Page 1


Jan Hawkins, VP of Operations and Human Resources at John Henry Foster, Eagan, MN

My Plan by Medica allows employers to set a budget to control health insurance costs while offering employees more choices. Your employees are able to select a health plan option that fits their life and financial needs best. It’s a win-win for everyone. For more information about My Plan call your broker or Medica at 952-992-3055.

MDC5245C1-7pt5x10-Mag.indd 1

6/4/15 11:19 AM


John B. Brownson CFO/COO Royal Tire, Inc.

smiling customers Top-notch service is a powerful thing. More than 90% of customers surveyed said they would recommend Marco. It’s no accident. We’ve been sending out monthly surveys and measuring the results since 1994 to make sure we’re doing everything we can to make our customers satisfied and successful. Our performance-driven attitude empowers our customers to work smarter, dream bigger and take technology further. That’s enough to make anyone smile. Learn more and get empowered at marconet.com.

marconet.com

#mpowering

taking technology further


6 President’s Letter 8 Editor’s Note 20 Business Calendar 26 Network Central

JULY/AUGUST 2015

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

PROFIT

44 Cover Story

WE POST. WE PIN. WE TWEET. WE BLOG.

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 5 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

44

At age 25 Luke Riordan has turned a summer internship into a 22-employee company experiencing triple digit growth.

51 Feature

THE POWER OF HER Knowing your female clients better may improve the customer relationship.

57 Special Focus FUN AND GAMES

Seniors are wealthy and healthy. If you’ve overlooked this critical market you’ll feel it in your bottom line.

Special Sections 55

WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

59

SENIOR HEALTH AND LIVING

10 UPFRONT Valuable and important information designed to guide and educate.

28 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business.

62 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Virginia Leach Guggenberger, Child’s Play Child Care Center

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2015 Business Central, LLC

• Top Tech Trends

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Common Branding Mistakes

110 Sixth Avenue South; P.O. Box 487,

• Establishing Business Credit • 11 Essential Excel Skills

Business Central is published six times a year

St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


WOMEN TO WATCH: DR. KARYN LENIEK, MD.

The best way to “ keep your workforce

healthy and productive is to create a positive work culture, one that promotes the well-being and safety of your employees. –– DR. KARYN LENIEK

Promoting Peak Performance HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic — Dr. Karyn Leniek, MD, Director of Occupational Medicine

C

entral Minnesota employers have a new local resource eager to help them and their employees function at peak performance. Her name is Dr. Karyn Leniek. A Board Certified Occupational Health Physician, Dr. Leniek serves as the Director of Occupational Medicine at HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic. Thrilled to be settled into her home in an historic St. Cloud neighborhood, Dr. Leniek is putting down roots. “I have been embraced by this community and am happy to call it my home,” she said. “I have welcoming neighbors and

get to work in an innovative, collaborative environment doing something I am passionate about, promoting the health of workers.” With the average American worker spending nearly onethird of life at work, it’s no surprise worker productivity is affected by an individual’s overall health. Dr. Leniek cares for patients with work-related injuries and collaborates with employers to prevent future injuries. The goal? An early and safe return to work with the help of appropriate medical care and restrictions. HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic Department

of Occupational Medicine promotes optimal health of employees with comprehensive, clinic-based services like pre-placement and DOT (Department of Transportation) exams. Dr. Leniek also provides on-site services—a “house call” for a business—to better evaluate the physical demands of a job and the overall worksite environment. While there is no magic pill or one-size-fits-all approach to practicing occupational medicine, Dr. Leniek offers this advice to employers, “The best way to keep your workforce healthy and productive is to create a positive work culture,

one that promotes the wellbeing and safety of your employees.” A healthy workforce has been shown to lower direct and indirect costs to employers. Dr. Leniek understands it’s in everyone’s best interest to get an injured employee back to work as soon as safely possible. She values the open, honest communication she shares with both employers and workers. “The connections I make with an injured worker are the best part of my job,” she reveals. “Seeing them ‘graduate’ from my care and return to work is my greatest reward.”

Spotlight: HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic

2251 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell, MN 56377

ABOUT US: HealthPartners Occupational Medicine specializes in preventing and managing workplace

320-253-5220 • www.hpcmc.com

injuries in a cost effective manner. Services are available to all companies. hpcmc.com/occmed SPONSORED PROFILE


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

President’s Letter MAIN PHONE

|

320-251-2940

AUTOMATED RESERVATION LINE 320-656-3826 PROGRAM HOTLINE 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com

How Well Are We?

I

f business owners are asked, “How well is your workforce?” Most think about employee absenteeism and sick time. Individually, when someone asks if you are “well,” I’ll bet you think in terms of how you physically feel. Thirty two months ago I embarked on a journey that changed my life. I decided to eat “clean,” limiting sugar and white flour in my diet and eating more vegetables and fruits. I hired a trainer, started exercising more regularly and integrated weight training into my gym visits. The more I did, the better I felt. I dropped pounds and firmed muscles, but even better, I felt truly well: physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. One of the people who began a similar journey to health at about the same time was Granite Equity Partners’ Rick Bauerly. Rick saw ties to corporate productivity and profits in helping workers become and stay healthy. He brought these ideas into his volunteer work with the Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation. Rick, along with Jason Bernick, Bernick’s Beverages and Vending, co-chaired the Wellness Corp of the GSDC, hosting Wellness Summits in 2014 and 2015. While the GSDC has ties to large businesses, they find it more difficult to recruit and engage small businesses in their initiatives. That’s where our Chamber enters the picture. I have agreed to host a President’s Wellness Initiative beginning in September. I’m not sure about all of the facets of our programming, but to begin, I see educational sessions around basic nutrition and fitness. I also think there is

WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF

a lot of information that can be helpful about what to expect during the aging process and how to stay in the most “well” place possible throughout your career and into retirement. Why would our Chamber be involved in such an initiative? Because improved well-being means improved business performance. Consider all five elements of well-being: 1 PURPOSE: Liking what you do each day and feeling motivated to achieve your goals. 2 SOCIAL: Having supportive relationships and love in your life. 3 FINANCIAL: Managing your economic life to reduce stress and increase security. 4 COMMUNITY: Liking where you live; feeling safe and having pride in your community. 5 PHYSICAL: Enjoying good health and enough energy to accomplish things daily. When individuals are healthy in all five areas, their employers almost certainly see superior job performance. So, I am embarking on another journey — a journey to bring better health and well-being to our small businesses. Would you like to join me? I’m keeping a list of interested volunteers and participants. Please email me at tbohnen@StCloudAreaChamber.com or leave a voicemail at (320) 656-3804. I encourage you and your employees to take part in our inaugural Season of Wellness.

PRESIDENT Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 VICE PRESIDENT Gail Ivers, ext. 109 DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR Virginia Kroll, ext. 105 COMMUNICATIONS & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Whitney Bina, ext.130

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Julie Lunning, ext. 111 DIRECTOR OF CONVENTION SALES Lori Cates, ext. 113 DIRECTOR OF SPORTS & SPECIAL EVENTS Dana Randt, ext. 110

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100

DIRECTOR OF VISITOR SERVICES Jean Robbins, ext. 129 SALES MANAGER Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Carrie Zwack, ext. 100

2014-15 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Board Vice Chair

Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care

Dan Bittman, Sauk Rapids-Rice School District

Dolora Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs

Dave Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Jayne Greeney Schill, St. Cloud Area School District #742 Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells

John Herges, Falcon National Bank, Past Board Chair Dennis Host, Coborn’s Inc.

6

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Sharon Henry, ext. 124

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF MAIN PHONE | 320-251-4170

Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

MEMBERSHIP SALES SPECIALIST Jaime Buley, ext. 134

Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, Inc., Board Chair Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Dr. Earl Potter, III, St. Cloud State University Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services Melinda Vonderahe, Times Media Bea Winkler, Pine Cone Pet Hospital Chriss Wohlleber, Le St. Germain Suite Hotel


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Editor’s Note

Early Adopter

PUBLISHER Teresa Bohnen MANAGING EDITOR Gail Ivers ASSOCIATE EDITOR Dawn Zimmerman

8

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Tracy Knofla, Bill Blazar, High Impact Minnesota Chamber Training Whitney Bina, Josh Longnecker, St. Cloud Area Northwestern Chamber of Mutual Commerce Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle wordingforyou

Heidi L. Everett, Watab Communications

Ronn Paulson, Thelen

Sharon Henry, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

John Pepper, Freelance Writer Mike Roth, Reventus Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

ADVERTISING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/SALES Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing AD TRAFFIC & CIRCULATION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART DESIGN & PRODUCTION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media COVER PHOTO Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman CORPORATE SPONSOR

Photo by Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

I

n the mid-2000s I attended a national conference of the association of Chamber of Commerce Executives. One of the speakers held up an example of cutting edge technology – a Palm Pilot. He went on to explain that this was the way our members were communicating with each other and we could either lead our members into the digital age or be left behind. I was familiar with the Palm Pilot. Chamber President Teresa Bohnen had been using one for some time. She had encouraged me to make the switch from paper, but I saw no value. Even as I listened to the speaker, I still saw no value. Then someone in the audience said: We have members who don’t even own a fax machine. What would they do with an electronic calendar? The speaker’s answer has stayed with me all these years: For less than $400 your members can leap over the fax and be communicating with each other using a hand-held device. You’re either part of it, or you’re obsolete. Obsolete. At that same conference, the speaker talked about a new online networking opportunity called LinkedIn. It was like MySpace (remember that?), only for businesses. Again, he stressed, this is the future and you can drive it or you can be left behind.

Left behind. I came back and put in a request for a Palm Pilot. I also brought up the question of joining LinkedIn to the Chamber’s Marketing Committee. Most had not heard of it, but those who had said it was a waste of time and a productivity buster. One well-known member of St. Cloud’s technology community specifically spoke out against it as a fad. (I like to remind him about that from time to time.) I usually try to follow the advice of our volunteers, but ‘obsolete’ and ‘left behind’ kept rolling around in my head. So one day I looked up LinkedIn, established a profile, and invited five people to ‘Connect’ with me. One, Diane Hageman, most recently at the College of Saint Benedict, set up a profile and connected with me immediately. One, an executive at what was then ING Direct, said his Internet banking company had a policy against these programs and blocked employees from using them. (Several years later I learned that ban was lifted when I received an invitation from him to connect.) I never heard from the other three. Such stories sound like the dark ages to Luke Riordan, owner of DAYTA Marketing (see the story on page 44). At age 25 he has hardly known a world without social media and to him the cutting edge Palm Pilot is a museum piece. “Early Adopter” and “Gail” are rarely used in the same sentence. But when the opportunity arises I like to tell people “I was on LinkedIn before you even knew what it was.” We all need a claim to fame. Until next issue,

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT Wendy Hendricks, (320) 656-3808 EDITORIAL SUGGESTIONS CAN BE MADE IN WRITING TO: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.


YOUR AFTER HOURS ALTERNATIVE Monday – Friday 5-10 p.m.

Common conditions treated:

Saturday, Sunday & holidays noon-8 p.m.

broken bones

dislocations, sprains and strains

365 days a year

fast-onset joint and back pain

high fever, dehydration, nausea or vomiting

mild chest pain with no cardiac history

minor injuries from motor vehicle collisions

pediatric illness and injuries

respiratory or breathing problems

serious cuts requiring stitches

severe headache/migraine

No appointment needed.

Visit centracare.com for current wait times.

CentraCare Health Plaza

Evenings & Weekends


UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

12 Getting Going 19 New at the Top

17 Point of View 18 Your Voice in Government 20 Business Calendar 24 The Trouble with Business

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Constant Learning

It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts. By Dr. Fred Hill “Is it possible to be at your best even when you are underqualified or doing something for the first time? Is it still possible, even after decades of experience, to recapture the enthusiasm, curiosity, and fearlessness of youth to take on new challenges? With the right mindset – with Rookie Smarts – you can.” This is the second review in a row of books written by Liz Wiseman. Multipliers, a book about best leaders, was the review for May 2015. Rookie Smarts is about constant learning. Constant learning must be recognized and nurtured by best leaders. In “the new game of work,” or “the new workscape,” leadership conditions are often far more complicated than when many organizational leaders began their careers. Leadership environments can be rife with conditions such as volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, to mention but a few.

DID YOU KNOW?

New Rookie Smarts; Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work by Liz Wiseman, HarperCollins, New York, 2011, ISBN 978-0-06-232263-0

Wiseman states that “work has become less of a place to go, a building to check into in the morning, and out of in the evening, and more of a landscape to which we contribute. The shift is from a workplace to a workscape, characterized by three fundamental shifts – vast, fast, and fleeting – that necessitate new ways of working and a different type of intelligence.” She states, as work shifts from the

physical to the knowledge realm, what are the implications for mastery? In a 24/7 business day, the day never ends. With a lean approach nothing extra is kept on the intellectual shelf. The impact on professional excellence is clear: “When work spins faster, learning cycles must spin faster, too.” This book consists of two parts. Part I: Rookie Smarts, living on the learning curve. And, Part II: Cultivating Rookie Smarts. Best leaders must consider that Rookies are more capable than we might expect. Inexperience is desperately needed in today’s rapidly evolving world of work. Whether one is a new Rookie or a perpetual Rookie, “It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.” Read this great book and discover why learning beats knowing in the new game of work. Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor from St. Cloud State University

Mueller joins WSB & Associates

Andrew Mueller joined WSB & Associates as a survey technician in the company’s St. Cloud office. Mueller holds a land surveying/civil engineering degree from St. Cloud Technical & Community College.

10

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

NEWS REEL OPPORTUNITY MATTERS WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBERS

(l-r) Anita Stoering, Wolters Kluwer; John Skalla, DeZURIK; and Courtney Vorrell, Rum River Special Education Cooperative recently joined the Board of Opportunity Matters. The board members help ensure continued advancement in the organization’s commitment to creating opportunities that empower individuals and their families to reach their full potential.

HANSMEIER APPOINTED CHAIR Gordon H. Hansmeier, Rajkowski Hansmeier Ltd., was appointed chair of the Seventh District Bar Association’s Ethics Committee by the Minnesota Supreme Court. District Bar Associations investigate complaints of unethical conduct against Minnesota lawyers. Committee members are comprised of volunteer attorneys and public members.

GAU NAMED EY “ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR” Jeff Gau, CEO, Marco, Inc., was named the 2015 Diversified Services EY Entrepreneur of the Year in the Upper Midwest. This program recognizes entrepreneurs who demonstrate excellence and extraordinary success in areas including innovation, financial performance, and personal commitment to their businesses and communities.


Growth

Space

CELEBRATING 65 YEARS Growth is great until you run out of room.

You can make do with the space you have, but eventually lack of space means lost productivity…and the end of growth.

More importantly, we can give you the freedom to work so you can get back to doing what you do best. Why make do with the space you have when W. Gohman Construction can help you do more?

