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Health – It’s Our Focus

Grace L. & family - Eagle Bend

Jenny’s shopping habits are better now that she uses NuVal® scores. CentraCare Health Foundation’s BLEND (Better Living: Exercise & Nutrition Daily) partnered with Coborn’s to introduce the NuVal® nutritional scoring system to grocery stores. Jenny is more aware of what she is buying and her family is eating healthier.

CentraCare Health — a sharper focus on your health.

centracare.com


ROCK SOLID FOUNDATION SINCE 1950

GENERAL CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT DESIGN/BUILD

St. Joseph, MN 320.363.7781

wgohman.com


6 President’s Letter 8 Editor’s Note 18 Business Calendar 22 Network Central

January/February 2015

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 5 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

PROFIT

36 Cover Story NO REGRETS

After weathering the recession with all employees intact, John and Lizzy Packert, owners of Ron’s Cabinets, are focusing on growth.

46 Feature CAUTIOUSLY OPTIMISTIC

Local business leaders share their forecasts for 2015.

49 Special Focus

FRISBEE GOLF ANYONE? Central Minnesota supports making good decisions for greater health and wellness.

Special Sections

36

A1 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW Since opening its doors over four decades ago, the Farm Show has been a popular community event for Central Minnesota.

51 HEALTH CARE &

10 UPFRONT Valuable and important information designed to guide and educate.

MEDICAL SERVICES

24 BUSINESS TOOLS

Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business.

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Insight Eye Care

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2015 Business Central, LLC

• Tax Guidance

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• The power of persuasion

110 Sixth Avenue South; P.O. Box 487,

• 19 cool maps • Responsive site vs. mobile app

Business Central is published six times a year

St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


Making It Easier to Manage and Improve the Health and Safety of Employees HealthPartners Occupational and Environmental Medicine Services specialize in preventing and managing workplace injuries in a cost effective manner. We understand the challenges you face and our goal is to help you manage the health and wellness of your employees, while exceeding your needs and expectations. Our services include: • Workers compensation injury care and return to work • DOT exam and pre-placement exams • OSHA medical and other surveillance exams • Respirator clearance/fit-testing programs • Hearing conservation programs

Now Occu providi ng pa E nv i t i o n a l a r onm nd M e d e ntal ic S e r v in e i ce s

• And more!

Karyn Leniek, MD, MPH Trained and board-eligible Occupational Medicine physician, Board certified in Preventive Medicine

for more information, contact Nicole Anderson

320-203-2388 Nicole.E.Anderson@hpcmc.com | hpcmc.com/occmed

This service is available to all companies. HealthPartners insurance is not needed.


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President’s Letter MAIN PHONE

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Business Central!

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Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5

320-251-2940

PROGRAM HOTLINE 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM

Business Central Magazine is 15 years old. This seems like an unbelievable milestone to me. I clearly remember walking into Managing Editor Gail Ivers’ office in 1998, tossing the Bloomington Chamber’s new magazine on her desk and saying, “I want to do this; what do you think???” Gail quickly (and excitedly) replied, “I’ve ALWAYS wanted to do a magazine like this. Let me work on it . . . .” Within weeks Gail brought several publishers to the table, we discussed the project and settled on using the same publisher as the Bloomington Chamber. Bloomington’s magazine only lasted a few years, due to the crowded magazine market in the Twin Cities. I would also say they most likely had no one on their staff with the passion, commitment and integrity for their magazine to match that which Gail has for ours. One thing is for certain: it takes a village to publish a successful magazine. We love our readers, but we could not exist without our advertisers. When we brought Business Central to Central Minnesota, we provided a venue and readership that was different from any other in the area. Our businesses responded enthusiastically to that offer. Four organizations have been with us since the beginning and have advertised in every issue: • Sandy Neutzling, Jennings Insurance • Bob Strack, Strack Companies • St. Cloud Hospital/CentraCare Health • Stearns Bank Sandy Neutzling and Bob Strack were Chamber Board members and served consecutively as chairs of the Board during the earliest years of the magazine. It would have been easy for them to pass the torch to others as their Board terms ended, but they continued to support the magazine. We believe the magazine has helped them

|

AUTOMATED RESERVATION LINE 320-656-3826

ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF PRESIDENT Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 VICE PRESIDENT Gail Ivers, ext. 109 DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106

The team! From left: Wendy Hendricks, Yola Hartmann, Gail Ivers, Teresa Bohnen

be even more successful in our community. St. Cloud Hospital/CentraCare Health and Stearns Bank have also maintained premium advertising positions through the years. We thank them for supporting the magazine and helping to make it a reality. There are others who have worked tirelessly to make Business Central what it is today. Yola Hartmann, our stalwart design, production, ad traffic and circulation manager. Yola is responsible for the magazine’s look and attitude – and has spent countless hours on the redesign (and trying to please everyone) that we unveil with this issue. Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography, our long-time photographer who does superior work with our cover stars. And, of course, a big thank you to Wendy Hendricks, our associate publisher/sales agent. Wendy has stuck with us through everything the last 15 years has brought, performing expertly in her important role. Wendy has a passion for this magazine that is only matched by Gail’s. She is a consummate professional, and we are extraordinarily fortunate to have retained her with this publication for its entire life. Did I say thank you to Gail? Thanks again, Gail. It’s been a wonderful ride!!

SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR Virginia Kroll, ext. 105 COMMUNICATIONS & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Whitney Bina, ext.130

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Sharon Henry, ext. 124 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Cindy Swarthout, ext. 100

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF MAIN PHONE | 320-251-4170 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Julie Lunning, ext. 111

SALES MANAGER Nikki Fisher, ext. 112

DIRECTOR OF CONVENTION SALES Lori Cates, ext. 113

SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR Dana Randt, ext. 110

DIRECTOR OF SPORTS & SPECIAL EVENTS Kelly Sayre, ext. 128 DIRECTOR OF VISITOR SERVICES Jean Robbins, ext. 129

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Carrie Zwack, ext. 100

2014-15 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Board Vice Chair

Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care

Dan Bittman, Sauk Rapids-Rice School District

Dolora Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs

Dave Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Jayne Greeney Schill, St. Cloud Area School District #742 Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

MEMBERSHIP SALES SPECIALIST Jaime Buley, ext. 134

John Herges, Falcon National Bank, Past Board Chair Dennis Host, Coborn’s Inc.

Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, Inc., Board Chair Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Dr. Earl Potter, III, St. Cloud State University Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services Melinda Vonderahe, Times Media Bea Winkler, Pine Cone Pet Hospital Chriss Wohlleber, Le St. Germain Suite Hotel


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Editor’s Note

Who Knew?

PUBLISHER Teresa Bohnen

T

his issue marks our 15th anniversary of producing Business Central. I remember being pretty excited when we secured that final sponsor and realized we had a year’s worth of financing. Who knew our fantasy of a business magazine for Central Minnesota would one day be a teenager. Who knew that we would pick up Associate Publisher Wendy Hendricks after only two issues. Our publishing partner at the time, Peter McNiff, wooed Wendy away from the St. Cloud Times. Wendy single-handedly generates our advertising support, weathered the worst recession in recent history, and enjoyed a record year in 2014. Peter has moved on to other projects, but Business Central exists in large part because of Wendy, and Wendy is with us because of Peter. As legacies go, that’s not bad. Who knew we’d out-last not one, not two, not three, but four other magazines. Though that’s not as easy as I make it sound. We almost missed the November 2008 issue because… Who knew we’d find ourselves on the periphery of the Tom Petters Ponzi scandal. In the space of just a few months our publisher brought in Tom Petters as a financing partner, Petters completely absorbed the publishing company, and Petters was raided by the federal government. All we could do was watch from a distance as all of our magazine files went into the black hole that had been Tom Petters’ holdings. Who knew that Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media, would join us in 2003 and ultimately be our lifeline to wresting BC out of the hands of the Tom Petters’ bankruptcy proceedings. Petters’ publishing properties were purchased by yet another magazine publisher and Business Central was included in the purchase. Chamber President Teresa Bohnen contacted the new publisher and explained that we owned the title

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MANAGING EDITOR Gail Ivers ASSOCIATE EDITOR Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS King Banaian, St. Cloud State University

Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Whitney Bina, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle wordingforyou

Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Julie Fisk, Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A.

The issue that almost wasn’t: Nov. 2008. In October 2008 we abruptly took over production of Business Central. Talk about team work! The only thing we forgot to do was put the date on the magazine.

to Business Central. He, in turn, had contracted with Yola to clean up the publishing files and told her to give us whatever we needed. Whew. Who knew that office administrator Judy Zetterlund would become an old hand at magazine jargon. I still crack up when I think about discussing selfpublishing the magazine and Judy’s role, including contracts, maps, and tearsheets. She said, “Let me tell you what I just heard: Blah, blah, blah, Judy.” As good Minnesotans it’s not in our nature to toot our horn too loudly. So we’re sharing the spotlight in this issue with other local businesses that are turning 15 in 2015. (See the story on page 36) Some of them you know – Netgain and J.F. Kruse Jewelers have been featured in these pages before. But we have a few new ones, including Ron’s Cabinets, our cover story, which, like Business Central, broke away from its founding partner and is thriving. So here we are 15 years later and looking forward to a few more good years. Who knew? Until next issue,

Steve Greenfield, Greenfield Public Relations Jamie Henkemeyer, CliftonLarsonAllen Sharon Henry, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University

Donniel Robinson, Robinson Writes Melinda Sanders, Central Minn. Community Foundation Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Bob White, Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

ADVERTISING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/SALES Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing AD TRAFFIC & CIRCULATION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART DESIGN & PRODUCTION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media COVER PHOTO Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman CORPORATE SPONSOR

110 Sixth Avenue South P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT Wendy Hendricks, (320) 656-3808 EDITORIAL SUGGESTIONS CAN BE MADE IN WRITING TO: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.


WE’RE GOING THROUGH A

GROWTH

SPURT. BUT WE’LL NEVER OUTGROW GIVING.

In the last three years, Marco’s gone through quite a growth spurt. We’ve doubled our workforce and expanded from 11 locations to 40. That’s good news for the communities we serve. We give up to 5% of our pretax profits to local programs that make our communities stronger. Because growing is better when we’re doing it together.

marconet.com


14 Getting Going 15 People to Know 18 Business Calendar 20 The Trouble with Business

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Circle of Safety

NEWS REEL

Good leaders create a secure environment that leads to adaptive, competent teams. By Dr. Fred Hill Author Simon Sinek writes: “Why do only a few people get to say ‘I love my Job’? It seems unfair that finding fulfillment at work is like winning a lottery; that only a few lucky ones get to feel valued by their organizations, to feel like they belong….in the world of work the best organizations foster truth and cooperation because their leaders build a Circle of Safety that separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside.” Leaders Eat Last contains 27 chapters organized in eight parts. The eight parts are: 1. Our Need to Feel Safe 2. Powerful Forces 3. Reality 4. How We Got Here 5. The Abstract Challenge 6. Destructive Abundance 7. Society of Addicts 8. Becoming a Leader I like the five chapters (17 – 21) in Part 6. Each of these chapters contains a

DID YOU KNOW?

Leaders Eat Last; Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t by Simon Sinek, Penguin Group, New York, 2014, ISBN 978-1-59184-532-4

Leadership Lesson. Lesson 1. So Goes the Culture, So Goes the Company Lesson 2. So Goes the Leader, So Goes the Culture Lesson 3. Integrity Matters Lesson 4. Friends Matter Lesson 5. Lead the People, Not the Numbers We are asked to ponder the following: Leadership

is not a license to do less; it is a responsibility to do more. And that’s the trouble. Leadership takes work. It is about committing to the well-being of those in our care and having a willingness to make sacrifices to see their interests advanced so that they may carry our banner long after we are gone. Sinek concludes that “Leaders are the ones who run headfirst into the unknown. They rush towards the danger. They put their own interests aside to protect us or pull us into the future. Leaders would sooner sacrifice what is theirs to save what is ours. And they would never sacrifice what is ours to save what is theirs. This is what it means to be a leader.” Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor of Learning Resources and Services, at St. Cloud State University.

Rambow Inc. expands

Rambow Inc., a New London company that specializes in custom embroidery and screen-printed apparel and promotional items, is expanding its operations and creating 15 full-time jobs as it increases its sales outside of Minnesota. The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) is assisting with the expansion with an $84,000 grant from the Minnesota Job Creation Fund.

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WILKENING JOINS WESTWOOD PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Brad Wilkening joined Westwood Professional Services as a project manager, supporting Westwood’s land division. He works on commercial, residential and medical projects throughout Central Minnesota.

PROCESSPRO RECOGNIZED Daniel Erickson, project manager, ProcessPro, received a Silver Stevie Award in the “Product Developer of the Year” category at the 12th Annual American Business Awards in San Francisco. Kate Orbeck and Karly Peters also received recognition as finalists in the 11th Annual Stevie Awards for Women in Business. Orbeck, marketing coordinator, was named finalist for “Employee of the Year-Business-All Other Industries,” and Peters, marketing manager, was named finalist for “Woman of the Year-Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations.”

KLUGHERZ HONORED Becker’s Hospital Review named Greg Klugherz, chief financial officer, CentraCare Health, to the list of “150 Hospital and Health Systems CFOs to Know.” The annual list recognizes men and women who demonstrate excellence in health care financial management by leading the largest, financially successful health care organizations in the United States.


DAYTA UNIVERSITY SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING SEMINAR

DAYTA Marketing comes from humble beginnings. What once was John and Luke working in a basement with spiders is now a social media marketing agency employing 25 people (and counting). We manage hundreds of social media strategies for businesses and organizations and now we all walk UP the stairs to get to our offices.

We found last year’s event very valuable to say the least! In fact one of the problems was that I didn’t have enough time to attend everything I wanted to. So Erin (our Marketing Director) and I split the day to cover everything. ”

DAYTA University also has humble beginnings. It began as a "lunch and learn" gathering of people who wanted to learn social media for their businesses. The attendees loved these sessions! They received actionable education which they could put to use, in the real world, right away.

We're going BIG with DAYTA U. Nine cities in six states in 2015, but it all starts at home. If you’re looking to harness the power of social media for your business, join us at the St. Cloud River’s Edge Convention Center on Friday, March 27th, 2015. In addition to the educational classes, this year we’ve also added a personal Q&A session and a networking after party.

A primary initiative within the company is expanding DAYTA University. DAYTA U is a one day social media seminar designed for small business owners, entrepreneurs, marketing professionals, and those who want to leverage the power of social media. Learn how a business can utilize the intricacies of individual social media platforms and understand the science and art behind them. Here are some comments from previous attendees: DAYTA U provides an excellent opportunity for both social media novices as well as for the social media practicing professionals. DAYTA’s staff members are both excellent teachers and practitioners - their high energy, enthusiasm, and knowledge of social media is in great supply. I promise you will learn a great deal of practical and useful information that you can put to immediate use.

