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NASHVILLE, TN Permit No. 22

700 Norwood Drive Nashville, TN 37204

Summer 2010 Volume XXXVII Number 2

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

Represent Your Class Father Ryan’s Alumni Association consists of over 10,000 living alumni worldwide. Today there is more communication between the school and our alumni than ever before, from our website to Irish Ayes to mailings and e-blast messages. Additionally, the Alumni Association hosts numerous events to keep our alumni connected. However, as good as these outreach methods are, they cannot replace the personal link that a Class Rep has when writing emails, letters and making phone calls to build interest in reunions, Annual Fund, special events and capital projects. To learn more about becoming a Class Rep, visit www.fatherryan.org/alumni.

A Tradition of Faith, Knowledge, Service

w w w. f a t h e r r y a n . o r g


Table of Contents Pat Langdon Retires .............................................. 1 Alumni Awaken the Faith ...................................... 3 Spotlight on Faculty, Staff and Students ............. 4 Father Black Award . .............................................. 6 Class of 2010 Graduates ....................................... 8 Athletics . .............................................................. 10 Flood Recovery .................................................... 14 Founder of Rachel’s Challenge Visits ................. 16 40 Years of Women (Cover Story) ...................... 18 Catholic HEART Work Camp ............................... 23 Legacy Gala . ........................................................ 24 Reunions .............................................................. 25 Class Notes .......................................................... 26 Weddings/Births .................................................. 28 In Memoriam ....................................................... 29

Administration Jim McIntyre, President Paul Davis ’81, Principal Connie Steinmetz, Chief Financial Officer Sara Hayes, Academic Dean Carolyn Evans, Dean of Students Tim Forbes ’93, Dean of Campus Ministry and Student Life Pat Lawson ’93, Athletic Director

Board of trustees Executive Committee Patrick J. Nolan III ’69, Chair Judy Komisky Orr ’75, Vice-Chair James Sochovka, Finance Committee Chair Rev. Ed Steiner, Secretary-Treasurer Tommy Bradley ’81, Membership Committee Chair

Committee Chairs Brett Wesnofske ‘88, Facilities Committee Chair Philip M. Mattingly, Sr. ’69, Advancement Committee Chair

Board Members Antoine Agassi Rev. Mark Beckman David Bohan ’66 Mary Brennan Betty Lou Burnett Lori Copeland Chamberlain Warner C. Hassell Judith E. Hoover Steve Janicak Rev. Patrick J. Kibby ’73 Dr. Robert Labadie Robert J. Mendes Stephen P. Mullins ’75 Rick Olszewski John Siedlecki

Ex-Officio Members Most Rev. David R. Choby ’65 Rev. David Perkin, V.G. James A. McIntyre Dr. Therese Williams

LIFE TRUSTEES W. Irvin Berry ’46 Thomas G. Connor Sr. ’60 John J. Cunningham Sr. William H. Farmer ’65 Edward B. Gore J. Terry Hunter Vincent T. Phillips John C. Shea ’51 William F. Smith Edward A. Stack

From the Advancement Office

Annual Fund Breaks All-Time Record

The 2009-2010 year marks a record breaking one for Father Ryan’s Annual Fund. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, a total of $484,737 was raised, exceeding our $375,000 goal. The total also exceeds the previous record by almost $100,000—an increase of 27%—making this year’s Annual Fund the most successful in history!

In Memoriam WILLIAM “BILL” F. ALEXANDER - Father of Billy Alexander, Philip Alexander ‘88 and Molly Mahoney and husband of Helen Alexander, former faculty member. CHRISTINE E. BAIRD - Wife of Bill Baird, Jr. ‘46 and mother of Marc T. Baird and Will Baird ‘84. JOHN “ERNIE” BEAZLEY ‘72.

Martin McLean ‘63 and Paul McLean ‘75. NANCY M. METZGER - Mother of Sue Holzapfel, Anne Clepper, David Metzger ‘72, Mary Ceil Langione ‘75, Danny Metzger ‘82 and Don Metzger ‘84. ROBERT S. MINTON, JR. ‘64 - Brother of George and John ‘66 Minton.

More than 975 parents, alumni, faculty, staff and friends responded to last year’s appeal. There were 206 individual gifts from first-time Annual Fund donors. One hundred percent of faculty donated. Parent participation reached an all-time high at 36% with the sophomore class parents contributing the most. Alumni participation increased with the Class of 1954 contributing the most.

MARK KEVIN BIENER ‘75.

The Annual Fund, which completed its campaign on June 30, provides unrestricted dollars to be used by the school to support the general operating budget. It has been instrumental in funding school programs and professional development for teachers. The fund also helps keeps tuition increases to a minimum.

JAMES T. BURNS ‘42.

“The Annual Fund is a living endowment,” explains President Jim McIntyre. “The dollars raised are equivalent to the income that would be generated annually by a $7.5 million endowment. That’s a significant part of our budget each year and makes the overall experience at Father Ryan even more rewarding for our students.”

JAMES J. “JIMMY” FORMOSA, JR. ‘62 - Brother of Stan ‘67 (deceased) and Charlie Formosa ‘64 and Nancy Malone.

JOE FRANKLIN - Former faculty member.

JANE K. ROSS - Mother of Paul Sorace ‘83 and Joan Wildasin.

Most importantly, the fund has helped families devastated by the flood through tuition relief, proving once again how the Annual Fund makes it possible for Father Ryan to help our community where the need is greatest. The 2009 - 2010 Annual Fund has been an extraordinary example of the generosity of so many people at Father Ryan.

MARGARET M. GILMORE - Mother of Joe ‘61, Kelly ‘71, Patrick and Tony Gilmore and Janet Gilmore-Bryan, Peggy Myers, Julia Starr ‘74 and Celia Watkins ‘78.

MARY FRANCES “FRANKIE” RUTLEDGE - Sister of Charles B. Rosa ‘69 (deceased), Kathy Pitts, Jimmy Rosa ‘73 and Tony Rosa.

“The generosity of Father Ryan alumni, parents, faculty and staff is humbling, gratifying and exciting for me,” said McIntyre. “It speaks well of the love our community has for this school and their support for our mission. I am especially appreciative of the work done by our Annual Fund and Constituent Relations Manager, Brooke Reusch; our Annual Fund Chairs Mary and Bill Brennan; and of all the various committees whose tireless efforts have made this possible.”

ROBERT V. “BOBBY” HAILEY - Father of Robert V. Hailey, Jr. ‘73, Mary Lee Payne ‘74, Martina Hailey ‘75, Steve Hailey ‘78 and Amy Hailey ‘80. Brother of Lehman Hailey ‘43, James Hailey, Sr. Roseanne Hailey, RSM and twin sister, Sr. Betty Hailey, RSM.

Thank you to all who gave to the 2009-2010 Annual Fund. Your investment in the Annual Fund ensures that Ryan can continue to provide the highest quality of school life in a setting that is grounded with faith and love.

JOHN R. HOLMES ‘55 - Father of Victoria, Kelly, John, Jr ‘78 and Karen. Brother of Phillip, Sr. ‘53, James ‘55, Michael, Sr. ‘58 (deceased) and Timothy Holmes ‘59 and Ann Donnelly.

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Annual Fund

The 2010-2011 Annual Fund campaign is already under way. We encourage everyone to prayerfully consider giving to the fund and make this year another banner year.Visit www.fatherryan.org/giving to make your gift online or contact the Advancement Office at (615) 269-7926.

IRISH AYES

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Summer 2010, Volume XXXVII Number 2

Irish Ayes is published by Father Ryan High School three times a year and is distributed without charge to alumni, parents, faculty, staff and friends of the school. Send address changes to: Father Ryan High School, Advancement Office • 770 Norwood Drive, Nashville, TN 37204. Phone: 615-269-7926 • E-mail: alumni@fatherryan.org.

Please send your comments and letters for Irish Ayes to alumni@fatherryan.org

Father Ryan High School admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other schooladministered programs.

JOHN ARCH BOYLE ‘52. BERNARD W. “BILL” BRODEN ‘45. JULIANA R. BURKE - Mother of Tony Burke ‘80, Melody Perkins ‘82, Catherine Foreman ‘84, Steve Burke and Christie Burke ‘94. JOAN MARIE CATIGNANI - Mother of Andrea Dudney, Catherine Cotter, Toney Catignani ‘70, Ricky Catignani ‘71, Connie Horton, Theresa Calvo, Rosemary Gray, Joan Catignani, Christina O’Connor, Linus Catignani ‘82, Bridget Rogers ‘83 and Carol Hostettler ‘85.

JOSEPH T. FORMOSA, JR. - Father of Mary Margaret Lambert and Joseph Formosa III.

JOHN E. GORHAM - Father of Peggy Krozely, John ‘71, Ben ‘72, Judy ‘74, Steve ‘75 and Pat Gorham ‘80. ROBERT G. GREENE ‘37.

WILLIAM W. “WOODY” HARRIS - Father of Bill Harris ‘65, Jerry Harris ‘68 and Robert Harris. FABIAN D. HENNINGS - Husband of Claire “Dede” Dentici Hennings ‘86.

ELIZABETH “ANNE” HUSSUNG - Mother of Buck Hussung ‘61 and Kerry Harrison.

JAMES R. MITCHELL, SR. - Father of James Mitchell, Jr. ‘73, Michael Sherrell and Debbie Dupree. JOSEPH WILLIAM NEIDERT ‘51 - Brother of the late Jim Neidert ‘53 and Catherine Hrickiewicz. ROBERT EDWARD O’CONNOR ‘51. WILLIAM “ BILL” P. ORTALE - Father of Pat ‘71, Jim ‘72, Sev ‘73, Vic ‘76 and Buddy Ortale ‘79 and Amelia Gesch ‘77. CORNELIUS ANTHONY “TONY” PEFFEN ‘49 - Father of Elaine Flick ‘76, Robert Peffen ‘77, Leigh Ann Zirkle ‘79 and Mark Peffen. JOSHUA B. PIETSCH ‘93 - Brother of Matt Pietsch ‘93 and Rebecca Pietsch ‘00. GERTRUDE PITTINGER - Mother of Suzanne Erpenbach, Charles Pittinger ‘71 and Catherine Helms. RONALD GARY RAGAN ‘70.

RONALD SERFASS, JR ‘80 - Brother of Karen Stamps ‘76, Donna Wolfe ‘78 and Debbie Morales ‘85. WILLIAM THOMAS STUMB ‘42. KATHERINE “KAY” DONNELLY-SWINEHART - Sister of Bubba Donnelly ‘69, Delores Hobbs, Steve Donnelly ‘72, Mike Donnelly ‘74, Mary Lynn Donnelly, Rita Ann Holiman, Denise Beaty and Paul Donnelly ‘83. JOHN A. THOMAN - Father of Sr. Elizabeth Thoman, CHM, Patricia Young, Mary Lynn Thoman, and Jim ‘65, John, Jr. and Lawrence Thoman. CHARLOTTE R. WALKER, MD - Sister of Matthew Walker II ‘59, Daniel P. Walker ‘60, and Maxine Giddings. CHARLES E. WALSH ‘54 - Brother of Jim Walsh ‘49. ROBERT E. WALSH - Father of Joann Aquino, Bob Walsh ‘64, Linda Work, Tom “Yogi” Walsh ‘67, Jim Walsh ‘71, Nancy Nolan and Debbie Weber.

KRISTOPHER C. KASPRZYCKI ‘77.

JOHN B. WARNER ‘43 - Father of Sharyn Curbo, Brady Warner ‘70, Dedie Rice, Anthony Warner ‘74, Patty Self and Billy Warner ‘79. Brother of Mary Winifred Boyd, Ann Vick and Thomas Warner ‘52.

JOSEPH M. KING, JR. - Son of Katie Tidwell King ‘04.

ALBERT GEORGE WEBER III ‘59.

BRETT GLEN KUBAN - Husband of Virginia Chaires Kuban ‘87.

THOMAS C. WEILAND - Father of Sr. Mary Christopher O.P., Mark ‘76, Lisa and Chris Weiland ‘87.

MARY ALICE LAMB - Mother of Becky Bickel ‘71 and Jo Ann Fitzgerald. THEODORE H. LENOX, JR. - Father of Ted Lenox ‘69 and Michelle Lenox ‘75.

ARLENE E. WEY - Mother of Lannie, Rick, Rob and Eric Wey ‘79. JAMES M. “MICKEY” WHITE ‘60 - Brother of Berry Jr. (deceased), Ray ‘55, Aaron (deceased), B. Ann, Chuck ‘67, Bernard ‘69, Theresa, Katy Warrick, Joe ‘73, John ‘75, Sherry Ray ‘77 and Terry White.

JAMES D. “JIMMY” LEWIS - Father of Don ‘75 and David Lewis ‘76, Kathy Tillman ‘77 and Mike Lewis.

TONY G. WHITE ‘81.

MARGUERITE WILSON MCCABE - Stepmother of Edward McCabe ‘53, Sissy Lynch and Tim McCabe ‘61.

HAL E. WILSON, JR. ‘62 - Father of Mary Crist, Christie Wilson ‘85 and Hal Wilson III ‘88. Brother of Chris and Tim Wilson ‘82.

ANNE MARIE MCLEAN - Mother of Patricia Brown, Maureen Hicks,

Deadline to submit Class Notes, Weddings, Births or In Memoriam for the winter Irish Ayes is November 19, 2010. Send to millsa@fatherryan.org or submit online at www.fatherryan.org/alumni.


Weddings

Pat Langdon Retires After 43 Years I

Katie Rowan ‘00 to Nick D’Alessandro of Birmingham, AL on December 12, 2009 at St. Henry Church. Katie’s sisters Blair and Dede Rowan ‘10 were the maids of honor and brother, Brien Rowan ‘04, was a groomsman. Katie works for the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the couple will live nearby in Vestavia Hills. Brigid and Jereme Frey

Jereme Frey (Faculty) married Brigid Frey on June 1, 2010 in Blue Mountain Beach, FL.

n the summer of 1991, before Father Ryan’s Elliston Place campus was demolished, bricks and other Ryan nostalgia made their way into the hands of a few inventive faculty and alumni. Pat Langdon was among the bold few who were able to save iconic pieces of history.

Suzanne Sevier ‘92 and Bart Rowland ‘93 were married on January 30, 2010 in Nashville, TN.

Jennifer Catignani and Michael Scruggs, Jr.

Jennifer Catignani ‘01 and Michael Scruggs, Jr. were married on January 30, 2010 at Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Nashville. The Nuptial Mass was celebrated by Father Mark Hunt ‘85. Jennifer is the daughter of Mike Catignani ‘75 and granddaughter of Margaret and the late Joe Catignani ‘50. Bridesmaids included Becky Savage ‘04, Jamie Boyd ‘05 and Rachel Boyd ‘06; Marie Allen ‘98 and Ray Allen ‘98 were lectors; Blake Allen (junior) and Nikki Allen (sophomore) were the altar servers and Kristi Catignani (freshman) assisted with offertory; all are cousins of the bride. The newlyweds live in Pleasant View, TN.

Cooper Malbrough McCabe

Deb Whitaker (Faculty) married Houston Akin on June 5, 2010 at St. Edward in Nashville, TN.

Deb Whitaker and Houston Akin

Births

Savannah Marie Maciuk

Cooper Malbrough to Lauren and Steven McCabe ‘92, born on June 16, 2009. Big brother Connor and grandparents Pat and Tom McCabe ‘67 love the family’s newest addition. Savannah Marie to James and Stacy (Schumaker) Maciuk ‘01, born on September 10, 2009. Stacy works at Belmont University (her alma mater) as the Associate Director of Donor Relations. Her husband, James, owns EcoBuild of TN, and they specialize in energy efficient construction of homes and commercial spaces.

Josie Gallagher Hinson

Eleck Michael to Jack and Lindsay (Moore) Fa ‘95, born in October 2009. Big brother, John Kalman, is two years old. The family lives in San Francisco, CA. Ellie Marie to Shane and Erin (Broussard) Hawkins ‘95, born on October 22, 2009. She joins siblings Michael Shane and Gracie. Josie Gallagher to Jamie and Joy (Sutton) Hinson ‘89, born on December 1, 2009. Big brother and sister, James and Julia, are very proud.

Lucius Alexander Jarrett

Lucius Alexander to Lane and Jonathan Jarrett ‘99 born on December 6, 2009. The family lives in Nashville where Jonathan works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Lane works for the Tennessee State Museum. Travis Brian to Steve and Kat (Travis) Coy ‘96, born on December 6, 2009. Morgan Elizabeth to Dan and Paige (Osborne) Meade ‘90, born on December 21, 2009. The family lives in Cleveland, OH with Morgan’s brothers, Daniel (9 years) and twins Jack and Jeff (4 years).

Patrick Gabriel Conrad

Patrick Gabriel to Jason and Mary Catherine (Furgess) Conrad ‘93, born on December 29, 2009. Big sisters Sarah Grace and Lillian Faith are so excited to have a little brother. Patrick is the 12th grandchild for Alma and John Furgess ‘61. Anna Claire to Kelsey (Nabors) ‘03 and Paul Witte ‘03, born on January 2, 2010. Asher Cannon to Mark and Brandy (Hounihan) Brandenburg ‘94, born on January 5, 2010. Big brother Matthan Blue turns two in December. The family lives in Frederick, MD.

Wesley James Reilly

Wesley James to Kelly (Cockerham) ‘93 and Rick Reilly ‘92, born on February 12, 2010.

Sitting on the window sill of his classroom was a collection of bricks—bricks from the Coliseum in Rome and bricks from the old Faculty House (a few charred from the fire of 1992) lying side-by-side. A cross he fashioned from the parquet floors in the Elliston Place gym hangs on the wall. The sight paints a picture of a man who appreciates history and enjoys educating others in its meaning. Few students have passed through Pat Langdon’s class without touching these artifacts and understanding their value. Some would argue that Pat is an iconic part of Father Ryan’s history. He graduated from Ryan in 1958, a time that was vastly different, though not unrecognizable, from the Ryan we know today.

Ellie Marie to Chad ‘01 and Lynne (Mullins) Moss ‘01 born on March 8, 2010. Patrick Fulenwider Heun to Art and Ashley (Wells) Heun ‘95, born on March 9, 2010. The Heuns live in Lake Charles, LA.

Ellie Marie Moss

Thomas Corey Phillips, Jr. to Jessica and Corey Phillips ‘00, born on March 24, 2010. Sarah Kathryn to Amy and Jason Larkin (Faculty), born on April 16, 2010. Judah Davis to Jeff and Julie Cox (Faculty), born on June 9, 2010. Sarah Kathryn Larkin

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Pat working the concession stand at Father Ryan.

He has taught Ancient Medieval History, World History, Morality, English, Life Science, Latin and Church History; the latter is his forte. Clearly, he loves the subject, having been to Rome twice. Ask him anything about the role of Christianity in Roman civilization and he could tell you story upon story painted with details not found in most textbooks. “I try to get the kids to understand that history is really important to understanding today’s world.You know, there’s nothing the [Catholic] church hasn’t been through—persecution, war, power struggles.” He didn’t mind being a storyteller or even a discipline enforcer once in awhile. “I did everything they asked me do—every dirty job. I had detention for 30 years,” he says with a smile.

“...history is really important to understanding today’s world.”

The Father Ryan he knew during his high school years was a little rough around the edges. “There were some fights, you know, manly stuff. But you knew it was a boys’ school,” he recalls. He also remembers a time when the school didn’t charge tuition. Midway through his high school career, families received a letter from Fr. Shea, principal at the time, announcing a $200 tuition requirement.

Katherine Gayle to Michael and Angela (Rohling) Gregory ‘98, born on March 2, 2010.

if there were anyone to give a history lesson of Father Ryan, he would certainly be qualified. He holds one of the longest tenures in the school’s history, at an astounding 43 years.

Five years after he graduated, he returned as a faculty member under Fr. Hitchcock. Pat left the school a couple of times to pursue other projects, but he always returned to his “home.” And

Former students and colleagues remember him as head of the work crew, a group of students who performed odd jobs like picking up trash around campus as part of their detention duty. And the students quickly learned to pick up all trash the first time.

