concert venue, 22 5th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sarah Noble, Ray Herrington, Jason Miller.

New Location: New Century Real Estate, helps you find the perfect property for sale in the St. Cloud area, 823 N Benton Drive, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Sharon Wilson, Berni Halaas, Randy Weiher, Inese Mehr.

New ownership: Child's Play of St Cloud MN, affordable child care center providing a secure, safe learning environment with a touch of home, 1401 W Saint Germain Street. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Kathleen LacQuay, Dennis LacQuay, Anita Rooney, Jason Miller.

Premium Option

for those who want the best. FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS... Relax and enjoy your beautiful outdoor living space with family and friends created with Borgert premium pavers, slabs and walls. Live your lifestyle for a lifetime with their beauty and timeless designs. For those who want the best, it’s simply borgert for over 95 years.

Your vision, brought to life. Visit our showroom at: 8646 Ridgewood Rd., St. Joseph, MN 56374 | For more information or for a FREE Borgert catalog call 320.363.4671 | borgertproducts.com

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

21


UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Embezzled!

If you think employee embezzlement only happens in large companies, think again. By Chris Panek and all checks should be stamped For Deposit Only immediately when received. ________

M

any cases of embezzlement happen in small businesses and involve a trusted person who is taking money from an unsuspecting business owner. The most common types of theft occur by stealing cash, claiming fake expenses, and taking property. Smaller organizations with limited resources are often targeted by their own employees, directors or officers. Employees who embezzle have typically worked for that business for several years before starting their criminal activities, and on average continue stealing for about three years before they ever get caught. The losses for those businesses add up quickly, but can be reduced significantly when detected early.

Early Detection

You don’t have to be a victim. Every business should consider implementing the following fraud prevention and detection activities: Hiring policy Have a policy that includes past employment verification, a background check, credit check and education verification. Use it for every employee, not just the ones you expect to handle money. ________ Reconcile your bank Make sure all money coming in and going out of the business goes through a checking account and reconcile your bank statements monthly. If you have cash transactions make sure to deposit money daily

Safeguards Segregation of duties and physical safeguards should be put in place. An employee who can request or approve payments should not have access to the printed checks. There should always be at least two people involved whenever money is being paid from the business. One person in control of the money coming in and another one in control of the money going out. ________ Vacation time Requiring employees to take time off not only helps to prevent fraud, but you can also make sure you have systems in place to cover key employees when they are absent. Don’t let your employees accumulate too much vacation time. ________

Login checks Make sure everyone has separate logins for their computers and use multifactor authentication whenever possible to prevent employees logging into computers under another employee’s login. Monitor audit logs from accounting software on a consistent basis.

WATCH OUT!

8

Signs of Trouble

Some of the things you should watch for that could indicate possible embezzlement include: 1 Employees who are misplacing files, not cooperating with other employees or working when no one else is around. 2 Employees who are financially strapped, under pressure for extra income, or recently divorced or facing family problems. 3 Employees with excessive control issues or objections to procedure changes in the office relating to finances. 4 Employees who refuse to take vacation. 5 Employees who consistently want to take work home. 6 Employees living beyond their means – expensive cars, jewelry or traveling. 7 Petty cash disappearing too quickly. 8 Business credit cards being used for personal expenses.

contributor Chris Panek is a Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor and Certified Public Accountant at Christine R Panek, CPA. She has over 20 years of experience helping small businesses with accounting and bookkeeping, financial statement preparation, QuickBooks consulting, and payroll services in the St. Cloud area. 22

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9


Trust your gut and if something doesn’t look or feel right, it probably isn’t. Pop quiz audits Surprise internal audits and unpredictable reviews of bank statements, credit card statements, payroll records and cancelled checks should be done by the owner. ________ Receipts All transactions should have a receipt – including petty cash. ________ Payments made Keep an eye out for missing or out of order checks, unknown payment recipients

and payments made to unrecognized business or personal accounts. ________

Restrict access Make sure all checks are in a secure location and restrict employee access to financial account data when possible. ________

Safety checks Require multiple signatures on all checks. ________ Big brother A simple video surveillance

system will help deter employees from stealing if they know you are always watching. ________ Expenses Monitor travel expenses to ensure they are in line by reviewing supporting receipts. ________

Fraud training Train your employees to prevent fraud, including how to identify, prevent and report suspicious behavior and common warning signs. Trust your gut and if something doesn’t look or feel right, it probably isn’t. Take the time right away to have these situations investigated and document any evidence. The

biggest deterrent to crime is the likelihood of being caught and prosecuted. Be prepared to prosecute if you find an employee stealing or embezzling and don’t become complacent with long-time employees. Don’t feel like you are distrusting your employees by putting processes and financial controls in place. Honest employees want to have checks and balances set up so there is never a question about the work they are performing, and in actuality they feel more at ease because of them. The simple act of letting your employees know you are reviewing account activity can help prevent fraud.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

23


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

Grow! Network! Profit! Honoring Central Minnesota’s Best at the 2019 Business Awards Luncheon // Photos by Jeff Yapuncich, YuppyPhoto

Doug and Carol Severson, Handyman's Inc, 2019 Small Business of the Year

Kevin (L) and Julie Johnson, K. Johnson Construction, 2017 Small Business of the Year; Evan Larson, Steve Paasch, GLTArchitects, 2002 Small Business of the Year

Dick Bitzan D.J. Bitzan Jewelers, 2010 Family Owned Business of the Year

24

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

John Herges, (L) Falcon National Bank, and Steve and Jeff Mies, Mies Outland, 2019 Family Owned Business of the Year

Larry Logeman, (L) Executive Express, 2015 Small Business of the Year; Frank and Peggy Imholte, Black Diamond Auctions

Joel Bauer (L) and Tim Burg, Midwest Manufacturing, 2018 Small Business of the Year

Tanja Goering, (L) Pro Staff and volunteer Top Hatter April Diederich, Proviant Group

Brenda Eisenschenk, (L) InteleCONNECT, 2019 Woman in Business Champion and Chamber Board chair Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St. Cloud


C Tom Rickers (L) and Curran Poganski, Bremer; Gary Bechtold, American Door Works

C Chamber President Teresa Bohnen, (L), Chamber Vice President Gail Ivers, and Jeff Yapuncich, YuppyPhoto

Bob Nemeth, (L) Nemeth Orthodontics and Luke Cesnik, Freedom Flight A

B Doug Bischoff, Design Electric, 2017 Entrepreneurial Success Award recipient

Grow with us. Business banking and more. At Farmers & Merchants State Bank, we’re able to look at your business differently. That means flexible solutions, timely decisions, and commercial banking that grows along with you.

Sauk Rapids 320.252.5121

Banking for you and me.

NMLS #528169

Pierz 320.468.6422

Eden Valley 320.453.2000

FMpierz.com J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

MEMBER FDIC

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

25


InSIDE THIS ISSUE:

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Management Tool kit • Entreprenuerism • Economy Central by Falcon Bank

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

TECH STRATEGIES

Where Will Your Stories Take You? Stories feature outpaces newsfeed on social media. By Dawn Zimmerman

H

ow relevant is your brand’s communication on social media? As business executives and marketers, we’d like to say highly relevant. A 2015 IBM study found that only 35 percent of people found the communication on a brand relevant. So often brands share the wrong information or even use the wrong tools. So, what’s relevant? Those seeing the best success — on

everything from social media to digital marketing — are selling their brand, not their stuff. They’re telling stories. Really short stories. Stories have long been used to capture attention, build word-of-mouth and inspire action. Social media giants are seeking to leverage those storytelling skills with “Stories” features. This enables you to share photos, video and text

with a selected audience for 24 hours. After 24 hours, they are stored in an archive that is only visible to you. Facebook and Instagram recently started rolling out the ability to also include a link.

1 Provide value

Moments of Life The “Stories” features are growing significantly faster on social media than the newsfeed. They are the first thing you see when you access the platforms. Stories are expected to become the primary way people share information with their inner circle in the next year. Many organizations have followed suit, but most still struggle with implementation. It requires them to step back and focus on their why – not their what – in new, meaningful ways. They need to be good, succinct storytellers.

2 Share moments of life.

Getting Results Whether you’re looking to leverage the social media feature or reinvigorate other communications, here are five steps for telling your story: ________

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based

strategic communications company that specializes in social media. She can be reached at dawn@writeadv.com

26

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

That usually takes the form of entertainment and can include an element of education. Think more about what you will give to the audience, than what you will get. ________ These defining moments are what bring people together and enable brands to feel personable, real and relatable. They pull on human emotion and build connections in ways in that few things can. ________ 3 Focus on the human factor.

Elevate the human dimension of your story. Who’s impacted? How? Too often, organizations share their stories without a human element. Yet, this is how we relate and connect. ________ 4 Create multi-media experiences.

Remember your teacher telling you to show, not tell? These stories are designed to be a more visual way of sharing. A mix of video, images, text and graphics increase engagement. ________ 5 Minimize production.

Don’t overproduce your stories. Users want to it to feel authentic, real and unplugged. Think about sitting across from


TECH NEWS

your followers over coffee. They want to feel who you are and what you believe. ________ The "Stories" feature challenges organizations to tell their stories well. You don’t have much time or space to grab attention and communicate your message. The stories need to be impactful and memorable. Using this feature hones your organization’s storytelling skills that can be translated across many other media. Our stories matter. In this fast-paced world, it’s good to remember to celebrate our moments of life.

