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Delivery 604-942-3081 • Friday, October 11, 2013

Local rider, horse form winning union

Mother-daughter duo publishes first book

PAGE 33

PAGE 11

Your source for local sports, news, weather and entertainment! >> www.burnabynow.com CHANGES TO CLINIC HOURS

Health reps take it on the chin Mayor says service level in city ‘is not good enough’ Stefania Seccia staff reporter

Mayor Derek Corrigan made his message clear when he told Fraser Health Authority decision makers that the mental health service level in Burnaby is just “not good enough.” Fraser Health’s Denise Houde, director of clinical programs, and Pam Vickram, Burnaby mental health and substance use manager, had a lot of explaining to do about the decision to standardize mental health service hours by ending them at 4:30 p.m. across the region. It was in response to the alarm bell that was rung by the B.C. Nurses’ Union last month, calling the hour change only the beginning of cuts in mental health. Houde and Vickram presented a delegation to council and noted that, of the 1,475 clients in Burnaby, only 16 were affected by the hour cuts, but they were all reaching the end of their counselling program and the group they attended in the evening was helping them transition. However, council grilled the two on how the decision process was made and what was being done to help the rising number of mental health calls in the city. “I’ve got to tell you, and it’s no offence to you, you deal with the cards that you’re given, but the message from me has been it’s not good enough,” Corrigan said. According to the Burnaby RCMP, there were 245 calls related to mental health in 2012 received by the police, which was a combination of calls at the Burnaby Centre for Mental Health Addiction, and calls in the city for service. Corrigan noted that the 100-bed mental Mental health Page 8

Larry Wright/burnaby now

Reaching out: Jim McQueen and Wanda Mulholland work with the Burnaby Task Force on For a video, Homelessness. Homelessness Action Week is being marked this coming week, Oct. 13 to 19.

The many faces of homelessness Stefania Seccia staff reporter

Dave Butler was in his wheelchair, sifting through his pile of belongings on the pavement under the hot sun – carefully selecting the few he was allowed to bring in to the Vancouver shelter. He had been transferred over from Burnaby Hospital to the shelter in Vancouver as it was the closest one – there is no overnight shelter in Burnaby – and had space. He was suffering with a leg injury, he had no time left to stay at the hospital, and he had nowhere else to go. “This isn’t right,” he told the Burnaby NOW in August, over the phone. “This should not be happening.” Butler’s story is only an example of how

homelessness has many faces – an impoverished man in a wheelchair, a senior citizen whose stagnant income doesn’t rise with inflation, a family down on their luck, a young couple passing through the city with their dogs, someone struggling with a mental health disorder that keeps them from obtaining work. Homelessness is an issue all municipalities are dealing with, which is why from Oct. 13 to 19 Metro Vancouver instituted Homelessness Action Week. One local volunteer, who helps the homeless every week, said it’s important to bring Burnaby’s homelessness issue to the forefront as the problem is very real. “I used to see folks that were out panhandling, people for so long you just walk by and then you realize, they’re part of the

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community. Burnaby is an inclusive community in that everyone should feel welcome,” said Jim McQueen, a volunteer with the Burnaby Task Force on Homelessness since 2006. McQueen volunteers every Thursday for the Outreach Resource Centre run by the Progressive Housing Society at Southside Community Church. “We have a cross-section of different people coming, different ethnic groups, age groups, young families coming with young children, and senior citizens,” he said. “I’m a senior citizen myself, and I’m starting to see a number of older folks coming and having to rely on our services. I find that a little (concerning).” The centre is open from 9 to 11:30 a.m.

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A03

5 Mayor will run again

Is it time for online voting?

Check out more local content at www. burnabynow.com Burnaby firefighters lend a hand in New Westminster

ARTS

Check out work from the My Artists’ Corner exhibition at Shadbolt

PHOTO GALLERIES The Burnaby NOW is well-travelled – see where we’ve been

ENTERTAINMENT Check out the latest Lively City column for Burnaby art news

EVENTS

See our complete arts calendar and city calendar listings

View our stories and photos with Layar Using Layar: Download the

Layar app to your smartphone. Look for the Layar symbol. Scan the photo or the page of the story as instructed. Ensure the photo or headline is entirely captured by your device. Check for advertisements that have Layar content, too. Watch as our pages become interactive.

Homelessness Action Week – check out a video Page 1 New support for eating disorders – a video Page 13 Horse and rider form a winning Union Page 33

11 Author shares vision

NDP FREQUENT FLYER MPS SAY IT WOULD BE A WAY TO CUT COSTS

NLINE EXTRAS NEWS

9 An attitude of gratitude

Don Hauka staff reporter

A pair of NDP MP frequent flyers say it’s time Parliamentarians looked at online voting to save taxpayers’ dollars. Peter Julian and Kennedy Stewart say it only makes sense to use technology to trump geography in a country as big as Canada. “I think it’s something we should consider, absolutely, especially in B.C. – there may be a variety of votes where it could be done using technology and I think we need to think about that,” said Burnaby-New Westminster MP Peter Julian. “Right now, unless I’m in my seat in the House of Commons, I can’t vote on legislation, and in a country as vast and large as Canada, that’s not necessarily the best way to go.” Julian was reacting to the figures in the recently released House of Commons Members Expenditure Report, which shows Canadian MPs filed over $123 million in expenses in the 2012-2013 fiscal year. The report details MPs’ spending on travel, office expenses and other costs. Julian had the most expenses of the trio of NDP MPs who represent New Westminster and Burnaby, with total expenses of $488,358.07. New Westminster-Coquitlam MP Fin Donnelly was next at $446,553.25. Kennedy Stewart from Burnaby-Douglas was third with $441,340.73 in costs. That’s a total of more than $1.376 million in expenses for the three NDP MPs. A big chunk of those expenses – $360,000 – was spent on travel. Julian was tops in this category among the three MPs, racking up over $126,000 in travel costs. Frequent trips between B.C. and

MP KENNEDY STEWART:

“I think it’s worth looking at.”

MP PETER JULIAN:

“There are some votes where every MP should be in his or her seat, but there are also some votes where we may be able to use technology.” Ottawa traditionally push the travel tab for all the province’s Parliamentarians sky-high. But Julian said that bill to the taxpayer could be trimmed by using distance technology. “There are some votes where every MP should be in his or her seat, but there are also some votes where we may be able to use technology,” said Julian. “It wouldn’t just save on costs – it also makes a lot of sense in other ways.” Julian said taxpayers would also save on MP housing allowances, living expenses and other costs like per diems. The reduced travel time would allow MPs to go the extra mile for their constituents at home and reduce the stress on their family lives as well. Julian’s fellow frequent flyer Stewart agreed, saying a Commons Committee should look into ways

to hold secure online votes in Parliament. “I don’t see why we couldn’t have a committee look at it,” said Kennedy. “I think it’s worth looking at.” Kennedy said MPs should still be required to attend crucial votes likes motions of confidence in the government in person. And making sure distance voting was secure from hacking would be critical. But Kennedy thinks he might already have slipped the thin edge of the silicon wedge into Parliamentary proceedings. He’s put forward a motion (M-428) to develop rules that would allow online petitions to be submitted to the House of Commons. “It’s a good test – if the House of Commons is willing to consider a minor change in technology, maybe we can move on to major changes,” he said.

Donnelly was out of the country travelling, but in an email response said he’s willing to spending 10plus hours on a plane each week while the House sits to stay in touch with his constituents. “It’s important to stay in touch with my community – just because we’re far away from Ottawa shouldn’t mean that British Columbians shouldn’t have access to their MP,” Donnelly’s email read. Donnelly also stated that he and his staff work hard to ensure they keep costs down while doing the public’s business. “For me, this lies in stark contrast to our Senators, who are not elected to represent anyone and yet who cost taxpayers $90 million dollars a year. That’s why the NDP is in favour of abolishing the Senate,” Donnelly wrote in his email.

BY THE NUMBERS - MP EXPENSES FOR 2012-2013

And more Layars on pages 16 and 25

Follow the Burnaby NOW on Twitter for news as it happens – @BurnabyNOW_ news

6

Opinion

6,7

Letters

11

Arts

Peter Julian (Burnaby-New Westminster)

Fin Donnelly (New WestminsterCoquitlam)

MP Travel: $121,987.09 Staff, family travel: $4,337.55 Member’s accommodation and per diem expenses: $15,294.81 Member’s secondary residence expenses: $10,778.18 Hospitality and events of $6,378.54). Total expenses (including salaries to assistants, office expenses, etc.): $488,358.07

MP Travel: $86,499.52 Staff, family travel: $5,415.23 Member’s accommodation and per diem expenses: $10,378.89 Member’s secondary residence expenses: $8,400.00 Hospitality and events: $7,866.77 Total expenses: $446,553.25

19

Top 5

22

Motoring

33

Sports

36

Classifieds

Superstore* Fair Market* M&M Meats* Drug Trading Company*

* not in all areas

Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby-Douglas) MP Travel: $54,797.92 Staff, family travel: $35,996.39 Member’s accommodation and per diem expenses: $6,667.18 Member’s secondary residence expenses: $19,506.19 Hospitality and events: $4,385.42 Total expenses: $441,340.73

Last week’s question Do you agree with the City of Burnaby’s vicious dog decision? NO 66% YES 34% This week’s question Do you think stores should be banned from selling pets? Vote at: www.burnabynow.com

Like the Burnaby NOW on Facebook Join the conversation


A04 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW


Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A05

Mayor Corrigan still Fall Burnaby’s ‘mother bear’ SAVINGS

under party discipline. I’m pretty independent and forthright in my opinions. staff reporter Municipal politics is ideal for me.” Corrigan said he’s enjoyed the experiTwelve consecutive years won’t be enough for Burnaby Mayor Derek ence as mayor and and wears his feelings Corrigan, who’s told the Burnaby NOW he on his sleeve when it comes to his city. “I’m a mother bear protecting fully intends to run again. our interests,” he said. “I know The next civic election is due I’m going to have real separation November 2014, and Corrigan anxiety when I’m no longer part said he hopes to make it his fifth of the decisions being made.” consecutive term as city mayor. Recently, Corrigan was under “I’m intending to come back to fire for his and council’s decision run for mayor,” he said in a phone to keep pit bulls muzzled in the interview. “I expect I’ll still be city, despite 95 letter writers and healthy and capable. I’m feeling all delegations that came forward good now and I’m ready, willsupporting the opposite. ing and able to take on another “I never like to make people term.” Derek Corrigan unhappy in the city, but I found When former NDP-lead- mayor that in politics, that sometimes er Adrian Dix stepped down, to make an omelet you’ve got to Corrigan’s name was touted by many political experts as a possible bidder in the break a few eggs,” he added. Corrigan said he hopes voters consider leadership race, however, Corrigan says he has no intention to get into provincial the redevelopment of the Edmonds area as one of his strong suits. politics. “I haven’t gotten to my best before “I don’t have the stomach for it,” he said. “I would have real trouble working date,” he noted.