W. Gohman Construction can build the space you need, from new construction to renovating an existing structure. We build environments that work for your employees and your budget. 65 YEARS | info@wgohman.com St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781CELEBRATING GENERAL CONTRACTOR

| DESIGN/BUILD | CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | BUILDING + REMODELING

WGOHMAN.COM


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL MARCO PROMOTES, RECEIVES RECOGNITION

A Little Word

Taking and giving “No” for an answer are done best with art and attitude. By Greg Vandal

Marco hired the following individuals:

(L-R) Dave Anderson –

solutions trainer, Alex Colt – audio/video lead installation technician, Jessica Davis – managed services project coordinator

(L-R) Ted Erickson – senior

network systems engineer, Brad Harrison – technical project manager, Melissa Henkemeyer – receptionist

(L-R) Jesse Juell – support

desk technician, Mitch Leen – cabling technician, Derek Lilleberg – network specialist

(L-R) Trevor Mark – network

operating center firewall specialist, Peggy VanNurden and Brandon Wilcken – service delivery coordinators Finance & Commerce named Marco one of the 2015 Progress Minnesota award recipients. The award recognizes individuals and companies for moving the Minnesota economy forward in innovative ways.

BEI Services and ENX Magazine selected Marco as an Office Technology Service Excellence Award recipient, which is given to dealerships that meet or exceed national performance standards in areas relating to customer satisfaction. Thirtynine Marco technicians were recognized for their service.

12

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

T

here is a wonderful scene in the nowclassic television sitcom “M*A*S*H.” Character Radar O’Reilly asks an injured and confused airman who thinks he is Jesus Christ, if it is true that God answers all our prayers. After a moment of quiet contemplation comes the soft response: “Yes. But sometimes the answer is no.” “No” can be a troubling little word. The salesperson ‘who won’t take no for an answer’ is often rewarded with multiple accounts. But a teenager, especially one in your own household, who acts in the same fashion might find a different result. It generally involves frustrated parents and consequences of a less satisfactory sort. I’ve learned a few things about “no” over the course of time -- both as a receiver

and a giver of such news. Some folks can convey an otherwise negative message in a way that makes the person making the request feel somehow uplifted or empowered. Implicit in the answer is the notion that the idea was a good one, but that circumstances might not permit it to happen right now. People who are particularly adept at offering a “no” often embed a form of “yes” in the response. “While I might not be able to give you what you asked for, here’s what I can do instead… .” There is an art in sharing an authentic affirmation in the midst of a rejection. Some people are not so artful. There are those who bark the negative response with a not-sohidden glee. And I’ve met more than a few people who simply can’t bring themselves to say out loud what is altogether too obvious: The answer will be “no.” Instead, there proceeds a series of delay tactics – postponements of a decision – that are, perhaps, intended to wear down the person making the request or otherwise

extend the deliberation beyond the point of relevancy. If the answer is going to be “no,” I prefer to give it or get it sooner rather than later. Then, we can both move on…. Of course, pressing too hard for an answer can precipitate the very “no” that might otherwise be avoided. I’ve found myself saying to those who feel they need an immediate response that, absent more time and information, “no” may be my safest course. Generally, unless something is genuinely an emergency, inaction is often a kind of stasis – nothing is likely to change for better or worse. “Yes” inevitably sets something into motion, and it is important to be reasonably certain about what the result will be. Where a fast answer might have to be “no,” a willingness to accept a reasonable delay might result in the preferred response. Art and attitude require the successful business person – and persistent teen – to hear “no” as “not today.” That leaves open the chance for tomorrow.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@ voxliberi.com.


Julie Anderson, M.D., F.A.A.F.P.

Diane Duckworth, D.O .,

F.A.C.O.G.

Elaina Lee, M.D., F.A .A.P.

Kimberly Spaulding , M.D.,

M.P.H.

Focusing on full-spectrum, family healthcare for 87 years and counting. Between St. Cloud Medical Group’s four locations, you’ll find more than a few doctors—there are actually over 60 providers to choose from. Yet, patients are known on a first-name basis, and cared for in a way that benefits their overall health. After 87 years in practice, St. Cloud Medical Group remains the local, family-focused healthcare clinic, offering the full scope of care—family medicine, pediatrics, OB/GYN, surgery, occupational medicine, Express Care for after-hour access, and more. St. Cloud Medical Group’s family practice providers are skilled at treating patients of all ages, administering care for everything from well-visits to various medical conditions, and coordinating non-medical care like counseling and social services. This patient-focused comprehensive technique results in long-term care relationships between

patient and provider. In fact, there are several instances where Dr. Kimberly Spaulding, M.D., M.P.H., is the primary care provider for multiple generations within the same family, from babies to grandparents.

“Our goal is to have the patient experience be comfortable and familiar—you should feel welcome, recognized, and listened to when you see your physician so that you feel content to share your concerns,”

methods for both surgical and general obstetrician and gynecological care. And at the other end of the spectrum, Dr. Elaina Lee, M.D., focuses on helping children manage chronic diseases such as Asthma, so they can continue to participate fully in their day-to-day activities.

“I am a passionate advocate for my patients and try to enable them to reach their full potential,” said Dr. Lee.

“I believe this is what we do best at St. Cloud Medical Group.”

These four doctors, who are just a few of the faces focused on your health, all agree: It’s the collective, caring approach that sets St. Cloud Medical Group apart.

St. Cloud Medical Group’s specialty physicians are dedicated to delivering the best possible care in their areas of expertise. For instance, Dr. Diane Duckworth, D.O., FACOG-OB/ GYN, promotes the least invasive

St. Cloud Medical Group has clinics at four convenient locations, including after-hours Express Care at both St. Cloud campuses. See all of their providers and learn about their online patient care at StCloudMedical.com.

said Dr. Julie Anderson, M.D., one of the clinic’s family physicians.

Family Medicine + OB/GYN + Pediatrics + Express Care + Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation + Occupational Medicine + Surgery


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront BY THE NUMBERS

NEWS REEL LAUERMANN JOINS SMARTSEARCH Mike Lauermann joined SmartSearch as a media consultant. He specializes in advertising and website development.

We’re #1

Central Minnesota is receiving recognition for growth and education.

MATHEW HALL LUMBER PROMOTES Mathew Hall Lumber promoted Calvin Fischer to operations manager and Shawn Kockler to design and estimating manager. Fischer oversees roof and floor truss and wall panel manufacturing. Kockler oversees the internal manufacturing operations.

SCHMITT RECEIVES RECOGNITION Scott M. Schmitt, CIM, Coldwell Banker Commercial Orion Real Estate, received the Silver Circle of Distinction by CBC Corporate, which recognizes the top producers within Coldwell Banker Commercial. He was recognized as the “Number One” CBC broker in Minnesota and in the top 2 percent of all associates globally. He also received the Greater Minnesota Transaction of the Year Award by Minnesota Commercial Association of Realtors.

FENSTERMACHER OBTAINS CERTIFICATION Victoria Fenstermacher, nurse practitioner, CentraCare Health — Becker, earned certification to become a Certified Commercial Motor Vehicle medical examiner. The certification allows her to determine if a commercial motor vehicle driver’s medical fitness for duty meets the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s standards.

14

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

O

k, maybe we’re not No. 1 everywhere, but St. Cloud and Central Minnesota are starting to appear on lists that boast of growth, affordability, and business friendliness. While we may not be No. 1 in the country, we are frequently listed as the #1 small community in Minnesota. Here’s a taste of some of the lists that have appeared in the last year: St. Cloud was Minnesota’s #1 city on NerdWallet’s list of “Fastest Growing U.S. Cities.” There were only two Minnesota cities in their top 20: St. Cloud at #7 and Duluth at #15. Using the latest Census data, the financial literacy website NerdWallet used a series of calculations to determine the nation’s

DID YOU KNOW?

fastest-growing cities based on employment, population and income growth. St. Cloud was the #1 Minnesota city in the Milken Institute’s 2014 Best Performing Small Cities list. At #26 on the list, St. Cloud was up from #30 in 2013, and beat out #27, Rochester, Minn., by a hair. The Milken Institute’s annual Best-Performing Cities report delivers a fact– based, comprehensive evaluation system, across metropolitan areas, which relies on job, wage, and technology trends shaping current and prospective pathways. Stearns County was #1 in Minnesota, according to Pittsburgh-based Fourth

Economy Consulting. The company ranked Stearns County as the tenth large-sized community in the nation poised to achieve sustainable growth while attracting people and business. Stearns County was compared to communities of similarly sized population. The company said Stearns County’s policies on food and livestock manufacturing, broadband access, workforce development, and domestic violence were of particular interest. County recreational opportunities and cultural festivals were also noted. Forbes ranked St. Cloud #24 out of 184 small cities for best small places for business and careers in 2014. That’s 31 spots higher than St. Cloud’s ranking in 2013. Ahead of us on the list were Mankato at #3 and Rochester at #23. Forbes also said St. Cloud State University was #3 among Minnesota schools for affordability and Money rated it in the top 9 percent of U.S. schools. – GMI

Erdmann earns Volunteer of the Year Award

Paula Erdmann, board member and former Board Chair, St. Cloud Federal Credit Union, received the 2015 Minnesota Credit Union Network Volunteer of the Year Award. Award recipients are chosen based on their involvement with credit unions and participation in activities that better their communities. Erdmann has served in various roles on the St. Cloud Federal Credit Union’s Board of Directors for 15 years.


i • GLARE BLURRY VISiON

INCREASED LIGHT SENSITIVITY MACULAR DEGENERATION IS THE LEADING CAUSE OF VISION LOSS. Insight Eye Care is one of the first eye clinics in the nation with a comprehensive strategy to assess the risk of developing Macular Degeneration (AMD) and to work in partnership with our patients to prevent vision loss.

Make an appointment today for AMD iManager risk assessment!

Example of MD

*A comprehensive eye exam may be required if patients choose to partner with us in a full risk management program.

Dr. Greg J. Friederichs

Dr. Bennett W. Nelson

Dr. Burt W. Dubow

Dr. Anna C. Malikowski

insighteyecare.us Waite Park 320-253-0365

Becker

763-261-5444

Paynesville 320-243-3566


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

UpFront TOP HATS : NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS

Mastey Financial Group, LLC, helping individuals and businesses manage their assets and pursue both short- and long-term financial goals, 1685 4th Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Joshua Sheets, Tracy Zapzalka, April Mastey and Jill Magelssen.

All Elements, a family owned organization providing highquality roofing system solutions through customer focused initiatives from start to finish, 301 Chelsea Road, Monticello. Pictured: Todd Fritz, Rick Poganski, Justin Marsh, John Thurber, Tara Thurber, Shawn Brannan and Rich Gallus.

Entice Media Works, a full-service video production company that specializes in producing awesome videos, 921 1st St. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran, Jon Theis and Amie Theis.

QuarterTon Productions, creating high-quality electronic presentations for marketing, advertising, business communication, education and entertainment,14 7th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran and Susan Scofield.

16

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5


POINT OF VIEW

Award Winner

Business Central asks readers:

“What aspect of social media is most effective for your business or organization?”

The interaction with our fan base on a different level. We have over 150,000 Facebook Page likes.”

“Twitter is most effective to gain new clients as we can provide information to perspective clients.” Jacob Reimer • Regus

Sarah Barten • Grand Casino

LinkedIn – the B2B connections have been very effective for us.”

Christine Tollefson • Alive Signage

Posting pictures and using polls and questions for product ideas.” Andrea Schurman • Cold Spring Bakery Connection

Staying in front of the customer. I like to put photos of projects up on Twitter to let people know what we’re up to.”

Joy Plamann, medicine care director, St. Cloud Hospital, was honored by the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST for providing leadership excellence in health care. The Women’s Health Leadership TRUST works to advance women leaders in health care, influence public policy, and improve health care in their communities.

Tom Conyers • Indigo Signworks

LIVE AND

LET WORK.

C Jo P S A D

When you’re running a business, the last thing you need is for someone to slow you down. Bremer business bankers get to know your business to provide the quick, flexible support you need to bank with ease. Come see us today.

WORK HARD. BANK EASY.

Bremer.com Downtown St. Cloud 251-3300 • West St. Cloud 656-3300 Sauk Rapids 252-1938 • Sartell 255-7121 • Rice 393-2600 800-908-BANK (2265) Member FDIC. ©2014 Bremer Financial Corporation. All rights reserved.

14-BRE-007_Print_BC_Live_75x4875_0801.indd 1

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

6/19/14 8:36 AM

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

17


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL APOLLO INSURANCE RECEIVES RECOGNITION North Risk Partners, which includes Apollo Insurance, received the Platinum Partner Agency award by the United Fire Group. This award is given to agencies that meet high standards of quality designated by United Fire Group.

COBORN’S CONTRIBUTES $1 MILLION TO YMCA Coborn’s Inc. donated $1 million to the new St. Cloud Area Family YMCA facility. This brings the total amount raised to over $23.5 million. The YMCA plans to begin construction on the new facility this fall.

MILLER, STRACK JOIN LEIGHTON INTERACTIVE Eve Miller joined Leighton Interactive as an inbound research lead, a new position for the company. She is charged with leading research efforts for new business, client reporting and new projects. Tony Strack also joined the company as a front end web developer.

DR. KROSKA RECEIVES AWARD David Kroska, MD, obstetrician/ gynecologist, CentraCare Health, received the 2015 Caduceus Award, which recognizes the outstanding work of Central Minnesota physicians who exhibit humanitarian medical efforts locally or around the world. Kroska founded the L.I.F.E (Lifestyle, Food & Exercise) Program, which provides education on diet, exercise and nutrition, and practical and behavioral aspects of a healthy lifestyle.

ST. CLOUD HOSPITAL BREAKS GROUND St. Cloud Hospital broke ground on the Gorecki Guest House addition in April. The new addition adds 16 bedrooms, a laundry room, two family suites and a meditation room. The house welcomes patients and their families who are receiving medical care in the St. Cloud community.

18

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

What Did Business Gain? Our legislators speak out about the 2015 Legislative Session. Business Central asked our area legislators: “What do you think is the biggest outcome of the 2015 Legislative Session for businesses in Central Minnesota?” ______________

______________

______________

Senator Michelle Fischbach: An increase in higher education spending focused on building a workforce by implementing an “earn while you learn” dual training program and expanding Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and early college programs. It also directed money to the Minnesota State Colleges and University System (MnSCU) for the needbased two-year college scholarship pilot program to encourage students to enter the trades. ______________

Representative Sondra Erickson In the Education Policy/ Finance omnibus bill we reduced testing and streamlined teacher licensure processes, while providing more child care scholarships to families in need. In higher education there will be more opportunities to move students into technical areas for careers, and the jobs bill has more than $2 million for STEM internships. ______________

Representative Jim Knoblach The biggest accomplishment was restraining the growth of government spending. In the last biennium, spending grew over 12 percent. As of now, spending is on track to grow less than 6 percent compared to the past two years, despite Gov. Dayton’s original proposal to spend nearly every dime of the $2 billion surplus. ______________

Senator John Pederson: I served on the Worker’s Compensation Advisory Committee, where we developed reforms that will drive costs down for nearly every business in Minnesota, due in part to the creation of an inpatient hospital fee schedule. Businesses should make sure to mention this reform when renewing their contracts with insurance companies.

Representative Jeff Howe: The legislature passed bipartisan measures to help Greater Minnesota thrive, including $4 million for workforce housing; $10.5 million for broadband grants; and two skilled-jobtraining programs to place and train workers in positions where the need is the highest. Also, construction codes adoption will now be on a six-year cycle.