Dean Kiffmeyer, Sales Manager at Central McGowan

REGULAR TICKET PRICE: $249

PROMO CODE:

Register before February 1 to receive our early bird special of:

Use this promo code to receive early bird pricing:

$199

BIZCENTRAL

ST

Included with registration is a box lunch and drink ticket for the networking after party. Registration and Event Information: www.daytamarketing.com/dayta-u

Lydia M, Professional Adjunct Professor

LEARN FROM THE PEOPLE WHO ACTUALLY DO THE WORK. Rivers Edge Convention Center, March 27TH, 2015

ANDREW LEINTZ

ELLIE BACKES

Event Sponsorship Opportunites: andrew@daytamarketing.com

Questions and Registration: ellie@daytamarketing.com

ST. CLOUD, MN | STEVENS POINT, WI | FARGO, ND | SIOUX FALLS, SD | OMAHA, NE | EAU CLAIRE, WI | GREEN BAY, WI | DES MOINES, IA | ROCHESTER, MN


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UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL MARCO RECEIVES RECOGNITION, EXPANDS, HIRES Fortune Magazine named Marco, Inc. one of the 50 Best Small & Medium Workplaces in the nation. Marco received high rankings in six focus areas of the assessment used to recognize organization: offering positive challenges, atmosphere, rewards, pride, communication, and bosses. The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal named the company as one of the “Fast 50,” the fastest-growing privately held companies in Minnesota. Recognition is based on revenue growth from 2011-2013. Marco purchased Illinois Valley Business Equipment (IVBE), a copier and printer company located in Peru, Bloomington and Peoria, Illinois. This is the 11th acquisition for Marco in the past three years. Employees of IVBE join the Marco staff. Marco recently hired the following people: • Sarah Anderson – returns and warranty representative • Ben Borgert, Paris Sauers, Matt Green, Chris Schuh – support desk technicians • Katelyn Butkowski – contract and service billing representative • Tina Davis – software solutions business analyst • April Eyvindsson, Melissa McCoy- contracts coordinators • Frank Haydon – field service technician • Doug Johnson, Jeff Keenan – voice systems engineers • Travis Overman –service representative • Matt Sing – inside sales representative

YMCA RECEIVES DONATION Bernick’s Beverages and Vending donated $500,000 to help build a new St. Cloud Area YMCA Aquatics and Community Center. This is the largest gift Bernick’s has donated to a single project. With this gift, over $15.5 million has been committed to the community center project.

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United We Fly

Access by air is a critical component of Central Minnesota’s economic future. By Robert White

A

ccess to commercial air service at the St. Cloud Regional Airport is not simply a luxury. It is a key component to the renaissance our dynamic, growing community is experiencing. Bold initiatives, such as securing air service, cannot be accomplished by one person or group. They are the responsibility of the entire community. In the case of air service, community members must use and grow it in order to secure the transportation platform our community needs for the 21st Century. The future growth and prosperity of our region hinges on our actions right now. This is your call to action. The Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation (GSDC), in partnership with the City of St. Cloud,

secured leisure air service in 2012 with Allegiant Airlines’ flights to Mesa, Arizona (IWA). In 2014, we celebrated the addition of twice-daily direct flights between St. Cloud (STC) and Chicago, O’Hare (ORD). Thousands of volunteer hours and hundreds of thousands of dollars from local businesses and organizations were needed to accomplish this. It’s tempting to rest on our laurels, but we have not yet truly achieved success. Instead, now is a critical time when we need to prove that we are serious about sustaining and growing the air service out of St. Cloud. It’s not enough to just have seats. We must fill those seats – right now. We know the first six months of service between

STC and ORD have not been without mishaps. Many of the problems encountered have been out of our control and attributed to the nature of air travel, as in the case of weather and technical problems at Chicago, O’Hare. Other problems are being aggressively addressed right now by teams of area business people, industry experts, and volunteers. Please know there is no way, having worked this hard, we are going to shrug our shoulders at these challenges as we near our goal. We remain committed, but we need your commitment – and your action, right now. We can list the many reasons to fly STC to ORD but this is not a sales pitch. It is a call to action. If you and your colleagues travel by air, use STC whenever possible, and book those flights right now. You may encounter inconveniences or need to change a routine. However, by putting up with these challenges in the short term, your travel options and experiences will improve quickly for the long term. Robert White is the board chair of the Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation. He is a retired CEO of Wolters Kluwer and a lifelong resident of St. Cloud.


IN THE NEWS

50 Years Young

O

n February 1, 2015 Chamber Special Events Coordinator Virginia “Ginny” Kroll will celebrate 50 years at the Chamber. In 1965, at age 18, she was one of only four employees and provided support and secretarial services to a variety of different Chamber events – some of which no longer exist. In 1996 she was named special events coordinator and during the past 18 years has raised over $3 million in revenue for the Chamber…not counting the memberships she has saved as the membership retention specialist.

TOP HATS : MILESTONES

35 year Chamber member Manpower, offering staffing service, recruiting, human resource, payroll, and temporary and permanent placement services, 425 E St. Germain St., Suite 103, St. Cloud. Pictured: Shawn Brannan, Dan Deavel, Julie Frana, Chris Jacques, Dan Bates and Kris Hellickson.

50 years in business Schlenner Wenner & Co., certified public accounting firm providing accounting, auditing, tax and consulting services, 630 Roosevelt Road, Suite 201, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Jim Schlenner, Steve Schueller, Brian Bastian and Julie Forsberg.

TOP 25

CONWAY, DEUTH & SCHMIESING Michael R. Zager CPA, CSEP™

Michael A. Johnson CPA, CVA, ABV

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J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL INITIATIVE FOUNDATION HIRES

Is the Customer Always Right? Maybe, but is it the right customer? By Greg Vandal

The Initiative Foundation added two new staff members: Elise Ristau, fund development specialist, and LeRae Foehrenbacher, fund development assistant.

STEARNS HISTORY MUSEUM APPOINTS CEO, COO Jim Davis joined the Stearns History Museum as chief executive officer. Davis retired as vice president for corporate services from CentraCare Health. Ann Meline, deputy director for the museum since 1985, was named chief operating officer and manages the day-to-day museum operations.

SULLIVAN JOINS QUINLIVAN & HUGHES John A. Sullivan joined Quinlivan & Hughes P.A. as an associate attorney. He practices in the areas of civil litigation, medical malpractice defense and insurance defense. Sullivan, raised in the St. Cloud area, earned his B.A. from St. John’s University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.

SCTCC, COLUMBIA GEAR RECEIVE GRANT Columbia Gear, in partnership with St. Cloud Technical and Community College (SCTCC), received a $300,000 grant from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) to develop a curriculum for 175 employees, including 25 apprentices and 50 new hires. Courses include: Action Selling for Sales Workers; Blueprint Reading; Machining Math and GD&T for apprentice and entry-level machinists; and Gear Inspection & Troubleshooting for quality engineers, among others.

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“T

he customer is always right.” This adage, if accepted between consultant and client, establishes a context for the business relationship. The wishes of the client seemingly become preeminent in the transaction and drive the relationship. But, what should “right” really mean? A couple of years back, I led a superintendent search for a school district some distance from here. Minnesota’s Data Practices Act is quite clear about how public meetings must be conducted. The board for a private enterprise can go behind closed doors to make important decisions. A public entity, however, has to act in the full “light of day.” It cannot adjourn to the shadows to take up the people’s business. As this school board narrowed the candidate list down to some impressive finalists, one board member wanted to continue discussions behind closed doors. “Screw the open meeting law,” the person argued.

“We need to get this done like any other business can do, and I want to hear what other board members have to say without worrying about the reaction of an audience.” The group was dutifully reminded about its obligation to keep everything open and legal, and that argument ultimately prevailed. But I was faced with the very real prospect that the client might decide to engage in a hiring practice that would have broken the law. I was prepared to step away from a contract had that occurred. A shrewd business owner in the professional services sector once told me a company has to be prepared to fire a customer. The successful entrepreneur argued that the customer is not only not “always right,” but sometimes is so far wrong that the business relationship simply can’t be sustained. Then, it is time to separate services, to walk away from the client before real damage is done. Of course, it’s best if this can be discerned before a contract is written. Just

as wise customers conduct market research on potential vendors before services are engaged, a savvy professional does background work on a prospective client. The questions a consultant needs to have answered are much the same as those the customer might ask: What is the reputation of the prospective client? How have previous business relationships gone? What is the likelihood of a good fit? Are the objectives clear and attainable? Are the timelines reasonable? What is the prospect for mutual success? If the answers reveal that the business relationship somehow doesn’t “feel” right, that it’s likely to be filled with turmoil, then it might be best to keep shopping for clients. In the minds of some, the customer is always right. But, one has to be open to the prospect that for you, it might also be the wrong customer.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@ voxliberi.com.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Tauna Quimby Girl Scouts of MN & WI Lakes & Pines ____________

(320) 252-2952 tquimby@gslakes andpines.org Chair, Membership & Workforce Development Division

____________

The Membership Division is responsible for all marketing and membership activities, including workforce development, networking programs and all of the Chamber’s special events.

Brian Olson

Mark J. Traut Wells ____________ (320) 251-5090 brianolson@jetup.net Chair, Central Minnesota Farm Show Committee

____________

This committee is responsible for planning and organizing the Central Minnesota Farm Show, the largest agri-business expo of its type in the Upper Midwest. For more information on the Farm Show, see the insert in this issue of Business Central.

Amanda Henry

Marilyn Birkland

Jane DeAustin

Times Media ____________

Central Minnesota Builders Assoc. ____________

(320) 259-8222 ahenry@hit4you.net Chair: Business Development Council

(320) 255-8794 mbirkland@stcloud. gannett.com Chair, Marketing Committee

(320) 251-4382 jdeaustin@aol.com Chair, Government Affairs Committee

The purpose of the Business Development Council is to provide training and education for Chamber members and their employees to help their businesses thrive. Programs include a variety of seminars, workshops, and certificate programs.

The Marketing Committee is responsible for the overall marketing efforts of the Chamber of Commerce, including communication materials, advertising, publications, the website, promotional programs, and organizational research.

The Government Affairs Committee researches legislative issues, makes recommendations to the Board of Directors regarding legislative policy positions, organizes trips to the Capitol and legislative updates during the session.

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UpFront NEW AT THE TOP

NEWS REEL ST. CLOUD HOSPITAL RECOGNIZED

Jeff Schwiebert, 55 School superintendent of Sartell/St. Stephen ISD 748

Truven Health Analytics, a leading health care data company, named CentraCare Heart & Vascular Center at St. Cloud Hospital as one of the nation’s 50 Top Cardiovascular Hospitals. The Top 50 heart hospitals show significantly higher survival rates, lower costs, fewer complications, and shorter hospital stays.

When did you start in your current position? July 1, 2014

UNITED WAY HIRES

United Way of Central Minnesota hired the following individuals: Jenny Theis, resource development associate, and Leah Voss, community impact coordinator.

SCHWEGMAN SERVES ON INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL Steve Schwegman, Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A., served on the faculty at the International Association of Defense Council’s (IADC) 42nd Annual Trial Day Academy at Stanford Law School in Palo Alto, CA. Faculty chosen to participate represent the leading defense lawyers from across the country. The seven day program blends faculty instruction and demonstration with individual student participation.

Previous employer: School superintendent at North Scott CSD, Eldridge, IA What will you miss most about your previous position? Working with quality people who have a great passion for public education

What are you looking forward to the most in your new position? Working with quality people who have a passion for public education. I know this is the same, but that is what makes my job doable as well as enjoyable. You have to surround yourself with quality people to accomplish any set of important goals and I have been fortunate to work with many great people. The Sartell/St. Stephen School District is full of these kind of people and I look

forward to meeting many over the coming years. Where did you grow up? Iowa and Minnesota. Fifty weeks of each of the past 50 years I’ve been in Iowa and two weeks in Minnesota. My grandparents bought a cabin in North Central Minnesota in 1963 and I have spent time there every year since. What are your hobbies? Watching team sports, particularly high school and college. I coached football, basketball and baseball for 22 years.

Fun fact: As a history teacher growing up around agriculture, I have great respect for the generation of Americans who developed the Midwest. I enjoy ag history and we owned a pair of draft horses when my kids were in school to relive some of that history of my grandparents’ generation.

TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

KERBER JOINS THELEN Mary Ellen Kerber joined Thelen as an account executive. Kerber brings over 20 years of marketing communications, branding and strategic planning experience to the St. Cloudbased advertising and marketing firm.

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Audio Video Extremes, including home theater, home automation, custom lighting, remote starts, boats and ATVs and much more, 1131 2nd St. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Beth Putz, Jodi Erkens, Richard Erkens and Brenda Eisenschenk.

Bumble Bee Express & Rolloff, LLC, offering roll-offs for construction, roofing, household clean up, and more. Family owned and operated. 5999 125th Ave., Clear Lake. Pictured: Beth Putz, Toni Knutson, Sandra Cox and Tauna Quimby.

Dave Cowley Incentives, a promotions company with over 35 years of experience, 32002 Narnia Lane, Avon. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Ali Andreasen and Tauna Quimby.

Gulfeagle Supply, a distributor of professional exterior building materials including both low-slope and steep-slope roofing, siding, windows, decking and more, 539 E St. Germain St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Dawn Koskinen, Jen Peters, John Capen and Sheri Moran.


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I want to get more connected in the community.” Beth KinyuaGathetu • St. Cloud Leadership Class 2014-15

We’d like to hire another experienced engineer and technician to assist with Central Minnesota and North Dakota projects.” Will Huston • Westwood Professional Services

For over 90 years, two names have been synonymous with quality legal representation in central Minnesota. Quinlivan and Hughes. Today our firm has grown to 20 attorneys practicing with proven success in nearly every aspect of law. From business and employment, to trust and estate planning, to representing clients in personal injury and business related lawsuits, there are two names you can trust for all of your legal needs. Quinlivan and Hughes.

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UpFront

NEWS REEL METRO BUS EMPLOYEES HONORED The Minnesota Public Transit Association named Jerry Gillman, Metro Bus, the Minnesota Bus Operator of the Year. Gillman has 15 years of experience driving for the Dial-a-Ride program at Metro Bus. He also serves as a driver instructor and a local union steward. Ed Yorek, maintenance manager, St. Cloud Metro Bus, received a Sustainability All-Star award from Green Fleet magazine. This award recognizes fleet professionals who have made a significant contribution to environmental sustainability and fleet efficiencies in the industry. Yorek’s recognition stemmed from his work on Metro Bus’ conversion to Compressed Natural Gas (CNG).

CENTRACARE HIRES, BREAKS GROUND

Three new physicians joined CentraCare Clinic: • Ellen Brown, MD, FACOG: obstetrician and gynecologist, CentraCare Clinic – Health Plaza • Abigail Taylor, MD: internal medicine physician, CentraCare Clinic – River Campus • Chris Thompson, MD: family medicine physician , CentraCare Clinic – Health Plaza CentraCare Health-Sauk Centre plans to break ground in spring 2015 on a 7,600 square-foot expansion. The $1.7 million addition features 15 new exam rooms and opens in late fall 2015. Compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@ BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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BCCalendar GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

JAN/FEB 2015

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar. SPOTLIGHT

FEBRUARY 24, 25 & 26 FROM 9 A .M. - 4 P.M.

Central Minnesota Farm Show The largest show of its kind in the Upper Midwest! Meet exhibitors from all areas of the agriculture industry. Free and open to the public. February 24-26 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the River’s Edge Convention Center. See the Central Minnesota Farm Show Guide in this issue for more information on the 2015 Farm Show.

JANUARY 7 & FEBRUARY 4

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge.

February 4, “How to Engage Employees with Volunteerism” presented by Andrea Peters-Swenson, Capital One 360, and Jon Ruis, United Way of Central MN, sponsored by Watab Communications.

Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m. at

JANUARY 7

the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public.