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and provides food, clothing, and medical care, among other services. “I would say that they are all part of my family, I know them and I’m really close to a lot of them,” he added. When they open first thing in the morning, McQueen said a lot of people had already spent the night outside waiting for the doors to open. “My main job there is I work in the kitchen, getting the coffee going in the morning and the juice,” he said. “So many of them have needs. For a lot of them, it’s a social time, too. A lot of them connect with us.” McQueen said the number of people coming to use the service every Thursday has risen over the years and last week had 140 people show up. “They’re looking for different services,” he said. “Whether it’s a nurse practitioner, they’re looking for a meal … and just to see a friendly face that can just be supportive and help with whatever is going on throughout that day.” In 2005, the city tore down several condemned buildings that people were illegally squatting in, in the Edmonds area. “My neighbourhood got quickly inundated with some pretty rough looking street people in my backyard, in my parking lot,” said Wanda Mulholland, who formed the

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task force in 2005. “So one day, I was furious. And I called the RCMP and asked to speak to the person in charge.” Mulholland got a hold of Staff Sgt. John Buis, who at the time was the commander of the South East community in Burnaby. “And his response was very wise,” she said. “First, he said, that homelessness is not a crime, and asked me if I knew any resources in Burnaby for people because he did not.” After that phone call, Mulholland started to do some research and discovered that no one was doing anything about the homeless in the city. Her next step was getting the appropriate agencies together with the RCMP, and the task force was born. “Then I’m not angry anymore, I’m concerned,” she said. “As soon as I got to meet some of the people who were homeless and extremely poor, there was no fear any longer because they’re just people. It can be any of us. I think that the change needed to start with me.” Now with a group of 45 people and many success stories of getting people off the street, Mulholland said the task force is still heavily involved with reaching out to people who have nowhere to go and giving them a place to stay. The Burnaby NOW has not heard from Butler since the summer.

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A06 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

The Burnaby NOW is a Canadian-owned community newspaper published and distributed in the city of Burnaby every Wednesday and Friday by the Burnaby Now, 201A – 3430 Brighton Avenue, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 3H4, a division of Glacier Media Group.

Brad Alden den Publisherr

Be kitchen smart and help to prevent fires

in the messages being disseminated by The kitchen is perhaps the most firefighters this week – National Fire important room in the average home. Prevention Week. You cook there. You clean there. You Locally and across Canada, the week’s eat there. You store food there. You hang theme is Prevent Kitchen Fires, and the out there. fire prevention campaign’s Parties often end up there goal is to raise awareness that as the festivities start to fade more fires start in the kitchen into the wee hours. Burnaby NOW than in any other part of the You could even burn your home. house down there – in fact, far too many Cooking is the main culprit in startpeople use their kitchens to do just that ing devastating fires that destroy homes (unintentionally, of course). – and lives. While millions of dollars That’s why kitchens are emphasized

OUR VIEW

are lost to kitchen fires every year, more than two out of three fire deaths have their roots in the kitchen. There are hundreds of ways to start a fire in the kitchen, not to mention the many ways to spill scalding water and get burn injuries without a hint of flame being involved. Worst are the fires that are started with untended pans of grease or cooking oil, which can erupt into flames that spread more quickly than most other sources of conflagration and have a pro-

pensity to wreak more devastation, as well. So when you’re cooking with grease or oil, it’s important to be prepared for an accidental flare-up – keep a lid handy to shut down flames immediately, for instance, instead of trying to move your pot or pan from the stove (a serious no-no!). Keep your smoke detectors up to date, and don’t leave cooking pots unattended on the stove. And have a family plan for escape, in case the unthinkable happens.

Quebec, you used to be so cool IN MY OPINION

E

Matthew Claxton

very province tries to be cool in its own way. You’ve got your Albertan version (tough cowboys), your Maritime version (fiddle-playing Celtic folks with weird accents), and your B.C. version (stoned slackers). For years, it seemed like Quebec had a lock on being the coolest province. You could buy beer and wine in the corner stores! Everybody spoke French and the cities had great architecture! Best of all, they were constantly sticking it to Ottawa. Then, they started taking themselves a little too seriously. Threatening to take your ball and go home maybe works once, but if you do it half a dozen times over 30-odd years, people just start rolling their eyes. Worst of all has been the weird habit of constantly claiming to be a victimized minority, while increasingly trying to stomp on non-francophone minorities. Earlier this year, we saw the Quebec Soccer Federation ban players from wearing turbans or other religious head coverings

on the pitch. Now the Parti Quebecois is proposing a ban on any religious head coverings or sizeable religious symbols for all public employees. It’s like PQ leader Pauline Marois was stung by one wasp, then decided to wear an entire hive as a hat while jumping up and down vigorously. Obviously, this new proposed law is stupid, racist, and if it was held up to the values of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, would stand as much chance of surviving as a delicate origami crane placed inside the engine of a 767. Why is this law being proposed in the first place? Marois has defended the so-called Charter of Quebec Values as part of the unique Quebecois culture of secularism. Well, I’m so full of secularism it’s coming out of my ears, and that’s a load of steaming horse manure. The freedom of people in Quebec to practice their religion or culture should only end when it causes demonstrable harm to others. Let’s say that I firmly believe that I must, at all times, wear a bedazzled purple pirate hat. Is this belief backed up by centuries of religious philosophy and tradition? Nope. Is it a statement about a proud cultural heritage?

PUBLISHER Brad Alden EDITOR Pat Tracy ASSISTANT EDITOR Julie MacLellan SPORTS EDITOR Tom Berridge REPORTERS Janaya Fuller-Evans, Jennifer Moreau PHOTOGRAPHER Larry Wright DIRECTOR, SALES AND MARKETING Lara Graham ADVERTISING REPS Cynthia Hendrix, Cam Northcott, Veronica Wong, Jennifer Kastelein AD CONTROL Ken Wall SALES ADMINISTRATOR Daaniele Sinclaire

Quebec Page 7

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR How to waste taxpayers’ money Dear Editor:

Re: “Burnaby mayor back from whirlwind tour of waste-energy facilities in Sweden,” Burnaby NOW online, Sept. 27. Derek Corrigan’s trip to Sweden is just another example of how Metro Vancouver is throwing our tax dollars away to push through this incinerator that no one wants. I guess the point was for him to learn more about this technology he’s trying to force on taxpayers, but it sounds like he didn’t learn his lessons. In the article, he admits that they have lower recycling rates in Sweden because of incineration, and that the European Parliament is questioning

PRODUCTION MANAGER Doug McMaster PRODUCTION STAFF Ron Beamish, Kevin Behnsen,, Nola Bowling, Rona Eastman-Magee, Laura Powell, Tony Sherman GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Helen-Louise Kinton, Gary E. Slavin REGIONAL CLASSIFIED MANAGER Trixi Agrios CLASSIFIED SUPERVISOR Dawn James CLASSIFIED REPS Darla Burns, John Taylor, ACCOUNTING Judy Sharp

continued investment in incinerators. So why does he want to build another one here in B.C.? Shouldn’t we be focused on recycling more, not less? He spent our tax dollars getting there and yet says that there was no time to see anything, spending his whole time in meetings and lectures. Ever heard of a telephone? Skype? Must have been a nice vacation. Corrigan says he’s seeking limited dependence on incineration here in B.C. and that we don’t really need the energy this proposed facility would produce. So why are we building a new one? We already have one that is underused. He also learned that in Sweden they get a cut of

Mayor Page 7

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A07

PUMPKIN SALES CAMPAIGN AT

Choices Markets

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Mayor’s trip was a waste continued from page 6

your personal income tax at the municipal level. Is that his plan to pay for his $500 million incinerator? His waste plan is a waste of your money. Jordan Bateman, B.C. director, Canadian

Taxpayers Federation

Pit bull decision was right

Dear Editor:

Re: City will keep pit bulls muzzled in dog bylaw, Burnaby NOW, Oct. 2. It is not very often that we (I) applaud Burnaby city council for anything, let alone for standing by their scruples, but when it

comes to protecting children and smaller animals and pets from these inbred dogs, they have my vote. Usually I don’t agree with mollycoddling citizens, but I lived in Surrey, and watched mothers with their children having to step off the sidewalk because some two-bit hood wanted to walk his dog without even a leash. Yes, yes, cocker spaniels can be nasty, and French poodles are listed as one of the most likely to bite, but they tend not to be so absolutely insane and unpredictable as pit bulls. I would go further and suggest that these dogs found without a muzzle (unless in a fenced junkyard) should be put down at the owner’s expense. Larry Bennett, Burnaby

Quebec: Provincial culture is changing – not for the better continued from page 6

Nope. Should the government be allowed to say that I can’t wear my spangly purple hat? Absolutely not. The point of freedom of religion means even freedom for dummies like me to believe whatever we want. This law is not about bringing Quebecers together and uniting people in la belle province, as Marois and her supporters have claimed. It’s about staking out a tribal enclave and making it clear to those who aren’t white, pure laine Francophones that they aren’t welcome.