Representative Tim O’Driscoll In the 2015 legislative session, we worked across the aisle with our House and Senate colleagues to implement new policies that help Minnesota businesses grow. Perhaps most importantly, we closed the legislative session without raising taxes (including the gas tax) on hardworking Minnesotans and Minnesota businesses.


NEW AT THE TOP

______________ Representative Tama Theis: The biggest outcome for Central Minnesota businesses this session is something that didn’t become law—a gas tax increase. This would have hurt Minnesotans, taking more from our economy and adding significant costs to businesses’ bottom line. I am proud to have stood against a regressive gas tax increase.

Ken Holmen, MD, 63 President & CEO, CentraCare Health Previous employer: HealthPartners What will you miss most about your previous position? The people and friendships. When did you start in your current position? January 1, 2015

Fun fact: I still take voice lessons.

USE US

difference in the care we provide to our patients, improving the health of our communities – and partnering with the folks at CentraCare and our communities. Also the opportunity to develop new relationships at CentraCare. Where did you grow up? Forest City, Iowa

What are you looking forward to the most in your new position? Making a

What are your hobbies? Music, reading, family

f or br illiant lig htin g up g r a de s .

Business facilities waste approximately 30% of the energy they pay for, and over half of that can be due to inefficient, conventional lighting. Xcel Energy works with businesses to help upgrade the efficiency and quality of their lighting, while providing rebates to offset the cost and speed up payback. Contact an energy efficiency specialist today at 855-839-8862, or visit ResponsibleByNature.com/business. ResponsibleByNature.com © 2015 Xcel Energy Inc.

15-XCL-01147-D_OC_Biz_LED_7.5x4.875_4C_FNL.indd 1

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

5/11/15 4:48 PM

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

19


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NEWS REEL BERETTA, MCSORLEY HONORED FOR DIVERSITY EFFORTS

BCCalendar GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

J U LY/AU GU ST 2015

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar. Dr. Dante Beretta, CentraCare Health – Melrose, and Todd McSorley, coordinator, environmental services, St. Cloud Hospital, received the 2015 Deb McCarl Diversity Award from CentraCare Health. This award acknowledges outstanding accomplishments of physicians, staff and volunteers whose efforts foster greater appreciation, advancement and celebration of diversity and inclusiveness.

CENTRACARE HEALTH FOUNDATION AWARDS GRANTS CentraCare Health Foundation approved 15 grants totaling $996,260 to support projects that promote health education, conduct research, or provide services or programs that improve health and health care for residents throughout a 12-county region. The CentraCare Health Foundation approved $440,000 over two years for the Central Minnesota Concussion Collaborative Program. This project seeks to improve the recognition, diagnosis and management of concussions. A community-wide collaborative has been established to support the program, and includes local medical providers, educational facilities and other community partners.

SANDLER TRAINING AWARDS SCHOLARSHIP Brian Hart, president, Sandler Training, awarded the third “Power and Potential” Scholarship for Veterans to Jamie Sieben of Clearwater. The annual scholarship covers all Sandler Training course materials, a weekly two-hour class for 12 months, and unlimited access to Hart as a consultant, coach and trainer.

SPOTLIGHT

AUGUST 10

Chamber Open The 69th annual Chamber Open is August 10 at Blackberry Ridge Golf Club, 3125 Clubhouse Rd., Sartell. The event begins with a shotgun start at 11:30 a.m. Dinner follows the event at 5:30 p.m.

JULY 15 & AUGUST 19

JULY 16 & AUGUST 6

Waite Park Chamber

Business After Hours

For businesses interested in Waite Park issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

July 15: Hosted by the Waite Park American Legion - Silver Star Post 428 on-site at 17 2nd Ave. N, Waite Park. The meeting includes a presentation on “Business Etiquette and Diversity” by Betsey Lund, Lund Sauter, P.A.

July 16: Hosted by D. J. Bitzan Jewelers, 203 Waite Ave. N, Waite Park

August 19: Hosted by Rasmussen College onsite at 226 Park Ave. S, St. Cloud. The meeting includes a networking event.

Sauk Rapids Chamber

August 6: Hosted by Park Industries, 6300 Saukview Dr., St. Cloud

JULY 23 & AUGUST 27

For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. at the Sauk Rapids

For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940.

20

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. July 23: Hosted by the Good Shepherd Community. August 27: Hosted by the Sauk Rapids Chamber. The meeting includes a Business Showcase featuring nine local businesses.

AUGUST 14

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office, 1411 W St. Germain St., Ste 101, St. Cloud. July: No meeting August 14: St. Cloud School District 742 Levy.


J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

21


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront PEOPLE TO KNOW

NEWS REEL

Volunteers lead Chamber programs

CENTRACARE HEALTH RECOGNIZED, HIRES CentraCare Health scored among the Top 15 medical groups and clinics for care provided to patients, according to the MN Community Measurement 2015 Health Care Quality Report. Tracy Roehl and Jane Suska joined CentraCare Clinic – Health Plaza Obstetrics & Women’ Health. Roehl, family nurse practitioner, holds special interest in preventative care, prenatal care and assisting patients with acute care needs. Suska, a women’s health nurse practitioner, has interest in primary care, infertility and lactation.

GERBER RECEIVES PROMOTION Garrity Gerber, Heartland Glass Company, was promoted to sales manager. Previously an estimator and sales representative with the company, he now oversees the commercial sales, project management, and drafting departments.

Katie Wayne College of Saint Scholastica ____________

(320) 529-6663 kwayne@css.edu Chair, Business, Education, and Technology Committee

____________

Rachael Bonn

Peters Body Shop, Inc. ____________

(320) 252-2993 rachaelb@ petersbodyshop.net Chair, Sauk Rapids Chamber

____________

The Business, Education, and Technology Committee organizes the Chamber’s annual fall conference providing education and training on a wide variety of topics including legal issues, human resources, information technology, organizational management, and more. Volunteers recruit speakers and sponsors.

The Sauk Rapids Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, promotes a healthy business environment in the community of Sauk Rapids. Volunteers and committee members work in cooperation with member businesses, local government, the public school system and other community organizations.

Andrea Lodermeier Minnwest Bank ____________

(320) 529-4801 andreal@ minnwestbankgroup.com Chair, Waite Park Chamber

____________

The Waite Park Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is a place where business, education and government come together for the betterment of the community. Programs include the Waite Park State of the City address.

TOP HATS : NEW BUSINESSES

NEE RECEIVES EXCELLENCE AWARD Patricia Nee, MD, an internal medicine physician at CentraCare Clinic – Health Plaza, received the St. Cloud Hospital Physician of Excellence award. Her nomination stated that she instills hope in her patients with her optimistic, caring attitude. The Physician of Excellence award recognizes a St. Cloud Hospital medical staff member who has an exemplary work ethic and lives the healing mission of providing Care Above All. Compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@ BusinessCentralMagazine.com

22

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Wirth Center for the Performing Arts, offering music and dance instruction to students of all ages, 823 1st St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Hellickson, Dr. Paul Wirth, Christopher Goering and Rick Poganski.

Beaver Island Brewery locally owned and operated production brewery and taproom. 216 6th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Shawn Brannan, Kern Anderson, Nick Barth, Matt Studer, Chris Laumb and Peg Imholte.

Pepperjax Grill, fresh to order Philly sandwiches, rice bowls, giant burritos, loaded nachos and fresh salads. 3219 W Division St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, TJ Kellner, Alysia Opatz, Taylor Day and Peg Imholte. Not pictured: Dan Neumann.

Balance Chiropractic, 750 1st St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Bob Lien, Dr. Jennifer Bestick and Jason Bernick.

Answer US.com, political website connecting elected officials to Minnesota, you ask questions we get answers, 585 Franklin Ave. NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran, Amy Claude, Lynn Kull, Debra Kull, Lionel Kull, Jim Brownson and Dave Borgert.


TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

Sarah Noble

Stephanie Court

____________

____________

Northwestern Mutual

NewCore Wireless

(320) 223-6647 sarah.noble@nmfn.com Chair, NEXT-St. Cloud

(320) 492-8141 Stephanie.court @corewg.com Chair, Star Celebration

____________

NEXT-St. Cloud provides networking and educational opportunities designed for the NEXT generation of business leaders in Central Minnesota.

____________

The Star Celebration is the Chamber’s annual volunteer recognition celebration. Committee members are responsible for planning the event and soliciting sponsorships

United Arts of Central Minnesota, fundraising for local arts organizations and special arts projects and initiatives, 913 W St. Germain St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Dave Borgert, Cindy Hawker and Brenda Eisenschenk. Fiscal Foundations – QuickBooks consulting and bookkeeping, 528 7th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Seal Dwyer and Greg E. Theis.

Relax & Revive Massage, with five themed rooms for your total relaxation, 1000 S Benton Dr., Suite 415, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Tammy Christopherson and Beth Putz.

Halfway Jam, an outdoor music festival located halfway between Royalton and Rice, Minn., featuring a variety of 80’s and 90’s rock bands, 16004 Highway 10 NW, Royalton. BMO Harris Bank, a full service bank designed to suit the needs of your business no matter its size, 50 6th St. S, Suite 1000, Minneapolis. Star Tribune Radius, a full service internet marketing solution providing businesses of all shapes and sizes with an array of internet marketing services and strategies designed to increase web presence, expand customer base, and drive revenue, 425 Portland Ave., Minneapolis.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

23


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Price Wars

THE MATH PROBLEM

Capacity and differentiation should drive your pricing strategy.

Y

ou can buy a battery anywhere. Dolora Musech knows this. As owner of Batteries Plus Bulbs since 1994, Musech shops the local market to stay competitively priced. She has the added benefit of a focused product line. Being a franchise helps, too, with the buying power of 600 stores. But Musech points out that people don’t go to Batteries Plus Bulbs just for batteries or bulbs – or because of price. “They come to us because they have a problem and want us to help them solve it,” she said. That’s why Musech is committed to hiring nice people. “Our average ticket is less than $50. We can’t make it if people don’t come back,” she said. “We treat every customer like a $7,000 sale. To do that, you need nice people. You can train people to be experts. You can’t train them to be nice.”

Musech’s philosophy sets the company apart and aligns with key business advice from Jamie Henkemeyer, CPA and principal of CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP. The first question Henkemeyer asks new business owners is why people are going to buy from them. “If the answer is lowest price, you might struggle,” he said. “Successful companies don’t win on price.” Henkemeyer encourages business owners to consider two things: Capacity and differentiation. At Capacity? Too often new business owners build their price based on cost of goods. Then they throw in overhead and what they think they need to make in terms of gross profit margin. Standard cost accounting, right? The problem with this is simple. “Businesses chase an expectation that limits them

Let’s say you have capacity to make 1,000 units. By Heidi L. Everett

because it isn’t supported by market conditions,” Henkemeyer said. “They ignore capacity, sell minimal units, and don’t make enough to cover overhead. Feeling the pressure, they reasonably conclude they need to charge more to make more. They start to charge more, sell even less because they are working against the market, and dig themselves into a hole.” Henkemeyer advises to maximize capacity first, then worry about margins. “If you want to make more money, charge less until you fill your capacity. This might not seem logical . . . at first.” What sets you apart? Time and again, people buy on instinct and feeling, Henkemeyer said. “You have to build a reason for people to buy from you.” It may be the way you answer the phone, your lead-time, your culture, your product or service. Park Industries, the largest manufacturer of stone working equipment in North America, gets it. The company builds machines that vary in price from $35,000 to $350,000. The price tag on replacement parts ranges from $2 to $20,000. “Our focus is Customer Service Excellence, and we take extra measures to ensure that our customers’ machines are operating,” said Matt Binsfeld,

contributor Heidi L. Everett is owner of Watab Communications and adjunct professor of marketing communications at St. Cloud State University. She has more than 20 years experience in strategic and tactical communications and can be reached at watabcomm@gmail.com.

24

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Your cost is $5 per unit. You want to charge $10 per unit to make $5,000 profit per month. [($10-$5) x 1000=$5000] Here’s the kicker. The market will only bear $9 per unit. This is where capacity comes in. At $10 per unit (less your unit cost of $5), you might only sell 300 units for a monthly profit of $1,500, well below your expectation. But if you cut the price to $9 and sell 600 units, you make $2,400 per month. At $8 per unit you sell out and reach capacity, earning $3,000 per month of gross margin. You’re closer to your goal. “At this point everything else can fall into place,” Henkemeyer said. “You sell more. You may get better pricing from your vendors due to increased purchases. Margins could increase as a result.”

director of customer support. “If a customer orders a part, and they don’t receive it the next day, it’s free. That’s our Next Day or No Pay policy. As a result, we are able to charge a premium for parts.” Binsfeld knows people come to Park Industries because of service. “It’s all about keeping their machines running – if they’re not running, they’re not making money,” Binsfeld said. “Customers want to know we understand that and care. You can’t put a price on empathy.”


TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

Signmax, a full service sign shop, 655 2nd St. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Ben Menke, John Kron, Michael Saterbak and Sheri Moran.

Atomic Learning, online technology training for schools and business, 15082 22nd Ave., Little Falls. Pictured: Rick Poganski, Jon Blissenbach, Deb Meester and Kris Hellickson.

Center for Pain Management, interventional management for people in pain, improving their quality of life, increasing their function, and assisting with acute, chronic and cancer pain, 166 19th St. S, Suite 101, Sartell. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Hannah Lindberg and Dolora Musech.

Chuck E. Cheese, where a kid can be a kid, and parents can enjoy every moment, 3818 W Division, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Chuck E. Cheese, Kristy Knutson and Shawn Brannan.

Kain & Scott, P. A., finding prompt and effective resolutions to your debt problems, 13 7th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, William P. Kain, Wesley W. Scott and Diane Diego Ohmann.

Granite Services, fabricator and installer of custom granite and quartz countertops, fireplace surrounds, tub surrounds, and more, 30736 Pearl Dr., St. Joseph. Pictured: Greg E. Theis, Jeff Burg, Angie Hill and Jill Magelssen

Schwan’s Home Service, delicious food delivered right to your door, 4655 Heatherwood Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk and Noel Skogen.

Regus, the world’s largest provider of flexible office space solutions that suit your individual business needs, 400 1st St. S, Suite 600, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Jacob Reimer and Diane Diego Ohmann.

M A N U FAC T U R E R OF P R E M I UM C ONC R E T E PAV I NG S TON E S , SL A B S & WA L L S

P

ASSION

is what drives us to bring you premium pavers, slabs and walls. Borgert Products was the first to produce concrete pavers in the Midwest and today is the ONLY to use local granite aggregate to create higher quality products.

Just better Visit our showroom at: 8646 Ridgewood Rd., St. Joseph, MN 56374

For more information or for a free Borgert catalog call 320.363.4671 W W W. B O R G E R T P R O D U C T S . CO M

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

25


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

RECOGNIZING BUSINESS EXCELLENCE at the Chamber’s 2015 Business Awards Luncheon

John Schnettler, CentraCare Health and Diane Diego Ohmann, St. Cloud School District.