Minnesota Chamber Session Priorities

January 7: sponsored by Pro Staff with Sharon Sorenson, Heartland Organizing, presenting “What is Your Productivity Forecast for 2015.”

The kickoff event to the 2015 legislative session. Network with business and public policy leaders from across the state, and gain practical knowledge on how to advance your priorities. 4 – 9 p.m. To be added

to the waiting list email ltomasetti@mnchamber.com. January 7: St. Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul.

FEBRUARY 13

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S. February 13: Special Guest Minnesota Commissioner of Transportation Charles A. Zelle.


JANUARY 15 & FEBRUARY 11

Business After Hours A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. January 15: hosted by Apollo, a division of North Risk Partners, 622 Roosevelt Rd., St. Cloud. February 11: hosted by Stearns Bank, 4191 2nd St. S, St. Cloud

JANUARY 21 & FEBRUARY 18

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in Waite Park issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. January 21: Hosted by College of Saint Benedict Gorecki Center at Waite Park City Hall, 19 13th Ave. N. Includes a presentation on “Fly St. Cloud” by Bill Towle, director, St. Cloud Airport. February 18: “Waite Park State of the City Address” by Waite Park Mayor Rick Miller, hosted by Falcon National Bank at the Waite Park American Legion, 17 2nd Ave. N, Waite Park.

Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids, with a presentation by Brian Hart, Sandler Training, on “Multitasking – Fact and Fiction.” February 26, hosted by C4 Welding on-site at 11 Industrial Blvd., Sauk Rapids. Includes a presentation by Sauk Rapids Police Chief Perry Beise on “What Businesses Can Do to Stay Safe.”

FEBRUARY 18 & 19

St. Cloud State University Winter Economic Institute This annual event, co-hosted by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, gathers the best minds in the region and the country to share their thoughts and ideas on various timely economic issues. Register online at stcloudstate.edu/winterinstitute. All programs are open to the public. February 18: Economic Outlook: Leading economists preview the year ahead from a national, state, and local perspective. 5 – 6:30 p.m., Best Western Kelly Inn, St. Cloud. The Economic Outlook is free; $25 for the reception that follows.

For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

February 19: Community Engagement programming including a panel discussion at noon of local business leaders discussing enhancements they have made to attract the best possible workforce. At 2 p.m. keynote speaker David Levinson, University of Minnesota, will discuss the economics of transportation, roads, and growth. 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., St. Cloud State University Atwood Center; $40 for the day, including breakfast and lunch.

January 22, hosted by 360 Chiropractic at the Sauk

For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940.

JANUARY 22 & FEBRUARY 26

Sauk Rapids Chamber

Changing the Look of Central Minnesota

Rice Building Systems continues to build on its 60+ year reputation as a leading design/build contractor serving Central Minnesota.

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UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Competitive Edge

Providing ongoing management training to even your best leaders will give your organization an edge over the competition. By Julie Fisk and Melinda Sanders upon age, the court awarded punitive damages against his dealership. Even experienced supervisors need ongoing training. Millions of dollars were awarded in a retaliation lawsuit involving a female employee who was fired after complaining of sexual harassment. The investigation revealed that the employee pushed one of the alleged harassers away from her during the incident in question. The supervisor determined that this violated the company’s anti-violence policy and acted without considering the larger situation.

I

f employees are not aligned around your organization’s mission or are not focused on their jobs, your organization will not be as effective as it can be, resulting in reduced production, sales and profits. When properly trained, supervisors and managers are your organization’s first line of defense. They can react quickly and appropriately to issues ranging from safety to preventing

unlawful discrimination. When not properly trained, they can become a liability. Their response is one that government investigators, lawyers and juries scrutinize when determining whether or not your organization handled a matter lawfully. Courts do not grant untrained supervisors any slack. When the general manager of a car dealership admitted he didn’t know it was unlawful to discriminate based

Needed Knowledge and Skills Employers are wise to invest in ongoing training for managers and supervisors designed to help them better manage people – the biggest asset, and potential liability, most employers have. In order to reduce legal risk, supervisors and managers need to know workplace rules, have a basic understanding of key laws affecting and protecting employees, and understand what types of situations may result in a lawsuit and require the help of Human

Resources or an officer in your organization. Supervisors and managers should also be equipped with effective communication, conflict resolution and even mediation skills. Work conflicts frequently arise because of a failure to communicate (typically a failure to listen). When given the proper training and tools, supervisors and managers can help employees communicate effectively, navigate conflict and keep productivity high. Equally important, supervisors and managers need to align the employees they supervise around the organization’s mission and the employee’s own part in carrying out that mission. Supervisors need to determine what motivates a particular employee, and redirect and coach employees into meeting expected performance goals. Whether a born leader or not, training and more training is particularly important for individuals who have recently been given the responsibility to supervise employees. More effective management of people leads to higher productivity, better retention and engagement of employees, and less risk.

contributors Julie Fisk is an attorney at Quinlivan & Hughes, in St. Cloud. She practices in the areas of employment law and business law. Melinda Sanders is the director of donor relations for the Central Minnesota Community Foundation. Previously, she practiced law with Quinlivan & Hughes, specializing in employment law and estate planning.

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GROW

KEEPING ON TOPIC Each year the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce offers a Supervisor Development Training Certificate. This series of courses – five required classes, plus the choice of one elective – gives both new and experienced supervisors the necessary tools to be more effective. Topics range from hiring for retention to motivating employees to conflict management. The cost is $525 for six sessions; St. Cloud Area, Waite Park and Sauk Rapids Chamber members receive a substantial discount. The program kicks off on Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 8 a.m. with Employment Law: Keeping You and Your Employer Out of Trouble. For more information, contact Whitney Bina at 320-656-3830, wbina@ StCloudAreaChamber.com or go online to www.Business CentralMagazine.com

ON THE CALENDAR

FEBRUARY 24

St. Cloud Area Evening at the Capital An annual event to meet state legislators and introduce them to the organization you represent. Join us for a relaxed and informal evening in our state capital and help our legislators understand the needs of Central Minnesota. Free transportation is available. Registration is required: $20 for Chamber members; $30 for the general public. February 24: 5-7 p.m. at the Best Western Kelly Inn St. Paul – 161 St. Anthony Ave., St. Paul.

Online On-Trend Onbelievable Mobile Websites Social Media Marketing Search Engine Marketing Search Engine Optimization

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

The Chamber’s Star Celebration provided plenty of networking and volunteer recognition. Royce Nies, KDV (L); Kris Hellickson, Rengel Printing; and Mike Forsberg, Forsberg Investments and Insurance.

Chamber Board Chair Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, presents the gavel plaque to outgoing Board Chair, John Herges, Falcon National Bank.

Brian Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs (L) and Keith Franklin, Franklin Outdoor Advertising

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Kelly Troska, St. Cloud Technical & Community College

Inese Mehr, Rengel Printing and Bob Ruetter, Central Minn. Council Boy Scouts of America

D’Narius Lewis, Words Worth Listening Academy and Mary Dingmann, Alphay International

Todd Myra, Todd Myra Photography

Tanya Johnson, ABRA Auto Body & Glass (L) and Chriss Wohlleber, Le St-Germain Suite Hotel


Jim Beck, Minnesota School of Business and Kristen Berreau, St. Cloud Overhead Door

King Banaian and Amber Schultz, St. Cloud State University

Lance Barthel, Batteries Plus Bulbs (L); Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells; and Jessica Bitz, Falcon National Bank

GROW

The Annual Technology & Education Conference had a little something for everyone – from understanding Google analytics to the latest information on the Affordable Care Act.

Ken Ritterspach, EOS Worldwide, shared tips on ensuring you have the right employees in the right jobs

Dave Garrison, Rasmussen, discussed global trends in technology, including IoT: the Internet of Things.

A popular topic at the 2014 Technology and Education Conference, ‘Gone Google?’ offered ideas on how businesses can save money while working in a mobile and flexible environment.

Kristen Carlson, St. Cloud State University, provided design principles for creating a successful website.

About 150 people attended the 2014 Technology & Education Conference.

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BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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26 29 32

Management Toolkit Entreprenuerism Economy Central by Falcon Bank

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RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

TECH STRATEGIES

SOCIAL SELLING

Sales professionals who use social media to interact with prospects are discovering bottom line results. By Dawn Zimmerman

S

ocial selling leaders create 45 percent more opportunities, are 51 percent more likely to achieve quota and 80 percent more productive, according to a recent report released by LinkedIn. My work with leading sales professionals validates those statistics. Sales leaders who use social selling skills and leverage the capabilities of tools like LinkedIn and Twitter are higher performers. They are landing more sales than their peers. Why does social selling make such a difference? For decades, we have known that the majority of a buyer’s journey is completed before that person gets to a sale. The power and information of the Internet has

only accelerated that. Much of the product research is conducted before a meeting is ever initiated. So how do you intersect? That’s where social selling comes in. Social selling is when sales professionals use social media to interact directly with their prospects. The sales professionals provide value by offering thoughtful content and answering questions until the prospect is ready to buy. Here are a few ways to get your feet wet as a social seller on a few common social media tools: LinkedIn Leveraging LinkedIn for social selling requires a multi-faceted

strategy that only begins with optimizing your profile and constantly adding connections. Social sellers use LinkedIn to gain significant intelligence on prospects – the organizations, the decision makers and the leadership structure. They also build lists, set up search alerts and lead recommendations, share valuable content, and send personal messages at strategic times to new connections to build the relationship. LinkedIn has paid plans with these features designed for sales professionals. Blogs Content marketing drives inbound leads. Results validate that again and again. Yes, blogs take time. But those who have executed them for the purpose of lead generation will tell you that they are worth the time. Blogs provide the new, valuable content that the Internet favors – and prospects desire. Blogs can play a key role in gaining better search engine rankings. Tools, like HubSpot, provide a funnel of qualified leads with an integrated call to action

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

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strategy. Studies show that business-to-business companies that maintain blogs, generate on average, two-thirds more leads per month than nonblogging firms. Twitter Connect with a world of influencers and hone in on prospects. Be a source of valuable information – in real time. Twitter is a microblogging site. While it works well to drive traffic to your blog or company website, sales leaders also see results by consistently “blogging” tweets based on a specific content strategy. A use of the tagging feature allows a more direct communication. Sales professionals also can use Twitter’s advanced search functionality to identify people on Twitter with a problem they can solve and directly responding to that tweet. Results require the development of a focused social selling strategy. That includes sales professionals clearly identifying and understanding who their ideal clients are and what their triggers for action are. Implementing a strategy takes intention and consistency. Effective sales professionals have made social selling a natural part of their daily routine to generate a lead and seal a sale.


TECH NEWS

2020 Education

T

he book, Shift 2020, explores the future of everything from greentech and health care to 3-D printing and transport. One futurist quoted in the book predicts education will become an “on-demand

service” where people “pull down a module of learning” when they need it. Large bundles of knowledge, as in traditional coursews, will be out. Specific will be in. Another predicts that gamification practices will be

Crop Disease photo Rob Felt/Georgia Tech

incorporated in schools to incentivize children to progress on their own. Source: FastCompany SCIENCE

New Android offers business-friendly features

Diagnosing crop disease

Google’s latest version of Android, has seven new features designed to appeal to the business audience, including extended battery life, better security, improved connectivity, and enhanced notification control. Source: Business News Daily

Farmers typically look for physical symptoms of disease, such as discolored or wilting leaves, to identify threats to crops. By the time these symptoms are visible, however, the plant is already dead or dying, and the culprit pathogen may have already spread to nearby plants. Now, researchers say robots equipped with tiny sensors, each about the size of a 9-volt battery, could detect threats to crops and warn farmers. The goal is to fit sensors on a ground robot that takes samples from plant to plant, providing results in minutes to the farmer. Source: Futurity

For more on this topic see “R2D2 on the Farm?” on page 29.

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BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Is Your Business Newsworthy? With a little effort you can receive excellent, free news coverage for your company.

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hen you see positive news stories about local businesses, do you ask yourself, “Why don’t they ever cover our company?” If you’re doing something newsworthy, the media will indeed cover it. They want to report on more local news. But you need to let them know about it – in the right way. Here are some do’s and don’ts for increasing your media exposure: Do … have legitimate news Hiring more staff is news. Doubling production is news.

By Steve Greenfield

Offering half-price discounts isn’t. If your “news” is really advertising, you’ll not only be ignored now, the media will be wary of future announcements that might truly be legitimate. Don’t … worry if you don’t know how to write a news release Some news organizations are short staffed, so it’s best to provide them a well-written release in journalism style. That gives them a detailed starting point and your opportunities for coverage improve.

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8/15/2014 12:27:27 PM

February 18 - 19, 2015 This year’s highlights:

Chamber Panel Economic Outlook Entertainment: The Andrew Walesch Band Keynote Speaker: David Levinson Thank you to our sponsors:

SCSU Economics Department

www.stcloudstate.edu/wi


Short of that, it’s OK to just include the 5W’s with answers: Who – Our Company; What – Hiring 25 new employees; and so on with When, Where and Why. But double check name spellings and other information. Your credibility depends on it. Do … compile a media list Most media websites list their news departments’ email addresses. St. Cloud Times reporters’ email addresses appear with their bylines. Don’t … make it difficult for reporters to follow-up Include all your phone numbers and your email address. If reporters can’t easily find you, they may move on to another

story. If they leave a voicemail, respond immediately. Do … include a photo and logo They may not get used, but give the media some options anyway. Don’t … insult reporters’ professionalism Never ask to review a story before it runs. Reporters may not include everything you want, but their decisions are based on journalistic experience. Once you send them a news item, they can pursue it as they wish. They might interview your competitors, too, but don’t complain about it. Their job is to present all sides of a story, not to be your company’s cheerleader.

Do … lay some groundwork for future coverage Include news organizations on your distribution list of newsletters, annual reports, etc. It’s a long term way of positioning your company as an expert. Two years from now reporters may want to interview a leader in your industry, and the good impressions your materials make could lead them to you. Don’t … get cocky Enjoy the good coverage you get, but remember that bad news can also happen. If you’re cutting back operations, for example, you need to think about how that news will impact your

customers, your staff and your reputation. You need to anticipate tough questions reporters might ask, and be ready with calm answers. Treat reporters as courteously as you did when they called about good news. If you have a logical explanation, the news story will reflect it and the public will probably cut you some slack, especially if they’ve seen positive news about you in the past. The way to do that is to go back to the beginning of this article and get started. Steve Greenfield is owner of Greenfield Public Relations in St. Cloud. For additional tips on effective media relations, visit GreenfieldPR.com.

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Made in Minnesota It pays for Minnesota companies to buy from each other.

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he Made in Minnesota Directory is a free online database of products and supplies manufactured in the state. Created by the Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development, it is designed to encourage Minnesota businesses to buy products and supplies from each other, rather than from out-of-state or foreign companies. The tool contains details of over 800 companies statewide. Businesses can use

BY THE NUMBERS

51%

Potential employees in Central Minn. who have college experience

28

2.8%

Population growth in Central Minn. making it the fastest growing region in the state

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5

400,000 Population within a 90-minute trade area of St. Cloud

4%

the database to find Minnesota manufacturers who make everything from food products to textiles, fabricated metals, machinery, and computers and electronics. Companies can be listed in the directory for free by going to the Made in Minnesota Directory website and providing their businesses information. You can find the link at www. BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Commercial vacancy rate in downtown St. Cloud

3.6%

Unemployment in the St. Cloud Area

500

Number of businesses located in downtown St. Cloud Source: City of St. Cloud


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2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show OPENING NOTES

Welcome to the 2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show! brochure you’ll find a complete map of the show and a list of vendors to help you make the most of your visit. The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce is committed to helping area farmers through organization and sponsorship of the Central Minnesota Farm Show. And there’s something else we’d like you to know. As part of our commitment to agriculture and education, each year the Chamber dedicates a portion of the proceeds from the Farm Show to high school scholarships.