Quebec has turned from cool young rebel of the 1960s, with its Quiet Revolution and radical politics, into a stodgy, aging, xenophobic old twit, shaking his cane at the kids and telling them to get off his lawn. So basically, it’s doing what all the other old hippies have been doing since the 1980s. Thankfully, not everyone from Quebec is this stupid and intolerant. Justin Trudeau, actually impressing me for once, has spoken out against it. Trudeau pointed to the idea that people this law sees as outsiders are

contributing to an evolving Quebec culture. That’s how I see it too – a culture, Canadian or Quebecois, is a growing, changing thing. Quebec was very, very different as a society 60 years ago. It changed, in many ways for the better. Now it has a chance to change again. It it doesn’t change, it will suffer the fate of every other old, cranky, annoying and essentially powerless bigot. It’ll wither and die. Matthew Claxton is a reporter with the Langley Advance, a sister paper of the Burnaby NOW.

ONLINE COMMENTS Find us on facebook at: Facebook/BurnabyNOW Or on Twitter at: @BurnabyNOW_news

THE BURNABYNOW STORY: “Burnaby’s pet sales discussion still a few weeks away” -Oct. 7

Twitter I @rthexton: I really hope they ban pet sales. There are SO many amazing animals in BC shelters who need homes. Twitter I @MacBarksBack: … #BWL is an IQ test 4 Politicians & @CityofBurnaby Officials have flunked. They need 2 be replaced.

For every carving pumpkin sold at Choices between October 1 and 31, $1.00 will be donated to seven different local elementary schools. Find us on

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Second Street Celebrates

100 years!

Le": Principals of Second Street: In typical 2nd Street style, our (From le" to right) Mark Harding, Sue en!re community rose to this Montabello, Rob Be%s, Brian Shuster grand occasion and came together and Dave Carter. to create a 100th Celebra!on for Second Street Community School that honoured our past, present and created a future legacy of success and connec!ons. New friendships were made and Former Students many re-established, as a family of 11 a community of families, from children—Lynda, Liz, Above: Clarence Henshaw and sta$ and students—former Deborah and Nancy Doug McCallum – Second Street Lyons went to school and present— were students in the 1930’s! welcomed ‘home’! Thank from 1965-1978. you to the extraordinary e$orts of sta$, students, Centennial Commi%ee and the army of volunteers for crea!ng a celebra!on that surpassed all expecta!ons. Please join us in thanking the following supporters of our Celebra!on: Access Computer Rentals Burnaby Central Secondary School – Culinary Department Burnaby Edmonds Lions Club Burnaby Lougheed Lions Club Burnaby Op!mist Club Burnaby School District Burnaby Village Museum Cariboo Hill Secondary Students and Mr. Bernard Centennial Commi%ee Members

City of Burnaby (Printshop, Parks, Recrea!on & Cultural Services, Fes!vals Burnaby) Cocoglobo Balloons Dino Klarich, Principal of Lochdale Community School Eastside Opportuni!es Society Irene Desrosiers and the Kni#ng Club Malito Printers McBride Safeway Memory Book Contributors Nelson and Buckingham Elementary Schools Richard Baker-”Old School” Hero Chairs

Photographers – Janey Talbot and Ray Jivraj Royal Printers Satwant Pal Jassal - Classic Car Owner “School Fence” Ar!sts Mona Lochan and Anna Talbot Second Street Community School Sta$ and Students Special Guest Speakers Vancity The Many Volunteers and Community Members

YOU ALL MADE THE CELEBRATION A HUGE SUCCESS! THANK YOU! !

Did you miss our Celebra!on? There is s!ll !me to tell us your stories and send in your class photo— just email us at 100yearsatsecondstreet@gmail.com—We are wai!ng for your memories!!

The Uptown Girl Are you a femme fatale or all business? The right coat can make all the difference.

THE BURNABYNOW STORY: “Burnaby mayor back from whirlwind tour of waste-energy facilities in Sweden” - Sept. 27

Twitter I @ncole604: #mayorswastemoney Twitter I @mierzwei as u say Nick, #Mayors Waste Soo much money, we pay all their little wipes plus, tax me tax me #bcpoli.

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A08 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

Mayor tours waste facilities in Sweden Stefania Seccia staff reporter

Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan was in Sweden in late September, touring district energy systems and waste-energy facilities for Metro Vancouver. Corrigan is vice-chair of Metro Van’s zero-waste committee and travelled to Sweden for the week – learning about Sweden’s energy solutions. Corrigan was with a dozen other Canadian delegates, touring central parts of Sweden by bus and asking experts questions about the energy facilities. The experts he met with about wasteenergy facilities were surprised to hear that landfills were still used in Canada, Corrigan said. “They were surprised that people are still arguing about waste-to-energy facilities still, which they said was absurd,” he noted. “They said, ‘You’re actually looking at landfills, that’s appalling.’ They’ve banned landfills.” However, when asked about the

European Parliament backing a resolution that aims to recover valuable materials ahead of landfilling – and a European directive questioning the further investment in waste-energy facilities – Corrigan said it’s due to the recycling initiatives of those countries and the fact that their diversion rates for recycling are not as high as ours. Corrigan said European countries over-depend on incinerators as a form of energy creation, which is not the focus of Burnaby’s incinerator. “We look at it not just as creating energy, but a byproduct of reducing waste,” he added. “It’s a good way for us to generate power for our houses, but we’re saying it’s a good way of getting rid of garbage. If we get the bonus of electricity out of it, it’s nice, but not crucial. “We want limited incineration, not dependence on it – it’s a real distinction in the way we approach it.” For an extended version of this story, see www.burnabynow.com.

Mental health: Council raises issues continued from page 1

health facility is run by Vancouver Coastal Health, but money is coming out of Burnaby’s pocket as the police are not subsidized when they are called there. “I don’t like it,” he added. “I’m saying, on behalf of my community, I don’t like it. We need resources in our community for our citizens to be hosting and paying for it through our police resources and facility in our community.” Corrigan also noted that Vancouver clients are given more priority to get beds in the shelter, despite it being based in Burnaby – where the need is growing. “The question very often floated by people is why don’t you have an overnight shelter – that’ll fix it,” he said. “But an overnight shelter for someone who has mental health issues and addictions issues, you know and I know that an overnight shelter does no good whatsoever. It’s a Band-Aid.” Coun. Colleen Jordan said she felt the decision to standardize the hours in the Fraser Health region was made without considering the impact on the community and clients. “Somewhere, someone made the deci-

sion to do that, but based on what?” she asked the delegation. “Based on surveying the needs of the community? Based on surveying the clients to see if that would be helpful for them? Make things harder for them? This whole process seems to be backwards and you make a bureaucratic decision what the hours will be rather than saying what’s the need in the community?” However, Houde said the opposite was true and she and Vickram were part of the team who made the call to end the evening hours offered. “We are the decision-makers, and the decision was not made lightly,” she said. “We made this decision because we have limited resources like any organization, and we have to manage these resources responsibly and in order to serve the largest numbers that need our services.” Houde said they’re obligated to serve the “seriously, persistently mentally ill” individuals and the 16 of about 1,475 were the only ones accessing the evening hours. “I think we’re acting responsibly,” she added. “The demand for our services is increasing. It was the responsible decision to make to serve the clients.”

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If you’re thankful and you know it, raise your hand: These Grade 3 and 4 students showed a little outside the Xbox thinking when teacher Derek Cockram asked them to write what they were thankful for.

Counting their blessings Big Bang, God, vegetables and chinchillas all make the gratitude list for this Grade 3-4 class Don Hauka staff reporter

When Derek Cockram gave his students a Thanksgiving writing assignment, the last thing he expected was to be blown away by their explosive, outside the Xbox thinking. The Burnaby teacher got a lesson in cosmic gratitude when he asked his split Grade 3-4 class to write three paragraphs about what they were thankful for. Cockram told his 22 students at Taylor Park Elementary School to focus on family, things and knowledge that they were grateful for. Some of the answers blew his mind. “Every year there’s something,” said Cockram. “This year, it was the ‘knowledge of the universe’ response

that I found really remarkable.” Students in the multiculturally Along with many expressions of diverse class expressed their apprethanks for things like friends and ciation of God’s goodness with honfamily, Xbox games, pets and other est and refreshing simplicity. possessions, Cockram found one of “I am thankful for God because his students boldly going where none he always helps me and listens to my had before. wishes,” wrote Nicole. “If “I am thankful for there were no God my “I am thankful knowledge of the uniwishes wouldn’t come for knowledge verse because it is very true, and I wouldn’t be weird that space never happy.” of the universe ends and that the Big Chloe, in addition because it is very to And Bang is still happening,” being grateful for her weird that space chinchillas and parents, wrote Howard. “There are an infinthanks God for granting never ends and ity of galaxies in space. wisdom – among other that the Big Bang things. Without this knowledge I would think that space “I am thankful for God is still would end and the world because he made everyhappening.” would never end and stars thing and all of us. He are made of rocks.” helps us think and conHOWARD Cockram was also surcentrate. If God was not Taylor Park student prised by the number of alive we wouldn’t be as his students who thanked smart as we are now,” God they’re alive – literally. Chloe wrote. “I found the responses that talkCockram has given a Thanksgiving ed about God very surprising,” said writing assignment to his classes for Cockram. Thanksgiving Page 10

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A10 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

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Don Hauka/burnaby now

An attitude of gratitude: These Grade 3 and 4 students at Taylor Park Elementary School are grateful for everything from their grandparents to gravity.