Alice Coudron, The Catholic Foundation Diocese of St. Cloud and John Herges, Falcon National Bank.

2001 Athena Recipient, Marj Hawkins, retired from the St. Cloud School District. Hawkins was recognized for her work in creating partnerships in St. Cloud, one of which led to the renovation funding for the Paramount Theater.

GROW

Two St. Cloud area businesses were recognized at the 2015 Minnesota Small Business Administration’s annual business award program.

Jane and Joel Meyer, owners of Papa Murphy’s Take ‘n’ Bake Pizza, were recognized by Stearns Bank with a Small Business Excellence Award. The criteria are response to adversity, service to community, growth, longevity, and innovation of products and services.

26

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Nancy Libersky, SBA district director (L); Jim Kruse and Melissa Kelley, J. F. Kruse Jewelers, the 2015 Minnesota Small Business Owners of the Year. J. F. Kruse Jewelers was nominated for the award by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Credit: U.S. Small Business Administration


PROFIT

Bill Knoblach, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac, presents the Business Central Mark of Excellence.

Michael Faber, Viking Coca-Cola, the 2015 Family Owned Business of the Year.

Larry Logeman, Executive Express, the 2015 St. Cloud Area Small Business Owner of the Year.

Chamber President Teresa Bohnen (L), and Chamber Board Chair Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, present Faber with his award.

Luke Riordan, DAYTA Marketing, the 2015 Business Central Mark of Excellence – Emerging Entrepreneur.

Brian Bauerly, the 2001 Entrepreneurial Success Award recipient with his brothers who at the time owned The Bauerly Companies.

Scott Warzecha, Netgain, the 2013 St. Cloud Area Small Business Owner of the Year and the 2014 Minnesota Entrepreneur of the Year.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

27


BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

30 36 40

Management Toolkit Entreprenuerism

34 38

Tech Strategies Going Green

Economy Central by Falcon Bank

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Conflict Equals Healthy!

In a company where healthy conflict happens, people are willing to take risks and speak up. By Mike Roth

Inattention to Results Avoidance of Accountability Lack of Commitment Fear of Conflict Absence of Trust

The Five Dysfunctions Model by Patrick Lencioni

O

ne of the most exciting things about what I do is helping companies take the journey to become “Healthy and Smart.” The truth is, they are all pretty “Smart” before I show up. In other words, they are all pretty good at delivering their product or service. That’s usually not an issue. But most are not as “Healthy” as they could be. What is healthy you ask? Healthy companies have: • High morale • Minimal politics

• Minimal confusion • High productivity • Low turnover • Open and honest conflict Yes that’s right, I said it, “Healthy companies have CONFLICT!” Many companies avoid conflict like the plague. That’s because we have experienced so much of the UNHEALTHY conflict in our lives. You know what I’m talking about. The kind based on individual agendas, bullying,

personal attacks, and win/ lose negotiations. Where these toxic activities are prevalent, they suck the life out of a company. People tend to shut down for fear of being wrong or criticized. I sometimes hear business owners say “My people don’t care,” when they really do care, but have been conditioned to hide it. What we want is “healthy” conflict. In a company where healthy conflict happens, people trust each other. They

know there are no personal attacks. Everyone is focused on doing what is best for the company. Everyone respects each other’s opinions and winning is about coming up with the best solution for EVERYONE, not the INDIVIDUAL. People can accept any decision because they know they are heard and respected. I call it a journey because healthy doesn’t happen overnight. The more toxic the environment, the longer the journey. It takes time to evolve from wherever a company is today to a state of better health because it takes time to build trust. Trust is the foundation necessary before anyone takes a risk and is willing to speak up. Once we have trust, we can have Healthy Conflict. Patrick Lencioni teaches this best in his book, The Five Dysfunctions of a Leadership Team. He explains what he calls the Dysfunction Pyramid, shown here. The message is clear.

Trust is the foundation of success.

contributor Mike Roth is the president of Reventus, a business consulting firm, and a certified implementer for the Entrepreneurial Operating System. He can be reached at Mike.Roth@reventusllc.com.

28

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5


TECH NEWS

eBay and Craigslist are so...yesterday Entrepreneurs are creating the next generation of online marketplaces by targeting key categories such as “sublets/temporary” and “vacation rentals.” This is enabling a new generation of mobile-first marketplaces that have dramatically superior ease of use. It’s also bringing marketplace dynamics to serve the needs of businesses, such as B2B rental of large construction equipment. Source: Andreessen and Horowitz

Without trust there can be no Conflict. Without conflict there can be no Commitment. Without commitment there can be no Accountability.

Without accountability there can be no Results. Or at least not the results you want.

Everything starts with trust. If you don’t trust each other, no one speaks up. If you don’t speak up, you have boring,

non-productive meetings. No one really agrees or commits to anything. You get a corporate “nod” when you ask if everyone is behind the decision you just announced. Nothing good can follow from there. The truth comes out when you listen at the water cooler.

Start the journey today to instill trust in you team. You will be amazed how much people care and the passion that appears with time.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

29


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Website Wisdom There are plenty of reasons to update your website. The key is knowing where to start. to date, that number is over 60 percent. Reflecting that trend, Google’s new mobile algorithm gives ranking preference to sites designed with readably sized type (no zooming), properly spaced links, and no use of Flash. Make sure your site is designed responsively, to automatically adjust the same content for optimal viewing on desktop, tablet or phone, or any other screen size yet to roll out. Besides better ranking and user experience, you can say goodbye to separate desktop and mobile sites, and hello to updated efficiency.

I

neffective. Outdated. Off brand. There’s a host of good reasons to bring your website up to date, or give it a complete overhaul to more effectively support your marketing objectives. The challenge is knowing how to go about the process and where to start.

Think user experience first. While it can be tempting to jump straight into the visual design of your new site, it’s crucial to take a step back to consider your site users’ needs and corresponding content strategy. Understanding your audiences’ full situation and emotional drivers is key. Who

30

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

are your site users? What problem do they need solved? What information are they seeking? Answering these questions first, and allowing the results to drive the navigational hierarchy and structure of your site, is the best first step to developing a site that meets your goals for engagement. Make it mobile. While Google and other search engines are always tweaking their algorithms, Google’s latest update, rolled out in April, reflects the soaring increase in mobile search. In 2014, 30 percent of all searches were on a mobile device. Year

Preserve your SEO Search engine optimization (SEO) is vital to helping prospects find your site. During a site overhaul, it’s critical to preserve the page ranking gains you’ve already made by using 301 re-directs to point search engines to where that same content resides on your new site. A simple spreadsheet is a great way to map out your old site content and the corresponding new page URLs. Every page of your site should be optimized for specific keywords and phrases, rather than the same page titles used repeatedly site-wide. Also, social media posts contribute to your search ranking for those keywords, so if you’re still on the social sidelines, it may be time to get in the game. Get to know your analytics. Many website owners have Google Analytics installed, but rarely use the tool to its

By Ronn Paulson

full advantage. Keeping a close eye on key stats such as unique visitors, the keywords and phrases used to find your site, the percentage viewing on desktop vs. mobile, most visited content, and time on site helps you learn what’s working to build on that success. Don’t forget to set up automatic report subscriptions straight to your email inbox. Have a plan and commit to it. You see it everywhere — a company’s website news page inviting customers to visit them at a trade show that took place five years ago, or the lonely Facebook page inviting you to “Like” them for special offers that never materialize. Instead of relying on good intentions, take the time up front to clarify your marketing goals for the site, the ongoing involvement needed to keep it fresh, and who’s responsible for each part. Or hire help from an outside firm to hold you accountable, make sure you hit your marks, and add a higher level of strategy, execution and polish to your site. Ronn Paulson is president of Thelen, a St. Cloud company that specializes in advertising, marketing, brand strategy, graphic design, and web development. He can be reached at ronn@thelen.com.

Find out if your website is mobile friendly and just why that’s so important at www.BusinessCentral Magazine.com


GROWTH

Job Growth

Arctic Cat increases assembly capability

S

t. Cloud will soon benefit from an expansion by Arctic Cat, Inc. The company plans to invest nearly $27 million in its manufacturing facilities in Thief River Falls and St. Cloud resulting in the creation of about 50 jobs. In St. Cloud, the company will spend approximatley $400,000 in expanded assembly capability that is anticipated to add roughly 10 positions. Arctic Cat manufactures and assembles ATV and snowmobile engines at its 56,000-square-foot Engine Manufacturing Division in St. Cloud. The planned projects are eligible to receive local and state tax incentives. The company chose to stay in Minnesota, where it has deep manufacturing roots and a highly educated and skilled labor force.

FAST BUSINESS & EQUIPMENT FINANCING

Approvals in Hours!

e We get teh! job don

ÂŽ

For Equipment Finance, call 1.800.247.1922

For Business Loans, call 1.888.320.2899

Two names,

one law firm you can trust

ECONOMICS

Top Five If you’re looking for a full time permanent position, employers say these are the jobs they are trying to fill: - Sales - Customer Service - Information Technology - Production - Administration Source: CareerBuilder, 2015 employment study

For over 90 years, two names have been synonymous with quality legal representation in central Minnesota. Quinlivan and Hughes. Today our firm has grown to 20 attorneys practicing with proven success in nearly every aspect of law. From business and employment, to trust and estate planning, to representing clients in personal injury and business related lawsuits, there are two names you can trust for all of your legal needs. Quinlivan and Hughes.

Now located in a new location in the heart of St. Cloud. 320-251-1414 quinlivan.com 1740 West St. Germain Street, St Cloud, MN 56301

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

TwoNames1/3 page Ada.indd 1

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

12/12/14 8:48 AM

31


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Boosting Productivity Employees who understand the value they bring to the workplace are happier and more engaged. By Whitney Bina

I

t is no secret: hiring and retaining motivated, productive employees leads to business success. What can business owners and managers do to help employees find motivation and boost productivity? Nick Granowski, operations manager, Capital One, and Brian Hart, president, Sandler Training, provide some insight.

Engage Employees Whether it’s employee training, staff outings or community involvement, engagement is key. “Happy, engaged associates are excited about their work and what they do,” Granowski said. “Continuous

32

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

training programs allow our associates to grow and learn to adapt to workplace change. This in turn provides our associates with the tools they need to make the right decisions for our company. “Volunteering allows our associates to get to know their neighbors and community outside of work,” he added. “They also learn about team work and what motivates them as individuals.” Explain the WHY Employees need purpose. They need to understand how their daily jobs impact the company as a whole, Granowski said. For every employee, answer the

question ‘Why does what I’m doing matter?’ An employee’s view of his or her position directly impacts motivation and productivity, according to Hart. Employees view their positions in one of three ways: 1 .Job – Individuals view daily tasks as a way to get paid. They put forth minimal effort and productivity while still earning a paycheck. 2. Career – Individuals view their position as a stepping stone on a path to their future. They are putting in their time to get to the next step. 3. Calling – Individuals feel like they were born for their work. They love their jobs and complete their tasks not for themselves, but for their co-workers, clients and the company as a whole. Employees who view their positions as a calling naturally do better work. Those who see their positions as “just a job” might benefit from extra oneon-one time to understand the importance of their work, or perhaps they might fit better into entirely new roles, Hart said. Encourage feedback Although motivation needs to come directly from each individual, managers and supervisors can use specific tools to help encourage and maintain employee motivation. Managers are busy, but spending regularly scheduled one-on-one time with every employee is important, Hart said.

“Always ask for feedback,” Granowski said. “Whether it’s through a survey or an individual meeting, learn how your associates are feeling and how they think you can improve.” Lead by example. “Associates are smart and can see right through you,” Granowski continued. “If you ask them to do something, but don’t believe in it yourself, you lose their investment in the company.” Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

GROWTH

Do you procrastinate? Increase your productivity with these tips:

1. Reframe procrastination View procrastination as “delayed gratification.” Think about how good you will feel once you complete a task. Then begin work on it so you can feel successful sooner. 2. Pomodoro Technique Set a specific period of time to accomplish one task and eliminate all distractions during that time. You will find that you can accomplish so much more. Source: Brian Hart, president, Sandler Training


RIVER’S EDGE CONVENTION CENTER | ST. CLOUD, MN

ECONOMIC NEWS

FOCUSED ONTHE FUTURE

Blattner Energy expands headquarters Blattner Energy, the leading installer of wind energy projects in the country, is investing $6.2 million to expand and renovate its headquarters in Avon and will create 12 new jobs at the site. The project will involve adding 75 new offices and work stations, expanding the parking lot, adding an electric car charging station, building a new auditorium, and increasing the size of an employee fitness center. The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) is supporting the project with $581,000 from the Minnesota Job Creation Fund. Blattner will receive the funding after meeting investment and job creation goals. Blattner Energy, which has built nearly 200 wind energy projects in the United States and Canada since 2001, also specializes in solar energy and power delivery projects. Affiliated company D.H. Blattner & Sons dates back to 1907, when founder David Henry Blattner and his crew helped build James J. Hill’s Great Northern Railroad.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT REAL ESTATE SERVICES 320.251.5933 | 888.678.7225 | StrackCompanies.com

www.scr-mn.com

Formerly St. Cloud Refrigeration CentRal | metRo diViSion St. Cloud 320-251-6861 MetRo 800-827-1642

RefRigeRation HVaC SeRViCe Building automation food SeRViCe

noRtHeRn diViSion BaxteR 800-273-9071

SoutHeRn diViSion RoCheSteR 877-399-4546 Mankato 800-447-3259

CHECK US OUT ONLINE.

www.BusinessCentral Magazine.com J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

To Blog or Not to Blog

Anyone can create a blog. But how do you know if it’s the right choice for you?

By Dawn Zimmerman

type into an Internet search on your subject, product or service and are embedded naturally into each post. Google provides a series of tools to help bloggers discover what words people use in their searches and artfully select the key words that will deliver the most results for you. (The most common words are not the best, though. You’ll face too much competition).

E

verywhere you look, you can find a blog. It seems like anyone can create one. Blogs have become drivers of marketing initiatives and business outcomes. How do you know if it’s right for you? Here are a few questions to consider:

Provide value. Do you have something to say that is valuable to others? Providing value to the reader – not selling – is the most important job of a blog. Effective blogs focus on education and insight and the more personal the content, the better. People want to read about people. If it doesn’t give something to the reader, then the reader likely will not come back for more or share it with others. Nothing motivates a blog author more

than building and growing a following. Tie into a strategy. How will it move our organizational goals forward? A blog takes intention. It’s not just about sharing a good story or some advice to others. While founded on providing value to others, a blog should help achieve specific organizational goals. Blogs can drive traffic to your website, increase your social media presence and generate leads. Understanding the “why” behind the blog is critical. It will direct “how” your blog is executed. Carve out time. Are you willing to put in the time? Until 2009, one individual produced a blog. Today, teams come together to create, publish, promote, and execute

the strategy effectively. A blog no longer needs to have even one author. It does need a coordinator, who calls the plays, monitors results and helps ensure the goals are reached. A blog should have at least two new posts a month and up to multiple posts a week, depending on the strategy. Subject matter experts spend an average of 2-3 hours working on the content for a blog post with a writing assistant. Know your keywords. Will you do the research? The words within a blog do not only promote readability and interest. They also help your blog be more easily found by search engines and direct leads to your website. It starts with keywords. These essential words and phrases are the same words that potential visitors would

Execute promotion strategy. How will you promote your blog? This is the most important question you’ll answer for your blog. While the content is key to building a foundation, a blog will not come close to its potential without a plan on how you will make it known and share it with others. These plans often are multi-faceted and incorporate a variety of communication channels, including e-marketing, social media, website promotion, and digital advertising. HOW TO

Key Elements of Blogs Headline: 3-5 words whenever possible and includes a keyword.