High school seniors apply for the scholarships, which are awarded based on merit and a stated intent to continue their education by studying some area of agriculture. Since the program started in 1982, the Chamber has awarded nearly 200 scholarships for a total of $72,000. Volunteers have worked hard to put together a show that you will find both valuable and fun. Enjoy your visit with us and if you have questions or suggestions, please stop by the information booth. We’d like to hear from you.

Minnesota Farm Facts Minnesota’s U.S. ranking in agricultural production

340,000

The number of jobs created by Minnesota’s agriculture sector

GINNY KROLL, Special Events Coordinator -----------------St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

DID YOU KNOW?

BY THE NUMBERS

5th

JOHN BIERINGER, Dairyland Supply -----------------Volunteer Vice Chair, Central Minn. Farm Show

3,501

Number of Farms in Stearns County, the most of any Minnesota county

$75 billion The economic activity generated in Minnesota because of agriculture

2nd

The Agriculture and Food Industries’ sector is the secondlargest employer in Minnesota.

74,542 Number of Minnesota Farms

Of Minnesota’s 26 million farm acres, 1.32 million acres are dedicated to conservation and wetland reserve programs. Minnesota ranks 3rd in the nation in corn production and 4th in soybean production Of the 12 types of soil in the world, Minnesota has seven.

CONTRIBUTORS Many thanks to writer Mary MacDonell Belisle, for her contributions to the content in this Farm Show program. Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with mary macdonell belisle - wordingforyou. She specializes in business articles and profiles, web content, and book editing. Also a special thank you to Jodie (Woeste) Pundsack - Gaslight Creative for designing the cover for the 2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show Guide. Her family has owned the Woeste Century Farm in Greenwald since 1881.

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2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Sources: U.S. Department of Agriculture 2012 Census of Agriculture; United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service

T

he Central Minnesota Farm Show, brought to you by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is the largest show if its kind in the Upper Midwest. Why does such a show exist in this growing metropolitan area? Because agriculture is still one of the area’s leading industries! Since opening its doors over four decades ago, the Farm Show has been a popular community event for Central Minnesota. The show offers something for everyone with an interest in agriculture. When you turn to the center of this

BRIAN OLSON, Mark J. Traut Wells -----------------Volunteer Chair, Central Minn. Farm Show


Calendar of Events

Get in-the-know at the 2015 Farm Show EXPANDED SEMINAR SCHEDULE OFFERS TIMELY TIPS FOR FARMERS

E

xpand your farming knowledge and get an update about conditions affecting the agricultural and food industry by attending the 2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show, Tuesday, Feb. 24th through Thursday, Feb. 26th at the River’s Edge Convention Center, St. Cloud. The event, organized by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is free to the public. Doors open at 9 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. New this year is the event’s expanded roster of seminars, increased from two individuals last year to six for 2015. Speakers will appear twice in the same day – once at 10:30 a.m. and again at 1:30 p.m. – for their one-hour talks. “I asked my farm customers what they wanted to hear about this year at the Farm Show,” Ryan Anderson, an agriculture lender with Bremer Bank in St. Cloud said. Anderson took the recommendations from the informal survey back to the committee of 24. “Six unique speakers seemed to be a good number to add value for people attending the show.” “We have a strong roster of speakers who will cover topics

pertinent to the production and risk management issues farm owners and operators are currently dealing with in their operations,” committee member Bernie Quist, said. Quist is senior client solutions team leader with AgStar Financial Services, St. Cloud. On Tuesday, February 24th, University of Minnesota educator Jim Paulson will speak on “The Cover Crop Option,” giving pointers to farmers as to how they can incorporate soil-building techniques into their operations. Also, Chairman/CEO Jerry Johnson, Farm Intelligence2, will explain “Decision Agriculture,” what it is and how data gathered by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can help farm operators with decision-making. On Wednesday, February 25th, Jim Emter, principal at Van Ahn & Co., will share his insights with attendees about current supply and demand statistics, key seasonal trends that could impact prices, outlook on investment money flow, and marketing approaches to manage risk. His talk is called, “Adapting Your Marketing Approach to

Volatile Weather and Growing Demand.” Marin Bozic, assistant professor in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota and associate director of Midwest Dairy Foods Research Center, will tackle the topic of “Dairy Markets Outlook: Will the 3-Year Cycle Hit Again?” The discussion will cover the impact of the European Union’s termination of the dairy quota and suggestions for integrating the Margin Protection Program and CME futures and options to increase profitability and manage risk for the dairy. On Thursday, February 26th, Lee Hanson, principal with Gray Plant Mooty, St. Cloud, will discuss issues associated with estate planning for farmers, during “The Family Farm – Passing It Through the Generations.” Commercial vehicle inspector Eric Sundby of the Minnesota State Patrol, will review “Commercial Vehicle Regulations,” reminding farmers about the rules for hauling on the state’s roadways. “The committee selected and invited this roster of speakers because they came to us with strong references regarding their expertise on the topics and their ability to deliver high quality and engaging presentations,” Quist said. “We expect our Farm Show attendees will find these seminars valuable.” – Mary MacDonell Belisle

DID YOU KNOW?

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For more information, please contact Wendy Hendricks at (320)656-3808 or at whendricks@ BusinessCentral Magazine.com

2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show SPENDING & PROFIT

Hope Springs Eternal

FARMERS MAY HAVE RIDDEN A ROLLERCOASTER IN 2014, BUT 2015 IS A NEW YEAR.

“Farming is a profession of hope.” — Brian Brett, author of “Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life”

W

hether a person takes a poetic or pragmatic view of the farm life, those who work the land will probably agree that the profession requires hope. And it’s with hope that Central Minnesota farmers look toward 2015 after a rollercoaster ride in 2014. “Central Minnesota experienced a wide variation

Mention Wetlands, Drainage, or Permits and Someone Will Mention

Kurt Deter

John Kolb

Gary Leistico

Hope for good weather. Farmers received too much of a good thing with recordsetting rainfall in 2014. June was the wettest month in the modern record, according to the Minnesota DNR, averaging just over

Smart Farm Your farm is in the palm of your hand!

Kale Van Bruggen

Farmers, landowners, and land improvement contractors are becoming increasingly aware of the legal and permitting challenges created by wetlands, drainage, and conservation compliance. Working with a team of attorneys experienced in navigating the DNR, NRCS, Corps of Engineers, EPA, and county and local governments regulations adds value to the success of your project.

If you’re facing a challenge with wetlands, drainage, or related permits, call Kurt, John, Gary, or Kale at 320-251-6700 or 888-899-6700. US Bank Plaza, Suite 300 1015 West St. Germain St. St. Cloud, MN 56302 320-251-6700 1-888-899-6700

www.rinkenoonan.com

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of conditions for producing crops and profitability,” said Dan Martens, University of Minnesota Extension educator, Ag Production Systems. Livestock and dairy were favorable, while crops were generally unfavorable.

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8 inches compared to the previous average high mark of 7.32 inches in 1914. This meant flooded fields and late planting by two to three weeks. Some areas in Benton and Morrison Counties couldn’t plant at all. An early frost damaged corn and soybeans in Central and West Central regions. Then, there was the hail at harvest time… .

Hope for a good crop. Corn and soybeans did so well this year for some that surpluses drove prices to their lowest in five years. Prudent farmers shored up some buffer income between 2011 and 2013 when corn

prices were high. Dairy and beef cattle prices were high in 2014, which may allow farmers to pay past feed bills or debt on equipment.

St. Cloud Area Technical and Community College farm business management instructor. “We can help provide information to farmers and their bankers.”

Hope you have a good relationship with your banker.

Hope you plan well for 2015.

“Bankers are your partners, so you need a strong relationship with them,” said Lyle Schefers, a St. Stephen dairy farmer. Schefers works with the farm management program at Central Lakes College in Brainerd, which helps him make sense of the numbers for his banker. “The last thing they like is a surprise,” said Ken Thiesen,

“Luck is always part of the draw,” said Chuck Uphoff, who raises grass fed beef west of New Munich. “Markets always fluctuate, so you need to ride the highs and prepare for the lows.” “Farmers should look at budgets carefully to make sure they’re spending every dollar on inputs in such a way as to produce profit,” said the U of M’s Martens,

who points out that things aren’t gloom and doom. “Farmers can plan for diversification, if their land can support it––livestock as a hedge if they grow crops, different crop combinations to make better use of the land, or explore other market opportunities.” Central Minnesota farmers have done a phenominal job of making use of the land and resources over 150 years, Martens said. When farmers are doing well, the area does well. So here’s hoping 2015 will be a good year of farming for everyone. – Mary MacDonell Belisle

One Cowgirl, Many Hats Diane Tribitt grew up here and knows ranching inside and out. But with the sudden death of her husband in 2004, she found herself running the family’s ranch and construction business alone. Diane turned to Farmers & Merchants for help to clarify her direction, guidance in running and growing the business, and financing to make it all come together. Today, Tribitt Ag Construction builds commercial grain bins nationwide, for everything from corn and oats in Minnesota to pistachios in California. Always quick to credit her loyal crew and bank, Diane says, “When you work with amazing people, you get amazing results.” If you’re ready to start or grow your business, F&M is eager to listen.

Sauk Rapids 1301 2nd St N. 320.252.5121

Pierz

80 Main St. 320.468.6422

Because friendly still counts.

fmpierz.com 2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show

2015 Booth Floor Plan

Calendar of Events

Presentation Schedule #6

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Bleacher Seating

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Topic: “The Cover Crop Option” Description: Incorporating soil-building techniques into farm operations Speaker: Jim Paulson, University of Minnesota ----------------------Topic: “Decision Agriculture” Description: How data gathering by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can help farm operators with decision-making Speaker: Jerry Johnson, Farm Intelligence2

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www.CentralMNFarmShow.com #FarmShow #FarmShow

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Topic: “Adapting Your Marketing Approach to Volatile Weather and Growing Demand” Description: Insights on current supply and demand statistics, key seasonal trends that could impact prices, outlook on investment money flow, and marketing approaches to manage risk Speaker: Jim Emter, principal at Van Ahn & Co. ----------------------Topic: “Dairy Markets Outlook: Will the 3-Year Cycle Hit Again?” Description: Discussion on the impact of the European Union’s termination of the dairy quota and suggestions for integrating the Margin Protection Program and CME futures and options to increase profitability and manage risk for the dairy Speaker: Marin Bozic, University of Minnesota, and associate director of Midwest Dairy Foods Research Center

C onces sions

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All speakers will appear twice in the same day – once at 10:30 a.m. and again at 1:30 p.m. – for their onehour talks. Signs will be posted to direct attendees to the presentation rooms.

#11 #12

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2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


OVER 300 BOO

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OV E R HE AD DOOR

Calendar of Events

The latest farm equipment and

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Topic: “Thesuggestions Family Farm for integrating the M – Passing It Program Through theand CME dairy features Generations” increase profitability and manage r Description: A discussion of Included: A discussion on the impa the key issues associated with estate planning for farmers termination of the d Union’s Speaker: Lee Hanson, Gray Plant Mooty, St. Cloud ----------------------Topic: “Commercial Vehicle Regulations” Learn about soil health-building te Description: An update about the for hauling into YOUR operatio berules incorporated on the state’s staffroadways that canand provide insight to the highlighting ways to move your soil and work together to impro goods, equipment, and livestock legally and safely agricultural profitabi Speaker: Eric Sundby, Minnesota State Patrol

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SPECIAL THANKS

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ThankTuesday You to Our Sponsors

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Glenn Carlson Exhibit Hall 87 - 10x10 Booths

through Th The following banks support the 24 - 26th February Farm Show with cash donations: AgStar Financial Services 9:00 am - 4:00 BankVista Bremer Bank River’s Edge Conventi Central Minnesota Credit Union Falcon National 10Bank South 4th Farmers & Merchants State Bank Frandsen Bank & Trust Harvest Bank MidCountry Bank Minnwest Bank, M.V. Stearns Bank Wells Fargo Bank

Avenue • St. C

The following businesses contributed gifts for our website drawing: P.O. BOX 487 Arnold’s, Inc. ST. CLOUD, MN 56302 Midwest Machinery, Inc.

320-251-2940 e-mail: vkroll@stcloudareach 2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE A7


2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show 21-GOLD

2015 Vendor Booth List*

Farm Rite Equipment of St. Cloud......................... 408

21st Century Ag.........104-106

Bremer Bank...................... 400

Dick Meyer Co.................... 912

Feed Stuff Bagging............ 815

ABC Seamless...........803-805

Byron Seeds....................... 606

EB Farms..........................4010

Finken Water....................6000

ABS Global.......................... 925

Calf Star.............................. 517

First District........................ 321

Ag Tech Drainage.............. 406

Carlson Wholesale.................... .........1039-1041; 2002-2004

Easy Fix Rubber Products.............................. 604

Agri-Dry................................ 825 Agri-King.............................. 926 Agri-News..................................5 Agri Plastics..............................6 Agri-Systems....................1018 AgStar Financial.........801-900 Albers Dairy Equipment.... 829 Alforex Seeds..................... 112 All America Pressure......... 111

Catholic United Financial.1015 Cen-Pe-Co........................... 508

Central MN Corn Growers..................... 822

Exclusive Home Products...........................13-15

Central Minnesota Credit Union....................... 908

Fairchild Equipment.................. ................................1025-1027

Central Minnesota Ethanol................................ 809

Falls Silo Service................ 833

Alternative Energy Systems..... ...........................................4004

Champion Milking..................... ............................ 401-403-405

American Door Works....... 835

Channel Bio........................ 924

American Pressure............ 307

CHS Prairie Lakes Co-op.. 204

American Shelters...........1052

Cleary Building................... 831

American Steel Systems.. 114

Complete Grain Systems......... ............................ 804-806-808

API Garage Door Stoe...... 819 Arnold’s of St. Cloud.................. ..............901-907, 1000-1006 Arnzen Const........2001-2005, ................................3000-3004 Arvig..................................... 504

Cy Pfannenstein Music Service..................... 821 DK Diesel of Montevideo... 417 Dairy Farmers of America........................1001

Dairyland Pest Control....1043

Avon Ag Lime...........................2

Dairyland Seed.................. 602

Barron Built................832-838

Dairyland Supply......601-621, .....................................700-720

Boot Shack......................... 506

Frandsen Bank & Trust.... 824 G3 Power Systems............ 407 Gateway Building Systems.............................. 109 Genex Farm Systems............... ..........1017-1019-1021-1023 Gilleland Chevrolet....203-205 Gilman Coop Creamery............ .....................................913-919 Gold Country Seed..........1026

LARGE SELECTION OF WORK-READY VEHICLES IN THE AREA

Cutco......................................12

Automation Plus..............6015

Bongards Creameries.....1020

Forward Farm Lines.......... 316

www.gillelandchevrolet.com

Culbac Products......................9

Dairy Star..................................7

Big Iron Stock Auction...... 826

Farm Bureau Financial Services............. 904

Form A Feed....................... 319

Courtland Waste................ 910

Auto Value Parts Stores........... ................................6001-6003

Benton County Ag Society........ ................................1022-1024

Equip-A-Life........................ 108 Erickson Marketing................... ............................ 810-812-814