“During detention, these kids would throw paper, pencils, pennies, Skittles, whatever they could find at each other when I wasn’t looking. The room would be silent except the sound of these things hitting the floor,” he laughs. Of course, he wouldn’t allow anyone to leave until all trash was picked up; sometimes it took a few tries. “That room would be cleaner than before we came in.” Over the years, “Fat Pat,” as he is lovingly called, acquired a reputation as a straight-talker, someone who is not afraid to speak his mind. It’s that candid demeanor that his students and colleagues alike remember, and it’s a trait that has served him well in the classroom. “I tell them in class, ‘You don’t know anything, certainly not as much as you think you do,’” he says. Although he refers to today’s high school generation as “sophisticated idiots,” his love and admiration for his students are apparent. “I’ve taught students who I think of as highly as my own kids. Don’t tell me that young people don’t have discipline. Continued on page 2

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A significant number cited him as their mentor, but asked if he had any mentors, Pat can’t pick one. “Everybody has been a mentor to me at one point. I’ve never been afraid to ask questions or seek answers.” He does mention a few names like Fr. Hitchcock, Fr. Cunningham, Jim Zralek, Eddie Krenson and Nancy Patton, all of whom were influences. He also credits his wife, Linda, for her unconditional support. His brother, Jim, another Father Ryan teacher, has also given Pat a healthy dose of support during his career. According to Pat, they are Pat visits St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. exactly alike except for one thing; politics. “We decided a long time ago to no longer discuss politics with each other. Other than that, we get along great.”

Evidently, he must have done something right. “People still speak to me from 40 years ago. I guess I’m still doing okay.” One non-debatable quality about Pat supervises the work crew in 1985. Pat is his faithful devotion to Father Ryan.You rarely see him without his trademark purple hat, “FR” emblazoned on the front. He’s behind the concession stands during football and basketball games. He’s in the audience for theatre performances. And don’t expect that to change once he settles into retirement. He’s a life-long advocate for Father Ryan. “Father Ryan has always produced a good education, and the academics get better and better each year. And we’ve always had good people. All of them will go the extra mile, and I can’t imagine any of them not helping a student succeed. This school is unique. I’m just proud that I taught at Father Ryan High School.” So are we.

Homecoming Weekend 2010 Celebrates 40 Years of Women Forty years ago, our student body celebrated Homecoming for the first time as a coeducational school.  To salute this milestone and to honor all of the Father Ryan alumni, this year’s Homecoming activities are being expanded with the creation of the Elliston Luncheon on Saturday, October 16, 2010, from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.  This event will provide another opportunity for the Father Ryan community to gather and celebrate our Irish Pride.  We’ll have a special salute to our alumnae as we continue our 40 Years of Women Celebration.  We will also be announcing the Distinguished Alumni Award Program. This last element is new to Father Ryan and will provide the means to salute formally and proudly the most

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distinguished of our alumni.  With 85 years of history, we are expecting a number of nominations for our first recipients, which is why we will begin accepting nominations this fall and announce the selections at the 2011 Homecoming.   Make plans to join us for another exciting weekend on Father Ryan’s campus. The Irish take on the Ensworth Tigers on Friday, October 15 with kick-off at 7:00 p.m., followed by the Elliston Luncheon on Saturday. The luncheon is only $15 per person and seating will be limited, so visit www.fatherryan.org/elliston to see all the details and to make your reservations now.

Class Notes

‘90

Stephen Zralek has been named to the 2010 Best of the Bar for outstanding small firm attorney in Nashville. This is his third time to be honored by his peers with this distinction. Stephen is an attorney with Bone McAllester Norton PLLC.

Lee Murphy graduated Summa Cum Laude from Vanderbilt University on May 14, 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics. Lee was also commissioned that day as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy and will be based in Pensacola, FL in September to attend Naval Flight Training.

‘92

Suzanne Sevier Rowland was named to The City Paper’s list of 2010 Entrepreneurs of the Year for her business, Sevier Skirts. The company has client networks in eight cities and produced almost 6,000 skirts last year. For more details on Sevier Skirts, visit www.sevierskirts.com.

‘98

Erin (Morrow) Still recently published, Fighting MS: Strength in Numbers, a guidebook for those recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. All proceeds from the book will go toward finding a cure for the disease. To order, please visit www.amazon.com.

‘93

‘00

Amy Bendle is the activities coordinator for the Blakeford at Green Hills, which is now a site for the Senior Service Program at Father Ryan led by Mrs. Betts Clippinger. Amy reports, “I have a few students each semester come to the health center to make the elderly smile. The students give their time and energy helping transport residents to my activities, the dining room or just be a companion in their room for a chat. It is wonderful for them and us! Thank you, Mrs. Clippinger!” Susan Cooper was named Volunteer of the Year by the Epilepsy Foundation of Middle and West Tennessee. She was presented an award from Community Health Charities at their annual Champions in Health Awards Celebration on February 25, 2010.

‘95

Kelly (Harding) Bryant is happily settled in East Nashville with her son Taylor and two dogs. After working on Music Row for the past five years, she is hoping to continue her education this year and start a nursing program in the fall. Hector Gaba works as a Mechanical Engineer for a global missile defense contractor working on Close-In Weapon Systems for the Navy and the Army. He and his wife, Catherine, have two children: a daughter, Gracie and a son, Cason. William Lofaro lives in New York City. He and his wife, Sarah, have a daughter who is 19 months-old and another baby on the way.

‘96

Kat (Travis) Coy lives in Knoxville, TN with her husband, Steve, and new son, Travis Brian Coy. She is in her fourth year at Knoxville Catholic High School as the Sophomore and Junior School Counselor. Kat is very involved in her local Smokey Mountain Counseling Association and is President-Elect. In 2009, she was honored by the Tennessee Counseling Association as the Secondary School Counselor of the Year.

Leah Conners graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis on May 28, 2010. She lives in Ft. Worth, TX where she is in a residency program in Family Medicine at John Peter Smith Hospital. Leah is a third-generation Father Ryan graduate preceded by her father John Conners, III, Class of 1969, and grandfather John Conners, Jr., Class of 1937.

‘06

Ruth Diroff was named Tennessee Tech University’s Derryberry Award winner. It is presented to a graduating senior who has exhibited scholastic attainment arising out of moral and intellectual integrity; successful campus activity where participation indicates a commitment to good citizenship, interest in one’s fellow person, and instincts for leadership; and physical vigor as shown by fondness for and success in sports. Ruth graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

‘06

Tom Morton is in Afghanistan serving in the United States Marines. He will return in December 2010. Please keep Tom and all our men and women of the military in your prayers.

‘08

Justin Guidry had a stand-out season for the MTSU Blue Raiders baseball team. During his sophomore year, he was named to the All-Sun Belt First Team, as chosen by the league’s head coaches. He also has been named to the John Olerud Two-Way Player Award watch list as announced by College Baseball Foundation. The “Ole” Award was created in 2010 and recognizes a player who makes an impact both on the mound and at the plate. Daniel Rone has accepted membership in the National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS). He will be honored during an Induction Convocation this fall on the campus of Loyola University Chicago. Daniel wanted to acknowledge the education that he received at Father Ryan which led to this accomplishment.

Father Ryan Flashback Answer

Jeff Turk ’85 wrote, “I don’t recall many of my high school teachers, but I do remember you—for all of the right reasons. You were consistently kind, positive and well-liked...no small feat for a high school teacher who oversaw Saturday work crew.”

Class Notes

Shannon Earl, Beth Santry, Louise Gilchrist, Susan Schindler (yearbook editor), Terri Fryer, all members of the Class of 1983.

Any accomplishments he’s particularly proud of? “I don’t know what I’ve done. I’ve just done it,” he answers without hesitation. It’s classic Pat Langdon.

Have you seen the drumline? The wrestling team?” That same appreciation and esteem are reflected by his former students and colleagues, dozens of whom submitted personal notes of congratulations for his retirement party.

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Alumni Awaken the Faith at Universities

Father Ryan Flashback As part of the “Annual Staff,” these ladies were instrumental in putting together the 1982 yearbook. Do you recognize any of them? Hint: one of them was the editor. (Answer on p. 27)

(From l. to r.) Alex Roushdi ‘09, Shelby Davis ‘09, Kathryn Webb ‘09, Andrew Lahaie ‘09 and Julia Morgan (SCA) ‘09 attend Awakening at University of Tennessee.

Class Notes Class Notes

‘41

Dr. William Schlattner lives in San Antonio, TX. As a Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, he worked in the Lockland Hospital Burn Center as a plastic surgeon before going into private practice. Bill has since retired and now enjoys daily walks and singing in a men’s choir.

‘42

Father Bernard Niedergeses ‘43 and Father Paul Hostettler ‘42 marked the 60th anniversary of their ordinations by concelebrating a Mass at St. Pius X Church on June 5, 2010. The two were ordained by Bishop William Adrian at the Cathedral of the Incarnation on June 3, 1950.

‘45

George Barrett was recently named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. He was recognized in the area of civil rights. George is a founding partner of Barrett Johnston, LLC in Nashville.

‘57

Father Philip Breen celebrated his 45th anniversary as a priest on May 22, 2010. His parishioners at St. Ann honored Fr. Breen with a special reception in July.

‘70

Mike Riley and his wife, Cheri, live in Atlanta, GA. They have two adult children who graduated from Christ the King in Atlanta and the Lovette School. They also have a seventh grader at Marist. Mike is always excited to hear about FRHS! Tony Spence, Director and Editor-in-Chief of Catholic News Service since 2004, recently won the Catholic Press Association’s 2010 St. Francis de Sales Award. The award is the highest award the CPA presents to an individual for outstanding contributions to Catholic journalism.

‘72

Luellen Hoffman’s book, Special Dream: Personal Accounts After the Death of a Loved One, is the winner of the 2010 Moms Choice Awards honoring excellence in family-friendly media, products and services. The book is also the gold winner in Adult Books, Body, Mind & Spirit category.

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‘73

Jim Murphy was recently named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. He was recognized in the area of zoning and land use. Jim is an attorney with Bradley Arant Boult Cummings in Nashville. Peter Strianse was also named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. He was recognized in the area of criminal defense. Peter is an attorney with Tune, Entrekin & White in Nashville.

‘76

Cindy Reisz was recently named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. She was recognized in the area of health care regulatory. Cindy is a member with Bass, Berry & Sims in Nashville.

‘77

Annie Hendricks works for the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development, Employee Relations Division, where she investigates all workplace harassment complaints filed by employees. She also continues to freelance as a paralegal for several attorneys in Nashville. Her most enjoyable pleasure is spending time with her four year-old granddaughter, McKenzie Cecilia Hendricks (left).

‘78

Tom Kelly is celebrating 22 years as a firefighter and shift captain for the second busiest department in Buncombe County, NC. He is also president of the county firefighters’ association, representing 20 county departments and three municipal fire departments. Outside of work, he and his wife, Margaret, enjoy the daily pleasures of a 14 monthold grandson.

‘85

Sean Sabin retired from the Air Force at the rank of lieutenant colonel in April 2010. His last Air Force position was as Staff Judge Advocate at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana. He, his wife, Suzanne, and their twin seven year-old daughters, Emma and Mae Claire, now live in Grosse Pointe Park, MI, where Sean specializes in federal contract law issues as of counsel at the law firm Foley & Lardner.

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nce or twice a year, college students around the country dedicate their weekend to deepening their relationships with God through a community retreat. The program is aptly named Awakening and invites college students of all denominations to a three-day retreat to develop their faith through group discussion, reflection and the sacraments. Awakening traces its roots to 1973 at McNeese State University in Lake Charles, Louisiana, and with the help of students—some of whom are Father Ryan alumni—it has since multiplied to 41 programs in 13 states. Students like Shelby Davis, a 2009 graduate, are drawn to Awakening because of its similarities to Search, a retreat program for high school students. “I wanted a structured retreat, and it was a lot like Search. I had friends from the University of Tennessee who had been through it and they loved it, so I wanted to try it.” Its structure is nearly parallel to Search: faith talks, small group discussions, music, reflection and camaraderie. The leadership structure is familiar, too, with a “mom” and “dad,” a coordinator for behindthe-scenes preparations, a rector who leads the retreat and a “gopher” who takes on the service crew elements of the weekend. Most importantly, the program draws these young adults because it is led by young adults, their peers. Founder Father Sam Jacobs (now Bishop of HoumaThibodaux, Louisiana) explained the formation of the program: “As our staff looked at how to best reach college and college-age young adults, we felt we had to first

provide them with a ‘conversion’ experience before a ‘catechesis’ experience. We modeled it after the Cursillo and the Search retreat, which the team was familiar with. We saw it as an evangelization moment... We wanted them to experience the joy of the Christian life.” Davis, who is a sophomore at the University of Kentucky, has already been through Awakening three times. She has attended retreats at Vanderbilt, Ohio State University and the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, which held its first retreat last year. While no program exists in Kentucky, she plans to initiate the retreat this November with the help of Frankie Giovetti, a fellow Wildcat and a 2008 graduate of Father Ryan. “I’ve been recruiting people to go to other schools’ Awakenings. I got a group of people to go to the University of Tennessee, and a few people from there will be helping me start one at UK this year,” she says. Like many of Father Ryan’s young alumni, Davis is continuing to develop her faith and spread her faith to communities outside of Ryan. “What I love about Awakenings,” she says, “is that you form friends from other school communities. When I was at Father Ryan, I went to Youth Leadership Workshop and Search, and those are the kind of people I want to be around. That was my goal.” With leadership, drive and faith in hand, Father Ryan’s young alumni are achieving their goals. What’s more is that they are taking the school’s mission with them to be living examples of the Gospel and building communities of their own. 3


Three Students Attend Boys, Girls State

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eniors Brandon Zeitlin, Amelia Norman and Catie Benenson were selected among hundreds of high school students across the state to participate in Tennessee American Legion Boys State and American Legion Auxiliary Volunteer Girls State. The weeklong program is designed to educate participants in local, county and state government through legislative sessions and forming a mock government. Local and state officials, including Governor Phil Bredesen, visited students this summer during their sessions.

Students Represent FRHS at Leadership Conference

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uniors Cole Moseley and John Arnold were selected to represent Tennessee and the TSSAA at this summer’s National Federation Leadership Conference in Indianapolis, IN. They were among 300 students

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ive students in Father Ryan’s Spanish program embarked on an overseas trip this summer to Salamanca, Spain for a three-week immersion program. Marci Davison, Robert Gallagher, Taylor Hawken, Alexandra Jones and Ryan Weiss lived with native families while studying the Spanish language and culture through daily classes at the Estudio Sampere and excursions to Madrid, Toledo and other notable attractions in the country. This marks Father Ryan’s first study abroad program, pioneered by teacher Rob Nasatir, Ph.D., who also traveled to Salamanca. Students who completed the program earned a half credit in their elective course. 

Science Teacher Receives Fellowship

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auraLee Morin was one of 75 teachers in the country to receive a fellowship from Rutgers University for a genome sequencing project for high schools. The program leads teachers and their students through the components of molecular biology to understand how

That evening, the celebration continued with reunion parties across Nashville with a few on Ryan’s campus. And at Sunday’s Golden Grad Mass and Brunch, the members of the Class of 1960 were inducted into the Golden Grad Society and presented plaques by Bishop David Choby ‘65. A special congratulations go to the Class of 1970 for winning the Reunion Year Challenge with the largest percent of gifts to the Annual Fund this year. Led by Class Rep Frederick Strobel, the Class of 1970 hit 24 percent by June 30. Thank you to all who joined us for the weekend’s events, and we hope to see you next year! Mark your calendar for next summer’s Reunion Weekend June 3-5, 2011. Classes ending with 6 or 1 will celebrate their reunions, beginning with the Class of 2001. If you are a member of the Classes of 2001, 1996, 1991, 1986, 1981, 1976, 1971, 1966, 1961, 1956 or 1951 and would like to serve on your Reunion Committee, please contact the Alumni Office at 615.269.7926 or millsa@fatherryan.org.

Alumni Reception Class of 1960

Saturday’s Lou Graham Alumni Invitational Golf Tournament, chaired by Tommy Bradley ’81, was another great event, raising more than $8,500 for tuition assistance for children or grandchildren of alumni. Thirty-one teams of four, plus Lou Graham ‘56 himself, came out to Champions Run to enjoy a game of golf and support tuition assistance at Ryan. The tournament’s first place prize went to J.D. Sharp ’92, Phil Sharp, Jimmy McGarrity and Frank Soper.

Class of 1965

Spanish Students, Teacher Initiate First Study Abroad

Friday night kicked off Reunion Weekend with the Alumni Reception at the Center for the Arts. Over 200 alumni came out on a gorgeous June evening to reconnect with friends over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres.

Class of 1970

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ina Fredericks, a 2010 graduate, earned third place in the 2010 National Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD) MultiMedia Arts Contest. In March, she entered her drawing, entitled Trapped by Poverty, to the Campaign for Human Development and earned the grand prize in Nashville’s diocesan competition. For her national third place finish, she will be awarded $250 that will go towards the Father Ryan Flood Relief Fund, and an additional $250 will be given in her name to a CCHD-funded group of her choice. During her senior year, she studied AP Studio Art taught by John Durand, pictured above with Nina’s winning entry.

who participated in the threeday conference designed to promote respect, sportsmanship, teamwork and community service through group discussion of contemporary issues affecting young people. They also performed community service to benefit high school students in Indianapolis. Their conference attendance was fully funded by corporate sponsors T-Mobile and the TSSAA.

Father Ryan celebrated one of the most successful reunion weekends to date this year! Alumni from across the country returned to Nashville June 4-6 to reunite with classmates and teachers.

Class of 1990

Art Student Earns National Prize

Reunion Weekend 2010

Class of 1995

Spotlight on Faculty,

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Dave Ramsey Speaks at Ryan Connections

The Legacy Gala Ends with a “BAM!”

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ather Ryan’s 2010 Legacy Gala was a smash hit and raised nearly $95,000 for the school. The event honored Bishop David R. Choby, a 1965 alumnus, and all alumni priests of the Nashville diocese. Rick and Lynette Bailey enjoy the evening’s festivities Nationally-known financial expert Dave Ramsey visited Father Ryan in April for the school’s networking event, Ryan Connections. Ramsey hosts The Dave Ramsey Show, a syndicated radio program that reaches 450 stations across the country and more than four million listeners. He is also the founder of The Lampo Group, Inc., a financial consulting business located in Brentwood, TN, and author of such books as Financial Peace and The Total Money Makeover. As the event’s key speaker, Ramsey covered such topics as business ownership, employee management and implementing a faithdriven mission, as he does with The Lampo Group. He also imparted financial advice taken from his own experience with debt at a young age. Several of his books and radio shows reference his early mistakes, for which he paid heavily, or what he calls “stupid tax,” and how a change in character helped him recover. Millions have been influenced by Ramsey, including economics teacher Greg Carson. In fact, it was Carson who was instrumental in Ramsey’s visit to campus. His class curriculum is based on Financial Peace; in 1997, Father Ryan became the first high school to use the book for a semester course. At Lampo Group’s request, Carson also wrote the accompanying workbook entitled Financial Peace for the Next Generation. Father Ryan invites all parents, alumni and friends interested in connecting with local business leaders to attend the next Ryan Connections October 14, 2010 at 7:30 a.m. in the Center for the Arts. The speaker will be Deborah Varallo, owner of Varallo Public Relations.

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Hundreds of items in the live and silent auctions including a trip to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Titans tickets, a personal wardrobe consultation and estate jewelry were auctioned off. The 2010 Gala also marked the second time for the Giving Tree, an opportunity for attendees to purchase classroom resources requested by teachers or make donations to financial aid. The theme of the night was “bid high and bid often” punctuated by auctioneer Marty Blair’s animated “BAM!” with every $1,000 bid.

The bishop also enlivened the live auction with an impromptu bid offer for homemade collard greens made by Mary Margaret Lambert, while families Jim McIntyre with quickly joined Honoree, Bishop together to bid on David Choby ‘65 the spectacular 4-bedroom beach house in Seagrove, FL. Overall, the event was another successful evening, thanks to chairs Cathy and Walt Wasyliw and the tremendous generosity of the Father Ryan community. Mark your calendar for the 32nd Annual Auctioneer Marty Blair Legacy Gala on Saturday, March 12, 2011. If you are interest in serving on the Gala Committee, contact Anna Beth Stephens at 615.269.7926.

Staff and Students DNA information is acquired and analyzed. Morin, who teaches AP Biology and Anatomy and Physiology, attended a two-week program in June to learn more about the project. Prior to Father Ryan, she worked with the Pediatric Infection Disease Department at Vanderbilt University and at the Arbovirus Laboratories in Albany, New York. She is also a published author of a manuscript about the West Nile Virus.

Teachers Attend Latin American Program

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eachers Laura Beasley and Debbie Nebel were accepted to a one-week summer institute on Latin American Film in the 9-12 Classroom at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Sponsored by UT’s Latin American Studies Interdisciplinary Program and the Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt, the institute helped teachers develop a curriculum that better incorporates Latin American studies and film into the classroom. Beasley, who teaches Spanish and Psychology, earned a Ph.D. in Psychology from the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain. Nebel, who teaches Multicultural Literature, Women’s Literature and American Literature, previously participated in the College Board’s AP Summer Institute in English Literature and Composition.