Subheads: Break up sections of content with sub-headings of 2-3 words.

Bold & Bullets: Use to direct the eye to high value content.

Images: Avoid publishing a

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

34

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

post without an image. It helps carry the post and elevate the blog presence on social media.


TECH NEWS

Job Mobility Nearly 90 percent of job seekers use a mobile device during their search so it’s imperative for companies to use mobile platforms to attract top talent. Optimizing your career pages for mobile devices, simplifying the application process, and sending job openings out via text message are a few ways to reach your ideal candidate. Source: Entrepreneur.com

ECONOMICS

Accepting Plastic

For small businesses, plastic payments can be a thorny problem. More people pay by plastic so the business that doesn’t make it an option could fall behind. There are a variety of mobile card readers available, but which one should you choose? Consider features, pricing and setup before you invest. If all you need is to accept payments from your customers and put the maximum money possible in your pocket, look at PayPal. It provides competitive pricing, easy acceptance of any payment form, and easy integration into the rest of the PayPal empire. Source: Bplans by Palo Alto Software Inc.

Centered on financial solutions.

Timi Molitor

- Personal Banker

We help take the hassle out of banking so you have more time to spend doing what matters most to you. Visit with Timi today to discuss how we can help you reach your financial goals. 1300 Elm Street E, St. Joseph 888.330.8482 | mycmcu.org |

Centered on you.

Federally Insured by NCUA

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

35


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Persuasive Presentations The most successful presentations are focused, engaging, and relevant to your audience. Picture this: A mahogany conference table littered with notepads, coffee cups, and half-eaten pastries. If you look up, you’ll see the faces of frazzled executives checking e-mail on their electronic devices, wishing they were anywhere but here. You are the next item on an already too-full agenda. Your topic is important to the overall health of the company and it means a lot to you. The challenge is for you to make it mean something to them. You can turn this losing scenario into a winner by following these easy steps.

No Varicose Veins. No Surgery. No Down Time. Physicians with The Vein Center and Regional Diagnostic Radiology: Dr. Jody Bolton Smith Dr. Danielle Leighton Dr. Rochelle Wolfe Dr. Chadd McMahon Terri Wolfe, PA-C “I have more energy at the end of the day.” LYNN

Know your audience Who are they? What do they want from you? How much do they know about your topic? Why are they here? Is their attendance voluntary or mandatory? Plan your presentation according to their needs. Attendees who are there because it is mandatory need more finesse and attention than ones who are there of their own volition. If the group has an extensive knowledge of your subject, your introduction to the topic will be different than if they are novices in the area.

By Tracy Knofla

Knowing your audience gives you a direction to focus your presentation. Change the physical environment Often your participants have been sitting in a room for some time before you start. Even if they haven’t, they generally sit in the same seat as previous meetings. Same seat, same perspective! Present your material from a different part of the room. Ask participants to change seats in the room. When you take command of

Customized Training Affordable. Professional. Personalized. Let us help build your business stronger with new skills for your employees. St. Cloud State University’s CEO program offers custom fit, high quality training

Call today for a complimentary varicose or spider vein consultation.

320-257-VEIN (8346) 1990 connecticut ave s sartell, mn 56377 for beautiful results

36

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

beautifulresults.com

scsutraining.com


the physical environment you re-engage the participants’ brains. They will wonder what else is going to happen, thus anticipating your next move instead of wondering what their next e-mail will say. Design an interesting opening Start with an unusual or thoughtprovoking question or facilitate a quick exercise involving the audience. Use a prop to demonstrate a key point. Do not feel the need to start with a joke and DO NOT start with PowerPoint. It is YOUR JOB to persuade the group, not the job of the PowerPoint. If you capture their interest from the onset, they will consider you, and your material, credible.

Pick three key points to share Most people can’t remember more than that. These points should sum up why the group needs to see things your way. Stay focused and on message. Don’t wander or allow the group to get you off point too often. Answer the “What’s in it for Me?” question quickly. Why should the participants care about this topic? How will adopting your position make their job easier, save the company money, or give them professional satisfaction. The more quickly they can see a personal or professional benefit to your perspective, the more quickly they become supporters. Make it easy for them to say “Yes.”

Anticipate their objections Brainstorm possible objections to your idea and have a plan ready to overcome them. Discuss your idea with co-workers to get a sense of what questions will arise and what issues will play into their decision to support or defeat your position. Use your best presentation skills Make eye contact with the audience. Dress professionally and at the same level as your

audience. Be lively in your performance. Move your body with ease. Answer questions as they arise. Keep the conversation on track. These steps will add a level of professionalism and confidence to your presentations. You don’t have to “sell” anyone on your ideas to be persuasive. You need to first get their attention, and then help them clearly see the benefits of your plan.

contributor Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.

Improve productivity, efficiency and customer satisfaction.

Today’s businesses need a reliable, affordable, flexible and expandable business phone system that is designed to serve the unique needs of their business. We can help you use technology to simplify your life. Contact us today. 888.99.ARVIG | arvig.com/business

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

37


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools GOING GREEN

Sustainability

‘Green’ the planet…and your bottom line.

M

By Bill Blazar

ore companies are becoming environmentally sustainable, generating profits while also protecting the natural environment. Why? Business owners and managers are realizing the practices that “green” the planet also add “green” to their bottom lines. That’s the premise of Minnesota Waste Wise. Waste Wise traces its roots to 1994 when business leaders, at the direction of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, decided to take the growing waste issue into their own hands.

Waste Wise has evolved and expanded into full-service consultation for a variety of environmental sustainability measures. If you’re paying too much for waste disposal or are having trouble finding an outlet for a waste material, Waste Wise can help. If you’re looking to re-energize your recycling program or want to green your organization’s supply chain, Waste Wise will get you started. The program consultants can also take a look at your energy bills and identify opportunities for reducing operational costs through energy efficiency.

Continuing to Make a Difference!

Celebrating 44 Years of Excellence in Caring for You! Accredited by Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc.

St. Cloud Surgical Center 1526 Northway Drive • St. Cloud • 251-8385 • 800-349-7272 www.stcsurgicalcenter.com

38

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Brian Hart 26 8th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN • 320-224-2121 www.brianhart.sandler.com 2015 S Sandler Training Finding Power in Reinforcement (with design) and Sandler Training are registered service marks of Sandler Systems, Inc. © 2015 Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.


help leaders prioritize plans and allocate resources based on what’s best for their business – whether that’s installing efficient lighting, reducing water use, upgrading equipment, or expanding recycling. Becoming an environmentally sustainable organization is more practical and profitdriven than some may realize. Much of the work lies in simply being less wasteful and controlling the supply chain. The rest depends on a strategic plan

with a clear vision created, communicated, implemented and championed by senior management. A sustainable business is a business that lasts, and now is a great time to set a course. Our Waste Wise and Energy Smart staffs are ready to help your organization implement a strategic and enduring environmental sustainability plan. Contact Jill Curran today at 651.292.4653 or jcurran@ mnchamber.com.

contributor Bill Blazar is interim president of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce: www.mnchamber.com.

MI NN

MI N

A OT

TA SO

A OT ES

MIN NE

WORKING WITH PEOPLE, NOT JUST NUMB3RS.

MIN NE S

Company’s July 2014 Report on Sustainability and Resource Productivity, “a growing body of evidence indicates that sustainability initiatives can help to create profits and business opportunities.” The report notes that “in the last three years, socially responsible investment has increased 22 percent; it now accounts for 11 percent of all assets under management in the United States.” So where should an organization focus its efforts? An excellent starting point is an on-site assessment conducted by environmental sustainability experts. Our Waste Wise staff is only a phone call away. The data and recommendations

TA SO NE

In all of our work, the guiding philosophy remains “Less waste is smart business for a better environment.” Waste Wise successes speak for themselves. Witness these results from the 2013-14 program year: • 3,399 direct services provided to more than 962 businesses in 168 Minnesota cities. • 646 onsite sustainability and energy consultations. • 1,704,221 estimated Year 1 pounds of waste diverted. At their core, successful sustainability programs benefit growth, return on capital, and risk management – including regulatory, reputational, and operational risk management. According to McKinsey &

LET US BE PART OF YOUR TEAM We provide expertise in business tax, accounting, auditing and consulting. That expertise has earned us a top 25 CPA firm in MN designation.

www.swcocpas.com Little Falls 320.632.6311 Albany 320.845.2940

Maple Lake 320.963.5414 Monticello 763.295.5070

St. Cloud 320.251.0286

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

39


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Job Creators

Investing in employees helps local manufacturers grow. By Whitney Bina

Business Panel: Jim Hill, Columbia Gear Corporation; Jeff Haviland, president, Seitz Stainless; Bob Sexton, CEO, C4 Welding, Inc.; and facilitator Teresa Bohnen, president, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

U

nemployment rates in the St. Cloud area are at pre-recession lows. What are local companies doing to retain their workforce and fill open positions? Local leaders gathered at the 53rd Annual Winter Economic Institute to discuss healthy job growth in the manufacturing industry. Sponsored by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, panelists showcased their companies and outlined plans for future growth.

Bob Sexton C4 Welding, Inc. __________ In 2013, C4 Welding had 39 employees. The company now employs 90 full-time employees, including certified welders and weld inspectors. Workforce development plays an important role at C4 Welding. In 2014, the company added its own training center to support the organization’s growth and provide employees with career enhancing education.

In addition to training its current employees, the company focuses on developing the future workforce. C4 Welding partners with St. Cloud Technical and Community College to provide training grants for students who commit to working for C4 Welding for five years after graduation. More work still needs to be done to increase awareness of the manufacturing industry in Central Minnesota. “There is a push right now to bring back the apprenticeship programs for high school students,” Sexton said. “Students need the skills and companies have the tools.”

Jeff Haviland Seitz Stainless __________ Seitz Stainless, a manufacturer of huge, custom stainless steel receptacles used in food processing, recently completed a major expansion in Holdingford which more than doubled their floor space. With 30 employees, Haviland remains comfortable with his workforce. “We will

never be a giant organization,” he said. “The industry doesn’t call for it.” When it comes to hiring, Seitz focuses on specialized skill levels and diversity of employees. “Our people are somewhat unique because we do much more than welding. They need to have finesse with metal,” he said. Diligent not to skip generations, Haviland attributes the company’s success to having a workforce comprised of both seasoned employees and recent graduates. In order to maintain his workforce, Haviland works directly with St. Cloud Technical and Community College instructors to find new employees. “Personally, I don’t waste my time with want ads,” he said.

Jim Hill Columbia Gear Corporation __________ Columbia Gear, founded in 1949, manufactures gears to complete unique components of projects nation-wide. In the last six months of 2014, the company hired 50 employees and has plans to build a third facility, depending on changes to the economy and industry, Hill said. Workforce challenges are not new to Columbia Gear, which celebrates multiple employee milestone anniversaries every month. “Many of our tenured

contributor Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

40

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Jobs for St. Joe

A new warehouse distribution center could be coming to St. Joseph and bringing with it up to 250 jobs. KDN Holdings is planning to build a 745,000-square-feet facility on 100 acres of land near Stearns County Road 133 and 19th Avenue North. The company hopes to start construction this fall with full build out anticipated in 2016, according to city documents. The St. Joseph City Council approved publishing the environmental assessment worksheet and making it available for comment. The document will go back to the council for final approval at a future meeting. Planning for the project is expected to start in June.

employees have been with Columbia Gear for over 25 years, and many have worked for us for over 40 years.” One cause for concern is the knowledge current high school students have about the manufacturing industry. Right now, only 1 or 2 percent of high school students are looking for careers in manufacturing and engineering, he said. This is concerning, especially in Central Minnesota. Columbia Gear plans to facilitate tours for high school students and showcase available jobs to increase overall awareness of the industry.


$50M

$60M

$70M

$80M

December

$40M

November

Residential 2013 2014 2015 2013 August #/$ #/$ #/$

March

October

September

August

July

June

TOTAL:$21,453,135*

October April

May

April

March

$30M

February

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL: $54,435,063

TOTAL: $62,358,547

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

February

St. Cloud 1227 1209 283 July $18,425,316 $26,145,498 $7,427,590 2015 January

0

300

Sauk Rapids 382 447 90 June $18,539,531 $19,206,069 $4,501,650

St. Augusta

March

$50M

$60M

$70M

$80M

January December 0 Total as of 6/8/15. *2015 totals are not cumulative, they represent up-to-month data. November October

600

$600k

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL: $45,867,047.00*

Sauk Rapids

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

409

203

Food and Bev

Sartell 174 30 8 November $3,531,780 $3,600,047 $693,413 May 2014

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. Waite Park 90 84 36 October $4,377,148 $7,151,019 $2,791,775 Apr ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

1200

TOTAL: $45,867,047.00*

St. Joseph 78 82 24 August Feb $3,102,294 $3,783,078 $5,380,348

TOTAL: 401*

$100M

11 7 1 September $6,945,494 $202,027 $12,000 Mar

TOTAL: 1429

$80M

St. Augusta

2013

2015

July $0 $300k Total as of 6/8/15. *2015 Jan totals are not cumulative, they represent up-to-month data.