Allied Distribution.............. 516

AMPS................................... 818

Edward Jones Investments.....................1011

Central McGowan...........2006

Centra-Sota Coop...................... .........4001-4013; 5000-5012

AMPI..................................6004

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Diamond Industrial Cleaning.................3005-3007

Dan Waytashek Seed Sales......................... 828 Dan’s Custom Welding............. Sales: (320) 281-4295 ................................1012-1014

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GO-MIN Gone 2 Green Wind & Solar..............507-509 Granite Electronics............ 200 Grassland Solutions.............11 Green Energy Products.....1033 Growers Mineral Solutions............................. 612 Hanson Silo..........2007-2013, ................................3006-3012

Hyland Seeds..................... 928 Joe’s Supplies............932-934 K & S Millwrights.............1048 KASM/KDDG...........................1 Kleen Test.......................... 713 Koronis Tire........................ 914 Kramer Financial............... 911

Hotsy Equipment............... 707 Hubbard Feeds.................. 709 Hutton, Inc........................6011 Hydro Engineering............. 827 Hydrotex.............................. 317

Midsota Mfg..............412-414, ............................ 416-418-420

Lange Agricultural..................... ................................1007-1009

Midwest Machinery ...................519-521; 618-620

Leedstone..................921-923

Midwest Manure Equipment.......................... 513

Legend Seeds..................3 & 4 Lifestyle Lumber................ 719 Lumber One.....................1005 Machinery Scope............6005

High Plains Industry........6013 Hodgman Drainage........... 616

Kuhn North America................. ...........300-302-304-306-308

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Mark J. Traut Wells............ 816 McKay’s Dodge........................ .........3001-3003; 4000-4002 MEDA..........................409-411 Messer Repair........................... ............................ 103-105-107 Mid-Central Heating.......... 909 MidCountry Bank.............. 303

Midwest Sales & Service......... .....................................419-421 Midwestern Bio Ag........... 820 Mies Outland...................... 101 Mimbach Fleet...........120-122 Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture...................... 823 Minnesota Farm Guide.... 202 Minnesota Farmers Union................................... 402 Minnesota Home Improvement..................... 116

Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program Certifying that Minnesota’s farms and waters can prosper together

Jared Nordick Certified Farmer

2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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2015 Central Minnesota Farm Show MI-SAM Minnesota Milk Producers........................... 922 Minnesota Pneumatic Products.................5001-5011 Minnesota Spray Foam Insulation...............1031 MN Pro Fence............413-415

BOOTH # 413-415

Mobile Washer................1016 Modern Farm Equipment ....... ...................837-843,936-942, ...............937-943,1032-1038 Morton Buildings............... 614 Mulching Mania................. 209

Northland Farm Systems.............................. 817 Nuseed Americas, Inc.....6002 O’Reilly Auto Parts...........4006 Osakis Silo........................4008

NAPA Central MN.............. 830

Patz Corp..............1045-1049, ................................2008-2012

National Farmers Organization.....................6007

Paul Mueller Co..............6008, ...............................6010, 6012

Nationwide Metal Roofing................................ 110

Paul’s Welding................... 102

New Century Exteriors, Inc....... ...........................................1029 Nextire....................3009-3011

Peterson Farms Seed....... 510 Pluto Legal.......................... 305 Powerhouse Outdoor..................1008-1010

Northern Tool & Equipment..... .....................................512-514

Prairie Brand Seed............ 118

Northland Buildings.......... 410

Prairie Trailer....................4012

Producers Hybrids............. 705 QC Supply........................... 906 Quality Forklift............811-813 Quality Sales...................... 930 R & S Tire....................608-610 RDO Equipment........115-121, .....................................214-220 Real-Tuff.....................715-717 Redfield............................... 213 Retrogreen Energy............ 515 Rinke Nooonan.................. 807 River Power & Equipment........ .....................................500-502 Royalton Lumber............... 505 Sam’s Club......................... 301

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2015 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW • ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


SC-ZOS Schlenner Wenner............ 918

Stor-Loc.......................800-802

Show-Me Shortline Co............. ....................309-311-313-315

Sunrise Ag.......................... 711

Silver Stream Shelters...... 212 Simonson Installation.....3013 Spee Dee Delivery Service................. 920 St. Cloud State University.206 St. Cloud Times Media...5015 St. Cloud VA Health Care System....................... 916 Stearns County Farm Bureau...................... 902 Stearns Electric................. 501 Steffes Group..................... 210

Tri-County Foam..............1013

Wingert Sales............................. ............................ 221-318-320

The Land................................10 The Minnesota Project..... 503 Thein Well........................... 404 Thunder Seed..................6006 Timewell Drainage Products......................518-520 Titan Pro.............................. 211 Tony’s Lifetime Exteriors.............................. 100 Tracy Seeds......................1003 Transportation Cr. For Excellence.................... 207

Wieser Concrete................ 201

Tri County Foam Insulation is an authorized installer of polyurethane Closed Cell 2# spray foam. Providingthe following services: Closed Cell – Spray Polyurethane Closed Cell #2 Foam Insulation, Cellulose – Blown-In Cellulose Insulation & Foam Roofing Systems Tri County Foam Insulation, LLC 10991 Zimmel Road NE Carlos, MN 56319 BOOTH # 1013

Usborne Books & More.. 5013 Van Ahn & Co..................... 113 W. Gohman Construction.927

Woller Eqipment........................ ............................ 310-312-314 WVAL/WHMH..........................8 Your Home Improvement..................... 511 Ziegler Cat.......................1040, ....................1042,1044, 1046 Zip’s Diesel Injection.......6017 Zoske’s.......................929-935................................1028-1034 *based on data as of December 3, 2014

Wells Fargo......................... 600

Stine Seed.......................... 208

Same great doors, service and people. New Name. American Door Works. • Commercial Overhead Doors • Residential Overhead Doors • Farm • Parts & Repair • 24-Hour Emergency Service

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BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

R2D2 and C-3PO on the farm? Technology is restructuring farm operations in ways our grandfathers could not imagine. field conditions and crop performance. The popular eBee Ag from SenseFly and Quad Indago from Farm Intelligence2, of Mankato, both cost around $25,000.

F

armers have the weight of the world on their shoulders. There are 7 billion human beings on this planet, 9.7 billion by the year 2050. Many smart and talented folks are giving farmers a hand with the burden of feeding the world’s population by developing new technologies to make the growing easier, safer, more prolific, and profitable. Smart Equipment Precision agriculture uses electronic data collection and GPS to locate a field, map it, and then observe, measure, and respond to field conditions in management zones. This process interfaces with computers and smart farm equipment, including selfguided tractors and combine platforms like John Deere’s AutoTrac Row Sense, which uses GPS guidance and sensors in the corn to eliminate over driving. This computer­­–equipment– wireless–data integration is networked on the farm. And like all technology, it is improving.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) These airborne data collectors have moved from the battlefield to farms and are still considered emerging technology. UAVs are up to 20 times more precise than satellite imagery, using highresolution aerial imagery and NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) to collect data. (NDVI measures plants’ absorption of photosynthetically active radiation, which can indicate plants’ response to heat or cold.) Drones collect data on soil moisture and nutrient levels, soil type, water damage, diseases, fertilizer/ herbicide/pesticide use, seed placement, stand population, row/gap configuration, and field typography. Flights are planned, monitored, and data uploaded to a PC, laptop, or tablet for 3-D field mapping, planting, harvesting, assessing and adjusting to

BIG-DATA Ag-based companies offer remote data storage, security, sharing capability, and farm management services via secure Internet (“in the cloud”), often as a subscription service. FARMserver, FarmLogs, Farm Sight, Connected Farm, and AgCommand are cloud-based data services. So is FieldScripts, which combines seed genetics with Monsanto’s field planning technology. It analyzes a field, using 20 layers of data, and develops a yield management zone map. Hybrid seeds are selected, and the field is planted according to yield areas. Biotechnology Scientists are genetically engineering seeds (GE seeds) for many reasons. Want a seed to stay fresh longer, or resist a particular insect or disease, contain specific nutrients, or respond to a field or soil type better? Chances are Monsanto, DuPont, or Land O’ Lakes have designed the “perfect” seed to perform to expectations. A huge innovation, according to GM Watch, is biotech’s ability to create seeds that tolerate herbicides. Who knows? In the future, biotechnology may be

contributor Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with WordingForYou.com. She specializes in business articles and profiles, web content, and book editing.

By Mary MacDonell Belisle

able to engineer seeds specific to a farm. Robots Robots process data and perform tasks instead of humans. Milking machines––an investment of between $150,000 and $250,000––work around the clock. Cows walk into robot stalls on their individual schedules and are recognized by the robot through an electronic tag. The machine weighs the cows, checks udder health, washes the teats, and records teat placement with a laser sensor. Suction cups are attached, and the cow is milked as she contentedly munches on food pellets. The “Nursery Bot,” from Harvest Automation, scoots around on four wheels to transfer potted plants from one location to another with gripper arms. Australia’s “herder bot” wrangles cattle. Spain’s ball-shaped “hamster bot” rolls along crop rows, transmitting data on soil conditions, nutrient levels, moisture, and plant health. Denmark’s “Hortibot” identifies and eliminates weeds. Robotics, in the early stage of development, could become commonplace in the future. Of course, the most anticipated robots are the autonomous tractors, which will be networked into an entirely computerized farm system. With the help of technology, farming has been transformed. Perhaps in the future, fleets of tiny drones will tend genetically modified rows of corn individually, communicating with tiny sensors no larger than a grain of sand.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5 //

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29


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BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Love at First Sight Or … “The Perils of Buying a Business” … and why it’s still a good idea.

By Jamie Henkemeyer

12 years of planning to arrive at the altar and 13 years (to date) of consistent effort to maintain a successful marriage. Any level of success in most endeavors, including buying a business, is often the result of a welldesigned plan and consistent effort.

T

he correlations between marriage and a client’s plunge into business ownership amaze me. I have been a business advisor for 15 years

and a husband for 13. I met my wife at a relatively young age and spent 12 years courting her before we married. It was classic love at first sight that involved

A OT

MIN NE S

30

Albany 320.845.2940

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Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5

TA SO NE

Little Falls 320.632.6311

MI N

Top 25 Minnesota CPA Firm

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Do you really love her? Owning a business will likely be a thankless and tireless job where the reward can be years away. It’s critical you have a strong passion for the company or the industry or maybe even the idea of having your name

above the door. True love will push you forward when it seems everything else is pulling you back. Pre-Nuptial Agreement. Successful negotiation will lead to a letter of intent prior to closing. It will not be written in enough detail to address all matters and is not legally binding, but it will be important to address, in good faith, items you consider necessities and items that concern you. Neither party will appreciate surprises later in the process.


No prearranged marriages! It is critical your investigation of the business provides accurate and complete information to spell out both positives and negatives of the various aspects of the business. Information will cover everything from non-financial information (employees, management team, capital assets) to market information (customer base, market share, proprietary products and prospects) to financial information (financial results, legal exposure,

financing options). You need to know the person you’re marrying. Consult your Clergy. Having an advisor who has been through the battle of business transfers can be invaluable. Listen and learn from input, but lead the process and make informed decisions based on the information provided. Do you want a big wedding? Structuring a business transfer that produces a win-win for both

parties is possible. However, most transfers result in a benefit to one party and a detriment to the other. Win the battles that are critical to your success but be sensitive to the other party’s needs. Risk of divorce. Buyers of privately held businesses often invest a great deal of personal wealth as part of the acquisition, rather than sharing the risk of losing it with, for example, a financial institution or another investor.

Funding a deal through your personal assets puts the entire risk in your court. In many instances you can balance your risk profile and allow for future flexibility by sharing risk with other parties. Owning your own business requires a skill set of passion, talent and guts. Meeting the love of your life only happens with the risk of heartbreak. Don’t let divorce rates spook you from an endeavor that can provide the reward only an entrepreneur can know.

contributor Jamie Henkemeyer, CPA, is a principal with CliftonLarsonAllen. He consults with owners of small to medium sized privately held businesses. He can be reached at 320.203.5534 or jamie.henkemeyer@claconnect.com

Please join us for the

53rd Winter Institute Wednesday, February 18th 5 - 6:30 pm 6:30 - 8 pm

Economic Outlook Reception & Entertainment by the Andrew Walesch Band

Thursday, February 19th 8 - 9 am 8 - 10:15 am 10:30 - 11:45 am 12 - 1:30 pm 2 - 3 pm 3 - 4 pm

Registration & Breakfast Session I Session II Lunch & Chamber Panel Keynote Speaker: David Levinson Q&A Session/Closing

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BusinessTools Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Retraining Creating a skilled workforce in Central Minnesota may depend on the investment employers are willing to make in employee development. By King Banaian Only 70 respondents indicated they would attend full-time training, while 50 wanted to train part-time. There was substantial interest in both working and training simultaneously, since a loss of income would be difficult. This challenge of providing training to a worker who also works part-time is one of the most interesting points to emerge from the survey. __________

I

n June 2014, Quad/Graphics (QG), a printing plant with 280 employees and a history in St. Cloud going back to 1938, announced it was closing its local facility to consolidate operations. An estimate of the direct loss of labor income to displaced QG workers is $16.8 million. For many of these workers, some retraining has to happen. This retraining will help determine the long-run impact of the plant closing on the area economy. What kinds of training will they need and how will they get it? In responding to the layoff, the Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development fielded a survey of QG employees after the announced closing, but before the plant was closed on August 22. More than 200 workers completed the survey. The results were used by Stearns-

Benton Employment & Training Council (SBETC), part of the Minnesota WorkForce Center, to plan and provide services to the workers. These results were presented to area leaders at a community meeting in August. Several interesting data points emerged: The workforce at QG was quite mature, with 99 employees over 50 years old. There were 100 employees with at least 25 years of experience with the firm. __________ Plant activity had been good, with 122 of the survey respondents indicating they had worked more than 40 hours per week. __________ Fifty-three QG workers were unsure of what kind of employment they wanted next; 97 were unsure whether they wanted to stay in their current occupation or change to a new one. __________

Most want new job skills, chiefly computer skills and updating of current job skills. A relatively small minority seek greater formal education or desire to start a new business.

The results are interesting in at least two ways. First, local businesses tend to want full-time workers (particularly when times are good, as they have been in 2014). It is a challenge for them to think about hiring someone who needs to leave the workplace 20 hours per week to receive training. And yet this may be necessary to find experienced workers who are accustomed to a paycheck. Second, a 2005 survey question in the St. Cloud Area Quarterly Business Report (which I co-author) found that less than 40 percent of firms locally spent more than 2 percent of their budgets on employee development and training. But over half of QG respondents wanted “new job

skills” that could be specific to a firm. The impact to St. Cloud of the QG closing will depend in no small part on the investment employers make in employee development.