Jim McIntyre Presents at Catholic School Conference

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resident Jim McIntyre was invited to speak at the National Advancement Conference for Catholic Schools in June. The conference is led by Partners in Mission, a Catholic education consulting firm based in Massachusetts. One hundred thirty Catholic school leaders from 30 states around the country attended the conference in Boston to learn ways to enhance advancement strategies. McIntyre conducted presentations on enrollment and the president and

principal administrative model, using examples from Father Ryan’s advancement achievements to illustrate successful strategies.

Advancement’s Reusch Named Award Finalist

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rooke Reusch, Father Ryan’s Annual Fund and Constituent Relations Manager, has been named a finalist for the 2010 Nashville Emerging Leader Award. She is one of five finalists in the Community Service and Non-profit industry category. The award, now in its fourth year, is sponsored by the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and Young Professionals of Nashville. The program honors Middle Tennessee’s young professionals under the age of 40 for their accomplishments in their career field as well as their contributions to the community.

Anna Beth Stephens Joins Advancement

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ast spring, Father Ryan welcomed Anna Beth Stephens to its staff. She joins the Advancement Office as Advancement Services Coordinator, supporting the Parent Student Network (PSN) and leading many other events like Legacy Gala throughout the year. She has previously worked with the University of Mississippi’s Foundation, Ruffalo/ Cody (an advancement service company) and Austin Monthly Magazine. Anna Beth is also a parishioner of Christ the King.

Gala Chairs Cathy and Walt Wasyliw 5


Illustrating the Role of Ryan names 25th winner of Father Black Award Reprinted with permission from Andy Telli, Tennessee Register

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ather James Black loved teaching and he loved teaching freshman. So after he lost a long battle to cancer in 1984, Father Ryan High School created the Father Black Honor Society for freshmen who achieve academically and the Father Black Award to honor one particular freshman each year who best demonstrates Catholic scholarship and Christian leadership.

are the same characteristics demonstrated by Father Black during his priesthood and his 12 years as a teacher at Father Ryan, Spore said. Father Black and Spore both graduated from Ryan in 1964 and returned to their alma mater as teachers in 1972.

This year, Mary Margaret Payne became the 25th winner of the award. Her name will be added to the plaque listing the names of all the previous winners that hangs in the office at Father Ryan.

“He had this knack as a teacher of getting the best of out of his students,” Spore added. “Whether you were someone who struggled or you were an honor student, he could get the best out of you.”

“It’s the highest award that a freshman can win,” said John Spore, director of academic counseling at Father Ryan. “We want the student to exemplify a person of faith, academic excellence and involvement in many facets of school life.”

Father Black taught Scripture to freshmen. “He really, really believed in taking care of freshmen,” Spore said. Because he was dissatisfied with the textbooks for the class, he wrote one himself that was specifically aimed at freshman students. “It was used in Catholic high schools all over the country in the 1970s and 80s,” Spore said. “He was extremely brilliant.”

The winner of the Father Black Award, chosen from a field of five finalists by a vote of the freshman faculty, receives a three-year scholarship to Ryan. This year, the faculty described Payne as “the perfect example of a Christian who lives her faith. She is an excellent role model for others in the classroom and always willing to help.” Payne’s family moved to Nashville from Louisville, KY, just before her freshman year, Spore said, but she has Father Ryan bloodlines. Her mother, Mary Pat Cassidy Payne, is a Ryan graduate, and her uncle, Mike Cassidy, is a Ryan grad and a former teacher at the school, Spore explained. The other finalists for the award were: Liz Haynes, Kathleen McInnis, Tom Novelly and Cole Pickney. The characteristics honored by the Father Black Award 6

“He was a great priest and a great teacher,” Spore said. “He had a way of being able to reach out to people.” And his students responded, Spore said. “They loved him. They loved taking his class.“You could tell he loved and cared for his students. When students know that they respond tremendously.”

While a teacher at Father Ryan, Father Black developed cancer. He underwent seven surgeries to fight the cancer and taught until his death at age 38. To honor him, the school established the Father Black Award and the Father Black Honor Society for freshmen who are named to the honor roll for three straight quarters. Students inducted into the society this year include: Mike Akers, Theresa Anderson, Mary Armbruster, Douglas Arney, Gina Beckman, Nick Bontrager, Shea Bradley, Mary Catherine Burdge, Philip Burns, Erica Bush, Joe Butler, Caroline Cheney, Griffin Connolly, Joe Connor, Carmyn Cook, Zach Crone, Drew Davis, Rob Davis, Josh Edmondson, George Edwards, Avery

Campers attend mass celebrated by Bishop Choby.

Steven Mackey, Tim Forbes ‘93 and Elizabeth Coyle ‘02 at Catholic HEART Work camp.

Father Ryan Hosts Catholic HEART Workcamp

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or the past 11 years, the Father Ryan campus has been the site for an international Catholic service program that draws hundreds of kids from across the region. The Catholic HEART Workcamp (CHWC) in Nashville welcomed 334 campers in late June for a week of city-wide mission work.

The camp is an opportunity for teens ages 14-20 to practice their faith and minister to the community through service projects. Each day, participants travel to work sites around the city to refurbish homes, help day care centers for low income families or distribute food to the needy. This year, the program is working with local outfits like Metro Development and Housing Authority (MDHA), Campus for Human Development and Salvation Army. Campers were also active with West Nashville Partnership flood relief. More than work-driven, CHWC also promotes camaraderie and bonding in youth group activities. The evening features youth group sharing time, prayer reflection, videos, staff presentations, skits and worship music. Campers also have a free day in the week to visit local attractions like Nashville Shores and the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere. What differentiates CHWC from other work camps is its focus on the Catholic faith. The program fosters the practice of faith through service to others while educating young people in the church’s teachings.

Daily morning mass, Eucharistic Adoration, daily rosary and reconciliation are all offered throughout the week. Catholic HEART Workcamp was founded in 1993 by two youth ministers in Orlando, FL, as a program that offers quality service projects to teens based in the Catholic faith. In the last 15 years, the program has expanded to 11,000 participants in 40 branches across the country like Pittsburgh, Oklahoma City, Los Angeles, St. Louis and one in Jamaica. The Nashville branch is led by 2002 alumna Elizabeth Coyle (whom we profiled in Irish Ayes last fall). Although this is her second year as manager of CHWC in Nashville, her first experience with the program was a trip to New Orleans the summer before her freshman year at Father Ryan. It makes sense that Father Ryan would be chosen as the site for the work camp. The school has always encouraged young people to practice faith and service daily. In fact, Ryan students have built strong relationships with non-profit organizations over the years like Ronald McDonald House, Habitat for Humanity and Monroe Harding, some of which have partnered with CHWC for service projects. Not to mention, CHWC and Father Ryan share similar missions—to encourage each person to achieve his or her spiritual potential and to be an example of Christ through faith, knowledge and service. 23


Newspaper Reports Mixed Reactions From Cathedral Chimes (of Cathedral High School) February 22, 1970: “I would like to see girls over here….If girls were here, I would start dressing better and studying harder.” - W. Gator ‘73 “The idea of Ryan going coeducational strikes me as being very significant. It represents a social change from old thinking. I’m in favor of having some girls to brighten up our lives.” – T. McDowell ‘73

even after Father Ryan became co-ed, but at that point, cheerleaders were exclusively Ryan students. Needless to say, boys at Father Ryan were not isolated from their female peers prior to 1970. The environment of the school has transformed immensely since that pivotal year. Today, women are present in every school activity—band, theatre, student government, honors societies, service clubs and athletics. Father Ryan was already ahead of the curve when Title IX was enacted in 1972. The statute prohibits gender discrimination among educational programs. “Title IX didn’t seem to have an impact here because gender equality was already happening,” explains Dieterich. “We were already trying to give girls the opportunity to excel the best we could. It is part of our mission.” “Women have brought so much class to the school,” adds Cockerham. “There are so many areas in which they excel and they have had a huge impact on the success of this school.”

“Even though I hate leaving Cathedral, Ryan is the next best school I know of.” – B Shearin ‘71

The achievements speak for themselves. In the last three years, 11 women were honored by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation; 15 earned college athletic scholarships; three were named salutatorian and one was named valedictorian. Women ranked high in post-graduation honors, too.

“I have always wanted to go to a co-ed Catholic High School, but I’m sorry I have to go in my senior year. It’s going to be hard to get used to boys after three years with girls, but I feel I will enjoy it.” – G. Mason ‘71

Luellen Hoffman ’72 is an award-winning author of Special Dream: Personal Accounts After the Death of a Loved One; Nanette Baker ’75 is Chief Judge in the Missouri Court of Appeals; Monica Wehby-Grant ’80 is a neurological surgeon; Andrea Arnold ’89 is the Senior VP of Government and Community Relations for the Nashville Convention and Visitor’s Bureau; Courtney Corbin ’00 is a professional dancer and member of the renowned Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in New York.

“I only wish the change had been sooner. I get tired of just seeing boys.” – C. Baxter ‘70

These are just a few of the successful alumnae who have helped pave the way for Father Ryan’s young women. In nearly every field, Father Ryan alumnae succeed—law, medicine, education, business, music—and they continue to excel alongside their male peers in parity, something unforeseen half a century ago. This year marks an outstanding milestone in Father Ryan’s history. The 2010-2011 school year is one of celebration as we commemorate the 40th anniversary of co-education. It may be hard to believe four decades have passed since women became part of the student body, but they have woven an unmistakable thread into the Father Ryan tradition. But, do not think for a moment that this is the finale of women’s contributions to Father Ryan. If women can accomplish this much in 40 years, imagine what they will do in the next 40.

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Service in Christian Leadership

Fr. James Black ‘64 taught at Father Ryan for 12 Years.

Embry, Mikhail Emmanuel, Grace Farone, Elena Ferguson, Erin Ferguson, McKenna Foster, Madeline Fox, Kaitlyn Gilbert, Conlon Griesmer, Kylan Hadley, Zana Hall, Liz Haynes, Callie Herrmann, Olivia Holmes, Shea Holmes, Daniel Huetter, Matthew Jaconetta, Daniel Johnson, Shelia Johnson, Nicholas Kniazewycz; Matthew Labadie, Luke LeFeve, Dani Manes, Mark Marchetti, Joseph McCluney, Kathleen McInnis, Waylon McInturff, Connor McSweeney, Nora Melton, Chloe Moix, Adam Neal, Tracy Neligan, Tom Novelly, Conor O’Bryan, Ransom Patterson, Margaret Payne, Jacob Phillips, Cole Pickney, Mac Pillon, Victor Pollack, Mitchell Pollard, Kalyn Pruett, Ryan Quarles, Marc Quitalig, Rachel Ralph, Jack Roberts, Alex Robinson, Amy Rohling, Sean Rollins, Mackie Round, Frane Santic, Stephanie Schwartz, Caleb Sharber, Paul Shinar, Danny Slattery, Patrick Stevens, Kiley Stinson, Suzanne Strupp, Delores Stuart, Tyler Stuessi, Rustin Suray, Melody Swope, Tyler Thompson, Kellen Wagner, Maddy Walters, Rachael Wesnofske, Caitlin Whalen, Daniel Whitcomb, Nicole White, Patrick Williamson and Katie Wilson.

Students Inducted into New Society

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ince 1925, Father Ryan has built a reputation in forming motivated, principled and compassionate young men and women. One of the defining characteristics of a Father Ryan education is service. Each year, students are asked to perform 120 hours of service to the underprivileged and marginalized with many of them going far beyond that request. With the level of service Father Ryan students are performing, the school has created a new way to recognize their exceptional and selfless acts of giving. The 2009-2010 school year marked the first year for the St. Vincent de Paul Service Society. The society was created to recognize students who have made a commitment to service during their time at Father Ryan. Its namesake, St. Vincent de Paul, serves as a connection between the saint of the poor and students and also honors the Daughters of Charity who have worked tirelessly with the poor in the Diocese of Nashville.

The St. Vincent de Paul’s Service Society’s inaugural year honored 23 students in April. Members inducted were Alissa Best, Evan Bohn, Amelia Bradshaw, Erin Brady, Jessica Burgy, Kathleen Butler, Sean Della Croce, Kay-Ann Curtis, Graham Englert, Nina Fredericks, Elizabeth Gentile, Catherine Glidwell, Neil Johnson, Kerry Lindstrom, Rebecca Menke, Stephanie Miller, Rachel Quesinberry, Andrea Robleto, Jackson Shacklett, Claire Stewart, Jennifer Travis, Rachelle VanMeter and Elizabeth Westbrook. 7


Class of 2010 Top Students Continue to Impress

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ach year, Father Ryan’s valedictorian and salutatorian represent two students who have reached the pinnacle of academic success in their class. Naturally, these students have completed nearly a dozen Advanced Placement and honors classes, but what is less discerning is their active involvement outside of the classroom and the humility they maintain through it all. Dom DiGiovanni and Becca Menke were named Father Ryan’s 2010 valedictorian and salutatorian, respectively, but are still your average teenagers. They attend sporting events with friends, participate in school clubs and are looking forward to college life. Their hectic academic schedules—18 AP classes between them—are slightly above average but are counterbalanced by activities outside of the classroom including athletics and service organizations. Dom is a member of the National Honor Society and Cum Laude Society and manager for the lacrosse and basketball teams. During his senior year, he was also elected by his peers to be “Ryan Man,” the school’s leprechaun-like mascot and spirit leader, clad in top hat and coattails. Colleges across the country recognized his strong leadership and academic abilities. He received acceptance letters from Alabama, Auburn, Hillsdale College, Notre Dame, Sewanee, St. Joseph’s, UVA, Vanderbilt, Villanova and Washington and Lee. The decision wasn’t easy, but he has decided to spend his collegiate career at Hillsdale College in Michigan. Becca has chosen to stay closer to home and enroll at Auburn, where she received a full academic scholarship. She was also accepted to Bellarmine, Christian Brothers University, Rhodes, Spring Hill College, St. Louis University, University of Dayton, UT Knoxville and Xavier. The number of acceptance letters is not surprising considering her level of commitment in academics 8

and service activities. She is a founding member of the Future Physicians of America, a member of the National Honor Society and Spanish Honor Society, a student ambassador and a varsity athlete on the soccer and track teams. Even with all these activities, she still finds time for involvement in her community by volunteering at LifeTeen, Second Harvest Food Bank and Catholic Heart Work Camp. Without a doubt, Dom and Becca have been very busy and in their four years, have accomplished an extraordinary amount. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation recognized both students as Finalists in their scholarship program for their performance on the Preliminary SAT (PSAT). Only 1% of students in the country who take the test each year qualify as Finalists. “I am continually impressed with the successes our students achieve each year. Dom and Becca are phenomenal examples of what can be accomplished with hard work and the support of a community of teachers, friends and family,” said Jim McIntyre, president. With the heavy amount of academic and extracurriculars under their belts, these top students will have the capability to pursue excellence beyond Father Ryan and achieve leadership roles in their own communities. McIntyre agrees, “I have no doubt that their dedication and integrity will take them far in life, and I know I will hear great things from them in the future.”

Williams with the Chemical Awareness Program, Cockerham with volleyball, Boo Lynch with the Cooperative Support Program, Phyllis Adgent with Science Academy. Through their example, they inspired young girls in their classrooms to take on leadership roles. “Many said that women wouldn’t get leadership positions because there are so many boys. That’s not true because four of the last five student body presidents have been female,” Davis contends. Female participation in athletics has also changed tremendously over the years. Despite a rough start with a winless first season, the girls’ varsity basketball team—the only girls’ team in 1970— prompted the addition of a few more like track, tennis and cross country. It wasn’t until 1976 that volleyball was sanctioned by the TSSAA. Led by Cockerham, the Lady Irish volleyball team has been recognized as one of the strongest programs in the state. “Jinx Cockerham is the biggest female influence here,” says Williams. “She has molded young women not to be high school sports players, but to be real solid athletes who go on to play in college.”

In 1981, Cockerham began the Gentry Award, which was given out to exceptional female basketball players. The award was named after another influential woman, Alice Gentry, Father Ryan’s former secretary and registrar. She was the only woman in the administrative office for a number of years, and from 1947 to 1981, she was a Father Ryan icon who did it all. Davis remembers, “She was secretary, assistant to the principal, registrar, everything. She used to do it all herself. The respect that she commanded was unbelievable.” Life before girls was certainly different, but 1970 was not the first year boys and girls attended class together at Father Ryan. Girls from St. Bernard Academy and St. Cecilia Academy frequently joined the boys for classes in physics and calculus because their schools did not offer them. Girls also attended pep rallies and interacted with Father Ryan at dances after every football game. Saturday was a big night, too, with Teen Town, a CYO event alternately hosted by Father Ryan and St. Joseph. Being a cheerleader was and still is a fairly big deal. Before co-education, girls from St. Cecilia, St. Bernard and Cathedral made up the cheerleading squad, two from each school. Girls competed for a spot on the squad by auditioning in front of the student body. It was a tradition that continued for many years Continued on page 22

Cathedral Chimes reported that 69 percent of the girls planned to attend Father Ryan, 21 percent to attend public school and 16 percent were undecided. In September of 1970, Father Ryan opened enrollment in grades 10, 11 and 12 exclusively to girls from Cathedral; grade 9 was open to girls from any school. Uniforms for sophomore, junior and senior girls remained the same from Cathedral, but new uniforms were designed for freshmen that first year. That year marked an end of an era for Cathedral following 61 years as an educational institution. Cathedral first opened in 1909 as a coeducational grade school and high school on West End Avenue. In 1925, Bishop Alphonse Smith formed a separate high school for boys on the same property, and Cathedral became an all-girls school. The boys’ school later moved to Elliston Place in 1929 to become Father Ryan. 21


The Class of 2010 The girls eventually became part of the tradition and were welcomed by their male peers. According to Dieterich, “We didn’t give them a hard time because we weren’t sure,” and he points out that the faculty, too, may have been unsure, simply because they had to adjust their teaching style. But as a student, “it wasn’t that much different to have guys and girls in the classroom. It was kind of nice, because it was more like the real world. We were learning how society is in real life.” That first year, all the class officers were male, but it didn’t take long before a few girls had infiltrated. Girls began to take on more leadership roles and heavily influenced Father Ryan’s curriculum. Teacher C.A. Williams remembers the early years when the school offered classes like Home Economics and Steno Skills. “We had classes in typing, business, short-hand. Girls were being prepared for clerical work or to be a homemaker. Today, it’s not so stereotypical. It’s now anybody’s class, not a guy’s class or a girl’s class.” Williams, who is entering her 39th year at Father Ryan, is an advocate for coeducation. “When I found out Ryan was going co-ed, I was shocked, but I thought it was way cool. I think it’s healthier when guys and girls interact daily and develop those friendships.”

Often cited as an influential woman at Ryan, Williams began her first week of teaching with a learning experience of her own—at the mercy of a student. She taught the last period of the day on the third floor where, she notes, there was no air conditioning. “On my first day, a student convinced me that teachers could dismiss their last period class early if the lesson were completed, because the room became so hot. So, that first day, I had finished my lesson, and I let them leave about 15 minutes early. I did this all week.” It wasn’t until teacher Jim Langdon ‘54 stepped in that she caught on. “I would go into the faculty lounge after class, and he asked me why I was always in there at that time. I told him I had dismissed my students early. He was so kind. He pulled me aside and calmly told me the truth. I had no idea!” And from that moment, he became her mentor. Principal Paul Davis, a 1981 alumnus, launched his career at Father Ryan in 1986. He points to several women on the faculty as his mentors, including C.A. Williams, Jinx Cockerham, Peggy Adams and Becky Young. Each was influential in increasing female leadership among the staff and among the student body. In fact, women initiated some of Father Ryan’s most successful programs.