‘I am thankful for every bit of knowledge’ What are Grade 3-4 students at Taylor Park thankful for? Samples of Derek Cockram’s class writing responses: ◆ I am thankful for the air. Without the air I would be choking. Without the air the world would be like mars. I am thankful for the ground. Without the ground I would be falling through the world. I am thankful for every bit of knowledge. Without knowledge I wouldn’t be typing here and Canada wouldn’t exist because we originated from Africa and if our ancestors didn’t know anything they wouldn’t move here to North America. – Andrew ◆ I am grateful for my grandma and grandpa because he plants the garden and they cook food for the family. I am thankful for my grandma because she washes the clothes and socks and she also walks me to school. I am thankful for the trees, because they give us oxygen. Without them, we don’t have clean air to breath. I am also thankful for the plants. With the plants and the trees we won’t get floods and the grass, because they make the earth more green and beautiful so easily because we won’t have so much water in the ground. – Sarah ◆ I am thankful for my dad because he drives me to school. I am thankful for my mom because she cooks vegetables for me to eat. I am also thankful for my sister because she plays hide and seek with me. I am thankful for my bunny, Ruby, because she is so cute. When she drinks water, she stands up. I am thankful for Social Studies because it is active and you can learn more history.

– Catherine

◆ I am thankful for my family: My mom for caring for me and cooking food for the family. She helps clean the house with my dad and me. I am thankful for my dad for working hard at work and earning money for the family. I am thankful for my little sister, Daisy, for sharing her candy and chocolate with me. I am thankful for my friends for playing with me when I am bored and lonely with nobody to play with. My friends care for me and sometimes give me presents. I am thankful for all the teachers that have helped me learn because without them, I wouldn’t learn anything. – Maggie ◆ I am thankful for my family, my pet cat, my friends and my little friend Lily the ladybug. My family and friends give me care. If I didn’t have them I would be sad, poor and homeless. I wouldn’t learn the ABCs, and I wouldn’t learn 1+1=2. I am thankful for my dolls because they keep me company. Without them I would feel absolutely, positively left out. Without my dolls I wouldn’t have anyone to cuddle at bedtime. I am thankful for God since he created food and created me. If God was not there I would not exist and there would not be any food for people and animals. This is what I am thankful for. – Mia ◆ I am thankful for books because some can be very interesting. I like Captain Underpants. If I didn’t have books there wouldn’t be any reading. – Deyan Read more of the students’ responses online at www.burnabynow.com.

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For his part, he’s thankful for what he reads in each year’s Thanksgiving writing assignment. “It reinforces my belief that kids are grateful,” he said. “Not just for things, but kids are grateful to be alive.”

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Thanksgiving: Kids have gratitude the past several years. Originally from Kingston, Ontario, he attended both Queen’s and Simon Fraser Universities. Cockram has been teaching for over 10 years and in Burnaby for the past four.

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A11

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Imagining a more inclusive world Burnaby mother-daughter duo publishes book with message of acceptance

T

he small hardcover book on Angela Louie’s kitchen counter is far more than just a children’s storybook. It’s a tale that grew out of her desire to share an important message with the world about inclusion and acceptance – and it’s one small step towards a mission to change that world. “If everybody took the message from this book, the world would be a better place,” she says. ON MY BEAT She laughs a Julie MacLellan little, realizing that “changing the world” may be a lofty goal for a book. But it’s a genuine intent of The Possibility Tree – the original story by Louie that takes the form of a Chinese folk tale. It’s been published with illustrations by Louie’s daughter, India Eliot Oates. The book, which Louie describes as a “storybook for adults,” tells the story of Lan, a young girl who learns about her unique gifts and place in the world after being chosen to study with Master Ming. The story grew out of Louie’s professional work as a speaker. With a background in mental health work, she gives many presentations about various aspects of recovery, hopes and dreams. She found herself wanting to have some story that could tie all the aspects of her speeches together. She started to write, and gradually, a folk-tale-like story emerged. Which is when she had the idea that the story should have some illustrations. She turned to her daughter, India, a Cariboo Hill Secondary student who’s always been an artist. “I really liked the idea,” India recalls. “I thought that was so cool.” India notes that, at the time, she was around 13 and didn’t have any experience doing illustrations for a book. So the whole process was a large learning curve for her. “It turned out to be so much more difficult than I thought,” admits the young artist, who’s now turning 17. The two collaborated on the look, feel and tone of the illustrations. The first one India did – which remains her favourite – was an acrylic painting of a young girl next to a large tree, all in burnished autumnal tones, that is now the cover of the book. The illustrations within are done in watercolour, reflecting a feel of Chinese brush painting. None of the illustrated characters have faces – a deliberate artistic decision. “Because it’s a parable, it gave it a certain universal kind of feel,” Louie explains. “You can relate it to your own life,” India adds. It was thanks to Louie’s husband, Allan de la Plante, that the story became a published book. “When he read the story, he said, ‘This

Photos contributed/burnaby now

Family talent: Angela Louie watches daughter India Oates at work on a new art project. The two have recently published their first book, The Possibility Tree, which takes the form of a folktale and carries a message of acceptance.

is great, this needs to be a book,’” Louie recalls. She hadn’t considered publishing the work before, she notes. But her husband – a photographer and author – has experience with publishing and was able to navigate her through the world of selfpublishing. They chose to work with Friesen Press in Victoria, and Louie is now learning about the business end of art. “That’s quite foreign to me,” she admits. She’s working hard to get the book into as many hands as possible. It’s currently being translated in to French, and she’s also looking at the possibility of publishing it in China. “I’d love it to get picked up in China,” she says. “I think that’s where it belongs.” Louie has also created a facilitator and teacher’s guide, so she’s hoping to approach educators about using it to help discuss the themes of the book: appreciation of your own gifts, appreciation of the gifts of others, and finding your own place in the world. Though she wrote it as an adult story, she notes it’s accessible and short enough for young readers and would be particularly appropriate for the eight- to 11-yearold set. “I’d love to see it being used with kids. I’d love to see it in parents’ hands, grandparents’ hands,” she says. “I’d love to have it being a seed just to change the way people view people in their own neighbourhood.” Louie notes that, in her background working with people with mental health

Sharing a message:

Angela Louie and daughter India Oates with copies of their first book, The Possibility Tree. It tells the story of a young girl who finds her place in the world after being chosen to study with a renowned master. and substance abuse issues, she has seen what happens when people aren’t included. “In our society we’ve got so many people who are marginalized, and we are very limited and narrow in terms of who we think is worthy,” Louie says. This story is a counter to all of that, she says, and she hopes it makes people ask the key question: “How do we include and appreciate the gifts everybody brings?” After this, there’s a chance mother and daughter may work together again – Louie notes that India has a huge amount of art work of various styles that lends itself to storytelling.

India herself is already at work illustrating another book and has applied to Emily Carr University of Art and Design for next year, after high school graduation. The teen, like her mother, wants to try to get The Possibility Tree into as many people’s hands as possible. “It’s important to do this, to introduce this message to everybody,” she says. The Possibility Tree is available online at www.friesenpress.com/bookstore, as well as through Amazon and Chapters online. It is also available for order from most book retailers. For more about the book, see www. angelalouie.com.


A12 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

Royal Columbian nets $660,000 plus in one day Stefania Seccia staff reporter

Former Vancouver Canucks goalie Kirk McLean is still making saves, but this time it’s to help save lives. Royal Columbian Hospital not only reached its fundraising goal but exceeded it by receiving more than $660,000 on Oct. 8, which was its donation day. The day included a visit from McLean, who personally dropped off a gift of more than $10,000. Another donator was Kelley Backman, who said his father, Ben Backman,

received great care at Royal Columbian. He committed $11,500 towards an equipment purchase on the hospital’s long wish list. “Our dad and founder of Kingston Construction … was impressed with the care he received at RCH, and was happy to give back,” Backman said in a media release. “Since he passed in 2009, our family business continues to support RCH in dad’s memory.” The donations will go towards the determined needs of the hospital, which serves about 1.7 million people in the region. “Royal Columbian

Hospital Foundation is extremely grateful to all its donors,” said Adrienne Bakker, president and CEO of Royal Columbian, in the release. “Between phone calls, online gifts, walk-in donations, corporate and community organization gifts, we exceeded expectations.” Bakker also said the funding will help the medical teams continue to provide “outstanding and compassionate” health care. For further information or to donate, visit rchcares. com or call 604-520-4438.

Making saves:

From left, Adrienne Bakker, president and CEO for Royal Columbian, with former Canuck goalie Kirk McLean and CaseyJo Loos, radio host, at Royal Columbian on Oct. 8 Contributed/ burnaby now

sseccia@burnabynow.com

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A13

Unique mental health resource finding its way Stefania Seccia staff reporter

“One of our main services will be supporting the person in the meal plan,” she said. “So meeting them to do meals, and often after meals are very difficult, so we’ll engage in what’s called post-meal support, which is things like coping mechanism skills, like distraction. Just anything to get them through that difficult period to just having eaten, which is often difficult for a lot of clients. Clients sometimes will purge, so we will be there just to help them choose not to do that.” Martin said they’re business’s mandate is to help move clients away from their eating disorder and “into life.” “To establish life goals and start to move towards meeting,” she said. “What happens when somebody gets an eating disorder, they become so focused on their illness that they lose the perspective they need to develop their talents and hobbies and to move towards being part of their community in work and whatever they would like to do. They lose it. The eating