Self-healing Cities

Robots tending buried water mains; robots watching over electricity cables; robots filling pot holes…is this the future? Possibly, according to researchers at the University of Leeds, in the UK. They envision cities where everyday maintenance issues will not only be reported by mobile robotic sensors roaming the metropolis, but one where the repairs themselves will be carried out by robots that would get to work as soon as the problems are reported. Source: New Scientist

Drone On

Drones are finding their way into small businesses, and the price is surprisingly affordable. From promoting clothing to surveying mines, a drone can move you into hard-to-reach places for as little as $1,000. Source: Inc.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

27


BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Found Time

Is your to-do list out of control? Maybe it’s time to try the Kanban System.

READ THIS

By Ryan McCormick

I

think most of us feel, at some point, that there just isn’t enough time in the day. There is already so much we want to accomplish and our “to do” lists just keep getting longer. If you often find yourself in such a situation, then maybe now is a good time to examine the processes behind your work – are they as efficient as they can be? Striving to improve productivity, often through the examination of existing processes, is the fundamental idea behind the Kanban System. Developed in Japan’s automobile manufacturing industry in the 1950s, Kanban is based on lean manufacturing – the principles of minimizing

28

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

waste while maintaining production. A Kanban System usually features a board or a wall displaying a few columns and sticky notes. Each column essentially represents a step in the process from idea to implementation and projects are identified on the sticky notes. As projects move through the process, the note is advanced from column to column. The board is a simple, straightforward framework that is helpful in visualizing some of the more complex ideas behind lean thinking. Kanban can help you see if there are steps in the process that are not adding value, but are merely creating waste. In addition to this visualization tool, Kanban also

stresses the importance of limiting works in progress – in other words, how many projects or tasks you are currently in the middle of. Having too many works in progress can create backups while you try to manage and juggle all the overhead. When this happens, the entire process is slowed down. The Kanban System has been adapted in workplaces around the world. It can be particularly helpful for teams trying to maintain a larger organizational view while seeking to avoid overextending

contributor

For an interesting read on how a specific industry has used Kanban, try The Lean Farm Guide to Growing Vegetables: More In-Depth Lean Techniques for Efficient Organic Production, by Ben Hartman. Hartman describes how his farm has used Kanban, and other lean principles, to reduce waste and increase profits. It is an engaging read that discusses some real-world applications of the Kanban System.

their capacity and making the most of their time. It can even be used as a meaningful way to organize the files on your computer’s desktop. However, many people also find Kanban to be an effective tool for managing their home lives. For example, sometimes major home renovation projects are almost easier to manage than the dozens of smaller projects we’re all meaning to

Ryan McCormick is patron services supervisor at the Great River Regional Library; griver.org


CERENITY SENIOR CARE | MARIAN REMODEL | ST. PAUL, MN

get around to. When it comes to these types of items, a Kanban board might be an effective way to determine limits to works in progress and establish priorities. Likewise, it can be an effective way to manage and track household chores. There are many blogs and other websites that describe how families have taken this approach. The simplest though is probably just a board with three columns: “To Do,” “In Progress,” and “Done,” and a stack of sticky notes with the chores that need to be completed. If you would like to learn more about Kanban, Lynda.com, available through your local public library, has courses on it and other systems for efficiently managing projects and workflow. The Kanban course provides greater detail on the system as well as how to setup a Kanban board.

Building with Care and Compassion

HUSKY STADIUM

BONESTROO

WE ARE COMMITTED TO CARING FOR OUR CUSTOMERS. For 70 years, our philosophy and attitude has been to constantly adjust to meet our clients needs through personal involvement and teamwork. This approach helps us reach our number one goal: to provide people with spaces to live, work and play.

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | info@wgohman.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR

|

DESIGN/BUILD

|

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

| BUILDING + REMODELING

WGOHMAN.COM

WWW.DESIGNELECT.COM

TECH NEWS

Pay Up

If you like Apple Wallet, just wait… here comes Fitbit Pay. Currently only available in Chicago and New York, users with a Fitbit Pay-capable device can use it to pay for their rides on select buses and trains on the New York City MTA system. Are you Fitbit-less? No worries. Those without a contactless payment wearable can also use apps on their smartphones to enter.

AWARD WINNING ALCUIN LIBRARY AT ST. JOHN’S UNIVERSITY

CONTACT US FOR ALL YOUR COMMERCIAL WIRING NEEDS ENERGY EFFICENCY SOLUTIONS FOR ANY FACILITY UNCOMPROMISING CUSTOMER SERVICE

ELECTRIC, INC.

Source: The Verge

PH-320.252.1658

24-Hour Emergency Service J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

29


BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOL KIT

Safe at Work

Small business safety practices can boggle the “bogeyman.” By Mary MacDonell Belisle vendor sign for such a key. Keeping a key record log tracks the location of keys and helps avoid access by unauthorized persons.”

B

30

e safe. That sounds simple enough, but how can a small business be safe these days when “bogeymen” lurk around every corner? Here are a few recommendations to ponder and practice.

security audits. Set up safety procedures around employee terminations, and use of a security guard. Plan for emergencies such as fire, theft, and weather events. Include instructions for reporting safety issues.

Follow a safety code of business conduct. In written documents, address personal safety for colleagues and customers, harassment and discrimination, industry and state/federal regulations, handling of company and client data, use of company equipment, etc. Clarify how social media is to be handled in and out of work. Plan for weekly/monthly shredding, and scheduled

Secure the office. Windows, doors, storage rooms, and sensitive areas should have locks and keys, and be monitored and maintained. “Monitor the keys that have access to your business,” Sandy Neu-Dwyer said. Neu-Dwyer is owner of Axis Commercial Realty, Inc., St. Cloud. “A business should identify each individual ‘do not duplicate’ key and have the employee/

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Protect computers and network security. “An enterprise-class firewall has the ability to block all of today’s threats,” according to John Koshiol, CEO/ President of Now IT Connects, Inc., Clearwater. Koshiol recommended businesses set up a firewall to block geo-location attempts, handle intrusion prevention, and set application controls. Koshiol suggested endpoint protection for all computer devices that operate remotely -- laptop, smartphone, tablet -- because each device presents an entrypoint for a potential threat. Use email filtering to block viruses and spam, and web filtering to block access to questionable websites and to monitor employee usage. Change passwords often–– every 30-45 days, according to BusinessSecurity.net. Passwords should contain capital and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters. Never open strange email attachments. Don’t bring sensitive information home. Other safety measures include backing up company data in the cloud, locking up laptops, shutting down desk computers at the end of the day, and removing ex-employee user accounts from computers and company devices.

Encourage individual safety practices. Staff should park near a light after hours, move their cars closer to the building when working late, and exit via the front entrance, Neu-Dwyer said. Individuals should not auto-unlock their cars until they are certain no one is sitting next to them in a parked car. Most importantly, report anything unusual to the police or business owner, advised Neu-Dwyer. Design the business premises/location with safety in mind. “The St. Cloud Police Department uses the Crime Prevention through Environmental Design model,” said Sgt. Tad Hoeschen, community engagement division. “The basic principle is to create an area in and around your business that makes it less appealing for those who want to cause trouble.” Hoeschen recommended physical maintenance. Clean up debris. Remove graffiti and broken windows. Trim greenery. Light the area -- the brighter an environment, the fewer people who will want to cause trouble for fear of identification. Move seating away from the front door to discourage loitering. Install motion detectors, camera systems or video recording devices. “A less expensive camera system can be just as effective as one that costs a lot of money, along


with signs that clearly state that your business is being monitored,” said Hoeschen. Leverage relationships. Build positive relationships with clients, visitors, and vendors. Routinely walk around the premises, not only to eyeball potential problems, but to build rapport and befriend the neighbors. Mary MacDonell Belisle is a St. Cloud freelance writer doing business as mary macdonell belisle —wordingforyou.com.

For a list of sources

used in this story, visit

BusinessCentralMagazine.com

TECH NEWS

Fitness Frustration

Experts say that fitness trackers can motivate us to get moving. However, unfavorable readings can lead to low self-esteem and feelings of guilt. Studies show that smartphones encourage people to hit the gym, while also inhibiting their ability to do so safely and efficiently. Some tracker enthusiasts admit to leaving the gym if their tracker runs out of battery or is on the counter at home. And even if you’re using it…it isn’t always precise. Another reason to put off that spinning class. Source: USA Today

THE IDEAL CHOICE

COMMERCIAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR

CIT Y OF WAITE PARK AMPHITHE ATER, OPENING SUMMER OF 2020. 3709 Quail Road NE, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 (320) 253-3524

www.alliancebuildingcorporation.com

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

31


BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOL KIT

Mid-Year Tax Planning

It’s tempting to wait until December to think about your taxes, but a little planning now can save you time and money at year-end. By Pat Plamann

A

s we turn the page on the 2018 tax filing season, now is the time to think about 2019 taxes. Here are some planning ideas business owners can use to save time and money next tax season. Analyze Your Equipment Needs The ability to currently deduct equipment purchases is a great tax planning tool. The IRS allows up to $1 million of qualified purchases to be currently deducted under IRC Section 179. However, there are some limiting factors. Section 179 cannot create a taxable loss, and it is limited to the first $2.5 million of qualified purchases. The IRS also allows “bonus” depreciation for qualified purchases. Bonus depreciation

32

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

provides a current tax deduction of 100 percent of the qualified equipment’s cost. Two advantages of using bonus deprecation are that it can create a taxable loss, and there is no limit on the amount of qualified purchases. Both Section 179 and bonus depreciation are great tools to manage taxable income and keep your equipment up-to-date. Consider Qualified Business Income As part of the new tax law, the IRS allows certain business owners to deduct 20 percent of their business income. The new law does not apply to C Corporation owners. Qualified business owners with taxable income of $315,000 and

below ($157,500 for singles) are eligible for the deduction. As income increases above $315,000/$157,500 qualified business owners are still allowed the deduction. However, the deduction is limited to either 50 percent of the businesses wages or 25 percent of the businesses wages plus 2.5 percent times the cost of the businesses equipment. Only certain professional service businesses (medical, accounting, legal and consulting) and certain rentals are not considered qualified businesses. Planning now to keep income below the IRS limits, or to ensure the business pays enough wages or invests in enough equipment, is a good strategy.