The 2030 workforce? Nearly half of jobs in America today could be automated in the next 10 to 20 years, according to a new paper in The Economist by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael A. Osborne. The question is: Which half? The paper’s authors think the following ten jobs have a 99 percent chance of being replaced by machines and software: Telemarketers Title Examiners Sewers Mathematical Technicians Insurance Underwriters Watch Repairers Cargo and Freight Agents Tax Preparers Photographic Process Workers New Accounts Clerks Library Technicians Data Entry Keyers

contributor King Banaian is a professor of economics and interim dean of the School of Public Affairs at St. Cloud State University. The survey results addressed in this column were provided by Kathy Zavala, executive director of SBETC, and used here with her kind permission.

32

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5


$60M

$120M

Economy Central presented by

December July

TOTAL: $54,049,155

COLOR KEY:

2015

November June

Home Sales C

October May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

August

Compiled by Sharon Henry, data current as of 11/22/14

Residential Building Permits

Home Sales C

PARK,

October September

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

2015

$54,049,155

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$54,435,063

50M

PARK,

2,109,767.10

100M

7,060,554.11

Residential Building Permits

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2014 ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE September April

St. Joseph

128 January

2013

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

$0M

$20M

TOTAL: $72,109,767.10

St. Cloud

$87,075,891 $56,271,162 December July

425

356

Sauk Rapids

November $12,027,944 $5,422,951 June

48

226

Sartell 174 29 October $3,531,780 $3,540,047 May Waite Park

September $4,377,148 $5,675,884 Apr

St. Augusta

August Mar $6,945,494 $171,857

St. Joseph

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

90

78

11

4

78

52

2015

$100M

$0

$300k

2014

2013

Non Farm Jobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

Feb 2013-2014 % CHANGE

$120M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

Apr

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

$80M

Food and Bev

2013 2015

July Feb $3,102,294 $1,027,867

Mar

2.5%

$0

Jan

$300k

2.0%

J

December

J

November

October

0.5%

September

August

July

June

May

April

1.0%

March

February

January

1.5%

December

November

October

September

August

6%

Food and Bev

2014

June Jan *Cummulative total is not year end. Total as of 11/22/14.

TOTAL: $72,109,767.10 $80M $100M $120M

$60M

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

7%

$40M

300

Commercial 2013 2014* 2015 August #/$ #/$ #/$

TOTAL: 1225

8%

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

November

TOTAL: 1411

2013-2014

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

151 0 $1,702,322 $1,299,877

1500

$1.5M

Unemployment Rates

300

67 $3,327,830 $4,161,437

TOTAL: 117,060,554.11 2013

December

99 February

Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, May and St. Joseph.

2014

November

St. Augusta

October

TOTAL: 117,060,554.11

$60M

0

80 101 $879,943 $1,567,664

1200

$40M

October

March

900

TOTAL: $895,614.88

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

$20M

382

Waite Park

600

$900k

$0M

382

2014

300

$600k 2013 2015

September

May $18,539,531 $18,059,059

December *Cummulative total is not year end. Total as of 11/22/14.

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

August

$60M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

Commercial Building Permits

110

2015

$50M

Commercial Building Permits

2015

July

$40M

1227

2014

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

$300k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$30M

June

Sauk Rapids

2013

2015

$0 $0M

May

June January $18,425,316 $21,407,302

0

2014

2013

$20M

St. Cloud

Sartell 438 268 April $11,560,121 $7,553,816

TOTAL: $54,435,063

$10M

April

Residential 2013 2014* 2013 2015 July February #/$ #/$ #/$ 2015

2014

2013

March

August BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY March

$40M TOTAL:$50M $60M $54,049,155

$30M

February

January

December

$20M

November

$10M

October

$0M

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

2013 2015

TOTAL: $54,435,063

A

S

0.0% -0.5%

5%

-1.0% -1.5%

4%

-2.0% -2.5% -3.0%

3% O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

O

Benton & Stearns Counties Minnesota United States

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


9,155

5,063

BusinessTools

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

November

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

September

April

March

January

December

November

February

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

November

October

OUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, H

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH uilding Permits

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

October

August

September July

2015

August

TOTAL: 1225

July

2013

$0

Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Jan $60MSources: $80M $100M $120M

600

$600k

250

2014 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS Residential 2013

2014*

July

TOTAL: $895,614.88 300

350

$600k

$900k

$1.2M

$1.5M

Lodging Tax Dollars

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

105.2

109.6

105.0

88.9

83.9

111.9

95.8

101.6

94.2

91.9

98.4

75.5

88.0

103.7

109.8

96.3

Pierre SD 101.5 January

112.1

112.4

89.4

92.8

95.6

96.5

105.8

April

102.7

110.3

Cedar Rapids, IA 93.1 March Eau Claire, WI

February

90.5

100.9

105.2

110.1

The Cost of Living index measures regional differences in the cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non-consumer expenditures, for professional and managerial households in the top income quintile. It is based on more than 90,000 prices covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected quarterly by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Small differences should not be interpreted as showing any measurable difference, according to ACCRA.

December

November

October

September

August

July

Accra Index

June

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5

111.8

95.3

May

34

New York (Manhattan) NY Honolulu HI New York (Brooklyn) NY $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M $1.5M CA San Francisco Hilo HI Housing/Real Estate sources: St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors, http:// Truckee-Nevada County CA stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics; Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Orange County CA Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office; http://thething.mplsrealtor.com/ Stamford CT Framingham-Natick MA Washington-Arlington-Alexandria DC-VA

99.9

83.1

April

2013

83.1

75.4

March

TOTAL: $1,336,559

78.2

109.8

Mankato, MN 96.2 102.9 85.7 87.0 99.3 104.6 102.0

February

2014

105.5

94.8

May

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

TOTAL: $1,119,509

95.7

Minneapolis, MN 107.0 103.2 113.4 92.0 100.7 104.8 110.8 St. Paul, MN

2015 $1,326,730.36 TOTAL:

Grocery Housing Utilities Transpo- Health Misc. Goods Items rtation Care & Services

June 3rd Quarter 95.6 110.3 74.7 89.4 95.9 108.7 105.8

1500

$1.5M

$300k

Items

2nd Quarter

Stearns Co. 246 153 2013 Benton Co. 70 41

$0

September All

August St. Cloud, MN 1st Quarter

TOTAL: 316

*Cummulative total is not year end. Total as of 11/22/14.

CITY

TOTAL: 1225

200

October

TOTAL: 1411

150

December

COST OF LIVING INDEX

1200

100

TOTAL: $895,614.88

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

50

$1.5M

MINNESOTA AND OTHER UPPER MIDWEST CITIES OF November COMPARABLE SIZE TO ST. CLOUD

900

$900k 0

$1.2M

Third Quarter 2014

TOTAL: 194PARK, 6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2015 2013

$900k

COST OF LIVING

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

2014

$600k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Incorporations - MN Secretary of State, Graph courtesy of SCSU

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2015

$300k

300

$300k

Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

January

1500

Feb

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Mar

1200

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

900

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

600

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

300

2015

February

2014

Apr

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

0

2014

2013

TOTAL: 117,060,554.11

April March

2015

2014

2013

2013

TOTAL: $895,614.88

June

TOTAL: $72,109,767.10

MayTOTAL: 1411

2015

June

2015

May

2014

$0

0M

$60M

67.10

54.11

$120M

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Among the 264 urban areas participating in the third quarter report, the after-tax cost for a professional/managerial standard of living ranged from more than twice the national average in New York (Manhattan) NY to about 20 percent below the national average in McAllen, TX. Manhattan NY

214.5

Honolulu HI

171.2

Brooklyn NY

168.6

San Francisco CA

165.5

Hilo HI Truckee-Nevada County CA

156.4 151.7

Orange County CA

145.9

Stamford CT Oakland CA

145.9 139.0

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria DC-VA $0

$50

$100

$150

138.8 $200

Economy Central presented by

$250


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>> Ron’s Cabinets, Inc.

..................... 380 Industrial Blvd. E Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 Phone: 320-252-7667 Fax: 320-257-0158 www.RonsCabinets.com Owners: John and Lizzy Packert Opened: April 1, 2000

36

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5

SALES In 2000: $1.5 million In 2015: $4.5 million NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES In 2000: 24 In 2015: 36 Business description: Custom cabinet manufacturer, residential and commercial


No Regrets

BY GAIL IVERS / PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI

AFTER WEATHERING THE RECESSION WITH ALL EMPLOYEES INTACT, JOHN AND LIZZY PACKERT, OWNERS OF RON’S CABINETS, ARE FOCUSING ON GROWTH.

W

hen John and Lizzy Packert were originally approached about buying Ron’s Cabinets, their first reaction was fear. “We were scared,” John said. “It was a lot of money.” Ron’s Cabinets, a cabinet manufacturing company in Sauk Rapids, was started in 1975 by Ron Schmitz. John joined the company in 1977, working part-time evenings manufacturing cabinets, and full-time days building homes for a local contractor. In 1978 John quit his contracting job and went full-time days at Ron’s Cabinets. He was the company’s third employee. As the business grew, John moved out of the shop and into management, becoming general manager in the mid-1980s. In 1997 Ron Schmitz sold the business to Marc Sanderson and Walter Wilkie. John stayed on as general manager. “Marc really wanted to grow the business,” John explained. “The plans were to expand at our current location, then add locations around the state, and then expand into other states.” In order to reach their expansion goals, the company began hiring a leadership team. They also decided to separate the commercial and residential parts of the business. “They were talking about either moving the residential part to another

location in the area or selling it,” John said. “We thought they’d move it.” Instead, in 2000, Sanderson offered to sell the residential business, including the name Ron’s Cabinets, to John and Lizzy. The remaining commercial manufacturing company was renamed Wilkie Sanderson. It was an offer the Packerts had not anticipated. “We were scared. But I didn’t really want to work for a large company – the kind that Marc had in mind with multiple locations,” John said. “So it was appealing.” “I wanted him out of the situation he was in,” Lizzy said. “He needed to make a change.” Still, it was a lot of money. “Think about it. We go to the bank and say we want to buy this part of a business that someone doesn’t want anymore and we have to build a facility to house it. You can imagine their response,” John said. “The bank said we had to down-size. Not hire as many people, build a smaller building, or find a co-signer for the loan.” John and Lizzy explained the situation to a local businessman who was also a family friend. He said he would be happy to co-sign the loan, allowing the sale to go through. “What was really surprising,” John said, “was the support we got from the local

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Biggest change: Technology demands and figuring out what will work for us and the company. “We’re a custom job shop. Most computer programs and equipment are designed to do the same cabinet over and over. We have to find tools that work well for one project because everything we do is custom.” Something that hasn’t changed: Hiring people who can do a better job that we can do. Most fun: It never gets old to see the excitement or the thrill on the customers’ faces when they see their finished projects. Receiving thank you cards telling us how much they like it. We are here to make the customers’ dreams come true.

But they didn’t. Instead they cut prices, taking on some jobs that didn’t turn a profit. “Some people would say that was not a good business decision,” John said. “But if we didn’t take the jobs, we didn’t have enough work to keep everyone busy.” They expanded into commercial work, in some cases traveling out of state, because residential construction had stopped completely. “We still had some remodeling,” John said, “but even with those jobs we’d get calls at the last minute saying the husband had lost a job or the wife’s hours had been cut and they just couldn’t do the remodel right now.” “We never cut an employee,” Lizzy added proudly. “We cut hours, and the employees supported that because it meant we didn’t lay off a single person.” “We have really good employees,” John said. “If we had laid anyone off, these are the kind of people who would have found other jobs. They would be hard to replace. We had a couple of really bad years, but when business

>>

and counting

builders once we were in business. They sent us money – not for work we’d done – they just sent us money,” he said, the awe still in his voice. “They said ‘We know you can use the money. We’ll buy something from you later.’” “We got back customers who had left Ron’s because of the growth and focus on commercial construction,” Lizzy said. “I think they were just glad to know Ron’s was going to continue to exist.” Today the Packerts are enjoying their busiest year ever. But even though they talk about expansion, the pain of the recent recession remains close to the surface. “We were doing 15-20 projects a year for a client before the recession,” John said. “That client was growing really fast and told us to gear up for 30 to 40 projects a year. We were talking about expanding to accommodate them. This building is designed so we can easily expand and we were talking about design plans and loans. Then the client went out of business – just bang, out of business. What if we had done the expansion…”

Biggest Challenge: Making it through the recession without laying one employee off. Dealing with all the government requirements. Lessons Learned: To make a business work you need good customers and good quality, skilled employees. It’s a continuous process to retain those relationships. Best Practices: Build a quality product at a fair price. Our number one priority is to service the customer. Always do what is right. Exceed the customers’ expectations. Chamber members since September 2000

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T i mel ine 1975 John Packert graduates from high school and begins working for a local contractor building houses.

1976 Lizzy Packert graduates from high school and continues working at a local

dental office where she has been working since she was 16 years old. 1977 John begins working at Ron’s Cabinets in the evenings, while continuing to build houses during the day.

The team at Ron’s Cabinets, November 2014

1978 Lizzy and John marry; John goes full time at Ron’s Cabinets. 1980’s John moves out of the shop and begins working with customers; the company builds the plant on Summit Avenue in Sauk Rapids that currently houses Wilkie Sanderson; over


Fun Fact: John and Lizzy were high school sweethearts. The first time

Persona l Prof i le

John called for a date, Lizzy turned him down. “I wanted to know if he was serious or not,” Lizzy said. “If he was serious he’d call back.” He called back.

turned around we still had all our good people and we were set to grow.” Remodeling was the first thing that came back. “Now we’re starting to see new home building coming back,” John said. “We’re probably 60 percent residential and 40 percent commercial today. During the recession it was more like 80 percent commercial and 20 percent residential.” “I think we’d like to be 50-50,” Lizzy said. “Our people can do both, we have the equipment to do both, and it provides the best cushion.” And with a couple of good years on their balance sheet and the growth they’ve experienced in 2014, expansion is back in the plans. “Probably not in 2015,” John said. “But if this keeps up we’ll need to add on and that was always our intent.” When it comes to business success, it is less about growth and more about people for John and Lizzy. “You get to know your employees and you know you’re responsible for them and their families and their children,” Lizzy said. “There’s no way to describe the

the next 20 years the company expands three times at that location. Mid 1980’s John is named general manager of Ron’s Cabinets. 1997 Ron Schmitz sells Ron’s Cabinets to Marc Sanderson and Walter Wilkie.

thrill of it. We look at them living good lives and we think, yes, this business is working!” “I feel good when we do work for a customer and we get a thank you note and they list the employees by name that they worked with. That’s really neat,” John said. “I know we tell people how important they are and they say, ‘Yea, yea, everyone says that.’ But we do mean it. The employees make this company.” Back in the days when Ron Schmitz owned the original Ron’s Cabinets, John would go around on pay day, hand out checks, chat with employees and thank them for their work. Of course, that’s all gone away with automatic payroll deposit. Or has it? “Oh no,” Lizzy said, with a chuckle. “That’s John’s time with the employees.” “I know we’ll have to switch to automatic deposit one day,” John said. “But for now I still hand out pay checks and thank the employees. We wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for them.” Gail Ivers is the editor of Business Central Magazine and vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

2000 Sanderson and Wilkie rebrand as Wilkie Sanderson, focusing on commercial cabinet manufacturing; they sell the residential cabinetry business and the name Ron’s Cabinets to John and Lizzy Packert. The Packerts build a 21,000square-foot building in the Sauk Rapids

industrial park and begin doing business as Ron’s Cabinets.

>>

2015

John and Lizzy celebrate 15 years in business.