It’s not usually an option for someone with an eating disorder to call and have a health-care professional show up at their door to help – but a new Burnaby-based private service is aiming to fix that. Burnaby residents Kathy Martin, a registered nurse, and Heather MacPherson, a youth and family counsellor, joined forces to start a new private business unlike any other, called Life Redefined Eating Disorders Support Services. “We met about six years ago and found we have similar interests in that she (Martin) is in the eating disorder field and I was in school at the time, and wanted to (study) eating disorders when I finished my degree,” said MacPherson. “I just noticed a need in the community with a lot more people that were struggling and noticed that needs were just not being met like they could be.” Martin has worked for 30 years at Disorder Page 14 a local hospital in the specialized eating disorders unit. MacPherson has several years experience working with people with eating disorders and mental health issues. “I noticed that when clients are in hospital, they do well and often the hospital will help to restore their body weight. But they’re often not able to help with restoring the mind, which is what needs to be restored after the body weight and it can take a long time,” Martin said. The local nurse noted a lack of resources means a lack of support for the clients who get their body back to a healthy weight and are sent home. “We often have a bit of a revolving door, and people come back,” she said. “For instance, a youth will start coming into the hospital at age 12 or 13, and still be coming to the hospital at age 17. Buying or building your own home? Find out about your rights, We support them as much as obligations and information that can help you make a more informed we can within the limits that we have. There’s something purchasing decision. else needed, there’s always Visit the B.C. government’s Homeowner Protection Office (HPO) something else needed. They website for free consumer information. don’t have what it takes, or their families don’t have what it takes.” MacPherson said the hospital environment isn’t real% 2#> =&:#G B#HDGE!( ) '85 &CE D" ;8( F&:# !#HDGE#!#5 >DEF EF# =/1ity, either, as they’re not only % 7;8 9# <#H;<<( &*#!#5 "&! G;<# time limited, but it’s difficult % F;G ; $&<D7( &" F&:# >;!!;8E( D8GC!;87# for people to transition when they go home. % DG 9CD<E 9( ; 6D7#8G#5 B#GD5#8ED;< 3CD<5#! &! ;8 &>8#! 9CD<5#! “We wanted to meet the % B#HDGE!( &" 6D7#8G#5 B#GD5#8ED;< 3CD<5#!G needs of the people in their community, in their home, the day to day, because in reality you’re not going to % Residential Construction Performance Guide ) ?8&> >F#8 E& '<# ; F&:# be living in a hospital, so we warranty insurance claim want to try and help people live at home – while get% Buying a Home in British Columbia Guide ting healthy and working % Guide to Home Warranty Insurance in British Columbia towards recovery,” she said. % Maintenance Matters bulletins and videos The service is not limited % @C9G7!D9# E& 7&8GC:#! $!&E#7ED&8 $C9<D7;ED&8G to people coming out of the hospital, but for “anybody that’s struggling” with an eating disorder, MacPherson www.hpo.bc.ca noted. Toll-free: 1-800-407-7757 A client will have to get a Email: hpo@hpo.bc.ca meal plan from a registered dietician, and MacPherson said they have one they’ll refer to clients.

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Burnaby residents Kathy Martin, left, and Heather MacPherson have started a new business to help those with an eating disorder. For a video, scan with

Larry Wright/burnaby now

Five Ways to Get the Most Out of Your Home Warranty Insurance Buyers of new homes in B.C. are protected by Canada’s strongest construction defect insurance. Those who learn as much as they can about their home warranty insurance will get the most out of their coverage. 1. Make note of each coverage expiry date. The home warranty insurance provided on new singlefamily and multi-family homes built for sale in B.C. protects ;H;D8GE 5D*#!#8E 5#"#7EG "&! G$#7D'7 $#!D&5G &" ED:#0 including 2 years on labour and materials (some limits apply), 5 years on the building envelope (including water $#8#E!;ED&84 ;85 +, (#;!G &8 EF# GE!C7EC!#. B#AD#> (&C! policy for details. 2. Know what’s covered and what isn’t. Make sure you understand the extent and limitations of your coverage by reading through your insurance documents. You can also search the HPO’s free online Residential Construction Performance Guide. 3. Make a claim. If you need to make a claim for defects not otherwise taken care of by your builder, be sure to send details in writing to your warranty provider prior to the expiry of coverage. 4. Maintain your home. Maintain your home to protect your coverage, and if you receive a maintenance manual for your home, read it and follow it. 5. Learn more. Check out the Homeowner Protection Office’s Guide to Home Warranty Insurance in British Columbia, a free download from www.hpo.bc.ca.


A14 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

Best in show: From

left, Joyce Chow, of Fortinet, accepts an Employer Recognition Award with Mauricio Barrios Silva, hired by Fortinet, Yijin Wen, of MOSAIC, and Eva Frozina, employment counsellor. Contributed/ burnaby now

staff reporter

Local immigrant-serving organization MOSAIC presented network security giant Fortinet Technology with its Employer Recognition Award recently. MOSAIC has two offices in Burnaby and a large percentage of its clients are from the area. It presented Fortinet with the award at its annual general meeting on Sept. 26. “It’s a truly humbling experience,” said Joyce Chow, Fortinet’s human resources manager, in a media release. “We feel so lucky that organizations like MOSAIC exist to connect us with qualified professionals who also have the added benefit of international experience and connections.”

Founded in 1973, MOSAIC is a multilingual, non-profit organization that links immigrants, refugees and newcomers with employment and services. “MOSAIC salutes Fortinet and all of the companies that we work with who are leaders in hiring newcomers,” said Joan Anderson, MOSAIC’s director of employment and language programs, in the release. The award’s criteria are to recognize employers for leadership and commitment in providing a workplace that supports the principles of multiculturalism and equity by having a diverse, multicultural staff. For the past two years, Fortinet has actively participated in MOSAIC’s job fairs, employer presentations, hired a number of newcomers, regularly sub-

Disorder: More help is needed continued from page 13

disorder basically steals everything they have. We want our service to be quite varied. So, if someone needed help applying for a job or putting in a resume, or anything like that, volunteering, just to help them get back to see that there’s more to life than their eating disorder because they really don’t understand that.” Martin and MacPherson note their business faces some challenges right now, including the fact that they are only a two-member team and the cost of the services they provide – as those are not covered by medical. However, MacPherson said the duo hope to eventually become a registered non-profit society. “We want to try and open a non-profit society so people, companies, corporations can donate and receive a tax receipt and … the money (will) be used to be given as grants for individuals who can’t afford it,” she added. “In reality, those who have a pretty severe eating disorder, they aren’t able to work, so it’s going to be up to family and friends to be able to pay for the service. We foresee that as a problem. and we’re looking for ways to rectify it by making it a society eventually.” For more information about Life Redefined, visit www. liferedefinedeatingdisorders.com.

Seminars for Parents! SUPPORTING YOUR CHILD’S LEARNING November 4, 2013 PATT CAFÉ (a casual forum on schools and education: parents bring questions and topics) January 15, 2014 INTERNET AWARENESS FOR PARENTS April 3, 2014

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mitted job openings and provided letters of support to the government to continue its funding to MOSAIC’s various programs, according to the release. Past recipients of the award include Vancity, Coastal Contacts, B.C. Hydro, Vancouver Coastal Health and Safeway, among others. For more information about MOSAIC, visit www. mosaicbc.com.

TIME: All seminars begin at 7:00 pm Space is limited - Please RSVP to bta5@telus.net Presented by the Burnaby Teachers’ Association

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A15

Time-saving cleaning tricks

H

ouse cleaning is a chore few people relish. House cleaning can be monotonous and time-consuming. But ignoring cleaning tasks may leave you with a much larger mess to tackle. • Do the dishes after every meal. A sink full of dishes can make the kitchen look like a mess, and letting dishes pile up increases the risk of an insect infestation. Although it may seem like a chore, keeping on top of dishes actually reduces your workload. If you’re lucky enough to have an automatic dishwasher, then load dishes directly into the dishwasher instead of putting dirty items into the sink.

FABULOUSLY GREEN

• Switch your soap. Glycerin or liquid soaps do not have traditional binders that are in many bar soaps. Without the binders, which are the primary cause of soap scum, you will have to contend with much less soap scum in showers and sinks. To further cut down on soap scum, use a small, flexible squeegee to wipe down tile walls and glass doors after each shower. • Work from the top down. Dust and dirt settles at the lowest levels. Avoid messing up what you have just cleaned by beginning any cleaning task high up and moving downward. Therefore, dust shelves and cobwebs from ceiling corners first, then tackle tables and other surfaces before ultimately cleaning the floors.

• Do laundry every day. Invest in a hamper that enables you to sort clothing into different compartments, including lights, darks and delicates. This way the sorting is already done when it comes time for washing. Then aim to do a load a day so that you’re not faced with 100 pounds of laundry come the weekend.

• Establish a drop zone. Foyers tend to accumulate a lot of clutter. Organize the space so you’re less tempted to drop items as soon as you come in. Keep the recycling bin (or shredder) handy for dealing with junk mail. Have a coat rack for hats, coats and umbrellas. Keep a basket available so you can transport items that belong in other rooms in the house.

• Rely on baking soda and vinegar as cleaning products. These kitchen staples are the workhorses of many cleaning projects. A mix of baking soda and vinegar can dislodge a clogged drain and be added to a wash to freshen towels and linens. A paste of baking soda can often scour tough stains, like marker, while vinegar has been known to neutralize pet odors from accidents.

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A16 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

FOR THE BIRDS Fly away:

Burnaby Arts Council artist in residence Olive Leung displays her bird, created from recycled material, at the Deer Lake Gallery on Sept. 29, as part of the Worldwide Bird Art Installation for Culture Days.

www.burnabynow.com

For more photos, scan with

Larry Wright/burnaby now

Keeping hedge pots green GREEN SCENE Anne Marrison

Question: I recently moved into a top-floor Vancouver condo with a lovely terrace, which faces west and south making it extremely hot. I shall have a planter of about 10’ (3m) long and 24-inches deep (60cm). What type of budget-priced hedging would be suitable? I need something evergreen, heat-tolerant, dense growth but not in constant need of pruning

and maximum height 3-4’ (11.2m). Scent/flowers would be a miracle addition. – Eva, by email Answer: It would be useful to check with your neighbours who have similar south-west exposures and find out what winters are like in your location. Do their planters ever freeze? Are there high winds from the west? Is your building very close to the coast? There are some evergreen, flowering, fragrant shrubs (like ceanothus) which would surely tempt you, but it needs a warm, sheltered spot. The sides of containers are very vulnerable to freezing and containerized plants need to

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Normally it’s about 12” (30cm) tall, but there are taller forms. Another which you might like so much that you decide to plunge for a 12” hedge is Daphne cneorum. This is pronounced ‘neeorum’ and its common name is the Garland Flower. It produces hugely fragrant pink flowers, has small evergreen leaves, spreads to 3-4’ feet across and is prairie-hardy (zone 2). It’s likely to end up overflowing the sides of the planter. This is so popular, it’s usually the most inexpensive of the daphnes. I hope this has given you a few ideas, Eva. The box and juniper are the most fuss-free.

of the

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be one zone hardier than ones planted in the open garden. Box (Buxus microphylla) usually grows 3-4’ tall, is dense and needs little pruning It likes sun, but needs watering in dry spells. There are many varieties of box but B. microphylla is one of the hardiest. Junipers should also do well in your situation. Most are very hardy and drought-resistant. Some are dwarf. Some other evergreen shrubs don’t meet all of your criteria, but are so nice you might be tempted. Cotoneaster dammeri is evergreen, dense and has white flowers in spring followed by red berries.