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n the early months of 1970, Cathedral pastor Monsignor Albert Siener came to a difficult conclusion. Operating costs for Cathedral High School were escalating and, coupled with the decline of religious personnel, the school could no longer handle the financial burden. Father Paul Morris, Superintendent of Diocesan Parochial School System, confirmed these thoughts. In the letter to Monsignor Siener, he wrote of his support to merge Cathedral and Father Ryan. He wrote, “My personal and professional feeling is that the consolidation of Cathedral high school and Father Ryan high school will indeed strengthen the Catholic school System in the city of Nashville.” With Father Morris’ approval, the plan to merge the high schools became official. Months before the closing, a school survey by 20

Graduates Full of Promise

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t would be impossible to characterize the Class of 2010 as anything other than accomplished. Just look at the numbers. Acceptances to more than 100 colleges and universities across the country and abroad. More than $17 million earned in scholarships. Enrollment in 59 colleges in 23 states (and one in England). Seven students honored by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, three as Finalists. What’s more is that one fifth of the class are members in academic and service societies—35 of the Cum Laude Society, 32 of the Cardinal Newman Association and 23 of the St. Vincent de Paul Service Society. But behind those numbers is something far more extraordinary. These students have reached beyond the basics of their education and beyond what is expected of them. While juggling advanced courses with school activities has become a national norm, doing so in addition to feeding the homeless or tutoring students is far above it. As Dom DiGiovanni said in his valedictory speech, “In a time when society points to norms and standards, Father Ryan’s mission strives to raise the bar.” Father Ryan students are setting the new standard. Like Nina Fredericks, who successfully balanced a challenging academic course load including AP Calculus with extra-curricular activities—student ambassador and Ultimate Frisbee Club—and still made time to participate in service organizations like Relay for Life and Rachel’s Challenge. She received the Presidential Scholarship to attend Creighton University in the fall. Or Nick Pollard, named TSSAA’s Mr. Football for his athleticism, academics and character, who represented Father Ryan as an ambassador on and off campus, volunteering with organizations such as Room in the Inn, Nashville’s Soup Kitchen and Norman Binkley Elementary School. The University of Tennessee in Chattanooga awarded him a scholarship to play football this fall. It’s not hard to believe that this graduating class has been accepted to prestigious colleges and universities such as Boston College, Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, Villanova, Washington and Lee and the University of Notre Dame. One student will continue her education in Europe. Sean Della Croce was accepted to the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts, chosen from 1,000 applicants world-wide for one of 55 available openings in the school’s music performance program. She established her own music publishing company, Working Week Music, and released her debut EP, On The Line, for which she wrote all the songs. Apart from her musical work, she was a staff writer for the Moina and a member of the National Honor Society. She is just one example of the breadth of talent and ambition within these graduates. Doctor, architect, musician, teacher, engineer, actor, service volunteer. The number of paths that these young men and women can take is endless. In their four years at Ryan, the Class of 2010—a class of entrepreneurs and philanthropists—has accomplished what few have in a lifetime, and they’re not done yet. 9


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Winter Sports Athletic Signings Father Ryan counts a whopping 17 students who received athletic scholarships to college this year. In addition to Brittanie Albright, Rachel Mayes and Ellen Mullins who signed earlier in the year, the following also signed their Letters of Intent this past spring: Eric Bolton will play baseball at the University of North Alabama; Jackson Coursey will play football at Washington and Lee; Gene Flathmann will play lacrosse at Oglethorpe University; Joe Francescon will play football at Austin Peay; Dylan Golden will play baseball at Wallace State; Conner Graves will play football at Lindsey Wilson College; Trey McPhail will play football at College of Mt. Saint Joseph; Nick Pollard will play football at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; John Rohling will play soccer at Southern Indiana; Kristen Sharp will play volleyball at Maryville College; Alex Shoulders will play baseball at Jackson State Community College; Anthony Simpson will run cross country for Bryan College; Landon Snyder will play baseball for Cleveland State; and Madison Wenzler will swim for University of Texas at Austin.

10

Wrestling Team Wins Eighteenth State Title

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he Irish wrestling team ended an impeccable season, earning top honors in the state again this year with a championship title in dual wrestling. With an overall season record of 29 wins and four defeats, and undefeated in state competition, the team went on to defeat Christian Brothers 28-24, marking the seventh title in dual wrestling and the eighteenth overall in Father Ryan’s history. The lead-up to the state duals title was a close one. The Irish defeated McCallie in the semi-finals 34-33 and their match against Christian Brothers was equally exciting. The Purple Wave was leading the match with four consecutive weight victories until rising senior Chris Agnew (145) pulled Ryan ahead against the state runner-up to a 25-18 lead. However, the point spread closed quickly to 25 and 24 after the Purple Wave secured six of seven weight classes to pull within a point before the 171 final. With the crowd on its feet, 2010 graduate Will Mix defeated his opponent 3-2 and closed the tournament with trophy in hand. A few weeks later, Father Ryan realized success again, this time at the state individual wrestling tournament. The team boasted two state champions and an overall fourth place finish behind Baylor, McCallie and Christian Brothers. Mike Akers was the state champion at 103 pounds and Wes Wesley won the state at 171 pounds. This is Wesley’s third consecutive state championship. Other wrestlers also competed well: Cole Moseley (112), Will Mix (189) and Ricky Fisher (215) all placed second; Chris Agnew (145), Mark Marchetti (125), T.J. Holmes (160) and Anthony Simpson (119) placed third; Dylan Wright (130) and Ale Benito (152) placed fifth and Brian Murphy (135) placed sixth. Head Coach Pat Simpson ‘74 also earned big honors this year. He was once again named TSSAA’s Coach of the Year after 31 years as coach for Father Ryan’s wrestling team.

he year was 1970 and boys ruled the school. There was the occasional classroom prank, the good-natured heckling of freshmen, a loose crude remark and maybe even a brief after - school scuffle. These were elements of an all-boys school, and that’s the way it was. Midway through in the school year, hallways echoed with the boisterous sounds of students already eager for summer. Father Ryan was rounding out its fortyfourth year and rumors abounded that a major shift was about to occur at Elliston Place. In February, just a few months shy of summer, the diocese officially announced to students and faculty that Cathedral High School, the all-girls school on West End Avenue, would be closing its doors, and its students would be joining Father Ryan the following year. The news was well-received, if not a bit surprising, and that fall approximately 112 girls arrived for their first day at Ryan. Rosemary (Strobel) Hehn, a 1972 alumna, was among the newcomers that day as she entered her junior year at Father Ryan. “I have fond memories of Ryan after the initial shock of consolidation,” she says. “Change is hard.” She admits that she and other girls were not thrilled about attending, but she easily bonded with other Cathedral transfers who shared a unique situation. Attending Father Ryan “meant leaving friends I had been with since first grade; after the school year began, new friends were made and many lasting friendships. I think our Catholic faith was a common bond that helped to unite us.” That day was also the first for a handful of female teachers, including Jinx Cockerham, who remembers her first impression well. “I walked in the door for an interview, sat down, and within ten minutes, Jim

Sullins said, ‘You’re hired. Your classroom is on the third floor. Go.’” With the influx of female students, Father Ryan’s administration began hiring more female teachers, and they favored those with a business background. Fortunately for Cockerham, she fit the bill, and was quickly ushered into a typing class, where her teaching chops were put to the test. That class, it turned out, helped her develop a resiliency to challenge that has become part of her reputation. “That first class, which was 99 percent male, told me I would not last long because they had gotten rid of the last teacher,” she says, amused. “The boys said they had thrown their typewriters out of the window from the third floor.” Little did they know that she would outlast them; she’s celebrating 40 years at Father Ryan, longer than any other female in the school’s history. Times have changed, but she cannot forget that defining year in 1970 when she became one of the few females among the staff—an accidental pioneer. She admits there was some resistance and a few hiccups in the beginning, particularly with the absence of female restrooms, but realized “we were changing an entire culture.” As a freshman in 1970, Pat Simpson witnessed the culture shift. His two brothers had preceded him at Father Ryan, and he had been looking forward to joining in among the guys. He didn’t mask his first reaction to the news. “I was disappointed when I first heard about the girls,” he concedes. This year Simpson will enter his 31st as a teacher and coach at Ryan. He has taught church history and economics and coached wrestling, football and even softball at one point. “The biggest difference between coaching boys and girls: it’s easier to hurt girls’ feelings,” he smiles unwittingly. Robin Dieterich agrees. “The difference is how you approach them and their motivation. Girls are more sensitive. Boys brush it off more easily.” Dieterich has also seen both sides of the coin, having taught and coached at Father Ryan since 1978. He is also a 1973 graduate, a position that offers him a unique perspective of school life before and after girls. “I had mixed feelings at that moment. There was so much tradition as an all-boys school.” 19


Bowling

The Irish bowling teams finished out the season with an individual state champion—Sam Bass (left), who also earned All-Midstate honors. The boys and girls teams fought hard in district competition, with the boys team finishing third in the district. Congratulations to the Irish bowlers for another great season!

Basketball

The Father Ryan boys’ basketball team finished the season with a 13-15 record. The players started the season off strong with a win against David Lipscomb, 63-58. The rest of the year was highlighted by other close victories—a 50-48 win against Franklin, who was undefeated at the time, and a 49-40 win against Hillsboro at the FRHS Christmas Tournament. Jackson Coursey was named to the Division II Middle-East All Region Team. Coach Doug Bontrager ‘81 also celebrated his 400th career victory at Father Ryan last season. The girls’ basketball team also completed a successful season with a 14-13 record and several notable accomplishments. The season began with important wins over Lipscomb and St. Benedict, and later in the season the Irish defeated both Harpeth Hall and BGA twice, each in region play. The Lady Irish also won the Overton Christmas Tournament—following victories over Maplewood 18

and Overton in the first two rounds, the Lady Irish defeated Glencliff in the championship game.

Hockey

The Father Ryan hockey team skated tough this year to defend their state championship title. Once the puck dropped, the players went to work putting the pressure on their opponents and managed four shutouts: Independence-Page (twice), Blackman and Franklin. Despite an aggressive offense and solid defense, it wasn’t enough to push the Irish through the playoffs. Led by seniors Harrison Burdge, Alex Glinski, Brian O’Loughlin and Will Orr, the team rounded out the season at 8-11-4. Matthew Neal led the team in points scored, and O’Loughlin, Orr and Andy Franklin represented Ryan in the All-Star game in the South division.

Swimming & Diving

The swim team participated in the state swim meet this year among 106 teams and finished in tenth place as a combined team. The women’s team also finished in tenth place and the men’s team in thirteenth place. All of the Father Ryan swimmers achieved at least one “Lifetime Best Swim” and most had two. Sophomore Sara Menke was named NISCA Swimming All-American and seniors Emily Akers, Chris Dahlhauser, Harrison Daigle, Eric Johnson and Claire Stewart qualified for Academic All-Americans. To achieve this honor, the senior athlete must have an overall grade point average of 3.75 for seven semesters.

11


spring Sports Spring Season Opens with Celebration

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he beginning of spring heralds warm weather, sunny skies and the opening of ballparks everywhere, including Father Ryan’s own at the Jim Carell Alumni Athletic Complex. In true Irish style, Father Ryan kicked off its spring season in March with a celebration— the Spring Sports Celebration, to be exact.

The week-long event saluted athletes and coaches while highlighting home games in baseball, softball, soccer and boys and girls lacrosse. Most importantly, the week celebrated the opening of the new baseball and softball fields, both commemorated with dedication ceremonies. The softball field opening kicked off the week, welcoming back the 1995 softball state champions and their former head coach, Pat Simpson ‘74. Softball players, coaches and supporters lined up to cut the ribbon and commence the first varsity game on the new field (below). Rounding out the celebration on Saturday was A Day at the Ballpark—the dedication of the baseball field. Guests enjoyed the traditional hot dog and soda, and kids competed in skills games before the blessing of the baseball field, led by Father Philip Breen ’57. 12

Bill Stejskal ‘79 and his family were honored for donating the home team dugout. Flanked by baseball players, the Stejskals, Jim Carell ’54, Pat Nolan ’69, Principal Paul Davis ’81, Father Philip Breen, Athletic Director Pat Lawson ’93, President Jim McIntyre and Baseball Head Coach Mike Mascari ’95 ceremoniously cut the purple ribbon (above). Then Bill Stejskal took to the mound to throw the first pitch and opened the game to a loud applause.

Baseball

The baseball team produced several highlights this past season, defeating #16 state-ranked Columbia Central 7-3. Four players, Eric Bolton, Dylan Golden, Alex Shoulders and Landon Snyder, were offered athletic scholarships and will continue their baseball careers this fall.

Softball

Likewise, the softball team also worked hard this year. Junior Emily Sochovka was named to the All-State softball team and pitcher Brittanie Albright received an athletic scholarship to Western Kentucky. The players finished out their season self-assured in their efforts on the field thanks to the leadership of the seniors and head coach Phil Davidson, who will be succeeded by Ashlee Schenk, former assistant coach, next season.

took notice; and the Tennessean featured an editorial by senior Rachel Quesinberry in its ongoing series about bullying. The following is an excerpt from her Carter Brallier ‘10 performs with letter: his band, Supple Station Trio. Rachel’s Challenge promotes an anti-bully environment. Rather than just discipline and discourage bullying behavior, this program has encouraged students to be kind and accepting to everyone.

Ronald McDonald House. They were also part of the welcoming crew for a displaced student from Haiti. Last but not least is a more permanent reminder of Rachel Scott’s message. A banner hangs in the dining hall inscribed with hundreds of student signatures and in the center reads “I Accept Rachel’s Challenge.” “I have this theory that if one person can go out of their way to show compassion then it will start a chain reaction of the same” - Rachel Scott.

Rules and regulations are crucial disciplinary measures to confront the problem of bullying. However, I believe that combining programs like Rachel’s Challenge with school policies, we can drastically reduce the incidence of bullying. This alternative approach is our solution to bullying and one effort to change the way all students act. The impact of Rachel’s Challenge can already be seen at Father Ryan. Last year, students organized Friends of Rachel, a club that actively promotes small acts of kindness. The club has performed talent shows and recorded books on tape for children at

Randy Lancaster ‘83 (faculty) and Sean Della Croce ‘10 entertain the Harmony for Haiti crowd.

17


Soccer

Founder of Rachel’s Challenge Visits Father Ryan

In soccer, the Irish completed another successful season, nearly undefeated in region play. The team took a loss at the state quarterfinals against Christian Brothers but celebrated a triumphant season, nevertheless, with a 12-5-1 record. John Rohling earned a spot on the All-State soccer team and was awarded an athletic scholarship to play in college. Dean of Students Carolyn Evans, President Jim McIntyre, Sandy and Darrell Scott meet with Governor Bredesen.

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t was 11 years ago this past April that the shootings at Columbine High School ended the lives of 13 students and teachers. This April, Father Ryan welcomed the man who lost his daughter that day as the first victim of the shootings. Darrell Scott came to Nashville for the first time for a twoday workshop and presentation series to promote his program, Rachel’s Challenge. The internationally-known program seeks to educate students in the areas of positive school culture and violence prevention.

Since then, Darrell Scott has spread her message to over five million people in live settings across the world and millions more through programs like Oprah, Larry King Live, CNN and the Today Show. He has also authored or co-authored five books. Rachel’s message has reached over one million people at over 1,500 schools and businesses, changing school cultures, preventing suicides and reducing bullying and violence.

Father Ryan is no stranger to Rachel’s Challenge. First introduced to students in 2007, the school is the first in the Southeast to host the program. This marks its fourth consecutive year. Rachel’s Challenge builds year-to-year, enabling freshmen through seniors to learn the message and develop new skills each year to improve their school experiences.

He capped off his two days in Nashville with Father Ryan’s “Harmony for Haiti” Concert and presentation to the public. The concert raised money for victims of the Haitian earthquake and featured performances by teacher and 1983 alumnus Randy Lancaster and seniors Sean Della Croce and Carter Brallier (the latter from the band Supple Station Trio). The evening was highlighted by the students’ presentation of a large paper chain with each link representing a student’s act of kindness.

The program was founded following the death of Rachel Scott, the first victim of the Columbine High School shootings in 1999. It was her writings that inspired the central message of the program—the challenge to “start a chain reaction” through acts of kindness. 16

Darrell’s visit to Nashville was an opportunity for him to meet with students and community leaders. He led a professional development workshop for local counselors and met with community leaders, including Governor Phil Bredesen, to introduce his program and extend its impact in Tennessee schools.

The visit also came on the coattails of Columbine’s 11th anniversary and of national news reports documenting cyber-bullying. Local news sources

Tennis

The tennis team sprouted a few honorable mentions this year. In the Middle/East Region Tournament, Sarah Haines and Matthew Kordowski represented Father Ryan in the singles with Haines advancing to the quarterfinals.

Lacrosse

The boys and girls lacrosse teams also had plenty to celebrate this year. With the new athletic complex, the Irish were able to showcase their skills in style. The boys team boasted over a dozen seniors and enjoyed a victorious Senior Night with a 10-7 win over Franklin. The players continued to push through the season to the state playoffs, despite a loss in the quarterfinals. A few players were recognized for their outstanding skills on the field—senior Gene Flathmann was named to the All-State and All-Region teams, plus earned a lacrosse college scholarship; and senior Patrick Gould and sophomore Griffin Young were named 2nd team All-Region. The girls lacrosse team kicked off the season by hosting for the first time a Maya Lacrosse Play Day to raise money for children in Guatemala City. Five other teams from across the state scrimmaged at Ryan’s Giacosa Stadium, collecting $800 worth of donations. Midway through the season, the girls experienced a string of victories against Independence, Briarcrest, Ravenwood and Centennial, capped with an overtime victory against USN.

Track

At the 2010 state track meet, Father Ryan received plenty of accolades. Junior Prince Iworah earned a state title with first place in the 100 meter dash; senior

Dwight Willingham finished third in the pole vault; and senior Joe Francescon finished second in the 200 meter dash. Iworah also made the All-Midstate 1st Team and Willingham made 3rd Team in the pole vault. The Lady Irish did exceptionally well at the Jim Webb Classic: Erin James placed first in the pole vault, second in the long jump and 100H, and Becca Menke earned second for the triple jump.

Rugby Honored for State Title

The grand prize this season went to rugby. The team earned its third state title in four years, following an undefeated season in the Middle Tennessee Conference. On their way to the championship game, the Irish Ruggers left in their wake Brighton and Brentwood before shutting out Ravenwood 15-0 in the finals. Even though Ryan was shorthanded for 10 minutes for a penalty, their stout defense held back the Raptors to maintain their lead. Winger Tyler Kincaid ’10, who scored two tries, was named Most Valuable Player for the tournament. In July, Senator Douglas Henry presented the team with a resolution passed by the Tennessee General Assembly (above) that he sponsored honoring the players and coaches for winning the 2010 Rugby State Championship Cup. Head Coach Keith Burnett explained to the senator that the players communicate with each other on the rugby pitch by saying “with you, with you,” which translates on the field of play as “I am backing you up.” Coach Burnett then presented him with a rugby ball signed by the team, saying, “On behalf of Father Ryan High School and the Father Ryan Rugby Club, Senator Henry, we are with you.” The success of the spring sports season was a perfect conclusion to the Jim Carell Alumni Athletic Complex inaugural year. Before we know it, the next season is upon us. 13


Imagine you have only five minutes to save your most precious possessions in your house. What would you save?

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early everyone has been asked that question at some point in their lives, but for hundreds of people, that question became a reality this year. On May 2, 2010, Tennessee experienced the largest natural disaster in its history. Following two days of torrential rain, the swelling rivers could hold no longer and overflowing waters quickly swept through homes and businesses across greater Nashville. In a matter of minutes, water rose to more than five feet deep in some areas. “The Flood of 2010,” as it is now called, trapped several people on roofs, in cars and on floating debris, and left a large number homeless in the wake of its destruction. Not surprisingly, though, was the immediate response by the Father Ryan community. Students, teachers, administrators and their families helped flood victims recover belongings and remove debris from their homes. Among them was President Jim McIntyre who saw “students wading into rising waters to save strangers, families offering their homes as safe harbor.” When flood waters entered his neighborhood, 2010 graduate Will Mix moved neighbors’ furniture to higher ground and rescued a few trapped by the rising waters.

(Above) President Jim McIntyre helps clean up after flood; (top right) seniors Elizabeth O’Rear, Jilli Richards and Abigail Thomas lend a hand to the community. 14

Father Ryan Aids Victims in Flood Aftermath

Still others gave clothing, food, textbooks—whatever they had to offer. And for a handful of families who lost everything, the financial burden was the hardest of all. Thanks to the help of generous donors like Mike ’76 and Barbara Barrett and the Class of 2010, that burden was lightened through the Tuition Relief Fund. During Baccalaureate Mass, senior class president Emily Phillips announced that although the seniors had already chosen their class gift, they had decided to donate their $7,000 to the fund instead. Pledges of up to $25,000 in matching dollars were initially offered; in addition, Annual Fund gifts received after May 15 were put in the fund for

qualifying Father Ryan families. The Faculty and Staff Assistance Fund was also set up, with an initial contribution of $25,000 from Father Ryan, through The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee under their Corporate Care structure. Within two short months, more than $70,000 was raised for both funds. Fortunately, Father Ryan’s campus fared well in the flood. However, its Hendersonville counterpart did not. Pope John Paul II High School sustained damage to its athletic fields and on top of that, the site of its commencement ceremony—the Grand Ole Opry— was flooded. With only two weeks until graduation, Father Ryan stepped forward and offered its reserved ceremony site at Belmont University. For the first time, Father Ryan and Pope John Paul II held graduation on the same day in the same location, within hours of each other. It was certainly a year for the history books. For Tennessee. For the Diocese of Nashville. For Father Ryan. And like most historic events, this was an occasion of heroic actions by the most unsuspecting people. The entire Father Ryan family should be proud. 15


Imagine you have only five minutes to save your most precious possessions in your house. What would you save?