John (57) and Lizzy (56) Packert Owners, Ron’s Cabinets

..................... Married: 1978 John’s education: 1975 graduate, Sauk Rapids-Rice High School Johns’ work experience: Worked for a local contractor building homes for two years; started part time evenings at Ron’s Cabinets for one year, then full time at Ron’s Cabinets until 2000; purchased the residential portion of the cabinet business in 2000, retaining the name Ron’s Cabinets. Lizzy’s education: 1976 graduate, Sauk Rapids-Rice High School Lizzy’s work experience: Farm girl – grew up on a chicken farm in rural Sauk Rapids with her parents and six siblings; worked in the dental office of Dr. Schad for 12 years; quit to stay home and raise their family; works at least four days a week at Ron’s Cabinets doing accounting, bookkeeping, and as little HR as possible. Family: Six children, three boys and three girls ranging in age from 35 to 16. Hobbies: They have a lake home in Merrifield, MN; gardening and landscaping; hunting and fishing; snowmobiling

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Central Magazine, LLC >> Business First published: January 1, 2000

Ownership: St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce LEADERSHIP Publisher: Teresa Bohnen Editor: Gail Ivers Associate Publisher: Wendy Hendricks Design and Production: Yola Hartmann Number of employees: None

From left: Yola Hartmann, Wendy Hendricks, Teresa Bohnen and Gail Ivers

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It’s a big year for Business Central – this is our 15th year of publishing Central Minnesota’s first (and we think best) business magazine. So we’re taking up a little space in this issue to reminisce about what has happened over the years – good and bad – and introduce you to our

and counting

team. But we’re not being totally selfish. We’ve invited some fellow 15-year-olds to share the spotlight with us.

.....................

From Teresa: Start Date: June 1999

From Gail: Start Date: June 1999 Biggest Change: Moving from working with an outside publisher to self-publishing. Something that hasn’t changed: Our mission to provide a high quality business publication that includes interesting feature stories and solid, valuable business information. Most Fun: Without a doubt -photo shoots Biggest Challenge: Determining content that is relevant, interesting, and not too repetitive Lessons Learned: Publishing a magazine is waaaaaaaaaaaaay harder than you think. Without advertising (and advertisers) there is no magazine. It’s a magazine…it’s not brain surgery. It may be embarrassing, but no one ever died from a typo. Best Practices: Find the best advertising and design people in the business; then do your best to keep them happy and engaged. Keep a wall of separation between advertising and editorial. Include as many “people” photos as possible in every issue.

Biggest Change: Undertaking publishing ourselves with the November 2008 issue. Because of unexpected events, we had to react decisively and quickly to get that issue out differently than we ever had before. We didn’t know it at the time, but the event and aftermath cemented a dedicated and talented team that sticks together today. We could not have done it without the support of our chief designer, Yola Hartmann. Something that hasn’t changed: Gail Ivers’ passion, dedication and commitment to the magazine. She is the magic that keeps Business Central editorially strong and ethically sound. Most Fun: (And Most Memorable) Proofreading the November 2013 issue in a cozy restaurant in Macerata, Italy while I traveled with Gail on an economic development trip. It was surreal to be communicating across the world via Wi-Fi from a castle fortress that was hundreds of years old. It’s also one of the only times we’ve sipped fine wine and ate terrific cheese while proofing. Did anyone find any errors in that issue?

Biggest Challenge: Meeting the deadlines for my editorial pieces. Some have been written by midnight oil. Lessons Learned: Deadlines can be stretched when absolutely necessary. Sometimes the best stories come from the smallest businesses. Making Rock Stars out of our Chamber members is a really good thing! Best Practices: Maintaining a successful, experienced team. Self-publishing so net profit does not have to be the most important operating criteria.

.....................

From Wendy: Start Date: April 2000 Biggest Change: Technology; magazine production is paperless. Something that hasn’t changed: Our amazing Business Central team who have been with the magazine since the beginning. Most Fun: Interesting cover photo shoots over the years (freezing cold at the St. Cloud Airport, in a pile of granite with Bauerly brothers). Biggest Challenge: When the former publisher suddenly went out of business and we had to take over publishing. The silver lining is that biggest challenge

was the best thing that could have happened! Lessons Learned: Don’t give up during the tough times, believe in yourself and what you are doing and keep going! Best Practices: Building positive relationships and networking.

.....................

From Yola: Start Date: Sept. 2003 Biggest Change: Taking the magazine in-house. Something that hasn’t changed at all: The people - for the most part. Oh, and Gail’s hair. Most Fun: Working with the remarkable ladies at the Chamber. They are all so different, but work well together. I find great satisfaction in knowing them for this long. Biggest Challenge: Satisfying opinions. Design is very subjective, as is editorial. It is hard to please everyone at all times. Lessons Learned: Sometimes you have to fall hard to get it right. If you work hard and be honest, life will find ways to reward you. Best Practices: A clear and common focus, paired with time and structure.

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and counting

>> BankVista .................. Start Date: February 1, 2000 Ownership: Rivers Ridge Holding Company (owned by 50 shareholders… most are in Minnesota) LEADERSHIP President and CEO: Stefan Freeman Senior Management: Robyn Holthaus, VP/CFO; LouAnn Peterson, VP Residential Real Estate; Mike Phillips, VP Senior Lending Officer; Dan Nygaard, VP Manager Small Business Division; Mary Shottenkirk, VP Loan Operations and Compliance NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES In 2000: 10 In 2015: 27

..................

The leadership team at BankVista: (Back, L-R) LouAnn Peterson, Stefan Freeman, Dan Nygaard, Mike Phillips (Front L-R): Robyn Holthaus, Mary Shottenkirk

Biggest Change: Technology! When BankVista opened its doors, our employees were getting used to the idea of email. Opening a checking account 15 years ago meant visiting a banker; paying bills required writing checks and mailing them to vendors. Now everything can be done online for FREE! Not only has technology helped increase efficiencies, it has also driven down price. Something that hasn’t changed: Providing exceptional service is the best form of banking. Knowing peoples’ stories, sharing ours, and creating lasting relationships are our building blocks to success.

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Most Fun: Visiting a business BankVista helped finance or watching a first time home buyer receive the keys to their new home never gets old! Biggest Challenge: Surviving the Great Recession. Lessons Learned: To be highly successful, you need to find and retain employees who are talented and dedicated to serving customers. BankVista has three original employees hitting their 15-year mark in early 2015. Best Practices: Stay true to your values and mission statement, treat customers with respect and enjoy your job. Do not compromise your standards or forget the need to continually earn the trust of your customers.


>> GrandStay Residential

Suites Hotel .................. Start Date: July 15, 2000 Ownership: Suite Ventures, LLC Leadership: Blue Sky Hospitality, LLC NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES In 2000: 15 In 2015: 25

Biggest Change: Entire remodel of guest room furniture and all common areas that took place at the end of 2012. The entire color scheme of the outside of the hotel. In 2013 we finally got an illuminated trademark sign on Division Street. Something that hasn’t changed: All the fixtures in the guest bathrooms have never been replaced, only the paint and shower rods and curtains have changed. Most Fun: The returning guests we get year after year from Sun City West. All the retired couples come and stay in the summer while the heat in Arizona is unbearable.

..................

Biggest Challenge: Keeping up with the “Jones” in the hotel market and always trying to be ahead of the curve with all the new changes in our industry and the demands of the market. Lessons Learned: Call on references for your snow plow company. So very important in downtown when you have such limited space. Best Practices: Our amazing customer service program….Every-Guest, EveryTime. Gives our employees so much pride in what they do and they understand the importance of making each and every guest feel important.

(From left): Kacee Carlson, front office manager; Melanie Tank, general manager; Mariah Schlichting, breakfast attendant/housekeeping; Al Picconatto, maintenance

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and counting

(Left to right) Scott Baynes, Scott Warzecha and Matt Riley

>> Netgain

...................... Start Date: January 1, 2000 Ownership: Scott Warzecha (majority), Matt Riley, Scott Baynes LEADERSHIP President: Scott Warzecha VP of Operations: Matt Riley VP of Technology: Scott Baynes VP of Finance: Franco Cusipag NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES In 2000: 3 In 2015: 96

............... ....

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Biggest Change: Going from serving clients only in Minnesota to serving clients throughout the United States. In that same respect, going from having employees only in Minnesota to having and managing employees in multiple states. Something that hasn’t changed: Our dedication to matching IT to business needs. When Scott started Netgain, he knew there was a better way to run IT that would result in a better experience for clients – and that hasn’t changed.

Most Fun: Developing employees has been a lot of fun. We have a lot of young, incredibly talented individuals here – and seeing them go through stages of life from marriage to house to baby to babies – it’s very rewarding and fun to see that happen – all the while seeing them succeed in their professions. Biggest Challenge: Finding employees that fit our culture and meet our core value structure. Best Practices: Respect, Relationships with each other, Responsibility. When we follow these three core values of our culture internally and externally, the rest falls into place.


>> J. F. Kruse Jewelers ............... Start Date: October 1, 2000 Ownership: Founded by Jim Kruse; now owned by Jim’s daughter, Melissa Kelley LEADERSHIP Visionary: Jim Kruse General Manager: Melissa Kelley Service Manager: Harry Monnier Custom Manager: Deanna Hennen Sales Floor Manager: Jason Steffes NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES In 2000: 3 In 2015: 17

...............

Melissa Kelley and Jim Kruse

Biggest Change: Moved locations and built a new store in fall of 2013. Something that hasn’t changed: Who we are. At J. F. Kruse Jewelers, we believe in enriching the lives of others. We believe in showing others that their special moments, their ideas, and their stories are important and valuable. Everything we do and every decision we make centers around this belief. Most Fun: Having the honor to be a small part of the lives and stories of our customers; enriching the lives of others; staying true to our culture; always moving forward through innovating; using creativity to try new things.

Biggest Challenge: Managing our growth. You can’t let the business get ahead of you – you have to stay true to who you are as a company and make sure that you’re managing your growth and your people effectively. Lessons Learned: The right thing to do is sometimes the hardest – and in order to move the entire team forward, the right thing ultimately needs to be done. Best Practices: In order to be successful, you must do two things. First, you must be the best at your craft. Be unique; be special. Second, you must always put people first. No one gets there alone; you need the help of others to reach your goals.

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Feature

CAUTIOUSLY OPTIMISTIC Local business leaders share their forecasts for 2015 By Whitney Bina As the new year kicks off, Business Central wants to know what 2015 looks like in Central Minnesota. We met with local industry leaders to gather their business forecasts. Representatives from the healthcare, technology, manufacturing, financial and construction industries shared their thoughts. Here’s what we learned:

HEALTHCARE Dr. Mark Roerick, Advantage Chiropractic

I

n the last two years, more individuals have opted to take their health into their own hands, according to Dr. Mark Roerick, owner of Advantage Chiropractic in St. Cloud. The company recently moved to a new office space, allowing Roerick and his wife, Donna, a certified natural health practitioner, to create an overall wellness-based focus for their business. In 2015, ongoing education proves important. Roerick predicts individuals will continue to take control of their health, increasing demand for preventative medicine like

chiropractic care. Nutrition classes will also gain in importance and popularity, One area of concern is new technologies. Mobile devices tend to work against good posture, according to Roerick. Schools now use mobile devices in the classroom, usually without realizing the health consequences. “There needs to be more awareness of how mobile devices are impacting our posture and health long-term,” he said. In 2015, Roerick and his team plan to educate both teachers and students at school districts across the nation on proper posture while using mobile devices. Overall, Roerick predicts the demand for preventative care will remain high in 2015. “We’ve continued to have steady growth at Advantage Chiropractic over the last several years,” he said. “As long as people maintain the idea that they are in charge of their own health, we will continue to help individuals be proactive and stay healthy.”

contributor Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

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TECHNOLOGY Cliff Robbins, Cohlab-Digital Marketing

B

ig data, cloud computing and mobile commerce (m-commerce) will increase their relevance in the next year, Cliff Robbins said. Robbins is the co-owner of Cohlab-Digital Marketing. In the last two years, the mobile market raced forward, providing opportunities for local businesses to take advantage of new technologies, according to Robbins. The increase in mobile devices and advancement in smartphone technology has opened the flood gates for m-commerce. “M-commerce, which allows users to make purchases directly from their wireless devices, will have an expanding role in the economy and prove more ingrained in our lives,” Robbins said. “I predict m-commerce will provide consumers with the capability to decrease shopping times while also allowing businesses to implement just-in-time order processing.” One of the biggest challenges the industry faces revolves around technical talent. Everyone wants to find the right people for the right positions. However, not all organizations use technology the same way. “Regardless, all businesses benefit as technology affords

us the capability to compete efficiently,” Robbins said. At Cohlab, mobile continues to speed up. “We see the importance for local companies to have a responsive website,” Robbins said. “The need for responsive design compounds year over year. Also, as more and more consumers have access to technology at their fingertips, businesses need to ensure they are ready for the various device segments such as tablets, wearable devices, smartphones and laptops.” Cohlab will continue to grow in 2015, Robbins said. “We are potentially launching five new product and service lines along with continued research in m-commerce and its uses and new technology for businesses.”

CONSTRUCTION Evan Larson, GLTArchitects

“T

he construction industry was disproportionately hit during the recession,” Evan Larson said. Larson is the managing partner at GLTArchitects. “In order to find work, some design firms, contractors and materials suppliers chased projects farther outside our region, particularly in North Dakota.” Over the last two years, growth and improvement in the local economy brought some of that focus back to the local area. In 2015, continued


www.scr-mn.com slow growth, at least in the first half of the year, will be the trend. Potentially higher interest rates, increasing materials costs, and labor shortages drive uncertainty for the industry in 2015, Larson said. If materials costs continue to rise and if labor shortages continue, certain construction projects might be forced to be put on hold. The biggest issue across the board continues to revolve around labor shortages. “If you are out there looking for work and can do the job, you can write your own ticket right now,” Larson said. Contractors are so short staffed they offer large incentives like training reimbursement. In the next year, larger publically funded projects will continue to be popular, according to Larson. “There are also a lot of empty and underutilized buildings still available for remodeling and additions, which will be popular locally.” The outlook for all project types appears to be improving, especially for education and medical related projects. “We have some nice projects lined up for 2015.” Larson said. “We recently broke ground on a large addition to a charter school and are starting design work on an expansion of the Gorecki Guest House for CentraCare Health.” The next year will be another good year for both commercial and residential projects, Larson said. “For the industry in general, the worst is over, but we remain cautious.”

MANUFACTURING Joel Bauer, Midsota Manufacturing

A

fter taking a hit during the recession, Central Minnesota’s manufacturers are growing and staying busy. “A number of local

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manufacturing companies expanded over the last two years,” according to Joel Bauer, one of three partners who own Midsota Manufacturing. “At Midsota Manufacturing, we added a second facility this past summer.” The company produces trailers and skid steer attachments. “Going into 2015, the manufacturing industry will see steady growth, but I predict it will not be as significant as the last two years,” Bauer said. Finding

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employees to fill vacant positions continues to challenge the industry. “Employees who come to work, work hard, and take pride in their work are hard to find.” With increasing employee shortages, more manufacturers choose to adopt automation processes to keep up with the increasing workload. “We recently purchased a second robotic welding machine to help maintain our product line,” Bauer said. J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5 //

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Feature

The manufacturing industry in Central Minnesota remains strong and companies continue to grow and prosper. “We’ve had a really good couple of years and are looking forward to expanding our product line,” Bauer said. Their recent expansion allows Midsota Manufacturing to house their trailers in the new building and keep the retail side and custom orders in the original facility. “We are also implementing a new freight incentive program to increase sales around the country.” Overall, Bauer predicts, steady growth will be the industry norm in 2015.