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A19

Have a thank-filled weekend in Burnaby

T

hanksgiving is val and the most importa’comin’, and while ant festival in Bengal, the many of us will be release adds. The celebradevouring delicious dintion is open to all people ners with loved ones this of all faiths. It is a five-day weekend, there are plenty non-stop festival, which of other things to do in the began yesterday and city – including a Hindu runs until Monday, at the autumn festiHindu temple at val, high school 3885 Albert St. reunions and a For more inforThanksgiving mation, go to skate. We’re conwww.utsab.ca. Get reunited tinuing with our – that is, if popular feature you attended – our staff’s Top 5 Burnaby North (Or More) Things Secondary To Do This School in 1963 or Weekend. Here’s Burnaby South our Top 5 list for (or more) Oct. 11 to 13. Things to do Secondary School Get laughing this weekend in 1973. Both classes are holdwith Boeinging reunions this Boeing, the classic Saturday. The Burnaby farce about a swinging North reunion is at the bachelor and his slightly Executive Plaza Hotel, turbulent life, which is 405 North Rd., Coquitlam. coming to the Shadbolt For more information, call Centre stage as part of the 604-802-8772. The Burnaby Arts Club on Tour series. South reunion is in the Boeing-Boeing is on stage Fraser room at Sheraton at the Shadbolt tonight Vancouver Guildford at 8 p.m. Tickets for the Hotel. For more informaBurnaby show are $42, tion and to register, go to or $38 for seniors and http://burnabysouth students. Tickets are availreunion2013.webs.com or able online through www. email reunion2013@shaw. shadboltcentre.com or by ca. calling the box office at Get on the ice at the 604-205-3000. For more on Thanksgiving all-ages the production, see www. loonie skate on Monday artsclub.com. from noon until 3:30 p.m. Get celebrating the annual Hindu autumn The skate takes place at the Kensington Recreation festival, Durga Puja with Complex, at 6159 Curtis St. UTSAB – A Cultural This public skate is free for Heritage of Bengal. The children three years and festival welcomes the eteryounger. The ratio of chilnal mother of strength, dren to adults must not be power and wisdom, greater than 3 to 1. Skates according to a press and helmets are included release from the organization. This annual Hindu in the admission fee. Skating bars are not availfestival is celebrated all able during loonie skates. over the world in honour of the Hindu goddess For more information, call Durga. The worship of Ma 604-297-4535. Get walking in one of Durga in autumn is the Burnaby’s many parks year’s largest Hindu festi-

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Follow the Burnaby NOW

Don’t miss any of our coverage, even if you’re out of town or away from home. Check out the Burnaby NOW online at www.burnabynow.com for all the news you’d find in our print edition, plus a variety of web-exclusive material, including photo galleries, reader photos and breaking news. Readers can follow us on Twitter, @BurnabyNOW_ news, or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ BurnabyNOW. Our reporters are online too, including, Jennifer Moreau (@JenniferMoreau), Janaya Fuller-Evans (@ janayafe), Cayley Dobie (@CayleyDobie), Julie MacLellan (@juliemaclellan) and Tom Berridge (@ThomasBerridge). Most of our reporters are online at Facebook, too: just search them by name to find their accounts. editorial@burnabynow.com

with friends and family this weekend. Take a stroll around Burnaby Lake or wander along Deer Lake and check out the many cultural offerings in the area. There are plenty of spots for a crisp fall walk in the city, so check out those changing leaves and get a little fresh air. Email your Top 5 ideas to calendar@burnabynow.com or jfuller-evans@burnaby now.com. compiled by Janaya Fuller-Evans

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In Honour of International Newspaper Carrier Day on October 12, 2013 The Burnaby Now would like to thank all our newspaper carriers for making an important contribution to our community. We value the work you do!


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Cars available at time of printing - not exactly as illustrated. All prices are net of all incentives and are plus taxes, levies and $395 document fee. See Dealer for details. Financing on approved credit. Payments are bi-weekly. • 2014 Cruze LS TP: $10,714 Res. $6,866 2013 Chevy Spark: TP $14,584 • 2013 GMC Terrain TP: $29,925 • 2013 Chevy Malibu LT TP: $25,792 • 2013 Chevy Equinox TP: $27,825 • 2013 Buick Encore TP: $32,715 • 2013 Buick Regal GS TP: $42,700 • 2013 Buick Verano TP: $26,059 • 2013 Cadillac ATS TP: $18,048 Res. $17,419

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A22 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

Thankful for car family FULL THROTTLE Courtney Hansen

C

oming from an automotive family, where my father has some pretty serious racing accolades, it’s hard not to talk about them. In fact, I want to talk about them. Since the auto world is where I spend a lot of my time, I love to tell my dad’s racing stories. What can I say? I am a proud daughter. But the beautiful truth is that my entire family is full of automotive enthusiasts. I’d like to introduce you to the rest of the Hansens. My mom has never been the extravagant type. She is completely down to earth and more interested in comfort and practicality in living and driving. And she is a natural beauty. She easily looks 10 years younger than she is, and if I had a dollar for every time someone told me my mom is beautiful, I would be a very rich woman. While my dad did a lot of the driving in our family when we were young, mom would often operate our monster GMC motor home on long drives while we kids slept or played. And while not desirous of flashy things, this did not prevent her from wanting a 1985 Corvette . . . in red. She waited for the car to arrive as per her desired specifications and was thrilled when it was finally ready for pickup from the dealership in Minneapolis, Minn., which is where we all lived at the time. After sliding behind the wheel, she decided to test out her baby. She opened it up on the highway, only to be pulled over by a policeman who clocked her at about 110 m.p.h. (180 km/h). It must have been the big smile she flashed, or her charm when explaining to him that she was racing driver Jerry Hansen’s wife, and her explanation that she “just wanted to see what the Corvette was capable of,” because the officer let her off with a mild short lecture and a warning. My brother Frans is nine years older than

me. While I was running around and playing in the dirt with my younger sister at the track, Frans appreciated the technical side of racing, spent a lot of time in the pit area and became active in karting in his teens. Mom and dad really discouraged the path of auto racing for any of us. And to Frans, receiving an education from the University of Virginia and later becoming the owner of the company www. TheCruiseWeb.com, were his goals and his passion. But having the undeniable love for auto racing in his blood, he began competing a few years ago in local kart races. Apparently he got the racing gene from dad. My stepbrother John, nicknamed Jay, also revelled in hanging at the tracks during the racing years. We would tool around the track together on scooters, and when at the cabin, jet skis and fourwheelers. A lover of just about anything with an engine, Jay also became involved in karting, doing it for fun in his teens. Always very technical and mechanical, Jay decided that he wanted to build and work on his own kart, and so he did. I recall hanging out in his garage during the process, greatly impressed by his abilities with a wrench. And a special moment stands out in my mind. During one of his races at Brainerd, Minn., Jay’s dad Chuck sat gripping his chair in excitement as Jay came in second. It was a proud and emotional time. My sister Jordyn is perhaps the biggest daredevil of the family and a bigger automotive enthusiast than any of us. At the ripe old age of four, she was riding small motorcycles, driving speedboats, snowmobiles and any other fun vehicle she could get her hands on. My dad loves to tell a story that compares Jordyn’s gutsy personality with my cautious one. While taking me around the racetrack during a victory lap, I yelled out in fear, “Dad slow down, slow down.” When Jordyn got her turn at a victory lap, she yelled, “Faster Daddy! Faster!” My favourite story about Jordyn involves the late, great Paul Newman,

who was a dear family friend. The racing bug bit Paul later in life, and that quickly consumed him. He actually befriended my father in an effort to become a better race driver. It would be a lifelong relationship. Paul raced cars into his 80s.

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Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, >, †, ∞, ‡, §, € The All Out Clearout Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating dealers on or after October 2, 2013. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,595–$1,695) and excludes licence, insurance, registration, any dealer administration fees, other dealer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Dealer may sell for less. •$19,998 Purchase Price applies to 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E) only and includes $8,100 Consumer Cash Discount. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select new 2013 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. >3.99% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,880 financed at 3.99% over 96 months with $0 down payment, equals 416 weekly payments of $47 with a cost of borrowing of $2,844 and a total obligation of $19,724. †0.0% purchase financing for 36 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance on 2012/2013 Jeep Compass, Patriot and 2013 Dodge Dart models. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,980, with a $0 down payment, financed at 0.0% for 36 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $217.69; cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $16,980. ∞$5,125 in Total Discounts available at participating dealers on the purchase of a new 2013 Dodge Journey SXT with Ultimate Journey Package (JCDP4928K). Discount consists of: (i) $2,000 in Consumer Cash, (ii) $2,500 in Bonus Cash that will be deducted from the negotiated price after taxes; and (iii) $625 in no-cost options hat will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Some conditions apply. See your dealer for complete details. ‡4.19% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Example: 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package/2013 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package with a Purchase Price of $19,998 (including applicable Consumer Cash Discounts) financed at 4.19% over 96 months with $0 down payment equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $113 with a cost of borrowing of $3,555 and a total obligation of $23,553. §2013 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $29,495. 2013 Dodge Dart GT shown. Price: $24,590. €$9,250 in Cash Discounts are available on new 2013 Ram 1500 models (excluding Reg Cab) and consist of $9,250 in Consumer Cash Discounts. See your dealer for complete details. ¤Based on 2013 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km (36 MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). 2013 Dodge Journey SE 2.4 L 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.7 L/100 km (37 MPG) and City: 11.2 L/100 km (25 MPG). 2013 Dodge Dart AERO (Late Availability) – Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.3 L/100 km (39 MPG). ^Based on 2013 Ward’s Middle Cross Utility segmentation. **Based on 2013 Ward’s upper small sedan costing under $25,000. ≠Based on Automotive News classification and 2013 Ram 1500 3.6 L V6 4x2 and 8-speed transmission. 11.4 L/100 km (25 MPG) City and 7.8 L/100 km (36 MPG) Highway. Based on 2013 EnerGuide fuel consumption guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. Ask your dealer for complete EnerGuide information. The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications LLC, used under license. ❖Real Deals. Real Time. Use your mobile device to build and price any model. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

A24 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A25

On the coast:

While camping for a few days in Astoria, Oregon, Eva Li, Alex Hui and eightyear-old Harrison Hui visited the wreck of the Peter Iredale, which sank in 1906, on the beach of Fort Stevens Park.