N

early everyone has been asked that question at some point in their lives, but for hundreds of people, that question became a reality this year. On May 2, 2010, Tennessee experienced the largest natural disaster in its history. Following two days of torrential rain, the swelling rivers could hold no longer and overflowing waters quickly swept through homes and businesses across greater Nashville. In a matter of minutes, water rose to more than five feet deep in some areas. “The Flood of 2010,” as it is now called, trapped several people on roofs, in cars and on floating debris, and left a large number homeless in the wake of its destruction. Not surprisingly, though, was the immediate response by the Father Ryan community. Students, teachers, administrators and their families helped flood victims recover belongings and remove debris from their homes. Among them was President Jim McIntyre who saw “students wading into rising waters to save strangers, families offering their homes as safe harbor.” When flood waters entered his neighborhood, 2010 graduate Will Mix moved neighbors’ furniture to higher ground and rescued a few trapped by the rising waters.

(Above) President Jim McIntyre helps clean up after flood; (top right) seniors Elizabeth O’Rear, Jilli Richards and Abigail Thomas lend a hand to the community. 14

Father Ryan Aids Victims in Flood Aftermath

Still others gave clothing, food, textbooks—whatever they had to offer. And for a handful of families who lost everything, the financial burden was the hardest of all. Thanks to the help of generous donors like Mike ’76 and Barbara Barrett and the Class of 2010, that burden was lightened through the Tuition Relief Fund. During Baccalaureate Mass, senior class president Emily Phillips announced that although the seniors had already chosen their class gift, they had decided to donate their $7,000 to the fund instead. Pledges of up to $25,000 in matching dollars were initially offered; in addition, Annual Fund gifts received after May 15 were put in the fund for

qualifying Father Ryan families. The Faculty and Staff Assistance Fund was also set up, with an initial contribution of $25,000 from Father Ryan, through The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee under their Corporate Care structure. Within two short months, more than $70,000 was raised for both funds. Fortunately, Father Ryan’s campus fared well in the flood. However, its Hendersonville counterpart did not. Pope John Paul II High School sustained damage to its athletic fields and on top of that, the site of its commencement ceremony—the Grand Ole Opry— was flooded. With only two weeks until graduation, Father Ryan stepped forward and offered its reserved ceremony site at Belmont University. For the first time, Father Ryan and Pope John Paul II held graduation on the same day in the same location, within hours of each other. It was certainly a year for the history books. For Tennessee. For the Diocese of Nashville. For Father Ryan. And like most historic events, this was an occasion of heroic actions by the most unsuspecting people. The entire Father Ryan family should be proud. 15


Soccer

Founder of Rachel’s Challenge Visits Father Ryan

In soccer, the Irish completed another successful season, nearly undefeated in region play. The team took a loss at the state quarterfinals against Christian Brothers but celebrated a triumphant season, nevertheless, with a 12-5-1 record. John Rohling earned a spot on the All-State soccer team and was awarded an athletic scholarship to play in college. Dean of Students Carolyn Evans, President Jim McIntyre, Sandy and Darrell Scott meet with Governor Bredesen.

I

t was 11 years ago this past April that the shootings at Columbine High School ended the lives of 13 students and teachers. This April, Father Ryan welcomed the man who lost his daughter that day as the first victim of the shootings. Darrell Scott came to Nashville for the first time for a twoday workshop and presentation series to promote his program, Rachel’s Challenge. The internationally-known program seeks to educate students in the areas of positive school culture and violence prevention.

Since then, Darrell Scott has spread her message to over five million people in live settings across the world and millions more through programs like Oprah, Larry King Live, CNN and the Today Show. He has also authored or co-authored five books. Rachel’s message has reached over one million people at over 1,500 schools and businesses, changing school cultures, preventing suicides and reducing bullying and violence.

Father Ryan is no stranger to Rachel’s Challenge. First introduced to students in 2007, the school is the first in the Southeast to host the program. This marks its fourth consecutive year. Rachel’s Challenge builds year-to-year, enabling freshmen through seniors to learn the message and develop new skills each year to improve their school experiences.

He capped off his two days in Nashville with Father Ryan’s “Harmony for Haiti” Concert and presentation to the public. The concert raised money for victims of the Haitian earthquake and featured performances by teacher and 1983 alumnus Randy Lancaster and seniors Sean Della Croce and Carter Brallier (the latter from the band Supple Station Trio). The evening was highlighted by the students’ presentation of a large paper chain with each link representing a student’s act of kindness.

The program was founded following the death of Rachel Scott, the first victim of the Columbine High School shootings in 1999. It was her writings that inspired the central message of the program—the challenge to “start a chain reaction” through acts of kindness. 16

Darrell’s visit to Nashville was an opportunity for him to meet with students and community leaders. He led a professional development workshop for local counselors and met with community leaders, including Governor Phil Bredesen, to introduce his program and extend its impact in Tennessee schools.

The visit also came on the coattails of Columbine’s 11th anniversary and of national news reports documenting cyber-bullying. Local news sources

Tennis

The tennis team sprouted a few honorable mentions this year. In the Middle/East Region Tournament, Sarah Haines and Matthew Kordowski represented Father Ryan in the singles with Haines advancing to the quarterfinals.

Lacrosse

The boys and girls lacrosse teams also had plenty to celebrate this year. With the new athletic complex, the Irish were able to showcase their skills in style. The boys team boasted over a dozen seniors and enjoyed a victorious Senior Night with a 10-7 win over Franklin. The players continued to push through the season to the state playoffs, despite a loss in the quarterfinals. A few players were recognized for their outstanding skills on the field—senior Gene Flathmann was named to the All-State and All-Region teams, plus earned a lacrosse college scholarship; and senior Patrick Gould and sophomore Griffin Young were named 2nd team All-Region. The girls lacrosse team kicked off the season by hosting for the first time a Maya Lacrosse Play Day to raise money for children in Guatemala City. Five other teams from across the state scrimmaged at Ryan’s Giacosa Stadium, collecting $800 worth of donations. Midway through the season, the girls experienced a string of victories against Independence, Briarcrest, Ravenwood and Centennial, capped with an overtime victory against USN.

Track

At the 2010 state track meet, Father Ryan received plenty of accolades. Junior Prince Iworah earned a state title with first place in the 100 meter dash; senior

Dwight Willingham finished third in the pole vault; and senior Joe Francescon finished second in the 200 meter dash. Iworah also made the All-Midstate 1st Team and Willingham made 3rd Team in the pole vault. The Lady Irish did exceptionally well at the Jim Webb Classic: Erin James placed first in the pole vault, second in the long jump and 100H, and Becca Menke earned second for the triple jump.

Rugby Honored for State Title

The grand prize this season went to rugby. The team earned its third state title in four years, following an undefeated season in the Middle Tennessee Conference. On their way to the championship game, the Irish Ruggers left in their wake Brighton and Brentwood before shutting out Ravenwood 15-0 in the finals. Even though Ryan was shorthanded for 10 minutes for a penalty, their stout defense held back the Raptors to maintain their lead. Winger Tyler Kincaid ’10, who scored two tries, was named Most Valuable Player for the tournament. In July, Senator Douglas Henry presented the team with a resolution passed by the Tennessee General Assembly (above) that he sponsored honoring the players and coaches for winning the 2010 Rugby State Championship Cup. Head Coach Keith Burnett explained to the senator that the players communicate with each other on the rugby pitch by saying “with you, with you,” which translates on the field of play as “I am backing you up.” Coach Burnett then presented him with a rugby ball signed by the team, saying, “On behalf of Father Ryan High School and the Father Ryan Rugby Club, Senator Henry, we are with you.” The success of the spring sports season was a perfect conclusion to the Jim Carell Alumni Athletic Complex inaugural year. Before we know it, the next season is upon us. 13


spring Sports Spring Season Opens with Celebration

T

he beginning of spring heralds warm weather, sunny skies and the opening of ballparks everywhere, including Father Ryan’s own at the Jim Carell Alumni Athletic Complex. In true Irish style, Father Ryan kicked off its spring season in March with a celebration— the Spring Sports Celebration, to be exact.

The week-long event saluted athletes and coaches while highlighting home games in baseball, softball, soccer and boys and girls lacrosse. Most importantly, the week celebrated the opening of the new baseball and softball fields, both commemorated with dedication ceremonies. The softball field opening kicked off the week, welcoming back the 1995 softball state champions and their former head coach, Pat Simpson ‘74. Softball players, coaches and supporters lined up to cut the ribbon and commence the first varsity game on the new field (below). Rounding out the celebration on Saturday was A Day at the Ballpark—the dedication of the baseball field. Guests enjoyed the traditional hot dog and soda, and kids competed in skills games before the blessing of the baseball field, led by Father Philip Breen ’57. 12

Bill Stejskal ‘79 and his family were honored for donating the home team dugout. Flanked by baseball players, the Stejskals, Jim Carell ’54, Pat Nolan ’69, Principal Paul Davis ’81, Father Philip Breen, Athletic Director Pat Lawson ’93, President Jim McIntyre and Baseball Head Coach Mike Mascari ’95 ceremoniously cut the purple ribbon (above). Then Bill Stejskal took to the mound to throw the first pitch and opened the game to a loud applause.

Baseball

The baseball team produced several highlights this past season, defeating #16 state-ranked Columbia Central 7-3. Four players, Eric Bolton, Dylan Golden, Alex Shoulders and Landon Snyder, were offered athletic scholarships and will continue their baseball careers this fall.

Softball

Likewise, the softball team also worked hard this year. Junior Emily Sochovka was named to the All-State softball team and pitcher Brittanie Albright received an athletic scholarship to Western Kentucky. The players finished out their season self-assured in their efforts on the field thanks to the leadership of the seniors and head coach Phil Davidson, who will be succeeded by Ashlee Schenk, former assistant coach, next season.

took notice; and the Tennessean featured an editorial by senior Rachel Quesinberry in its ongoing series about bullying. The following is an excerpt from her Carter Brallier ‘10 performs with letter: his band, Supple Station Trio. Rachel’s Challenge promotes an anti-bully environment. Rather than just discipline and discourage bullying behavior, this program has encouraged students to be kind and accepting to everyone.

Ronald McDonald House. They were also part of the welcoming crew for a displaced student from Haiti. Last but not least is a more permanent reminder of Rachel Scott’s message. A banner hangs in the dining hall inscribed with hundreds of student signatures and in the center reads “I Accept Rachel’s Challenge.” “I have this theory that if one person can go out of their way to show compassion then it will start a chain reaction of the same” - Rachel Scott.

Rules and regulations are crucial disciplinary measures to confront the problem of bullying. However, I believe that combining programs like Rachel’s Challenge with school policies, we can drastically reduce the incidence of bullying. This alternative approach is our solution to bullying and one effort to change the way all students act. The impact of Rachel’s Challenge can already be seen at Father Ryan. Last year, students organized Friends of Rachel, a club that actively promotes small acts of kindness. The club has performed talent shows and recorded books on tape for children at

Randy Lancaster ‘83 (faculty) and Sean Della Croce ‘10 entertain the Harmony for Haiti crowd.

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Bowling

The Irish bowling teams finished out the season with an individual state champion—Sam Bass (left), who also earned All-Midstate honors. The boys and girls teams fought hard in district competition, with the boys team finishing third in the district. Congratulations to the Irish bowlers for another great season!

Basketball

The Father Ryan boys’ basketball team finished the season with a 13-15 record. The players started the season off strong with a win against David Lipscomb, 63-58. The rest of the year was highlighted by other close victories—a 50-48 win against Franklin, who was undefeated at the time, and a 49-40 win against Hillsboro at the FRHS Christmas Tournament. Jackson Coursey was named to the Division II Middle-East All Region Team. Coach Doug Bontrager ‘81 also celebrated his 400th career victory at Father Ryan last season. The girls’ basketball team also completed a successful season with a 14-13 record and several notable accomplishments. The season began with important wins over Lipscomb and St. Benedict, and later in the season the Irish defeated both Harpeth Hall and BGA twice, each in region play. The Lady Irish also won the Overton Christmas Tournament—following victories over Maplewood 18

and Overton in the first two rounds, the Lady Irish defeated Glencliff in the championship game.

Hockey

The Father Ryan hockey team skated tough this year to defend their state championship title. Once the puck dropped, the players went to work putting the pressure on their opponents and managed four shutouts: Independence-Page (twice), Blackman and Franklin. Despite an aggressive offense and solid defense, it wasn’t enough to push the Irish through the playoffs. Led by seniors Harrison Burdge, Alex Glinski, Brian O’Loughlin and Will Orr, the team rounded out the season at 8-11-4. Matthew Neal led the team in points scored, and O’Loughlin, Orr and Andy Franklin represented Ryan in the All-Star game in the South division.

Swimming & Diving

The swim team participated in the state swim meet this year among 106 teams and finished in tenth place as a combined team. The women’s team also finished in tenth place and the men’s team in thirteenth place. All of the Father Ryan swimmers achieved at least one “Lifetime Best Swim” and most had two. Sophomore Sara Menke was named NISCA Swimming All-American and seniors Emily Akers, Chris Dahlhauser, Harrison Daigle, Eric Johnson and Claire Stewart qualified for Academic All-Americans. To achieve this honor, the senior athlete must have an overall grade point average of 3.75 for seven semesters.

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Winter Sports Athletic Signings Father Ryan counts a whopping 17 students who received athletic scholarships to college this year. In addition to Brittanie Albright, Rachel Mayes and Ellen Mullins who signed earlier in the year, the following also signed their Letters of Intent this past spring: Eric Bolton will play baseball at the University of North Alabama; Jackson Coursey will play football at Washington and Lee; Gene Flathmann will play lacrosse at Oglethorpe University; Joe Francescon will play football at Austin Peay; Dylan Golden will play baseball at Wallace State; Conner Graves will play football at Lindsey Wilson College; Trey McPhail will play football at College of Mt. Saint Joseph; Nick Pollard will play football at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; John Rohling will play soccer at Southern Indiana; Kristen Sharp will play volleyball at Maryville College; Alex Shoulders will play baseball at Jackson State Community College; Anthony Simpson will run cross country for Bryan College; Landon Snyder will play baseball for Cleveland State; and Madison Wenzler will swim for University of Texas at Austin.

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Wrestling Team Wins Eighteenth State Title

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he Irish wrestling team ended an impeccable season, earning top honors in the state again this year with a championship title in dual wrestling. With an overall season record of 29 wins and four defeats, and undefeated in state competition, the team went on to defeat Christian Brothers 28-24, marking the seventh title in dual wrestling and the eighteenth overall in Father Ryan’s history. The lead-up to the state duals title was a close one. The Irish defeated McCallie in the semi-finals 34-33 and their match against Christian Brothers was equally exciting. The Purple Wave was leading the match with four consecutive weight victories until rising senior Chris Agnew (145) pulled Ryan ahead against the state runner-up to a 25-18 lead. However, the point spread closed quickly to 25 and 24 after the Purple Wave secured six of seven weight classes to pull within a point before the 171 final. With the crowd on its feet, 2010 graduate Will Mix defeated his opponent 3-2 and closed the tournament with trophy in hand. A few weeks later, Father Ryan realized success again, this time at the state individual wrestling tournament. The team boasted two state champions and an overall fourth place finish behind Baylor, McCallie and Christian Brothers. Mike Akers was the state champion at 103 pounds and Wes Wesley won the state at 171 pounds. This is Wesley’s third consecutive state championship. Other wrestlers also competed well: Cole Moseley (112), Will Mix (189) and Ricky Fisher (215) all placed second; Chris Agnew (145), Mark Marchetti (125), T.J. Holmes (160) and Anthony Simpson (119) placed third; Dylan Wright (130) and Ale Benito (152) placed fifth and Brian Murphy (135) placed sixth. Head Coach Pat Simpson ‘74 also earned big honors this year. He was once again named TSSAA’s Coach of the Year after 31 years as coach for Father Ryan’s wrestling team.

he year was 1970 and boys ruled the school. There was the occasional classroom prank, the good-natured heckling of freshmen, a loose crude remark and maybe even a brief after - school scuffle. These were elements of an all-boys school, and that’s the way it was. Midway through in the school year, hallways echoed with the boisterous sounds of students already eager for summer. Father Ryan was rounding out its fortyfourth year and rumors abounded that a major shift was about to occur at Elliston Place. In February, just a few months shy of summer, the diocese officially announced to students and faculty that Cathedral High School, the all-girls school on West End Avenue, would be closing its doors, and its students would be joining Father Ryan the following year. The news was well-received, if not a bit surprising, and that fall approximately 112 girls arrived for their first day at Ryan. Rosemary (Strobel) Hehn, a 1972 alumna, was among the newcomers that day as she entered her junior year at Father Ryan. “I have fond memories of Ryan after the initial shock of consolidation,” she says. “Change is hard.” She admits that she and other girls were not thrilled about attending, but she easily bonded with other Cathedral transfers who shared a unique situation. Attending Father Ryan “meant leaving friends I had been with since first grade; after the school year began, new friends were made and many lasting friendships. I think our Catholic faith was a common bond that helped to unite us.” That day was also the first for a handful of female teachers, including Jinx Cockerham, who remembers her first impression well. “I walked in the door for an interview, sat down, and within ten minutes, Jim

Sullins said, ‘You’re hired. Your classroom is on the third floor. Go.’” With the influx of female students, Father Ryan’s administration began hiring more female teachers, and they favored those with a business background. Fortunately for Cockerham, she fit the bill, and was quickly ushered into a typing class, where her teaching chops were put to the test. That class, it turned out, helped her develop a resiliency to challenge that has become part of her reputation. “That first class, which was 99 percent male, told me I would not last long because they had gotten rid of the last teacher,” she says, amused. “The boys said they had thrown their typewriters out of the window from the third floor.” Little did they know that she would outlast them; she’s celebrating 40 years at Father Ryan, longer than any other female in the school’s history. Times have changed, but she cannot forget that defining year in 1970 when she became one of the few females among the staff—an accidental pioneer. She admits there was some resistance and a few hiccups in the beginning, particularly with the absence of female restrooms, but realized “we were changing an entire culture.” As a freshman in 1970, Pat Simpson witnessed the culture shift. His two brothers had preceded him at Father Ryan, and he had been looking forward to joining in among the guys. He didn’t mask his first reaction to the news. “I was disappointed when I first heard about the girls,” he concedes. This year Simpson will enter his 31st as a teacher and coach at Ryan. He has taught church history and economics and coached wrestling, football and even softball at one point. “The biggest difference between coaching boys and girls: it’s easier to hurt girls’ feelings,” he smiles unwittingly. Robin Dieterich agrees. “The difference is how you approach them and their motivation. Girls are more sensitive. Boys brush it off more easily.” Dieterich has also seen both sides of the coin, having taught and coached at Father Ryan since 1978. He is also a 1973 graduate, a position that offers him a unique perspective of school life before and after girls. “I had mixed feelings at that moment. There was so much tradition as an all-boys school.” 19


The Class of 2010 The girls eventually became part of the tradition and were welcomed by their male peers. According to Dieterich, “We didn’t give them a hard time because we weren’t sure,” and he points out that the faculty, too, may have been unsure, simply because they had to adjust their teaching style. But as a student, “it wasn’t that much different to have guys and girls in the classroom. It was kind of nice, because it was more like the real world. We were learning how society is in real life.” That first year, all the class officers were male, but it didn’t take long before a few girls had infiltrated. Girls began to take on more leadership roles and heavily influenced Father Ryan’s curriculum. Teacher C.A. Williams remembers the early years when the school offered classes like Home Economics and Steno Skills. “We had classes in typing, business, short-hand. Girls were being prepared for clerical work or to be a homemaker. Today, it’s not so stereotypical. It’s now anybody’s class, not a guy’s class or a girl’s class.” Williams, who is entering her 39th year at Father Ryan, is an advocate for coeducation. “When I found out Ryan was going co-ed, I was shocked, but I thought it was way cool. I think it’s healthier when guys and girls interact daily and develop those friendships.”

Often cited as an influential woman at Ryan, Williams began her first week of teaching with a learning experience of her own—at the mercy of a student. She taught the last period of the day on the third floor where, she notes, there was no air conditioning. “On my first day, a student convinced me that teachers could dismiss their last period class early if the lesson were completed, because the room became so hot. So, that first day, I had finished my lesson, and I let them leave about 15 minutes early. I did this all week.” It wasn’t until teacher Jim Langdon ‘54 stepped in that she caught on. “I would go into the faculty lounge after class, and he asked me why I was always in there at that time. I told him I had dismissed my students early. He was so kind. He pulled me aside and calmly told me the truth. I had no idea!” And from that moment, he became her mentor. Principal Paul Davis, a 1981 alumnus, launched his career at Father Ryan in 1986. He points to several women on the faculty as his mentors, including C.A. Williams, Jinx Cockerham, Peggy Adams and Becky Young. Each was influential in increasing female leadership among the staff and among the student body. In fact, women initiated some of Father Ryan’s most successful programs.