1500

$60M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

December $12,027,944 $7,465,381 $5,308,489 June

TOTAL: 1411

TOTAL: $360,215.87*

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

$40M

48

900

$900k $20M

Food and Be

St. Cloud 425 397 129 2015 $87,075,891 $57,715,070 $31,681,022 July

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0

September

300

Commercial 2013 2014 2015* August #/$ #/$ #/$

Commercial Building Permits

2013

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

2013

St. Joseph 128 176 54 February $1,702,322 $1,353,832 $618,338

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

34

99 100 26 $3,327,830 $4,437,367 $1,599,730

Commercial Building Permits

2015

116

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

2015

$30M

April $879,943 $1,803,560 $375,593

300

$20M

80

2014

Waite Park

0

$10M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

$300k

$0

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2013

2014

2015

2014

2013

$0

TOTAL: $54,435,063

2013

Sartell 438 291 81 May $11,560,121 $8,129,708 $6,530,235

2014

2015

January

$20M

Home Sales C

2014

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

$10M

2015

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0

July December June

November May

2013 2015

53,135*

$80M

$120M

COLOR KEY:

TOTAL: $62,358,547 2014

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

Compiled by Sharon Henry, data current as of 6/8/15

Residential Building Permits

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$21,453,135*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

358,547

October

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2015

435,063

047.00*

,621.69

,554.11

0M

Residential Building Permits

$120M

June $79,916,621.69 Sources: Building departments for the following cities:TOTAL: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2014

May

2014

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2014-2015

2013

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

Unemployment Rates

August

September

October

A

S

O

N

D

December

July

J

Jan

November

June

1.5%

May

$120M

Feb

April

$100M

March

$80M

December

November

$60M

October

$40M

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$20M

2.0%

February

2.5%

January

8%

$0 7%

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2013

2014-2015 % CHANGE

J

F

$0

$300k

1.0% 0.5%

6%

0.0% -0.5%

5%

-1.0% -1.5%

4%

-2.0% -2.5% -3.0%

3% M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

M

A

M

J

M

Benton & Stearns Counties Minnesota United States

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

41


3,135*

58,547

35,063

$80M

BusinessTools

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

September

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

September

OUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, H

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

uilding Permits

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

October

TOTAL: 401*

August

September

2015

TOTAL: $360,215.87*

July

TOTAL: $45,867,047.00*

August

TOTAL: 1429

July

June

2015

May

2014

MayTOTAL: 1411

October

TOTAL: $360,215.87*

July

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

$600k

$900k

$1.2M

Businesses that plan to transition temporary workers into full-time, permanent jobs

March February

28%

January

$1.5M

36%

Lodging Tax Dollars

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES TOTAL: $335,544.67*

$900k

$1.2M

$1.5M

Housing/Real Estate sources: St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors, http:// stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics; Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office; http://thething.mplsrealtor.com/

Employers planning to hire temporary or contract workers

Business that are hiring workers with college degrees for jobs that had been primarily held by those with high school diplomas. Source: CareerBuilder, 2015 employment study

Total as of 6/8/15. *2015 totals are not cumulative, they represent up-to-month data.

42

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Economy Central presented by

December

$600k

37%

November

$300k

October

46% $0

September

2013

August

TOTAL: $1,336,559.26

July

9%

Businesses that expect to decrease staff levels

2014

Businesses that are now hiring workers with master’s degrees for positions that had been primarily held by those with four-year degrees

June

May

April

March

February

TOTAL: $1,454,373.86

Employers who plan to increase their full-time, permanent head count January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2015

May April

1500

$1.5M

Total as of 6/8/15. *2015 totals are not cumulative, they represent up-to-month data.

56%

June

TOTAL: 401*

350

TOTAL: 1429

300

Stearns Co. 246 168 58 2013 Benton Co. 70 53 22

$300k

September August

TOTAL: 316

Residential 2013 2014 2015* TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$0

$1.5M

If you’re looking for a new job, the statistics are on your side. TOTAL: 1411

2014 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

250

December

November

1200

TOTAL: $360,215.87*

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

200

$1.2M

BY THE NUMBERS

TOTAL: 80*

900

$900k

150

$900k

Total as of 6/8/15. *2015 totals are not cumulative, they represent up-to-month data.

600

$600k

100

$600k

300

$300k

50

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Incorporations - MN Secretary of State, Graph courtesy of SCSU

TOTAL: 221PARK, 6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

0

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

2015 2013

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2013

$0

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

2015

1500

Feb

Total as of 6/8/15. *2015 totals are not cumulative, they represent up-to-month data.

2014

2014

1200

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

900

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

600

Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Jan $60MSources: $80M $100M $120M Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2015

2013

February Mar

300

2014

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

0

April March

2015

2014

2013

2013

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

June

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

$0

0M

M

7.00*

21.69

54.11

$120M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu


Paula Capes

Debra Grant

Jessica Bitz

Kendra Berger

Caryn Stadther

FALCON NATIONAL BANK WOMEN MAKING A REAL DIFFERENCE That’s Us. Truly making a difference inside our organization and out in our communities, the women of Falcon National Bank lead with strength and trust. Bringing dedicated leadership, our team of women is here for the bank – and here for you.

Member FDIC

www.FalconNational.com


44

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

BLOG. WE BLOG. WE TWEE WE TW POST WE BLOG WE TWEE WE T PIN. W WE


. WE POST. WE PIN. WE POST.WE PIN. WE TWEET . WE POST. WE PIN. WE BLOG. WE POST.WE PIN ET.WE BLOG.WE PIN. WE WEET. WE TWEET.WE BL T. WE PIN.WE BLOG. WE AT AGE 25 LUKE WE TWEET POST.WE PIN. RIORDAN HAS TURNED A SUMMERPIN.WE T G.WE POST.WE INTERNSHIP INTO A 22-EMPLOYEE E BLOG.WE POST.WE PIN COMPANY ET.WEEXPERIENCING BLOG.WE POST.W TRIPLE DIGIT TWEET.WE GROWTH. BLOG.WE POS WE TWEET.WE BLOG.WE PIN.WE TWEET.WE BLOG

I

BY JOHN PEPPER PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI, BDI

f you hang out with millennials, you might see this. You’re at a gathering of people, the kind of people who habitually leave iPhones and the like on countertops and coffee tables for instant access. They’re young, professional, and they have small children. Out the corner of your eye you’ll see a child, young enough that it might still be wearing diapers, swiping at a cell-phone screen in a concentrated, purposeful way that tells you he or she has done this many times before. It’s true. In 2015, children so young they don’t yet speak in sentences are accessing the Internet. To them, it’s an experience no more novel

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

45


than sitting down in front of a TV was to their parents, or getting mail from a mailbox was for their grandparents. Today, the generation gap could be defined this way: millennials aren’t surprised to see their three-year-olds surfing for cartoons, but Grandpa may be wondering why the only things in his mailbox are bills and catalogs.

A Young Man with an Idea

I

f you’re a business owner, and you haven’t yet adjusted to the fact that the world in which you do business has been forever changed by the Internet, you would probably benefit from speaking to Luke Riordan and his staff at DAYTA Marketing. Luke has been recognized by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce with the 2015 Business Central Mark of ExcellenceEmerging Entrepreneur award. He’s friendly and unstuffy, 25 years old, given to wearing polo’s rather than a shirt and tie, and he maintains the compact physique that helped him excel in high school on the golf course, football field and hockey rink. Like many young professionals of his generation, he’s driven less by a career plan than by doing something he believes in and enjoys. Luke attended St. John’s University in Collegeville where, after beginning as a nursing major, he graduated as a management major with marketing classes on his transcript. Nearing graduation he

“We have a great team, that’s the real reason for our success. Many of the employees who work here grew up with social media as part of their lives, from the time that they were in middle school or high school.” —LUKE RIORDAN

remained interested in the health care industry, so despite what he describes as “zero” business experience, he approached an orthopedic clinic in his hometown of Stevens Point, Wisconsin, offering to market their clinic through social media. The results, he says, were good. “At the end of the internship I was able to show what I had done for them, using hard data, and they were so impressed they asked me to continue the work,” Luke said. “I hadn’t been paid, and I didn’t have a plan for a business at the time. The money they offered me to continue the work made me realize that there was an opportunity to begin a business. And it also made me look at how I could scale the business to create what has become DAYTA Marketing.”

Starting Out

S

mart enough to know he needed help, Luke turned to his uncle, John Riordan. John describes himself as a serial entrepreneur. “I started the first mortgage brokerage company in the state of California in 1982. I’ve started an aircraft leasing company, a title company, a real

BUSINESS PROFILE > DAYTA MARKETING 415 3rd Street N., Suite 200, Waite Park, MN 56387 320-345-7307 www.daytamarketing.com EMAIL: info@ daytamarketing.com CEO: Luke Riordan OTHER SIGNIFICANT OFFICERS: Director of Sales John Riordan OWNERSHIP: Luke Riordan is the majority owner with a significant number of minority owners

46

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Brian Myres, Myres Consulting; Brian Schoenborn, Stinson Leonard Street; Gordy Meyer, eBureau BUSINESS DESCRIPTION: DAYTA Marketing is a social media marketing agency. They conduct and implement social media strategies for businesses and organizations in order to grow and engage large targeted audiences on behalf of their clients.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 22 PREVIOUS YEAR SALES: $700,000 CURRENT YEAR PROJECTED SALES: $1.2 - $1.5 million

FUN FACT: About 40 percent of DAYTA’s employees started out as interns.

estate company....” After hearing about Luke’s ideas and his initial success, John agreed to move from Green Bay, Wisconsin to St. Cloud, Minnesota to mentor Luke in his new business venture. St. John’s University helped the Riordans present their business idea to the St. Cloud business community by connecting them to a St. Cloud Area Chamber executive dialogue group. Luke pitched the idea for DAYTA Marketing to the group of about ten local business owners. The Chamber group offered feedback which the Riordans used to shape the company. “That was a great connection,” Luke said. “I ran the numbers a few months ago, and over time we’ve established 23 client relationships directly from that day when I walked in and told them about my experience and my idea to start DAYTA Marketing.” He formally founded DAYTA Marketing in February 2012. Today the company has 22 employees working from a building in Waite Park, the fourth business address in three years as the company expands at a triple digit rate.

A New Kind of Marketing

D

AYTA Marketing is not a typical marketing company. They aren’t going to develop a radio schedule, put ads in the local papers or post billboards on I-94. Neither are they a company of computer techs. They aren’t developing software. What they are doing is developing social media marketing strategies customized to your business using existing social media platforms. And they are doing it well enough that they have more than 150 customers nationwide, as well as a couple outside U.S. borders. It’s a broad mix including landscaping companies, accountants, insurance agencies, golf


Luke Riordan and the posting, pinning, tweeting, blogging team at DAYTA Marketing.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

47


courses, politicians, event centers, government agencies and more. Despite the emphasis on the Internet, Luke describes DAYTA Marketing as a people business. Walk around the offices and you’ll be tempted to redefine it as a young people business. The average age looks to be about 24. It’s a modern workplace. Nobody wears a suit. There’s a foosball table. People are laughing. Everybody is looking at a screen of some kind, people aren’t cubicled. Luke believes strongly that satisfied employees will keep their clients happy, so he strives to create a happy workplace. Employees are actually encouraged to work one day midweek from home. “We have a great team,” Luke said, “that’s the real reason for our success. Many of the employees who work here grew up with social media as part of their lives, from the time that they were in middle school or high school. We are experts on the social media sites, and it takes a specific kind of expertise when you are talking about how to leverage these platforms for business use, for marketing, for generating a return on investment for time that is spent dealing with these platforms. And that’s what we pride ourselves on – our ability to use these platforms to help businesses generate more revenue.” Perhaps the greatest value that DAYTA Marketing brings to the table is that they provide a full service. Almost every business has been told they should ‘develop their web presence,’ ‘get on Facebook,’ or ‘begin tweeting.’ Unfortunately, that advice can leave business owners and marketing executives scratching their heads, wondering where to begin or go next. DAYTA Marketing replaces that insecurity or lack of understanding by

Ellie Backes, director of marketing, and Jason Wolbeck, director of social advertising, collaborate on a campaign.

providing a complete service model that they both plan and execute. Their service menu includes education, email marketing, reputation management, social media marketing, and social advertising. They might design a social media contest to generate some online buzz, or build a new website. To do those things they maintain traditional ad agency competencies in graphic design, copywriting, video, and photography services. Luke doesn’t see social media replacing more traditional marketing methods, but he does see it as an essential marketing method to be considered in the mix. “We are not a replacement for the billboard. We’re an additional marketing tool. That’s why we need a spot within the marketing budget.”

The Social Media Spectrum

N

ot every business is an ideal candidate for social media marketing. There’s a social media spectrum in which some businesses are

poised to succeed, and others are not going to do as well. Businesses at the higher end of the spectrum should dedicate significant time and resources to social media if they want to be successful in the modern marketplace, according to Luke. For others, social media marketing can be a much smaller part of the mix. Perhaps the largest factor that influences a company’s place on the spectrum is their products or services. Businesses that rely heavily on customer engagement are most likely to benefit from social media marketing. For example, Luke said, it’s essential that businesses in the wedding industry are on social media, such as jewelers, florists and decorators. “All of these people have to be on social media, because that’s where a bride-to-be goes to do her research and planning,” he said. “Pinterest is the essential wedding planning tool, along with other more specialized wedding planning sites.” Perhaps less obviously, banks and credit unions should

TIMELINE > DAYTA MARKETING

48

MAY 2011 Luke starts social media internship in Stevens Point, Wisconsin

FEBRUARY 2012 John Riordan relocates to St. Cloud – DAYTA Marketing is a full GO!

OCTOBER 2011 Luke presents business plan to his uncle, John Riordan

MAY 2012 The company moves from Luke’s basement to an office

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

JUNE 2012 Luke hires his first employee

Best Companies to Work For by Minnesota Business Magazine

OCTOBER 2013 DAYTA acquires its 100th client

NOVEMBER 2014 Luke and John Riordan successfully complete their first round of raising capital

MARCH 2014 DAYTA Marketing is included in the 100

MARCH 2015 The DAYTA University (full-day social media marketing seminar) tour launches in St. Cloud. Other scheduled locations in 2015 are Fargo, Sioux Falls, and Stevens Point, Wisc.


be marketing through social media, Luke said, because people are very engaged in decisions made about their money. Another factor that places a business high on the need for social media marketing is high foot traffic - whether going into a brick and mortar storefront or a digital one. A third factor is employee numbers. Large numbers of employees increase opportunities to create a social media presence. “Word of mouth is what I’m trying to describe,” Luke said. “It’s people talking about your business, which you can use to drive your sales. If you have a large employee base, you can leverage and expand word of mouth through social media.” DAYTA Marketing might recommend activity using Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google, YouTube, Yelp, Foursquare, Bing, Yahoo, Urbanspoon, TripAdvisor or other websites. The Internet presents a constantly shifting world in which mature sites (MySpace, Gawker) can become less popular as newer sites take what they’ve done and modify it to better meet changing tastes. DAYTA staff members closely monitor the social media world, ensuring their clients move in the same direction as popular culture.

Success Measured

B

usinesses always want to see a return on their marketing investment. The definition of return on investment doesn’t change, Luke said. What the Internet changes is the ways to get that return on investment. And what social media provides is the opportunity for increased engagement between the potential customer and the business. How many people, and more specifically, how many individuals within your target market, are you engaging with? Instead of using traffic data to measure billboard views, social media marketers measure shares, retweets, and replies, all of which create actual conversations with a target market. DAYTA Marketing staff members tweet 200 to 300 times daily on behalf of various clients. Printed screen shots of Internet pages hang in a hallway of the DAYTA office. They are case studies of DAYTA’s marketing. One is of a post that went viral and was seen by

PERSONAL PROFILE

LUKE RIORDAN AGE: 25

TITLE: CEO and Founder HOMETOWN: Stevens Point, Wisconsin EDUCATION: Pacelli High School, St. John’s University, Collegeville FAMILY: Parents: Matthew and Paula Riordan. Siblings: Logan, Alex, Austin, and Natalie Riordan. (Luke is the middle child) HOBBIES: Golfing, exercising, spending time with family. BEST ADVICE YOU’VE RECEIVED AND WHO GAVE IT TO YOU: “Feedback is a gift and therefore should be treated as such.” —John Riordan.

2.7 million people. It was shared by 34,000 people. “How do you quantify that as a value?” Luke asked rhetorically. “How many sales that brings we can’t tell you, because there’s still a grey area. But that’s brand awareness right there. The numbers make tangible something that may seem intangible.” Another framed case study is a fundraising ad for WACOSA. Thirteen people shared it, eleven commented on it, and 170 people liked it. “That’s what I mean when I speak about engagement,” Luke said. “When you get 200 people interacting with a piece, that’s the kind of value we’re bringing to our clients every day.”