THE WORLD I N B U R N A BY The World in Burnaby needs your help to make our city the most welcoming community to newcomers! Here are some ways you can go the extra mile: Tip #21 - Visit a newcomers’ home. Invite them to your home. Tip #49 - If you speak another language, offer to help translate. Tip #95 - Learn about the services that are available to immigrants in your community. Visit www.worldinburnaby.com to make a pledge to welcome a newcomer and challenge stereotypes Tweet us #WorldInBurnaby

Sandy history: Helen Soderholm and her For more Paper family travelled to Crete, Greece. This photo Postcards, scan was taken at the Fortezza in Rethymon, in with front of the Sultan Ibrahim Mosque.

Take a trip with our Paper Postcards From the misty heights of Machu Picchu to the sandy shores of Cuba, our readers have been everywhere, and they have the photos to prove it. If you would like to be featured in Paper Postcards, take a copy of the Burnaby NOW along with you on your next trip. Take a photo of yourself in front of a scenic backdrop or landmark, holding the newspaper.

Send your photos by email to postcards@burnabynow.com or send by mail to Burnaby NOW, 201A-3430 Brighton Ave., Burnaby, B.C., V5A 3H4. Include the names of everyone in the picture and a few details about your trip. For a full online gallery of the NOW’s previous Paper Postcards, go to www. burnabynow.com. Happy trails! editorial@burnabynow.com

Facebook.com/worldinburnaby


A26 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

CALENDAR OF EVENTS UNTIL MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 Leadership Training Program, for immigrant, refugee and visible minority women who have experienced abuse or want to help other women in the community. Light refreshments and child-minding will be provided for this free program put on by the Vancouver & Lower Mainland Multicultural Family Support Services Society. Mondays from 10 a.m. to noon at Burnaby-Metrotown. For info and to register, call Anna at 604-436-1025, ext. 129 or email volunteers@vlmfss.ca.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11 TO MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 UTSAB - A Cultural Heritage of Bengal, celebrates Durga Puja, welcoming the eternal mother of strength, power and wisdom. This is an annual Hindu festival celebrated all over the world to worship the Hindu goddess, Durga. The worship of Ma Durga in autumn is the year’s largest Hindu festival and the most important festival in Bengal. The celebration is open to all people of all faiths. It is a five-day, non-stop festival at the Hindu temple at 3885 Albert St.. For more information, go to www.utsab.ca.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 50th reunion for the Burnaby North class of ‘63, at the Executive Plaza Hotel, 405 North Rd., Coquitlam. For more information, call 604802-8772. Burnaby South Secondary School 40th grad reunion, class of ’73 and invitation to

classes from ’70 to ’74. Fraser Room at Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel. For more information and to register, go to burnabysouth reunion2013.webs.com or email reunion2013@shaw.ca.

WEDNESDAY, OCT 16 Swing to Swedish fiddling, listen and dance to the unforgettable music of Swedish band Grävvå – traditional Swedish fiddling at its best. At the Scandinavian Community Centre, 6540 Thomas St., at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10. Presented by the Scandinavian Dancers of Vancouver. Sponsored by the Swedish Cultural Society.

THURSDAY, OCT. 17 History in the Heights, from 7 to 8 p.m., McGill branch, Burnaby Public Library, 4595 Albert St. Back by popular demand. Speakers from the Burnaby Village Museum and Burnaby Archives will tell fascinating stories about the pioneer era of the Burnaby Heights neighbourhood, and give tips for researching local history. Presented by the Heights Neighbourhood Association and Burnaby Public Library. More information at bpl.bc.ca/events/his tory-in-the-heights-1. Free but space is limited; please register online, by calling 604 299-8955, or in person at the library.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 Speak clearer – techniques in accent reduction, 7 to 8 p.m. at the Bob Prittie Metrotown branch, 6100 Willingdon Ave. Jeff Madigan from the L2

Accent Reduction Centre will present speaking tips and information on his software tools. This is a free workshop presented by Burnaby Public Library in partnership with SUCCESS. Registration is required. Please register with SUCCESS at 604-684-1628.

ROTARY Coats for Kids

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 Getting to know dementia, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Holiday Inn Metrotown, 4405 Central Blvd. This introductory session reviews information about Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, Pre-registration is required. Please call 604-298-0780. Confused about life after high school, or puzzled on what post-secondary faculty to enroll in? Unsure what kinds of financial aids are out there? Tian-Jin Community is hosting a free event from 6 to 9 p.m. at 3426 Smith Ave., to help you decide on what to do upon graduating high school. Light refreshments provided. Seats are limited; please call 604-568-9880 to reserve your seat. Second part takes place on Sunday at the same time. CWL Bazaar, doors open from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at St Francis de Sales Church basement, 6610 Balmoral St. This year’s bazaar has an area dedicated to crafters with wool, crochet yarn, embroidery floss, transfers, patterns etc. Also a large variety of new toys and new children’s books along with fresh Okanagan apples. Stop by for a homemade lunch. A great opportunity to start Christmas shopping.

The 11th Annual Rotary Coats for Kids campaign is now underway! You can help children and youth in Burnaby by donating: ! new or “gently” used waterproof hooded winter coats ! cash/cheque ($20 will buy a new coat; tax receipts available for $15+) All coats will be distributed directly to Burnaby children and youth in need by the Rotary Club of Burnaby Metrotown. FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, COAT DONATIONS CAN BE DROPPED OFF AT: Any of the Burnaby Public Libraries (Sept. 8 – Oct. 31): Cameron, McGill, Metrotown, Tommy Douglas South Burnaby Neighbourhood House (Sept. 8 – Dec. 31): 4845 Imperial Street, Burnaby The UPS Store (Edmonds location only) (Sept. 8 – Dec. 31): #105-7655 Edmonds Street, Burnaby Staples Stores: 5821 Marine Way (Sept. 8 – Nov. 30) 4561 Kingsway (Sept. 8 – Nov. 30) 4265 Lougheed Highway (Oct. 15 – Nov. 30)

For more information: burnabymetrotownrotary.org rotarycoatsforkids@gmail.com 604-431-0400

CASH/CHEQUE DONATIONS CAN BE DROPPED OFF AT THE SOUTH BURNABY NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE OR MAILED TO ROTARY CLUB OF BURNABY METROTOWN, BOX 266, 105 – 7655 EDMONDS ST, BURNABY, BC,

V3H 0C2. ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE TO HAVE YOUR CHEQUE PICKED UP BY CALLING 604-323-6756.

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A27


A28 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

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Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A29

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A30 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

SOLO DISTRICT SETS A NEW RECORD

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350 SUITES SOLD The majority of buyers will call this community home (versus simply investing) — this is a breakthrough in real estate history

THE JIM BOSA PERFECT HOME OWNERSHIP PLAN To create this iconic community of intelligent owners, Jim Bosa’s Appia Development introduces the PERFECT HOME OWNERSHIP PLAN to enable buyers to own and live in the Community.

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*Conditions and restrictions apply. This is not an offering for sale. Any such offering can only be made by way of disclosure statement. E.&.O.E.


Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A31


A32 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

GRAND OPENING SATURDAY OCT. 19TH


Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A33

34 A second gold medal 34 Two G-W’ers for ’Nuck 35 Showjumping photo SECTION COORDINATOR Tom Berridge, 604-444-3022 • tberridge@burnabynow.com

Rider and horse form winning Union New West show jumper looking for a long career Cayley Dobie staff reporter

It can be seen every year live from Spruce Meadows. Professional equestrian athletes race around the course, leaping over a variety of jumps, fences and obstacles. The movement of horse and rider is measured and elegant, but there’s a lot more to it. Showjumpingtakesconfidence, and until recently, Natasha Sukorokoff had none. Sukorokoff, a Royal City resident and current Douglas College student, quietly dominated the junior division of show jumping in B.C. last season. She garnered a total of 44 points throughout four competitions. “For the first two competitions it was mostly just focusing on actually winning, but once I did find out this (the Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships) was an end goal, it was in the back of my mind,” she said. Sukorokoff didn’t hear about the Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships until she’d already competed in two qualifying competitions. Lucky for her she’d won them both and went on to win the final two as well. Sukorokoff finished her equestrian season this August as the top junior show jumper in the prov-

Steelers off to best start in years Tom Berridge

sports editor

Larry Wright/burnaby now

Strong bond: Natasha Sukorokoff and mount Union S look to take a step up in height next season in the equestrian sport of showjumping. ince, winning herself a spot on Team B.C. She credits the newfound success to a new trainer and her own budding desire to win. “Lately I’ve gotten this really crazy competitive drive,” she said. This is something new for the 18-year-old athlete. About four years ago ,Sukorokoff was in a terrible car accident that traumatized her. She had to seek counseling for post-traumatic stress disorder and really

struggled with her riding. supposed to take no longer “I had a problem with than 37 seconds. going fast, and when “It’s a shortened course you’re in a timed event that’s really against the that’s not exactly how you clock, and that’s what want to ride,” she you points,” To view a wins said. she said. This season video scan But that soon with something changed changed. in Sukorokoff, she “I suddenly was suddenly gunstarted going really ning to go faster. fast and winning a In previous sealot and being really sons, events that demand- successful,” she said. ed a speedy rider, such as In her first jump-off this a jump-off, she could never season, she remembers run the course under 40 walking out and hearing seconds, even though it’s her time announced. The

judge called out 35 seconds, her best time ever. “I heard the time announced and that I was in first position, and I couldn’t stop smiling. I looked at my dad and I pumped my fist in the air because I was so overwhelmed with how much better I had become. It didn’t even matter if I won the class, … that in itself was a huge victory for me,” she said. Sukorokoff, along with Equestrian Page 35

Giants keep pace with first-place Rockets Tom Berridge

sports editor

Owen Stout’s fifth goal of the season in the opening minute of the first period stood up as the game-winner in the Northwest Giants’ 1-0 victory over the Greater Vancouver Canadians in Richmond on Sunday. The Giants also won the first game of the two-game weekend series with the Canadians 6-1 at the Burnaby Winter Club on Saturday. The back-to-back wins kept the Giants in a first-place tie in the B.C. major midget hockey league with the Okanagan Rockets, both with 5-1-0 records.