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n the early months of 1970, Cathedral pastor Monsignor Albert Siener came to a difficult conclusion. Operating costs for Cathedral High School were escalating and, coupled with the decline of religious personnel, the school could no longer handle the financial burden. Father Paul Morris, Superintendent of Diocesan Parochial School System, confirmed these thoughts. In the letter to Monsignor Siener, he wrote of his support to merge Cathedral and Father Ryan. He wrote, “My personal and professional feeling is that the consolidation of Cathedral high school and Father Ryan high school will indeed strengthen the Catholic school System in the city of Nashville.” With Father Morris’ approval, the plan to merge the high schools became official. Months before the closing, a school survey by 20

Graduates Full of Promise

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t would be impossible to characterize the Class of 2010 as anything other than accomplished. Just look at the numbers. Acceptances to more than 100 colleges and universities across the country and abroad. More than $17 million earned in scholarships. Enrollment in 59 colleges in 23 states (and one in England). Seven students honored by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, three as Finalists. What’s more is that one fifth of the class are members in academic and service societies—35 of the Cum Laude Society, 32 of the Cardinal Newman Association and 23 of the St. Vincent de Paul Service Society. But behind those numbers is something far more extraordinary. These students have reached beyond the basics of their education and beyond what is expected of them. While juggling advanced courses with school activities has become a national norm, doing so in addition to feeding the homeless or tutoring students is far above it. As Dom DiGiovanni said in his valedictory speech, “In a time when society points to norms and standards, Father Ryan’s mission strives to raise the bar.” Father Ryan students are setting the new standard. Like Nina Fredericks, who successfully balanced a challenging academic course load including AP Calculus with extra-curricular activities—student ambassador and Ultimate Frisbee Club—and still made time to participate in service organizations like Relay for Life and Rachel’s Challenge. She received the Presidential Scholarship to attend Creighton University in the fall. Or Nick Pollard, named TSSAA’s Mr. Football for his athleticism, academics and character, who represented Father Ryan as an ambassador on and off campus, volunteering with organizations such as Room in the Inn, Nashville’s Soup Kitchen and Norman Binkley Elementary School. The University of Tennessee in Chattanooga awarded him a scholarship to play football this fall. It’s not hard to believe that this graduating class has been accepted to prestigious colleges and universities such as Boston College, Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, Villanova, Washington and Lee and the University of Notre Dame. One student will continue her education in Europe. Sean Della Croce was accepted to the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts, chosen from 1,000 applicants world-wide for one of 55 available openings in the school’s music performance program. She established her own music publishing company, Working Week Music, and released her debut EP, On The Line, for which she wrote all the songs. Apart from her musical work, she was a staff writer for the Moina and a member of the National Honor Society. She is just one example of the breadth of talent and ambition within these graduates. Doctor, architect, musician, teacher, engineer, actor, service volunteer. The number of paths that these young men and women can take is endless. In their four years at Ryan, the Class of 2010—a class of entrepreneurs and philanthropists—has accomplished what few have in a lifetime, and they’re not done yet. 9


Class of 2010 Top Students Continue to Impress

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ach year, Father Ryan’s valedictorian and salutatorian represent two students who have reached the pinnacle of academic success in their class. Naturally, these students have completed nearly a dozen Advanced Placement and honors classes, but what is less discerning is their active involvement outside of the classroom and the humility they maintain through it all. Dom DiGiovanni and Becca Menke were named Father Ryan’s 2010 valedictorian and salutatorian, respectively, but are still your average teenagers. They attend sporting events with friends, participate in school clubs and are looking forward to college life. Their hectic academic schedules—18 AP classes between them—are slightly above average but are counterbalanced by activities outside of the classroom including athletics and service organizations. Dom is a member of the National Honor Society and Cum Laude Society and manager for the lacrosse and basketball teams. During his senior year, he was also elected by his peers to be “Ryan Man,” the school’s leprechaun-like mascot and spirit leader, clad in top hat and coattails. Colleges across the country recognized his strong leadership and academic abilities. He received acceptance letters from Alabama, Auburn, Hillsdale College, Notre Dame, Sewanee, St. Joseph’s, UVA, Vanderbilt, Villanova and Washington and Lee. The decision wasn’t easy, but he has decided to spend his collegiate career at Hillsdale College in Michigan. Becca has chosen to stay closer to home and enroll at Auburn, where she received a full academic scholarship. She was also accepted to Bellarmine, Christian Brothers University, Rhodes, Spring Hill College, St. Louis University, University of Dayton, UT Knoxville and Xavier. The number of acceptance letters is not surprising considering her level of commitment in academics 8

and service activities. She is a founding member of the Future Physicians of America, a member of the National Honor Society and Spanish Honor Society, a student ambassador and a varsity athlete on the soccer and track teams. Even with all these activities, she still finds time for involvement in her community by volunteering at LifeTeen, Second Harvest Food Bank and Catholic Heart Work Camp. Without a doubt, Dom and Becca have been very busy and in their four years, have accomplished an extraordinary amount. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation recognized both students as Finalists in their scholarship program for their performance on the Preliminary SAT (PSAT). Only 1% of students in the country who take the test each year qualify as Finalists. “I am continually impressed with the successes our students achieve each year. Dom and Becca are phenomenal examples of what can be accomplished with hard work and the support of a community of teachers, friends and family,” said Jim McIntyre, president. With the heavy amount of academic and extracurriculars under their belts, these top students will have the capability to pursue excellence beyond Father Ryan and achieve leadership roles in their own communities. McIntyre agrees, “I have no doubt that their dedication and integrity will take them far in life, and I know I will hear great things from them in the future.”

Williams with the Chemical Awareness Program, Cockerham with volleyball, Boo Lynch with the Cooperative Support Program, Phyllis Adgent with Science Academy. Through their example, they inspired young girls in their classrooms to take on leadership roles. “Many said that women wouldn’t get leadership positions because there are so many boys. That’s not true because four of the last five student body presidents have been female,” Davis contends. Female participation in athletics has also changed tremendously over the years. Despite a rough start with a winless first season, the girls’ varsity basketball team—the only girls’ team in 1970— prompted the addition of a few more like track, tennis and cross country. It wasn’t until 1976 that volleyball was sanctioned by the TSSAA. Led by Cockerham, the Lady Irish volleyball team has been recognized as one of the strongest programs in the state. “Jinx Cockerham is the biggest female influence here,” says Williams. “She has molded young women not to be high school sports players, but to be real solid athletes who go on to play in college.”

In 1981, Cockerham began the Gentry Award, which was given out to exceptional female basketball players. The award was named after another influential woman, Alice Gentry, Father Ryan’s former secretary and registrar. She was the only woman in the administrative office for a number of years, and from 1947 to 1981, she was a Father Ryan icon who did it all. Davis remembers, “She was secretary, assistant to the principal, registrar, everything. She used to do it all herself. The respect that she commanded was unbelievable.” Life before girls was certainly different, but 1970 was not the first year boys and girls attended class together at Father Ryan. Girls from St. Bernard Academy and St. Cecilia Academy frequently joined the boys for classes in physics and calculus because their schools did not offer them. Girls also attended pep rallies and interacted with Father Ryan at dances after every football game. Saturday was a big night, too, with Teen Town, a CYO event alternately hosted by Father Ryan and St. Joseph. Being a cheerleader was and still is a fairly big deal. Before co-education, girls from St. Cecilia, St. Bernard and Cathedral made up the cheerleading squad, two from each school. Girls competed for a spot on the squad by auditioning in front of the student body. It was a tradition that continued for many years Continued on page 22

Cathedral Chimes reported that 69 percent of the girls planned to attend Father Ryan, 21 percent to attend public school and 16 percent were undecided. In September of 1970, Father Ryan opened enrollment in grades 10, 11 and 12 exclusively to girls from Cathedral; grade 9 was open to girls from any school. Uniforms for sophomore, junior and senior girls remained the same from Cathedral, but new uniforms were designed for freshmen that first year. That year marked an end of an era for Cathedral following 61 years as an educational institution. Cathedral first opened in 1909 as a coeducational grade school and high school on West End Avenue. In 1925, Bishop Alphonse Smith formed a separate high school for boys on the same property, and Cathedral became an all-girls school. The boys’ school later moved to Elliston Place in 1929 to become Father Ryan. 21


Newspaper Reports Mixed Reactions From Cathedral Chimes (of Cathedral High School) February 22, 1970: “I would like to see girls over here….If girls were here, I would start dressing better and studying harder.” - W. Gator ‘73 “The idea of Ryan going coeducational strikes me as being very significant. It represents a social change from old thinking. I’m in favor of having some girls to brighten up our lives.” – T. McDowell ‘73

even after Father Ryan became co-ed, but at that point, cheerleaders were exclusively Ryan students. Needless to say, boys at Father Ryan were not isolated from their female peers prior to 1970. The environment of the school has transformed immensely since that pivotal year. Today, women are present in every school activity—band, theatre, student government, honors societies, service clubs and athletics. Father Ryan was already ahead of the curve when Title IX was enacted in 1972. The statute prohibits gender discrimination among educational programs. “Title IX didn’t seem to have an impact here because gender equality was already happening,” explains Dieterich. “We were already trying to give girls the opportunity to excel the best we could. It is part of our mission.” “Women have brought so much class to the school,” adds Cockerham. “There are so many areas in which they excel and they have had a huge impact on the success of this school.”

“Even though I hate leaving Cathedral, Ryan is the next best school I know of.” – B Shearin ‘71

The achievements speak for themselves. In the last three years, 11 women were honored by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation; 15 earned college athletic scholarships; three were named salutatorian and one was named valedictorian. Women ranked high in post-graduation honors, too.

“I have always wanted to go to a co-ed Catholic High School, but I’m sorry I have to go in my senior year. It’s going to be hard to get used to boys after three years with girls, but I feel I will enjoy it.” – G. Mason ‘71

Luellen Hoffman ’72 is an award-winning author of Special Dream: Personal Accounts After the Death of a Loved One; Nanette Baker ’75 is Chief Judge in the Missouri Court of Appeals; Monica Wehby-Grant ’80 is a neurological surgeon; Andrea Arnold ’89 is the Senior VP of Government and Community Relations for the Nashville Convention and Visitor’s Bureau; Courtney Corbin ’00 is a professional dancer and member of the renowned Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in New York.

“I only wish the change had been sooner. I get tired of just seeing boys.” – C. Baxter ‘70

These are just a few of the successful alumnae who have helped pave the way for Father Ryan’s young women. In nearly every field, Father Ryan alumnae succeed—law, medicine, education, business, music—and they continue to excel alongside their male peers in parity, something unforeseen half a century ago. This year marks an outstanding milestone in Father Ryan’s history. The 2010-2011 school year is one of celebration as we commemorate the 40th anniversary of co-education. It may be hard to believe four decades have passed since women became part of the student body, but they have woven an unmistakable thread into the Father Ryan tradition. But, do not think for a moment that this is the finale of women’s contributions to Father Ryan. If women can accomplish this much in 40 years, imagine what they will do in the next 40.

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Service in Christian Leadership

Fr. James Black ‘64 taught at Father Ryan for 12 Years.

Embry, Mikhail Emmanuel, Grace Farone, Elena Ferguson, Erin Ferguson, McKenna Foster, Madeline Fox, Kaitlyn Gilbert, Conlon Griesmer, Kylan Hadley, Zana Hall, Liz Haynes, Callie Herrmann, Olivia Holmes, Shea Holmes, Daniel Huetter, Matthew Jaconetta, Daniel Johnson, Shelia Johnson, Nicholas Kniazewycz; Matthew Labadie, Luke LeFeve, Dani Manes, Mark Marchetti, Joseph McCluney, Kathleen McInnis, Waylon McInturff, Connor McSweeney, Nora Melton, Chloe Moix, Adam Neal, Tracy Neligan, Tom Novelly, Conor O’Bryan, Ransom Patterson, Margaret Payne, Jacob Phillips, Cole Pickney, Mac Pillon, Victor Pollack, Mitchell Pollard, Kalyn Pruett, Ryan Quarles, Marc Quitalig, Rachel Ralph, Jack Roberts, Alex Robinson, Amy Rohling, Sean Rollins, Mackie Round, Frane Santic, Stephanie Schwartz, Caleb Sharber, Paul Shinar, Danny Slattery, Patrick Stevens, Kiley Stinson, Suzanne Strupp, Delores Stuart, Tyler Stuessi, Rustin Suray, Melody Swope, Tyler Thompson, Kellen Wagner, Maddy Walters, Rachael Wesnofske, Caitlin Whalen, Daniel Whitcomb, Nicole White, Patrick Williamson and Katie Wilson.

Students Inducted into New Society

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ince 1925, Father Ryan has built a reputation in forming motivated, principled and compassionate young men and women. One of the defining characteristics of a Father Ryan education is service. Each year, students are asked to perform 120 hours of service to the underprivileged and marginalized with many of them going far beyond that request. With the level of service Father Ryan students are performing, the school has created a new way to recognize their exceptional and selfless acts of giving. The 2009-2010 school year marked the first year for the St. Vincent de Paul Service Society. The society was created to recognize students who have made a commitment to service during their time at Father Ryan. Its namesake, St. Vincent de Paul, serves as a connection between the saint of the poor and students and also honors the Daughters of Charity who have worked tirelessly with the poor in the Diocese of Nashville.

The St. Vincent de Paul’s Service Society’s inaugural year honored 23 students in April. Members inducted were Alissa Best, Evan Bohn, Amelia Bradshaw, Erin Brady, Jessica Burgy, Kathleen Butler, Sean Della Croce, Kay-Ann Curtis, Graham Englert, Nina Fredericks, Elizabeth Gentile, Catherine Glidwell, Neil Johnson, Kerry Lindstrom, Rebecca Menke, Stephanie Miller, Rachel Quesinberry, Andrea Robleto, Jackson Shacklett, Claire Stewart, Jennifer Travis, Rachelle VanMeter and Elizabeth Westbrook. 7


Illustrating the Role of Ryan names 25th winner of Father Black Award Reprinted with permission from Andy Telli, Tennessee Register

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ather James Black loved teaching and he loved teaching freshman. So after he lost a long battle to cancer in 1984, Father Ryan High School created the Father Black Honor Society for freshmen who achieve academically and the Father Black Award to honor one particular freshman each year who best demonstrates Catholic scholarship and Christian leadership.

are the same characteristics demonstrated by Father Black during his priesthood and his 12 years as a teacher at Father Ryan, Spore said. Father Black and Spore both graduated from Ryan in 1964 and returned to their alma mater as teachers in 1972.

This year, Mary Margaret Payne became the 25th winner of the award. Her name will be added to the plaque listing the names of all the previous winners that hangs in the office at Father Ryan.

“He had this knack as a teacher of getting the best of out of his students,” Spore added. “Whether you were someone who struggled or you were an honor student, he could get the best out of you.”

“It’s the highest award that a freshman can win,” said John Spore, director of academic counseling at Father Ryan. “We want the student to exemplify a person of faith, academic excellence and involvement in many facets of school life.”

Father Black taught Scripture to freshmen. “He really, really believed in taking care of freshmen,” Spore said. Because he was dissatisfied with the textbooks for the class, he wrote one himself that was specifically aimed at freshman students. “It was used in Catholic high schools all over the country in the 1970s and 80s,” Spore said. “He was extremely brilliant.”

The winner of the Father Black Award, chosen from a field of five finalists by a vote of the freshman faculty, receives a three-year scholarship to Ryan. This year, the faculty described Payne as “the perfect example of a Christian who lives her faith. She is an excellent role model for others in the classroom and always willing to help.” Payne’s family moved to Nashville from Louisville, KY, just before her freshman year, Spore said, but she has Father Ryan bloodlines. Her mother, Mary Pat Cassidy Payne, is a Ryan graduate, and her uncle, Mike Cassidy, is a Ryan grad and a former teacher at the school, Spore explained. The other finalists for the award were: Liz Haynes, Kathleen McInnis, Tom Novelly and Cole Pickney. The characteristics honored by the Father Black Award 6

“He was a great priest and a great teacher,” Spore said. “He had a way of being able to reach out to people.” And his students responded, Spore said. “They loved him. They loved taking his class.“You could tell he loved and cared for his students. When students know that they respond tremendously.”

While a teacher at Father Ryan, Father Black developed cancer. He underwent seven surgeries to fight the cancer and taught until his death at age 38. To honor him, the school established the Father Black Award and the Father Black Honor Society for freshmen who are named to the honor roll for three straight quarters. Students inducted into the society this year include: Mike Akers, Theresa Anderson, Mary Armbruster, Douglas Arney, Gina Beckman, Nick Bontrager, Shea Bradley, Mary Catherine Burdge, Philip Burns, Erica Bush, Joe Butler, Caroline Cheney, Griffin Connolly, Joe Connor, Carmyn Cook, Zach Crone, Drew Davis, Rob Davis, Josh Edmondson, George Edwards, Avery

Campers attend mass celebrated by Bishop Choby.

Steven Mackey, Tim Forbes ‘93 and Elizabeth Coyle ‘02 at Catholic HEART Work camp.

Father Ryan Hosts Catholic HEART Workcamp

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or the past 11 years, the Father Ryan campus has been the site for an international Catholic service program that draws hundreds of kids from across the region. The Catholic HEART Workcamp (CHWC) in Nashville welcomed 334 campers in late June for a week of city-wide mission work.

The camp is an opportunity for teens ages 14-20 to practice their faith and minister to the community through service projects. Each day, participants travel to work sites around the city to refurbish homes, help day care centers for low income families or distribute food to the needy. This year, the program is working with local outfits like Metro Development and Housing Authority (MDHA), Campus for Human Development and Salvation Army. Campers were also active with West Nashville Partnership flood relief. More than work-driven, CHWC also promotes camaraderie and bonding in youth group activities. The evening features youth group sharing time, prayer reflection, videos, staff presentations, skits and worship music. Campers also have a free day in the week to visit local attractions like Nashville Shores and the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere. What differentiates CHWC from other work camps is its focus on the Catholic faith. The program fosters the practice of faith through service to others while educating young people in the church’s teachings.

Daily morning mass, Eucharistic Adoration, daily rosary and reconciliation are all offered throughout the week. Catholic HEART Workcamp was founded in 1993 by two youth ministers in Orlando, FL, as a program that offers quality service projects to teens based in the Catholic faith. In the last 15 years, the program has expanded to 11,000 participants in 40 branches across the country like Pittsburgh, Oklahoma City, Los Angeles, St. Louis and one in Jamaica. The Nashville branch is led by 2002 alumna Elizabeth Coyle (whom we profiled in Irish Ayes last fall). Although this is her second year as manager of CHWC in Nashville, her first experience with the program was a trip to New Orleans the summer before her freshman year at Father Ryan. It makes sense that Father Ryan would be chosen as the site for the work camp. The school has always encouraged young people to practice faith and service daily. In fact, Ryan students have built strong relationships with non-profit organizations over the years like Ronald McDonald House, Habitat for Humanity and Monroe Harding, some of which have partnered with CHWC for service projects. Not to mention, CHWC and Father Ryan share similar missions—to encourage each person to achieve his or her spiritual potential and to be an example of Christ through faith, knowledge and service. 23


Dave Ramsey Speaks at Ryan Connections

The Legacy Gala Ends with a “BAM!”

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ather Ryan’s 2010 Legacy Gala was a smash hit and raised nearly $95,000 for the school. The event honored Bishop David R. Choby, a 1965 alumnus, and all alumni priests of the Nashville diocese. Rick and Lynette Bailey enjoy the evening’s festivities Nationally-known financial expert Dave Ramsey visited Father Ryan in April for the school’s networking event, Ryan Connections. Ramsey hosts The Dave Ramsey Show, a syndicated radio program that reaches 450 stations across the country and more than four million listeners. He is also the founder of The Lampo Group, Inc., a financial consulting business located in Brentwood, TN, and author of such books as Financial Peace and The Total Money Makeover. As the event’s key speaker, Ramsey covered such topics as business ownership, employee management and implementing a faithdriven mission, as he does with The Lampo Group. He also imparted financial advice taken from his own experience with debt at a young age. Several of his books and radio shows reference his early mistakes, for which he paid heavily, or what he calls “stupid tax,” and how a change in character helped him recover. Millions have been influenced by Ramsey, including economics teacher Greg Carson. In fact, it was Carson who was instrumental in Ramsey’s visit to campus. His class curriculum is based on Financial Peace; in 1997, Father Ryan became the first high school to use the book for a semester course. At Lampo Group’s request, Carson also wrote the accompanying workbook entitled Financial Peace for the Next Generation. Father Ryan invites all parents, alumni and friends interested in connecting with local business leaders to attend the next Ryan Connections October 14, 2010 at 7:30 a.m. in the Center for the Arts. The speaker will be Deborah Varallo, owner of Varallo Public Relations.