Future Growth

R

apid growth often creates problems for young businesses, but Luke doesn’t appear to be worried,

nor weighed down by the responsibility of meeting payroll for his employees. They are passionate about what they’re doing, he says, and dedicated to their jobs. “I’ve got a young, ambitious team. I often refer to them as entrepreneurs because they work late at night and they love what they do. They see the value of what they bring to their clients. We see that day after day, and we want to continue to offer our services to many, many more companies. The staff are fantastic. That’s why I don’t fear growth. We have the systems and we have the capabilities to scale up very quickly.” Uncle John Riordan now sits across from Luke at a desk they share. “John brought that business savvy. He has taught me so much in a very short time. I’ve still got a lot to learn, but I’m gaining knowledge as I go. I believe I’m getting better at the business side. And I love it. But John is the reason that we are where we are today.” The Riordans are currently preparing to raise capital that they will use to hire developers in order to streamline and automate many of their internal processes. Their goal is to continue acquiring new clients at a fast rate, while maintaining a high level of service and quality control. Approximately 70 percent of their business is subscription based revenue. “We cannot grow if we are not retaining our current clients. The happier they are with DAYTA, the longer they will stay with us and the more new business they will refer,” Luke said. “We see our employee base and headquarters remaining in the St. Cloud area. We love it here. In five years we plan to have more than 100 employees, and we don’t plan on relocating.” In addition to his Uncle John, Luke credits the employees for sustaining the company’s growth. “It’s hard to maintain your sanity when you are growing this fast. But we’ve got fantastic people here, and they’re the people who have won this young entrepreneur award. When I got the award, I was so excited, not because I’d received the award, but because I was able to go back to our team and say, ‘Look at what the hard work you put into this has done.’” John Pepper is a freelance writer in St. Cloud.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

49


WOMEN TO WATCH: ERIN BITZAN

A Brilliant Future for D.J. Bitzan Jewelers Polished and personable, Erin Bitzan embodies the bright future of D.J. Bitzan Jewelers.

A

third-generation industry professional, Erin Bitzan brings luster to the family business as Vice President while relying on the core values of integrity and trust established by her father and grandfather. “Everything we do from purchasing to education is shaped by the groundwork laid by my grandparents and parents,” she elaborates, “which is to always provide the best possible customer experience.” Erin respectfully recognizes her grandfather’s willingness to embrace challenges and take risks, shown when he opened the business in the brandnew Crossroads mall in 1966. Her father, Dick, saw similar opportunities for growth and innovation in 2010 when he moved the business to its current

50

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

location. Erin is quick to credit the long-term success of the company, not only to her family, but to the 22 hard-working employees who deliver unparalleled customer service experiences every day. Erin and staff continuously seek opportunities to exceed customer expectations, whether sending a bottle of wine to a couple celebrating their 45th wedding anniversary or personally delivering watches to a customer’s home. “We’re privileged to be commemorating special occasions with our customers, an honor we don’t take lightly.” Relationships, Erin believes, deliver the sparkle to this multi-faceted business, making it rewarding and fun. The Bitzan family has forged trusted relationships that span decades—

and generations—with both customers and colleagues. Erin enjoys connecting with the next generation of customers whose parents and grandparents have been a part of the D.J. Bitzan story. As lead diamond and bridal buyer for the store, Erin has a keen eye for quality and beauty. She brings a fresh fashion focus to the business, currently working with leading designers to create a carefully edited collection of fashion jewelry that appeals to new and repeat customers alike. Always grateful for the foundation set by generations before her, Erin is motivated to simultaneously honor the past and welcome the future with a fresh perspective, a millennial point of view, and a solid vision in an everevolving industry.

SPONSORED PROFILE

Spotlight: D.J. BITZAN JEWELERS

Where Central Minnesota Gets Engaged 203 Waite Avenue N Waite Park, MN 56387 (320) 251-4812 www.djbitzan.com Hours: Monday - Friday: 9:30am - 8:00pm Saturday: 9:30am - 6:00pm Sunday: Closed


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Feature

The Power of Her

BY THE NUMBERS

Knowing your female clients better may improve the customer relationship. By mary macdonell belisle

Women & Finance 42%

Women who say they are in the role of primary financial decision maker because they view themselves as the most financially savvy individual in their household. –––––––––––––

91%

Women ages 55-70 who say they feel it is their responsibility to understand their financial situation. –––––––––––––

“S

Source: Ameriprise Financial 2014 study: Women and Financial Power

he-conomy.” “Digital diva.” “Female factor.” “Fem-vertising.” These terms refer to the sizeable, and growing, impact of women’s buying power. If businesses haven’t befriended the female shopper and tuned their marketing efforts accordingly, they’re missing an opportunity. Women work. They are firmly entrenched in the economy. In 2013, females comprised 51 percent of the U.S. population, over 159 million persons. The Bureau of Labor Statistics noted in its 2014 report that 58 percent of females were in the labor force in 2012, 71 percent of whom were working mothers with children under 18 years old. Thirty-eight percent of all women in the labor force had college degrees, and women accounted for 52 percent of all workers in management, professional, and related occupations. More than half of

all workers in financial activities, education and health, leisure and hospitality, and other services were women. Twentyeight percent of wives earned more than their husbands in 2011, and working wives contributed 37 percent to their families’ incomes. The Federal Reserve also reported 51 percent of all wealth in the U.S., as of 2007, was controlled by women. There are approximately 9 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., that’s 30 percent of all enterprises, according to the 2014 State of WomenOwned Businesses report from American Express. Women buy. They are a market, not a niche. According to a 2010 survey by Unicast, women made 85 percent of all brand purchases, 92 percent of vacation purchases, and 93 percent of food purchases. They initiated or influenced 61 percent of

consumer electronics purchases in 2012, reports the Consumer Electronics Association. Women buy 54 percent of cars in the U.S. and influence 84 percent of vehicle purchases. Eighty percent of women control the household finances. Women also make home purchase decisions 91 percent of the time. Search “statistics on women’s buying power” for a dozen websites delivering lengthy lists of facts concerning women’s buying numbers. “Women are not a niche market. They should always be considered. They are either the primary market or the secondary market,” said Kelly Zaske, co-owner of Gaslight Creative, a St. Cloud marketing and advertising firm. “Men really are more of a niche market.” When comparing and contrasting women and men, broad generalizations are applied to each group’s behavior. Obviously, there are many people who don’t fall

82%

Women ages 25-34 who say they feel it is their responsibility to understand their financial situation. –––––––––––––

62%

Women ages 25-34 who reported that they had the opportunity to learn about finances from one or both parents (62% compared to 45% of older women). –––––––––––––

42%

Women ages 35-54 who have experienced a divorce, unemployment, are supporting a child’s college education and/or have seen a significant decrease in assets in the last five years. This compares to 29 percent of older women and 24 percent of younger women.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

51


uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu

Feature DID YOU KNOW?

45% of older women reported that they had the opportunity to learn about finances from one or both parents than women’s. Gray matter controls the information and action processing parts of the brain. Women have more white matter, the “networking grid” of the brain, linking processing centers. The gray-white matter difference may explain why, in adulthood, females are great multi-taskers, while men excel in highly task-focused projects, noted Jantz. Chemically, women and men process neurochemicals–– serotonin, testosterone, estrogen, and oxytocin–– differently, mostly due to bodybrain connections based on

neatly into defined groups. All the same, generalizations, including the ones that follow, can help businesses determine their marketing strategies and target their desired audiences. Women are smart. Their brains aren’t better, just different. Science knows men’s and women’s brains are different in processing, chemistry, structure, and activity, said Gregory L. Jantz, Ph.D., in Psychology Today. In fact, scientists have found 100 differences. Men’s brains contain more gray matter

Bob Feuling has been awarded the MLBA Board Member of the Year for 2014 Liquor, Beer & Wine is all we do!! There’s One Near You!! ********************************* Westside Liquor offers the best selection of Beer & Craft Beer, Wine & Liquor in the State ********************************* Our temperature controlled atmosphere offers the freshest products at everyday low prices. *********************************

4 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! 8 AM - 10 PM Monday - Saturday Little Falls.................... 320-632-2582 Rice.............................. 320-393-4513 St Cloud...................... 320-259-7740 Waite Park................... 320-253-9511

Visit our web site at: www.westsideliquor.com

Bob & Linda are also owners of other businesses in Sartell: Liquid Assets, MacKenzie’s, Westside Learning & Events Center and The Pantry More than just a coffee house. Come for the coffee, bakery goods, homemade soup, paninis and more

Looking for a place to hold your

event...You have found it here!  Westside Learning and Event Center is great for showers, breakfast or lunch business meetings, staff education meetings, anniversaries or any type of party you are doing. We also hold various many of our own events you are encouraged to attend.  See our website for details. www.westsidelearningcenter.com or call 320-257-5097

We have FREE high speed wireless internet service, outdoor patio seating and a very comfy atmosphere.

Mon thru Thurs, 6am - 9pm Fri, 6am - 7pm Sat, 7am - 4pm Sun, 8am - 4pm

Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Sunday Closed

MacKenzie’s is your place to find everything you need to enhance your unique style. Stop in today and look through our exclusive designs, hand picked just for you! We get in new items every week and only get a couple of each to ensure the items you are buying are original.

The Place to Fulfill Your Kitchen Needs!

From delicious gourmet foods and effortless baking mixes, to useful and unique kitchenware, you will find what you need in The Pantry. Whatever you are looking for, our friendly staff can help you find just what you need.

1091 2nd Street South, Sartell, MN 56377 | 320.259.7713

52

2nd St S, Suite 600 Sartell, MN 56377 320-230-5201

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

1001 2nd St S, Suite 200, Sartell, MN | 320-281-3447

gender. Results of this include a male’s difficulty in sitting still for as long as a female, and his tendency to be more aggressive and physically impulsive. Structurally, females have a larger memory center, the hippocampus, and a higher density of neural connections to this center. As a result, women tend to absorb more sensorial information than males, noticing more of what’s happening around them. Women tend to have verbal centers on both sides of the brain, versus the one center for men, and they have more

connections between these centers and their feelings. So, women use more words than men and are more inclined to describe their emotions. Women experience higher blood flow to the “concentration” part of the brain. This helps women revisit and ruminate on emotional memories more often than men. Men tend to briefly reflect and analyze an emotion, and then move on to another task. Knowing men’s and women’s brains are wired differently may help companies better market to both. Women care more. People and causes are important to them. Nielsen’s 2014


Corporate Social Responsibility Survey of 30,000 online shoppers in 60 countries revealed both genders are concerned with companies’ environmental practices. However, women were apt to be more so, supporting companies that demonstrated affinity for human-oriented causes, such as disease, clean water, poverty, gender equality, etc. Of the 20 causes listed, men scored higher in four areas––construction, technology, education, and small business support. Interestingly, men (53 percent) and women (52 percent) were both willing to pay more for products if the company demonstrates social responsibility. Companies that communicated their engagement

in social responsibility saw a five percent rise in sales. To appeal to more women (and men), companies should consider sharing their commitment to issues of social responsibility. Women matter. They want recognition, respect, and relational buying experiences. Boston Consulting Group’s survey on women and consumerism indicated 73 percent of the 12,000 women polled were “most dissatisfied” with financial services. They cited disrespect, condescending attitudes, poor advice, red tape, and “one-size-fits-all” forms. “What women mean by ‘respect’ is more akin to being

understood,” said marketing consultant Marti Barletta, known as the “The High Priestess of Marketing to Women.” “She wants to be listened to and accorded as much response as if the communication were coming from a man, a man who speaks up for what he wants and matterof-factly expects to get it.” Remember the Dell computer fiasco? Dell launched Della.com in 2009, selling pastel laptops with USB cords painted with daisies and glittery clutches to hold wireless speakers. “They thought that we couldn’t understand megabytes unless they were pink and purple,” said Stephanie Holland, owner of Holland + Holland Advertising and

founding author of the Sheconomy blog. “Pink it and shrink it” is definitely not the way for companies to attract women, noted Barletta. Better for companies to recognize the opportunities they have to market to women, refine their messages, and refocus the media mix, which shouldn’t cost more than what they’re already spending. mary macdonell belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with mary macdonell belisle - wordingforyou. She specializes in business articles and profiles, web content, and book editing.

For a complete list of sources used in this story visit www. BusinessCentralMagazine.com

www.bdiphoto.com • 1-320-333-1520

Still and moving images for business communication.

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

53


WOMEN TO WATCH: MELISSA KRUSE KELLEY

Refining, making it “ my own, and moving to

the next level are the steps I plan to take to make J.F. Kruse Jewelers a truly world-class, exceptional store. –– MELISSA KRUSE KELLEY

J.F. Kruse Fine & Custom Jewelers Continuing the legacy with spirit, sparkle, and celebration of stories

A

sk Melissa Kruse Kelley about plans for the jewelry store’s future, and watch her eyes glow as brightly as the polished gold and diamonds in the display cases. “Refining, making it my own, and moving to the next level are the steps I plan to take to make J.F. Kruse Jewelers a truly worldclass, exceptional store,” says an enthusiastic Kelley, who will build upon her father’s legacy. Kelley bought the business in 2014 when Jim Kruse retired. Her husband Mike assists her with marketing and technology tasks. Kruse mentored his daughter over the years, bringing her into the store at age 13 to do a bit of cleaning until she began selling at 16. Upon graduation from Apollo High School, Kelley knew she

54

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

wanted to become a permanent part of the business. “I had earned my place on the team and knew the customers on a personal level, including the celebrations in their lives,” says Kelley, who has a degree in Business Management and Marketing, and is a Gemologist through the Gemological Institute of America. “Their stories–– customers’ as well as staff––are valuable and important.” Kelley encourages the staff of 18 to operate in the Christian spirit and to sparkle, providing the best pricing and service and by sparkling in the lives of each customer, the team, and the community. The business also supports Birthline, Pregnancy Resource Center, Youth for Christ,

and the YMCA’s youth programs. During the “Week of Giving,” 10 percent of every sale is donated to Catholic Charities’ St. Cloud Children’s Home. Proceeds from the sale of Tara Gronhovd’s “Becoming” jewelry collection, custom designed by J.F. Kruse Jewelers, are given to support women experiencing crisis pregnancies. Truly, the business’s culture is one of giving. Each employee is encouraged to add to their skillset in order to better serve customers. The store allows them to pursue their education and helps to pay tuition. “We really do have an exceptional group of people here,” says Kelley, who is willing to help support their goals just as her father Jim supported hers.