December 31, 2026. In addition, other tax benefits are available for Opportunity Zone investments held longer than 10 years. Investing in a Qualified Opportunity Zone is a great way to defer capital gains tax. This strategy is new and there are many rules and regulations that need to be considered. Consult your tax advisor before investing in a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Invest in a Qualified Opportunity Zone The new tax bill provides an opportunity to defer paying capital gains tax. Taxpayers that generate capital gains have 180 days to reinvest the capital gain amount into Qualified Opportunity Zone businesses or property and defer paying the tax. Opportunity Zone investments held for certain time periods are allowed a basis step-up, eliminating part of the gain from income tax. Any remaining deferred gain becomes taxable on

Maximize Health Savings Account deduction:

Other Tax Planning Ideas

These are planning ideas that can be implemented now to save time and money next tax season.

• $3,500 single • $7,000 family ________

Those over age 55 can contribute an additional $1,000 ________

Maximize Retirement Plan Contributions: • 401(k): $19,000; $25,000 if over 50 • Simple: $13,000; $16,000 if over 50 • IRA: $6,000; $7,000 if over 50

contributor Pat Plamann is a partner with Schlenner Wenner and Co.


TECH NEWS

Source: techradar.pro

Cool workplace tech tools

If you’re looking for efficiency and convenience – there’s a tech tool for that. An unhackable USB flash drive? Try eyeDisk. A multipurpose battery charger? Try Omni Ultimate. Premium security? Try Kingston Ironkey D300S. A portable speakerphone? Meet EMeet. So what’s the catch? Open your wallet (very) wide and be prepared for tricky set up, bulky design, and flimsy construction.

FIRST DISTRICT ASSOCIATION LITCHFIELD, MN

www. s t r ackcom p ani es . com Commercial Construction • Project Management • Real Estate Services

GOING GREEN

Plant More Trees

Planting trees and other greenery can cool some areas by as much as 15 degrees on hot days. Beyond providing shade, trees help cool the air as water evaporates from leaves. In a study with Georgia Tech, the Texas Tree Foundation found that planting trees was three times more effective than other strategies for cooling the city of Dallas. As cities get hotter – by 2100, summer in New York City could feel like Juarez, Mexico, does now – more cities are starting to plant trees and other greenery to mitigate heat. Source: Fast Company

meta13.com • 320-230-1223 J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Addition or Subtraction?

Economists offer differing views on the impact of immigration.

“I am a refugee. I grew up

yearning for a home. I am

so tired of being judged for who I am not. If the world must judge me, let them

do it for who I am, not how I look or sound.”

– Kao Kalia Yang, Hmong

refugee, author, film-maker and teacher.

W

hen we talk about immigration, we are talking about lives like Kao Kalia Yang’s. The long and the short lives, who struggle to survive in wartorn native lands, and seek education in America to better their reality and the chance of survival for the next generation. “We can all run alone,” Yang said, “but success is when we move forward together.” The adoption of any immigration policy implicitly makes a statement. “Not only about how much we care about immigrants as compared to natives, but also

34

how much we care about this particular group of natives versus that particular group of natives,” said Bryan Caplan, professor of Economics at George Mason University. Yang, Caplan, and Harvard Economics Professor George Borjas were the featured speakers at St. Cloud State University’s Winter Economics Institute in February. In free labor markets, workers tend to move from places where wages are low, to places where they are high, according to Caplan. While this clearly benefits the workers themselves, this choice has a larger impact on the rest of the world. “Wages and productivity are closely linked,” Caplan said. “Workers who earn low wages normally produce little, and vice-versa.” This logic remains true across national borders. Movement enriches the productivity and profits of the entire world. “Think about it,” Caplan urged. “When a manufacturer produces and sells a tractor,

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

By Kelti Lorence

they are not gaining the most benefit from that transaction. Their consumers do, because the consumers receive the food harvested by that tractor.” Even estimates of massive economic gains rarely change mindsets about immigration, according to Caplan. Instead, “people who know the numbers rarely challenge the effect on global production. Instead, they point to offsetting concerns.” “People can manipulate data to obtain very different results,” according to George Borjas, professor of Economics and Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. “Immigration is not overall bad or good. For some people, it’s good, for some, it’s bad. It depends on who you ask and what kind of person or country they want to be.” As a result, immigration policy analysts can easily ignore the gains – or drawbacks -- of immigration by overlooking inconvenient facts, making assumptions,

and ignoring the distinction between workers and people to back up their graphs and beliefs on how immigration truly affects our nation. Calculating the impact of immigrants requires taking into account that they will act in particular ways because some actions are more beneficial than others. These choices can magnify or shrink the beneficial impact of immigration in our country, Borjas said. Choices include whether or not to assimilate; purchasing ethnic labels; and obtaining homes outside the factory gates, increasing the interaction between immigrants and the welfare state. “Most money within the U.S. welfare system goes to the elderly, not the poor,” Caplan said. “Even if this was a serious concern, there are options such as freely admitting immigrants, but limiting their eligibility for benefits.” Immigrants aren’t running to America to abuse our resources and systems or destroy American culture, Caplan said. They see safety and opportunity for their families within our borders. Many immigrants speak fluent English, and are preassimilating because American culture, media and ideals spread worldwide with the advancement of technology. “If your only tool is a hammer, everything looks like a nail,” Caplan concluded. Kelti Lorence is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.


$80M

TOTAL: $66,467,193

$40M

$80M

TOTAL: $75,856,974*

TOTAL: $288,822,542

12

$1,160,067.68

January December *Total as of 6/6/19; St. Augusta data is only available quarterly. November

TOTAL: $288,822,542

St. Augusta

13 September Mar $2,107,200

7 $1,587,313

2017 2

$10,100

August St. Joseph 56 70 9 2019 Feb $0 $19,525,262 $18,129,160 $3,674,800

June

2018

Apr

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2018�19 % CHANGE

D

J

December

October

N

1.0%

$0

November

September

Jan

August

July

June

May

April

Feb

March

1.5%

February

$300M

4%

2017

Non FarmMarJobs January

$250M

$500k

July JanAugusta data is only available quarterly. *Total as of 6/6/19; St.

2.0%

December

November

October

September

$200M

Food and Be

ST. CLOUD Waite Park 73 83 22 October Apr $6,403,398 $7,260,629 $2,018,674 TOTAL: 1789

$300M

2018

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

$150M

ST. CLOUD

Sauk Rapids 32 34 9 November May $14,128,688 $16,509,793 $12,803,852

TOTAL: $221,316,488

August

$100M

July

June

$50M

May

April

March

$0M

February

January

5%

Food and Be

Sartell 44 50 8 December $89,959,156 $13,856,200 $618,400.00 June

May

2018�2019

500

St. Cloud 341 383 106 $89,192,774 $231,596,447 $56,731,148 July

Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

Unemployment Rates

0

Commercial 2017 2018 2019* #/$ #/$ #/$ August 2019

2018

2017

5 $58,016

2017

$6,043,519

TOTAL: 1752

$250M

98

$4,433,502

2000

$200M

140 February

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: $221,316,488

TOTAL: $75,856,974*

$150M

46 $1,509,887

St. Augusta 88 72 4 March $6,116,630 $6,469,120 $338,495.00

1500

TOTAL: $133,773*

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

$100M

70 April $4,244,281

1000

$900000

$50M

26 $1,180,751

2018

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0M

174 $8,409,293

October

Commercial Building Permits

2017 2019

$70M

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$600000 2018

$60M

Commercial Building Permits

2019

Waite Park

St. Joseph

$50M

500

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$30M

199 May $7,908,010

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

Sauk Rapids

0

January

Sartell 299 380 72 June $15,947,945 $20,426,812 $3,831,380

2017

$10M

622 597 123 July 2019 $32,230,127 $25,555,950 $7,080,579

500

$300000

$0M

February

St. Cloud

2016

2017

March

Residential 2017 2018 2019* 2017 August #/$ #/$ #/$

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

$0

TOTAL:$70,880,396

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

2015

2018

2017

2016

2018

December

$70M

November

$60M

Home Sales C

2018 October

$50M

September

$40M

August

$30M

July

$20M

June

$10M

October April

May

$0M

April

2019

TOTAL: $13,649,289*

November May

March

2017

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec February

TOTAL:$70,880,396

2019

July December June

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

880,396

COLOR KEY:

TOTAL: $66,467,193 2018

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

Economy Central presented by August

2019 Compiled by Amanda , data current as of 6/6/19

Residential Building Permits

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL: $13,649,289*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

908,072

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

832,866

316,488

669,534

111,110

Residential Building Permits

F

M

$500k

0.5% 0.0% -0.5%

3%

-1.0% -1.5% 2%

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

-2.0%

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

A

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

35


396

072

866

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

Jan November Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

December

tractor-trailerApril truck driver openings in 2017, the largest number ever recorded (dating back to 2001). The job vacancy rate for March

driving occupation.

December

November

October

September

27%

The rate at which truckdriving job openings increased over the last eight years

*Total as of 6/6/19

Economy Central presented by

Source: MN DEED

The increase in wages for truck drivers between 2010 to 2017

August

The median hourly wage offer for heavy and tractortrailer truck drivers

July

35%

Trucking Facts

June

$22.04

May

BY THE NUMBERS

April

$2M

amount of employment in the heavy and tractor-trailer truck January

March

2017

$2M

February

TOTAL: $1,623,035

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

TOTAL: 1789

May Central Minnesota reported an average of 433 heavy and

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2018

36

October

September

AccordingJune to DEED’s Job Vacancy Survey, employers in

2000

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,748,626

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

anytime soon.