Last weekend, the Kelownabased Rockets downed the winless Thompson Blazers 6-3 in Kamloops before taking the weekend series with an 11-2 shellacking at home. “I thought it would be a bit of a cakewalk,” said Giants head coach Clint Thornton after the game-opening goal Sunday. “Then it turned into the Tavin Grant show.” Grant, who played last season with the Burnaby Minor AAA bantam team, was stellar between the pipes to register his first shutout in B.C. major midget hockey. On Saturday, Colton Kerfoot got the Giants off to another quick start at home, scoring the first of

two tallies 41 seconds after the puck dropped. Stout, with his first of two tallies, and Hockey Now minor hockey player of the year, Dante Fabbro, also scored for the Giants in the opening period. The Giants built a 5-0 lead before Cameron Ginnetti, a Burnaby Winter Club product, spoiled the shutout bid by Cody Porter six minutes into the final frame. Quinn Thompson also scored a goal for the first-place Giants in the middle period. Mitchell Stapely assisted on three goals for the Giants, while Justin Szeto of Burnaby helped out on a pair of markers. Both Stapely

and Szeto chalked up their eighth points of the season in the win. Although the Giants find themselves in a similar position atop the elite midget league, Thornton stresses this season is shaping up to be tighter than ever. “More than ever we have to strive to inspire,” Thornton said. “There’s a lot of good teams this year. We have to match their play and improve on it.” This weekend, the Giants face off with the Fraser Valley Thunderbirds, hosting Game 1 at the Burnaby Winter Club on Saturday at 7:45 p.m. Game 2 will be played at Prospera Place in Chilliwack on Sunday at 10 a.m.

Matteo Belmonte’s empty-net goal capped a winning week of hockey for the Grandview Steelers. The fourth-year junior’s second goal of the season gave the Burnaby Winter Club-based team a 3-2 victory over the visiting North Delta Devils on Sunday and a temporary first-place tie in the Pacific Junior Hockey League. Adam Cronier garnered first-star honours with 31 stops in the Steelers’ cage. A day earlier, Nicholas Bruyere kicked out 30 shots, including five in overtime, to ensure the Steelers a 2-2 draw with the North Vancouver Wolf Pack. Trailing 2-0 heading into the final period, Anthony Dispirito, with an unassisted marker, and Cameron Seto, with his first of the year from younger brother Christopher Seto and Lucas Mercer, sent the game into extra time. Earlier in the week, Grandview doubled the reigning national junior B Keystone Cup champion Richmond Sockeyes 2-1 on the road. Christopher Seto scored both goals, including the second-period game-winner on a power play from Mercer. Bruyere was the game’s second star, with 34 stops. Grandview head coach Aldo Bruno described the team’s strong start as “bit of a surprise.” “I’m really happy with the young kids,” Bruno said, adding the strong play in the back end is a particular improvement. “I think we’ve really tightened up in that area, and it shows so far.” With just two 20-yearolds on the roster and 12first-year players, including goalies Cronier and Bruyere, who are currently fourth and fifth, respectively, in overall goals against average, the Steelers look to make it two consecutive wins over Richmond when they host the Sockeyes at the winter club on Sunday. Game time is 4 p.m.


A34 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

SPORTS BRIEFS

COLLEGIATE SPORTS

SFU varsity fall to .500 at Dixie

ing drive, completing four passes to Tore Corrado, including a touchdown pass of nine yards to complete the scoring. Rushton completed 15 of 31 passes for 193 yards and one TD and one interception. Casey Chin led the Clan in tackles with 12, including the sharing in a sack of Dixie State’s QB Griff Robles. The loss left SFU with a 2-2 record in conference play. The Clan is on the road next week to Azusa Pacific.

Douglas striker named player of the week Douglas College freshman Shahbaz Khattra was the PacWest men’s soccer player of the week following a fivepoint weekend for the first-place Royals. Khattra came on as a second-half sub, scoring two goals and setting up a third in the Royals’ 3-0 win over Kwantlen University at Town Centre Stadium on Saturday. The following day, Khattra again scored the game-winner and assisted on another in a 2-0 victory in a return match with the Eagles. The back-to-back wins were the fifth and sixth in a row for the PacWest leaders. Khattra moved up to second in overall league scoring with five goals in eight games.

Fall from first

Larry Wright/burnaby now

On the prowl: The Moscrop Panthers, in black, upset Cariboo Hill 1-0 in BurWest high school senior boys’ soccer on Monday.

Fighter wins second world medal Scott Boudreau of Burnaby won his second consecutive world Brazilian JiuJitsu title last weekend. Boudreau, an instructor at Budo Mixed Martial Arts in Burnaby, captured the senior 1 lightweight purple belt division title at the world masters championships in Long Beach, California on Oct. 5. Last year, Boudreau became the first

fighter from Western Canada to win a gold medal, when he took the senior 1 lightweight title as a blue belt at the first-ever international masters federation championships. Boudreau defeated Joe Gemma of John Crouch Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in this year’s final. More than 1,800 competitors took part at this year’s masters, including 21 in Boudreau’s division.

EDC FC Burnaby fell out of first place in the Vancouver Metro Soccer League premier division following a scoreless draw with Croatia SC last Friday. Columbus FC moved past the Burnaby-based club into top spot following a goal and two assists by Steve DeBlasio in a 30 victory over Norvan on Saturday.

A rocky road

Simon Fraser University dropped a pair of exhibition road hockey games against NCAA Division I schools. The SFU club team lost 7-3 to Holy Cross and 3-0 to Sacred Heart last weekend.

101013

The Simon Fraser University football team fell to .500 following a 39-12 loss to Dixie State College last Saturday. Playing without starting quarterback Ryan Stanford, SFU gave up 430 yards of total offence and trailed the Red Storm 39-0 at one point before posting two late fourth-quarter scores. Mitchell Rushton took over from backup pivot Ryan Blum and engineered a couple of scores – the first on a two-yard run run by Burnaby’s Steve Spagnuolo and the second on the ensu-

Burnaby’s Mike Santorelli counted his second consecutive game-winning goal for the Vancouver Canucks this week. The free-agent signing was credited with the winner when a point shot from Jason Garrison went in off Santorelli in Tuesday’s 3-2 overtime win over the New Jersey Devils. The former Florida Panthers forward also deflected in the gamewinner in extra time from Kevin Bieksa in a two-goal effort in Vancouver’s 5-4 win over Calgary.


Burnaby NOW • Friday, October 11, 2013 • A35

Equestrian: Higher next year continued from page 33

seven other riders from B.C. headed out to Calgary for the Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships held in September. The team did well at the fledgling competition, which began only three years ago. B.C. took home a gold medal in show jumping and one in dressage, as well as a team bronze medal in dressage. While Sukorokoff didn’t earn a medal this year, she said she’d be interested in returning next season to try again. Until then, her horse, Union S, has a few more weeks of holidays before she’ll start training with him again. Next season, Sukorokoff is looking to advance to the 4-3 jumping division, and if she can do that she said she’ll be looking into a possible professional equestrian career. But for now she said she’s enjoying her remaining weeks of vacation before she and Union will be back together for more training.

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A40 • Friday, October 11, 2013 • Burnaby NOW

HAPPY THANKSGIVING 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective October 10 to October 16, 2013.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department

Meat Department Breyers Ice Cream Creamery Style

Salt Spring Organic Fair Trade Coffee assorted varieties

SAVE

10.99

22%

400g • product of Canada

Uncle Luke’s Organic Maple Syrup

19.99

1L

SAVE

32%

31% Sun Rype Juice assorted varieties

Mighty Leaf Artisan Tea

142g • product of USA

Gather Red, Green or Yellow Pepper Jelly

8.99

4.99

27%

product of USA

32%

assorted varieties

2.99

SAVE

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16%

2/5.00

50%

4/6.00

300-400g product of USA

36%

assorted varieties

product of USA

Kettle Brand Krinkle Potato Chips assorted varieties

3.79

8” Pumpkin Pies

Organic White Quinoa

from 6.99

PRICING

6.99

Genesis Today Organic GoJi 100 Juice

reg 9.99

34.99

Hero Yummi Bear Multivitamins

9.99

All 6 and 8” Pumpkin Pies or 6” No Egg or Dairy Pumpkin Pie

2.00 off regular

retail price

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Health Care Department

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R.W. Knudsen Sparkling Beverages (Apple, Pear, Cranberry)

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cheddar or sour cream & chive

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Produce Department

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Burnaby Now October 11 2013  

Burnaby Now October 11 2013

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