SPONSORED PROFILE

Spotlight: J.F. KRUSE FINE & CUSTOM JEWELERS

When it’s forever. Honored to be YOUR family jeweler. 110 Waite Avenue South, St. Cloud, MN 56301 320.253.4755 www.jfkruse.com Hours: Monday – Friday: 10 AM – 8PM Saturdays: 10 AM – 5 PM Sundays: Seasonal or By Appointment


2015 Women in Business Directory Introduces you to some of the women who are Redefining Business

our future

Committed to Transforming Young Women

INSIDE OBSERVATIONS

Marketing to Women

Mary Dana Hinton, Ph.D., President

C

ompanies that do their homework and design their marketing with women in mind, are more apt to tap the lucrative she-conomy, and create lasting relationships well into the next generation. Marketing consultant Marti Barletta offers these observations to help you start:

1. Female culture is about commonality and empathy. Women want a connection to a company and reassurance that the company is “real.” 2.Women’s thought processes are not linear like a man’s. Women usually don’t know exactly what they want, so the buying process is also an educational process. Give them more information and details.

www.csbsju.edu

3. Women’s humor is different than men’s. While men generally enjoy put-downs because of a hierarchical viewpoint, women’s humor is self-deprecating. 4. Tap into the “girlfriend” factor, depicting women enjoying products in the company of their girlfriends, sisters, and moms.

The Women’s Fund of the Central Minnesota Community Foundation congratulates

2015 ATHENA Award Recipient

ANN COFELL

MARKETING | ADVERTISING | PUBLIC RELATIONS | SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY | VIDEO PRODUCTION | PUBLISHING | WEBSITES WENDY HENDRICKS | hendricksmarketing.com | wendy@hendricksmarketing.com 501 W St Germain St #302, St Cloud MN 56301 | 320.293.6379

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

55


2015 WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Alyce Justin Chief Operating Officer/ Executive Vice President (320) 252-2634

Thank you Alyce! GB & Co. Hair-Skin-Spa is the most respected salon/spa in this area. The women employed at GB & Co. are given better learning opportunities and earn a better living by maintaining higher standards in their field. ________________ The women at GB & Co. are a team striving together to be the best and support each other. They work in a business that respects their skills and are treated as professionals.

The choice is clear. Choose GB & Co. Hair-Skin-Spa.

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

BUYING A HOME? LOOKING TO REFINANCE?

NMLS #451081 • Lender ID # 327578

FUNERALS CREMATION PREPLANNING

Eileen Theisen Mortgage Consultant

Deb Dingmann Funeral Director

w w w. w i l l i a m s d i n g m a n n . c o m

56

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

St. Cloud Federal Credit Union is a local not-for-profit. We are passionate about banking the way it should be for people, not for profit. We are committed to making a meaningful difference for our members and communities.

Sartell & St Cloud stcloudfcu.coop

80 37th Ave. S. (Across from Holiday Inn) 253-4832 • www.gbcosalonspa.com

Phone: (320) 291-1075 501 W. St. Germain St. Suite #305 St. Cloud, MN 56301

For over 35 years, we have enjoyed an incredibly dedicated and talented leader; Alyce Justin has helped shape who we are.

Emily Grow Funeral Director

Ashley Prentice Funeral Director


Special Focus SENIOR HEALTH AND LIVING

FUN AND GAMES

Seniors are wealthy and healthy. If you’ve overlooked this critical market you’ll feel it in your bottom line. Profiles by Laura Hood, Aging Services Director, City of St. Cloud.

BY THE NUMBERS

BABY BOOMERS:

60%

are likely to use an app recommended by a doctor –––––––––––––

E

xercise doesn’t have to be boring. Aside from the proven benefits of living a healthy life – decreased risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes – exercise can be fun! Really! More and more businesses and organizations are providing incentives to employees of all ages to include fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle. Even communities are joining the wellness movement (see the President’s Letter on page 6) If you’re in the health and wellness business – and that includes things as diverse as food, travel, electronics, and furniture – be sure you’re including the senior audience in your marketing plan.

59% Senior Games St. Cloud joined in the fun in May by hosting the Minnesota Senior Games. More than 400 athletes participated in over 20 events. The Minnesota Senior Games is a yearly sports competition for people ages 50 and better dedicated to motivating active adults to lead a healthy lifestyle. There are many ways to reach out to the affluent, and growing, senior market, and one of those is through athletics. If you missed the 2015 Minnesota Senior Games, mark your calendar now for May 2016 when the games return to St. Cloud.

MEET SOME OF ST. CLOUD’S ATHLETES:

track weight, diet or exercise –––––––––––––

Joe Chovan, St. Cloud

3.3 million

You have to move quickly to keep up with Joe. His love of activity includes long distance bike trips, most recently traveling by bike from the Gulf of Mexico to St. Cloud. “I bike recreationally, but enjoy

underwent a cosmetic procedure in the preceding five years –––––––––––––

35%

get moderate physical activity 12 times a month –––––––––––––

82%

of Internet users (which is almost 100% of Boomers) research health and wellness information online Source: Advise America

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

Photo of Joe Chovan courtesy of the City of St. Cloud

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

57


Special Focus

Phil & Val Rogosheske photo courtesy of Neal Anderson and the City of St. Cloud

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

58

Joe Chovan, continued...

DID YOU KNOW?

the long trips with groups.” His philosophy is to try, rather than measure success only by speed or competition. “My goal is to do the best I can in whatever activity and not worry about how that measures up to others.” He regularly plays pickleball and billiards at St. Cloud’s Whitney Center and enjoys the friendly competition.

Baby boomers spend more than any other generation on health care and pharmaceuticals.

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Phil & Val Rogosheske, St. Cloud Phil Rogosheske, St. Cloud Phil cannot remember a time when he was not competing or involved in organized sports. “It is a life-long passion, with summers on Little Rock Lake and creating games to play that involved outdoor physical activity in and out of the water.” In 1972 Phil represented the U.S. in the four-person flat kayak competition at the Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany. Since then he has competed in a wide variety of sports, including over 40 Birkebeiner cross country ski races held in Hayward, Wisc.

Val Rogosheske, St. Cloud There were few organized sports for girls when Val was growing up. “As a kid I was outside, running and playing games with others and I really enjoyed it.” In 1972 Val was among the first women to officially be recognized to compete in the Boston Marathon. She spent her 20s and 30s running in races until she was struck by a health condition that made her adjust to other activities. She enjoys biking, walking and her new found passion of pickleball. “Participating in physical activity ignites an excitement in doing things in a group, it is that spark of child-like play that carries on.”


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

Special Section: Senior Health & Living

SPECIAL SECTION

On the following pages you can learn more about the many programs, services, and opportunities available for older adults in Central Minnesota.

About us:

Rapid Recovery & Aquatic Center houses 60 private patient suites, designed for short-term stay rehabilitation. With indoor access to shopping, restaurants, salon & spas, clinic, bank and Chapel.

Services:

Programs suited for every need. Including: Inpatient, outpatient, sub-acute, and in-home therapy.

Hospice Care. Respite Care.

Providing Comfort, Medical Care, Dignity, and Celebration of Each Life.

At a glance: Rapid Recovery & Aquatic Center Phone: 320-253-1920 Website: www.countrymanorcampus.org

Quiet Oaks Hospice House Highway 15 South and I-94 | St. Cloud, MN www.quietoakshospicehouse.org | 320.255.5433

EVERY DAY. EVERY WAY. We’ve got you covered.

TM

About us:

St. Benedict’s Senior Community – Gorecki Care Center has expanded from 44 to 64 Short Stay Care suites to meet your complex medical care and rehabilitation needs while you transition from hospital to home. We are the only Short Stay facility in the area to offer a team of onsite physicians – offering comfort and care, all within your suite. Know the difference when planning your short-term care – the choice is yours!

At a glance: St. Benedict’s Senior Community Gorecki Care Center 1810 Minnesota Boulevard SE, St. Cloud, MN 56304

www.centracare.com

Contact: Information & Registration at: sbcinformationregistry @centracare.com (320) 654-2355

Leave behind the work and worry and let us take care of everything. Independent Living Assisted Living Memory Care Home Care

• Cozy common areas • Scrumptious food • Chapel for all faiths • Coffee shop & Gift shop • Beauty salon • Entertainment and social outings • Beautiful outdoor spaces

320-203-2747 centracare.com

A faith-based, nonprofit organization. All faiths welcome. Equal Housing Opportunity EOE/AA

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

59


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

Special Section: Senior Health & Living

it’s not about the place, it’s about the people.

About us: ����e����ee��u��e�����ulie����e�����i�e�i�� ��e���������uic�l�������e�e�e����������� ��������������������������������������ucille ACE REHAB In/Out-Patient Therapy PHYSICAL OCCUPATIONAL SPEECH

(320) 259-3476 Sauk Rapids, MN

About us:

A 25 acre health care facility providing a complete continuum of care. Enriching lives.

Services:

Independent senior living, long term care, memory care, short stay care, rehabilitation services

Our experienced eye doctors offer comprehensive vision examinations and specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems. We use advanced diagnostic technology and vision correction products to care for our patients in the St. Cloud, Paynesville, and Becker communities.

At a glance:

Insight Eye Care • www.insighteyecare.us

At a glance: Country Manor Campus Phone: 320-253-1920 Website: www.countrymanorcampus.org

GoodShepherdCampus.org

St. Cloud (Waite Park) 206 W Division Street 320-253-0365 Becker 12390 Sherburne Ave 763-261-5444

Redefining Senior Living A NEW Style of Senior Living:

- Drakes on-site restaurant and bar - Country Store & Pharmacy Plaza (providing indoor access to shopping, clinic, branch bank, and Subway) - Health and wellness programs - Mullple salon and spas

Enjoy all the Features of a Custom-Built Home: - Paao/deck - AAached garages with storage - In-floor heat - Stainless steel appliances - 9 foot ceilings

An Accve, Supporrve Community: - Candlelight dinners - Day trip excursions - On-site rehabilitaaon - Chapel and spiritual care - In-home nursing services available

25 Different Apartment Styles to Choose From! Call Today to Schedule a Tour!

60

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

Paynesville 204 Washburne Ave 320-243-3566


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

Special Section: Senior Health & Living

About us:

About us:

We are a St. Cloud based commercial construction firm that has been in business for 46 years. Our greatest strength is our ability to take your vision and make it a reality. Through our development process we can assist you in selecting a site, hiring an architect, creating a concept, preparing all submittals for governmental reviews, creating a budget and schedule, assist in securing financing and building your dream. Let us help bring your ideas to life!

At a glance:

We’re here to help you live your healthiest life. • Same day appointments • All major insurance is welcome • Onsite pharmacy Providing medical care in: Family medicine OB/Gyn Pediatrics Chiropractic General and colorectal surgery Behavioral health Dental

At a glance:

Winkelman Building Corp 340 Hwy 10 S, St.Cloud, MN 56304

Contact: Mike Schoenecker mikes@winkbuild.com • 320-253-2411

www.winkbuild.com

HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic 2251 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell, MN 56377

320-253-5220 • www.hpcmc.com

About us:

Recovery is often faster at home. CentraCare Health Home Care & Hospice provides high-quality medical care and compassionate emotional and spiritual support. A team of skilled professionals work to provide a total continuum of care. Services include home care, palliative care, hospice, telemonitoring, infusion/IV therapy, pediatrics, rehabilitation and more.

At a glance: CentraCare Health Home Care & Hospice Phone: (320) 259-9375 Website: www.centracare.com

Coming September 2015

GROWTH GUIDE Deadline: July 24, 2015

Featuring: New Businesses • New Ownership • New Locations • Expansions The Face of Leadership & Smart Business Profiles

For more information contact Wendy Hendricks - 320.656.3808 or whendricks@BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Check us out online at www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

61


Business Spotlight CHILD’S PLAY CHILD CARE CENTER

HAPPY SMILES

Virginia Leach Guggenberger knows she’s making a difference because she’s greeted each morning by children looking forward to their day at Child’s Play. By Gail Ivers VLG: The time it takes to be a business owner. It absorbs your life.

Virginia Leach Guggenberger, owner, Child’s Play of St. Cloud

BC: What has been your biggest challenge? ______________ VLG: I was a single parent when I started Child’s Play. I wasn’t paid for two years. I rented out the basement of my home to help make ends meet. Keeping the center full is always a concern. I’m working on this all the time. If we have an opening, it’s my responsibility to fill it. I have a responsibility to keep the staff employed and keep the business healthy. BC: How do you find families? ______________ VLG: Word of mouth. Our website. The new generation looks for information on the web before they do anything else. I encourage people to look around. You need to find a good match for your family and it may or may not be us.

Business Central: How did you end up owning a day care center? ______________ Virginia Leach Guggenberger: I made a series of decisions in my professional life that led me in this direction. When I decided this is what I was going to do, Dr. John Reisinger and Dr. Joe Belshe were instrumental in making it happen. Our building is the old St. Cloud Surgical Center. I was able to assume the loan on the building with their help. I don’t know that I would have been able to do this otherwise.

BC: What do you like best? ______________

Fun fact: Squeak the Cockatiel lives at Child’s Play during the week and is a regular visitor to the classrooms.

BC: What has been your biggest surprise? ______________

Child’s Play of St Cloud, Inc. 1401 W St. Germain St. Cloud, MN 56301 320-259-4540 info@stcloudchildcare.com www.stcloudchildcare.com

62

Owner: Virginia Leach Guggenberger Established: 1994 Number of employees: 23; Guggenberger anticipates

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 5

adding more permanent, full time staff this summer. Business description: Child’s Play is an affordable child care center that provides a secure, safe

1979 Virginia Leach Guggenberger teaches Home Economics in the Anoka Hennepin School District 1982 Leach Guggenberger works with Early Childhood Services as a parent educator 1986 Leach Guggenberger runs a family child care center in her home 1992 Childcare Choices sponsors a conference where Leach Guggenberger speaks about her vision to open a preschool January 1994 Leach Guggenberger opens Child’s Play of St. Cloud at 1401 W St. Germain Street in St. Cloud

PERSONAL PROFILE

VLG: I never know what my day is going to be like. The people. The children. The happy little smiles. The staff are excellent, like a family. Our environment is more family-like, than ‘center.’ Many of our staff have been here for years and have helped create a good work environment – a rewarding one in which to work.

AT A GLANCE

TIMELINE

learning environment with a touch of home. Child’s Play has an emphasis on early childhood education and an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau.

Virginia Leach Guggenberger, 58 Education: Degrees in Education, Consumer Homemaking and Family Life from Mankato State University Family: Husband David Guggenberger, (who does all of the shopping for the center and a good portion of the maintenance); four adult sons Hobbies: Spending time with family and neighbors; gardening for stress relief

Number of children: The facility holds 80 children, including two infant rooms that can hold up to 21. Chamber member since 1995


15184

5 x 10 4c

Map your future today

Build your business with smart financing At Wells Fargo you’ll find a variety of business credit options to help you reach your short- and long-term goals, or simply to supplement cash flow. A local banker is here to help guide you to the appropriate financing for your business, including: • Credit cards • Lines of credit • Loans

• Real estate financing • Vehicle and equipment loans

You can borrow with confidence knowing you’re working with a bank that’s loaned more money to small businesses than any other bank for more than a decade.* Stop by to speak with a local banker today, or visit wellsfargo.com/appointments to make an appointment.

*2002 – 2013 Community Reinvestment Act government data. All financing subject to credit approval. © 2015 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Member FDIC. NMLSR ID 399801 All rights reserved. (1255353_15184)


July/August 2015  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you