February that a large number of jobs are currently unfilled relative to the

TOTAL: $522,974*

$1.5M

currently exist, truck driving occupations aren’t disappearing

truck drivers was nearly double the overall rate, which means

Lodging Tax Dollars

$1M

truck drivers August to transport goods. And while autonomous vehicles

TOTAL: 1752

TOTAL: $1,523,946

*Total as of 6/6/19

$500k

September Virtually every facet of our life depends on incredibly important.

July

120

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office

$0

August

TOTAL: 111

100

$2M

Truck driving October is not only a career in high demand, it’s also

TOTAL: 125

Benton Co. 27 94 2 $0 $500k $1M $1.5M

2019

2017

November

Residential 2017 2018 2019 2017 Stearns Co. 84 31 38

ST. CLOUD

July

Convoy!

TOTAL: 1655

SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

June

December

TOTAL: 40*

TOTAL: $1,566,952

80

$1.5M

1500

60

TOTAL: $133,773*

40

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

20

May

$900000

2018 0

$1M

1000

$600000

2017

$500k

DID YOU KNOW?

TOTAL: $366,304*

2019

January

500

$300000

2018

February

*Total as of 6/6/19

Food and Beverage Tax Collection ST. CLOUD

TOTAL: $1,523,946

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2019

$0

2016

2000

April

Feb 1500

March

2017

Jan $200M $250M $300M Housing/Real Estate sources: St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors, http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. *Total as of 6/6/19

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

March

0

1000

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

500

ST. CLOUD

$0 0

April

TOTAL: 1789

Mar

TOTAL: $1,566,952

May

2015

2018

2017

2016

TOTAL: $221,316,488

June

2018

Apr

February

June

TOTAL: $366,304*

July

TOTAL:1815

May

2017

August

2019

August

TOTAL: $288,822,542

2018

January

TOTAL: 424* September

July

October

ST. CLOUD September

October

TOTAL: $75,856,974*

2019

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

$150M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

November 6 COMMUNITIES � ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

ding Permits ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

M

$100M

488

534

110

$250M

BusinessTools


BUSINESS CHECKING WHERE THE GRASS TRULY IS GREENER ✓No hidden fees ✓No minimum balance

#FEECHALLENGE

Do you know how much you are paying in monthly checking fees? It’s time to reclaim your hard-earned funds with our Business Plus Checking. Take our #FEECHALLENGE to find out if our Business Plus Checking can save you money!

FalconNational.com/FeeChallenge

Call a Relationship Banker today to see how much you can save! ST. CLOUD

ISANTI

RICHMOND

FOLEY

HAM LAKE

Traci Rau 320.223.6319

Helonna Heller 763.235.2385

Kris Ruegemer 320.597.2145

Jennifer Volkmann 320.968.6181

Sandy Welander 763.235.3939


COVER STORY

Brenda Eisenschenk, InteleCONNECT, may be small in stature, but her positive attitude and generous heart have made life better for the people around her. By Gail Ivers •• Photos by Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

W

hen Brenda Eisenschenk told her dad that she had secured a job in sales – low base rate, high commission – he was aghast. “Noooooooooooooo,” he cried. “Don’t go into sales!” Eisenschenk’s father was a teacher who sold pots and pans and insurance during the summer. It was not his best experience and he strongly encouraged her to choose a different career path. “Once I got started,” Eisenschenk said, “I loved it.” She did a stint selling copiers, spent some time in retail selling furniture, worked for a little while with a company doing inside sales and service which, she said, “didn’t have enough real sales for me so I left.” Eventually she landed at Astound Broadband, a start-up telecommunications company that sold

38

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9


Brenda Eisenschenk – a woman of many hats.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

39


COVER STORY

PERSONAL PROFILE

Brenda Eisenschenk President/CEO, InteleCONNECT Age: 49

Hometown: Faribault

Education: Bachelor of Science in Interdepartmental Speech Communications with a marketing emphasis and German minor from St. Cloud State University

Work History: First job - The Dairy Queen in Faribault putting the twist on the DQ cone. After college – various sales positions, including copiers, furniture, and cable broadband.

Family: Husband Keith, children: Mathew, 21, a senior at Milwaukee School of Engineering; Rachel, 18, sophomore at the University of Minnesota – Duluth Hobbies: Golf, spending time with family, travel, entertaining, scrapbooking

Best advice you’ve received: Hire (or surround yourself) with people who are more qualified than you!

40

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

high-speed Internet, cable television and local and longdistance telephone service to residential and business customers. Today such services are considered mainstream, but at the time Astound was breaking new ground. “Back then we were selling cable modems and we used to say we're selling with no arms and legs because nobody knew what it was,” Eisenschenk said with a laugh. Those years at Astound lit a fire for Eisenschenk that never quite went out. She worked at Astound for six years until the company was sold to Charter. At that time

Integra Telecom approached her about becoming a direct sales rep. “I decided to make the move to Integra and learn about that side of the telecom industry,” Eisenschenk said. Three years later she was approached by a business acquaintance who encouraged her to join his sales team at the St. Cloud Times. Though she gave advertising sales a sincere try, it turned out that the little flame from her days at Astound was starting to burn brighter. “I missed the telecom industry,” Eisenschenk said. And when she dug deeper into what

she really wanted to do, it turned out that becoming an entrepreneur was high on the list. Eisenschenk started researching telecom agents, or channel partners, as they’re called. These are companies that essentially broker telecom services on behalf of multiple carriers, much like an independent insurance company brokers a variety of insurance providers. She traveled to the Twin Cities to meet with existing channel partners, she researched the industry, and then she took the final step. She talked with her husband.

Timeline 1992

Brenda Eisenschenk attends her first Chamber meeting, Chamber Connection, as a student in the AISEC program at St. Cloud State University.

1993

Eisenschenk graduates from St. Cloud State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Interdepartmental Speech Communications; she begins working as a copier salesperson for Albinson’s.

1994-1998

Eisenschenk works in sales at Becker Furniture World.

1998

Eisenschenk works at Franklin Outdoor Advertising; she begins attending Chamber Connection regularly and is invited to become

vice chair of the group in 1999.

1998 – 2004

Eisenschenk takes a job with the startup telecommunications company Astound Broadband.

2004 – 2006

Eisenschenk works for Integra Telecom.


BEST ADVICE

Find a good trusted group of mentors who can be your sounding board and support you along the way. Like the saying ‘It takes a village to raise a family,’ I believe it takes a village of mentors to help a business owner grow and succeed! And remember the community that helped you along the way. Be generous to them and give in whatever way you are able.

“Going through the research process was when I really found the passion for the industry and for running my own company,” Eisenschenk said. “I had a long consultation with my husband going over whether or not we thought we could make this work. In the end he was totally supportive. He said, ‘You should do this.’” So in July 2007 Eisenschenk launched InteleCONNECT.

Family

T

here was a time when Eisenschenk joked that she was the first mom to drop off her kids in the morning and the last one to pick them up in the evening. She laughed about it, but it had a little bite, too. Becoming her own boss allowed her to change that. “For me the most rewarding part of being a business owner is the ability to work for myself and to be there for my kids,” she said. “When we first started InteleCONNECT, I worked

2006-2007

Eisenschenk works in sales at the St. Cloud Times.

2007

Eisenschenk starts InteleCONNECT.

2008

Lisa Vouk joins InteleCONNECT as the first employee.

out of my home. That was very important to me because I was able to be there for my kids when they got off the bus.” Eisenschenk’s commitment to her own family was one of the reasons she was able to expand her business. “About a year after I started InteleCONNECT, I was getting to the point that I had so many customers I was doing customer service all the time and not bringing in new clients. I had to wear so many hats I felt like I wasn’t getting anything done,” she said. At a business meeting, she sat next to Lisa Vouk who mentioned she was ready for a job transition. Brenda wistfully responded that Lisa was just the person InteleCONNECT needed, but the salary just wasn’t there. “How do you know?” Vouk asked. “We haven’t even talked about it.” It turned out that what Vouk was looking for was the flexibility to work and still be deeply involved with her

2009

Robin Grote joins InteleCONNECT in sales.

2010

Eisenschenk partners with Todd Fritz, allowing InteleCONNECT to expand its services to include wireless consulting.

two daughters. “I wanted to be there when they got off the bus. I wanted to be able to be in school with them, to volunteer and do things with them. Brenda said, ‘I can do all that and I can teach you telecom.’ That was 11 years ago.” That family first attitude resulted in a second employee for Eisenschenk. She was at Como Park Zoo and ran into Robin Grote, a college friend. Grote was on maternity leave and between jobs. “I knew she was a great sales person. I knew how she conducted herself in front of others, and I knew I could teach her telecom. It’s a lot easier to teach telecom than it is to teach sales.” Much like Vouk, Grote was looking for the flexibility to be home with her family, but still have a fulfilling career. “We found a way to make it work,” Eisenschenk said, “and she joined our team as our sales manager.” That was 10 years ago.

2016

Brenda and Keith Eisenschenk purchase a warehouse in Sauk Rapids. They renovate the building, including building out office space.

2017

InteleCONNECT moves into the newly renovated office space. Keith Eisenschenk and his business partner share

the remaining office space and warehouse. Katrina Crouse joins InteleCONNECT.