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FINANCIAL Tammy Reis, American National Bank of Minnesota

D

uring the last two years the local financial industry has been bouncing back from the recession. Bankowned real estate significantly decreased allowing more lending availability. However, the demand for funding by creditworthy borrowers has been low, according to

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Tammy Reis, American National Bank of Minnesota. Some banks, looking for more business, even changed their business model to accommodate new clients. Secondary market credit standards lowered slightly, which also shows the industry’s upswing. Lower credit standards help more individuals secure automated credit loans, Reis said. One piece of advice Reis gives is to learn your credit score. “If you don’t know your credit score and how to manage it at an acceptable level, then you should seek a mortgage professional who has worked in the industry since credit scoring came out.” Throughout the next year Reis foresees more individuals

getting back to their prerecession normal. “Those who went through foreclosure and who have been renting the last few years will repair their credit score and look for homes again,” she said. Individuals will also refinance their alternative sources of money from families or friends and payoff a contract for deed, she added. Another positive to look forward to in 2015 may be lower fuel prices. “Decreasing fuel costs allows for more disposable income and helps individuals purchase higher ticket items like homes, second homes and automobiles,” Reis said, optimistic that 2015 will be a good year for the financial industry.


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Special Focus HEALTH CARE & MEDICAL SERVICES

FRISBEE GOLF ANYONE?

BY THE NUMBERS

Central Minnesota supports making good decisions for greater health and wellness . By Donniel Robinson

2,800

Total number of people graduating from a nursing program in 2010 –––––––––––––

2,995

Total number of people graduating from a nursing program in 2011 –––––––––––––

81%

The percent of Minnesota’s 2011 nursing graduates employed in the state –––––––––––––

Source: Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development; Minnesota Department of Health.

$26.20

The full-time median wage for registered nurses 18 months after graduation in 2011 –––––––––––––

$35.11

M

innesota continues to be one of the healthiest states in the country, according to America’s Health Rankings. Health and wellness are the product of eating well, moving often, and detecting potential health problems early. St. Cloud area communities are doing a great job to support their residents with a wide array of health-promoting options.

Local Health Care Providers A healthy community starts with healthy children. The CentraCare Health Foundation funds a program called BLEND (Better Living: Exercise and Nutrition Daily). BLEND is a coalition of St. Cloud area stakeholders who are focused

on reducing the epidemic of childhood obesity. This program partners with many local events, businesses, and educators to provide education and opportunities for children and their families to become more active. HealthPartners’ Well@ Work program makes it easier for patients to attend medical appointments by bringing clinics to the worksites of participating companies. Well@Work clinics provide easier access and quicker appointments. Users of this program are finding that appointments are about one half the cost of going to their primary care clinic with an average time savings of

2.5 hours per visit, according to HealthPartners’ data. They also note that employers who bring these clinics to their worksites are finding a 2:1 return on their investment within the first year. The St. Cloud Medical Group is also making it easier for their patients to take care of their health. Established patients, two years and older, can sign up to participate in Virtual Office Visits for the treatment of common illnesses. Patients are asked to complete an online questionnaire that assists a doctor in diagnosing their current condition. Patients can also submit vitals such as their blood pressure or temperature

The 2012 hourly median wage for registered nurses employed in health care in the Central Minnesota

DID YOU KNOW?

About 55 percent of Minnesota employers with 100 or more employees now offer some form of health promotion program.

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Special Focus

DID YOU KNOW?

Heart disease, stroke and cancer kill 52 Minnesotans every day and cost nearly $2 billion in healthcare every year. Up to 35 percent of these deaths could be prevented if our cities, towns and schools supported healthy choices.

and attach pictures that help the doctor make a diagnosis. Patients can expect a response, in the comfort of their own homes, with 24 hours.

Having a program increases employee morale, reduces absenteeism, and improves the overall health of employees, according to Rejuv Medical.

Local Employers The St. Cloud Area Family YMCA has a suite of corporate wellness programs that cater to area businesses. The programs allow the company’s employees and their families to participate in various opportunities for health and fitness at the YMCA. Programs can be customized to meet the specific needs of each company. Rejuv Medical is also ready to help companies create corporate wellness programs.

Community Local grocers have been using the NuVal System, which scores food on a scale of 1-100. The higher the NuVal Score, the better the nutrition. This simple scoring system is designed to help families make better nutritional choices. School districts are helping students make better choices by improving the nutritional value of the foods that are available in school buildings. Federal guidelines now set

limits on the number of calories, and the amounts of sodium, fat, and sugar a school-provided snack food can contain. St. Cloud Area School District 742 voluntarily participates in Farm-to-School, which allows schools to use fresh foods from local farms. After eating a healthy meal or snack, St. Cloud area residents have many opportunities to get active. There are walking/biking trails and public parks for selfdirected recreation. Donniel Robinson is the owner of Robinson Writes, a St. Cloud based commercial copywriting company. She can be reached at info@ robinsonwrites.net.

Greater Outcomes JOINED AT THE HIP We use the most advanced techniques and technologies to perform nearly 1,000 joint replacements each year. Like muscle sparing direct anterior hip surgery with computer assisted navigation. It gives our board certified orthopedic surgeons amazing control and accuracy during surgery. Which means a better outcome, quicker recovery, and faster return to the things you love to do.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center • Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy 50

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 5 BCGreaterOutcomes7.5x4.875.indd 1

4/21/14 3:12 PM


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Special Focus: Health Care & Medical Services

Special Focus:

St.Cloud Orthopedics

St. Cloud Medical Group

Kristen Sigurdson, D.P.M.

Bruce Broman, MD

320-259-4100 www.stcloudorthopedics.com

320-251-8181 www.stcloudmedical.com

Podiatric medicine

Health Care & Medical Services Continue reading to learn more about the variety of Health Care & Medical Services available in Central Minnesota.

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risten Sigurdson, D.P.M., has been with St. Cloud Orthopedics since 2009 specializing in Podiatry. Dr. Sigurdson received her Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree from the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine in Cleveland. She has completed a fellowship program with the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons and is an active member of several other associations. Her specialized interests include podiatric medicine, public health, and diabetes podiatric care.

South Campus

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ruce Broman, MD, is the newest addition to the Pediatrics team at St. Cloud Medical Group. Dr. Broman is now providing pediatric physician services at their South Campus. He completed his pediatric residency at the University of Iowa. Dr. Broman is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and is an active member of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He enjoys getting to know families and helping children stay healthy as they grow. Dr. Broman is now accepting new patients.

Caring for Generations People of all ages are important to us. Since 1928, our team of compassionate healthcare professionals has provided exceptional care for families across central Minnesota—like Rose’s family. For four generations, they’ve chosen St. Cloud Medical Group for every stage of their family’s health. We provide the same genuine care and respect for patients we had when we started 86 years ago.

South Campus

Northwest Campus

320-251-8181

320-202-8949

Clearwater Clinic

Cold Spring Clinic

320-558-2293

320-685-8641

Family Medicine + OB/GYN + Pediatrics + Express Care + Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation + Occupational Medicine + Surgery

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Special Focus: Health Care & Medical Services

St. Benedict’s Senior Community

Benedict Village and Benedict Court

P YOUR BRIDGE between hospital and home

We believe the key to success is meeting a patient’s needs. It’s the focus and quality of treatment that makes the difference. Inpatient and Outpatient Rehab | Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy

Care Center 320-654-2355 Short stay care | Memory care Long term care | Respite care

centracare.com

Physicians with The Vein Center and Regional Diagnostic Radiology: Dr. Jody Bolton Smith “The best Dr. Danielle Leighton thing about the Dr. Rochelle Wolfe whole procedure Dr. Chadd McMahon was that I didn’t Terri Wolfe, PA-C have to take any

Jody Bolton Smith, M.D. Imaging Specialist; Member of the American College of Phlebology 320-257-VEIN (8346) www.beautifulresults.com

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time off work.” MICHELE

Call today for a complimentary varicose or spider vein consultation.

320-257-VEIN (8346)

1990 connecticut ave s, sartell, mn 56377

beautifulresults.com

for beautiful results

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1810 Minnesota Boulevard SE, St. Cloud, MN 56304 (320) 203-2747 • centracare.com email:SBSCInformation Registry@centracare.com

The Vein Vein Center The Center

No Varicose Veins. No Surgery. No Down Time.

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ut down your shovel and pick up your social life with outings, happy hours, shopping trips and musical entertainment. Let the staff at Benedict Village and Benedict Court take care of the cooking, cleaning and shoveling! Personal care delivered to your individual apartment is among one of the many community highlights. We invite you and your loved ones to come in for a complimentary lunch, take a tour, meet our friendly staff and see what makes our campus a wonderful place to call home. Every day. Every way. We’ve got you covered!

r. Jody Bolton Smith from The Vein Center, along with her colleagues Dr. Rochelle Wolfe, Dr. Danielle Leighton, and Dr. Chadd McMahon are interventional radiologists with Regional Diagnostic Radiology specializing in imaging and minimally invasive procedures. Along with their physician assistant Terri Wolfe, they treat your veins using proven laser technology. These non-surgical procedures are quick, safe, effective and require no down time. Trust the experts in vascular and vein treatments. Goodbye veins...hello confidence. Call today for a complimentary, no obligation consultation.


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Special Focus: Health Care & Medical Services

HealthPartners

CentraCare Diabetes Center

Midsota Plastic Surgeons Plastic Surgery Clinic

Central Minnesota Clinic

(320) 253-7257 info@midsota.com www.midsota.com

(320) 253-5220 hpcmc.com

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Make Good Happen • Same day appointments • FREE supervised childcare during your medical and dental appointments • All major insurance welcome • Walk-in strep tests • E-visits and phone appointments for established patients • Family medicine, pediatrics, OB/Gyn, dental, chiropractic, behavioral health, general and colorectal surgery, pharmacy • View lab results online • 24/7 CareLine

idsota Plastic Surgeons has set a standard of excellence in the cosmetic and reconstructive industry by delivering patients the results they desire. Our commitment to high quality and personalized patient care has made us the largest private plastic surgery clinic in the Upper Midwest. From our surgical center in Minnesota to our mission trips to Guatemala, our experienced surgeons are transforming not only our patients’ appearance, but also the quality of their lives. Let us help you imagine the possibilities.  

Services for employers: • Occupational Medicine to prevent and manage workplace injury • Well@Work programs for companies to lower medical costs

1900 CentraCare Circle St. Cloud, MN 56303

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320-202-7759 centracare.com

entraCare Health provides a full range of diabetes care for patients and families in our region through education, leadership, health promotion and preventive services. We help you manage your diabetes so you can maintain the best possible health and quality of life. Ask your provider for a referral. Our team of experts include: • Endocrinologists (specialist who care for patients with diabetes) • Certified Diabetes Educators (registered nurses, registered dietitians) • Pharmacists • Internal Medicine • Family Practice

s your health plan working as hard as you do to lower costs? s your plan partnering with the region’s finest care providers – like St. Cloud Medical Group – to improve care?

~ Since 1983 ~

imagine the possibilities Specializing in: • • • • • •

Breast Augmentation Breast Lift Breast Reconstruction Breast Reduction Tummy Tuck Liposuction

• • • • • •

Nasal Surgery Facelift Eyelid Surgery Laser Treatments Browlift Thigh Lift

• • • • • •

Varicose Veins Spider Veins Hand Surgery BOTOX® Cosmetic JUVÉDERM® RADIESSE® dermal filler

Check out our website to learn about upcoming events, special offers and our wide range of services. www.midsota.com

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320.253.7257

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Toll Free: 1.888.MIDSOTA

f not, let the region’s only certified ACO health network help you find the right plan for your business.

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Business Spotlight INSIGHT EYE CARE

HIGH TECH – HIGH TOUCH Insight Eye Care combines compassion and technology to give patients the care they deserve. Drs. Dubow, Nelson and Malikowski with a piece of technology used to diagnose eye disease. Missing: Dr. Friederichs (who sensibly stayed in Paynesville during the first major snowfall of the season).

TIMELINE 1975 Burt Dubow graduates from optometry school and joins his father’s practice in Little Falls. 1977 Dubow opens the St. Cloud Optometry Clinic in a one room office in St. Cloud; the office does not have running water – the water needs to be pumped by hand into the sink. 1978 Dubow moves to the top floor of the Germain Medical Building.

AT A GLANCE Insight Eye Care 206 W Division St. Waite Park, MN 56387 320-253-0365 www.InsightEyeCare.us Additional Locations: Paynesville and Becker Opened: 1977 Founder: Burt Dubow Current optometrists: Drs. Dubow, 65; Greg Friederichs, 50; Bennett Nelson, 50; and Anna Malikowski, 38 Ownership: Drs. Friederichs and Nelson; Dr. Dubow sold his shares in the practice and became an employee in January 2014. Chamber member since 2000

Fun fact: Insight Eye Care was the 14th clinic in the world to add the Optos Optomap, used to take a picture of the retina that goes far beyond what can be seen with simple dilation of the pupil.

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Business Central: ‘Technology’ features prominently in your mission statement. Why? ______________ Dr. Dubow: I’ve always liked technology. When I joined my dad in his practice, I tried to get him to adopt some of the new technology. He wasn’t interested. I think that’s why I opened the St. Cloud office. In the end he said I did the right thing. Dr. Nelson: It’s one of the reasons I was interested in joining this practice. Dr. Dubow is known throughout the industry as a leader in research, technology and patient care. I came from Illinois and even the contact lens reps there knew about this practice and said it was a great opportunity. Dr. Malikowski: Keeping up with technology is one of the challenges. There’s always more to learn so you can better treat and help people. Dubow: When I started in practice, you couldn’t dilate pupils. You couldn’t diagnose eye diseases. You couldn’t

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prescribe medications. We can do all that and so much more because of the advances in science and technology. It used to be we had to wait until someone lost vision in one eye before we could diagnose macular degeneration. Now we can treat it early and manage people appropriately to preserve their vision. BC: What do you like best about this work? ______________ Dubow: The personal relationships with patients. I truly love my patients and I think they can sense that sincerity. Malikowski: All the staff care about each other and about the patients. We personally care about them. Dubow: It’s not by accident that we have this kind of care for each other and the patients. We work at it, we support each other, and we all buy into the mission.

1980 Dubow moves his clinic to the bottom floor of the Germain Medical Building and opens Peepers Distinctive Eyewear across the hall where customers can order glasses. At this time it is rare for optometrists to provide both eye care and eye wear in order to avoid the perception of being ‘glorified eyeglass sellers.’ 1987 Dubow moves to Marketplace in Waite Park. Trends change. Peepers becomes part of the office suite, allowing care and service from exam through eywear. 1991 Dubow opens an office in Paynesville and renames the business Minnesota Vision Group. 1993 Dr. Friederichs joins the practice. 1995 Minnesota Vision Group opens an office in Becker. 2006 Minnesota Vision Group changes its name to Insight Eye Care and renames Peepers to Instyle Eyewear. 2007 Insight Eye Care and Instyle Eyewear move to their current location in Waite Park; Dr. Nelson joins the practice. 2012 Dr. Malikowski joins the practice.


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Jan/Feb 2015  

Business Central business magazine