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Hundreds of items in the live and silent auctions including a trip to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Titans tickets, a personal wardrobe consultation and estate jewelry were auctioned off. The 2010 Gala also marked the second time for the Giving Tree, an opportunity for attendees to purchase classroom resources requested by teachers or make donations to financial aid. The theme of the night was “bid high and bid often” punctuated by auctioneer Marty Blair’s animated “BAM!” with every $1,000 bid.

The bishop also enlivened the live auction with an impromptu bid offer for homemade collard greens made by Mary Margaret Lambert, while families Jim McIntyre with quickly joined Honoree, Bishop together to bid on David Choby ‘65 the spectacular 4-bedroom beach house in Seagrove, FL. Overall, the event was another successful evening, thanks to chairs Cathy and Walt Wasyliw and the tremendous generosity of the Father Ryan community. Mark your calendar for the 32nd Annual Auctioneer Marty Blair Legacy Gala on Saturday, March 12, 2011. If you are interest in serving on the Gala Committee, contact Anna Beth Stephens at 615.269.7926.

Staff and Students DNA information is acquired and analyzed. Morin, who teaches AP Biology and Anatomy and Physiology, attended a two-week program in June to learn more about the project. Prior to Father Ryan, she worked with the Pediatric Infection Disease Department at Vanderbilt University and at the Arbovirus Laboratories in Albany, New York. She is also a published author of a manuscript about the West Nile Virus.

Teachers Attend Latin American Program

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eachers Laura Beasley and Debbie Nebel were accepted to a one-week summer institute on Latin American Film in the 9-12 Classroom at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Sponsored by UT’s Latin American Studies Interdisciplinary Program and the Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt, the institute helped teachers develop a curriculum that better incorporates Latin American studies and film into the classroom. Beasley, who teaches Spanish and Psychology, earned a Ph.D. in Psychology from the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain. Nebel, who teaches Multicultural Literature, Women’s Literature and American Literature, previously participated in the College Board’s AP Summer Institute in English Literature and Composition.

Jim McIntyre Presents at Catholic School Conference

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resident Jim McIntyre was invited to speak at the National Advancement Conference for Catholic Schools in June. The conference is led by Partners in Mission, a Catholic education consulting firm based in Massachusetts. One hundred thirty Catholic school leaders from 30 states around the country attended the conference in Boston to learn ways to enhance advancement strategies. McIntyre conducted presentations on enrollment and the president and

principal administrative model, using examples from Father Ryan’s advancement achievements to illustrate successful strategies.

Advancement’s Reusch Named Award Finalist

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rooke Reusch, Father Ryan’s Annual Fund and Constituent Relations Manager, has been named a finalist for the 2010 Nashville Emerging Leader Award. She is one of five finalists in the Community Service and Non-profit industry category. The award, now in its fourth year, is sponsored by the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and Young Professionals of Nashville. The program honors Middle Tennessee’s young professionals under the age of 40 for their accomplishments in their career field as well as their contributions to the community.

Anna Beth Stephens Joins Advancement

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ast spring, Father Ryan welcomed Anna Beth Stephens to its staff. She joins the Advancement Office as Advancement Services Coordinator, supporting the Parent Student Network (PSN) and leading many other events like Legacy Gala throughout the year. She has previously worked with the University of Mississippi’s Foundation, Ruffalo/ Cody (an advancement service company) and Austin Monthly Magazine. Anna Beth is also a parishioner of Christ the King.

Gala Chairs Cathy and Walt Wasyliw 5


Three Students Attend Boys, Girls State

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eniors Brandon Zeitlin, Amelia Norman and Catie Benenson were selected among hundreds of high school students across the state to participate in Tennessee American Legion Boys State and American Legion Auxiliary Volunteer Girls State. The weeklong program is designed to educate participants in local, county and state government through legislative sessions and forming a mock government. Local and state officials, including Governor Phil Bredesen, visited students this summer during their sessions.

Students Represent FRHS at Leadership Conference

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uniors Cole Moseley and John Arnold were selected to represent Tennessee and the TSSAA at this summer’s National Federation Leadership Conference in Indianapolis, IN. They were among 300 students

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ive students in Father Ryan’s Spanish program embarked on an overseas trip this summer to Salamanca, Spain for a three-week immersion program. Marci Davison, Robert Gallagher, Taylor Hawken, Alexandra Jones and Ryan Weiss lived with native families while studying the Spanish language and culture through daily classes at the Estudio Sampere and excursions to Madrid, Toledo and other notable attractions in the country. This marks Father Ryan’s first study abroad program, pioneered by teacher Rob Nasatir, Ph.D., who also traveled to Salamanca. Students who completed the program earned a half credit in their elective course. 

Science Teacher Receives Fellowship

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auraLee Morin was one of 75 teachers in the country to receive a fellowship from Rutgers University for a genome sequencing project for high schools. The program leads teachers and their students through the components of molecular biology to understand how

That evening, the celebration continued with reunion parties across Nashville with a few on Ryan’s campus. And at Sunday’s Golden Grad Mass and Brunch, the members of the Class of 1960 were inducted into the Golden Grad Society and presented plaques by Bishop David Choby ‘65. A special congratulations go to the Class of 1970 for winning the Reunion Year Challenge with the largest percent of gifts to the Annual Fund this year. Led by Class Rep Frederick Strobel, the Class of 1970 hit 24 percent by June 30. Thank you to all who joined us for the weekend’s events, and we hope to see you next year! Mark your calendar for next summer’s Reunion Weekend June 3-5, 2011. Classes ending with 6 or 1 will celebrate their reunions, beginning with the Class of 2001. If you are a member of the Classes of 2001, 1996, 1991, 1986, 1981, 1976, 1971, 1966, 1961, 1956 or 1951 and would like to serve on your Reunion Committee, please contact the Alumni Office at 615.269.7926 or millsa@fatherryan.org.

Alumni Reception Class of 1960

Saturday’s Lou Graham Alumni Invitational Golf Tournament, chaired by Tommy Bradley ’81, was another great event, raising more than $8,500 for tuition assistance for children or grandchildren of alumni. Thirty-one teams of four, plus Lou Graham ‘56 himself, came out to Champions Run to enjoy a game of golf and support tuition assistance at Ryan. The tournament’s first place prize went to J.D. Sharp ’92, Phil Sharp, Jimmy McGarrity and Frank Soper.

Class of 1965

Spanish Students, Teacher Initiate First Study Abroad

Friday night kicked off Reunion Weekend with the Alumni Reception at the Center for the Arts. Over 200 alumni came out on a gorgeous June evening to reconnect with friends over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres.

Class of 1970

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ina Fredericks, a 2010 graduate, earned third place in the 2010 National Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD) MultiMedia Arts Contest. In March, she entered her drawing, entitled Trapped by Poverty, to the Campaign for Human Development and earned the grand prize in Nashville’s diocesan competition. For her national third place finish, she will be awarded $250 that will go towards the Father Ryan Flood Relief Fund, and an additional $250 will be given in her name to a CCHD-funded group of her choice. During her senior year, she studied AP Studio Art taught by John Durand, pictured above with Nina’s winning entry.

who participated in the threeday conference designed to promote respect, sportsmanship, teamwork and community service through group discussion of contemporary issues affecting young people. They also performed community service to benefit high school students in Indianapolis. Their conference attendance was fully funded by corporate sponsors T-Mobile and the TSSAA.

Father Ryan celebrated one of the most successful reunion weekends to date this year! Alumni from across the country returned to Nashville June 4-6 to reunite with classmates and teachers.

Class of 1990

Art Student Earns National Prize

Reunion Weekend 2010

Class of 1995

Spotlight on Faculty,

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Alumni Awaken the Faith at Universities

Father Ryan Flashback As part of the “Annual Staff,” these ladies were instrumental in putting together the 1982 yearbook. Do you recognize any of them? Hint: one of them was the editor. (Answer on p. 27)

(From l. to r.) Alex Roushdi ‘09, Shelby Davis ‘09, Kathryn Webb ‘09, Andrew Lahaie ‘09 and Julia Morgan (SCA) ‘09 attend Awakening at University of Tennessee.

Class Notes Class Notes

‘41

Dr. William Schlattner lives in San Antonio, TX. As a Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, he worked in the Lockland Hospital Burn Center as a plastic surgeon before going into private practice. Bill has since retired and now enjoys daily walks and singing in a men’s choir.

‘42

Father Bernard Niedergeses ‘43 and Father Paul Hostettler ‘42 marked the 60th anniversary of their ordinations by concelebrating a Mass at St. Pius X Church on June 5, 2010. The two were ordained by Bishop William Adrian at the Cathedral of the Incarnation on June 3, 1950.

‘45

George Barrett was recently named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. He was recognized in the area of civil rights. George is a founding partner of Barrett Johnston, LLC in Nashville.

‘57

Father Philip Breen celebrated his 45th anniversary as a priest on May 22, 2010. His parishioners at St. Ann honored Fr. Breen with a special reception in July.

‘70

Mike Riley and his wife, Cheri, live in Atlanta, GA. They have two adult children who graduated from Christ the King in Atlanta and the Lovette School. They also have a seventh grader at Marist. Mike is always excited to hear about FRHS! Tony Spence, Director and Editor-in-Chief of Catholic News Service since 2004, recently won the Catholic Press Association’s 2010 St. Francis de Sales Award. The award is the highest award the CPA presents to an individual for outstanding contributions to Catholic journalism.

‘72

Luellen Hoffman’s book, Special Dream: Personal Accounts After the Death of a Loved One, is the winner of the 2010 Moms Choice Awards honoring excellence in family-friendly media, products and services. The book is also the gold winner in Adult Books, Body, Mind & Spirit category.

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‘73

Jim Murphy was recently named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. He was recognized in the area of zoning and land use. Jim is an attorney with Bradley Arant Boult Cummings in Nashville. Peter Strianse was also named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. He was recognized in the area of criminal defense. Peter is an attorney with Tune, Entrekin & White in Nashville.

‘76

Cindy Reisz was recently named to Business Tennessee’s list of the Top 150 Lawyers in the state. She was recognized in the area of health care regulatory. Cindy is a member with Bass, Berry & Sims in Nashville.

‘77

Annie Hendricks works for the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development, Employee Relations Division, where she investigates all workplace harassment complaints filed by employees. She also continues to freelance as a paralegal for several attorneys in Nashville. Her most enjoyable pleasure is spending time with her four year-old granddaughter, McKenzie Cecilia Hendricks (left).

‘78

Tom Kelly is celebrating 22 years as a firefighter and shift captain for the second busiest department in Buncombe County, NC. He is also president of the county firefighters’ association, representing 20 county departments and three municipal fire departments. Outside of work, he and his wife, Margaret, enjoy the daily pleasures of a 14 monthold grandson.

‘85

Sean Sabin retired from the Air Force at the rank of lieutenant colonel in April 2010. His last Air Force position was as Staff Judge Advocate at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana. He, his wife, Suzanne, and their twin seven year-old daughters, Emma and Mae Claire, now live in Grosse Pointe Park, MI, where Sean specializes in federal contract law issues as of counsel at the law firm Foley & Lardner.

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nce or twice a year, college students around the country dedicate their weekend to deepening their relationships with God through a community retreat. The program is aptly named Awakening and invites college students of all denominations to a three-day retreat to develop their faith through group discussion, reflection and the sacraments. Awakening traces its roots to 1973 at McNeese State University in Lake Charles, Louisiana, and with the help of students—some of whom are Father Ryan alumni—it has since multiplied to 41 programs in 13 states. Students like Shelby Davis, a 2009 graduate, are drawn to Awakening because of its similarities to Search, a retreat program for high school students. “I wanted a structured retreat, and it was a lot like Search. I had friends from the University of Tennessee who had been through it and they loved it, so I wanted to try it.” Its structure is nearly parallel to Search: faith talks, small group discussions, music, reflection and camaraderie. The leadership structure is familiar, too, with a “mom” and “dad,” a coordinator for behindthe-scenes preparations, a rector who leads the retreat and a “gopher” who takes on the service crew elements of the weekend. Most importantly, the program draws these young adults because it is led by young adults, their peers. Founder Father Sam Jacobs (now Bishop of HoumaThibodaux, Louisiana) explained the formation of the program: “As our staff looked at how to best reach college and college-age young adults, we felt we had to first

provide them with a ‘conversion’ experience before a ‘catechesis’ experience. We modeled it after the Cursillo and the Search retreat, which the team was familiar with. We saw it as an evangelization moment... We wanted them to experience the joy of the Christian life.” Davis, who is a sophomore at the University of Kentucky, has already been through Awakening three times. She has attended retreats at Vanderbilt, Ohio State University and the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, which held its first retreat last year. While no program exists in Kentucky, she plans to initiate the retreat this November with the help of Frankie Giovetti, a fellow Wildcat and a 2008 graduate of Father Ryan. “I’ve been recruiting people to go to other schools’ Awakenings. I got a group of people to go to the University of Tennessee, and a few people from there will be helping me start one at UK this year,” she says. Like many of Father Ryan’s young alumni, Davis is continuing to develop her faith and spread her faith to communities outside of Ryan. “What I love about Awakenings,” she says, “is that you form friends from other school communities. When I was at Father Ryan, I went to Youth Leadership Workshop and Search, and those are the kind of people I want to be around. That was my goal.” With leadership, drive and faith in hand, Father Ryan’s young alumni are achieving their goals. What’s more is that they are taking the school’s mission with them to be living examples of the Gospel and building communities of their own. 3


A significant number cited him as their mentor, but asked if he had any mentors, Pat can’t pick one. “Everybody has been a mentor to me at one point. I’ve never been afraid to ask questions or seek answers.” He does mention a few names like Fr. Hitchcock, Fr. Cunningham, Jim Zralek, Eddie Krenson and Nancy Patton, all of whom were influences. He also credits his wife, Linda, for her unconditional support. His brother, Jim, another Father Ryan teacher, has also given Pat a healthy dose of support during his career. According to Pat, they are Pat visits St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. exactly alike except for one thing; politics. “We decided a long time ago to no longer discuss politics with each other. Other than that, we get along great.”

Evidently, he must have done something right. “People still speak to me from 40 years ago. I guess I’m still doing okay.” One non-debatable quality about Pat supervises the work crew in 1985. Pat is his faithful devotion to Father Ryan.You rarely see him without his trademark purple hat, “FR” emblazoned on the front. He’s behind the concession stands during football and basketball games. He’s in the audience for theatre performances. And don’t expect that to change once he settles into retirement. He’s a life-long advocate for Father Ryan. “Father Ryan has always produced a good education, and the academics get better and better each year. And we’ve always had good people. All of them will go the extra mile, and I can’t imagine any of them not helping a student succeed. This school is unique. I’m just proud that I taught at Father Ryan High School.” So are we.

Homecoming Weekend 2010 Celebrates 40 Years of Women Forty years ago, our student body celebrated Homecoming for the first time as a coeducational school.  To salute this milestone and to honor all of the Father Ryan alumni, this year’s Homecoming activities are being expanded with the creation of the Elliston Luncheon on Saturday, October 16, 2010, from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.  This event will provide another opportunity for the Father Ryan community to gather and celebrate our Irish Pride.  We’ll have a special salute to our alumnae as we continue our 40 Years of Women Celebration.  We will also be announcing the Distinguished Alumni Award Program. This last element is new to Father Ryan and will provide the means to salute formally and proudly the most

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distinguished of our alumni.  With 85 years of history, we are expecting a number of nominations for our first recipients, which is why we will begin accepting nominations this fall and announce the selections at the 2011 Homecoming.   Make plans to join us for another exciting weekend on Father Ryan’s campus. The Irish take on the Ensworth Tigers on Friday, October 15 with kick-off at 7:00 p.m., followed by the Elliston Luncheon on Saturday. The luncheon is only $15 per person and seating will be limited, so visit www.fatherryan.org/elliston to see all the details and to make your reservations now.

Class Notes

‘90

Stephen Zralek has been named to the 2010 Best of the Bar for outstanding small firm attorney in Nashville. This is his third time to be honored by his peers with this distinction. Stephen is an attorney with Bone McAllester Norton PLLC.

Lee Murphy graduated Summa Cum Laude from Vanderbilt University on May 14, 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics. Lee was also commissioned that day as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy and will be based in Pensacola, FL in September to attend Naval Flight Training.

‘92

Suzanne Sevier Rowland was named to The City Paper’s list of 2010 Entrepreneurs of the Year for her business, Sevier Skirts. The company has client networks in eight cities and produced almost 6,000 skirts last year. For more details on Sevier Skirts, visit www.sevierskirts.com.

‘98

Erin (Morrow) Still recently published, Fighting MS: Strength in Numbers, a guidebook for those recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. All proceeds from the book will go toward finding a cure for the disease. To order, please visit www.amazon.com.

‘93

‘00

Amy Bendle is the activities coordinator for the Blakeford at Green Hills, which is now a site for the Senior Service Program at Father Ryan led by Mrs. Betts Clippinger. Amy reports, “I have a few students each semester come to the health center to make the elderly smile. The students give their time and energy helping transport residents to my activities, the dining room or just be a companion in their room for a chat. It is wonderful for them and us! Thank you, Mrs. Clippinger!” Susan Cooper was named Volunteer of the Year by the Epilepsy Foundation of Middle and West Tennessee. She was presented an award from Community Health Charities at their annual Champions in Health Awards Celebration on February 25, 2010.

‘95

Kelly (Harding) Bryant is happily settled in East Nashville with her son Taylor and two dogs. After working on Music Row for the past five years, she is hoping to continue her education this year and start a nursing program in the fall. Hector Gaba works as a Mechanical Engineer for a global missile defense contractor working on Close-In Weapon Systems for the Navy and the Army. He and his wife, Catherine, have two children: a daughter, Gracie and a son, Cason. William Lofaro lives in New York City. He and his wife, Sarah, have a daughter who is 19 months-old and another baby on the way.

‘96

Kat (Travis) Coy lives in Knoxville, TN with her husband, Steve, and new son, Travis Brian Coy. She is in her fourth year at Knoxville Catholic High School as the Sophomore and Junior School Counselor. Kat is very involved in her local Smokey Mountain Counseling Association and is President-Elect. In 2009, she was honored by the Tennessee Counseling Association as the Secondary School Counselor of the Year.

Leah Conners graduated from the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis on May 28, 2010. She lives in Ft. Worth, TX where she is in a residency program in Family Medicine at John Peter Smith Hospital. Leah is a third-generation Father Ryan graduate preceded by her father John Conners, III, Class of 1969, and grandfather John Conners, Jr., Class of 1937.

‘06

Ruth Diroff was named Tennessee Tech University’s Derryberry Award winner. It is presented to a graduating senior who has exhibited scholastic attainment arising out of moral and intellectual integrity; successful campus activity where participation indicates a commitment to good citizenship, interest in one’s fellow person, and instincts for leadership; and physical vigor as shown by fondness for and success in sports. Ruth graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

‘06

Tom Morton is in Afghanistan serving in the United States Marines. He will return in December 2010. Please keep Tom and all our men and women of the military in your prayers.

‘08

Justin Guidry had a stand-out season for the MTSU Blue Raiders baseball team. During his sophomore year, he was named to the All-Sun Belt First Team, as chosen by the league’s head coaches. He also has been named to the John Olerud Two-Way Player Award watch list as announced by College Baseball Foundation. The “Ole” Award was created in 2010 and recognizes a player who makes an impact both on the mound and at the plate. Daniel Rone has accepted membership in the National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS). He will be honored during an Induction Convocation this fall on the campus of Loyola University Chicago. Daniel wanted to acknowledge the education that he received at Father Ryan which led to this accomplishment.

Father Ryan Flashback Answer

Jeff Turk ’85 wrote, “I don’t recall many of my high school teachers, but I do remember you—for all of the right reasons. You were consistently kind, positive and well-liked...no small feat for a high school teacher who oversaw Saturday work crew.”

Class Notes

Shannon Earl, Beth Santry, Louise Gilchrist, Susan Schindler (yearbook editor), Terri Fryer, all members of the Class of 1983.

Any accomplishments he’s particularly proud of? “I don’t know what I’ve done. I’ve just done it,” he answers without hesitation. It’s classic Pat Langdon.

Have you seen the drumline? The wrestling team?” That same appreciation and esteem are reflected by his former students and colleagues, dozens of whom submitted personal notes of congratulations for his retirement party.