Spring 2019

Eisenschenk is selected as the 2019 St. Cloud Area Woman in Business Champion; Patrick Hollermann joins InteleCONNECT as a project manager

Until recently, the InteleCONNECT staff has been primarily women. “I think one of the things I have grown into,” Eisenschenk said, “is understanding how as a business owner I can support the women who work for me and help them grow in their careers and be there for their families. That’s one of our core values – we believe your family and your faith should be first in your life. If you’re good in your family life, you can also be good in your work life.” “Juggling work, family and life can be stressful,” Vouk said. “I think Brenda has made that easy for the women who work at InteleCONNECT. About two months after I started working here my daughter said, ‘Mom, you’re so much more fun than you used to be.’”

Courage and Confidence

T

he constantly changing world of telecom, with its

Fun Fact: Eisenschenk was in Berlin when the wall came down. She was even able to secure her own piece of the wall. “The police officers kept saying ‘Nein! Nein!’ We figured that meant we were supposed to take nine pieces.”

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

41


B IntelleCONNECT at work.

can we as a company take this challenge, grow and be a stronger company going forward.” “Brenda’s confidence inspires others,” Tauna Quimby, a longtime associate, said. “Because she’s confident you say, ‘I can do this.’ You see it in her work and you see it in her volunteer activities.”

C Patrick Hollermann and Brenda Eisenschenk.

BUSINESS PROFILE

Intele CONNECT, Inc.

24 7th St. N, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 320-257-7400 Fax: 866-422-8253 info@inteleconnect.net www.inteleconnect.net Ownership: S-CORP (51% woman owned) by Brenda and Keith Eisenschenk

Business Description: InteleCONNECT, Inc. is a locally owned national telecommunications consulting firm working with businesses on their local, long distance, VoIP, wireless, internet and cable TV services to find the best companies to represent their clients’ needs. Total number of employees: 5; “Not including my husband and kids.”

AWARD WINNER

mergers and acquisitions, has not left InteleCONNECT unscarred. Eisenschenk still recalls with anxiety, when one of their vendors decided to eliminate the smaller channel agents. “It wasn’t about providing service or who knew the business best, it was simply a business decision that they wanted to work with fewer agents and that meant going with bigger companies, rather than small ones like us,” she said. For InteleCONNECT, the loss of a large vendor hit hard. The company lost important revenue. “We had to be creative on how we were going to continue to thrive and grow in this industry,” Eisenschenk said. She sat down with her team who all agreed that everyone

would find a way to focus on sales, no matter what their individual responsibilities were. They also looked at expenses. Vouk approached vendors and asked them to cosponsor and co-fund many of InteleCONNECT’S marketing initiatives, allowing them to drastically cut their marketing budget, while largely maintaining the activities. “What I love about it was how Brenda handled it,” Vouk said. “She brought the staff together, we talked about what had happened, about how we thought we could move forward. What she didn’t do was a knee-jerk reaction of ‘There’s less income maybe I should lay someone off.’ Maybe she considered it, but she didn’t make it visible at all. She was all about how

Mentor

E

isenschenk’s interest in helping women succeed isn’t limited to the ones who work for her. She has mentored girls in her church, through the St. Cloud Times Mentor Morning program, and she is a life-long Girl Scout. “If you know Brenda, then you know she was the top cookie sales person as a girl,” Quimby said. Now director of philanthropy for the Tri-County Humane Society, Quimby was working with Girl Scouts of MN & WI Lakes & Pines when she first met Eisenschenk. “The thing about Brenda,” Quimby said, “is that she started Girl Scouts as a young girl, went all the way through the program, then

Woman in Business Champion Brenda Eisenschenk likes sales.

S

ince graduating from St. Cloud State University Brenda Eisenschenk has focused her career on sales: copiers to outdoor, telecom to newsprint. In the end she discovered that telecom was her passion and business ownership was her future. She was selected as the 2019 Women in Business Champion because along the way she has made a point of supporting women and girls. Eisenschenk started InteleCONNECT in August 2007. Her vision was new to the St. Cloud area. Telecom agents were uncommon, but she found a few in the Twin Cities market who were willing to talk with her and explain their

42

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

services. She wrote a business plan and started making sales calls. “I started at zero and went out and sold,” she said. Though she started as a one-person operation, Eisenschenk now has four employees. Her growth has been in part because of her desire to see others succeed. She was able to hire her first employee, Lisa Vouk, by creating a plan that could accommodate Eisenschenk’s growing business and Vouk’s desire to have more time with her family. A similar arrangement was made with a second employee who was looking for a change following the birth of a baby.


QUOTE-WORTHY

“She gives from the heart — her time, her talents, and her treasure.” — Lisa Vouk

came back as an adult to help make the Girl Scout program an opportunity for her own daughter and other girls in the community.” But her commitment didn’t stop there. “We needed someone to inspire the girls during the cookie sale to get out there and do sales and understand the skills that the cookie program provides,” according to Quimby, who worked at the Girl Scouts at the time. “Brenda was that person. She was a great cookie spokes model and actually went around the state and talked about the value and importance of the program.” “One thing that comes to my mind,” Vouk said, “is when the Stearns History Museum was going to have Sue the T-Rex on exhibit. Brenda had this idea to ‘Sleep with Sue at the Museum.’ But not just for our girls or their troops. For all the girls in the Girl Scout council.”

In addition to driving the idea, soliciting the donations to support it, and working the event, Eisenschenk developed a variety of education activities for the girls. “I wonder how many of those girls went into science or explored it in a different way because of Brenda’s inspiration,” Quimby said. “That’s how she thinks,” Vouk agreed. “Brenda looks for something others wouldn’t think of and asks, ‘How can I work on that…make it better…help someone?”

Many Hats

M

uch of Eisenschenk’s business success is due to her deep understanding of the telecom industry. “She geeks out on this stuff,” Vouk said. “And she loves taking care of customers.” She’s also a woman of many hats. In addition to being a business owner, mother, and mentor, Eisenschenk is also

In addition to her support of the women who work for her, Eisenschenk has been a strong advocate for women and girls. She has participated in Mentor Morning, a program of the St. Cloud Times/LocaliQ that connects young women with experienced female professionals, and she mentors girls in her church. Possibly her greatest impact is her volunteer work with the local Girl Scout program. She does presentations on how to sell cookies, how to run a business, and serves as a mentor. In addition to running her company, Eisenschenk volunteers for a number of organizations, including the

an extraordinary community volunteer. “She gives from the heart – her time, her talents, and her treasure,” Vouk said. “That’s a huge part of who she is and a large part of why InteleCONNECT has been as successful as we’ve been. She’s out in the community being involved and giving back, and that pays her back in return.” “One of the things I love about InteleCONNECT,” Quimby said, “is that they encourage all of their employees to get involved in the community and to volunteer…and they are given time off to do it.” Eisenschenk puts community involvement high on her list of priorities. “Part of being in business is having the means to give back,” she said, “both to our customers and the community as a whole.” That list of involvement is long: United Way, Girl Scouts, Tri-County Humane Society, customer appreciation events,

charitable golf tournaments, Habitat for Humanity, Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast, Leadercast, school supply drives, and the list goes on. “Brenda and Todd [Fritz, owner of Intelligent Wireless Management and affiliated with InteleCONNECT] sat in a dunk tank one year and InteleCONNECT matched whatever we raised,” Vouk said. “Last year one of our vendors donated tickets to the Elton John concert. We raffled them off in order to raise money for WACOSA. “We try to get out there and do lots of different things and have fun,” Vouk said, “because all work and no play isn’t really our motto.” Eisenschenk agrees. “You’ve heard of the miniature Snickers bar?” she asked. “Well, I’m the fun size!” Gail Ivers is vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and editor of Business Central Magazine.

Sartell Chamber, the St. Cloud Area Chamber, her church, Girl Scouts of Minnesota and Wisconsin Lakes and Pines; Habitat for Humanity, and Sertoma. She also provides paid time off for staff to volunteer. Eisenschenk was honored at the St. Cloud Area Chamber’s Business Awards Luncheon in April, along with Handyman’s Inc., the 2019 St. Cloud Area Small Business of the Year and Mies Outland, the 2019 Business Central Mark of Excellence-Family Owned Business of the Year.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

43


S

1881: A civic organization forms, led by H.C. Waite and L.A. Evans. This group, too, is short-lived.

1883: The first official Chamber

of Commerce debuts in St. Cloud. Among the officers: D.B. Searle.

1887: The Chamber attempts to

interest younger men. The group meets weekly for a time, then disbands.

1891: The Business Union

launches – and like its forerunners, expires soon thereafter.

1895: The Business Men’s Association is founded.

R A E Y 0 5 1

replaces its predecessor.

DATE UNKNOWN: The St. Cloud

Commercial Club takes root.

1915-1924: Records have

been lost, but during this nineyear timeframe it appears that the Commercial Club evolves into what is now the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. The association’s greatest accomplishment of that era: bringing what today is known as the Veterans Affairs Medical Center to St. Cloud.

1925: The Chamber moves from

the Breen Hotel to the Journal-Press building at 23 Fifth Ave. S. In the 1920s, the Chamber’s most successful activity is the annual seed and poultry show for farmers. The Chamber also favors a bond issue to improve the Lake George area for park and playground purposes.

1929: Chamber offices move back to the Breen Hotel.

1930S: Regular standing committees form, including retail, legislative, roads.

1937: Offices move to 915 St. Germain St. The Chamber reorganizes and launches ambitious membership and finance drives.

LATE 1930S: Information and tourist bureau begin; the Chamber starts the Building and Home Furnishings Show; the organization affiliates with highways 10, 95, 15 and 52 associations.

1944: The Chamber publishes a detailed annual report commemorating the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the first Chamber-style organization in the community. Surnames that remain familiar in 2019 appear on the 1944 44

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

ce

mb

e r of C o m

m

ha COMING m om

C

1906: The Civic Improvement League

ha

C

launches with 68 members; annual dues are $5. The board doesn’t last long, but does work toward opening a new hotel and improving area roads.

RS A E Y 0 15 er

1869: St. Cloud Board of Trade

S

TIMELINE

CLOUD T.

D

b e r of C TOGETHER

Some things change – leadership, programs, street names. But after 150 years, the Chamber’s fundamental role of bringing people together for a healthy business environment remains as strong as ever.

T

By Jeanine Nistler ** Photos Courtesy of the Stearns History Museum he words “St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce” may sound formal and perhaps a bit stuffy, but the organization itself is anything but. It’s all about people connecting with and supporting each other. They even have fun doing it. And it’s been that way for 150 years. “I just have fun doing things with the Chamber,” said Jason Bernick, director of corporate affairs for Bernick’s and Chamber board chair in 2015-16. “It’s a positive community of people,” combining business and fun. “The Chamber has created a unique sense of connection for

me with the community,” Jason Hallonquist, CEO and managing director of AIS Planning, said. Hallonquist will chair the Chamber board beginning in September. During his first 10 years of working in St. Cloud, Hallonquist “didn’t know many people outside of the company, never felt connected to the community and didn’t know how or where to start.” After he joined AIS Planning in 2001, he enrolled in the Chamber’s leadership program. “I vividly recall attending a large community fundraising event shortly after Leadership graduation and the amazing feeling of walking into


RS

Ginny Kroll won’t be writing any tell-all books about her 50 years with the Chamber. That’s right: she worked there for one-third of the organization’s history. She was hired Feb. 1, 1965, and retired Sept. 30, 2015.

er

ce

a crowded room and seeing familiar faces, having a broad mix of people I knew, and no longer feeling like an ‘outsider.’ That experience has fueled my desire to be and stay connected to this community.” You’d expect the incoming board chair to have great things to say about the Chamber, but how about a past employee? Ginny Kroll won’t be writing any tell-all books about her 50 years with the Chamber. That’s right: she worked there for one-third of the organization’s history. She was hired Feb. 1, 1965, and retired Sept. 30, 2015.

m

“If people don’t belong to the Chamber, they should,” she said. “Where else are you going to make these kinds of connections?” The Chamber changed during Kroll’s years. She worked through seven moves and four presidents. When Kroll started, “we only had four employees and there was no Convention and Visitors Bureau. Sauk Rapids had their own Chamber; they weren’t part of St. Cloud. There was no Waite Park Chamber. We didn’t do any training. We did not do the golf outing, and we had, maybe, 500 members.”

Perhaps most telling of the changes: “We used an addressograph to label letters,” she said. Sandy Neutzling chaired the Chamber board in 1998-99. She owns Jennings Insurance in St. Cloud and has been a Chamber member for 25 years. She joined at a critical time for her company. “If I wanted to continue to grow my insurance business with the changes happening in my industry, I needed to be more local. I turned to the Chamber to meet other business owners and people who I could connect with.

This is Ginny

PROGRESS. OPPORTUNITY. GROWTH. Coborn’s, Inc. has a strong tradition of progress, opportunity and growth, along with a commitment to growing value for our employee shareholders. Our foundation is built on service to our guests, support of our employees and caring for the communities where we operate. Our employee-owners pride themselves on providing remarkable service to our guests in more than 125 business units operating under 15 unique guestfocused brands in five states across the upper Midwest. We’re progressive, bullish on growth and look forward to the remarkable opportunities that lie ahead. From our newest “next generation” Coborn’s store formats, to the expansion of our Cash Wise stores into western North Dakota our Marketplace Foods stores in western Wisconsin and the recent acquision of Horbacher’s Foods in the Fargo/Moorhead metro area, we continue to inspire, innovate and invest. Interested in learning more about us and the opportunities we have to offer in being part of our team? Visit us today at cobornsinc.com. Proud Family of Stores

cobFcsMdMgznAd2019

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

45


S

TIMELINE

D

R A E Y 0 5 1

committee list, including Helgeson, Landwehr, Bernick and Herberger. V.C. Fandel’s “President’s Page” notes that World War II pushed civic projects aside. Fandel writes that he placed “as the Number 1 job of this organization the backing of the war effort, the Number 2 job was to keep the Home Front on an even keel.” The third priority, he writes: Post-War Planning.

1946: The Chamber launches a full-scale public relations campaign to tout St. Cloud’s advantages. Also at this time, the Chamber plays a key role in bringing the Northern League baseball franchise to town. LATE 1940S: Celebrations and

1950S: The Chamber’s activities broaden to include publication of the first Manufacturers Directory, affiliation with the National Better Business Bureau, Central Minnesota Dairy Days and the launch of St. Cloud Opportunities Inc.

1953: Glenn Carlson is hired as the Chamber’s first professional manager.

1954: The Chamber hosts the “Orchids for Enterprise Dinner” at which 49 businesses are honored for “changing the face of the community during the past year” by constructing new buildings or remodeling old ones to beautify the city. 1955: The Chamber’s “Strike a

Light in ’55” program of work is outlined in a matchbook-themed booklet. Each division has goals to attain, many of them quite ambitious.

1965: Crossroads Shopping Center opens. The Chamber works to unite downtown and west-end businesses.

1974: St. Cloud is named as one of

10 All-America Cities by the National Municipal League. This economic development award recognizes citizen-achieved improvements in the community. The effort was spearheaded by the Chamber of Commerce.

1975: The U.S. Chamber of

Commerce accredits the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, indicating that the Chamber operates under effective organizational procedures and contributes to significant positive change in the community.

46

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

It also gave me the opportunity to meet our local, state and national legislative leaders. The Chamber helped me to thrive, survive and grow my business.” And, Neutzling noted, “I have enjoyed my many years of getting to know so many wonderful people in the community that I would not have been able to meet and know.” It’s not necessary to be board chair like Bernick, Neutzling and Hallonquist to benefit from Chamber membership. “The Chamber also allows businesses to engage their employees with all the programs that are available as a Chamber member,” Neutzling said. Take, for instance, Business After Hours, a monthly 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. networking event hosted at member businesses. And there’s Lunchtime Learning, which offers business professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge with monthly offerings that include lunch, a presentation, time for questions, networking, and a business card exchange. For those looking for a more indepth experience, the Chamber offers St. Cloud Area Leadership, a ninemonth program consisting of a two-day retreat and monthly daylong classes designed to help current and emerging leaders understand the dynamics of the community and the role of leadership in building healthy communities. “The leadership program broadened my understanding of the St. Cloud community and exposed me to organizations and issues I hadn’t

ha

C

festivals take center stage. Among them: The Tri-County Centennial Harvest Festival, the first Tri-County 4-H Livestock Show and Sale, and the Orchids for Enterprise dinner honoring those who changed the face of St. Cloud.

mb

m o e r of C considered before,” said Berta Hartig, interim operations manager for Metro Bus, who graduated from the program in 2005. Advocacy is another of the Chamber’s key roles, particularly in the areas of economic development and government affairs. The government affairs committee’s trips to Washington, D.C., have resulted in strengthened relationships, successful lobbying on numerous issues – and a healthy dose of fun for the travelers. Of course, none of these efforts or programs existed in the Chamber’s early days. (See the timeline for a look at the string of organizations that preceded the Chamber that we know today.) It’s impossible to predict how the Chamber will grow and change over the next 150 years, but here’s what Chamber President Teresa Bohnen sees in the next five to 10: “We will have three significant retirements of management staff. I expect within 10 years Gail Ivers, Judy Zetterlund and I will all retire after combined service to the Chamber of over 90 years. That’s a significant change and represents


er

ce

great opportunity for the Chamber. Fresh perspectives and fresh leadership are good for all organizations and I have supreme confidence in our volunteers and members to make great choices for future staff leadership of our Chamber.” The Chamber will remain relevant, she added. “Our workforce development efforts will become essential in the future. As social media expands, our members will crave face-to-face, high-quality, fun networking opportunities.” Hallonquist foresees continued focus on embracing the community’s growing

m

S diversity and the emergence of millennials in leadership roles. “We need to continue to bring people together and put attention to ways we can attract and retain that talent that comes to the community for an education, but seem to think all the action and activity is in the Twin Cities area,” Hallonquist said. “That was my opinion/perception when I moved up here for college, but now I’m very grateful I stayed!” Bernick has been impressed with Chamber improvements over the years. “And we’re still improving even though I think we’re right at the top,” he said.

mb

er

ha

ce

ARS E Y 0 5 1 C

RS

CLOUD T.

e r of C o m

m

Bohnen’s thoughts on the next 150 years in general for the city, the state and the country? “My crystal ball doesn’t go quite that far out! I’d bet we have self-driving -- or flying? -- vehicles. Sustainability will be required in everything we do. Solar power will be a primary form of energy. Marijuana will be legal. Keyboards won’t be necessary. Water will be valuable. We will have had multiple female presidents. I don’t know WHAT we’ll be eating, but the State Fair will still sell Pronto Pups.” Jeanine Nistler is a former St. Cloud

communications professional now living and working in the Twin Cities.

The Choice is Yours... Choose the Best! Finding innovative solutions to challenges that face our clients.

Working with buyers, sellers, realtors, lenders and builders throughout Central and Greater Minnesota

Development / Architectural Design / Construction Services

SINCE 1874

From left - right: Brenda Roettger, Mary Weis, Mary Schneider, Sue Lentner - St. Cloud Area Escrow Manager, Mary Jo Schepers and Melanie Walz

800.772.1758 / www.millerab.com

1-800-892-2399 / tricountyabstract.com

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

47


S

TIMELINE

1986: Glenn Carlson retires. Tom

Moore becomes Chamber president.