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Weddings

Pat Langdon Retires After 43 Years I

Katie Rowan ‘00 to Nick D’Alessandro of Birmingham, AL on December 12, 2009 at St. Henry Church. Katie’s sisters Blair and Dede Rowan ‘10 were the maids of honor and brother, Brien Rowan ‘04, was a groomsman. Katie works for the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the couple will live nearby in Vestavia Hills. Brigid and Jereme Frey

Jereme Frey (Faculty) married Brigid Frey on June 1, 2010 in Blue Mountain Beach, FL.

n the summer of 1991, before Father Ryan’s Elliston Place campus was demolished, bricks and other Ryan nostalgia made their way into the hands of a few inventive faculty and alumni. Pat Langdon was among the bold few who were able to save iconic pieces of history.

Suzanne Sevier ‘92 and Bart Rowland ‘93 were married on January 30, 2010 in Nashville, TN.

Jennifer Catignani and Michael Scruggs, Jr.

Jennifer Catignani ‘01 and Michael Scruggs, Jr. were married on January 30, 2010 at Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Nashville. The Nuptial Mass was celebrated by Father Mark Hunt ‘85. Jennifer is the daughter of Mike Catignani ‘75 and granddaughter of Margaret and the late Joe Catignani ‘50. Bridesmaids included Becky Savage ‘04, Jamie Boyd ‘05 and Rachel Boyd ‘06; Marie Allen ‘98 and Ray Allen ‘98 were lectors; Blake Allen (junior) and Nikki Allen (sophomore) were the altar servers and Kristi Catignani (freshman) assisted with offertory; all are cousins of the bride. The newlyweds live in Pleasant View, TN.

Cooper Malbrough McCabe

Deb Whitaker (Faculty) married Houston Akin on June 5, 2010 at St. Edward in Nashville, TN.

Deb Whitaker and Houston Akin

Births

Savannah Marie Maciuk

Cooper Malbrough to Lauren and Steven McCabe ‘92, born on June 16, 2009. Big brother Connor and grandparents Pat and Tom McCabe ‘67 love the family’s newest addition. Savannah Marie to James and Stacy (Schumaker) Maciuk ‘01, born on September 10, 2009. Stacy works at Belmont University (her alma mater) as the Associate Director of Donor Relations. Her husband, James, owns EcoBuild of TN, and they specialize in energy efficient construction of homes and commercial spaces.

Josie Gallagher Hinson

Eleck Michael to Jack and Lindsay (Moore) Fa ‘95, born in October 2009. Big brother, John Kalman, is two years old. The family lives in San Francisco, CA. Ellie Marie to Shane and Erin (Broussard) Hawkins ‘95, born on October 22, 2009. She joins siblings Michael Shane and Gracie. Josie Gallagher to Jamie and Joy (Sutton) Hinson ‘89, born on December 1, 2009. Big brother and sister, James and Julia, are very proud.

Lucius Alexander Jarrett

Lucius Alexander to Lane and Jonathan Jarrett ‘99 born on December 6, 2009. The family lives in Nashville where Jonathan works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Lane works for the Tennessee State Museum. Travis Brian to Steve and Kat (Travis) Coy ‘96, born on December 6, 2009. Morgan Elizabeth to Dan and Paige (Osborne) Meade ‘90, born on December 21, 2009. The family lives in Cleveland, OH with Morgan’s brothers, Daniel (9 years) and twins Jack and Jeff (4 years).

Patrick Gabriel Conrad

Patrick Gabriel to Jason and Mary Catherine (Furgess) Conrad ‘93, born on December 29, 2009. Big sisters Sarah Grace and Lillian Faith are so excited to have a little brother. Patrick is the 12th grandchild for Alma and John Furgess ‘61. Anna Claire to Kelsey (Nabors) ‘03 and Paul Witte ‘03, born on January 2, 2010. Asher Cannon to Mark and Brandy (Hounihan) Brandenburg ‘94, born on January 5, 2010. Big brother Matthan Blue turns two in December. The family lives in Frederick, MD.

Wesley James Reilly

Wesley James to Kelly (Cockerham) ‘93 and Rick Reilly ‘92, born on February 12, 2010.

Sitting on the window sill of his classroom was a collection of bricks—bricks from the Coliseum in Rome and bricks from the old Faculty House (a few charred from the fire of 1992) lying side-by-side. A cross he fashioned from the parquet floors in the Elliston Place gym hangs on the wall. The sight paints a picture of a man who appreciates history and enjoys educating others in its meaning. Few students have passed through Pat Langdon’s class without touching these artifacts and understanding their value. Some would argue that Pat is an iconic part of Father Ryan’s history. He graduated from Ryan in 1958, a time that was vastly different, though not unrecognizable, from the Ryan we know today.

Ellie Marie to Chad ‘01 and Lynne (Mullins) Moss ‘01 born on March 8, 2010. Patrick Fulenwider Heun to Art and Ashley (Wells) Heun ‘95, born on March 9, 2010. The Heuns live in Lake Charles, LA.

Ellie Marie Moss

Thomas Corey Phillips, Jr. to Jessica and Corey Phillips ‘00, born on March 24, 2010. Sarah Kathryn to Amy and Jason Larkin (Faculty), born on April 16, 2010. Judah Davis to Jeff and Julie Cox (Faculty), born on June 9, 2010. Sarah Kathryn Larkin

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Pat working the concession stand at Father Ryan.

He has taught Ancient Medieval History, World History, Morality, English, Life Science, Latin and Church History; the latter is his forte. Clearly, he loves the subject, having been to Rome twice. Ask him anything about the role of Christianity in Roman civilization and he could tell you story upon story painted with details not found in most textbooks. “I try to get the kids to understand that history is really important to understanding today’s world.You know, there’s nothing the [Catholic] church hasn’t been through—persecution, war, power struggles.” He didn’t mind being a storyteller or even a discipline enforcer once in awhile. “I did everything they asked me do—every dirty job. I had detention for 30 years,” he says with a smile.

“...history is really important to understanding today’s world.”

The Father Ryan he knew during his high school years was a little rough around the edges. “There were some fights, you know, manly stuff. But you knew it was a boys’ school,” he recalls. He also remembers a time when the school didn’t charge tuition. Midway through his high school career, families received a letter from Fr. Shea, principal at the time, announcing a $200 tuition requirement.

Katherine Gayle to Michael and Angela (Rohling) Gregory ‘98, born on March 2, 2010.

if there were anyone to give a history lesson of Father Ryan, he would certainly be qualified. He holds one of the longest tenures in the school’s history, at an astounding 43 years.

Five years after he graduated, he returned as a faculty member under Fr. Hitchcock. Pat left the school a couple of times to pursue other projects, but he always returned to his “home.” And

Former students and colleagues remember him as head of the work crew, a group of students who performed odd jobs like picking up trash around campus as part of their detention duty. And the students quickly learned to pick up all trash the first time.

“During detention, these kids would throw paper, pencils, pennies, Skittles, whatever they could find at each other when I wasn’t looking. The room would be silent except the sound of these things hitting the floor,” he laughs. Of course, he wouldn’t allow anyone to leave until all trash was picked up; sometimes it took a few tries. “That room would be cleaner than before we came in.” Over the years, “Fat Pat,” as he is lovingly called, acquired a reputation as a straight-talker, someone who is not afraid to speak his mind. It’s that candid demeanor that his students and colleagues alike remember, and it’s a trait that has served him well in the classroom. “I tell them in class, ‘You don’t know anything, certainly not as much as you think you do,’” he says. Although he refers to today’s high school generation as “sophisticated idiots,” his love and admiration for his students are apparent. “I’ve taught students who I think of as highly as my own kids. Don’t tell me that young people don’t have discipline. Continued on page 2

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Table of Contents Pat Langdon Retires .............................................. 1 Alumni Awaken the Faith ...................................... 3 Spotlight on Faculty, Staff and Students ............. 4 Father Black Award . .............................................. 6 Class of 2010 Graduates ....................................... 8 Athletics . .............................................................. 10 Flood Recovery .................................................... 14 Founder of Rachel’s Challenge Visits ................. 16 40 Years of Women (Cover Story) ...................... 18 Catholic HEART Work Camp ............................... 23 Legacy Gala . ........................................................ 24 Reunions .............................................................. 25 Class Notes .......................................................... 26 Weddings/Births .................................................. 28 In Memoriam ....................................................... 29

Administration Jim McIntyre, President Paul Davis ’81, Principal Connie Steinmetz, Chief Financial Officer Sara Hayes, Academic Dean Carolyn Evans, Dean of Students Tim Forbes ’93, Dean of Campus Ministry and Student Life Pat Lawson ’93, Athletic Director

Board of trustees Executive Committee Patrick J. Nolan III ’69, Chair Judy Komisky Orr ’75, Vice-Chair James Sochovka, Finance Committee Chair Rev. Ed Steiner, Secretary-Treasurer Tommy Bradley ’81, Membership Committee Chair

Committee Chairs Brett Wesnofske ‘88, Facilities Committee Chair Philip M. Mattingly, Sr. ’69, Advancement Committee Chair

Board Members Antoine Agassi Rev. Mark Beckman David Bohan ’66 Mary Brennan Betty Lou Burnett Lori Copeland Chamberlain Warner C. Hassell Judith E. Hoover Steve Janicak Rev. Patrick J. Kibby ’73 Dr. Robert Labadie Robert J. Mendes Stephen P. Mullins ’75 Rick Olszewski John Siedlecki

Ex-Officio Members Most Rev. David R. Choby ’65 Rev. David Perkin, V.G. James A. McIntyre Dr. Therese Williams

LIFE TRUSTEES W. Irvin Berry ’46 Thomas G. Connor Sr. ’60 John J. Cunningham Sr. William H. Farmer ’65 Edward B. Gore J. Terry Hunter Vincent T. Phillips John C. Shea ’51 William F. Smith Edward A. Stack

From the Advancement Office

Annual Fund Breaks All-Time Record

The 2009-2010 year marks a record breaking one for Father Ryan’s Annual Fund. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, a total of $484,737 was raised, exceeding our $375,000 goal. The total also exceeds the previous record by almost $100,000—an increase of 27%—making this year’s Annual Fund the most successful in history!

In Memoriam WILLIAM “BILL” F. ALEXANDER - Father of Billy Alexander, Philip Alexander ‘88 and Molly Mahoney and husband of Helen Alexander, former faculty member. CHRISTINE E. BAIRD - Wife of Bill Baird, Jr. ‘46 and mother of Marc T. Baird and Will Baird ‘84. JOHN “ERNIE” BEAZLEY ‘72.

Martin McLean ‘63 and Paul McLean ‘75. NANCY M. METZGER - Mother of Sue Holzapfel, Anne Clepper, David Metzger ‘72, Mary Ceil Langione ‘75, Danny Metzger ‘82 and Don Metzger ‘84. ROBERT S. MINTON, JR. ‘64 - Brother of George and John ‘66 Minton.

More than 975 parents, alumni, faculty, staff and friends responded to last year’s appeal. There were 206 individual gifts from first-time Annual Fund donors. One hundred percent of faculty donated. Parent participation reached an all-time high at 36% with the sophomore class parents contributing the most. Alumni participation increased with the Class of 1954 contributing the most.

MARK KEVIN BIENER ‘75.

The Annual Fund, which completed its campaign on June 30, provides unrestricted dollars to be used by the school to support the general operating budget. It has been instrumental in funding school programs and professional development for teachers. The fund also helps keeps tuition increases to a minimum.

JAMES T. BURNS ‘42.

“The Annual Fund is a living endowment,” explains President Jim McIntyre. “The dollars raised are equivalent to the income that would be generated annually by a $7.5 million endowment. That’s a significant part of our budget each year and makes the overall experience at Father Ryan even more rewarding for our students.”

JAMES J. “JIMMY” FORMOSA, JR. ‘62 - Brother of Stan ‘67 (deceased) and Charlie Formosa ‘64 and Nancy Malone.

JOE FRANKLIN - Former faculty member.

JANE K. ROSS - Mother of Paul Sorace ‘83 and Joan Wildasin.

Most importantly, the fund has helped families devastated by the flood through tuition relief, proving once again how the Annual Fund makes it possible for Father Ryan to help our community where the need is greatest. The 2009 - 2010 Annual Fund has been an extraordinary example of the generosity of so many people at Father Ryan.

MARGARET M. GILMORE - Mother of Joe ‘61, Kelly ‘71, Patrick and Tony Gilmore and Janet Gilmore-Bryan, Peggy Myers, Julia Starr ‘74 and Celia Watkins ‘78.

MARY FRANCES “FRANKIE” RUTLEDGE - Sister of Charles B. Rosa ‘69 (deceased), Kathy Pitts, Jimmy Rosa ‘73 and Tony Rosa.

“The generosity of Father Ryan alumni, parents, faculty and staff is humbling, gratifying and exciting for me,” said McIntyre. “It speaks well of the love our community has for this school and their support for our mission. I am especially appreciative of the work done by our Annual Fund and Constituent Relations Manager, Brooke Reusch; our Annual Fund Chairs Mary and Bill Brennan; and of all the various committees whose tireless efforts have made this possible.”

ROBERT V. “BOBBY” HAILEY - Father of Robert V. Hailey, Jr. ‘73, Mary Lee Payne ‘74, Martina Hailey ‘75, Steve Hailey ‘78 and Amy Hailey ‘80. Brother of Lehman Hailey ‘43, James Hailey, Sr. Roseanne Hailey, RSM and twin sister, Sr. Betty Hailey, RSM.

Thank you to all who gave to the 2009-2010 Annual Fund. Your investment in the Annual Fund ensures that Ryan can continue to provide the highest quality of school life in a setting that is grounded with faith and love.

JOHN R. HOLMES ‘55 - Father of Victoria, Kelly, John, Jr ‘78 and Karen. Brother of Phillip, Sr. ‘53, James ‘55, Michael, Sr. ‘58 (deceased) and Timothy Holmes ‘59 and Ann Donnelly.

AF

Annual Fund

The 2010-2011 Annual Fund campaign is already under way. We encourage everyone to prayerfully consider giving to the fund and make this year another banner year.Visit www.fatherryan.org/giving to make your gift online or contact the Advancement Office at (615) 269-7926.

IRISH AYES

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Summer 2010, Volume XXXVII Number 2

Irish Ayes is published by Father Ryan High School three times a year and is distributed without charge to alumni, parents, faculty, staff and friends of the school. Send address changes to: Father Ryan High School, Advancement Office • 770 Norwood Drive, Nashville, TN 37204. Phone: 615-269-7926 • E-mail: alumni@fatherryan.org.

Please send your comments and letters for Irish Ayes to alumni@fatherryan.org

Father Ryan High School admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national, and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other schooladministered programs.

JOHN ARCH BOYLE ‘52. BERNARD W. “BILL” BRODEN ‘45. JULIANA R. BURKE - Mother of Tony Burke ‘80, Melody Perkins ‘82, Catherine Foreman ‘84, Steve Burke and Christie Burke ‘94. JOAN MARIE CATIGNANI - Mother of Andrea Dudney, Catherine Cotter, Toney Catignani ‘70, Ricky Catignani ‘71, Connie Horton, Theresa Calvo, Rosemary Gray, Joan Catignani, Christina O’Connor, Linus Catignani ‘82, Bridget Rogers ‘83 and Carol Hostettler ‘85.

JOSEPH T. FORMOSA, JR. - Father of Mary Margaret Lambert and Joseph Formosa III.

JOHN E. GORHAM - Father of Peggy Krozely, John ‘71, Ben ‘72, Judy ‘74, Steve ‘75 and Pat Gorham ‘80. ROBERT G. GREENE ‘37.

WILLIAM W. “WOODY” HARRIS - Father of Bill Harris ‘65, Jerry Harris ‘68 and Robert Harris. FABIAN D. HENNINGS - Husband of Claire “Dede” Dentici Hennings ‘86.

ELIZABETH “ANNE” HUSSUNG - Mother of Buck Hussung ‘61 and Kerry Harrison.

JAMES R. MITCHELL, SR. - Father of James Mitchell, Jr. ‘73, Michael Sherrell and Debbie Dupree. JOSEPH WILLIAM NEIDERT ‘51 - Brother of the late Jim Neidert ‘53 and Catherine Hrickiewicz. ROBERT EDWARD O’CONNOR ‘51. WILLIAM “ BILL” P. ORTALE - Father of Pat ‘71, Jim ‘72, Sev ‘73, Vic ‘76 and Buddy Ortale ‘79 and Amelia Gesch ‘77. CORNELIUS ANTHONY “TONY” PEFFEN ‘49 - Father of Elaine Flick ‘76, Robert Peffen ‘77, Leigh Ann Zirkle ‘79 and Mark Peffen. JOSHUA B. PIETSCH ‘93 - Brother of Matt Pietsch ‘93 and Rebecca Pietsch ‘00. GERTRUDE PITTINGER - Mother of Suzanne Erpenbach, Charles Pittinger ‘71 and Catherine Helms. RONALD GARY RAGAN ‘70.

RONALD SERFASS, JR ‘80 - Brother of Karen Stamps ‘76, Donna Wolfe ‘78 and Debbie Morales ‘85. WILLIAM THOMAS STUMB ‘42. KATHERINE “KAY” DONNELLY-SWINEHART - Sister of Bubba Donnelly ‘69, Delores Hobbs, Steve Donnelly ‘72, Mike Donnelly ‘74, Mary Lynn Donnelly, Rita Ann Holiman, Denise Beaty and Paul Donnelly ‘83. JOHN A. THOMAN - Father of Sr. Elizabeth Thoman, CHM, Patricia Young, Mary Lynn Thoman, and Jim ‘65, John, Jr. and Lawrence Thoman. CHARLOTTE R. WALKER, MD - Sister of Matthew Walker II ‘59, Daniel P. Walker ‘60, and Maxine Giddings. CHARLES E. WALSH ‘54 - Brother of Jim Walsh ‘49. ROBERT E. WALSH - Father of Joann Aquino, Bob Walsh ‘64, Linda Work, Tom “Yogi” Walsh ‘67, Jim Walsh ‘71, Nancy Nolan and Debbie Weber.

KRISTOPHER C. KASPRZYCKI ‘77.

JOHN B. WARNER ‘43 - Father of Sharyn Curbo, Brady Warner ‘70, Dedie Rice, Anthony Warner ‘74, Patty Self and Billy Warner ‘79. Brother of Mary Winifred Boyd, Ann Vick and Thomas Warner ‘52.

JOSEPH M. KING, JR. - Son of Katie Tidwell King ‘04.

ALBERT GEORGE WEBER III ‘59.

BRETT GLEN KUBAN - Husband of Virginia Chaires Kuban ‘87.

THOMAS C. WEILAND - Father of Sr. Mary Christopher O.P., Mark ‘76, Lisa and Chris Weiland ‘87.

MARY ALICE LAMB - Mother of Becky Bickel ‘71 and Jo Ann Fitzgerald. THEODORE H. LENOX, JR. - Father of Ted Lenox ‘69 and Michelle Lenox ‘75.

ARLENE E. WEY - Mother of Lannie, Rick, Rob and Eric Wey ‘79. JAMES M. “MICKEY” WHITE ‘60 - Brother of Berry Jr. (deceased), Ray ‘55, Aaron (deceased), B. Ann, Chuck ‘67, Bernard ‘69, Theresa, Katy Warrick, Joe ‘73, John ‘75, Sherry Ray ‘77 and Terry White.

JAMES D. “JIMMY” LEWIS - Father of Don ‘75 and David Lewis ‘76, Kathy Tillman ‘77 and Mike Lewis.

TONY G. WHITE ‘81.

MARGUERITE WILSON MCCABE - Stepmother of Edward McCabe ‘53, Sissy Lynch and Tim McCabe ‘61.

HAL E. WILSON, JR. ‘62 - Father of Mary Crist, Christie Wilson ‘85 and Hal Wilson III ‘88. Brother of Chris and Tim Wilson ‘82.

ANNE MARIE MCLEAN - Mother of Patricia Brown, Maureen Hicks,

Deadline to submit Class Notes, Weddings, Births or In Memoriam for the winter Irish Ayes is November 19, 2010. Send to millsa@fatherryan.org or submit online at www.fatherryan.org/alumni.


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Summer 2010 Volume XXXVII Number 2

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

Represent Your Class Father Ryan’s Alumni Association consists of over 10,000 living alumni worldwide. Today there is more communication between the school and our alumni than ever before, from our website to Irish Ayes to mailings and e-blast messages. Additionally, the Alumni Association hosts numerous events to keep our alumni connected. However, as good as these outreach methods are, they cannot replace the personal link that a Class Rep has when writing emails, letters and making phone calls to build interest in reunions, Annual Fund, special events and capital projects. To learn more about becoming a Class Rep, visit www.fatherryan.org/alumni.

A Tradition of Faith, Knowledge, Service

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Irish Ayes summer 2010