IT ISN’T THE TOWN, IT’S YOU.

R A E Y 0 5 1

1978: A full-page ad in the St. Cloud Daily Times proclaims, “ST. CLOUD’S FUTURE is the CHAMBER’S BUSINESS TODAY!” The ad features a brief message from 1977-78 Chamber president Ray Hughes of Dairy Craft Inc., several photos and an explanation of the Chamber’s purpose, people, program and all its committees.

The year was 1869.

1942 CHAMBER CARD

If you want to live in the kind of town Like the kind of town you like,

You needn’t slip your clothes in a grip

1996: Tom Moore resigns as president. Ken Warner is named president. 1998: Ken Warner resigns as

president. Teresa Bohnen, is named president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce after five years as executive director of the United Way of Central Minnesota. She is the first woman to hold the position. issue of Business Central Magazine is published by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and edited by Chamber vice president Gail Ivers. Its purpose is to promote the local business community and provide useful information to area businesses.

And start on a long, long hike.

You’ll only find what you left behind, For there’s nothing really new.

You knock yourself when you knock your town —

ha

2006: The Chamber is recognized as a 5-Star Chamber, the first year such recognition is available. To achieve this standing, the Chamber performs an intensive, nine-month self-assessment of operations. The Chamber receives 90 percent or more of available points in nine areas of work: governance, government affairs, technology, finance, human resources, program development, communications, and facilities. The accreditation, the first for a Chamber in Minnesota, puts the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce in the top 1 percent of Chambers nationwide. 2015: The Chamber moves to its current location at 1411 West St. Germain Street.

2019: The St. Cloud Area Chamber

of Commerce volunteers embark on a year-long celebration, including a community celebration on August 27 co-hosted with St. Cloud State University, also celebrating its sesquicentennial.

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Lest somebody get ahead.

mb

If everyone works and no one shirks

m o e r of C

You’ll raise a town from the dead.

If, while you make your personal stake, Your neighbor makes his, too,

Your town will be what you want to see —

2004: At the request of the City

of Waite Park, the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce establishes the Waite Park Chamber.

It isn’t the town, it’s you.

Real towns aren’t made by men afraid

C

JANUARY 2000: The inaugural

48

D

R

It isn’t the town, it’s you.

epublican William McKinley defeated Democrat William Jennings Bryan in the race for president of the United States. Dow Jones started reporting an average of selected industrial stocks, the dial telephone was patented, and John Philip Sousa composed “Stars and Stripes Forever.” In St. Cloud, which had been incorporated just 13 years earlier, Oscar Taylor became mayor. The city’s population had not yet hit 10,000. St. Cloud Normal School, which we now know as St. Cloud State University, opened with only 22 employees, including faculty and staff. The overall number of businesses in the community was small, but some were getting quite a foothold. Among them: The Great Northern Car Shops in Waite Park with nearly 400 employees; the Blood & Smith Broom Company at 701 23rd Ave. N.; Standard Granite at St. Germain and Cooper Ave.; and the

St. Cloud Paper Company on Fifth Avenue South. It was in January of that year that the forerunner of today’s Chamber of Commerce was born as the St. Cloud Board of Trade – with 68 members. In 2019, Chamber celebrates 150 years with 970 members. The Chamber, the city, the state, the nation and the world have undergone tremendous changes over the decades, but one thing remains constant. Just like that fledgling Board of Trade in 1869, the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce is focused on supporting local business and the community. The words printed on a 1942 Chamber card may sound dated and even a bit corny, yet they truly reflect the commitment of the individuals and businesses of the Chamber of Commerce, past, present and, no doubt, future.


RS

LEGACY

Glenn Carlson created a foundation for the modern-day Chamber of Commerce.

G

er

ce

lenn Carlson’s legacy is much more than a street named for him in the I-94 Business Park and a 16,000-square-foot room that bears his name at River’s Edge Convention Center downtown. Carlson served longer than any other St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce president – 33 years. But it really isn’t the length of service that distinguished Carlson as much as the nature of his service. “He made this town. He made the Chamber,” said Dave Marquardt, co-founder of Marco and 198081 Chamber board chair. “He knew how to meet and greet. He’s the hero of this place, in my opinion.” Carlson hired Ginny Kroll, who retired in 2015 after 50 years with the Chamber. “Glenn was the best. He was like a father figure to me. I’m forever grateful to him,” Kroll said, adding that Carlson was “the most wonderful boss you could ever ask for.”

m

In addition to leading the Chamber from 1953 until 1986, Carlson was a founder, executive director and secretary of St. Cloud Opportunities from 1954 until his death in 1999. He was a founder, member and secretary of the Minnesota Amateur Baseball Hall of Fame for 35 years. He helped found the Minnesota Princess Kay of the Milky Way contest and Central Minnesota Dairy Days, and co-founded St. Cloud Crime Stoppers.

ON A MISSION TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS

He was named one of the city’s most influential persons in 1979. The list of his memberships and leadership positions goes on and on and on. This is Glenn Two of Carlson’s children, Peggy and Rollie, recall a father who understood the value of networking, mentored scores of people, and never uttered a negative word. He walked the talk of the advice he gave his kids: Never take the credit. Work behind the scenes, lay the groundwork and recruit others, but if the endeavor goes south, step to the front and take responsibility. Said Rollie, “He was just one hell of a guy.”

We Fix It!

LOCALiQ knows our local business community, we specialize in custom campaigns and continually optimize for the best ROI.

WISHING A TH HAPPY 150 BIRTHDAY TO D THE ST. CLOU F O ER CHAMB COMMERCE

CAPABILITIES Print Marketing Direct Mail Video Production Digital Display PPC & SEO Website Development Email Marketing Social Media

ST CLOUD 2710 2nd St South 320.240.2332

Let’s Grow Your Business Call LOCALiQ TODAY! 320.255.8794

SAUK RAPIDS 27 N Benton Drive 320.230.2332 ONLINE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

BATTERIESPLUS.COM

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

49


SPECIAL FOCUS

CELEBRATE. PLAN. ENGAGE. Celebrating Successes In 2018, Waite Park stood out on the map when the city secured final funding for the Waite Park Amphitheater, completing the design of the facility and grounds and Phase I of construction. Funding for the project is estimated at $10 million, with $5 million coming from the State of Minnesota and $5 million coming from Waite Park’s portion of the regional local option sales tax.

The AMP is being designed as a multiuse park facility with seating capacity of 4,000-5,000. The city is contracting with a professional booking company to bring in 15-20 national acts per year and the rest of the time the facility will be available for community events and rentals. Phase II construction is currently underway, and the AMP is expected to be open for business in 2020. Other successes in 2018 included:

• Upgrading fire equipment and hoses • Implementing franchise fees • Establishing a human trafficking taskforce and a location for Terebinth Refuge, a temporary shelter for trafficked women • Creating a mental health multidisciplinary team to assist the Police Department

PEOPLE TO KNOW

The Waite Park Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is a place where business, education and government come together for the betterment of the community. Programs include the Waite Park State of the City address.

David Vee, Edina Realty

Chair, Waite Park Chamber ––––––––––– (320) 255-9000 DavidVee@EdinaRealty.com

50

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Amanda Henry, High Impact Training Vice Chair, Waite Park Chamber ––––––––––– (320) 259-8222 ahenry@hit4you.net

Ampitheater photo courtesy of Oertel Architects; Waite Park photos by Joel Butkowski, BDI photo.

2019 Waite Park State of the City address had a little something for everyone.


• Repainting the 10th Avenue water tower from its 1960s smiley face to the city’s current contemporary colors • Improvements to Rivers Edge Park

4 2 0

10

5

0

WE KNOW THE TOWN.

Bath

And we understand the financial needs of small business here in Central Minnesota. WHY CHOOSE US? WHY WOULDN’T YOU. Specializing in Small Business & Individual Accounting Tax & Business Planning Income Tax Preparation Bookkeeping & Payroll Services

St. Joseph – 7.9%

15

Sauk Rapids – 10.8%

St. Cloud – 10.3%

20

Sartell – 10.2%

Percent of population aged 65 or better

Waite Park – 17.4%

6

Minnesota – 7.4%

8

St. Joseph – 4.5%

10

Sauk Rapids – 2.6%

St. Cloud – 6.7%

12

Sartell – 2.8%

Percent of foreign-born residents by population

Minnesota – 12.9%

BY THE NUMBERS

Waite Park – 11.7%

Planning for our Future The city is focused on long-range planning in 2019. Activities include updating the city’s master plan, evaluating current and future land use, updating the zoning map with consideration given to changes that preserve and promote future development, and evaluating the southwest beltway/ring road around the city. “We’ll be coordinating with property owners, real estate professionals, and developers,” Jon Noerenberg, planning and

Kitchen Home

1428 2nd Street N, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 | 320-252-9972 | stjsk.com

Beautiful Solutions, for Your Entire Home At MCI/Carpet One Floor & Home, we have everything for your home under one roof.

Flooring • Lighting • Window Treatments

WAITE PARK: 26 1st Ave N • 320-253-5078 mcicarpetonewaitepark.com Store Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 9am-4pm, Sun 11am-4pm Selection and hours may vary with store location. MANKATO: 224 St. Andrews Drive 507-625-3472 • ftcmankato.com

BAXTER: 14317 Edgewood Drive 218-454-5027 • mcicarpetonebaxter.com

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

51


SPECIAL FOCUS

community development director, said. “Particularly on larger scale redevelopment efforts in selected areas.” The city will also explore options for programs to assist home and business owners with needed improvements and store-front updates, according to Noerenberg. Anticipated projects include: • City facility planning for the former public works building, the public library, and City Hall • Parks and trail improvements for River’s Edge Park and the Glacial Lakes Trail extension • A staffing plan that looks at retirements and evaluates department needs As with many other city departments, the Fire Department is concerned about recruitment and retention of firefighters. In addition, one of their major goals, now and into the future, is to reduce the number of nuisance calls – calls that don’t require a department response – by educating businesses

and community members on smoke alarm maintenance and fire safety.

Engaging the Community The Waite Park Police Department has had a focus on community engagement for the last several years. In addition to inviting residents to City Hall to meet informally with Police Chief Dave Bentrud, the Police Department also engaged with city residents in a variety of other ways, including: • Summer Soccer Youth Program • Waite Park Senior Center • Night to Unite • Metro Citizens Police Academy A plan to establish a Police Reserve Program in 2018 didn’t quite make the to-do list for the Police Department, but Chief Bentrud said it is still a goal for the department, possibly in 2020. He also spent a few minutes addressing the legalization of marijuana. “We can document that traffic accidents increase and crime goes up in areas that have legalized marijuana,” he said. “It’s a terrible idea.”

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Waite Park Chamber

11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. // For businesses interested in Waite Park community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. July 17 Host: Deerwood Bank on-site at 131 6th Ave. S., Ste. 100, Waite Park. Speaker: Brad Steele, St. Cloud VA Health Care System Topic: Hiring Veterans and Veteran Programs August 21 Host: Kensington Title at Waite Park City Hall. Topic: Wire Fraud September 18 Host: Advantage Chiropractic Speaker: David Leapaldt, IIW Topic: Geo-mapping in area schools

52

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

October 16 Host: H & S Heating & A/C Speaker: Great River Regional Library Topic: Your public library as a business resource November 20 Host: Pizza Ranch Speaker: Stearns History Museum December 18 Host: Sentry Bank Special Presentation by the Tech High School Singers


LIVING CLEAN

HEALTHY LIVING

The City of Waite Park has taken a leadership role among area communities when it comes to encouraging residents to get outside and move. One example is the “Healthy Living Trail.” The City of Waite Park completed the new Healthy Living Trail along the walk/bike path on 3rd Street N. The trail already provided a great cardio workout, but 10 exercise stations have been added along the trail to further enhance the experience. City officials consulted with staff at Waite Park business Rejuv Medical to determine the best type of exercise equipment to install, ensuring it was suitable for people of all ages and any fitness level. Pictures and instructions are provided directly on the equipment, so it can be used safely and effectively. Medicinal Flower Gardens A unique element of the Health Living Trail is the flower gardens, which display various plants that have medicinal qualities. City employees built the planter boxes and residents volunteered their time to plant the gardens. Signage along the trail gives information about the useful benefits of the medicinal plants.

Business Broker Sell your business Find a business

Access to over 300 Franchises Commercial Property If you are Selling or Buying Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø

Confidential Business Analysis Sale Structure Confidentially Network & Advertise the Sale Assist & Control Information Flow Support through Due Diligence to Closing

Marv Soldner 40+ Years of Business Experience in Minnesota 320 267-9626 msoldner@tworld.com www.tworldminnesota.com

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

53


Business Spotlight

Word Travels

Russ Panek has learned that providing good service with a good product makes for a good business. By Gail Ivers I flew out there and he really helped. He tweaked a few things and suggested better quality products. It made all the difference.

Business Central: How did you ever get started in this business? Russ Panek: I took a job at a welding shop right out of high school. During that time I got interested in business ownership. I saw an ad in the paper about running your own business doing kitchen and bath resurfacing. I responded to the ad and they sent me some information. There wasn’t a lot of competition so in January 2000 I went to a training in Florida. I started out part-time, and then in April 2001 I went full-time. BC: And it’s been smooth sailing ever since?

Panek: Ohhhh, I had some problems in the beginning. I was a new business owner with so little training – three days. I was selling products that aren’t as good as what we have now. I had to go back and fix for free the things that went wrong. BC: And yet you’re still in business…. Panek: I struggled for a few years and then I started researching tub refinishing supplies. I talked to a guy in Fort Wayne, Indiana, who ran a refinishing company, but had also worked at a fiberglass shower manufacturer. He knew tubs.

All Surface Professionals –––––– PO Box 347, Avon, MN 56310 (320) 260-1539 info@allsurfacepros.com www.allsurfacepros.com

54

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 9

Owners: Russ and Chris Panek Number of Employees: Just one - Russ Chamber member since 2001

BC: What do you like best about being a business owner? Panek: I like the freedom – I get to do the decision-making. I need to problem-shoot and decide what to do. I get to run my own schedule and provide a service to my customers that saves them thousands of dollars every time I walk out the door. I provide a benefit to people who might feel they have few options, or only really expensive options. BC: What’s your biggest challenge? Panek: Growing pains. You do a good job for one person and they tell five people. Word travels. I’m one guy, I can only do so much. Over 50 percent of my business comes from word-of-mouth, which is great for me. I choose to be small with no employees. Chris and I decided we’d stay small, take the work I can handle, and keep a hand on quality control. If I mess up, at least I’m the one who messed up.

Personal Profile Russ Panek, 44

––––––

Family: Wife, Chris, married 19 years; daughter, Rachel, a sophomore in high school; and Chris’ daughter, Nikki, who has three children Hobbies: Obsession with meat barbecue – smoking it, making sausage and summer sausage, hot dogs, bologna, pepper sticks, beef jerky…. Deer hunting; 20-year member of the Avon Fire Department and an emergency medical responder.

Timeline –––––– 1993

Russ Panek graduates from high school and starts work at a welding shop in Avon

2001

Panek opens All Surface Professionals as a full-time business

2005

Panek does his first tub cut, the only one that year. “Now I might do two or three a day.” He adds cultured marble showers to his product line.

2009

Panek builds a shop for his business. Up to this point he has worked in a 1.5 stall garage.

Business Description: Resurfacing, repair, and recoloring of bathtubs, tile, countertops, cabinets and appliances; shower surround installation; fiberglass repair; can turn an existing bathtub into a shower for easy access and safety; also offer bathtub door inserts, and bathtub cut downs.


Highly dedicated to clients. Now, highly regarded by the industry. Congratulations to Michael K. Karl and Matthew R. Nikodym for being named 2019 Forbes Best-In-State Wealth Advisors At UBS, we believe managing a client’s assets goes beyond just the value of their portfolio. It’s about establishing trust, instilling confidence and building personal relationships. Those are just a few of the reasons Michael K. Karl and Matthew R. Nikodym have both been named to the 2019 Forbes/SHOOK list of Best-In-State Wealth Advisors in Minnesota. We’re proud to have people who have the passion and dedication to excellence like Mike and Matt on our team. We think you’ll feel the same about them, too. For more information, contact: Michael K. Karl, CFP®, CIMA® Senior Vice President–Wealth Management Branch Manager Advisory & Brokerage Services Senior Portfolio Manager Retirement Plan Consultant michael.k.karl@ubs.com Matthew R. Nikodym, AAMS®, CRPS® Senior Vice President– Wealth Management Advisory & Brokerage Services Senior Portfolio Manager Retirement Plan Consultant matthew.r.nikodym@ubs.com

UBS Financial Services Inc. 4150 2nd Street South, Suite 500 St. Cloud, MN 56301 320-252-6909 800-444-3809

ubs.com/team/knwm

Forbes Best-In-State Wealth Advisors list is comprised of approximately 2,200 financial advisors. It was developed by SHOOK Research and is based on in-person and telephone due diligence meetings to measure factors such as: quality of practice, industry experience, compliance record, assets under management (which vary from state to state) and revenue. Neither UBS Financial Services Inc. nor its employees pay a fee in exchange for these ratings. Past performance is not an indication of future results. Investment performance is not a criterion because client objectives and risk tolerances vary, and advisors rarely have audited performance reports. Rankings are based on the opinions of SHOOK Research, LLC and not indicative of future performance or representative of any one client’s experience. As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, UBS Financial Services nc. offers both investment advisory services and brokerage services. Investment advisory services and brokerage services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate arrangements. It is important that clients understand the ways in which we conduct business and that they carefully read the agreements and disclosures that we provide to them about the products or services we offer. For more information, visit our website at ubs.com/workingwithus. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, Certified finanCial PlannerTM and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the US, which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. CIMA® is a registered certification mark of the Investments & Wealth InstituteTM in the United States of America and worldwide. For designation disclosures, visit ubs.com/us/en/designationdisclosures. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. © UBS 2019. All rights reserved. ACC_05212019-3 Exp.: 05/31/2020


It’s Your Time to

BUILD!

Let Us Do the Heavy Lifting! One-Time Close Construction to Permanent Program

• Save thousands with one time close!

• One set of home loan closing costs

• 12 month construction draw period

• 13 month rate lock opportunity

• Float down option to relock rate

• 30 year fixed permanent mortgage

• Including remodeling projects

2915 2nd St. S. P.O. Box 160 St. Cloud, MN (320) 654-9555

525 Hwy 10 S. P.O. Box 160 St. Cloud, MN (320) 257-5000

800 Nelson Dr. P.O. Box 509 Clearwater, MN (320) 558-2021

Call for a

FREE CONSULTATION

RYAN DAVIDSON NMLS# 578081 (320) 257-5063 RyanD@LogBank.com

104 Avon Ave. N. P.O. Box 8 Avon, MN (320) 356-7334

24 2nd St. S. P.O. Box 509 Long Prairie, MN (320) 732-6131

TIM SM I TH

NMLS# 533151 (320) 529-4230 TimS@LogBank.com

502 S. Main St. P.O. Box 211 Browerville, MN (320) 594-2215

Profile for St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

July/August 2019 Issue  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

July/August 2019 Issue  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine